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Sample records for adsorption surface diffusion

  1. Protein diffusion and long-term adsorption states at charged solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kubiak-Ossowska, Karina; Mulheran, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    The diffusion pathways of lysozyme adsorbed to a model charged ionic surface are studied using fully atomistic steered molecular dynamics simulation. The simulations start from existing protein adsorption trajectories, where it has been found that one particular residue, Arg128 at the N,C-terminal face, plays a crucial role in anchoring the lysozyme to the surface [Langmuir 2010 , 26 , 15954 - 15965]. We first investigate the desorption pathway for the protein by pulling the Arg128 side chain away from the surface in the normal direction, and its subsequent readsorption, before studying diffusion pathways by pulling the Arg128 side chain parallel to the surface. We find that the orientation of this side chain plays a decisive role in the diffusion process. Initially, it is oriented normal to the surface, aligning in the electrostatic field of the surface during the adsorption process, but after resorption it lies parallel to the surface, being unable to return to its original orientation due to geometric constraints arising from structured water layers at the surface. Diffusion from this alternative adsorption state has a lower energy barrier of ∼0.9 eV, associated with breaking hydrogen bonds along the pathway, in reasonable agreement with the barrier inferred from previous experimental observation of lysozyme surface clustering. These results show the importance of studying protein diffusion alongside adsorption to gain full insight into the formation of protein clusters and films, essential steps in the future development of functionalized surfaces. PMID:23062108

  2. First-principles study of oxygen adsorption and diffusion on the UN(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. L.; Ao, L.; Zu, X. T.; Huang, H.; Liu, K. Z.

    2015-12-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the interaction of oxygen with UN(001) surface. The molecule oxygen was found to dissociate spontaneously on all considered adsorption sites on the surface. Atomic oxygen (O) preferred to adsorb on a hollow site or the top of uranium ions, which were energetically degenerate. Adsorption on top of nitrogen (N) ion was found to be unstable which may be attributed to the repulsion of negatively charged O with the N anions. In comparison with those on α-U(001)surface at the same coverage, the adsorption of O on UN(001) surface was found to be less stable, being about 0.7 eV higher in adsorption energy. The diffusion barrier for O on the surface was found to be ∼0.5 eV, similar to those of α-U(001)surface. The penetration of O into the substrate was difficult with a high barrier of 2.86 eV. Analysis on the density of states (DOS) has shown that the adsorbed oxygen has strong chemical interaction with surface ions, characterized by the hybridization of O 2p states with N 2p and U 6d, U 5f states.

  3. Strain effect on the adsorption, diffusion, and molecular dissociation of hydrogen on Mg (0001) surface.

    PubMed

    Lei, Huaping; Wang, Caizhuang; Yao, Yongxin; Wang, Yangang; Hupalo, Myron; McDougall, Dan; Tringides, Michael; Ho, Kaiming

    2013-12-14

    The adsorption, diffusion, and molecular dissociation of hydrogen on the biaxially strained Mg (0001) surface have been systematically investigated by the first principle calculations based on density functional theory. When the strain changes from the compressive to tensile state, the adsorption energy of H atom linearly increases while its diffusion barrier linearly decreases oppositely. The dissociation barrier of H2 molecule linearly reduces in the tensile strain region. Through the chemical bonding analysis including the charge density difference, the projected density of states and the Mulliken population, the mechanism of the strain effect on the adsorption of H atom and the dissociation of H2 molecule has been elucidated by an s-p charge transfer model. With the reduction of the orbital overlap between the surface Mg atoms upon the lattice expansion, the charge transfers from p to s states of Mg atoms, which enhances the hybridization of H s and Mg s orbitals. Therefore, the bonding interaction of H with Mg surface is strengthened and then the atomic diffusion and molecular dissociation barriers of hydrogen decrease accordingly. Our works will be helpful to understand and to estimate the influence of the lattice deformation on the performance of Mg-containing hydrogen storage materials. PMID:24329077

  4. Transition metals on the (0001) surface of graphite: Fundamental aspects of adsorption, diffusion, and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Appy, David; Lei, Huaping; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Tringides, Michael C; Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W; Thiel, Patricia A

    2014-08-01

    In this article, we review basic information about the interaction of transition metal atoms with the (0 0 0 1) surface of graphite, especially fundamental phenomena related to growth. Those phenomena involve adatom-surface bonding, diffusion, morphology of metal clusters, interactions with steps and sputter-induced defects, condensation, and desorption. General traits emerge which have not been summarized previously. Some of these features are rather surprising when compared with metal-on-metal adsorption and growth. Opportunities for future work are pointed out.

  5. Hydrogen Adsorption, Dissociation and Diffusion on the α-U(001) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, JL; Xiao, H. Y.; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei

    2008-11-05

    First-principles pseudopotential plane wave calculations based on density functional theory and the generalized gradient approximation have been used to study the adsorption, dissociation, and diffusion of hydrogen on the α-U(001) surface. Weak molecular chemisorption was observed for H2 approaching with its molecular axis parallel to the surface. The optimization of the adsorption geometries on the threefold hollow sites yields final configurations with H2 molecules move towards the top site at both coverages of 0.25 and 0.5 monolayer. A low dissociation barrier of 0.081 eV was determined for H2 dissociated from onefold top site with the H atoms falling into the two adjacent threefold hollow sites. The density of states analysis along the dissociation paths show that the hybridization of U 5f and H 1s states only occurs when H2 molecule is dissociated.

  6. Long Chain Molecules in the Molten State: Surface Adsorption, Near Surface Structure, and Mutual-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng

    1993-01-01

    The surface segregation in a binary mixture of polymer due to surface energy difference or end-grafting is studied. The surface energy difference induced segregation is compared with the mean-field theory. The end-labeling of chains strengthens the ability of the chain to bind to the surface, and the stretching of the end grafted chains is proved to be a controlling fact limiting the brush density. The structure of a chain near a surface needs to be known in order to make more quantitative analysis. Such knowledge is currently not available although a reflecting surface model is proposed. We also studied the mutual-diffusion of compatible linear chains. It is observed that the broadening of the interfacial width scales as the 1/4 power of the diffusion time for a time scale much longer than the reptation time. It is speculated that the anomalous behavior is either due to small molecular residue in the sample or due to the long chain nature of the polymer itself. If the former possibility can be ruled out, the validity of applying the reptation model to polymer diffusion over small distances might be under challenge. Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is an established technique and its application in polymer science has been around for quite some time. However, the quantitative application in depth profiling was so far not very successful. The technique is reviewed and procedures that ensure correct extraction of depth profiles from raw SIMS data are discussed.

  7. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems. PMID:26197108

  8. Optical luminescence studies of diffusion times at the potassium ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Anitas, E. M.; Szakács, Zs

    2016-08-01

    We propose reflectance measurements as a method for the evaluation of the kinetics of adsorption processes, to compute the diffusion times of the adsorption products at the thin layers formed at the sphalerite natural mineral-potassium ethyl xanthate solution interface. The method is based on the intensity measurement of the reflected monochromatic radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate thin layer as a function of time. These determinations were made at the thin layer formed between the sphalerite or activated sphalerite natural minerals with potassium ethyl xanthate, for different solutions concentrations and pH values at constant temperature. Diffusion times of desorbed molecular species into the liquid bring important information about the global kinetics of the ions in this phase during adsorption processes at interfaces. Analysing the time dependence of this parameter one concluded on the diffusion properties of the xanthate molecule in the solution depending on its concentration and pH, knowing that at the initial time these molecules had a uniform spread. This method enabled us to determine that, in time interval of approximately 35 minutes to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer, one had three different kinetic behaviours of our systems. In the first 5-8 min one had highly adsorbent character, the state of equilibrium is followed by low adsorbent properties. Gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface leads to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process.

  9. Adsorption of Water Monomer and Clusters on Platinum(111) Terrace and Related Steps and Kinks II. Surface Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Arnadottir, Liney; Stuve, Eric M.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-02-01

    Surface diffusion of water monomer, dimer, and trimer on the (111) terrace, (221) and (322) stepped, and (763) and (854) kinked surfaces of platinum was studied by density functional theory using the PW91 approximation to the energy functional. Monomer diffusion on the terrace is facile, with an activation barrier of 0.20 eV, while dimer and trimer diffusions are restricted due to their high activation barriers of 0.43 and 0.48 eV, respectively. During monomer diffusion on the terrace the O–Pt distance increases by 0.54 Å, about 23% of the initial distance of 2.34 Å. The calculated rate of monomer diffusion hops is in good agreement with the onset temperature of diffusion measurements of Daschbach et al., J. Chem. Phys., 120 (2004) 1516. Alternative monomer diffusion pathways, in which the molecule rolls or flips, were also found. These pathways have diffusion barriers of 0.22 eV. During dimer diffusion on the terrace, the donor molecule rises 0.4 Å at the saddle point, while the acceptor rises by only 0.03 Å. Monomer diffusion up to steps and kinks, with activation barriers of 0.11–0.13 eV, facilitate chain formation on top of step edges. The energy landscape of monomer diffusion from terrace to step to kink sites is downhill with a maximum activation barrier of 0.26 eV. A model for water adsorption is presented inwhichmonomer diffusion leads to concurrent formation of terrace clusters and population of steps/kinks, the latter consistent with the STMmeasurements ofMorgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 77 (1996) 703.

  10. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium-sulfur battery design.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides. PMID:27046216

  11. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium-sulfur battery design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.

  12. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium–sulfur battery design

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium–sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides. PMID:27046216

  13. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium–sulfur battery design

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; et al

    2016-04-05

    Lithium–sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance.more » Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Lastly, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.« less

  14. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G.; Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-01

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  15. Adsorption and diffusion of fluorine on Cr-doped Ni(111) surface: Fluorine-induced initial corrosion of non-passivated Ni-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Cui-Lan; Han, Han; Gong, Wen-Bin; Wang, Cheng-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Cheng; Huai, Ping; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Adsorption and diffusion behaviors of fluorine on Cr-doped Ni(111) surface are investigated by using first-principles simulation. It shows that the Cr in the Cr-doped Ni(111) surface serve a trap site for fluorine with adsorption energy 3.52 eV, which is 1.04 eV higher than that on Ni(111) surface. Moreover, the Cr atom is pulled out the surface for 0.41 Å after the fluorine adsorption, much higher than that on Ni(111) surface. Further diffusion behaviors analysis confirms the conclusion because the fluorine diffusion from neighbored sites onto the Cr top site is an energy barrierless process. Detailed electronic structure analysis shows that a deeper hybrid state of F 2 p-Cr 3 d indicates a strong Fsbnd Cr interaction. The Nisbnd Cr bond is elongated and weakened due to the new formed Fsbnd Cr bonding. Our results help to understanding the basic fluorine-induced initial corrosion mechanism for Ni-based alloy in molten salt environment.

  16. Multistage adsorption of diffusing macromolecules and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2007-09-01

    We derive the equations that describe adsorption of diffusing particles onto a surface followed by additional surface kinetic steps before being transported across the interface. Multistage surface kinetics occurs during membrane protein insertion, cell signaling, and the infection of cells by virus particles. For example, viral entry into healthy cells is possible only after a series of receptor and coreceptor binding events occurs at the cellular surface. We couple the diffusion of particles in the bulk phase with the multistage surface kinetics and derive an effective, integrodifferential boundary condition that contains a memory kernel embodying the delay induced by the surface reactions. This boundary condition takes the form of a singular perturbation problem in the limit where particle-surface interactions are short ranged. Moreover, depending on the surface kinetics, the delay kernel induces a nonmonotonic, transient replenishment of the bulk particle concentration near the interface. The approach generalizes that of Ward and Tordai [J. Chem. Phys. 14, 453 (1946)] and Diamant and Andelman [Colloids Surf. A 183-185, 259 (2001)] to include surface kinetics, giving rise to qualitatively new behaviors. Our analysis also suggests a simple scheme by which stochastic surface reactions may be coupled to deterministic bulk diffusion.

  17. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi2 Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otrokov, Mikhail; Ryabishchenkova, Anastasia; Gosalvez, Miguel Angel; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Chulkov, Evgueni

    We present the results of an ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) stepped surface of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of the adatoms diffusion on the surface and in the van der Waals gaps near the steps, as well as the estimation of diffusion lengths, show that efficient intercalation through the steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can start before intercalation. These results are discussed in the context of the experimental data available.

  18. First-principles study on the interaction of nitrogen atom with α–uranium: From surface adsorption to bulk diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qiulei; Deng, Huiqiu E-mail: hqdeng@gmail.com; Xiao, Shifang; Li, Xiaofan; Hu, Wangyu; Ao, Bingyun; Chen, Piheng

    2014-04-28

    Experimental studies of nitriding on uranium surfaces show that the modified layers provide considerable protection against air corrosion. The bimodal distribution of nitrogen is affected by both its implantation and diffusion, and the diffusion of nitrogen during implantation is also governed by vacancy trapping. In the present paper, nitrogen adsorption, absorption, diffusion, and vacancy trapping on the surface of and in the bulk of α–uranium are studied with a first-principles density functional theory approach and the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The calculated results indicate that, regardless of the nitrogen coverage, a nitrogen atom prefers to reside at the hollow1 site and octahedral (Oct) site on and below the surface, respectively. The lowest energy barriers for on-surface and penetration diffusion occur at a coverage of 1/2 monolayer. A nitrogen atom prefers to occupy the Oct site in bulk α–uranium. High energy barriers are observed during the diffusion between neighboring Oct sites. A vacancy can capture its nearby interstitial nitrogen atom with a low energy barrier, providing a significant attractive nitrogen-vacancy interaction at the trapping center site. This study provides a reference for understanding the nitriding process on uranium surfaces.

  19. Modeling diffusion and adsorption in compacted bentonite: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Bourg, Alain C M; Sposito, Garrison

    2003-03-01

    The current way of describing diffusive transport through compacted clays is a simple diffusion model coupled to a linear adsorption coefficient (K(d)). To fit the observed results of cation diffusion, this model is usually extended with an adjustable "surface diffusion" coefficient. Description of the negative adsorption of anions calls for a further adjustment through the use of an "effective porosity". The final model thus includes many fitting parameters. This is inconvenient where predictive modeling is called for (e.g., for waste confinement using compacted clay liners). The diffusion/adsorption models in current use have been derived from the common hydrogeological equation of advection/dispersion/adsorption. However, certain simplifications were also borrowed without questioning their applicability to the case of compacted clays. Among these simplifications, the assumption that the volume of the adsorbed phase is negligible should be discussed. We propose a modified diffusion/adsorption model that accounts for the volume of the adsorbed phase. It suggests that diffusion through highly compacted clay takes place through the interlayers (i.e., in the adsorbed phase). Quantitative prediction of the diffusive flux will necessitate more detailed descriptions of surface reactivity and of the mobility of interlayer species. PMID:12598111

  20. Insights into Surface Interactions between Metal Organic Frameworks and Gases during Transient Adsorption and Diffusion by In-Situ Small Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Dumée, Ludovic F; He, Li; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of molecular gas sieving materials with specific affinities for a single gas species and able to store large quantities of materials at a low or atmospheric pressure is desperately required to reduce the adverse effects of coal and oil usage in carbon capture. Fundamental understanding of the dynamic adsorption of gas, the diffusion mechanisms across thin film membranes, and the impact of interfaces play a vital role in developing these materials. In this work, single gas permeation tests across micro-porous membrane materials, based on metal organic framework crystals grown on the surface of carbon nanotubes (ZiF-8@CNT), were performed for the first time in-situ at the Australian Synchrotron on the small angle X-ray scattering beamline in order to reveal molecular sieving mechanisms and gas adsorption within the material. The results show that specific chemi-sorption of CO₂ across the ZiF-8 crystal lattices affected the morphology and unit cell parameters, while the sieving of other noble or noble like gases across the ZiF-8@CNT membranes was found to largely follow Knudsen diffusion. This work demonstrates for the first time a novel and effective technique to assess molecular diffusion at the nano-scale across sub-nano-porous materials by probing molecular flexibility across crystal lattice and single cell units. PMID:27598211

  1. Irreversible adsorption of particles on heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Jaszczółt, Katarzyna; Michna, Aneta; Siwek, Barbara; Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Zembala, Maria

    2005-12-30

    Methods of theoretical and experimental evaluation of irreversible adsorption of particles, e.g., colloids and globular proteins at heterogeneous surfaces were reviewed. The theoretical models were based on the generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach. Within the scope of these models, localized adsorption of particles occurring as a result of short-ranged attractive interactions with discrete adsorption sites was analyzed. Monte-Carlo type simulations performed according to this model enabled one to determine the initial flux, adsorption kinetics, jamming coverage and the structure of the particle monolayer as a function of the site coverage and the particle/site size ratio, denoted by lambda. It was revealed that the initial flux increased significantly with the site coverage theta(s) and the lambda parameter. This behavior was quantitatively interpreted in terms of the scaled particle theory. It also was demonstrated that particle adsorption kinetics and the jamming coverage increased significantly, at fixed site coverage, when the lambda parameter increased. Practically, for alpha = lambda2theta(s) > 1 the jamming coverage at the heterogeneous surfaces attained the value pertinent to continuous surfaces. The results obtained prove unequivocally that spherically shaped sites were more efficient in binding particles in comparison with disk-shaped sites. It also was predicted that for particle size ratio lambda < 4 the site multiplicity effect plays a dominant role, affecting significantly the structure of particle monolayers and the jamming coverage. Experimental results validating main aspects of these theoretical predictions also have been reviewed. These results were derived by using monodisperse latex particles adsorbing on substrates produced by covering uniform surface by adsorption sites of a desired size, coverage and surface charge. Particle deposition occurred under diffusion-controlled transport conditions and their coverage was

  2. Surface rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Stanimirova, R; Marinova, K; Tcholakova, S; Denkov, N D; Stoyanov, S; Pelan, E

    2011-10-18

    Extracts of the Quillaja saponaria tree contain natural surfactant molecules called saponins that very efficiently stabilize foams and emulsions. Therefore, such extracts are widely used in several technologies. In addition, saponins have demonstrated nontrivial bioactivity and are currently used as essential ingredients in vaccines, food supplements, and other health products. Previous preliminary studies showed that saponins have some peculiar surface properties, such as a very high surface modulus, that may have an important impact on the mechanisms of foam and emulsion stabilization. Here we present a detailed characterization of the main surface properties of highly purified aqueous extracts of Quillaja saponins. Surface tension isotherms showed that the purified Quillaja saponins behave as nonionic surfactants with a relatively high cmc (0.025 wt %). The saponin adsorption isotherm is described well by the Volmer equation, with an area per molecule of close to 1 nm(2). By comparing this area to the molecular dimensions, we deduce that the hydrophobic triterpenoid rings of the saponin molecules lie parallel to the air-water interface, with the hydrophilic glucoside tails protruding into the aqueous phase. Upon small deformation, the saponin adsorption layers exhibit a very high surface dilatational elasticity (280 ± 30 mN/m), a much lower shear elasticity (26 ± 15 mN/m), and a negligible true dilatational surface viscosity. The measured dilatational elasticity is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions of the Volmer adsorption model (260 mN/m). The measured characteristic adsorption time of the saponin molecules is 4 to 5 orders of magnitude longer than that predicted theoretically for diffusion-controlled adsorption, which means that the saponin adsorption is barrier-controlled around and above the cmc. The perturbed saponin layers relax toward equilibrium in a complex manner, with several relaxation times, the longest of them being around 3

  3. Diffusion on strained surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, M.; Wolf, D. E.

    1997-03-01

    The change of diffusion kinetics when elastic fields are present is discussed for diffusion on (001) surfaces of simple cubic, fcc and bcc lattices. All particles interact pairwise with a Lennard-Jones potential. The simple cubic lattice was stabilized by an anisotropic prefactor. It is found that generically compressive strain enhances diffusion whereas tensile strain increases the activation barrier. An approximately linear dependence of the barrier in a wide range of misfits is found. In heteroepitaxy, diffusion on top of large clusters is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. The kinetics close to edges and centers of islands are remarkably different. In many cases changes of binding energies are small compared to those of saddle point energies. Thermodynamic arguments (minimization of free energy) are not appropriate to describe diffusion on strained surfaces in these cases.

  4. Diffusion on Cu surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimi, Majid

    1993-01-01

    Understanding surface diffusion is essential in understanding surface phenomena, such as crystal growth, thin film growth, corrosion, physisorption, and chemisorption. Because of its importance, various experimental and theoretical efforts have been directed to understand this phenomena. The Field Ion Microscope (FIM) has been the major experimental tool for studying surface diffusion. FIM have been employed by various research groups to study surface diffusion of adatoms. Because of limitations of the FIM, such studies are only limited to a few surfaces: nickel, platinum, aluminum, iridium, tungsten, and rhodium. From the theoretical standpoint, various atomistic simulations are performed to study surface diffusion. In most of these calculations the Embedded Atom Method (EAM) along with the molecular static (MS) simulation are utilized. The EAM is a semi-empirical approach for modeling the interatomic interactions. The MS simulation is a technique for minimizing the total energy of a system of particles with respect to the positions of its particles. One of the objectives of this work is to develop the EAM functions for Cu and use them in conjunction with the molecular static (MS) simulation to study diffusion of a Cu atom on a perfect as well as stepped Cu(100) surfaces. This will provide a test of the validity of the EAM functions on Cu(100) surface and near the stepped environments. In particular, we construct a terrace-ledge-kink (TLK) model and calculate the migration energies of an atom on a terrace, near a ledge site, near a kink site, and going over a descending step. We have also calculated formation energies of an atom on the bare surface, a vacancy in the surface, a stepped surface, and a stepped-kink surface. Our results are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  5. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G. Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-15

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  6. Adsorption of organic molecules on silica surface.

    PubMed

    Parida, Sudam K; Dash, Sukalyan; Patel, Sabita; Mishra, B K

    2006-09-13

    The adsorption behaviour of various organic adsorbates on silica surface is reviewed. Most of the structural information on silica is obtained from IR spectral data and from the characteristics of water present at the silica surface. Silica surface is generally embedded with hydroxy groups and ethereal linkages, and hence considered to have a negative charged surface prone to adsorption of electron deficient species. Adsorption isotherms of the adsorbates delineate the nature of binding of the adsorbate with silica. Aromatic compounds are found to involve the pi-cloud in hydrogen bonding with silanol OH group during adsorption. Cationic and nonionic surfactants adsorb on silica surface involving hydrogen bonding. Sometimes, a polar part of the surfactants also contributes to the adsorption process. Styryl pyridinium dyes are found to anchor on silica surface in flat-on position. On modification of the silica by treating with alkali, the adsorption behaviour of cationic surfactant or polyethylene glycol changes due to change in the characteristics of silica or modified silica surface. In case of PEG-modified silica, adsolubilization of the adsorbate is observed. By using a modified adsorption equation, hemimicellization is proposed for these dyes. Adsorptions of some natural macromolecules like proteins and nucleic acids are investigated to study the hydrophobic and hydrophilic binding sites of silica. Artificial macromolecules like synthetic polymers are found to be adsorbed on silica surface due to the interaction of the multifunctional groups of the polymers with silanols. Preferential adsorption of polar adsorbates is observed in case of adsorbate mixtures. When surfactant mixtures are considered to study competitive adsorption on silica surface, critical micelle concentration of individual surfactant also contributes to the adsorption isotherm. The structural study of adsorbed surface and the thermodynamics of adsorption are given some importance in this review

  7. DNA adsorption onto glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Krista Lynn

    Streaming potential measurements were performed on microspheres of silica, lime silicate (SLS) and calcium aluminate (CA) glasses containing silica and iron oxide (CASi and CAFe). The silicate based glasses exhibited acidic surfaces with isoelectric points (IEP) around a pH of 3 while the calcium aluminates displayed more basic surfaces with IEP ranging from 8--9.5. The surface of the calcium aluminate microspheres containing silica reacted with the background electrolyte, altering the measured zeta potential values and inhibiting electrolyte flow past the sample at ˜ pH 4 due to formation of a solid plug. DNA adsorption experiments were performed using the microspheres and a commercially available silicate based DNA isolation filter using a known quantity of DNA suspended in a chaotropic agent free 0.35 wt% Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) buffer solution. The microspheres and commercial filter were also used to isolate DNA from macrophage cells in the presence of chaotropic agents. UV absorbance at ˜260 nm and gel electrophoresis were used to quantify the amount and size of the DNA strands that adsorbed to the microsphere surfaces. In both experiments, the 43--106 microm CAFe microspheres adsorbed the largest quantity of DNA. However, the 43--106 microm SLS microspheres isolated more DNA from the cells than the <43 microm CAFe microspheres, indicating that microsphere size contributes to isolation ability. The UV absorbance of DNA at ˜260 nm was slightly altered due to the dissolution of the calcium aluminate glasses during the adsorption process. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) determined that calcium and aluminum ions leached from the CA and CAFe microsphere surfaces during these experiments. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy showed that the leached ions had no effect on the conformation of the DNA, and therefore would not be expected to interfere in downstream applications such as DNA replication. The 0.35 wt

  8. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  9. Convective diffusion and adsorption in a swarm of spheroidal particles

    SciTech Connect

    Coutelieris, F.A.; Burganos, V.N.; Payatakes, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    The problem of mass transfer from a Newtonian fluid to a swarm of spheroidal adsorbers under creeping flow conditions is considered using the spheroid-in-cell model to represent the swarm. The flow field within the fluid envelope for the Kuwabara type of boundary conditions is obtained from the analytical solution of Dassios et al. (1994). The complete convective diffusion equation is used to describe mass transport within the envelope so that moderate and strong diffusion terms can be taken into account. A new set of boundary conditions is used that respects mass flux and concentration continuity across the outer surface of the cell and maximizes the applicability of the spheroid-in-cell model in the convection-to-diffusion transition regime. The resulting elliptic problem in two dimensions is solved numerically. Results for the upstream and downstream concentration profiles reveal that tangential diffusion is very significant and should not be neglected for moderate and low Peclet number values. Also, the classical Levich-type of formulation, which is theoretically valid for very weak diffusional terms only, can in practice be modified to predict with fair accuracy the overall Sherwood number and the adsorption efficiency of prolate and oblate spheroids-in-cell even in moderate Peclet number cases.

  10. Carbon monoxide adsorption on beryllium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allouche, A.

    2013-02-01

    Density functional calculations are here carried out to study the carbon monoxide molecule adsorption on pristine, hydrogenated and hydroxylated beryllium Be (0001) surfaces. The adsorption energies and structures, the activation barriers to molecular adsorption and dissociation are calculated. These reactions are described in terms of potential energy surfaces and electronic density of states. The quantum results are discussed along two directions: the beryllium surface reactivity in the domain of nuclear fusion devices and the possible usage of beryllium as a catalyst of Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis.

  11. Dynamic surface tension and adsorption kinetics of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dianlong; Qu, Wenshan; Li, Zhe

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic surface tension (DST) of a siloxane dicephalic surfactant was measured by using the maximum bubble pressure method. By using the classical Ward and Tordai equation, the diffusion coefficient for each bulk surfactant concentration was calculated. The results show that at the initial adsorption stage and at the end of the adsorption process, the dynamic surface tension data were all consistent with this diffusion-controlled mechanism. Their diffusion coefficient was slightly lower than that for conventional hydrocarbon surfactants.

  12. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  13. Adsorption of polyampholytes on charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ozon, F; di Meglio, J-M; Joanny, J-F

    2002-06-01

    We have studied the adsorption of neutral polyampholytes on model charged surfaces that have been characterized by contact angle and streaming current measurements. The loop size distributions of adsorbed polymer chains have been obtained using atomic-force microscopy (AFM) and compared to recent theoretical predictions. We find a qualitative agreement with theory; the higher the surface charge, the smaller the number of monomers in the adsorbed layer. We propose an original scenario for the adsorption of polyampholytes on surfaces covered with both neutral long-chain and charged short-chain thiols. PMID:15010954

  14. Ion adsorption and diffusion in smectite: Molecular, pore, and continuum scale views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Holmboe, Michael; Tournassat, Christophe; Bourg, Ian C.; Davis, James A.

    2016-03-01

    Clay-rich media have been proposed as engineered barrier materials or host rocks for high level radioactive waste repositories in several countries. Hence, a detailed understanding of adsorption and diffusion in these materials is needed, not only for radioactive contaminants, but also for predominant earth metals, which can affect radionuclide speciation and diffusion. The prediction of adsorption and diffusion in clay-rich media, however, is complicated by the similarity between the width of clay nanopores and the thickness of the electrical double layer (EDL) at charged clay mineral-water interfaces. Because of this similarity, the distinction between 'bulk liquid' water and 'surface' water (i.e., EDL water) in clayey media can be ambiguous. Hence, the goal of this study was to examine the ability of existing pore scale conceptual models (single porosity models) to link molecular and macroscopic scale data on adsorption and diffusion in compacted smectite. Macroscopic scale measurements of the adsorption and diffusion of calcium, bromide, and tritiated water in Na-montmorillonite were modeled using a multi-component reactive transport approach while testing a variety of conceptual models of pore scale properties (adsorption and diffusion in individual pores). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out under conditions similar to those of our macroscopic scale diffusion experiments to help constrain the pore scale models. Our results indicate that single porosity models cannot be simultaneously consistent with our MD simulation results and our macroscopic scale diffusion data. A dual porosity model, which allows for the existence of a significant fraction of bulk liquid water-even at conditions where the average pore width is only a few nanometers-may be required to describe both pore scale and macroscopic scale data.

  15. Surface-adsorption-induced polymer translocation through a nanopore: Effects of the adsorption strength and the surface corrugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoyu; Yu, Wancheng; Luo, Kaifu

    2015-08-01

    The surface corrugation plays an important role in single polymer diffusion on attractive surfaces. However, its effect on dynamics of surface adsorption-induced polymer translocation through a nanopore is not clear. Using three-dimensional Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the dynamics of a flexible polymer chain translocation through a nanopore induced by the selective adsorption of translocated segments onto the trans side of the membrane. The translocation probability Pt r a n s increases monotonically, while the mean translocation time τ has a minimum as a function of the adsorption strength ɛ , which are explained from the perspective of the effective driving force for the translocation. With the surface being smoother, τ as well as the scaling exponent α of τ with the chain length N decreases. Finally, we show that the distributions of the translocation time are non-Gaussian even for strong adsorption at a moderate surface corrugation. A nearly Gaussian distribution of the translocation time is observed only for the smoothest surface we studied.

  16. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  17. Hydrogen adsorption on palladium: a comparative theoretical study of different surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Ledentu, V.; Sautet, Ph.; Eichler, A.; Hafner, J.

    1998-08-01

    The interaction of atomic hydrogen with the Pd(111), Pd(100) and Pd(110) surfaces is studied by ab-initio density functional calculations within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). For the three surfaces, we have determined the preferred adsorption sites, the adsorption structures, the work function changes and the surface diffusion barrier, including relaxation effects. This comparative study allows some common features to be seen, in particular in the adsorption energies and geometries for both surface and subsurface H-atoms, and some significant differences such as the surface diffusion and the dispersion of the H-induced surface state. The origin of these differences is explained by a detailed analysis of the electronic structures of both clean and hydrogen-covered surfaces. Our study leads to an interesting correlation between the hydrogen diffusion barrier and the surface roughness since it plays an important part in the catalytic activity of the respective surfaces.

  18. Adsorption of copper at aqueous illite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Q.; Sun, Z.; Forsling, W.; Tang, H.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, the authors conducted potentiometric titrations, batch adsorption experiments and FT-IR analysis to study the uptake of copper in illite/water suspensions and then applied the constant capacitance surface complexation model to interpret the reaction mechanism at the aqueous illite surfaces. This research shows that the copper adsorption at these surfaces is strongly dependent on pH and that the adsorption causes a deprotonation of surface groups. The authors propose that the uptake of copper in the carbonate-free illite suspensions can be explained by the formation of mononuclear surface complexes, {triple_bond}SOCu{sup +} and {triple_bond}SOCuOH, and a multinuclear surface complex, {triple_bond}SOCu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}{sup +}, followed by the formation of a bulk precipitate, Cu(OH){sub 2}(s), or a surface precipitate, {triple_bond}SOCu{sub 2}(OH){sub 3}(sp). For the illite suspensions containing carbonates, the authors propose that the copper-illite interaction can be depicted by the formation of mononuclear surface complexes, {triple_bond}SOCu{sup +} and {triple_bond}SOCuOH, followed by the formation of a copper hydroxylcarbonate precipitate, Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s), rather than a copper hydroxide precipitate. The existence of Cu{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}CO{sub 3}(s) in the carbonate-containing illite suspensions was identified by FT-IR analysis.

  19. Surface shear rheology of saponin adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Golemanov, Konstantin; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Pelan, Edward; Stoyanov, Simeon D

    2012-08-21

    Saponins are a wide class of natural surfactants, with molecules containing a rigid hydrophobic group (triterpenoid or steroid), connected via glycoside bonds to hydrophilic oligosaccharide chains. These surfactants are very good foam stabiliziers and emulsifiers, and show a range of nontrivial biological activities. The molecular mechanisms behind these unusual properties are unknown, and, therefore, the saponins have attracted significant research interest in recent years. In our previous study (Stanimirova et al. Langmuir 2011, 27, 12486-12498), we showed that the triterpenoid saponins extracted from Quillaja saponaria plant (Quillaja saponins) formed adsorption layers with unusually high surface dilatational elasticity, 280 ± 30 mN/m. In this Article, we study the shear rheological properties of the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins. In addition, we study the surface shear rheological properties of Yucca saponins, which are of steroid type. The experimental results show that the adsorption layers of Yucca saponins exhibit purely viscous rheological response, even at the lowest shear stress applied, whereas the adsorption layers of Quillaja saponins behave like a viscoelastic two-dimensional body. For Quillaja saponins, a single master curve describes the data for the viscoelastic creep compliance versus deformation time, up to a certain critical value of the applied shear stress. Above this value, the layer compliance increases, and the adsorption layers eventually transform into viscous ones. The experimental creep-recovery curves for the viscoelastic layers are fitted very well by compound Voigt rheological model. The obtained results are discussed from the viewpoint of the layer structure and the possible molecular mechanisms, governing the rheological response of the saponin adsorption layers. PMID:22830458

  20. Adsorption and coupling of 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero-Irurueta, G.; Martínez, J. I.; Bueno, R. A.; Palomares, F. J.; Salavagione, H. J.; Singh, M. K.; Méndez, J.; Ellis, G. J.; López, M. F.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    We have deposited 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and studied the strength of its adsorption through a combination of STM, LEED, XPS and ab initio calculations. Although an ordered (2√3 × 2√3)R30° phase appears, we have observed that molecule-substrate interaction dominates the adsorption geometry and properties of the system. At RT the high catalytic activity of Pt induces aminophenol to lose the H atom from the hydroxyl group, and a proportion of the molecules lose the complete hydroxyl group. After annealing above 420 K, all deposited aminophenol molecules have lost the OH moiety and some hydrogen atoms from the amino groups. At this temperature, short single-molecule oligomer chains can be observed. These chains are the product of a new reaction that proceeds via the coupling of radical species that is favored by surface diffusion.

  1. Adsorption and Coupling of 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Irurueta, G.; Martínez, J. I.; Bueno, R.A.; Palomares, F. J.; Salavagione, H. J.; Singh, M. K.; Méndez, J.; Ellis, G. J.; López, M. F.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We have deposited 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and studied the strength of its adsorption through a combination of STM, LEED, XPS and ab initio calculations. Although an ordered (2√3×2√3)R30° phase appears, we have observed that molecule-substrate interaction dominates the adsorption geometry and properties of the system. At RT the high catalytic activity of Pt induces aminophenol to lose the H atom from the hydroxyl group, and a proportion of the molecules lose the complete hydroxyl group. After annealing above 420K, all deposited aminophenol molecules have lost the OH moiety and some hydrogen atoms from the amino groups. At this temperature, short single-molecule oligomer chains can be observed. These chains are the product of a new reaction that proceeds via the coupling of radical species that is favoured by surface diffusion. PMID:27279673

  2. A local view of bonding and diffusion at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.

    1996-09-01

    First-principles density functional calculations and corresponding experimental results underline the importance of basic chemical concepts, such as coordination, valence saturation and promotion-hybridization energetics, in understanding bonding and diffusion of atoms at and on metal surfaces. Several examples are reviewed, including outer-layer relaxations of clean hcp(0001) surfaces, liquid-metal-embrittlement energetics, separation energies of metal-adatom dimers, concerted substitutional self-diffusion on fcc(001) surfaces, and adsorption and diffusion barrier sites for adatoms near steps.

  3. Initial stages of benzotriazole adsorption on the Cu(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Federico; Tee, Daniel W; Francis, Stephen M; Früchtl, Herbert; Richardson, Neville V

    2013-06-21

    Benzotriazole (BTAH) has been used as a copper corrosion inhibitor since the 1950s; however, the molecular level detail of how inhibition occurs remains a matter of debate. The onset of BTAH adsorption on a Cu(111) single crystal was investigated via scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), vibrational spectroscopy (RAIRS) and supporting DFT modelling. BTAH adsorbs as anionic (BTA(-)), CuBTA is a minority species, while Cu(BTA)2, the majority of the adsorbed species, form chains, whose sections appear to diffuse in a concerted manner. The copper surface appears to reconstruct in a (2 × 1) fashion. PMID:23652707

  4. Design of a hybrid advective-diffusive microfluidic system with ellipsometric detection for studying adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Cunlu; Wijnperlé, Daniel; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    Establishing and maintaining concentration gradients that are stable in space and time is critical for applications that require screening the adsorption behavior of organic or inorganic species onto solid surfaces for wide ranges of fluid compositions. In this work, we present a design of a simple and compact microfluidic device based on steady-state diffusion of the analyte, between two control channels where liquid is pumped through. The device generates a near-linear distribution of concentrations. We demonstrate this via experiments with dye solutions and comparison to finite-element numerical simulations. In a subsequent step, the device is combined with total internal reflection ellipsometry to study the adsorption of (cat)ions on silica surfaces from CsCl solutions at variable pH. Such a combined setup permits a fast determination of an adsorption isotherm. The measured optical thickness is compared to calculations from a triple layer model for the ion distribution, where surface complexation reactions of the silica are taken into account. Our results show a clear enhancement of the ion adsorption with increasing pH, which can be well described with reasonable values for the equilibrium constants of the surface reactions. PMID:27375818

  5. Oxygen Atom Adsorption on and Diffusion into Nb(110) and Nb(100) from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Tafen, De Nyago; Gao, Michael C

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the dynamics of oxidation of Nb, we examine the adsorption, absorption, and diffusion of an oxygen atom on, in, and into Nb(110) and Nb(100) surfaces, respectively, using density functional theory. Our calculations predict that the oxygen atom adsorbs on the threefold site on Nb(110) and the fourfold hollow site on Nb(100), and the adsorption energy is -5.08 and -5.18 eV respectively. We find the long and short bridge sites to be transition states for O diffusion on Nb(110), while the on top site is a rank-2 saddle point. In the subsurface region, the oxygen atom prefers the octahedral site, as in bulk niobium. Our results also show that the O atom is more stable on Nb(110) subsurface than on Nb(100) subsurface. The diffusion of oxygen atoms into niobium surfaces passes through transition states where the oxygen atom is coordinated to four niobium atoms. The diffusion barriers of the oxygen atom into Nb(110) and Nb(100) are 1.81 and 2.05 eV, respectively. Analysis of the electronic density of states reveals the emergence of well localized electronic states below the lowest states of clean Nb surfaces due to d-p orbital hybridization.

  6. Surface Tension and Adsorption without a Dividing Surface.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2015-11-24

    The ingenious concept of a dividing surface of zero thickness that was introduced by Gibbs is the basis of the theory of surface tension and adsorption. However, some fundamental questions, mainly those related to the location of the dividing surface and the proper definition of relative adsorption, have remained open over the years. To avoid these questions, the present paper proposes to analyze an interfacial phase by defining a thermodynamic system of constant, but nonzero thickness. The interfacial phase is analyzed as it really is, namely a nonuniform three-dimensional entity. The current analysis redevelops the equation for calculating surface tension, though with different assumptions. However, the main point in the proposed model is that the thermodynamic interfacial system, due to its fixed thickness, conforms to the requirement of first-order homogeneity of the internal energy. This property is the key that allows using the Gibbs adsorption isotherm. It is also characteristic of the Gibbs dividing surface model, but has not always been discussed with regard to subsequent models. The resulting equation leads to a simple, "natural" expression for the relative adsorption. This expression may be compared with simulations and sophisticated surface concentration measurements, and from which the dependence of interfacial tension on the solution composition can be derived. Finally, it is important to point out that in order to calculate the interfacial tension as well as the relative adsorption from data on the properties of the interfacial phase, there is no need to know its exact thickness, as long as it is bigger than the actual thickness but sufficiently small. PMID:26523466

  7. Protein adsorption kinetics in different surface potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, A.; Mantz, H.; Jacobs, K.; Bellion, M.; Santen, L.

    2008-03-01

    We have studied the adsorption kinetics of the protein amylase at solid/liquid interfaces. Offering substrates with tailored properties, we are able to separate the impact of short- and long-range interactions. By means of a colloidal Monte Carlo approach including conformational changes of the adsorbed proteins induced by density fluctuations, we develop a scenario that is consistent with the experimentally observed three-step kinetics on specific substrates. Our observations show that not only the surface chemistry determines the properties of an adsorbed protein layer but also the van der Waals contributions of a composite substrate may lead to non-negligible effects.

  8. Adsorption of flexible polyelectrolytes on charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Subbotin, A V; Semenov, A N

    2016-08-10

    Adsorption of weakly charged polyelectrolyte (PE) chains from dilute solution on an oppositely charged surface is studied using the self-consistent mean-field approach. The structure of the adsorbed polymer layer and its excess charge are analyzed in the most important asymptotic and intermediate regimes both analytically and numerically. Different regimes of surface charge compensation by PE chains including partial and full charge inversion are identified and discussed in terms of physical parameters like the magnitude of specific short-range interactions of PE segments with the surface, solvent quality and ionic strength. The effect of excluded-volume monomer interactions is considered quantitatively both in the marginally good and poor solvent regimes. PMID:27452184

  9. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-impregnated mesoporous silicates: surface structure and behavior of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Woo; Han, James S; Jang, Min; Min, Soo-Hong; Park, Jae Kwang; Rowell, Roger M

    2004-02-01

    Phosphorus from excess fertilizers and detergents ends up washing into lakes, creeks, and rivers. This overabundance of phosphorus causes excessive aquatic plant and algae growth and depletes the dissolved oxygen supply in the water. In this study, aluminum-impregnated mesoporous adsorbents were tested for their ability to remove phosphate from water. The surface structure of the materials was investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD), a N2 adsorption-desorption technique, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the effect of surface properties on the adsorption behavior of phosphate. The mesoporous materials were loaded with Al components by reaction with surface silanol groups. In the adsorption test, the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials showed fast adsorption kinetics as well as high adsorption capacities, compared with activated alumina. The uniform mesopores of the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials caused the diffusion rate in the adsorption process to increase, which in turn caused the fast adsorption kinetics. High phosphate adsorption capacities of the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials were attributed to not only the increase of surface hydroxyl density on Al oxide due to well-dispersed impregnation of Al components but also the decrease in stoichiometry of surface hydroxyl ions to phosphate by the formation of monodentate surface complexes. PMID:14968882

  10. Surface chemistry of ferrihydrite: Part 2. Kinetics of arsenate adsorption and coprecipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Dadis, J.A.; Waychunas, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of As(V) adsorption by ferrihydrite was investigated in coprecipitation and postsynthesis adsorption experiments conducted in the pH range 7.5-9.0. In coprecipitation experiments, As(V) was present in solution during the hydrolysis and precipitation of iron. In adsorption experiments, a period of rapid (<5 min) As(V) uptake from solution was followed by continued uptake for at least eight days, as As(V) diffused to adsorption sites on ferrihydrite surfaces within aggregates of colloidal particles. The time dependence of As(V) adsorption is well described by a general model for diffusion into a sphere if a subset of surface sites located near the exterior of aggregates is assumed to attain adsorptive equilibrium rapidly. The kinetics of As(V) desorption after an increase in pH were also consistent with diffusion as a rate-limiting process. Aging of pure ferrihydrite prior to As(V) adsorption caused a decrease in adsorption sites on the precipitate owing to crystallite growth. In coprecipitation experiments, the initial As(V) uptake was significantly greater than in post-synthesis adsorption experiments, and the rate of uptake was not diffusion limited because As(V) was coordinated by surface sites before crystallite growth and coagulation processes could proceed. After the initial adsorption, As(V) was slowly released from coprecipitates for at least one month, as crystallite growth caused desorption of As(V). Adsorption densities as high as 0.7 mole As(V) per mole of Fe were measured in coprecipitates, in comparison to 0.25 mole As(V) per mole of Fe in post-synthesis adsorption experiments. Despite the high Concentration of As(V) in the precipitates, EXAFS spectroscopy (Waychunas et al., 1993) showed that neither ferric arsenate nor any other As-bearing surface precipitate or solid solution was formed. The high adsorption densities are possible because the ferrihydrite particles are extremely small, approaching the size of small dioctahedral chains at

  11. Experimental determination of barium isotope fractionation during diffusion and adsorption processes at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zuilen, Kirsten; Müller, Thomas; Nägler, Thomas F.; Dietzel, Martin; Küsters, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Variations in barium (Ba) stable isotope abundances measured in low and high temperature environments have recently received increasing attention. The actual processes controlling Ba isotope fractionation, however, remain mostly elusive. In this study, we present the first experimental approach to quantify the contribution of diffusion and adsorption on mass-dependent Ba isotope fractionation during transport of aqueous Ba2+ ions through a porous medium. Experiments have been carried out in which a BaCl2 solution of known isotopic composition diffused through u-shaped glass tubes filled with silica hydrogel at 10 °C and 25 °C for up to 201 days. The diffused Ba was highly fractionated by up to -2.15‰ in δ137/134Ba, despite the low relative difference in atomic mass. The time-dependent isotope fractionation can be successfully reproduced by a diffusive transport model accounting for mass-dependent differences in the effective diffusivities of the Ba isotope species (D137Ba /D134Ba =(m134 /m137) β). Values of β extracted from the transport model were in the range of 0.010-0.011. Independently conducted batch experiments revealed that adsorption of Ba onto the surface of silica hydrogel favoured the heavier Ba isotopes (α = 1.00015 ± 0.00008). The contribution of adsorption on the overall isotope fractionation in the diffusion experiments, however, was found to be small. Our results contribute to the understanding of Ba isotope fractionation processes, which is crucial for interpreting natural isotope variations and the assessment of Ba isotope ratios as geochemical proxies.

  12. Mapping the Surface Adsorption Forces of Nanomaterials in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xin R.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Mathur, Sanjay; Song, Xuefeng; Xiao, Lisong; Oldenberg, Steven J.; Fadeel, Bengt; Riviere, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    The biological surface adsorption index (BSAI) is a novel approach to characterize surface adsorption energy of nanomaterials that is the primary force behind nanoparticle aggregation, protein corona formation, and other complex interactions of nanomaterials within biological systems. Five quantitative nanodescriptors were obtained to represent the surface adsorption forces (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond, polarity/polarizability, and lone-pair electrons) of the nanomaterial interaction with biological components. We have mapped the surface adsorption forces over 16 different nanomaterials. When the five-dimensional information of the nanodescriptors was reduced to two dimensions, the 16 nanomaterials were classified into distinct clusters according their surface adsorption properties. BSAI nanodescriptors are intrinsic properties of nanomaterials useful for quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) model development. This is the first success in quantitative characterization of the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological conditions, which could open a quantitative avenue in predictive nanomedicine development, risk assessment, and safety evaluation of nanomaterials. PMID:21999618

  13. Surface Adsorption in Nonpolarizable Atomic Models.

    PubMed

    Whitmer, Jonathan K; Joshi, Abhijeet A; Carlton, Rebecca J; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2014-12-01

    Many ionic solutions exhibit species-dependent properties, including surface tension and the salting-out of proteins. These effects may be loosely quantified in terms of the Hofmeister series, first identified in the context of protein solubility. Here, our interest is to develop atomistic models capable of capturing Hofmeister effects rigorously. Importantly, we aim to capture this dependence in computationally cheap "hard" ionic models, which do not exhibit dynamic polarization. To do this, we have performed an investigation detailing the effects of the water model on these properties. Though incredibly important, the role of water models in simulation of ionic solutions and biological systems is essentially unexplored. We quantify this via the ion-dependent surface attraction of the halide series (Cl, Br, I) and, in so doing, determine the relative importance of various hypothesized contributions to ionic surface free energies. Importantly, we demonstrate surface adsorption can result in hard ionic models combined with a thermodynamically accurate representation of the water molecule (TIP4Q). The effect observed in simulations of iodide is commensurate with previous calculations of the surface potential of mean force in rigid molecular dynamics and polarizable density-functional models. Our calculations are direct simulation evidence of the subtle but sensitive role of water thermodynamics in atomistic simulations. PMID:26583244

  14. Study of water adsorption on activated carbons with different degrees of surface oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-02-15

    A carbon of wood origin was oxidized with different oxidizing agents (nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulfate). The microstructural properties of the starting material and the oxidized samples were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. The surface acidity was determined using Boehm titration and potentiometric titration. The changes in the surface chemistry were also studied by diffuse reflectance FTIR. Water adsorption isotherms were measured at three different temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From the isotherms the heats of adsorption were calculated using a virial equation. The results indicated that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by the surface heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption was equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol).

  15. Adsorption of boron on a Mo(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.; Turiev, Anatolij M.; Tsidaeva, Natal'ja I.; Panteleev, Dmitrij G.; Vladimirov, Georgij G.; Rump, Gennadij A.

    2008-12-01

    Adsorption of boron atoms in submonolayer to multilayer coverage on atomically clean Mo(110) surfaces has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and work function measurements. According to Auger results there is a layer-by-layer growth mode of the film on the substrate held at room temperature. In the submonolayer region the work function gradually increases with boron coverage until a saturation value of 5.8 eV is achieved after completion of the first monoatomic layer. The B-Mo(110) adsorbate system formed on the substrate at room temperature is not stable, dominated by a strong tendency of the boron atoms to diffuse into the bulk of the crystal. The latter is manifested by dramatic Mo(110) surface plasmon mode transformation upon boron adsorption, presumably as a result of penetration of boron atoms into the topmost substrate layer even at T = 300 K. Slight annealing up to 450 K facilitates this trend, leading to total dissolution of deposited boron atoms in the bulk of the crystal under further annealing, restoring the initial state of the Mo(110) surface after achieving a temperature of approximately 2000 K.

  16. Pyridine adsorption and diffusion on Pt(111) investigated with density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolsbjerg, Esben L.; Groves, Michael N.; Hammer, Bjørk

    2016-04-01

    The adsorption, diffusion, and dissociation of pyridine, C5H5N, on Pt(111) are investigated with van der Waals-corrected density functional theory. An elaborate search for local minima in the adsorption potential energy landscape reveals that the intact pyridine adsorbs with the aromatic ring parallel to the surface. Piecewise interconnections of the local minima in the energy landscape reveal that the most favourable diffusion path for pyridine has a barrier of 0.53 eV. In the preferred path, the pyridine remains parallel to the surface while performing small single rotational steps with a carbon-carbon double bond hinged above a single Pt atom. The origin of the diffusion pathway is discussed in terms of the C2-Pt π-bond being stronger than the corresponding CN-Pt π-bond. The energy barrier and reaction enthalpy for dehydrogenation of adsorbed pyridine into an adsorbed, upright bound α-pyridyl species are calculated to 0.71 eV and 0.18 eV, respectively (both zero-point energy corrected). The calculations are used to rationalize previous experimental observations from the literature for pyridine on Pt(111).

  17. Pyridine adsorption and diffusion on Pt(111) investigated with density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Kolsbjerg, Esben L; Groves, Michael N; Hammer, Bjørk

    2016-04-28

    The adsorption, diffusion, and dissociation of pyridine, C5H5N, on Pt(111) are investigated with van der Waals-corrected density functional theory. An elaborate search for local minima in the adsorption potential energy landscape reveals that the intact pyridine adsorbs with the aromatic ring parallel to the surface. Piecewise interconnections of the local minima in the energy landscape reveal that the most favourable diffusion path for pyridine has a barrier of 0.53 eV. In the preferred path, the pyridine remains parallel to the surface while performing small single rotational steps with a carbon-carbon double bond hinged above a single Pt atom. The origin of the diffusion pathway is discussed in terms of the C2-Pt π-bond being stronger than the corresponding CN-Pt π-bond. The energy barrier and reaction enthalpy for dehydrogenation of adsorbed pyridine into an adsorbed, upright bound α-pyridyl species are calculated to 0.71 eV and 0.18 eV, respectively (both zero-point energy corrected). The calculations are used to rationalize previous experimental observations from the literature for pyridine on Pt(111). PMID:27131536

  18. A first-principles study of sodium adsorption and diffusion on phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Wen, Yanwei; Chen, Zhengzheng; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-07-01

    The structural, electronic, electrochemical as well as diffusion properties of Na doped phosphorene have been investigated based on first-principles calculations. The strong binding energy between Na and phosphorene indicates that Na could be stabilized on the surface of phosphorene without clustering. By comparing the adsorption of Na atoms on one side and on both sides of phosphorene, it has been found that Na-Na exhibits strong repulsion at the Na-Na distance of less than 4.35 Å. The Na intercalation capacity is estimated to be 324 mA h g(-1) and the calculated discharge curve indicates quite a low Na(+)/Na voltage of phosphorene. Moreover, the diffusion energy barrier of Na atoms on the phosphorene surface at both low and high Na concentrations is as low as 40-63 meV, which implies the high mobility of Na during the charge/discharge process. PMID:26051226

  19. Competitive Protein Adsorption on Polysaccharide and Hyaluronate Modified Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ombelli, Michela; Costello, Lauren; Postle, Corinne; Anantharaman, Vinod; Meng, Qing Cheng; Composto, Russell J.; Eckmann, David M.

    2011-01-01

    We measured adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) onto six distinct bare and dextran- and hyaluronate-modified silicon surfaces created using two dextran grafting densities and three hyaluronic acid (HA) sodium salts derived from human umbilical cord, rooster comb and streptococcus zooepidemicus. Film thickness and surface morphology depended on HA molecular weight and concentration. BSA coverage was enhanced on surfaces upon competitive adsorption of BSA:Fg mixtures. Dextranization differentially reduced protein adsorption onto surfaces based on oxidation state. Hyaluronization was demonstrated to provide the greatest resistance to protein coverage, equivalent to that of the most resistant dextranized surface. Resistance to protein adsorption was independent of the type of hyaluronic acid utilized. With changing bulk protein concentration from 20 to 40 µg ml−1 for each species, Fg coverage on silicon increased by 4×, whereas both BSA and Fg adsorption on dextran and HA were far less dependent of protein bulk concentration. PMID:21623481

  20. Size dependent adsorption on nanocrystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. M.; Wen, Z.; Jiang, Q.

    2005-03-01

    A quantitative thermodynamic correlation method to describe the size dependent Langmuir adsorption isotherm is developed. According to the model, the equilibrium adsorption constant increases as material size decreases, which is in agreement with the literature data of acetic acid, valeric acid, oxalic acid, and adipic acid on anatase nanoparticles.

  1. Adsorption and viscoelastic analysis of polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes on charged hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dhopatkar, Nishad; Park, Jung Hyun; Chari, Krishnan; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-27

    The aggregation of surfactants around oppositely charged polyelectrolytes brings about a peculiar bulk phase behavior of the complex, known as coacervation, and can control the extent of adsorption of the polyelectrolyte at an aqueous-solid interface. Adsorption kinetics from turbid premixed polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures have been difficult to measure using optical techniques such as ellipsometry and reflectometry, thus limiting the correlation between bulk phases and interfacial adsorption. Here, we investigated the adsorption from premixed solutions of a cationic polysaccharide (PQ10) and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on an amphoteric alumina surface using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCMD). The surface charge on the alumina was tuned by changing the pH of the premixed solutions, allowing us to assess the role of electrostatic interactions by studying the adsorption on both negatively and positively charged surfaces. We observed a maximum extent of adsorption on both negatively and positively charged surfaces from a solution corresponding to the maximum turbidity. Enhanced adsorption upon diluting the redissolved complexes at a high SDS concentration was seen only on the negatively charged surface, and not on the positively charged one, confirming the importance of electrostatic interactions in controlling the adsorption on a hydrophilic charged surface. Using the Voight based viscoelastic model, QCMD also provided information on the effective viscosity, effective shear modulus, and thickness of the adsorbed polymeric complex. The findings of viscoelastic analysis, corroborated by atomic force microscopy measurements, suggest that PQ10 by itself forms a flat, uniform layer, rigidly attached to the surface. The PQ10-SDS complex shows a heterogeneous surface structure, where the underlayer is relatively compact and tightly attached and the top is a loosely bound diffused overlayer, accounting for most of the adsorbate

  2. Self-diffusion in fluids in porous glass: confinement by pores and liquid adsorption layers.

    PubMed

    Kimmich, R; Stapf, S; Maklakov, A I; Skirda, V D; Khozina, E V

    1996-01-01

    Diffusion coefficients of 10 different polar and nonpolar liquids filled in porous glasses with mean pore diameters of 4 or 30 nm were determined with the aid of the NMR field-gradient technique. In the time scale of these experiments (0.3 to 500 ms) diffusion coefficients were found to be time independent. Within the experimental error, no influence of the polarity of the adsorbate can be stated. The diffusion coefficients of all investigated fluids in glass with 4 and 30 nm pores were reduced by factors of 0.17 and 0.63, respectively, relative to the bulk values. This relatively weak reduction can be explained by considering the known porosities of the adsorbents. The second objective of this study was to examine the diffusion behaviour below the melting point of adsorbates in porous glass. Fluids confined in pores do not freeze at the bulk freezing temperatures. In this respect, two phases must be distinguished. A maximal two monolayer thick film adsorbed on the inner surfaces does not crystallize at all, whereas the "free" fraction of the fluid in the pores freezes at reduced temperatures according to the Gibbs-Thompson relation. The nonfrozen surface layers form a network in which self-diffusion can be investigated. Experiments have been carried out with cyclohexane. A reduction factor of 0.06 was found relative to the extrapolated values of the entirely unfrozen fluid in porous glass with a mean pore diameter of 30 nm. It is, thus, demonstrated that molecules in adsorption layers virtually retain their translational degrees of freedom along the surfaces. The lowering of the diffusivity is mainly due to the geometric restriction rather than to the interaction with the surface. PMID:8970083

  3. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  4. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  5. Further insights into the role of carbon surface functionalities in the mechanism of phenol adsorption.

    PubMed

    Terzyk, Artur P

    2003-12-15

    kinetics is considered. The analytical solution of Fick's law of diffusion for adsorption in cylindrical particles is applied, the diffusion coefficients are calculated. It is shown that phenol diffusion is mixed between a surface process and a pore one. The obtained energy of diffusion is correlated with the values of the physicochemical parameters of studied carbons. As a final point, it is concluded that the mechanism of phenol adsorption is not only determined by so called "pi-pi interactions" and "donor-acceptor complex formation" but also by (strongly depending on temperature) the "solvent effect" balancing the influence of the two mentioned factors on this mechanism. PMID:14643231

  6. Albumin adsorption on to aluminium oxide and polyurethane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, C P; Sunny, M C

    1990-05-01

    The changes in protein adsorption onto aluminium surfaces coated with different thicknesses of oxide layers were examined. The oxide layers on aluminium substrates were derived by the anodizing technique. Protein adsorption studies were conducted using 125I-labelled albumin and the amount of albumin adsorbed was estimated with the help of a gamma counter. An increase in albumin adsorption was observed on oxide layer coated aluminium surfaces. The effect of anti-Hageman factor on albumin and fibrinogen adsorption on to bare aluminium, oxide layer coated aluminium and bare polyether urethane urea surfaces was also investigated. It was observed that the presence of anti-Hageman factor increased the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on to all these substrates. PMID:2383620

  7. The effects of surface chemistry of mesoporous silica materials and solution pH on kinetics of molsidomine adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinina, E.S.; Parfenyuk, E.V.

    2014-01-15

    Adsorption kinetics of molsidomine on mesoporous silica material (UMS), the phenyl- (PhMS) and mercaptopropyl-functionalized (MMS) derivatives from solution with different pH and 298 K was studied. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model for all studied silica materials and pH. Effects of surface functional groups and pH on adsorption efficiency and kinetic adsorption parameters were investigated. At all studied pH, the highest molsidomine amount is adsorbed on PhMS due to π–π interactions and hydrogen bonding between surface groups of PhMS and molsidomine molecules. An increase of pH results in a decrease of the amounts of adsorbed molsidomine onto the silica materials. Furthermore, the highest adsorption rate kinetically evaluated using a pseudo-second-order model, is observed onto UMS and it strongly depends on pH. The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion and Boyd kinetic film–diffusion models. The results showed that the molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials is controlled by film diffusion. Effect of pH on the diffusion parameters is discussed. - Graphical abstract: The kinetic study showed that the k{sub 2} value, the rate constant of pseudo-second order kinetic model, is the highest for molsidomine adsorption on UMS and strongly depends on pH because it is determined by availability and accessibility of the reaction sites of the adsorbents molsidomine binding. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The adsorption capacities of UMS, PhMS and MMS were dependent on the pH. • At all studied pH, the highest molsidomine amount is adsorbed on PhMS. • The highest adsorption rate, k{sub 2}, is observed onto UMS and strongly depends on pH. • Film diffusion was the likely rate-limiting step in the adsorption process.

  8. Adsorption of xenon on vicinal copper and platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Layton

    The adsorption of xenon was studied on Cu(111), Cu(221), Cu(643) and on Pt(111), Pt(221), and Pt(531) using low energy electron diffraction (LEED), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of xenon, and ultraviolet photoemission of adsorbed xenon (PAX). These experiments were performed to study the atomic and electronic structure of stepped and step-kinked, chiral metal surfaces. Xenon TPD and PAX were performed on each surface in an attempt to titrate terrace, step edge, and kink adsorption sites by adsorption energetics (TPD) and local work function differences (PAX). Due to the complex behavior of xenon on the vicinal copper and platinum metal surfaces, adsorption sites on these surfaces could not be adequately titrated by xenon TPD. On Cu(221) and Cu(643), xenon desorption from step adsorption sites was not apparent leading to the conclusion that the energy difference between terrace and step adsorption is minuscule. On Pt(221) and Pt(531), xenon TPD indicated that xenon prefers to bond at step edges and that the xenon-xenon interaction at step edges in repulsive but no further indication of step-kink adsorption was observed. The Pt(221) and Pt(531) TPD spectra indicated that the xenon overlayer undergoes strong compression near monolayer coverage on these surfaces due to repulsion between step-edge adsorbed xenon and other encroaching xenon atoms. The PAX experiments on the copper and platinum surfaces demonstrated that the step adsorption sites have lower local work functions than terrace adsorption sites and that higher step density leads to a larger separation in the local work function of terrace and step adsorption sites. The PAX spectra also indicated that, for all surfaces studied at 50--70 K, step adsorption is favored at low coverage but the step sites are not saturated until monolayer coverage is reached; this observation is due to the large entropy difference between terrace and step adsorption states and to repulsive interactions between xenon atoms

  9. Microscopic Perspective on the Adsorption Isotherm of a Heterogeneous Surface

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Rogan; Comer, Jeffrey; Ginsberg, Mark D.; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption of dissolved molecules onto solid surfaces can be extremely sensitive to the atomic-scale properties of the solute and surface, causing difficulties for the design of fluidic systems in industrial, medical and technological applications. In this communication, we show that the Langmuir isotherm for adsorption of a small molecule to a realistic, heterogeneous surface can be predicted from atomic structures of the molecule and surface through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We highlight the method by studying the adsorption of dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP) to amorphous silica substrates and show that subtle differences in the atomic-scale surface properties can have drastic effects on the Langmuir isotherm. The sensitivity of the method presented is sufficient to permit the optimization of fluidic devices and to determine fundamental design rules for controlling adsorption at the nanoscale. PMID:22611479

  10. Chlorine adsorption on the InAs (001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bakulin, A. V.; Eremeev, S. V.; Tereshchenko, O. E.; Kulkova, S. E.

    2011-01-15

    Chlorine adsorption on the In-stabilized InAs(001) surface with {zeta}-(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) and {beta}3 Prime -(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) reconstructions and on the Ga-stabilized GaAs (001)-{zeta}-(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) surface has been studied within the electron density functional theory. The equilibrium structural parameters of these reconstructions, surface atom positions, bond lengths in dimers, and their changes upon chlorine adsorption are determined. The electronic characteristics of the clean surface and the surface with adsorbed chlorine are calculated. It is shown that the most energetically favorable positions for chlorine adsorption are top positions over dimerized indium or gallium atoms. The mechanism of chlorine binding with In(Ga)-stabilized surface is explained. The interaction of chlorine atoms with dimerized surface atoms weakens surface atom bonds and controls the initial stage of surface etching.

  11. Unusual diffusing regimes caused by different adsorbing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Veridiana G; Ribeiro, Haroldo V; Li, Quan; Evangelista, Luiz R; Lenzi, Ervin K; Zola, Rafael S

    2015-03-01

    A confined liquid with dispersed neutral particles is theoretically studied when the limiting surfaces present different dynamics for the adsorption-desorption phenomena. The investigation considers different non-singular kernels in the kinetic equations at the walls, where the suitable choice of the kernel can account for the relative importance of physisorption or chemisorption. We find that even a small difference in the adsorption-desorption rate of one surface (relative to the other) can drastically affect the behavior of the whole system. The surface and bulk densities and the dispersion are calculated when several scenarios are considered and anomalous-like behaviors are found. The approach described here is closely related to experimental situations, and can be applied in several contexts such as dielectric relaxation, diffusion-controlled relaxation in liquids, liquid crystals, and amorphous polymers. PMID:25633342

  12. Control of gold surface diffusion on si nanowires.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Martien I; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Dhalluin, Florian; Desré, Pierre J; Gentile, Pascal; Ferret, Pierre; Oehler, Fabrice; Baron, Thiery

    2008-05-01

    Silicon nanowires (NW) were grown by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism using gold as the catalyst and silane as the precursor. Gold from the catalyst particle can diffuse over the wire sidewalls, resulting in gold clusters decorating the wire sidewalls. The presence or absence of gold clusters was observed either by high angle annular darkfield scanning transmission electron microscopy images or by scanning electron microscopy. We find that the gold surface diffusion can be controlled by two growth parameters, the silane partial pressure and the growth temperature, and that the wire diameter also affects gold diffusion. Gold clusters are not present on the NW side walls for high silane partial pressure, low temperature, and small NW diameters. The absence or presence of gold on the NW sidewall has an effect on the sidewall morphology. Different models are qualitatively discussed. The main physical effect governing gold diffusion seems to be the adsorption of silane on the NW sidewalls. PMID:18422363

  13. Adsorption of CO on Ni/Cu(110) bimetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, E.; Carbogno, C.; Groß, A.; Winkler, A.

    2009-08-01

    The adsorption behavior of CO on bimetallic Ni/Cu(110) surfaces has been studied experimentally by thermal-desorption spectroscopy and theoretically by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The bimetallic surfaces were produced either by evaporation of nickel or by decomposition of Ni(CO)4 on Cu(110). Adsorption of CO at 180 K on such a bimetallic surface yields three new adsorption states with adsorption energies between that of CO on clean Cu(110) and clean Ni(110). The new desorption peaks from the bimetallic surface, designated as β1-β3 , can be observed at 250, 300, and 360 K, respectively. These new states are most pronounced when (1)/(2) monolayer of nickel is present on the copper surface. DFT calculations, using the Vienna ab initio simulation package code, were performed to identify the most probable Ni/Cu atomic arrangements at the bimetallic surface to reconcile with the experimental results. It turned out that CO adsorption on nickel dimers consisting of in-surface and adjacent subsurface atoms can best explain the observed experimental data. The result shows that CO adsorption is determined by local (geometric) effects rather than by long-range (electronic) effects. These findings should contribute to a better understanding of tailoring catalytic processes with the help of bimetallic catalysts.

  14. Heavy metal adsorption by sulphide mineral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Gilles E.; Bancroft, G. Michael

    1986-07-01

    The adsorption of aqueous Hg 2+, Pb 2+, Zn 2+ and Cd 2+ complexes on a variety of sulphide minerals has been studied as a function of the solution pH and also as a function of the nature of the ligands in solution. Sulphide minerals are excellent scavengers for these heavy metals. The adsorption is strongly pH dependent, i.e. there is a critical pH at which the adsorption increases dramatically. The pH dependence is related to the hydrolysis of the metal ions. Indirect evidence suggests that the hydrolyzed species are adsorbed directly on the sulphide groups, probably as a monolayer. The results also suggest the presence of MCI n2- n species physisorbed on the adsorbed monolayer. A positive identification of the adsorbed species was not possible using ESCA/XPS.

  15. Adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes onto oppositely charged surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sandipan; Jho, Y. S.

    2016-03-01

    In many biological processes highly charged biopolymers are adsorbed onto oppositely charged surfaces of macroions and membranes. They form strongly correlated structures close to the surface which cannot be explained by the conventional Poisson-Boltzmann theory. In this work strong coupling theory is used to study the adsorption of highly charged Gaussian polyelectrolytes. Two cases of adsorptions are considered, when the Gaussian polyelectrolytes are confined (a) by one charged wall, and (b) between two charged walls. The effects of salt and the geometry of the polymers on their adsorption-depletion transitions in the strong coupling regime are discussed.

  16. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si—O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si—C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption.

  17. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide; Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi

    2015-03-14

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) - 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si-O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si-C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption. PMID:25770493

  18. Computer simulations for the adsorption of polymers onto surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, A.C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is to develop theoretical models and computer simulations to examine the adsorption of polymers onto a variety of surfaces, and to understand how the chain architecture and conditions such as the surface or solvent affect the extent of adsorption and the morphology of the interfacial layers. Results obtained last year are summarized under the following headings: behavior of copolymers at a liquid-liquid interface, grafted homopolymer chains in a poor solvent, amphiphilic comb copolymers in oil/water solutions, modeling polymer adsorption onto influenza virus, and behavior of polymers in concentrated surfactant solutions. Plans for future work are also given. 17 refs. (DLC)

  19. Albumin adsorption on CoCrMo alloy surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Proteins can adsorb on the surface of artificial joints immediately after being implanted. Although research studying protein adsorption on medical material surfaces has been carried out, the mechanism of the proteins’ adsorption which affects the corrosion behaviour of such materials still lacks in situ observation at the micro level. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on CoCrMo alloy surfaces was studied in situ by AFM and SKPFM as a function of pH and the charge of CoCrMo alloy surfaces. Results showed that when the specimens were uncharged, hydrophobic interaction could govern the process of the adsorption rather than electrostatic interaction, and BSA molecules tended to adsorb on the surfaces forming a monolayer in the side-on model. Results also showed that adsorbed BSA molecules could promote the corrosion process for CoCrMo alloys. When the surface was positively charged, the electrostatic interaction played a leading role in the adsorption process. The maximum adsorption occurred at the isoelectric point (pH 4.7) of BSA. PMID:26673525

  20. Albumin adsorption on CoCrMo alloy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2015-12-01

    Proteins can adsorb on the surface of artificial joints immediately after being implanted. Although research studying protein adsorption on medical material surfaces has been carried out, the mechanism of the proteins’ adsorption which affects the corrosion behaviour of such materials still lacks in situ observation at the micro level. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on CoCrMo alloy surfaces was studied in situ by AFM and SKPFM as a function of pH and the charge of CoCrMo alloy surfaces. Results showed that when the specimens were uncharged, hydrophobic interaction could govern the process of the adsorption rather than electrostatic interaction, and BSA molecules tended to adsorb on the surfaces forming a monolayer in the side-on model. Results also showed that adsorbed BSA molecules could promote the corrosion process for CoCrMo alloys. When the surface was positively charged, the electrostatic interaction played a leading role in the adsorption process. The maximum adsorption occurred at the isoelectric point (pH 4.7) of BSA.

  1. Asphaltene adsorption and desorption from mineral surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, S.T. ); Waxman, M.H.

    1991-02-01

    This paper reports results of asphaltene adsorption/desorption on clay minerals, silica, and carbonates. It also describes the effect of adsorbed asphaltenes on rock wettability and a screening pyrolysis-flame-ionization-detection (P-FID) test to evaluate the ability of solvents to remove asphaltene from kaolin and formation core material.

  2. Adsorption of ammonia on treated stainless steel and polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaittinen, O.; Metsälä, M.; Persijn, S.; Vainio, M.; Halonen, L.

    2014-05-01

    Adsorption of dynamically diluted ammonia at part-per-billion to low part-per-million concentrations in dry nitrogen was studied with treated and non-treated stainless steel and polymer test tubes. The treatments included electropolishing and two types of coatings based on amorphous silicon. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an external cavity diode laser operating in the near-infrared wavelength range was used to monitor the adsorption process in real time in continuous-flow conditions to obtain quantitative assessment of the adsorptive properties of the studied surfaces. The investigated polymers were all less adsorptive than any of the treated or non-treated stainless steel surfaces. Some of the commercial coatings reduced the adsorption loss of stainless steel by a factor of ten or more. Polyvinylidene fluoride was found to be superior (less adsorption) to the four other studied polymer coatings. The number of adsorbed ammonia molecules per surface area obtained at different ammonia gas phase concentrations was modeled with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The time behavior of the adsorption-desorption process occurring in the time scale of seconds and minutes was simulated with a simple kinetic model.

  3. Peptide adsorption on the hydrophobic surface: A free energy perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Yuebiao; Wang, Wei; Chen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Protein adsorption is a very attractive topic which relates to many novel applications in biomaterials, biotechnology and nanotechnology. Ionic complementary peptides are a group of novel nano-biomaterials with many biomedical applications. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations of the ionic-complementary peptide EAK16-II on a hydrophobic graphite surface were performed under neutral, acidic and basic solution conditions. Adsorption free energy contour maps were obtained by analyzing the dynamical trajectories. Hydrophobic interactions were found to govern the adsorption of the first peptide molecule, and both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contributed to the adsorption of the second peptide molecule. Especially under acidic and basic solution conditions, interplay existed among chain-chain hydrophobic, chain-surface hydrophobic and chain-chain electrostatic interactions during the adsorption of the second peptide molecule. Non-charged residues were found to lie on the graphite surface, while charged residue side-chains oriented towards the solution after the peptide deposited on the surface. These results provide a basis for understanding peptide adsorption on the hydrophobic surface under different solution conditions, which is useful for novel applications such as bioactive implant devices and drug delivery material design.

  4. SURFACE INHOMOGENEITY EFFECTS ON CONVECTIVE DIFFUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is suggested that convectlve scaling, with appropriate extensions, provides the most useful framework for estimating the effects of urban-scale surface inhomogeneities on diffusion in convective conditions. trong contrasts in surface heat flux exist between cropland, forests, ...

  5. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom inmore » the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).« less

  6. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).

  7. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-28

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C{sub 6}-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ∼0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. This in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001)

  8. Adsorption of antimony onto iron oxyhydroxides: adsorption behavior and surface structure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejun; Wu, Zhijun; He, Mengchang; Meng, Xiaoguang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Nan; Zhang, Jing

    2014-07-15

    Antimony is detected in soil and water with elevated concentration due to a variety of industrial applications and mining activities. Though antimony is classified as a pollutant of priority interest by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Europe Union (EU), very little is known about its environmental behavior and adsorption mechanism. In this study, the adsorption behaviors and surface structure of antimony (III/V) on iron oxides were investigated using batch adsorption techniques, surface complexation modeling (SCM), X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The adsorption isotherms and edges indicated that the affinity of Sb(V) and Sb(III) toward the iron oxides depended on the Sb species, solution pH, and the characteristics of iron oxides. Sb(V) adsorption was favored at acidic pH and decreased dramatically with increasing pH, while Sb(III) adsorption was constant over a broad pH range. When pH is higher than 7, Sb(III) adsorption by goethite and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was greater than Sb(V). EXAFS analysis indicated that the majority of Sb(III), either adsorbed onto HFO or co-precipitated by FeCl3, was oxidized into Sb(V) probably due to the involvement of O2 in the long duration of sample preservation. Only one Sb-Fe subshell was filtered in the EXAFS spectra of antimony adsorption onto HFO, with the coordination number of 1.0-1.9 attributed to bidentate mononuclear edge-sharing ((2)E) between Sb and HFO. PMID:24910911

  9. Chemisorption and diffusion of hydrogen on surface and subsurface sites of flat and stepped nickel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Bhawna; Sholl, David S.

    2005-05-01

    Plane-wave density functional theory calculations were performed to investigate the binding and diffusion of hydrogen on three flat Ni surfaces, Ni(100), Ni(110), and Ni(111), and two stepped Ni surfaces, Ni(210) and Ni(531). On each surface, the favored adsorption sites were identified by considering the energy and stability of various binding sites and zero-point energy corrections were computed. Binding energies are compared with experimental and theoretical results from the literature. Good agreement with experimental and previous theoretical data is found. At surface coverages where adsorbate-adsorbate interactions are relatively weak, the binding energy of H is similar on the five Ni surfaces studied. Favorable binding energies are observed for stable surface sites, while subsurface sites have unfavorable values relative to the gas phase molecular hydrogen. Minimum energy paths for hydrogen diffusion on Ni surfaces and into subsurface sites were constructed.

  10. Surface texture and specific adsorption sites of sol-gel synthesized anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zaki, Mohamed I.; Mekhemer, Gamal A.H.; Fouad, Nasr E.; Jagadale, Tushar C.; Ogale, Satishchandra B.

    2010-10-15

    The surface properties of sol-gel synthesized anatase titania (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles are probed by sorptiometry, infrared absorption spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results reveal strong correlations of the surface area, porosity, pyridine adsorption capacity and strength, and catalytic methylbutynol decomposition activity.

  11. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, Sylva; Bolanz, Ralph M; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Siddique, Jamal A; Komárek, Michael

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3-10), ionic strengths (0.001-0.1M KNO3), sorbate concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6)M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50-500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes. PMID:27450335

  12. The adsorption of cesium on lanthanum hexaboride surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. R.; Swanson, L. W.; Chambers, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption/desorption characteristics of cesium on clean and oxygen-covered LaB6 (100) surfaces were studied using various surface analysis techniques. On the initially clean surface (phi = 2.77 eV), adsorption produces a minimum work function of 1.96 eV and a saturation work function of 2.07 eV. For the oxygen-saturated surface, the cesium adsorption curve shows no minimum, the lowest work function (1.35 eV) occurring at cesium saturation. The utility of LaB6 (100) as an emitter or collector in thermionic converter applications (particularly for space nuclear electric propulsion) is evaluated.

  13. Adsorption of fluorescently labeled microbeads on PDMS surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikcevic, Irena; Bange, Adam; Peterson, Erik T. K.; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R.; Halsall, H. B.; Seliskar, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescently labeled beads may be utilized in transparent microfluidic devices to facilitate a variety of immunoassay based chemical measurements. We investigate the ability to visualize, quantitate, and reduce undesirable adsorption of beads within a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel device. These methods are prerequisites to the design of practical bead-based microfluidic sensing devices. The PDMS microchannels were shown to be transparent enough to make accurate quantitative optical measurements, although significant adsorption was observed. Epifluorescence microscopy was employed in an attempt to quantitatively evaluate microbead adsorption to PDMS microchannel walls and bulk surfaces after different agitation, solution, and surface treatments. This microscopy method provides reproducible imaging of individual beads and allows for characterization of adsorption to PDMS microchannel walls. Solution composition seemed to play a more important role in the ability to reduce the number of adsorbed beads to the PDMS surface than agitation. The most significant reduction in bead adsorption was seen in surface treatment. The most effective surface treatment examined in this study was Teflon AF.

  14. Adsorption of Polyethylene from Solution onto Starch Film Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since starch adsorbs onto polyethylene (PE) surfaces from cooled solutions of jet cooked starch, this study was carried out to determine whether adsorption of PE onto hydrophilic starch film surfaces would also take place if starch films were placed in hot solutions of PE in organic solvents, and th...

  15. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions. PMID:26851452

  16. A diffuse-interface approximation for surface diffusion including adatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rätz, Andreas; Voigt, A.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a diffuse-interface approximation for solving partial differential equations on evolving surfaces. The model of interest is a fourth-order geometric evolution equation for a growing surface with an additional diffusive adatom density on the surface. Such models arise in the description of epitaxial growth, where the surface of interest is the solid-vapour interface. The model allows us to handle complex geometries in an implicit manner, by considering an evolution equation for a phase-field variable describing the surface and an evolution equation for an extended adatom concentration on a time-independent domain. Matched asymptotic analysis shows the formal convergence towards the sharp interface model and numerical results based on adaptive finite elements demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

  17. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  18. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  19. Water diffusion on TiO2 anatase surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agosta, L.; Gala, F.; Zollo, G.

    2015-06-01

    Compatibility between biological molecules and inorganic materials, such as crystalline metal oxides, is strongly dependent on the selectivity properties and the adhesion processes at the interface between the two systems. Among the many different aspects that affect the adsorption processes of peptides or proteins onto inorganic surfaces, such as the charge state of the amino acids, the peptide 3D structure, the surface roughness, the presence of vacancies or defects on and below the surface, a key role is certainly played by the water solvent whose molecules mediate the interaction. Then the surface hydration pattern may strongly affect the adsorption behavior of biological molecules. For the particular case of (101) anatase TiO2 surface that has a fundamental importance in the interaction of biocompatible nano-devices with biological environment, it was shown, both theoretically and experimentally, that various hydration patterns are close in energy and that the water molecules are mobile at as low temperature values as 190 K. Then it is important to understand the dynamical behavior of first hydration layer of the (101) anatase surface. As a first approach to this problem, density functional calculations are used to investigate water diffusion on the (101) anatase TiO2 surface by sampling the potential energy surface of water molecules of the first hydration layer thus calculating the water molecule migration energy along some relevant diffusion paths on the (101) surface. The measured activation energy of water migration seems in contrast with the observed surface mobility of the water molecules that, as a consequence could be explained invoking a strong role of the entropic term in the context of the transition state theory.

  20. Uphill diffusion and overshooting in the adsorption of binary mixtures in nanoporous solids.

    PubMed

    Lauerer, Alexander; Binder, Tomas; Chmelik, Christian; Miersemann, Erich; Haase, Jürgen; Ruthven, Douglas M; Kärger, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Under certain conditions, during binary mixture adsorption in nanoporous hosts, the concentration of one component may temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. This implies that, in contrast to Fick's Law, molecules must diffuse in the direction of increasing rather than decreasing concentration. Although this phenomenon of 'overshooting' has been observed previously, it is only recently, using microimaging techniques, that diffusive fluxes in the interior of nanoporous materials have become accessible to direct observation. Here we report the application of interference microscopy to monitor 'uphill' fluxes, covering the entire period of overshooting from initiation until final equilibration. It is shown that the evolution of the profiles can be adequately predicted from the single-component diffusivities together with the binary adsorption equilibrium data. The guest molecules studied (carbon dioxide, ethane and propene) and the host material (ZSM-58 or DDR) are of practical interest in relation to the development of kinetically selective adsorption separation processes. PMID:26177626

  1. Uphill diffusion and overshooting in the adsorption of binary mixtures in nanoporous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauerer, Alexander; Binder, Tomas; Chmelik, Christian; Miersemann, Erich; Haase, Jürgen; Ruthven, Douglas M.; Kärger, Jörg

    2015-07-01

    Under certain conditions, during binary mixture adsorption in nanoporous hosts, the concentration of one component may temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. This implies that, in contrast to Fick's Law, molecules must diffuse in the direction of increasing rather than decreasing concentration. Although this phenomenon of `overshooting' has been observed previously, it is only recently, using microimaging techniques, that diffusive fluxes in the interior of nanoporous materials have become accessible to direct observation. Here we report the application of interference microscopy to monitor `uphill' fluxes, covering the entire period of overshooting from initiation until final equilibration. It is shown that the evolution of the profiles can be adequately predicted from the single-component diffusivities together with the binary adsorption equilibrium data. The guest molecules studied (carbon dioxide, ethane and propene) and the host material (ZSM-58 or DDR) are of practical interest in relation to the development of kinetically selective adsorption separation processes.

  2. Uphill diffusion and overshooting in the adsorption of binary mixtures in nanoporous solids

    PubMed Central

    Lauerer, Alexander; Binder, Tomas; Chmelik, Christian; Miersemann, Erich; Haase, Jürgen; Ruthven, Douglas M.; Kärger, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Under certain conditions, during binary mixture adsorption in nanoporous hosts, the concentration of one component may temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. This implies that, in contrast to Fick's Law, molecules must diffuse in the direction of increasing rather than decreasing concentration. Although this phenomenon of ‘overshooting' has been observed previously, it is only recently, using microimaging techniques, that diffusive fluxes in the interior of nanoporous materials have become accessible to direct observation. Here we report the application of interference microscopy to monitor ‘uphill' fluxes, covering the entire period of overshooting from initiation until final equilibration. It is shown that the evolution of the profiles can be adequately predicted from the single-component diffusivities together with the binary adsorption equilibrium data. The guest molecules studied (carbon dioxide, ethane and propene) and the host material (ZSM-58 or DDR) are of practical interest in relation to the development of kinetically selective adsorption separation processes. PMID:26177626

  3. Adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen on Pd(211) and Pd(111): Results from first-principles electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sampyo; Rahman, Talat S.

    2007-04-01

    We have carried out first-principles calculations of H adsorption on Pd(211) using density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation in the plane-wave basis to find out that the most preferred is the threefold hollow site on the terrace of Pd(211) with an adsorption energy of 0.52eV : the hcp and fcc sites being almost energetically equally favorable. For subsurface H adsorption on Pd(211), the octahedral site with an adsorption energy of 0.19eV is slightly more favorable than the tetrahedral site (0.18eV) . Our calculated activation energy barrier for H to diffuse from the preferred surface site to the subsurface one on Pd(211) is 0.33eV , as compared with 0.41eV on Pd(111). Thus, there is an enhancement of the probability of finding subsurface hydrogen in Pd(211). Additionally, we find the diffusion barriers for H on the terraces of Pd(211) to be 0.11eV , while that along the step edge to be only 0.05eV and that within the second layer (subsurface) to be 0.15eV .

  4. Diffusion mediated localization on membrane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using the model of a cell membrane of a spherical surface in which membrane components may diffuse, the rate of localization due to trapping under diffusion control has been estimated by computing an analytical expression for the mean trapping time including the possibilities of a trapping probability less than one and/or the establishment of an equilibrium at the trap boundary.

  5. Structural Determinants for Protein adsorption/non-adsorption to Silica Surface

    PubMed Central

    Mathé, Christelle; Devineau, Stéphanie; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Lagniel, Gilles; Chédin, Stéphane; Legros, Véronique; Mathon, Marie-Hélène; Renault, Jean-Philippe; Pin, Serge; Boulard, Yves; Labarre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the interaction of proteins with inorganic surfaces is of major interest in both fundamental research and applications such as nanotechnology. However, despite intense research, the mechanisms and the structural determinants of protein/surface interactions are still unclear. We developed a strategy consisting in identifying, in a mixture of hundreds of soluble proteins, those proteins that are adsorbed on the surface and those that are not. If the two protein subsets are large enough, their statistical comparative analysis must reveal the physicochemical determinants relevant for adsorption versus non-adsorption. This methodology was tested with silica nanoparticles. We found that the adsorbed proteins contain a higher number of charged amino acids, particularly arginine, which is consistent with involvement of this basic amino acid in electrostatic interactions with silica. The analysis also identified a marked bias toward low aromatic amino acid content (phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine) in adsorbed proteins. Structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations of proteins from the two groups indicate that non-adsorbed proteins have twice as many π-π interactions and higher structural rigidity. The data are consistent with the notion that adsorption is correlated with the flexibility of the protein and with its ability to spread on the surface. Our findings led us to propose a refined model of protein adsorption. PMID:24282583

  6. DFT modelling of hydrogen sulphide adsorption on α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Frank; Stashans, Arvids

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory has been used to predict properties of hydrogen sulphide, H2S, adsorption on the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface. Five energetically most favourable adsorption configurations have been selected for the study. Our work reveals adsorption geometries as well as discusses electronic and magnetic properties of the adsorbate on chromium oxide surface. It is shown that two different adsorption types, namely molecular adsorption and dissociative adsorption, can take place leading to two sets of adsorption energies. The most favourable arrangement is found to correspond to the case of dissociative adsorption with molecular hydrogen forming OH group at the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface.

  7. Nanoscale topography influences polymer surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; He, Chunlin; Stoykovich, Mark P; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-02-24

    Using high-throughput single-molecule tracking, we studied the diffusion of poly(ethylene glycol) chains at the interface between water and a hydrophobic surface patterned with an array of hexagonally arranged nanopillars. Polymer molecules displayed anomalous diffusion; in particular, they exhibited intermittent motion (i.e., immobilization and "hopping") suggestive of continuous-time random walk (CTRW) behavior associated with desorption-mediated surface diffusion. The statistics of the molecular trajectories changed systematically on surfaces with pillars of increasing height, exhibiting motion that was increasingly subdiffusive and with longer waiting times between diffusive steps. The trajectories were well-described by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of CTRW motion in the presence of randomly distributed permeable obstacles, where the permeability (the main undetermined parameter) was conceptually related to the obstacle height. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of interfacial transport in the presence of obstacles and on nanotopographically patterned surfaces. PMID:25621372

  8. Adsorption of comb copolymers on weakly attractive solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Striolo, A; Jayaraman, A; Genzer, J; Hall, C K

    2005-08-01

    In this work continuum and lattice Monte Carlo simulation methods are used to study the adsorption of linear and comb polymers on flat surfaces. Selected polymer segments, located at the tips of the side chains in comb polymers or equally spaced along the linear polymers, are attracted to each other and to the surface via square-well potentials. The rest of the polymer segments are modeled as tangent hard spheres in the continuum model and as self-avoiding random walks in the lattice model. Results are presented in terms of segment-density profiles, distribution functions, and radii of gyration of the adsorbed polymers. At infinite dilution the presence of short side chains promotes the adsorption of polymers favoring both a decrease in the depletion-layer thickness and a spreading of the polymer molecule on the surface. The presence of long side chains favors the adsorption of polymers on the surface, but does not permit the spreading of the polymers. At finite concentration linear polymers and comb polymers with long side chains readily adsorb on the solid surface, while comb polymers with short side chains are unlikely to adsorb. The simple models of comb copolymers with short side chains used here show properties similar to those of associating polymers and of globular proteins in aqueous solutions, and can be used as a first approximation to investigate the mechanism of adsorption of proteins onto hydrophobic surfaces. PMID:16122338

  9. Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-11-14

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

  10. The determination of oxide surface charging parameters for a predictive metal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Marc; Feltes, Theresa E; Schaal, Melanie T; Regalbuto, John R

    2010-08-15

    The procurement of oxide surface charging parameters has been a widely researched topic in recent years [1-30]. In this study, a one-site, two-pK surface charging mechanism is used in combination with a diffuse double-layer description of the electric double-layer to fit pH shift data over silica and alumina. From these fits of pH data, with no further adjustment of parameters, metal adsorption can be predicted over both supports to a reasonable degree of accuracy. A multi-dimensional optimization procedure employing a Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm is used to optimize the DeltapK (pK(2)-pK(1)) parameter to obtain a best fit of the pH shift data with fixed PZC and hydroxyl density (N(s)). The resulting set of parameters is then used with no adjustment in a purely electrostatic adsorption model (the Revised Physical Adsorption or RPA model) in order to predict anionic chloroplatinic acid (CPA, [PtCl(6)](-2)) adsorption on alumina and cationic platinum tetraammine (PTA, [Pt(NH(3))(4)](+2)) adsorption on alumina and silica. The optimization procedure developed in this study gives reasonable values of the DeltapK compared to other values reported in the literature, with fits to the pH shift data at various oxide loadings with relative errors below 2.8%. PMID:20478569

  11. Adsorption of annealed branched polymers on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Jef; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya

    Annealed branched polymers play important roles in many biological and industrial systems, notable among them single stranded RNA (ssRNA) that in solution takes on a branched secondary structure. Using a mean field theory, we both perturbatively and numerically examine the adsorption of annealed branched polymers on surfaces of several different geometries in a good solvent. Independent of the geometry of the wall, we observe that as branching density increases, surface tension decreases. However, we find a coupling between the branching density and curvature in that a further lowering of surface tension occurs when the wall curves towards the polymer, but the amount of lowering of surface tension decreases when the wall curves away from the polymer. This work was inspired by the idea of using functionalized gold nano-particles to bind RNA for gene delivery. Understanding the mechanisms involved with the adsorption of annealed branched polymers onto different surfaces will play a critical role in many biomedical technologies.

  12. Water adsorption on the LaMnO3 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billman, Chris R.; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Studying the adsorption of water on the metallic LaMnO3 surface can provide insight into this complicated surface-adsorbate interaction. Using density functional theory, we investigated the adsorption of a water monomer, dimer, trimer, and a monolayer on the surface. The electronic structure of ground state configurations is explored using analysis of density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital overlap populations. We found that the interaction between the surface and water molecules is stronger than hydrogen bonding between molecules, which facilitates wetting of the surface. Adsorbed water molecules form very strong hydrogen bonds, with substantially shifted OH stretch modes. For the monolayer of adsorbed water, a hint of a bilayer is observed with a height separation of only 0.2 A˚. However, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images and vibrational spectra suggest a significant difference between the two layers due to intermolecular bonding and interaction with the substrate.

  13. Water Adsorption on the LaMnO3 Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billman, Chris; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    Studying the adsorption of water on the metallic LaMnO3 surface can provide insight into this complicated surface-adsorbate interaction. Using density functional theory, we investigated the adsorption of a water monomer, dimer, trimer and a monolayer on the surface. The electronic structure of ground state configurations is explored using analysis of density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital overlap populations. We found that the interaction between the surface and water molecules is stronger than hydrogen bonding between molecules, which facilitates wetting of the surface. Adsorbed water molecules form very strong hydrogen bonds, with substantially shifted OH stretch modes. For the monolayer of adsorbed water, a hint of a bilayer is observed with a height separation of only 0.2 Å. However, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images and vibrational spectra suggest a significant difference between the two layers due to intermolecular bonding and interaction with the substrate.

  14. Reversible Adsorption Kinetics of Near Surface Dimer Colloids.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Paul F; Hudson, Steven D

    2016-08-30

    We investigate the effect of shape on reversible adsorption kinetics using colloidal polystyrene dimers near a solid glass surface as a model system. The interaction between colloid and wall is tuned using electrostatic, depletion, and gravity forces to produce a double-well potential. The dwell time in each of the potential wells is measured from long duration particle trajectories. The height of each monomer relative to the glass surface is measured to a resolution of <20 nm by in-line holographic microscopy. The measured transition probability distributions are used in kinetic equations to describe the flux of particles to and from the surface. The dimers are compared to independent isolated monomers to determine the effects of shape on adsorption equilibria and kinetics. To elucidate these differences, we consider both mass and surface coverage and two definitions of surface coverage. The results show that dimers with single coverage produce slower adsorption, lower surface coverage, and higher mass coverage in comparison to those of monomers, while dimers with double coverage adsorb faster and result in higher surface coverage. PMID:27483023

  15. Antifreeze glycopeptide adsorption on single crystal ice surfaces using ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P. W.; Beaglehole, D.; DeVries, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic fishes synthesise antifreeze proteins which can effectively inhibit the growth of ice crystals. The mechanism relies on adsorption of these proteins to the ice surface. Ellipsometry has been used to quantify glycopeptide antifreeze adsorption to the basal and prism faces of single ice crystals. The rate of accumulation was determined as a function of time and at concentrations between 0.0005 and 1.2 mg/ml. Estimates of packing density at saturation coverage have been made for the basal and prism faces. PMID:19431902

  16. Differential adsorption of CHON isomers at interstellar grain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattelais, M.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The CHON generic chemical formula covers different isomers such as isocyanic acid (HNCO), cyanic acid (HOCN), fulminic acid (HCNO), and isofulminic acid (HONC); the first three have been identified in a large variety of environments in the interstellar medium (ISM). Several phenomena could be at the origin of the observed abundances, such as different pathways of formation and destruction involving gas phase reactions with different possible activation barriers and/or surface processes depending on the local temperature and the nature of the support. Aims: The scope of this article is to shed some light on the interaction of the CHON isomers with interstellar grains as a function of the nature of the surface and to determine the corresponding adsorption energies in order to find whether this phenomenon could play a role in the abundances observed in the ISM. Methods: The question was addressed by means of numerical simulations using first principle periodic density functional theory (DFT) to represent the grain support as a solid of infinite dimension. Results: Regardless of the nature of the model surface (water ice, graphene, silica), two different classes of isomers were identified: weakly bound (HNCO and HCNO) and strongly bound (HOCN and HONC), with the adsorption energies of the latter group being about twice those of the former. The range of the adsorption energies is (from highest to lowest) HOCN > HONC > HNCO > HCNO. They are totally disconnected from the relative stabilities, which range from HNCO > HOCN > HCNO > HONC. Conclusions: The possibility of hydrogen bonding is the discriminating factor in the trapping of CHON species on grain surfaces. Whatever the environment, differential adsorption is effective and its contribution to the molecular abundances should not be ignored. The theoretical adsorption energies provided here could be profitably used for a more realistic modeling of molecule-surfaces interactions.

  17. Zwitteration: Coating Surfaces with Zwitterionic Functionality to Reduce Nonspecific Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coating surfaces with thin or thick films of zwitterionic material is an effective way to reduce or eliminate nonspecific adsorption to the solid/liquid interface. This review tracks the various approaches to zwitteration, such as monolayer assemblies and polymeric brush coatings, on micro- to macroscopic surfaces. A critical summary of the mechanisms responsible for antifouling shows how zwitterions are ideally suited to this task. PMID:24754399

  18. Surface free energy analysis of adsorbents used for radioiodine adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, C. M.; Román, S.; González, J. F.; Sabio, E.; Ledesma, B.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the surface free energy of biomass-based activated carbons, both fresh and impregnated with triethylenediamine, has been evaluated. The contribution of Lifshitz van der Waals components was determined by the model proposed by van Oss et al. The results obtained allowed predicting the most probable configurations of the impregnant onto the carbon surface and its influence on the subsequent adsorption of radioactive methyl iodide.

  19. Stochastic models for surface diffusion of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2014-07-28

    We derive a stochastic model for the surface diffusion of molecules, starting from the classical equations of motion for an N-atom molecule on a surface. The equation of motion becomes a generalized Langevin equation for the center of mass of the molecule, with a non-Markovian friction kernel. In the Markov approximation, a standard Langevin equation is recovered, and the effect of the molecular vibrations on the diffusion is seen to lead to an increase in the friction for center of mass motion. This effective friction has a simple form that depends on the curvature of the lowest energy diffusion path in the 3N-dimensional coordinate space. We also find that so long as the intramolecular forces are sufficiently strong, memory effects are usually not significant and the Markov approximation can be employed, resulting in a simple one-dimensional model that can account for the effect of the dynamics of the molecular vibrations on the diffusive motion.

  20. Surface Analysis of 4-Aminothiophenol Adsorption at Polycrystalline Platinum Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Fachini, Estevao R.; Contes, Enid J.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2008-01-01

    Formation of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been studied by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Raman spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments give an idea about the packing quality of the monolayer. RAIR and Raman spectra for 4-ATP modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for neat 4-ATP indicating the adsorption of 4-ATP molecules on platinum surface. The adsorption on platinum was also evidenced by the presence of sulfur and nitrogen peaks by XPS survey spectra of the modified platinum electrodes. High resolution XPS studies and RAIR spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption gives up an amino terminated SAM. Thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses. Derivatization of 4-ATP SAM was performed using 16-Br hexadecanoic acid.

  1. CO adsorption on cobalt: Prediction of stable surface phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasooriya, G. T. Kasun Kalhara; van Bavel, Alexander P.; Kuipers, Herman P. C. E.; Saeys, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Adsorption is often described by a Langmuir isotherm, sometimes accounting for a gradual decrease in the adsorption energy with coverage. Using density functional theory, we show that CO adsorption on cobalt does not follow this typical behavior. Instead, adsorption on Co(0001) is dominated by two surface phases. At low pressures, the (√3 × √3)R30°-CO structure is the stable phase, and CO forms (√3 × √3)R30°-CO islands for coverages below 1/3 ML because of attractive CO-CO interactions. Increasing the pressure does not gradually increase the coverage beyond 1/3 ML. Instead, a transition to a high coverage (2√3 × 2√3)R30°-7CO surface structure occurs at 0.1 mbar at room temperature and at 21 bar at 500 K. These two phases are also the dominant structures that have been characterized experimentally on Co(0001), and the conditions where each phase was observed match the first principle surface phase diagram.

  2. Surface silylation of natural mesoporous/macroporous diatomite for adsorption of benzene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenbin; Deng, Liangliang; Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Yuan, Weiwei; Liu, Peng; He, Hongping; Li, Zhaohui; Chen, Fanrong

    2015-06-15

    Naturally occurring porous diatomite (Dt) was functionalized with phenyltriethoxysilane (PTES), and the PTES-modified diatomite (PTES-Dt) was characterized using diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. After silylation, a functional group (-C6H5, phenyl) was successfully introduced onto the surface of Dt. PTES-Dt exhibited hydrophobic properties with a water contact angle (WCA) as high as 120°±1°, whereas Dt was superhydrophilic with a WCA of 0°. The benzene adsorption data on both Dt and PTES-Dt fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The Langmuir adsorption capacity of benzene on PTES-Dt is 28.1 mg/g, more than 4-fold greater than that on Dt. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics results show that equilibrium was achieved faster for PTES-Dt than for Dt, over the relative pressure range of 0.118-0.157. The excellent benzene adsorption performance of PTES-Dt is attributed to strong π-system interactions between the phenyl groups and the benzene molecules as well as to the macroporosity of the PTES-Dt. These results show that the silylated diatomite could be a new and inexpensive adsorbent suitable for use in benzene emission control. PMID:25792477

  3. Adsorption of ciprofloxacin on surface-modified carbon materials.

    PubMed

    Carabineiro, S A C; Thavorn-Amornsri, T; Pereira, M F R; Figueiredo, J L

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption capacity of ciprofloxacin (CPX) was determined on three types of carbon-based materials: activated carbon (commercial sample), carbon nanotubes (commercial multi-walled carbon nanotubes) and carbon xerogel (prepared by the resorcinol/formaldehyde approach at pH 6.0). These materials were used as received/prepared and functionalised through oxidation with nitric acid. The oxidised materials were then heat treated under inert atmosphere (N2) at different temperatures (between 350 and 900°C). The obtained samples were characterised by adsorption of N2 at -196 °C, determination of the point of zero charge and by temperature programmed desorption. High adsorption capacities ranging from approximately 60 to 300 mgCPxgC(-1) were obtained (for oxidised carbon xerogel, and oxidised thermally treated activated carbon Norit ROX 8.0, respectively). In general, it was found that the nitric acid treatment of samples has a detrimental effect in adsorption capacity, whereas thermal treatments, especially at 900 °C after oxidation, enhance adsorption performance. This is due to the positive effect of the surface basicity. The kinetic curves obtained were fitted using 1st or 2nd order models, and the Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the equilibrium isotherms obtained. The 2nd order and the Langmuir models, respectively, were shown to present the best fittings. PMID:21733541

  4. Effect of surface strain on oxygen adsorption on Zr (0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xing; Khafizov, Marat; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2014-02-01

    The effect of surface strain on oxygen adsorption on Zr (0 0 0 1) surface is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that both surface strain and interactions between oxygen adsorbates influence the adsorption process. Oxygen binding to zirconium becomes stronger as the strain changes from compressive to tensile. When oxygen coverage is low and the oxygen interactions are negligible, surface face-centered cubic sites are the most stable for O binding. At high coverage and under compression, octahedral sites between second and third Zr layers become most favorable because the interactions between adsorbates are weakened by positive charge screening. Calculations with both single-layer adsorption model and multiple-layer adsorption model demonstrate that compressive strain at the Zr/oxide interface will provide a thermodynamic driving force for oxygen to incorporate from the surface into the bulk of Zr, while binding oxygen to the Zr surface will be easier when tensile strain is applied.

  5. Surface complexation modeling of Cu(II) adsorption on mixtures of hydrous ferric oxide and kaolinite

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Tracy J; Koretsky, Carla M; Landry, Christopher J; Schaller, Melinda S; Das, Soumya

    2008-01-01

    Background The application of surface complexation models (SCMs) to natural sediments and soils is hindered by a lack of consistent models and data for large suites of metals and minerals of interest. Furthermore, the surface complexation approach has mostly been developed and tested for single solid systems. Few studies have extended the SCM approach to systems containing multiple solids. Results Cu adsorption was measured on pure hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), pure kaolinite (from two sources) and in systems containing mixtures of HFO and kaolinite over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, sorbate/sorbent ratios and, for the mixed solid systems, using a range of kaolinite/HFO ratios. Cu adsorption data measured for the HFO and kaolinite systems was used to derive diffuse layer surface complexation models (DLMs) describing Cu adsorption. Cu adsorption on HFO is reasonably well described using a 1-site or 2-site DLM. Adsorption of Cu on kaolinite could be described using a simple 1-site DLM with formation of a monodentate Cu complex on a variable charge surface site. However, for consistency with models derived for weaker sorbing cations, a 2-site DLM with a variable charge and a permanent charge site was also developed. Conclusion Component additivity predictions of speciation in mixed mineral systems based on DLM parameters derived for the pure mineral systems were in good agreement with measured data. Discrepancies between the model predictions and measured data were similar to those observed for the calibrated pure mineral systems. The results suggest that quantifying specific interactions between HFO and kaolinite in speciation models may not be necessary. However, before the component additivity approach can be applied to natural sediments and soils, the effects of aging must be further studied and methods must be developed to estimate reactive surface areas of solid constituents in natural samples. PMID:18783619

  6. Ethanol adsorption on the Si (111) surface: First principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilenko, Alexander V.; Bonner, Carl E.; Gavrilenko, Vladimir I.

    2012-03-01

    Equilibrium atomic configurations and electron energy structure of ethanol adsorbed on the Si (111) surface are studied by the first principles density functional theory. Geometry optimization is performed by the total energy minimization method. Equilibrium atomic geometries of ethanol, both undissociated and dissociated, on the Si (111) surface are found and analysed. Reaction pathways and predicted transition states are discussed in comparison with available experimental data in terms of the feasibility of the reactions occurring. Analysis of atom and orbital resolved projected density of states indicates substantial modifications of the Si surface valence and conduction electron bands due to the adsorption of ethanol affecting the electronic properties of the surface.

  7. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed. PMID:23915280

  8. Initial Processes of Sulfur Adsorption on Si(100) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li; Wang, Jian-Guang; Wang, Guang-Hou

    2005-10-01

    The adsorption of one monolayer S atoms on ideal Si(100) surface is studied by using the self-consistent tight binding linear muffin-tin orbital method. Energies of adsorption systems of S atoms on different sites are calculated. It is found that the adsorbed S atoms are more favorable on B1 site (bridge site) with a distance 0.131 nm above the Si surface. The S, Si mixed layer might exist at S/Si(100) interface. The layer projected density of states are calculated and compared with that of the clean surface. The charge transfers are also investigated. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 90206033 and 10274031

  9. Reversible adsorption of hydrogen chloride to ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Stefan; Kippenberger, Matthias; Crowley, John

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen chloride is the most important reservoir of gaseous, reactive chlorine in the atmosphere. Although several laboratory investigations of the interaction of HCl with ice surfaces have been conducted, there is still great uncertainty associated with the adsorption isotherms of HCl on ice, which is largely a consequence of most previous studies being unable to work at concentrations relevant for the atmosphere and to explore the non-saturated part of the isotherm at sub-monolayer coverage. We have conducted experiments on HCl uptake on ice surfaces at temperatures between 190 and 220 K, using a coated wall flow tube. HCl at concentrations as low as 2 × 109 molecule cm3 (~10-8 Torr) was detected using a chemical-ionization, quadrupole mass spectrometer. The equilibrium surface coverage of HCl on ice could be interpreted using the Langmuir-model to derive partition coefficients (KLang). We find that the dissociative Langmuir isotherm describes our data significantly better than the non-dissociative type. Surprisingly, and in contrast to the behavior of the majority of traces-gases which adsorb reversibly on ice surfaces, the partition-coefficients we derive for HCl do not show a systematic dependence on temperature, precluding the simple derivation of an adsorption enthalpy and indicating the presence of more complex adsorption and desorption mechanisms for strong acids ionizing on the surface compared to H-bonded trace gases.

  10. Switchable surface coatings for control over protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Martin A.; Jasieniak, Marek; Voelcker, Nicolas H.; Thissen, Helmut; Horn, Roger; Griesser, Hans J.

    2007-12-01

    Control over biomolecule interactions at interfaces is becoming an increasingly important goal for a range of scientific fields and is being intensively studied in areas of biotechnological, biomedical and materials science. Improvement in the control over materials and biomolecules is particularly important to applications such as arrays, biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery and 'lab on a chip' devices. Further development of these devices is expected to be achieved with thin coatings of stimuli responsive materials that can have their chemical properties 'switched' or tuned to stimulate a certain biological response such as adsorption/desorption of proteins. Switchable coatings show great potential for the realisation of spatial and temporal immobilisation of cells and biomolecules such as DNA and proteins. This study focuses on protein adsorption onto coatings of the thermosensitive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) which can exhibit low and high protein adsorption properties based on its temperature dependent conformation. At temperatures above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) pNIPAM polymer chains are collapsed and protein adsorbing whilst below the LCST they are hydrated and protein repellent. Coatings of pNIPAM on silicon wafers were prepared by free radical polymerisation in the presence of surface bound polymerisable groups. Surface analysis and protein adsorption was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and contact angle measurements. This study is expected to aid the development of stimuli-responsive coatings for biochips and biodevices.

  11. Oxidation of activated carbon fibers: Effect on pore size, surface chemistry, and adsorption properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mangun, C.L.; Benak, K.R.; Daley, M.A.; Economy, J.

    1999-12-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were oxidized using both aqueous and nonaqueous treatments. As much as 29 wt% oxygen can be incorporated onto the pore surface in the form of phenolic hydroxyl, quinine, and carboxylic acid groups. The effect of oxidation on the pore size, pore volume, and the pore surface chemistry was thoroughly examined. The average micropore size is typically affected very little by aqueous oxidation while the micropore volume and surface area decreases with such a treatment. In contrast, the micropore size and micropore volume both increase with oxidation in air. Oxidation of the fibers produces surface chemistries in the pore that provide for enhanced adsorption of basic (ammonia) and polar (acetone) molecules at ambient and nonambient temperatures. The adsorption capacity of the oxidized fibers for acetone is modestly better than the untreated ACFs while the adsorption capacity for ammonia can increase up to 30 times compared to untreated ACFs. The pore surface chemical makeup was analyzed using elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  12. Influence of pH and Surface Chemistry on Poly(L-lysine) Adsorption onto Solid Supports Investigated by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Linardy, Eric; Dreaden, Erik C; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Hammond, Paula T; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-08-20

    Poly(L-lysine) (PLL) adsorption onto various materials has been widely applied as a surface modification strategy and layer-by-layer fabrication method. Considering the role of electrostatic charges, a detailed understanding of the influence of solution pH on PLL adsorption process is important for optimization of PLL coating protocols. Herein, PLL adsorption onto different polar and hydrophilic substrates—silica, an amine-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold, and a carboxyl-terminated SAM on gold—across a range of pH conditions was investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. The adsorption kinetics consisted of an initial rapid phase, followed by a second phase where adsorption rate gradually decelerated. These features were interpreted by applying a mean-field kinetic model implying diffusion-limited adsorption in the first phase and reconfiguration of adsorbed PLL molecules in the second phase. The adsorption kinetics and uptake were found to be sensitive to the pH condition, surface chemistry, and flow rate. The strongest PLL adsorption occurred at pH 11 on all three surfaces while weak PLL adsorption generally occurred under acidic conditions. The surface morphology and roughness of adsorbed PLL layers were investigated using atomic force microscopy, and strong PLL adsorption is found to produce a uniform and smooth adlayer while weak adsorption formed a nonuniform and rough adlayer. PMID:26061703

  13. Diffusion of tungsten on stepped tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D. S.; Kim, S. K.; Gomer, R.

    1990-08-01

    Self-diffusion of thermally generated tungsten atoms near (123) and (257), on the zone (011)-(112) and on (023), on the zone (011)-(001) of a tungsten field emitter has been investigated by the field-emission fluctuation method, using a rectangular probe in order to investigate diffusion anisotropy. In agreement with earlier findings of Gong and Gomer [J. Chem. Phys. 88 (1988) 1359, 1370] diffusion of single W atoms along and across (011) terraces separated by (011) steps, i.e. step edges running along [111] is essentially isotropic with Ed = 16 kcal, D0 ≈ 10 -4 cm 2 s -1, while atoms can cross (001) oriented steps only with much activation energy: Ed ≈ 35 kcal, D0 = 10 -2 cm -2 s -1. Slow diffusion parallel to steps attributed previously by Gong Chem. Phys. 88 (1988) 1359, 1370] to kink motion was also seen along the zone (011)-(112) but seems more complicated than previously assumed, with several regimes, which may correspond to motions of different kink configurations. Distinct dips in the slow regime diffusion coefficients occurred at 910 K, somewhat higher than the previously seen onset of dips, 875 K, and may indicate roughening, as previously hypothesized. Slow diffusion perpendicular to steps was also seen in this zone and is not fully understood. It may arise from some step components always perpendicular to the short slit dimensions, or may correspond to more complicated surface configurations than the step and terrace pattern on an ideal emitter surface.

  14. Adsorption of Amelogenin onto Self-Assembled and Fluoroapatite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Bernt, William; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2009-02-19

    Abstract. The interactions of proteins at surfaces are of great importance to biomineralizaton processes and to the development and function of biomaterials. Amelogenin is a unique biomineralization protein because it self-assembles to form supramolecular structures called “nanospheres,” spherical aggregates of monomers that are 20-60 nm in diameter. Although the nanosphere quaternary structure has been observed in solution, the quaternary structure of amelogenin adsorbed onto surfaces is also of great interest because the surface structure is critical to its function. We report studies of the adsorption of the amelogenin onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with COOH and CH3 end group functionality and single crystal fluoroapatite (FAP). Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments showed that the solutions contained nanospheres and aggregates of nanospheres. Protein adsorption onto the various substrates was evidenced by null ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and external reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ERFTIR). Although only nanospheres were observed in solution, ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the protein adsorbates were much smaller structures than the original nanospheres, from monomers to small oligomers in size. Monomer adsorption was promoted onto the CH3 surfaces and small oligomer adsorption was promoted onto the COOH and FAP substrates. In some cases, remnants of the original nanospheres adsorbed as multilayers on top of the underlying subnanosphere layers. This work suggests that amelogenin can adsorb by the “shedding” or disassembling of substructures from the nanospheres onto substrates and indicates that amelogenin may have a range of possible quaternary structures depending on whether it is in solution or interacting with surfaces.

  15. Surface-modified magnetic colloids for affinity adsorption of immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Fernanda; Pinho, Samantha C.; Zollner, Terezinha C. A.; Zollner, Ricardo L.; de Cuyper, Marcel; Santana, Maria Helena A.

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and in vitro adsorption tests of surface-modified magnetoliposomes for affinity binding of (i) anticardiolipin (isotype G) antibodies and (ii) specific isotype E antibodies generated by hypersensitivity reactions in humans with respiratory allergy. In the first case, cardiolipin embedded in the bilayer of magnetoliposomes was used as specific ligand. In the second case, antigenic proteins present in an extract of Dermatophagoids pteronyssinus and Blomia tropicalis mites were covalently coupled on the surface of magnetoliposomes via a diglycolic spacer arm, and used as specific ligands for IgE. Antibody adsorption was performed in a high-gradient magnetophoresis system, using either sera of healthy individuals or a pool of sera from autoimmune or allergic patients. The selectivity and capacity of the system were quantified by a frontal analysis in a capillary column, and by constructing breakthrough curves. The results show that the highest yield and selectivity were obtained if the ligand was extended into the aqueous layer surrounding the magnetoliposome surface. A 100% selectivity was obtained for adsorption of specific IgE, and 8% for IgG. These results demonstrate the potentialities of both types of surface-modified magnetic biocolloids in the field of in vitro diagnosis tests for allergic or autoimmune conditions.

  16. Adsorption structure of water molecules on the Be(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yu; Li, Yanfang; Wang, Shuangxi; Zhang, Ping

    2014-06-07

    By using density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the adsorption of water molecules at different coverages on the Be(0001) surface. The coverage dependence of the prototype water structures and energetics for water adlayer growth are systematically studied. The structures, energetics, and electronic properties are calculated and compared with other available studies. Through our systematic investigations, we find that water molecules form clusters or chains on the Be(0001) surface at low coverages. When increasing the water coverage, water molecules tend to form a 2 × 2 hexagonal network on the Be(0001) surface.

  17. Chlorine adsorption on Au(111): chlorine overlayer or surface chloride?

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiwei; Baker, Thomas A; Zhou, Ling; Pinnaduwage, Dilini S; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Friend, Cynthia M

    2008-03-19

    We report the first scanning tunneling microscope (STM) investigation, combined with density functional theory calculations, to resolve controversy regarding the bonding and structure of chlorine adsorbed on Au(111). STM experiments are carried out at 120 K to overcome instability caused by mobile species upon chlorine adsorption at room temperature. Chlorine adsorption initially lifts the herringbone reconstruction. At low coverages (<0.33 ML), chlorine binds to the top of Au(111)-(1 x 1) surface and leads to formation of an overlayer with (square root(3) x square root(3))R30 degree structure at 0.33 ML. At higher coverages, packing chlorine into an overlayer structure is no longer favored. Gold atoms incorporate into a complex superlattice of a Au-Cl surface compound. PMID:18290645

  18. Study of Gas Adsorption on Biphasic Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader, Rami; Hamieh, Tayssir; Villieras, Frédéric; Angelina. Razafitianamaharav; Toufaily, Joumana; Mcheik, Ali S.; Thomas, Fabien

    This work has carried out on grafted nanoparticles oxide silica to determine the possible existence of "nanoeffect". The textural properties and heterogeneity of surface of the samples were studied at the interface solid-gas. The Geometric properties were discussed in terms of the surface area while the energy properties were discussed in terms of the reactive sites of the surface.In the framework of this study, firstly, the sample was used in the non-grafted state and then in the grafted state using a hydrophilic molecule and a hydrophobic molecule. Several techniques have been used: Infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, the point by point volumetric technique, which enable us to study the interactions between the adsorbate and the solid surface. Finally we have determined the size and electro thermal mobility using zestasizer (Nano ZS). The results obtained show that there are two types of groups silanols and siloxanes on the silica OX5 giving a composite hydrophilic-hydrophobic. This character causes a singular behavior in adsorptive material, the presence of hydrophilic groups, strongly polarized, and is detected by infrared spectroscopy. These groups cause significant differences depending on the polarizability of the probe molecules, and the adsorption of argon shows no heterogeneity of the surface, while nitrogen is adsorbed on the polar sites at low relative pressure, While the volumetric continues to adsorption of argon and nitrogen on combustion silica to obtain and to highlight sites of high energy and polar surface sites. The combustion silica which has been used as adsorbent in this study has an amorphous surface, virtually free of impurities indicates that the sample is not micro porous and grafting of the molecules makes a decrease in high energy sites or to a relative increase in surface low energy.

  19. Physicochemical properties of surfaces of SBA-15 silicas, according to adsorption-static, gas-chromatographic, and IR spectroscopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchina, T. M.; Shoniya, N. K.; Tegina, O. Ya.; Tkachenko, O. P.; Kustov, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Interaction between vapors of organic compounds and water with surfaces of mesoporous silica SBA-15 and silica SBA-15 modified with n-C6F13(CH2)2Si(CH3)2Cl via adsorption under static conditions is studied by means of gas chromatography and IR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. It is shown that modification notably reduces the energy of disperse and specific interactions, along with the acidity of adsorption centers. Even low concentrations of the grafted groups (0.76 nm-2) allows us to obtain highly hydrophobic coatings on SBA-15 surfaces.

  20. Diffusion and Surface Reaction in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiker, A.; Richarz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene hydrogenation on a platinum catalyst, electrolytically applied to a tube wall, is a good system for the study of the interactions between diffusion and surface reaction in heterogeneous catalysis. Theoretical background, apparatus, procedure, and student performance of this experiment are discussed. (BB)

  1. The surface modification of stainless steel and the correlation between the surface properties and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chan-Koo; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2007-07-01

    Protein adsorption on a biomaterial surface is of great importance as it usually induces unfavorable biological cascades, with the result that much surface modification research has had to be performed in an effort to prevent this. In this study, we developed surface modification methods for stainless steel, which is a representative metal for biomedical device. The stainless steels were first smoothened to different extents by electropolishing, in order to obtain a rough or smooth surface. On these two kinds of substrates, we introduced epoxide groups to the metal surface by silanization with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTS). Then, various polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly(tetrahydrofuran glycol) (PTG), poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) were grafted on the silanized stainless steels. Each surface modification step was confirmed by various analytical methods. Contact angle measurement revealed that the surface hydrophilicity was controllable by polymer grafting. Root-mean-square (RMS) data of atomic force microscopy showed that surface roughness was dramatically changed by electropolishing. Based on these results, the correlation between surface properties and protein adsorption was investigated. In the protein adsorption study, we observed that all of the polymer-grafted stainless steels exhibited lower protein adsorption, when compared with bare stainless steel. Moreover, a hydrophilic and smooth surface was found to be the best of choice for decreasing the protein adsorption. PMID:17277988

  2. The influence of the adsorption of metoclopramide on the surface ionization of fumed silica.

    PubMed

    Buyuktimkin, Tuba; Wurster, Dale Eric

    2015-01-15

    The effect of adsorbed metoclopramide on the surface ionization of fumed silica was studied using potentiometric titration. Adsorption isotherms of metoclopramide to unionized and negatively-charged silica surfaces were generated and compared to the titration data. The adsorption of metoclopramide caused the silica surface charge to become more negative with increasing pH that was independent of ionic strength which suggested that specific adsorbate-surface interactions were occurring. Adsorption studies showed that metoclopramide adsorbs to the unionized silica surface. Ionization caused drug adsorption to increase which was consistent with at least two distinct surface adsorption sites. The ratio of the additional amount of metoclopramide adsorbed to the surface ionized group density determined from the titration curves was approximately unity which showed conclusively that the negatively-charged silanols constitute one of the surface adsorption sites. Potentiometric titration has been shown to be a useful technique for determining the number and types of adsorption sites on the silica surface. PMID:25448578

  3. Adsorption and desorption studies of cesium on sapphire surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, K.R.; Ing, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption were studied using combined surface analytical techniques. An approximate initial sticking coefficient for Cs on sapphire was measured using reflection mass spectrometry and found to be 0.9. Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometry (TDMS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) were used to verify that a significant decrease in sticking coefficient occurs as the Cs coverage reaches a critical submonolayer value. TDMS analysis demonstrates that Cs is stabilized on a clean sapphire surface at temperatures (1200 K) in excess of the temperatures experienced by sapphire in a TOPAZ-2 thermionic fuel element (TFE). Surface contaminants on sapphire can enhance Cs adsorption relative to the clean surface. C contamination eliminates the high temperature state of Cs desorption found on clean sapphire but shifts the bulk of the C desorption from 400 to 620 K. Surface C is a difficult contaminant to remove from sapphire, requiring annealing above 1400 K. Whether Cs is stabilized on sapphire in a TFE environment will most likely depend on relation between surface contamination and surface structure.

  4. The Adsorption of Polyatomic Molecules on Carbon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burde, Jared T.

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit the structure and chemical properties that make them apt substrates for many adsorption applications. Of particular interest are carbon nanotube bundles, whose unique geometry is conducive to the formation of pseudo-one-dimensional phases of matter, and graphite, whose simple planar structure allows ordered phases to form in the absence of surface effects. Although both of these structures have been the focus of many research studies, knowledge gaps still remain. Much of the work with carbon nanotubes has used simple adsorbates1-43, and there is little kinetic data available. On the other hand, there are many studies of complex molecules adsorbing on graphite; however, there is almost no kinetic data reported for this substrate. We seek to close these knowledge gaps by performing a kinetic study of linear molecules of increasing length adsorbing on carbon nanotube bundles and on graphite. We elucidated the process of adsorption of complex admolecules on carbon nanotube bundles, while at the same time producing some of the first equilibrium results of the films formed by large adsorbates on these structures. We also extended the current knowledge of adsorption on graphite to include the kinetics of adsorption. The kinetic data that we have produced enables a more complete understanding of the process of adsorption of large admolecules on carbon nanotube bundles and graphite. We studied the adsorption of particles on carbon nanotube bundles and graphite using analytical and computational techniques. By employing these methods separately but in parallel, we were able to constantly compare and verify our results. We calculated and simulated the behavior of a given system throughout its evolution and then analyzed our results to determine which system parameters have the greatest effect on the kinetics of adsorption. Our analytical and computational results show good agreement with each other and with the experimental isotherm data provided by

  5. Mn segregation in Ge/Mn5Ge3 heterostructures: The role of surface carbon adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dau, Minh-Tuan; Thanh, Vinh Le; Le, Thi-Giang; Spiesser, Aurélie; Petit, Mathieu; Michez, Lisa A.; Daineche, Rachid

    2011-10-01

    Mn5Ge3 compound, with its room-temperature ferromagnetism and possibility to epitaxially grow on Ge, acts as a potential spin injector into group-IV semiconductors. However, the realization of Ge/Mn5Ge3 multilayers is highly hampered by Mn segregation toward the Ge growing surface. Here, we show that adsorption of some monolayers of carbon on top of the Mn5Ge3 surface prior to Ge deposition allows to greatly reduce Mn segregation. In addition, a fraction of deposited carbon can diffuse down to the underneath Mn5Ge3 layers, resulting in an enhancement of the Curie temperature up to ˜360 K. The obtained results will be discussed in terms of the formation of a diffusion barrier by filling interstitial sites of Mn5Ge3 by carbon.

  6. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities. PMID:26367247

  7. DNA adsorption onto calcium aluminate and silicate glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Krista; Flick, Lisa; Hall, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A common technique for small-scale isolation of genomic DNA is via adsorption of the DNA molecules onto a silica scaffold. In this work, the isolation capacities of calcium aluminate based glasses were compared against a commercially available silica scaffold. Silica scaffolds exhibit a negative surface at the physiological pH values used during DNA isolation (pH 5-9), while the calcium aluminate glass microspheres exhibit a positive surface charge. Isolation data demonstrates that the positively charged surface enhanced DNA adsorption over the negatively charged surface. DNA was eluted from the calcium aluminate surface by shifting the pH of the solution to above its IEP at pH 8. Iron additions to the calcium aluminate glass improved the chemical durability without compromising the surface charge. Morphology of the glass substrate was also found to affect DNA isolation; 43-106 μm diameter soda lime silicate microspheres adsorbed a greater quantity of genomic DNA than silica fibers with an average diameter of ∼2 μm. PMID:24309135

  8. Water adsorption on etched hydrophobic surfaces of L-, D- and DL-valine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, J. J.; Verdaguer, A.; Fraxedas, J.

    2014-03-01

    The adsorption of water on etched (001) surfaces of L-, D- and DL-valine crystals has been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) using different operational modes (contact, non-contact and electrostatic) above and below the dew point, the temperature at which water vapor from humid air condenses into liquid water at constant atmospheric pressure. The analysis of the images suggests the formation of aggregates of solvated valine molecules that easily diffuse on the hydrophobic terraces only constrained by step barriers of the well-defined chiral parallelepipedic patterns induced by the etching process.

  9. Defect-Mediated Lithium Adsorption and Diffusion on Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Y Q

    2015-01-01

    Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its high capacities. In this work, first principle calculations based on spin density functional theory were performed to investigate adsorption and diffusion of lithium on monolayer MoS2 with defects, such as single- and few-atom vacancies, antisite, and grain boundary. The values of adsorption energies on the monolayer MoS2 with the defects were increased compared to those on the pristine MoS2. The presence of defects causes that the Li is strongly bound to the monolayer MoS2 with adsorption energies in the range between 2.81 and 3.80 eV. The donation of Li 2s electron to the defects causes an enhancement of adsorption of Li on the monolayer MoS2. At the same time, the presence of defects does not apparently affect the diffusion of Li, and the energy barriers are in the range of 0.25-0.42 eV. The presence of the defects can enhance the energy storage capacity, suggesting that the monolayer MoS2 with defects is a suitable anode material for the Li-ion batteries. PMID:26692345

  10. Experimental and Numerical Simulation of Water Vapor Adsorption and Diffusion in Shale Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Cihan, A.; Wan, J.; Zheng, L.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in deep horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have lead to large increases in production from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. Despite the success of this technology, uncertainties associated with basic transport processes require understanding in order to improve efficiency and minimize environmental impacts. The hydraulic fracturing process introduces large volumes of water into shale gas reservoirs. Most of the fracturing water remains in reservoirs to interfere with gas production. The quantification of the amount of water retained in shale gas reservoirs is crucial for predicting gas shale formation productivity and for optimizing extraction conditions. In this study, water vapor adsorption isotherms were gravimetrically measured on granular fractions of Woodford formation shales sieved after crushing. The isotherms were obtained at 30℃ and 50℃, for relative humidities from 11.1% to 97.0%. Water adsorption in these shale grains conformed to the typeⅡisotherm, and were nearly identical for the two experimental temperatures. In order to better understand the isotherms, a computational model based on the Maxwell-Stefan Diffusion equations (MSDM) was constructed to analyze the water adsorption and gas diffusion in shale grains. Based on the experimental results, the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) isotherm model for gas adsorption was included in the model.

  11. Defect-Mediated Lithium Adsorption and Diffusion on Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Y. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its high capacities. In this work, first principle calculations based on spin density functional theory were performed to investigate adsorption and diffusion of lithium on monolayer MoS2 with defects, such as single- and few-atom vacancies, antisite, and grain boundary. The values of adsorption energies on the monolayer MoS2 with the defects were increased compared to those on the pristine MoS2. The presence of defects causes that the Li is strongly bound to the monolayer MoS2 with adsorption energies in the range between 2.81 and 3.80 eV. The donation of Li 2s electron to the defects causes an enhancement of adsorption of Li on the monolayer MoS2. At the same time, the presence of defects does not apparently affect the diffusion of Li, and the energy barriers are in the range of 0.25–0.42 eV. The presence of the defects can enhance the energy storage capacity, suggesting that the monolayer MoS2 with defects is a suitable anode material for the Li-ion batteries. PMID:26692345

  12. Defect-Mediated Lithium Adsorption and Diffusion on Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Y. Q.

    2015-12-01

    Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its high capacities. In this work, first principle calculations based on spin density functional theory were performed to investigate adsorption and diffusion of lithium on monolayer MoS2 with defects, such as single- and few-atom vacancies, antisite, and grain boundary. The values of adsorption energies on the monolayer MoS2 with the defects were increased compared to those on the pristine MoS2. The presence of defects causes that the Li is strongly bound to the monolayer MoS2 with adsorption energies in the range between 2.81 and 3.80 eV. The donation of Li 2s electron to the defects causes an enhancement of adsorption of Li on the monolayer MoS2. At the same time, the presence of defects does not apparently affect the diffusion of Li, and the energy barriers are in the range of 0.25-0.42 eV. The presence of the defects can enhance the energy storage capacity, suggesting that the monolayer MoS2 with defects is a suitable anode material for the Li-ion batteries.

  13. Diffusion of silver over atomically clean silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Ol'shanetskii, B. Z.

    2013-06-15

    The diffusion of silver the (111), (100), and (110) silicon surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The mechanisms of diffusion over the (111) and (110) surfaces are revealed, and the temperature dependences of diffusion coefficients are measured. An anisotropy of silver diffusion over the (110) surface is detected.

  14. Numerical Computation of Diffusion on a Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Peter; Adalsteinsson, David; Colella, Phillip; Arkin, Adam Paul; Onsum, Matthew

    2005-02-24

    We present a numerical method for computing diffusive transport on a surface derived from image data. Our underlying discretization method uses a Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for computing the volume transport in region consisting of all points a small distance from the surface. We obtain a representation of this region from image data using a front propagation computation based on level set methods for solving the Hamilton-Jacobi and eikonal equations. We demonstrate that the method is second-order accurate in space and time, and is capable of computing solutions on complex surface geometries obtained from image data of cells.

  15. Zinc isotope fractionation during surface adsorption by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafantaris, F. A.; Borrok, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The cycling and transport of zinc (Zn) in natural waters is partly controlled by its adsorption and uptake by bacterial communities. These reactions are reflected in changes in the ratios of stable Zn isotopes; however, the magnitudes and directions of these changes are largely unconstrained. In the current work, we attempt to define Zn isotope fractionation factors for bacteria-Zn interactions by performing adsorption experiments with representative Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas mendocina) bacteria. Experiments included, (1) pH-dependent adsorption using differing bacteria:Zn ratios, (2) Zn loading at constant pH, and (3) kinetics and reversibility experiments. Results indicate that Zn adsorption is fully reversible for both bacterial species. Moreover, under the same experimental conditions both bacterial species adsorbed Zn to similar extents. Initial isotopic analysis (using a Nu Instruments MC-ICP-MS) demonstrates that, as the extent of adsorption increases, the heavier Zn isotopes are preferentially incorporated as bacterial-surface complexes. Under conditions of low bacteria:Zn ratio, the Δ66Znbacteria-solution was about 0.3% for both bacterial species. This separation factor is similar to that found in other studies involving the complexation of Zn with biologic or organic components. For example, the complexation of Zn with Purified Humic Acid (PHA) resulted in a Δ66ZnPHA-solution of +0.24% [1], and sorption of Zn onto two separate diatom species resulted in Δ66Znsolid-solution of +0.43% and +0.27%, respectively [2]. These results suggest that Zn complexation with functional groups common to bacteria and natural organic matter may be a process that universally incorporates the heavier Zn isotopes. Our current work is focused on quantifying Zn isotope fractionation during metabolic incorporation by separating this effect from surface adsorption reactions. [1] Jouvin et al., (2009) Environ. Sci. Technol., 43(15) 5747

  16. Halogens on Semiconductor Surfaces: Adsorption, Oxidation, and Etching.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepniak, Frank

    This dissertation presents studies of Si, GaAs, and InP surfaces following exposure to the halogens Cl _2 and Br_2. Synchrotron radiation photoemission is used to investigate the oxidation states of Si near the Si/SiO_2 interface as a function of Cl_2 exposure. Oxidation of highly ordered surfaces shows no dependence of the oxidation state concentration on Cl_2 inclusion in the gas mixture. For less-than-ideal Si surfaces, oxidation with O_2 -only results in a broader transition region, and presumably, inferior electrical properties. The addition of Cl_2 in the oxidizing gas reduced the concentration of intermediate oxides by a factor of two for these disordered starting Si surfaces. A new feature is also measured from Cl-Si bonds that we associate with passivation of Si defects at the oxide interface. The adsorption and reactivity of Br_2 and Cl_2 on GaAs(110) and InP(110) was studied in the temperature range of 25 K < T < 625 K with photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Initial halogen adsorption was dissociative at all temperatures and we find that a simple model where the halogen atoms bond to a single Ga or As surface site can not account for the complex surface chemistry and morphology. Thermally-activated etching was observed after warming a surface with chemisorbed Br or Cl. Etching resulted from the formation and eventual temperature dependent desorption of the trihalides of Ga and As. For halogen exposures where T < 650 K, monohalide-like surface bonding persist during the etching process and the etched surface is rough. For T > 700 K, the surface is essentially free of halogen and etching occurs in a nearly layer-by-layer fashion.

  17. Diffusing colloidal probes of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-25

    Measurements and analyses are reported to quantify dynamic and equilibrium interactions between colloidal particles and live cell surfaces using dark field video microscopy. Two-dimensional trajectories of micron-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated silica colloids relative to adherent epithelial breast cancer cell perimeters are determined allowing measurement of position dependent diffusivities and interaction potentials. PEG was chosen as the material system of interest to assess non-specific interactions with cell surfaces and establishes a basis for investigation of specific interactions in future studies. Analysis of measured potential energies on cell surfaces reveals the spatial dependence in cell topography. With the measured cell topography and models for particle-cell surface hydrodynamic interactions, excellent agreement is obtained between theoretical and measured colloidal transport on cell surfaces. Quantitative analyses of association lifetimes showed that PEG coatings act to stabilize colloids above the cell surface through net repulsive, steric interactions. Our results demonstrate a self-consistent analysis of diffusing colloidal probe interactions due to conservative and non-conservative forces to characterize biophysical cell surface properties. PMID:27117575

  18. Surface diffusion of xenon on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, D. Laurence; George, Steven M.

    1993-06-01

    The surface diffusion of xenon on the Pt(111) surface was investigated using laser induced thermal desorption (LITD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. The surface diffusion coefficient at 80 K decreased dramatically from D=8×10-7 cm2/s at θ=0.05θs to approximately D=2×10-8 cm2/s at θ=θs, where θs denotes the saturation coverage at 85 K, corresponding to a commensurate monolayer coverage of 5.0×1014 xenon atoms/cm2. This coverage dependence was consistent with attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms and the existence of two-dimensional condensed phases of xenon on Pt(111). The kinetic parameters for surface diffusion at θ=θs were Edif=1.3±0.1 kcal/mol and D0=1.1×10-4±0.2 cm2/s. The magnitude of Edif at θ=θs represented the combined effect of the intrinsic corrugation of the adsorbate-surface potential and attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms. LITD experiments at θ=0.25 θs revealed diffusion kinetic parameters of Edif=1.2±0.2 kcal/mol and D0=3.4×10-4±0.5 cm2/s. The constant Edif at low and high coverage was attributed to the ``breakaway'' of xenon atoms from the edges of condensed phase xenon islands. The coverage dependence of the surface diffusion coefficient for Xe/Pt(111) was explained by a multiple site diffusion mechanism, where collisions with xenon islands limit diffusional motion. Thermal desorption kinetics for xenon on Pt(111) were determined using TPD experiments. Using the variation of heating rates method, the desorption parameters were Edes=6.6±0.2 kcal/mol and νdes=1.3×1013±0.4 s-1, in good agreement with previous studies. The xenon TPD peak shifted to higher temperature versus initial coverage at a fixed heating rate, providing further evidence for attractive interactions between the adsorbed xenon atoms.

  19. Pretreatment of amphiphilic comb polymer surfaces dramatically affects protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanping; Ma, Hongwei; Hausner, Douglas B; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Beebe, Thomas P

    2005-01-01

    New applications in regenerative biotechnology require the ability to understand and control protein-surface interactions on micrometer and submicrometer length scales. Evidence presented here shows that micropatterned amphiphilic comb polymer films exhibit a pretreatment-dependent behavior with respect to protein adsorption for the proteins fibronectin, laminin, and for serum. A micropatterned surface, consisting of protein-reactive regions, separated by comb polymer, was created and tested for protein adsorption using the surface-sensitive imaging tool TOF-SIMS. Immersion of micropatterned surfaces in solutions of fibronectin or laminin resulted in uniform protein coverage on both the comb polymer and protein-reactive regions. However, preimmersion of similarly patterned surfaces in water for 2 h prior to protein incubation was found to dramatically improve the protein-resistant properties of the comb polymer regions. These results are consistent with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chain reorientation and/or hydration and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) backbone segregation away from the interface region. PMID:16283770

  20. Adsorption of surfactant-rich stickies onto mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Christopher M; Matthews, G Peter; Gantenbein, Daniel; Turner, Andrew; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick A C

    2010-12-15

    "Stickies" are tacky species, present in recycled paper and coated broke, derived from coating formulations, adhesives etc. They impact negatively on paper quality and cause web runnability problems by deposit build-up. To sustain recycling, stickies are controlled by adsorbing them onto minerals added to the recycled stock. We report isotherms for a fatty acid ester defoamer and an acrylic acid ester copolymer adsorbing from colloidal suspension onto various talcs and modified calcium carbonates. We used commercial preparations of the fatty acid ester defoamer and acrylic acid ester copolymer to provide a simple analogue to the industrial process. The modified calcium carbonates are hydrophilic with anionic and cationic sites present. Adsorption isotherms for low surface area modified calcium carbonate conform to the Langmuir model, while those for high surface area modified calcium carbonate reflect a two stage process involving the formation of a monolayer over the mineral surface and subsequent partial aggregation. Talc platelets display hydrophilic edges and hydrophobic surfaces. Adsorption onto them appears to involve three stages; specifically, a hydrophilic interaction between hydrophilic groups on the molecules and the talc edges, followed by hydrophobic interactions between the molecules and the talc surfaces, and finally by formation of multilayers. PMID:20850132

  1. VIRUS ADSORPTION TO MINERAL SURFACES IS REDUCED BY MICROBIAL OVERGROWTH AND ORGANIC COATINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In experiments with strains of poliovirus, reovirus, echovirus and Coxsackievirus, overgrowth with exopolymer-forming bacteria reduced virus adsorption to mineral surfaces. Adsorption was improved when organic materials adsorbed to minerals were removed by low-temperature ashing....

  2. Surface Diffusion of Single Polymer Chain Using Molecular Dynamics SIMULATION*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Tapan; Keblinski, Pawel; Kumar, Sanat; Granick, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Results of recent experiments on polymer chains adsorbed from dilute solution at solid-liquid interface show the power scaling law dependence of the chain diffusivity, D, as a function of the degree of polymerization, N, D ˜ N^3/2. By contrast, DNA molecules bound to fluid cationic lipid bilayers follows Rouse dynamics with D ˜ N^1. We used molecular dynamics simulations to gain an understanding of these dissimilar scaling behaviors. Our model systems contain chains comprised of N monomers connected by anharmonic springs described by the finite extendible nonlinear elastic, FENE potential, embedded into a solvent of N=1 monomers. Two types of simulations we performed: (i) the chain is confined to two dimensions, (ii) the three dimensional chain in the solvent is confined between two solids plates. With randomly placed impenetrable obstacles on the surface, the diffusion of 2D chains exhibits, D ˜ N^3/2 behavior, when the chain radius of gyration, Rg, is larger than half the distance between obstacles, and D ˜ N^1 for shorter chains. In the presence of an athermal solvent, the scaling exponent is 0.75 due to hydrodynamic forces, for the two-dimensional system. We will also discuss the nature of dynamic adsorption transition and effects of hydrodynamics forces on chain diffusion for the three-dimensional simulations.

  3. Polymer adsorption on platinum: surface coverage determination using iodide-125. [Polyethylene glycol terephthalate

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, T.M.; Van de Mark, M.R.; mi, FL

    1981-10-01

    Adsorption of iodide-125, a ..gamma.. emitter, was used as a quantitative methodology for polymer adsorption surface coverage analysis. Adsorption of I-125 on clean platinum produced surface elemental ratios of I:Pt of 1:4. The technique was applied to the adsorption of polyethylene glycol terephthalate from trifluoroacetic acid on platinum flags with a 2-cm/sup 2/ surface area. This polymer adsorption is approximated by a logarithmic relationship similar to the Temkin isotherm. Polymer coverage attained up to 99.6% of the surface.

  4. Polyamide-thallium selenide composite materials via temperature and pH controlled adsorption-diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanauskas, Remigijus; Samardokas, Linas; Mikolajunas, Marius; Virzonis, Darius; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2014-10-01

    Composite materials based on III-VI elements are promising in designing efficient photoelectronic devices, such as thin film organic-inorganic solar cells. In this work, TlSe composite materials were synthesized on a model polymer polyamide using temperature and pH controlled adsorption-diffusion method via (a) selenization followed by (b) the exposure to the group III metal (Tl) salt solution and their surface morphological, chemical and crystalline phase information was determined with particular focus on their corresponding structure-optical property relationship. XRD analysis yielded a complex crystalline phase distribution which correlated well with the optical and surface morphological properties measured. pH 11.3 and 80 °C yielded well defined, low structural disorder composite material surface. After annealing in N2 at 100 °C, polycrystalline PA-TlxSey composite materials yielded a single TlSe phase due to the enhanced diffusion and reaction of thallium ions into the polymer. The method described here can be used to synthesize variety of binary III-VI compounds diffused into the polymer at relatively low temperatures and low overall cost, thus providing for a flexible synthesis route for novel composite solar energy harvesting materials.

  5. Molecular Simulations of Adsorption and Diffusion of RDX in IRMOF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Xong, Ruichang Xong; Fern, Jared T.; Keffer, David J.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Nicholson, Don M

    2009-01-01

    In order to test the feasibility of using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to pre-concentrate explosive molecules for detection, molecular simulations of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) within IRMOF-1 were performed. Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used to generate adsorption isotherms for pure RDX, RDX in dry air, and RDX in wet air. In addition to the isotherms, the GCMC simulations provide adsorption energies and density distributions of the adsorbates within the MOF. Molecular dynamics simulations calculate diffusivities and provide a detailed understanding of the change in conformation of the RDX molecule upon adsorption. The presence of dry air has little influence on the amount of RDX that adsorbs. The presence of wet air increases the amount of RDX that adsorbs due to favorable interactions between RDX and water. We found a Henry's law constant of 21.2 mol/kg/bar for both pure RDX and RDX in dry air. The RDX adsorption sites are located (i) in big cages, (ii) near a vertex, and (iii) between benzene rings. The energy of adsorption of RDX at infinite dilution was found to be - 9.2 kcal/mol. The distributions of bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles in RDX are uniformly slightly broader in the gas phase than in the adsorbed phase, but not markedly so. The self-diffusivity of RDX in IRMOF-1 is a strong function of temperature, with an activation energy of 6.0 kcal/mol.

  6. Silver diffusion over silicon surfaces with adsorbed tin atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Olshanetskii, B. Z.

    2015-02-15

    Silver diffusion over the (111), (100), and (110) surfaces of silicon with preliminarily adsorbed tin atoms is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Diffusion is observed only on the surface of Si(111)-2√3 × 2√3-Sn. The diffusion mechanism is established. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends on the concentration of diffusing atoms. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing silver concentration, while the activation energy and the preexponential factor increase.

  7. Surface modification by subsurface pressure induced diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Claus G.

    2012-01-23

    Polycrystalline Ag, covered with a nm thin siloxane layer, was irradiated with ultraviolet light in vacuum at 500 K. Ag particles of different aspect ratios, 50-1000 nm in size, formed on the surface, including a small fraction of nanorods. Pressurized water vapor bubbles are created in the subsurface region by hydrogen radicals photo-chemically released by the siloxane layer. They provide the driving force for a diffusive material flux along grain boundaries to the surface. This mechanism was modeled and found to agree with the experimental timescale: approximately 300 h are required for a 1000 nm particle to form.

  8. A framework to analyze cerebral mean diffusivity using surface guided diffusion mapping in diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Sang-Won; Na, Duk L.; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The mean diffusivity (MD) value has been used to describe microstructural properties in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in cortical gray matter (GM). Recently, researchers have applied a cortical surface generated from the T1-weighted volume. When the DTI data are analyzed using the cortical surface, it is important to assign an accurate MD value from the volume space to the vertex of the cortical surface, considering the anatomical correspondence between the DTI and the T1-weighted image. Previous studies usually sampled the MD value using the nearest-neighbor (NN) method or Linear method, even though there are geometric distortions in diffusion-weighted volumes. Here we introduce a Surface Guided Diffusion Mapping (SGDM) method to compensate for such geometric distortions. We compared our SGDM method with results using NN and Linear methods by investigating differences in the sampled MD value. We also projected the tissue classification results of non-diffusion-weighted volumes to the cortical midsurface. The CSF probability values provided by the SGDM method were lower than those produced by the NN and Linear methods. The MD values provided by the NN and Linear methods were significantly greater than those of the SGDM method in regions suffering from geometric distortion. These results indicate that the NN and Linear methods assigned the MD value in the CSF region to the cortical midsurface (GM region). Our results suggest that the SGDM method is an effective way to correct such mapping errors. PMID:26236180

  9. Diffusion-limited aggregation on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Crowdy, D.; Bazant, M. Z.

    2010-08-01

    We develop a general theory of transport-limited aggregation phenomena occurring on curved surfaces, based on stochastic iterated conformal maps and conformal projections to the complex plane. To illustrate the theory, we use stereographic projections to simulate diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on surfaces of constant Gaussian curvature, including the sphere (K>0) and the pseudo-sphere (K<0), which approximate "bumps" and "saddles" in smooth surfaces, respectively. Although the curvature affects the global morphology of the aggregates, the fractal dimension (in the curved metric) is remarkably insensitive to curvature, as long as the particle size is much smaller than the radius of curvature. We conjecture that all aggregates grown by conformally invariant transport on curved surfaces have the same fractal dimension as DLA in the plane. Our simulations suggest, however, that the multifractal dimensions increase from hyperbolic (K<0) to elliptic (K>0) geometry, which we attribute to curvature-dependent screening of tip branching.

  10. Effects of CO/CO2/NO on elemental lead adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhengyang; Yang, Weijie

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption processes of elemental lead on carbonaceous surfaces which adsorbed CO/CO2/NO flue gases were investigated to understand the effects of CO/CO2/NO on elemental lead adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces with density functional theory. All calculations including optimizations, energies, and frequencies were conducted at B3PW91 density functional theory level, utilizing SDD basis set for lead and 6-31G(d) Pople basis set for other atoms. The results indicate that CO, CO2, and NO can promote the adsorption of elemental lead on the carbonaceous surface, but probably compete for adsorption sites with elemental lead. The promotion effects on adsorption can be attributed to active sites on the carbonaceous surface rather than flue gas adsorption on the carbonaceous surface. In addition, the adsorption order of three kinds of flue gas on the carbonaceous surface is CO2 > NO > CO > Pb on average. Furthermore, the enhancement order of three kinds of flue gas on the elemental lead adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces is CO-CS > CO2-CS > NO-CS > CS in general. In particular, atomic charge and adsorption energy have good linear relationship in the process of elemental lead adsorption. Graphical Abstract Competitive adsorption between flue gas and elemental lead on carbonaceous surfaces. PMID:27342251

  11. Bovine serum albumin adsorption on functionalized porous silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Li-Lin; Rowell, Nelson L.; Lockwood, David J.; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2004-10-01

    The large surface area within porous Si (pSi) and its strong room temperature photoluminescence (PL) make it an ideal host for biological sensors. In particular, the development of pSi-based optical sensors for DNA, enzyme and other biochemical molecules have become of great interest. Here, we demonstrate that the in-situ monitoring of the pSi PL behaviour can be used as a positive identification of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein adsorption inside the porous matrix. Electrochemically prepared pSi films were first functionalized with undecylenic acid to produce an organic monolayer covalently attached to the porous silicon surfaces. The acid terminal group also provided favourable BSA binding sites on the pSi matrix sidewalls. In-situ PL spectra showed a gradual red shift (up to 12 meV) in the PL peak energy due to the protein incorporation into the porous matrix. The PL then exhibited a continuous blue shift after saturation of the protein molecules in the pores. This blue shift of the PL peak frequency and a steady increase in the PL intensity is evidence of surface oxidation. Comparing the specular reflectance obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) before and after BSA incubation confirmed the adsorption of protein in the pSi matrix.

  12. Fibronectin adsorption, cell adhesion, and proliferation on nanostructured tantalum surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Jensen, T; Kraft, David Christian; Foss, Morten; Kingshott, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Chevallier, Jacques; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2010-05-25

    The interaction between dental pulp derived mesenchymal stem cells (DP-MSCs) and three different tantalum nanotopographies with and without a fibronectin coating is examined: sputter-coated tantalum surfaces with low surface roughness <0.2 nm, hut-nanostructured surfaces with a height of 2.9 +/- 0.6 nm and a width of 35 +/- 8 nm, and dome structures with a height of 13 +/- 2 nm and a width of 52 +/- 14 nm. Using ellipsometry, the adsorption and the availability of fibronectin cell-binding domains on the tantalum surfaces were examined, as well as cellular attachment, proliferation, and vinculin focal adhesion spot assembly on the respective surfaces. The results showed the highest fibronectin mass uptake on the hut structures, with a slightly higher availability of cell-binding domains and the most pronounced formation of vinculin focal adhesion spots as compared to the other surfaces. The proliferation of DP-MSCs was found to be significantly higher on dome and hut surfaces coated with fibronectin compared to the uncoated flat tantalum surfaces. Consequently, the results presented in this study indicate that fibronectin-coated nanotopographies with a vertical dimension of less than 5 nm influence cell adhesion. This rather interesting behavior is argued to originate from the more available fibronectin cell-binding domains observed on the hut structures. PMID:20443575

  13. Study of DNA adsorption on mica surfaces using a surface force apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Yajing; Tan, Qiyan; Wu, Gensheng; Si, Wei; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-02-01

    We report our studies on the adsorption properties of double-stranded DNA molecules on mica surfaces in a confined environment using a surface force apparatus. Specifically, we studied the influence of cation species and concentrations on DNA adsorption properties. Our results indicated that divalent cations (Mg2+ and Co2+) preferred to form uniform and moderately dense DNA layers on a mica substrate. By measuring the interactions between DNA-coated mica and bare mica in an aqueous solution, obvious adhesion was observed in a cobalt chloride solution, possibly due to the ion-correlation attraction between negatively charged DNA and the mica surface. Furthermore, the interaction differences that were observed with MgCl2 and CoCl2 solutions reveal that the specific adsorption behaviors of DNA molecules on a mica substrate were mediated by these two salts. Our results are helpful to elucidate the dynamics of DNA binding on a solid substrate.

  14. Surface modifications by field induced diffusion.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Martin; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    By applying a voltage pulse to a scanning tunneling microscope tip the surface under the tip will be modified. We have in this paper taken a closer look at the model of electric field induced surface diffusion of adatoms including the van der Waals force as a contribution in formations of a mound on a surface. The dipole moment of an adatom is the sum of the surface induced dipole moment (which is constant) and the dipole moment due to electric field polarisation which depends on the strength and polarity of the electric field. The electric field is analytically modelled by a point charge over an infinite conducting flat surface. From this we calculate the force that cause adatoms to migrate. The calculated force is small for voltage used, typical 1 pN, but due to thermal vibration adatoms are hopping on the surface and even a small net force can be significant in the drift of adatoms. In this way we obtain a novel formula for a polarity dependent threshold voltage for mound formation on the surface for positive tip. Knowing the voltage of the pulse we then can calculate the radius of the formed mound. A threshold electric field for mound formation of about 2 V/nm is calculated. In addition, we found that van der Waals force is of importance for shorter distances and its contribution to the radial force on the adatoms has to be considered for distances smaller than 1.5 nm for commonly used voltages. PMID:22253894

  15. Surface Modifications by Field Induced Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Martin; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    By applying a voltage pulse to a scanning tunneling microscope tip the surface under the tip will be modified. We have in this paper taken a closer look at the model of electric field induced surface diffusion of adatoms including the van der Waals force as a contribution in formations of a mound on a surface. The dipole moment of an adatom is the sum of the surface induced dipole moment (which is constant) and the dipole moment due to electric field polarisation which depends on the strength and polarity of the electric field. The electric field is analytically modelled by a point charge over an infinite conducting flat surface. From this we calculate the force that cause adatoms to migrate. The calculated force is small for voltage used, typical 1 pN, but due to thermal vibration adatoms are hopping on the surface and even a small net force can be significant in the drift of adatoms. In this way we obtain a novel formula for a polarity dependent threshold voltage for mound formation on the surface for positive tip. Knowing the voltage of the pulse we then can calculate the radius of the formed mound. A threshold electric field for mound formation of about 2 V/nm is calculated. In addition, we found that van der Waals force is of importance for shorter distances and its contribution to the radial force on the adatoms has to be considered for distances smaller than 1.5 nm for commonly used voltages. PMID:22253894

  16. Adsorption of annealed branched polymers on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Jef; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya

    2015-12-01

    The behavior of annealed branched polymers near adsorbing surfaces plays a fundamental role in many biological and industrial processes. Most importantly single stranded RNA in solution tends to fold up and self-bind to form a highly branched structure. Using a mean field theory, we both perturbatively and numerically examine the adsorption of branched polymers on surfaces of several different geometries in a good solvent. Independent of the geometry of the wall, we observe that as branching density increases, surface tension decreases. However, we find a coupling between the branching density and curvature in that a further lowering of surface tension occurs when the wall curves towards the polymer, but the amount of lowering of surface tension decreases when the wall curves away from the polymer. We find that for branched polymers confined into spherical cavities, most of branch-points are located in the vicinity of the interior wall and the surface tension is minimized for a critical cavity radius. For branch polymers next to sinusoidal surfaces, we find that branch-points accumulate at the valleys while end-points on the peaks.

  17. Sulfate adsorption and surface precipitation on a volcanic ash soil (allophanic andisol).

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Munehide; Makino, Tomoyuki; Hattori, Yasunobu

    2006-08-15

    Sulfate strongly adsorbs on metal oxides and soils with variable charges. However, its surface precipitation has not been clearly evaluated and its adsorption mechanism has been in dispute. In the present study, an allophanic andisol, a typical volcanic ash soil having both negative and positive variable charges, was used to identify the adsorption mechanism of sulfate. Sulfate adsorption isotherms were obtained by a batch method at pH values of 4, 5, 6, and 7 in a wide range of concentrations in an Na-H-SO(4)-OH system. Theoretical isotherms were applied to the measured values for the evaluation. The surface precipitation was detected by the measured adsorption isotherms, and the BET isotherm confirmed the presence of multilayer adsorption. Stronger and weaker adsorption sites were suggested by using the Langmuir isotherm for the monolayer adsorption. The adsorption energies obtained from the Langmuir equation and recent spectroscopic analysis suggested that the stronger adsorption corresponded to an inner-sphere surface complex and that the weaker adsorption corresponded to outer-sphere surface complexation. The BET and Langmuir equations showed three types of adsorption mechanisms for the sulfate adsorption on the soil. PMID:16750540

  18. Adsorption study of antibiotics on silver nanoparticle surfaces by surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueiras, Aline Luciano; Paschoal, Diego; Dos Santos, Hélio F.; Sant'Ana, Antonio C.

    2015-02-01

    In this work the adsorption of the antibiotics levofloxacin (LV), tetracycline (TC) and benzylpenicillin (BP) on the surface of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have been investigated through both surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopies. The SERS spectra were obtained using 1064 nm exciting radiation. Theoretical models for the antibiotic molecules were obtained from DFT calculations, and used in the vibrational assignment. The adsorption geometries were proposed based on the changes in the spectral patterns. The LV compound adsorbs through carboxylate group, TC compound interacts with silver atoms through carbonyl from intermediate ring, and BP compound adsorbs by carbonyl moieties from carboxylate and acyclic amide.

  19. Enhanced Li adsorption and diffusion in single-walled silicon nanotubes: an ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Kulish, Vadym V; Ng, Man-Fai; Malyi, Oleksandr I; Wu, Ping; Chen, Zhong

    2013-04-15

    We report a first-principles investigation of Li adsorption and diffusion in single-walled Si nanotubes (SWSiNTs) of interest to Li-ion battery anodes. We calculate Li insertion characteristics in SWSiNTs and compare them with the respective ones in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and other silicon nanostructures. From our calculations, SWSiNTs show higher reactivity toward the adsorption of Li adatoms than CNTs and Si nanoclusters. Considering the importance of Li kinetics, we demonstrate that the interior of SWSiNTs may serve as a fast Li diffusion channel. The important advantage of SWSiNTs over their carbon analogues is a sevenfold reduction in the energy barrier for the penetration of the Li atoms into the nanotube interior through the sidewalls. This prepossesses easier Li diffusion inside the tube and subsequent utilization of the interior sites, which enhances Li storage capacity of the system. The improvements in both Li uptake and Li mobility over their analogues support the great potential of SWSiNTs as Li-ion battery anodes. PMID:23564742

  20. Two-scale modeling of adsorption processes at structured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, Julia; de Cuba, Maria Radke; Gemming, Sibylle; Emmerich, Heike

    2009-01-01

    We present an algorithm for the simulation of vicinal surface growth. It combines a lattice gas anisotropic Ising model with a phase-field model. The molecular behavior of individual adatoms is described by the lattice gas model. The microstructure dynamics on the vicinal surface are calculated using the phase-field method. In this way, adsorption processes on two different length scales can be described: nucleation processes on the terraces (lattice gas model) and step-flow growth (phase field model). The hybrid algorithm that is proposed here, is therefore able to describe an epitaxial layer-by-layer growth controlled by temperature and by deposition rate. This method is faster than kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and can take into account the stochastic processes in a comparable way.

  1. The influence of surface adsorption on microbubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stride, E

    2008-06-28

    In a pure liquid, the behaviour of a gas or vapour microbubble is determined primarily by its size, the ambient pressure and the properties of the surrounding liquid. In practice, however, adsorption of a dissolved substance from the surrounding liquid onto the microbubble surface will often take place, producing a thin coating which can significantly affect both the microbubble's stability and its dynamic response. This can have important implications in a wide range of applications, including underwater acoustics, cavitation detection, medical imaging and drug delivery. The aim of this paper is to review the existing theoretical treatments of coated microbubbles and to present and discuss some recent developments. It will be shown that the presence of the coating can substantially modify the amplitude of microbubble volumetric oscillation, resonance characteristics and relative amplitude in tension and compression. Finally, the need for improved understanding of the dynamic behaviour of surface coatings at high frequencies will be discussed. PMID:18348975

  2. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion around Si(0 0 1)/Si(1 1 0) corners in nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard; Brázdová, Veronika; Bowler, David R

    2014-07-23

    While the diffusion of hydrogen on silicon surfaces has been relatively well characterized, both experimentally and theoretically, diffusion around corners between surfaces, as will be found on nanowires and nanostructures, has not been studied. Motivated by nanostructure fabrication by Patterned Atomic Layer Epitaxy, we present a density functional theory study of the diffusion of hydrogen around the edge formed by the orthogonal (0 0 1) and (1 1 0) surfaces in silicon. We find that the barrier from (0 0 1) to (1 1 0) is approximately 0.3 eV lower than from (1 1 0) to (0 0 1), and that it is comparable to diffusion between rows on a clean surface, with no significant effect on the hydrogen patterns at the growth temperatures used. PMID:24957137

  3. Adsorption of ethanol and water on calcite: dependence on surface geometry and effect on surface behavior.

    PubMed

    Keller, K S; Olsson, M H M; Yang, M; Stipp, S L S

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to explore adsorption on calcite, from a 1:1 mixture of ethanol and water, on planar {10.4} and stepped, i.e. vicinal, surfaces. Varying the surface geometry resulted in different adsorption patterns, which would directly influence the ability of ethanol to control calcite crystal growth, dissolution, and adsorption/desorption of other ions and molecules. Ethanol forms a well-ordered adsorbed layer on planar faces and on larger terraces, such as between steps and defects, providing little chance for water, with its weaker attachment, to displace it. However, on surfaces with steps, adsorption affinity depends on the length of the terraces between the steps. Long terraces allow ethanol to form a well-ordered, hydrophobic layer, but when step density is high, ethanol adsorption is less ordered, allowing water to associate at and near the steps and even displacing pre-existing ethanol. Water adsorbed at steps forms mass transport pathways between the bulk solution and the solid surface. Our simulations confirm the growth inhibiting properties of ethanol, also explaining how certain crystal faces are more stabilized because of their surface geometry. The -O(H) functional group on ethanol forms tight bonds with calcite; the nonpolar, -CH3 ends, which point away from the surface, create a hydrophobic layer that changes surface charge, thus wettability, and partly protects calcite from precipitation and dissolution. These tricks could easily be adopted by biomineralizing organisms, allowing them to turn on and off crystal growth. They undoubtedly also play a role in the wetting properties of mineral surfaces in commercial CaCO3 manufacture, oil production, and contamination remediation. PMID:25790337

  4. Effect of grain size on uranium(VI) surface complexation kinetics and adsorption additivity.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M

    2011-07-15

    The contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption was studied using a sediment from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.053-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (<0.053 mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch and flow-cell experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms and kinetic uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. One important implication of this study is that grain-size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location. PMID:21648458

  5. Diffusion limited aggregation. The role of surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ruiz, Juan M.; Otálora, Fermín

    1991-11-01

    We present a growth model in which the hitting particles are able to diffuse to more stable growth sites in the perimeter of a cluster growing by diffusion limited aggregation. By tuning the diffusion path Ls, the morphological output - from disordered fractal to perfect single crystals - can be controlled. Instabilities appear when the mean length of the crystal faces Lf are greater than 2 Ls.

  6. Surface Properties of PEMFC Gas Diffusion Layers

    SciTech Connect

    WoodIII, David L; Rulison, Christopher; Borup, Rodney

    2010-01-01

    The wetting properties of PEMFC Gas Diffusion Layers (GDLs) were quantified by surface characterization measurements and modeling of material properties. Single-fiber contact-angle and surface energy (both Zisman and Owens-Wendt) data of a wide spectrum of GDL types is presented to delineate the effects of hydrophobic post-processing treatments. Modeling of the basic sessile-drop contact angle demonstrates that this value only gives a fraction of the total picture of interfacial wetting physics. Polar forces are shown to contribute 10-20 less than dispersive forces to the composite wetting of GDLs. Internal water contact angles obtained from Owens-Wendt analysis were measured at 13-19 higher than their single-fiber counterparts. An inverse relationship was found between internal contact angle and both Owens-Wendt surface energy and % polarity of the GDL. The most sophisticated PEMFC mathematical models use either experimentally measured capillary pressures or the standard Young-Laplace capillary-pressure equation. Based on the results of the Owens-Wendt analysis, an advancement to the Young-Laplace equation is proposed for use in these mathematical models, which utilizes only solid surface energies and fractional surface coverage of fluoropolymer. Capillary constants for the spectrum of analyzed GDLs are presented for the same purpose.

  7. Insights on finite size effects in ab initio study of CO adsorption and dissociation on Fe 110 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Aurab; Bouhali, Othmane; Mousseau, Normand; Becquart, Charlotte S.; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption and dissociation of hydrocarbons on metallic surfaces represent crucial steps on the path to carburization, eventually leading to dusting corrosion. While adsorption of CO molecules on Fe surface is a barrier-less exothermic process, this is not the case for the dissociation of CO into C and O adatoms and the diffusion of C beneath the surface that are found to be associated with large energy barriers. In practice, these barriers can be affected by numerous factors that combine to favour the CO-Fe reaction such as the abundance of CO and other hydrocarbons as well as the presence of structural defects. From a numerical point of view, studying these factors is challenging and a step-by-step approach is necessary to assess, in particular, the influence of the finite box size on the reaction parameters for adsorption and dissociation of CO on metal surfaces. Here, we use density functional theory (DFT) total energy calculations with the climbing-image nudged elastic band method to estimate the adsorption energies and dissociation barriers for different CO coverages with surface supercells of different sizes. We further compute the effect of periodic boundary condition for DFT calculations and find that the contribution from van der Waals interaction in the computation of adsorption parameters is important as they contribute to correcting the finite-size error in small systems. The dissociation process involves carbon insertion into the Fe surface causing a lattice deformation that requires a larger surface system for unrestricted relaxation. We show that, in the larger surface systems associated with dilute CO-coverages, C-insertion is energetically more favourable, leading to a significant decrease in the dissociation barrier. This observation suggests that a large surface system with dilute coverage is necessary for all similar metal-hydrocarbon reactions in order to study their fundamental electronic mechanisms, as an isolated phenomenon, free from

  8. Charge Regulation in the Electrical Double Layer: Ion Adsorption and Surface Interactions.

    PubMed

    Trefalt, Gregor; Behrens, Sven Holger; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-01-19

    Charge regulation in the electrical double layer has important implications for ion adsorption, interparticle forces, colloidal stability, and deposition phenomena. Although charge regulation generally receives little attention, its consequences can be major, especially when considering interactions between unequally charged surfaces. The present article discusses common approaches to quantify such phenomena, especially within classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory, and pinpoints numerous situations where a consideration of charge regulation is essential. For the interpretation of interaction energy profiles, we advocate the use of the constant regulation approximation, which summarizes the surface properties in terms of two quantities, namely, the diffuse layer potential and the regulation parameter. This description also captures some pronounced regulation effects observed in the presence of multivalent ions. PMID:26599980

  9. Adsorption of O on Mo(110) surface from first-principles calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yungang; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Ni, Jiening; Gao, Fei

    2009-01-01

    First-principles calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) have been performed to study O adsorption in on-surface and subsurface sites. For different coverages, hollow site is found to be the most stable on-surface adsorption site. The subsurface adsorption at the bare Mo surface is found unfavored. The most stable subsurface site, the tetrahedral site, has a higher adsorption energy than on-surface sites. The pre-adsorbed O overlayer reduces the adsorption energy of subsurface O atoms, particularly for the octahedral site at p(2×2) phase. Also, vibrational frequencies, work-function and density of states are presented for O adsorption in on-surface sites.

  10. Critical adsorption of copolymer tethered on selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Qian, Chang-Ji; Luo, Meng-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Critical adsorption behaviors of flexible copolymer chains tethered to a flat homogeneous surface are studied by using Monte Carlo simulations. We have compared the critical adsorption temperature Tc, estimated by a finite-size scaling method, for different AB copolymer sequences with A the attractive monomer and B the inert monomer. We find that Tc increases with an increase in the fraction of monomers A, fA, in copolymers, and it increases with an increase in the length of block A for the same fA. In particular, Tc of copolymer (AnBn)r can be expressed as a function of the block length, n, and Tc of copolymer (AnB)r and (ABm)r can be expressed as a linear function of fA. Tc of random copolymer chains also can be expressed as a linear function of fA and it can be estimated by using weight-average of Tc of different diblocks in the random copolymer. However, the crossover exponent is roughly independent of AB sequence distributions either for block copolymers or for random copolymers.

  11. Adsorption-desorption kinetics of soft particles onto surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osberg, Brendan; Gerland, Ulrich

    A broad range of physical, chemical, and biological systems feature processes in which particles randomly adsorb on a substrate. Theoretical models usually assume ``hard'' (mutually impenetrable) particles, but in soft matter physics the adsorbing particles can be effectively compressible, implying ``soft'' interaction potentials. We recently studied the kinetics of such soft particles adsorbing onto one-dimensional substrates, identifying three novel phenomena: (i) a gradual density increase, or ''cramming'', replaces the usual jamming behavior of hard particles, (ii) a density overshoot, can occur (only for soft particles) on a time scale set by the desorption rate, and (iii) relaxation rates of soft particles increase with particle size (on a lattice), while hard particles show the opposite trend. The latter occurs since unjamming requires desorption and many-bodied reorganization to equilibrate -a process that is generally very slow. Here we extend this analysis to a two-dimensional substrate, focusing on the question of whether the adsorption-desorption kinetics of particles in two dimensions is similarly enriched by the introduction of soft interactions. Application to experiments, for example the adsorption of fibrinogen on two-dimensional surfaces, will be discussed.

  12. Bacterial locomotion, adsorption and growth over chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Maryam; Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Complex dynamic interactions between bacteria and chemically patched interface that mimics the heterogeneous energy landscape of a real-life interfacial environment are studied in the paper. We explore effects of these spatially varying chemical patches on bacterial locomotion, adsorption, biofilm formation and the film growth rate. Using micro-fabrication and soft-lithography, we have fabricated PDMS microfluidic channels with a solid substrate covered by micro-scale chemical patches. Arrays of 2D geometries of characteristic scales varying from 10 to 50 μm are transferred onto a glass substrate by soft-lithography. The substrate is functionalized to generate alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions and bonded with the channel. The 3D swimming characteristics near these surfaces, such as swimming velocity, linear and angular dispersions, are measured in-situ using 3D digital holographic microscopy. The observations are used to examine the mechanisms involved in adsorption and desorption of swimming bacteria onto the substrate. Long-term experiments are conducted to quantify the growth rate and structures of colony. A correlation between various length scales of the substrate and bacteria motility are observed.

  13. Methanol adsorption on the clean CeO₂(111) surface: A density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Deskins, N. Aaron; Dupuis, Michel; Ge, Qingfeng

    2007-07-19

    Molecular and dissociative adsorption of methanol at various sites on the stoichiometric CeO₂(111) surface have been studied using density functional theory periodic calculations. At 0.25 monolayer (ML) coverage, the dissociative adsorption with an adsorption energy of 0.55 eV is slightly favored. The most stable state is the dissociative adsorption of methanol via C-H bond breaking, forming a coadsorbed hydroxymethyl group and hydrogen adatom on two separate O₃C surface sites. The strongest molecular adsorption occurs through an O-Ce₇subC connection with an adsorption energy of 0.48 eV. At methanol coverage of 0.5 ML, the dissociative adsorption and the molecular adsorption became competitive. The adsorption energy per methanol molecule for both adsorption modes falls into a narrow range of 0.46-0.55 eV. As methanol coverage increases beyond 0.5 ML, the molecular adsorption becomes more energetically favorable than the dissociative adsorption because of the attractive hydrogen bonding between coadsorbed methanol molecules. At full monolayer, the adsorption energy of molecular adsorption is 0.40 eV per molecule while the adsorption energy for total dissociative adsorption of methanol is only 0.17 eV. The results at different methanol coverages indicate that methanol can adsorb on a defect-free CeO₂(111) surface, which are also consistent with experimental observations. This research was performed using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington. Computing time was made available under a Computational Grand Challenge “Computational Catalysis”. This work also financially supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project of PNNL.

  14. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Study of Kinetics and Thermodynamics of IgG Adsorption on the Polystyrene Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Feng, Xi; Xie, Xiaomei; Wang, Caiyun; Zhang, Mengxue; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2015-03-01

    Polystyrene (PS) is a common substrate material for protein adsorption on biosensors and bioassays. By employing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique, we studied the kinetics and thermodynamics of anti-HBeAg adsorption on this substrate in situ. First, a thin PS film was deposited on the interface between the liquid and the quartz crystal wafer. Second, a solution containing anti-HBeAg was introduced into the holding tank. Third, we measured the change in the oscillation frequency of the quartz that was induced by the antibody-PS binding, which in turn depended on macroscopic parameters, such as antibody concentration and solution temperature, as well as on microscopic parameters, such as the diffusion type and the change in Gibb's free energy. The adsorption rate and capacity of anti-HBeAg on the PS surface were quantified and fitted using the conventional Langmuir model. It was shown that this model was applicable to protein-PS interface system. Approximately 250 nm2 of the surface area was occupied by a single antibody molecule at 298 K when the concentration was 90 μg/mL. The adsorption process might have been controlled by both liquid film and particle diffusions.

  15. Determination of surface-accessible acidic hydroxyls and surface area of lignin by cationic dye adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sipponen, Mika Henrikki; Pihlajaniemi, Ville; Littunen, Kuisma; Pastinen, Ossi; Laakso, Simo

    2014-10-01

    A new colorimetric method for determining the surface-accessible acidic lignin hydroxyl groups in lignocellulose solid fractions was developed. The method is based on selective adsorption of Azure B, a basic dye, onto acidic hydroxyl groups of lignin. Selectivity of adsorption of Azure B on lignin was demonstrated using lignin and cellulose materials as adsorbents. Adsorption isotherms of Azure B on wheat straw (WS), sugarcane bagasse (SGB), oat husk, and isolated lignin materials were determined. The maximum adsorption capacities predicted by the Langmuir isotherms were used to calculate the amounts of surface-accessible acidic hydroxyl groups. WS contained 1.7-times more acidic hydroxyls (0.21 mmol/g) and higher surface area of lignin (84 m(2)/g) than SGB or oat husk materials. Equations for determining the amount of surface-accessible acidic hydroxyls in solid fractions of the three plant materials by a single point measurement were developed. A method for high-throughput characterization of lignocellulosic materials is now available. PMID:25033327

  16. Lipidation Effect on Surface Adsorption and Associated Fibrillation of the Model Protein Insulin.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Sofie Fogh; Cárdenas, Marité; Barker, Robert; Jorgensen, Lene; van de Weert, Marco

    2016-07-19

    Lipidation of proteins is used in the pharmaceutical field to increase the therapeutic efficacy of proteins. In this study, we investigate the effect of a 14-carbon fatty acid modification on the adsorption behavior of human insulin to a hydrophobic solid surface and the subsequent fibrillation development under highly acidic conditions and elevated temperature by comparing to the fibrillation of human insulin. At these stressed conditions, the lipid modification accelerates the rate of fibrillation in bulk solution. With the use of several complementary surface-sensitive techniques, including quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and neutron reflectivity (NR), we show that there are two levels of structurally different protein organization at a hydrophobic surface for both human insulin and the lipidated analogue: a dense protein layer formed within minutes on the surface and a diffuse outer layer of fibrillar structures which took hours to form. The two layers may only be weakly connected, and proteins from both layers are able to desorb from the surface. The lipid modification increases the protein surface coverage and the thickness of both layer organizations. Upon lipidation not only the fibrillation extent but also the morphology of the fibrillar structures changes from fibril clusters on the surface to a more homogeneous network of fibrils covering the entire hydrophobic surface. PMID:27348237

  17. High temperature adsorption of nitrogen on a polycrystalline nickel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughaba, S.; Auvert, G.

    1994-01-01

    Nickel tetracarbonyl [Ni(CO)4] molecules were used as a probe to investigate the coverage of a heated polycrystalline nickel surface with nitrogen adspecies. For this purpose, the deposition kinetics of nickel (Ni) microstructures from the thermal decomposition of nickel tetracarbonyl was investigated as a function of the partial pressure of nitrogen (N2), used as buffer gas. The laser-induced chemical vapor deposition technique was used to produce polycrystalline nickel lines in an atmosphere of pure Ni(CO)4 or a [Ni(CO)4+N2] mixture. The deposition process was performed on polysilicon/silicon dioxide/<100> monosilicon substrates. As a heat source, a cw argon-ion laser was used. The laser-induced surface temperature was varied in the range 500-850 °C. For Ni(CO)4 partial pressures typically below 0.3 mbar, the nickel deposition rate was found to decrease as the N2 partial pressure increases. For higher Ni(CO)4 partial pressures, the deposition rate was found to be independent of the N2 partial pressure. On the basis of these results, the high temperature adsorption of nitrogen on a polycrystalline nickel surface was investigated. A model which accounts for the dependence of the nickel deposition rate and surface coverage with nitrogen adspecies on the N2 partial pressure was elaborated.

  18. Adsorption-Induced Surface Stresses of the Water/Quartz Interface: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Gor, Gennady Y; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-05-31

    Adsorption-induced deformation is expansion or contraction of a solid due to adsorption on its surface. This phenomenon is important for a wide range of applications, from chemomechanical sensors to methane recovery from geological formations. The strain of the solid is driven by the change of the surface stress due to adsorption. Using ab initio molecular dynamics, we calculate the surface stresses for the dry α-quartz surfaces, and investigate how these stresses change when the surfaces are exposed to water. We find that the nonhydroxylated surface shows small and approximately isotropic changes in stress, while the hydroxylated surface, which interacts more strongly with the polar water molecules, shows larger and qualitatively anisotropic (opposite sign in xx and yy) surface stress changes. All of these changes are several times larger than the surface tension of water itself. The anisotropy and possibility of positive surface stress change can explain experimentally observed surface area contraction due to adsorption. PMID:27159032

  19. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  20. The influence of CO adsorption on the surface composition of cobalt/palladium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, A.; Trant, A. G.; Gustafson, J.; Jones, T. E.; Noakes, T. C. Q.; Bailey, P.; Baddeley, C. J.

    2016-04-01

    Segregation induced by the adsorption of gas phase species can strongly influence the composition of bimetallic surfaces and can therefore play an important role in influencing heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The addition of palladium to cobalt catalysts has been shown to promote Fischer Tropsch catalysis. We investigate the adsorption of CO onto bimetallic CoPd surfaces on Pd{111} using a combination of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and medium energy ion scattering. The vibrational frequency of adsorbed CO provides crucial information on the adsorption sites adopted by CO and medium energy ion scattering probes the surface composition before and after CO exposure. We show that cobalt segregation is induced by CO adsorption and rationalise these observations in terms of the strength of adsorption of CO in various surface adsorption sites.

  1. Response Mechanism for Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors Based on Surface-Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiansheng; Lu, Yanyan

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent's method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator) and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC) analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data. PMID:24743157

  2. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  3. Adsorption Structure of Nitric Oxide on the Pt(111) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Masuaki

    The adsorption structure of Pt(111) surface was studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), infra-red absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). LEED dynamical analysis, with the aid of other techniques, concluded that NO occupies the fcc hollow site at a low coverage, the fcc hollow and ontop sites at a medium coverage and the fcc hollow, ontop and hcp hollow sites at a high coverage, which is consistent with the other experimental and theoretical results. The desorption temperatures of NO on the fcc hollow (α species), ontop (β species) and hcp hollow sites (γ species) are 390, 300 and 200 K, respectively. The N-O stretching vibrations of each species are 1430-1490 cm-1, 1710 cm-1 and 1508 cm-1, respectively. Annealing to 250 K causes the desorption of the γ species, which results in the highly ordered two site occupied (α and β) surface. The high energy (>1 eV) electron injection from the STM tip causes the desorption of the β species, which enables us to get the surface of highly ordered α species. The mechanism of the desorption of the β species is the electron injection to the 2πa orbital, which has an anti-bonding character for the Pt-N bonding of the β species.

  4. Adsorption of naphthenic acids on high surface area activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Iranmanesh, Sobhan; Harding, Thomas; Abedi, Jalal; Seyedeyn-Azad, Fakhry; Layzell, David B

    2014-01-01

    In oil sands mining extraction, water is an essential component; however, the processed water becomes contaminated through contact with the bitumen at high temperature, and a portion of it cannot be recycled and ends up in tailing ponds. The removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) from tailing pond water is crucial, as they are corrosive and toxic and provide a substrate for microbial activity that can give rise to methane, which is a potent greenhouse gas. In this study, the conversion of sawdust into an activated carbon (AC) that could be used to remove NAs from tailings water was studied. After producing biochar from sawdust by a slow-pyrolysis process, the biochar was physically activated using carbon dioxide (CO2) over a range of temperatures or prior to producing biochar, and the sawdust was chemically activated using phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The physically activated carbon had a lower surface area per gram than the chemically activated carbon. The physically produced ACs had a lower surface area per gram than chemically produced AC. In the adsorption tests with NAs, up to 35 mg of NAs was removed from the water per gram of AC. The chemically treated ACs showed better uptake, which can be attributed to its higher surface area and increased mesopore size when compared with the physically treated AC. Both the chemically produced and physically produced AC provided better uptake than the commercially AC. PMID:24766592

  5. Jump rates for surface diffusion of large molecules from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2015-04-21

    We apply a recently developed stochastic model for the surface diffusion of large molecules to calculate jump rates for 9,10-dithioanthracene on a Cu(111) surface. The necessary input parameters for the stochastic model are calculated from first principles using density functional theory (DFT). We find that the inclusion of van der Waals corrections to the DFT energies is critical to obtain good agreement with experimental results for the adsorption geometry and energy barrier for diffusion. The predictions for jump rates in our model are in excellent agreement with measured values and show a marked improvement over transition state theory (TST). We find that the jump rate prefactor is reduced by an order of magnitude from the TST estimate due to frictional damping resulting from energy exchange with surface phonons, as well as a rotational mode of the diffusing molecule.

  6. Investigating the thermodynamic stability of Bacillus subtilis spore-uranium(VI) adsorption though surface complexation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Z.; Hertel, M.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Dissolved uranium speciation, mobility, and remediation are increasingly important topics given continued and potential uranium (U) release from mining operations and nuclear waste. Vegetative bacterial cell surfaces are known to adsorb uranium and may influence uranium speciation in the environment. Previous investigations regarding U(VI) adsorption to bacterial spores, a differentiated and dormant cell type with a tough proteinaceous coat, include U adsorption affinity and XAFS data. We investigated the thermodynamic stability of aerobic, pH dependent uranium adsorption to bacterial spore surfaces using purified Bacillus subtilis spores in solution with 5ppm uranium. Adsorption reversibility and kinetic experiments indicate that uranium does not precipitate over the duration of the experiments and equilibrium is reached within 20 minutes. Uranium-spore adsorption edges exhibited adsorption at all pH measured between 2 and 10. Maximum adsorption was achieved around pH 7 and decreased as pH increased above 7. We used surface complexation modeling (SCM) to quantify uranium adsorption based on balanced chemical equations and derive thermodynamic stability constants for discrete uranium-spore adsorption reactions. Site specific thermodynamic stability constants provide insight on interactions occurring between aqueous uranium species and spore surface ligands. The uranium adsorption data and SCM parameters described herein, also provide a basis for predicting the influence of bacterial spores on uranium speciation in natural systems and investigating their potential as biosorption agents in engineered systems.

  7. Atom and Amine Adsorption on Flat and Stepped Gold Surfaces & Structure, Stability and Spin Ordering in Manganese Sulfide Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewoczko, April D.

    In part I, we investigate gold catalysis in the chemistry of organonitrogen compounds. We examine the adsorption of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur atoms on the gold (111), (100) and (211) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT). Sulfur atoms bind most strongly, followed by oxygen and nitrogen atoms with stronger adsorption for greater coordination to the surface. We see a trend of stronger adsorption to undercoordinated gold, but find it is non-universal with the adsorption strength trend: (111) > (211) > (100). We consider the diffusion of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur adatoms and find facile long-range diffusion of oxygen atoms on the (100) surface. Lastly, we compare the adsorption of methylamine on gold to that of a selection of alkylamines, methanol and methanethiol. In each case, the ontop site is preferred with stronger adsorption at low coordinated gold. At oxygen atom coverages of 0.125 -- 0.25 ML on Au (111), we find cooperative adsorption of methylamine and oxygen atoms. Energetic costs for adsorbate tilt from the surface normal and rotation about the gold-nitrogen bond are calculated. While methylamine rotation is barrierless on the (111) and (211) surfaces, it has a low energetic barrier for the 0.125 ML and 0.25 ML O atom pre-covered Au (111) surfaces. In part II, we interpret the experimental mass spectrum of small gas phase manganese sulfide clusters using DFT and elucidate the role of ionicity and spin ordering in sizes with special stability, i.e. magic clusters. We first consider nine low lying minima (MnS)6 structures and reveal antiferromagnetic (AFM) spin ordering with a ˜0.1 eV/pair AFM energy benefit and a ˜0.1 A shrinkage of average Mn-Mn distances over clusters with ferromagnetic (FM) spin ordering. We calculate energetic barriers for interconversion between the two lowest lying (MnS)6 isomers and predict an elevated cluster melting temperature due to increased configurational entropy in a pre-melted state. Second, we demonstrate the

  8. A Relation for Nanodroplet Diffusion on Smooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu; Huang, Jizu; Li, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the diffusion of nanodroplets on smooth surfaces through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and theoretical analyses. Molecular dynamics simulations show that nanodroplet surface diffusion is different from that of single molecules and solid particles. The dependence of nanodroplet diffusion coefficient on temperature undergoes a transition from linear to nonlinear as the surface wettability is weakened due to the coupling of temperature and surface energy. We also develop a simple relation for the diffusion coefficient by using the contact angle and contact radius of the droplet. It works well for a wide range of surface wettabilities and different sized nanodroplets, as confirmed by MD simulations. PMID:27215471

  9. A Relation for Nanodroplet Diffusion on Smooth Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Chu; Huang, Jizu; Li, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the diffusion of nanodroplets on smooth surfaces through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and theoretical analyses. Molecular dynamics simulations show that nanodroplet surface diffusion is different from that of single molecules and solid particles. The dependence of nanodroplet diffusion coefficient on temperature undergoes a transition from linear to nonlinear as the surface wettability is weakened due to the coupling of temperature and surface energy. We also develop a simple relation for the diffusion coefficient by using the contact angle and contact radius of the droplet. It works well for a wide range of surface wettabilities and different sized nanodroplets, as confirmed by MD simulations. PMID:27215471

  10. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide onto activated carbon fibers: effect of pore structure and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Kwon, Seokjoon; Borguet, Eric; Vidic, Radisav

    2005-12-15

    To understand the nature of H2S adsorption onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas. Surface pretreatments, including oxidation and heattreatment, were conducted before adsorption/desorption tests in a fixed-bed reactor. Raw ACFs with higher surface area showed greater adsorption and retention of sulfur, and heat treatment further enhanced adsorption and retention of sulfur. The retained amount of hydrogen sulfide correlated well with the amount of basic functional groups on the carbon surface, while the desorbed amount reflected the effect of pore structure. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the retained sulfurous compounds were strongly bonded to the carbon surface. In addition, surface chemistry of the sorbent might determine the predominant form of adsorbate on the surface. PMID:16475362

  11. Surface stoichiometry of zinc sulfide and its effect on the adsorption behaviors of xanthate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the surface stoichiometry, acid-base properties as well as the adsorption of xanthate at ZnS surfaces were studied by means of potentiometric titration, adsorption and solution speciation modeling. The surface proton binding site was determined by using Gran plot to evaluate the potentiometric titration data. Testing results implied that for stoichiometric surfaces of zinc sulfide, the proton and hydroxide determine the surface charge. For the nonstoichiometric surfaces, the surface charge is controlled by proton, hydroxide, zinc and sulfide ions depending on specific conditions. The xanthate adsorption decreases with increasing solution pH, which indicates an ion exchange reaction at the surfaces. Based on experimental results, the surface protonation, deprotonation, stoichiometry and xanthate adsorption mechanism were discussed. PMID:22112283

  12. [Adsorption of Cu on Core-shell Structured Magnetic Particles: Relationship Between Adsorption Performance and Surface Properties].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-mei; Chen, Jing; Li, Hai-ning; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Gao-sheng

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between the adsorption performance of adsorbents and their compositions, structure, and surface properties, the core-shell structured Fe₃O₄/MnO2 and Fe-Mn/Mn₂2 magnetic particles were systematically characterized using multiple techniques and their Cu adsorption behaviors as well as mechanism were also investigated in details. It was found that both Fe₃O4 and Fe-Mn had spinel structure and no obvious crystalline phase change was observed after coating with MnO₂. The introduction of Mn might improve the affinity between the core and the shell, and therefore enhanced the amount and distribution uniformity of the MnO₂ coated. Consequently, Fe-Mn/MnO₂ exhibited a higher BET specific surface area and a lower isoelectric point. The results of sorption experiments showed that Fe-Mn had a higher maximal Cu adsorption capacity of 33.7 mg · g⁻¹ at pH 5.5, compared with 17.5 mg · g⁻¹ of Fe₃O4. After coating, the maximal adsorption capacity of Fe-Mn/MnO₂ was increased to 58.2 mg · g⁻¹, which was 2.6 times as high as that of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ and outperformed the majority of magnetic adsorbents reported in literature. In addition, a specific adsorption of Cu occurred at the surface of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ or Fe-Mn/MnO₂ through the formation of inner-sphere complexes. In conclusion, the adsorption performance of the magnetic particles was positively related to their compositions, structure, and surface properties. PMID:27011990

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  14. Surface complexation modeling and spectroscopic evidence of antimony adsorption on iron-oxide-rich red earth soils.

    PubMed

    Vithanage, Meththika; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Dou, Xiaomin; Bolan, Nanthi S; Yang, Jae E; Ok, Yong Sik

    2013-09-15

    Few studies have investigated surface complexation of antimony (Sb) on natural sorbents. In addition, intrinsic acidic constants, speciation, and spectroscopic data are scarce for Sb sorption in soil. Only simple sorption models have been proposed to describe the sorption of Sb(V) on specific mineral surfaces. This study therefore assessed the mechanisms of Sb(III) and Sb(V) adsorption on natural red earth (NRE), a naturally occurring iron coated sand, at various pHs and Sb loadings. The Sb(V) adsorption followed typical anion adsorption curve with adsorption reaching maximum around pH 4-5, while no pH dependence was observed for Sb(III) sorption. The FT-IR spectra revealed that shifts in absorbance of the hydroxyl groups in iron-oxide were related to the Fe-O-Sb bonds and provided evidence for inner sphere bond formation. Direct evidence on the strong interaction of Sb(III) and Sb(V) with ≡Fe-O and ≡Al-O was observed from the decrease in Fe-2p, Al-2p, and Si-2p peaks of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data before and after Sb(V) and Sb(III) adsorption on NRE. Successful data modeling using the 2-pK diffuse double layer model (DDLM) with the FITEQL revealed that sorption occurs through the formation of bidentate mononuclear and binuclear complexes. Model simulations showed a high affinity to the ≡FeOH sites at high Sb loadings, whereas at low loadings, both≡ FeOH and ≡AlOH sites showed similar affinities to Sb. In the case of Sb(V), multilayer formation was also revealed in addition to surface complexation by the isotherm data fitted with the Freundlich model and two sites Langmuir equations, which indicated heterogeneous multilayer adsorption of Sb(V) on NRE. PMID:23791229

  15. High coverage hydrogen adsorption on the Fe3O4(1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohu; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Shengguang

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on the A and B termination layers of the Fe3O4(1 1 0) surface at different coverage has been systematically studied by density functional theory calculations including an on-site Hubbard term (GGA + U). The adsorption of hydrogen prefers surface oxygen atoms on both layers. The more stable A layer has stronger adsorption energy than the less stable B layer. The saturation coverage has two dissociatively adsorbed H2 on the A layer, and one dissociatively adsorbed H2 on the B layer. The adsorption mechanism has been analyzed on the basis of projected density of states (PDOS).

  16. Adsorption of alkali metals on Ge(001)(2×1) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H Y.; Zu, Xiaotao; Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Fei

    2006-01-09

    Ab initio total energy calculations have been performed for Na, K and Rb adsorption on Ge(001)(2?1) surface. It was found that the adsorption site of AM is AM size dependent. Structural analysis showed that the Ge-Ge dimer bond becomes stronger with increasing AM size. As the coverage increases from 0.5 to 1 ML it turns out that no depolarization effect occurs upon Na adsorption, while this effect become more important with increasing AM size. We also found that for all adsorption systems investigated the germanium surface is metallic and semiconducting for the coverage of 0.5 and 1 ML, respectively.

  17. Revisiting Bangham's law of adsorption-induced deformation: changes of surface energy and surface stress.

    PubMed

    Gor, Gennady Y; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-04-14

    When fluids are adsorbed on a solid surface they induce noticeable stresses, which cause the deformation of the solid. D. H. Bangham and co-authors performed a series of experimental measurements of adsorption-induced strains, and concluded that physisorption causes expansion, which is proportional to the lowering of the surface energy Δγ. This statement is referred to as the Bangham effect or Bangham's law. However, it is known that the quantity that controls the deformation is actually the change in surface stress Δf rather than surface energy Δγ, but this difference has not been considered in the context of adsorption-induced deformation of mesoporous materials. We use the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) theory to derive both values and show the difference between them. We find the condition when the difference between the two vanishes, and Bangham's law is applicable; it is likely that this condition is satisfied in most cases, and prediction of strain based on Δγ is a good approximation. We show that this is the case for adsorption of argon and water on Vycor glass. Finally, we show that the difference between Δγ and Δf can explain some of the experimental data that contradicts Bangham's law. PMID:27001041

  18. Ion adsorption on metal oxide surface to hydrothermal conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Wesolowski, D. J.; Machesky, M. L.; Ridley, M. K.; Palmer, D. A.; Zhang, Z.; Fenter, P.; Predota, M.; Vlcek, L.; ORNL; Illinois State Water Survey; Texsas Tech Univ.; Unv. of South Bohemia; Vanderbilt Univ.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we review the sorption of multivalent cations on rutile (alpha-TiO2) powder surfaces in aqueous 1:1 electrolyte media from room temperature to 250 degrees C. All cations are shown to occupy 'inner sphere' sorption sites in contact with surface oxygens and hydroxyl groups, as well as the diffuse portion of the electrical double layer (EDL). Sorption is shown to increase strongly with increasing temperature, and the sorption affinity is strongly-related to cation radius and charge. Macroscopic powder pH-titration results obtained with ORNL's high temperature hydrogen electrode concentration cells can be rationalized with Gouy-Chapman-Stern models of the EDL, augmented by atomic-scale structural and proton affinity data from synchrotron X-ray studies and computational modeling approaches.

  19. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica: Surface structure and adsorption behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Weiya; Li, Dan; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Kai; Li, Jianqiang; Han, Boping; Zhang, Yuanming

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Al-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica for phosphate removal. • It had the maximum adsorption capacity of 23.59 mg P/g. • Over 95% of the final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min. - Abstract: In this study, Al(III)-coordinated diamino-functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Because of well-defined and interconnecting macroporous–mesoporous networks, the resulting adsorbent (MM-SBA) exhibited a significantly better phosphate adsorption performance and faster removal rate, as compared with the mesoporous adsorbent (M-SBA). Based on the Freundlich and Langmuir models, the phosphate adsorption capacity and the maximum adsorption capacity of MM-SBA were 7.99 mg P/g and 23.59 mg P/g, respectively. In the kinetic study of MM-SBA, over 95% of its final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min; whereas that of M-SBA was less than 79%.

  20. Unique surface adsorption behaviors of serum proteins on chemically uniform and alternating surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng

    With increasing interests of studying proteins adsorption on the surfaces with nanoscale features in biomedical field, it is crucial to have fundamental understandings on how the proteins are adsorbed on such a surface and what factors contribute to the driving forces of adsorption. Besides, exploring more available nanoscale templates would greatly offer more possibilities one could design surface bio-detection methods with favorable protein-surface interactions. Thus, to fulfill the purpose, the work in this dissertation has been made into three major sections. First, to probe the intermediate states which possibly exist between stable and unstable phases described in mean-field theory diagram, a solvent vapor annealing method is chosen to slowly induce the copolymer polystyrene-block-polyvinylpyridine (PS-b-PVP)'s both blocks undergoing micro-phase separations from initial spherical nanodomains into terminal cylindrical nanodomains. During this process, real time atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been conducted to capture other six intermediate states with different morphologies on the polymeric film surfaces. Secondly, upon recognizing each intermediate state, the solution of immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) proteins has been deposited on the surface and been rinsed off with buffer solution before the protein-bounded surface is imaged by AFM. It has been found IgG showing a strong adsorption preference on PS over P4VP block. Among all the six intermediate states, the proteins are almost exclusively adsorbed on PS nanodomains regardless the concentration and deposition time. Thirdly, a trinodular shape protein fibrinogen (Fg) is selected for investigating how geometry and surface charge of proteins would interplay with cylindrical nanodomains on a surface developed from Polystyrene -block-Poly-(methyl methacrylate) PS-b-PMMA. Also, Fg adsorptions on chemically homogeneous surfaces are included here to have a better contrast of showing how much difference it can make

  1. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  2. Surface diffusion in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, Kanji; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, Giddings pointed out in 'Dynamics of Chromatography' that surface diffusion should become an important research topic in the kinetics of chromatographic phenomena. However, few studies on surface diffusion in adsorbents used in chromatography were published since then. Most scientists use ordinary rate equations to study mass transfer kinetics in chromatography. They take no account of surface diffusion and overlook the significant contributions of this mass transfer process to chromatographic behavior and to column efficiency at high mobile phase flow rate. Only recently did the significance of surface diffusion in separation processes begin to be recognized in connection with the development of new techniques of fast flow, high efficiency chromatography. In this review, we revisit the reports on experimental data on surface diffusion and introduce a surface-restricted molecular diffusion model, derived as a first approximation for the mechanism of surface diffusion, on the basis of the absolute rate theory. We also explain how this model accounts for many intrinsic characteristics of surface diffusion that cannot properly be explained by the conventional models of surface diffusion.

  3. Oxygen adsorption on the Al₉Co₂(001) surface: first-principles and STM study.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, S Alarcón; Loli, L N Serkovic; Ledieu, J; Fournée, V; Gille, P; Dubois, J-M; Gaudry, E

    2013-09-01

    Atomic oxygen adsorption on a pure aluminum terminated Al9Co2(001) surface is studied by first-principle calculations coupled with STM measurements. Relative adsorption energies of oxygen atoms have been calculated on different surface sites along with the associated STM images. The local electronic structure of the most favourable adsorption site is described. The preferential adsorption site is identified as a 'bridge' type site between the cluster entities exposed at the (001) surface termination. The Al-O bonding between the adsorbate and the substrate presents a covalent character, with s-p hybridization occurring between the states of the adsorbed oxygen atom and the aluminum atoms of the surface. The simulated STM image of the preferential adsorption site is in agreement with experimental observations. This work shows that oxygen adsorption generates important atomic relaxations of the topmost surface layer and that sub-surface cobalt atoms strongly influence the values of the adsorption energies. The calculated Al-O distances are in agreement with those reported in Al2O and Al2O3 oxides and for oxygen adsorption on Al(111). PMID:23883551

  4. Initial heats of H{sub 2}S adsorption on activated carbons: Effect of surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-11-15

    The sorption of hydrogen sulfide was studied on activated carbons of various origins by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The conditions of the experiment were dry and anaerobic. Prior to the experiments the surface of some carbon samples was oxidized using either nitric acid or ammonium persulfate. Then the structural parameters of carbons were evaluated from the sorption of nitrogen. From the IGC experiments at various temperatures, heats of adsorption were calculated. The results showed that the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption under dry anaerobic conditions does not depend on surface chemistry. The dependence of the heat of adsorption on the characteristic energy of nitrogen adsorption calculated from the Dubinin-Raduskevich equation was found. This correlation can be used to predict the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption based on the results obtained from nitrogen adsorption.

  5. Adsorption and dynamics of group IV, V atoms and molecular oxygen on semiconductor group IV (0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasieva, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this review we address (1) the co-adsorption of group V (As, Sb, Bi) atoms and molecular oxygen on the Si(0 0 1) surface and (2) the adsorption and dynamics of Sb, Bi, Si and Ge ad-dimers on the Si(0 0 1) and Ge(0 0 1) surfaces. The adsorption and diffusion processes of group IV and V atoms on the (0 0 1) surfaces of group IV semiconductor surfaces have been studied using multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and density functional theory calculations. Results obtained by various types of first-principle total energy calculations are mutually compared and discussed. Our results demonstrate the capability of these quantum chemistry methods to provide relevant and reliable information on the interaction between adsorbate and semiconductor surfaces.

  6. Adsorption and dynamics of group IV, V atoms and molecular oxygen on semiconductor group IV (0 0 1) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, T

    2016-08-10

    In this review we address (1) the co-adsorption of group V (As, Sb, Bi) atoms and molecular oxygen on the Si(0 0 1) surface and (2) the adsorption and dynamics of Sb, Bi, Si and Ge ad-dimers on the Si(0 0 1) and Ge(0 0 1) surfaces. The adsorption and diffusion processes of group IV and V atoms on the (0 0 1) surfaces of group IV semiconductor surfaces have been studied using multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and density functional theory calculations. Results obtained by various types of first-principle total energy calculations are mutually compared and discussed. Our results demonstrate the capability of these quantum chemistry methods to provide relevant and reliable information on the interaction between adsorbate and semiconductor surfaces. PMID:27299666

  7. Design of PAMAM-COO dendron-grafted surfaces to promote Pb(II) ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Chong, Leebyn; Dutt, Meenakshi

    2015-04-28

    An expanding area of green technology is the wastewater treatment of heavy metal ions. As the adsorption of cations onto solid surfaces has been proven to be successful, recent research has demonstrated enhanced adsorption profiles by grafting dendron brushes onto a solid support. Via the molecular dynamics technique, we examine the adsorption of Pb(II) ions onto polyamidoamine (PAMAM) with carboxylate terminal groups through a coarse-grained implicit solvent model. We identify dendron generations and grafting densities, or surface coverage levels, which demonstrate optimal adsorption of Pb(II) ions. Our results can be potentially used to design functionalized surfaces for metal ion adsorption in application entailing environmental remediation or protective surface coating. PMID:25804856

  8. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system. PMID:26461439

  9. Adsorption and surface-enhanced Raman of dyes on silver and gold sols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.C.; Meisel, D.

    1982-08-19

    Several negatively charged dyes were investigated for their possible adsorption on the surface of silver and gold colloidal particles. Those dyes that were found to adsorb on the particles were then checked for surface enhancement of Raman scattering. Highly efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was observed from a carbocyanine dye in both sols. Excitation-dependence studies as well as adsorption studies confirm the SERS nature of the Raman spectra obtained. The dye is probably aggregated on adsorption and is probably attached through the naphthalene side moiety to the surface. Less efficient SERS was also observed for copper phthalocyanine.

  10. Surface diffusion and surface crystal growth of tris-naphthyl benzene glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shigang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Ye; Ediger, M. D.; Yu, Lian

    2016-08-01

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients of α,α,β-tris-naphthyl benzene (TNB) glasses have been measured using the method of surface grating decay. For 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the decay occurs by viscous flow at temperatures above Tg + 15 K, where Tg is the glass transition temperature (347 K), and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion of TNB is vastly faster than bulk diffusion, by a factor of 107 at Tg. Comparing TNB with other molecular glasses, each evaluated at its own Tg, we find that surface diffusion has a greater system-to-system variation than bulk diffusion, slowing down with increasing molecular size and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Experimentally determined surface diffusion coefficients are in reasonable agreement with those from simulations and theoretical predictions. TNB and other molecular glasses show fast crystal growth on the free surface and the growth velocity is nearly proportional to the surface diffusion coefficient, indicating that the process is supported by surface mobility.

  11. A DFT study of water adsorption on rutile TiO2 (110) surface: The effects of surface steps.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Chunya; Chen, Mingjun; Zhang, Yu; Cummings, Peter T

    2016-07-28

    The associative and dissociative adsorption of water molecules at low-coverage situations on rutile TiO2 (110) surface with step defects was investigated by the density functional theory calculations. Structural optimization of the hydroxylated/hydrated configurations at step edges along the 11̄1 crystal directions and the dynamic process of water dissociation were discussed to get a better description of the water/TiO2 interface. Our results indicate that steps on the TiO2 (110) surface could be an active site for water dissociation. The results of geometry optimization suggest that the stability of hydroxylated configuration is largely dependent on the locations of the H species and the recombination of water molecules from hydroxyls is observed in the fully hydroxylated condition. However, these hydroxyls can be stabilized by the associatively absorbed water nearby by forming competitive intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The dynamics of water dissociation and hydrogen diffusion were studied by the first principles molecular dynamics simulation and our results suggest that the hydrogen released by water dissociation can be transferred among the adsorbates, such as the unsaturated oxygen atoms-H2O-hydroxyl (TiO-H2O-OH) complex at step edges, or gradually diffuses to the bulk water system in the form of hydronium (H3O(+)) at higher water coverage. PMID:27475381

  12. A DFT study of water adsorption on rutile TiO2 (110) surface: The effects of surface steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Chunya; Chen, Mingjun; Zhang, Yu; Cummings, Peter T.

    2016-07-01

    The associative and dissociative adsorption of water molecules at low-coverage situations on rutile TiO2 (110) surface with step defects was investigated by the density functional theory calculations. Structural optimization of the hydroxylated/hydrated configurations at step edges along the <" separators="1 1 ¯ 1 > crystal directions and the dynamic process of water dissociation were discussed to get a better description of the water/TiO2 interface. Our results indicate that steps on the TiO2 (110) surface could be an active site for water dissociation. The results of geometry optimization suggest that the stability of hydroxylated configuration is largely dependent on the locations of the H species and the recombination of water molecules from hydroxyls is observed in the fully hydroxylated condition. However, these hydroxyls can be stabilized by the associatively absorbed water nearby by forming competitive intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The dynamics of water dissociation and hydrogen diffusion were studied by the first principles molecular dynamics simulation and our results suggest that the hydrogen released by water dissociation can be transferred among the adsorbates, such as the unsaturated oxygen atoms-H2O-hydroxyl (TiO-H2O-OH) complex at step edges, or gradually diffuses to the bulk water system in the form of hydronium (H3O+) at higher water coverage.

  13. Two-dimensional convex-molecule fluid model for surface adsorption of proteins: Effect of soft interaction on adsorption equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahata, Paritosh; Das, Sovan Lal

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of proteins on membrane surfaces plays an important role in cell biological processes. In this work, we develop a two-dimensional fluid model for proteins. The protein molecules have been modeled as two-dimensional convex and soft particles. The Lennard-Jones potential for circular particles and Kihara (12,6) potential for elliptical particles with hard core have been used to model pairwise intermolecular interactions. The equation of state of the fluid model has been derived using Weeks-Chandler-Andersen decomposition and it involves three parameters, an attraction, a repulsion, and a size parameter, which depend on the shape and core size of the molecules. For validation of the model, a two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation has been performed. Finally, the model has been applied to study the adsorption of proteins on a flat membrane. In comparison with the existing model of hard and convex particles for protein adsorption, our model predicts a higher packing fraction for the adsorption equilibria. Although the present work is based on Lennard-Jones-type interaction, it can be extended for other specific soft interactions between convex molecules. Thus the model has general applicability for any other two-dimensional adsorption systems of molecules with soft interaction.

  14. Cd adsorption properties of components in different freshwater surface coatings: the important role of ferromanganese oxides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Deming; Hua, Xiuyi; Li, Yu; Zhang, Jingjing; Yan, Dongxu

    2003-09-15

    Surface coatings developed in different natural waters were used to study the role of the composition of surface coatings in controlling Cd adsorption in aquatic environments. To investigate the adsorption property of each component, the method of extraction techniques followed by Cd adsorption and statistical analysis were employed. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride was used to remove Mn oxides selectively, sodium dithionite was used to remove Mn and Fe oxides, and oxalic acid was used to remove most metal oxides and part of the organic material. Adsorption of Cd to surface coatings was measured before and after extraction under controlled laboratory conditions. The observed Cd adsorptions to unextracted and extracted surface coatings were analyzed using nonlinear least-squares fitting to estimate the adsorption property of each surface coating constituent. In different waters, the relative contribution to Cd adsorption of each component was different, but in all the waters studied, ferromanganese oxides contributed most with lesser roles indicated for organic phase and Al oxides. The Cd adsorption ability of manganese oxides was significantly higher than that of the other components. PMID:14524442

  15. Oleate adsorption at an apatite surface studied by ex-situ FTIR internal reflection spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Drelich, J.; Miller, J.D.

    1998-06-15

    Oleate adsorption at an apatite surface was investigated by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared internal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR/IRS). Adsorption isotherms have been determined using an apatite internal reflection element (IRE) and it has been found that pH has a significant influence on oleate adsorption by apatite. At pH 8.0 and 20 C, oleate adsorption density increases monotonically as equilibrium oleate concentration increases from 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M. These results are in contrast to the results at pH 9.5 and 20 C in which case the adsorption density is limited to that corresponding to approximately monolayer coverage. Oleate adsorption by apatite was compared to oleate adsorption by fluorite and calcite and the different adsorption behavior at these three mineral surfaces is attributed to the differences in the densities of surface calcium sites and to the differences in the solubilities of these minerals. Contact angles have been measured at the apatite IRE surface and it has been demonstrated that both the amount and the nature of the adsorbed species influence the hydrophobic state of the surface.

  16. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  17. The effects of pH and surface composition on Pb adsorption to natural freshwater biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A R; Lion, L W; Nelson, Y M; Shuler, M L; Ghiorse, W C

    2001-08-01

    Two dominant variables that control the adsorption of toxic trace metals to suspended particulate materials and aquatic surface coatings are surface composition and solution pH. A model for the pH-dependent adsorption of Pbto heterogeneous particulate surface mixtures was derived from experimental evaluation of Pb adsorption to laboratory-derived surrogates. The surrogate materials were selected to represent natural reactive surface components. Pb adsorption to both the laboratory surrogates and natural biofilms was determined in chemically defined solutions under controlled laboratory conditions. Pb adsorption was measured over a pH range of 5-8, with an initial Pb concentration in solution of 2.0 microM. The surface components considered include amorphous Fe oxide, biogenic Mn oxide produced by a Mn(II) oxidizing bacterium (Leptothrix discophora SS-1), Al oxide, the common green alga Chlorella vulgaris, and Leptothrix discophora SS-1 cells. A linearization of Pb adsorption data for each adsorbent was used to quantify the relationship between Pb adsorption and pH. The parameters for individual adsorbents were incorporated into an additive model to predict the total Pb adsorption in multiple-adsorbent natural surface coatings that were collected from Cayuga Lake, NY. Pb adsorption experiments on the natural surface coatings at variable pH were utilized to verify the additive model predictions based on the pH dependent behavior of the experimental laboratory surrogates. Observed Pb adsorption is consistent with the model predictions (within 1-24%) over the range of solution pH values considered. The experimental results indicate that the combination of Fe and biogenic Mn oxides can contribute as much as 90% of Pb adsorbed on Cayuga Lake biofilms, with the dominant adsorbent switching from Mn to Fe oxide with increasing pH. PMID:11505999

  18. Site-Specific Scaling Relations for Hydrocarbon Adsorption on Hexagonal Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Montemore, Matthew M.; Medlin, James W.

    2013-10-03

    Screening a large number of surfaces for their catalytic performance remains a challenge, leading to the need for simple models to predict adsorption properties. To facilitate rapid prediction of hydrocarbon adsorption energies, scaling relations that allow for calculation of the adsorption energy of any intermediate attached to any symmetric site on any hexagonal metal surface through a carbon atom were developed. For input, these relations require only simple electronic properties of the surface and of the gas-phase reactant molecules. Determining adsorption energies consists of up to four steps: (i) calculating the adsorption energy of methyl in the top site using density functional theory or by simple relations based on the electronic structure of the surface; (ii) using modified versions of classical scaling relations to scale between methyl in the top site and C₁ species with more metal-surface bonds (i.e., C, CH, CH₂) in sites that complete adsorbate tetravalency; (iii) using gas-phase bond energies to predict adsorption energies of longer hydrocarbons (i.e., CR, CR₂, CR₃); and (iv) expressing energetic changes upon translation of hydrocarbons to various sites in terms of the number of agostic interactions and the change in the number of carbon-metal bonds. Combining all of these relations allows accurate scaling over a wide range of adsorbates and surfaces, resulting in efficient screening of catalytic surfaces and a clear elucidation of adsorption trends. The relations are used to explain trends in methane reforming, hydrocarbon chain growth, and propane dehydrogenation.

  19. Hydrogen Reactivity on Highly-hydroxylated TiO2(110) Surfaces Prepared via Carboxylic Acid Adsorption and Photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Wang, Zhitao; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2012-02-27

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, photo stimulated desorption, and density functional theory studies have probed the formation and reactivity of highly-hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, which were prepared via a novel, photochemical route using trimethyl acetic acid (TMAA) dissociative adsorption and subsequent photolysis at 300 K. Deprotonation of TMAA molecules upon adsorption produces both surface bridging hydroxyls (OHb) and bidentate trimethyl acetate (TMA) species with a saturation coverage of near 0.5 monolayer (ML). Ultra-violet light irradiation selectively removes TMA species, producing a highly-hydroxylated surface with up to ~0.5 ML OHb coverage. At high coverages, the OHb species typically occupy second-nearest neighbor sites along the bridging oxygen row locally forming linear (2×1) structures of different lengths, although the surface is less ordered on a long scale. The annealing of the highly-hydroxylated surface leads to hydroxyl recombination and H2O desorption with ~100% yield, thus ruling out the diffusion of H into the bulk that has been suggested in the literature. In agreement with experimental data, theoretical results show that the recombinative H2O desorption is preferred over both H bulk diffusion and H2 desorption processes.

  20. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  1. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption will be presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model w...

  2. Specific surface area effect on adsorption of chlorpyrifos and TCP by soils and modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and TCP (3,5,6, trichloro-2-pyridinol) was determined in four soils (Mollisol, Inceptisol, Entisol, Alfisol) having different specific surface areas (19–84 m2/g) but rather similar organic matter content (2.4–3.5%). Adsorption isotherms were derived from batch equilibr...

  3. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY OF VIRUS ADSORPTION AND DEGRADATION ON INORGANIC SURFACES - ITS RELATION TO WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DLVO-Lifshitz theory of colloid stability is applied to adsorption of poliovirus on oxide surfaces common in soil and aquatic environments. Excellent agreement was found between colloid stability theory and adsorption free energies calculated from mass-action principles. Coll...

  4. Adsorption of alkenyl succinic anhydride from solutions in carbon tetrachloride on a fine magnetite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmasova, O. V.; Ramazanova, A. G.; Korolev, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of alkenyl succinic anhydride from a solution in carbon tetrachloride on a fine magnetite surface at a temperature of 298.15 K is studied using fine magnetite, which forms the basis of magnetic fluids, as the adsorbent. An adsorption isotherm is recorded and interpreted in terms of the theory of the volume filling of micropores (TVFM). Adsorption process parameters are calculated on the basis of the isotherm. It is shown that at low equilibrium concentrations, the experimental adsorption isotherm is linear in the TVFM equation coordinates.

  5. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption are presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model, are described in the present study. Characteristics common to all the surface complexation models are equilibrium constant expressions, mass and charge balances, and surface activity coefficient electrostatic potential terms. Methods for determining parameter values for surface site density, capacitances, and surface complexation constants also are discussed. Spectroscopic experimental methods of establishing ion adsorption mechanisms include vibrational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. Experimental determinations of point of zero charge shifts and ionic strength dependence of adsorption results and molecular modeling calculations also can be used to deduce adsorption mechanisms. Applications of the surface complexation models to heterogeneous natural materials, such as soils, using the component additivity and the generalized composite approaches are described. Emphasis is on the generalized composite approach for predicting anion adsorption by soils. Continuing research is needed to develop consistent and realistic protocols for describing ion adsorption reactions on soil minerals and soils. The availability of standardized model parameter databases for use in chemical speciation-transport models is critical. PMID:24619924

  6. Surface-water Interface Induces Conformational Changes Critical for Protein Adsorption: Implications for Monolayer Formation of EAS Hydrophobin

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Kamron; Christofferson, Andrew; Penna, Matthew; Winkler, Dave; Maclaughlin, Shane; Yarovsky, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The class I hydrophobin EAS is part of a family of small, amphiphilic fungal proteins best known for their ability to self-assemble into stable monolayers that modify the hydrophobicity of a surface to facilitate further microbial growth. These proteins have attracted increasing attention for industrial and biomedical applications, with the aim of designing surfaces that have the potential to maintain their clean state by resisting non-specific protein binding. To gain a better understanding of this process, we have employed all-atom molecular dynamics to study initial stages of the spontaneous adsorption of monomeric EAS hydrophobin on fully hydroxylated silica, a commonly used industrial and biomedical substrate. Particular interest has been paid to the Cys3-Cys4 loop, which has been shown to exhibit disruptive behavior in solution, and the Cys7-Cys8 loop, which is believed to be involved in the aggregation of EAS hydrophobin at interfaces. Specific and water mediated interactions with the surface were also analyzed. We have identified two possible binding motifs, one which allows unfolding of the Cys7-Cys8 loop due to the surfactant-like behavior of the Cys3-Cys4 loop, and another which has limited unfolding due to the Cys3-Cys4 loop remaining disordered in solution. We have also identified intermittent interactions with water which mediate the protein adsorption to the surface, as well as longer lasting interactions which control the diffusion of water around the adsorption site. These results have shown that EAS behaves in a similar way at the air-water and surface-water interfaces, and have also highlighted the need for hydrophilic ligand functionalization of the silica surface in order to prevent the adsorption of EAS hydrophobin. PMID:26636091

  7. Adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids by carbonaceous adsorbents: Effect of carbon surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption by carbonaceous sorbents is among the most feasible processes to remove perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) from drinking and ground waters. However, carbon surface chemistry, which has long been recognized essential for dictating performance of such sorbents, has never been considered for PFOS and PFOA adsorption. Thus, the role of surface chemistry was systematically investigated using sorbents with a wide range in precursor material, pore structure, and surface chemistry. Sorbent surface chemistry overwhelmed physical properties in controlling the extent of uptake. The adsorption affinity was positively correlated carbon surface basicity, suggesting that high acid neutralizing or anion exchange capacity was critical for substantial uptake of PFOS and PFOA. Carbon polarity or hydrophobicity had insignificant impact on the extent of adsorption. Synthetic polymer-based Ambersorb and activated carbon fibers were more effective than activated carbon made of natural materials in removing PFOS and PFOA from aqueous solutions. PMID:25827692

  8. Adsorption of polyiodobenzene molecules on the Pt(111) surface using van der Waals density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Karen; Pekoz, Rengin; Donadio, Davide

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption of aromatic molecules on surfaces is widely studied due to applications in molecular electronics. In this work, the adsorption of iodobenzene molecules on the Pt(111) surface has been studied using density functional theory. Iodobenzene molecules, with various numbers of iodine atoms, have two non-dissociative adsorption minima. One structure exhibits chemisorption between the ring and the surface (short-range) and the other structure exhibits chemisorption between the iodine ions and the surface (long-range). Both structures have a strong van der Waals interaction with the surface. In general, the adsorption energy increases as the number of iodine atoms increases. The dissociated structure of monoiodobenzene was investigated, and the dissociation barrier and the barrier between the short- and long-range states were compared.

  9. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism. PMID:26331549

  10. Adsorption of hyaluronic acid on solid supports: role of pH and surface chemistry in thin film self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Linardy, Eric; Dreaden, Erik C; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Hammond, Paula T; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-06-15

    Owing to its biocompatibility, resistance to biofouling, and desirable physicochemical and biological properties, hyaluronic acid (HA) has been widely used to modify the surface of various materials. The role of various physicochemical factors in HA adsorption remains, however, to be clarified. Herein, we employed quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) in order to investigate HA adsorption at different pH conditions onto three substrates-silicon oxide, amine-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold, and carboxylic acid-terminated SAM on gold. The QCM-D experiments indicated specific pH conditions where either strong or weak HA adsorption occurs. The morphology of the adsorbed HA layers was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and we identified that strong HA adsorption produced a complete, homogenous and smooth HA layer, while weak HA adsorption resulted in rough and inhomogeneous HA layers. The observed specifics of the kinetics of HA adsorption, including a short initial linear phase and subsequent long non-linear phase, were described by using a mean-field kinetic model taking HA diffusion limitations and reconfiguration in the adsorbed state into account. The findings extend the physicochemical background of design strategies for improving the use of passive HA adsorption for surface modification applications. PMID:25734222

  11. Adsorption of chlorophenols from aqueous solutions by pristine and surface functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Han; Li, Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaojian; Chen, Chao

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of six kinds of chlorophenols on pristine, hydroxylated and carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been investigated. Pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models were used to describe the kinetic data. All adsorption isotherms were well fitted with Langmuir, Freundlich and Polanyi-Manes models, due to surface adsorption dominating the adsorption process. The close linear relationship between logKow and logKd suggested that hydrophobicity played an important role in the adsorption. The SWCNTs' adsorption capacity for chlorophenols was weakened by addition of oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface, due to the loss of specific surface area, the increase of hydrophilicity and the reduction of π-π interaction. The best adsorption capacity of pristine SWCNTs, SWCNT-OH and SWCNT-COOH for six chlorophenols varied from 19 to 84mg/g, from 19 to 65mg/g and from 17 to 65mg/g, respectively. The effect of pH on the adsorption of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), was also studied. When pH is over the pKa of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), its removal dropped sharply. When ionic strength increased (NaCl or KCl concentration from 0 to 0.02mmol/L), the adsorption capacity of 2,6-DCP on pristine SWCNTs decreased slightly. The comparison of chlorophenols adsorption by SWCNTs, MWCNTs and PAC was made, indicating that the adsorption rate of CNTs was much faster than that of PAC. The results provide useful information about the feasibility of SWCNTs as an adsorbent to remove chlorophenols from aqueous solutions. PMID:27155424

  12. TiO2 hollow microspheres with mesoporous surface: Superior adsorption performance for dye removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Cai, Xia; Shen, Fenglei

    2014-06-01

    TiO2 hollow microspheres with mesoporous surface were synthesized by a facile template-assisted solvothermal reaction. The adsorption performance of TiO2 hollow microspheres for removing Methylene Blue from aqueous solution has been investigated. The comparative adsorption study indicated that adsorption capacity of TiO2 hollow microspheres with mesoporous surface is markedly higher than that of solid microsphere. The equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity reached 196.83 mg/g. The kinetics of dye adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorbed dye could be degraded completely by the subsequent photocatalytic process. These TiO2 hollow microspheres can be considered as a low-cost alternative adsorbent for removal of organic pollutants from wastewater.

  13. Surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence during adsorption of oxygen on magnesium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecules on magnesium surfaces represents a non-adiabatic reaction exhibiting exoelectron emission, chemicurrent generation, and weak chemiluminescence. Using thin film Mg/Ag/p-Si(111) Schottky diodes with 1 nm Mg on a 10-60 nm thick Ag layer as 2π-photodetectors, the chemiluminescence is internally detected with a much larger efficiency than external methods. The chemically induced photoyield shows a maximum for a Ag film thickness of 45 nm. The enhancement is explained by surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence, i.e., surface plasmon polaritons are effectively excited in the Ag layer by the oxidation reaction and decay radiatively leading to the observed photocurrent. Model calculations of the maximum absorption in attenuated total reflection geometry support the interpretation. The study demonstrates the extreme sensitivity and the practical usage of internal detection schemes for investigating surface chemiluminescence.

  14. Surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence during adsorption of oxygen on magnesium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2015-12-28

    The dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecules on magnesium surfaces represents a non-adiabatic reaction exhibiting exoelectron emission, chemicurrent generation, and weak chemiluminescence. Using thin film Mg/Ag/p-Si(111) Schottky diodes with 1 nm Mg on a 10-60 nm thick Ag layer as 2π-photodetectors, the chemiluminescence is internally detected with a much larger efficiency than external methods. The chemically induced photoyield shows a maximum for a Ag film thickness of 45 nm. The enhancement is explained by surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence, i.e., surface plasmon polaritons are effectively excited in the Ag layer by the oxidation reaction and decay radiatively leading to the observed photocurrent. Model calculations of the maximum absorption in attenuated total reflection geometry support the interpretation. The study demonstrates the extreme sensitivity and the practical usage of internal detection schemes for investigating surface chemiluminescence.

  15. Adsorption of oxygen atom on MoSi2 (110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. P.; Li, X. P.; Wang, H. J.; Jiang, Y.; Yi, D. Q.

    2016-09-01

    The adsorption energy, structural relaxation and electronic properties of oxygen atom on MoSi2 (110) surface have been investigated by first-principles calculations. The energetic stability of MoSi2 low-index surfaces was analyzed, and the results suggested that MoSi2 (110) surface had energetically stability. The site of oxygen atom adsorbed on MoSi2 (110) surface were discussed, and the results indicated that the preference adsorption site of MoSi2 (110) surface for oxygen atom was H site (hollow position). Our calculated work should help to understand further the interaction between oxygen atoms and MoSi2 surfaces.

  16. Study of intradrystalline diffusion in zeolites communication 3. Kinetics of adsorption of trans-2-butene by NaA and NaMgA zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Broddak, R.; Dubinin, M.M.; Falko, L.A.; Gorlov, V.A.; Kuhlmann, B.; Scholner, E.; Voloshchuk, A.M.

    1985-09-10

    This article studies the kinetics of adsorption of trans-2-butene by NaA zeolite with a varying crystal size, microcrystalline granulated NaA zeolite using granules of different sizes, and microcrystalline powdered Na/sub 8/Mg/sub 2/A zeolite. It is shown that the rate of adsorption is determined by the intracrystalline diffusion and that the effect of transfer in the transport pores and the final rate of dissipation of the heat of adsorption can be neglected. In adsorption of trans-2-butene by Na/sub 8/Mg/sub 2/A zeolite with a stepwise change in the pressure of the adsorbate, the kinetic curves are satisfactorily described by an internal diffusion equation for the kinetics of isothermal adsorption. The kinetics of adsorption were studied at 303 degrees K from the one-component vapor phase on a vacuum adsorption setup using quartz spring balance.

  17. Diffusion, adsorption, and desorption of molecular hydrogen on graphene and in graphite.

    PubMed

    Petucci, Justin; LeBlond, Carl; Karimi, Majid; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2013-07-28

    The diffusion of molecular hydrogen (H2) on a layer of graphene and in the interlayer space between the layers of graphite is studied using molecular dynamics computer simulations. The interatomic interactions were modeled by an Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order (AIREBO) potential. Molecular statics calculations of H2 on graphene indicate binding energies ranging from 41 meV to 54 meV and migration barriers ranging from 3 meV to 12 meV. The potential energy surface of an H2 molecule on graphene, with the full relaxations of molecular hydrogen and carbon atoms is calculated. Barriers for the formation of H2 through the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism are calculated. Molecular dynamics calculations of mean square displacements and average surface lifetimes of H2 on graphene at various temperatures indicate a diffusion barrier of 9.8 meV and a desorption barrier of 28.7 meV. Similar calculations for the diffusion of H2 in the interlayer space between the graphite sheets indicate high and low temperature regimes for the diffusion with barriers of 51.2 meV and 11.5 meV. Our results are compared with those of first principles. PMID:23902002

  18. On the hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on Cu surfaces and nanorows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Falcón, Leny; Viñes, Francesc; Notario-Estévez, Almudena; Illas, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Here we present a thorough density functional theory study, including and excluding dispersive forces interaction description, on the adsorption and dissociation of H2 molecule on the low-index Miller Cu (111), (100), and (110) surfaces and two different surface Cu nanorows, all displaying a different number of surface nearest neighbors, nn. The computational setup has been optimized granting an accuracy below 0.04 eV. Surface and nanorow energies-for which a new methodology to extract them is presented- are found to follow the nn number. However, the adsorption strength is found not to. Thus, the adsorption energies seem to be governed by a particular orbital ↔ band interaction rather than by the simple nn surface saturation. The van der Waals (vdW) forces are found to play a key role in the adsorption of H2, and merely an energetic adjustment on chemisorbed H adatoms. Neither clear trends are observed for H2 and H adsorption energies, and H2 dissociation energy with respect nn, and nor Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi, making H2 adsorption and dissociation a trend outlier compared to other cases. H2 is found to adsorb and dissociate on Cu(100) surface. On the Cu(111) surface, the rather small H2 adsorption energy would prevent H2 dissociation, regardless if it is thermodynamically driven. On Cu(110) surface, the H2 dissociation process would be endothermic and achievable if adsorption energy is released on surpassing the dissociation energy barrier. On low-coordinated sites on Cu nanorows, vdW plays a key role in the H2 dissociation process, which otherwise is found to be endothermic. Indeed, dispersive forces turn the process markedly exothermic. Nanoparticle Cu systems must display Cu(100) surfaces or facets in order to dissociate H2, vital in many hydrogenation processes.

  19. Prediction of iodide adsorption on oxides by surface complexation modeling with spectroscopic confirmation.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takahiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2009-04-15

    A deficiency in environmental iodine can cause a number of health problems. Understanding how iodine is sequestered by materials is helpful for evaluating and developing methods for minimizing human health effects related to iodine. In addition, (129)I is considered to be strategically important for safety assessment of underground radioactive waste disposal. To assess the long-term stability of disposed radioactive waste, an understanding of (129)I adsorption on geologic materials is essential. Therefore, the adsorption of I(-) on naturally occurring oxides is of environmental concern. The surface charges of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) in NaI electrolyte solutions were measured by potentiometric acid-base titration. The surface charge data were analyzed by means of an extended triple-layer model (ETLM) for surface complexation modeling to obtain the I(-) adsorption reaction and its equilibrium constant. The adsorption of I(-) was determined to be an outer-sphere process from ETLM analysis, which was consistent with independent X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) observation of I(-) adsorbed on HFO. The adsorption equilibrium constants for I(-) on beta-TiO(2) and gamma-Al(2)O(3) were also evaluated by analyzing the surface charge data of these oxides in NaI solution as reported in the literature. Comparison of these adsorption equilibrium constants for HFO, beta-TiO(2), and gamma-Al(2)O(3) based on site-occupancy standard states permitted prediction of I(-) adsorption equilibrium constants for all oxides by means of the Born solvation theory. The batch adsorption data for I(-) on HFO and amorphous aluminum oxide were reasonably reproduced by ETLM with the predicted equilibrium constants, confirming the validity of the present approach. Using the predicted adsorption equilibrium constants, we calculated distribution coefficient (K(d)) values for I(-) adsorption on common soil minerals as a function of pH and ionic strength. PMID:19176225

  20. Influence of particle/solid surface zeta potential on particle adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Savaji, Kunal V; Niitsoo, Olivia; Couzis, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we attempt to understand monolayer formation of spherical particles on a solid surface immersed in a suspension and driven by electrostatic interaction force. The study focuses on the theoretical aspects of the particle adsorption and modeling work based on the random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach is done in order to describe the particle adsorption kinetics and the saturation coverage. The theoretical model is then compared with experimental data obtained under conditions similar to those of the modeling work. Studying the adsorption of polystyrene particles on a silicon wafer in an aqueous system was employed to experimentally validate the theoretical framework. It has been shown both theoretically and experimentally that the particle and solid surface zeta potential values do influence the adsorption kinetics but the effect is too negligible to be of any use in accelerating the kinetics. We have shown that the electrostatically driven particle adsorption is a transport limited process and the rate of transport is not a major function of the zeta potential values of the particle and the solid surface. The faster kinetics seen when the ionic concentration of the suspension is increased is because of the blocking effects and not due to faster approach of particles towards the solid surface. Finally, we have made an important addition to the existing models by incorporating the variation in the flux as a function of particle/solid surface zeta potentials, surface coverage and the randomized position of incidence of an incoming particle on the solid surface. PMID:24996026

  1. Periodic Density Functional Theory Study of Water Adsorption on the a-Quartz (101) Surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Bandura, Andrei V.; Kubicki, James D.; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2011-01-01

    Plane wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the atomic structure, preferred H2O adsorption sites, adsorption energies, and vibrational frequencies for water adsorption on the R-quartz (101) surface. Surface energies and atomic displacements on the vacuum-reconstructed, hydrolyzed, and solvated surfaces have been calculated and compared with available experimental and theoretical data. By considering different initial positions of H2O molecules, the most stable structures of water adsorption at different coverages have been determined. Calculated H2O adsorption energies are in the range -55 to -65 kJ/mol, consistent with experimental data. The lowest and the highest O-H stretching vibrational bands may be attributed to different states of silanol groups on the watercovered surface. The dissociation energy of the silanol group on the surface covered by the adsorption monolayer is estimated to be 80 kJ/mol. The metastable states for the protonated surface bridging O atoms (Obr), which may lead to hydrolysis of siloxane bonds, have been investigated. The calculated formation energy of a Q2 center from a Q3 center on the (101) surface with 2/3 dense monolayer coverage is equal to 70 kJ/mol which is in the range of experimental activation energies for quartz dissolution.

  2. Adsorption of pentacene on (100) vicinal surfaces: role of coordination, surface chemistry and vdWs effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Jeronimo; Kara, Abdelkader

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to low miller index surfaces, vicinal surfaces are characterized by steps and step edges that not only present an interesting atomic landscape for the adsorption organic molecules, but also a unique electronic structure resulting in part from the low coordinated atoms at the step edges. The adsorption of pentacene on the stepped (511), (711), (911) surfaces (respectively 3, 4 and 5-atom wide terraces) of Cu and Ag (coinage transition metals); Pt (reactive transition metal); and Ni (reactive, magnetic transition metal) are studied using density functional theory, in order to investigate the support effects arising from differing surface chemistry. We compare the adsorption energy, adsorption geometry and electronic structure predicted by the PBE functional with those obtained from one of the optimized vdW-DF methods: optB88-vdW. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Science under Contract No. DE-FG02-11ER16243.

  3. Adsorption of oxazole and isoxazole on BNNT surface: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasleen; Singla, Preeti; Goel, Neetu

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption behavior of oxazole and isoxazole heterocycles over the (6,0) zigzag and (5,5) armchair boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has been studied within the formalism of density functional theory (DFT). The adsorption energies, the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analysis and the structural changes at the adsorption site are indicative of covalent adsorption on the zigzag BNNT surface, while the adsorption is physical in nature on the armchair BNNT surface. The role of solvent in improving the adsorption properties over the BNNT surface is elucidated by reoptimizing the structures in aqueous phase. The solvation energy is indicative of remarkable increase in the solubility of BNNTs after adsorption of heterocyclic rings. The Density of states (DOS) Plots, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the quantum molecular descriptors (QMD) are witness to the substantial changes in the electronic properties of the BNNT systems following the attachment of these heterocycles with the tube surface. The study envisages the functionalization of the BNNT as well as its applicability as carrier of the drugs containing heterocyclic rings oxazole and isoxazole with marked sensitivity to the type of adsorbate and the adsorbent.

  4. Surface Enhanced Infrared Studies of 4-Methoxypyridine Adsorption on Gold Film Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Amanda; Unni, Bipinlal; Burgess, Ian J

    2016-03-01

    This work uses electrochemical surface sensitive vibrational spectroscopy to characterize the adsorption of a known metal nanoparticle stabilizer and growth director, 4-methoxypyridine (MOP). Surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) is employed to study the adsorption of 4-methoxypyridine on gold films. Experiments are performed under electrochemical control and in different electrolyte acidities to identify both the extent of protonation of the adsorbed species as well as its orientation with respect to the electrode surface. No evidence of adsorbed conjugated acid is found even when the electrolyte pH is considerably lower than the pKa. Through an analysis of the transition dipole moments, determined from DFT calculations, the SEIRA spectra support an adsorption configuration through the ring nitrogen which is particularly dominant in neutral pH conditions. Adsorption is dependent on both the electrical state of the Au film electrode as well as the presence of ions in the electrolyte that compete for adsorption sites at positive potentials. Combined differential capacitance measurements and spectroscopic data demonstrate that both a horizontal adsorption geometry and a vertical adsorption phase can be induced, with the former being found on negatively charged surfaces in acidic media and the latter over a wide range of polarizations in neutral solutions. PMID:26862774

  5. Theoretical study of adsorption and dissociation of NH3 on pentanuclear Fe(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwiandono, G.; Triyono; Wijaya, K.

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical study regarding the adsorption and dissociation of NH3 molecule on Fe(111) surface has been carried out. The method used was DFT-B3LYP, and the basis sets used were ECP and 6-311G**. This research aimed at giving the theoretical understanding of adsorption and dissociation of NH3 molecule on Fe(111) surface. The adsorption and dissociation were studied based on the energetic parameter, bond length, electron population, vibration and orbital interaction. The result of theoretical calculation revealed that the on top position is the interaction position with the minimum energy for the adsorption of NH3 molecule on Fe(111) surface. The analysis of electron population of the two composing molecular orbitals indicated that the transfer of electron has an important role in the mechanism of adsorption. The visualization of molecular orbital showed that the transfer of electron occurred in the electron pairs of the interacting orbital. Relating to the adsorption mechanism and the overlapping of interaction orbitals, NH3 molecule provides the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) as the interaction pair for the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital (LUMO) on Fe surface. The insignificant difference between the oxidation state of N and H atoms as well as the higher hemolytic N-H bond dissociation energy (compared to heterolytic dissociation) cause the adsorption mechanism of NH3 on Fe(111) model to occur through homolytic-dissociative chemisorption.

  6. Chiral effect of the dissociative adsorption of molecular oxygen on the carbon nanotube surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamina, E. N.; Lebedev, N. G.

    2015-05-01

    The electronic-energy characteristics of the adsorption of the oxygen molecule in the ground triplet and excited singlet states on the surface of chiral and achiral single-walled carbon nanotubes were studied by semiempirical MNDO and PM3 quantum-chemical methods using the molecular cluster model with boundary pseudoatoms. The energies of dissociative adsorption of molecular oxygen on the surface of nanotubes were calculated. The chiral effect of the dissociative adsorption of the O2 molecule was predicted and studied. The diameters of the carbon nanotubes that adsorb molecular oxygen most effectively were predicted. A physical rationale of the obtained dependences was presented.

  7. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) − 2 × 1 surface

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takayuki Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide

    2015-03-14

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) − 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si—O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si—C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption.

  8. Computer simulations for the adsorption of polymers onto surfaces. Annual technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, A.C.

    1992-08-01

    The objective is to develop theoretical models and computer simulations to examine the adsorption of polymers onto a variety of surfaces, and to understand how the chain architecture and conditions such as the surface or solvent affect the extent of adsorption and the morphology of the interfacial layers. Results obtained last year are summarized under the following headings: behavior of copolymers at a liquid-liquid interface, grafted homopolymer chains in a poor solvent, amphiphilic comb copolymers in oil/water solutions, modeling polymer adsorption onto influenza virus, and behavior of polymers in concentrated surfactant solutions. Plans for future work are also given. 17 refs. (DLC)

  9. Surface structural ion adsorption modeling of competitive binding of oxyanions by metal (hydr)oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-02-01

    An important challenge in surface complexation models (SCM) is to connect the molecular microscopic reality to macroscopic adsorption phenomena. This study elucidates the primary factor controlling the adsorption process by analyzing the adsorption and competition of PO{sub 4}, AsO{sub 4}, and SeO{sub 3}. The authors show that the structure of the surface-complex acting in the dominant electrostatic field can be ascertained as the primary controlling adsorption factor. The surface species of arsenate are identical with those of phosphate and the adsorption behavior is very similar. On the basis of the selenite adsorption, The authors show that the commonly used 1pK models are incapable to incorporate in the adsorption modeling the correct bidentate binding mechanism found by spectroscopy. The use of the bidentate mechanism leads to a proton-oxyanion ratio and corresponding pH dependence that are too large. The inappropriate intrinsic charge attribution to the primary surface groups and the condensation of the inner sphere surface complex to a point charge are responsible for this behavior of commonly used 2pK models. Both key factors are differently defined in the charge distributed multi-site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model and are based in this model on a surface structural approach. The CD-MUSIC model can successfully describe the macroscopic adsorption phenomena using the surface speciation and binding mechanisms as found by spectroscopy. The model is also able to predict the anion competition well. The charge distribution in the interface is in agreement with the observed structure of surface complexes.

  10. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration. PMID:26720514

  11. A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: The charge distribution (CD) model

    SciTech Connect

    Hiemstra, T.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.

    1996-05-10

    Cation and anion adsorption at the solid/solution interface of metal hydroxides plays an important role in several fields of chemistry, including colloid and interface chemistry, soil chemistry and geochemistry, aquatic chemistry, environmental chemistry, catalysis, and chemical engineering. An ion adsorption model for metal hydroxides has been developed which deals with the observation that in the case of inner sphere complex formation only part of the surface complex is incorporated into the surface by a ligand exchange reaction while the other part is located in the Stern layer. The charge distribution (CD) concept of Pauling, used previously in the multi site complexation (MUSIC) model approach, is extended to account for adsorbed surface complexes. In the new model, surface complexes are not treated as point charges, but are considered as having a spatial distribution of charge in the interfacial region. The new CD model can describe within a single conceptual framework all important experimental adsorption phenomena, taking into account the chemical composition of the crystal surface. The CD model has been applied to one of the most difficult and challenging ion adsorption phenomena, i.e., PO{sub 4} adsorption on goethite, and successfully describes simultaneously the basic charging behavior of goethite, the concentration, pH, and salt dependency of adsorption, the shifts in the zeta potentials and isoelectric point (IEP), and the OH/P exchange ratio. This is all achieved within the constraint that the experimental surface speciation found from in situ IR spectroscopy is also described satisfactorily.

  12. Surface Curvature Relation to Protein Adsorption for Carbon-based Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Chong, Yu; Ge, Cuicui; Weber, Jeffrey K; Bell, David R; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of proteins onto carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is dictated by hydrophobic and π-π interactions between aliphatic and aromatic residues and the conjugated CBN surface. Accordingly, protein adsorption is highly sensitive to topological constraints imposed by CBN surface structure; in particular, adsorption capacity is thought to increase as the incident surface curvature decreases. In this work, we couple Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with fluorescence spectroscopy experiments to characterize this curvature dependence in detail for the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). By studying BSA adsorption onto carbon nanotubes of increasing radius (featuring descending local curvatures) and a flat graphene sheet, we confirm that adsorption capacity is indeed enhanced on flatter surfaces. Naïve fluorescence experiments featuring multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), however, conform to an opposing trend. To reconcile these observations, we conduct additional MD simulations with MWCNTs that match those prepared in experiments; such simulations indicate that increased mass to surface area ratios in multi-walled systems explain the observed discrepancies. In reduction, our work substantiates the inverse relationship between protein adsorption capacity and surface curvature and further demonstrates the need for subtle consideration in experimental and simulation design. PMID:26041015

  13. Surface Curvature Relation to Protein Adsorption for Carbon-based Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Chong, Yu; Ge, Cuicui; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Bell, David R.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of proteins onto carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is dictated by hydrophobic and π-π interactions between aliphatic and aromatic residues and the conjugated CBN surface. Accordingly, protein adsorption is highly sensitive to topological constraints imposed by CBN surface structure; in particular, adsorption capacity is thought to increase as the incident surface curvature decreases. In this work, we couple Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with fluorescence spectroscopy experiments to characterize this curvature dependence in detail for the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). By studying BSA adsorption onto carbon nanotubes of increasing radius (featuring descending local curvatures) and a flat graphene sheet, we confirm that adsorption capacity is indeed enhanced on flatter surfaces. Naïve fluorescence experiments featuring multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), however, conform to an opposing trend. To reconcile these observations, we conduct additional MD simulations with MWCNTs that match those prepared in experiments; such simulations indicate that increased mass to surface area ratios in multi-walled systems explain the observed discrepancies. In reduction, our work substantiates the inverse relationship between protein adsorption capacity and surface curvature and further demonstrates the need for subtle consideration in experimental and simulation design. PMID:26041015

  14. Surface energetics of alkaline-earth metal oxides: Trends in stability and adsorption of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Nørskov, Jens K.; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    We present a systematic theoretical investigation of the surface properties, stability, and reactivity of rocksalt type alkaline-earth metal oxides including MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The accuracy of commonly used exchange-correlation density functionals (LDA, PBE, RPBE, PBEsol, BEEF-vdW, and hybrid HSE) and random-phase approximation (RPA) is evaluated and compared to existing experimental values. Calculated surface energies of the four most stable surface facets under vacuum conditions, the (100) surface, the metal and oxygen terminated octopolar (111), and the (110) surfaces, exhibit a monotonic increase in stability from MgO to BaO. On the MgO(100) surface, adsorption of CO, NO, and CH4 is characterized by physisorption while H2O chemisorbs, which is in agreement with experimental findings. We further use the on-top metal adsorption of CO and NO molecules to map out the surface energetics of each alkaline-earth metal oxide surface. The considered functionals all qualitatively predict similar adsorption energy trends. The ordering between the adsorption energies on different surface facets can be attributed to differences in the local geometrical surface structure and the electronic structure of the metal constituent of the alkaline-earth metal oxide. The striking observation that CO adsorption strength is weaker than NO adsorption on the (100) terraces as the period of the alkaline-earth metal in the oxide increases is analyzed in detail in terms of charge redistribution within the σ and π channels of adsorbates. Finally, we also present oxygen adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies in these oxide systems.

  15. Surface reactions, solvation and adsorption phenomena of electrolytic adlayers on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seng Woon

    Fundamental understandings of electrolytic adlayers are important to areas like: batteries, ultra-capacitors, fuel cells, corrosion and atmospheric chemistry. In this dissertation, interactions of electrolytic adlayers are systematically examined using ultra-high vacuum surface analytical techniques. In particular, interactions of water with constituents of electrolytic adlayers are closely followed. On clean Ag(110), water desorbs at 165 K and adsorbs as crystalline ice at 145 K. During continuous adsorption, water initially adsorbs with its molecular plane parallel to the surface, and then gradually tilts towards the surface normal as more water adsorbs. A layer-by-layer adsorption model is proposed for crystalline ice growth on Ag(110). When water is separately coadsorbed with hydroxyl and carbonate, water is stabilized to temperatures as high as 220 and 300 K, respectively. Both anions exhibit great surface solvation. An extended bilayer model is proposed for OH interactions with water, and isotopic exchange experiments have illustrated that (1) the extent of proton mobility in the adlayers, and (2) the migration of hydroxide ion into the water-ice multilayer. On Pt(111), mutual displacement of water and methanol occurs in electrolytic adlayers. Adsorbed methanol monolayer is destabilized when it is co-adsorbed with hydrogen. However, methanol monolayer can be restabilized when water is introduced to the adlayer system. With addition of excess water, destabilization induced by hydrogen can be completely removed and methanol behaves as if it interacts only with water. Interactions of Ru-modified Pt(111) with electrolytic adlayer has been studied. Ru adlayers were deposited with a low power electron beam heated evaporation source, and Ru can be probed with molecular nitrogen. Optimum activity of Ru/Pt(111) surfaces occurs when they are thermally activated to 573 K. Water can be stabilized to temperatures as high as 250 K on these surfaces, and partial

  16. Surface adsorption behaviour of milk whey protein and pectin mixtures under conditions of air-water interface saturation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Adrián A; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Patino, Juan M Rodríguez; Rubiolo, Amelia C; Santiago, Liliana G

    2011-07-01

    Milk whey proteins (MWP) and pectins (Ps) are biopolymer ingredients commonly used in the manufacture of colloidal food products. Therefore, knowledge of the interfacial characteristics of these biopolymers and their mixtures is very important for the design of food dispersion formulations (foams and/or emulsions). In this paper, we examine the adsorption and surface dilatational behaviour of MWP/Ps systems under conditions in which biopolymers can saturate the air-water interface on their own. Experiments were performed at constant temperature (20 °C), pH 7 and ionic strength 0.05 M. Two MWP samples, β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) and whey protein concentrate (WPC), and two Ps samples, low-methoxyl pectin (LMP) and high-methoxyl pectin (HMP) were evaluated. The contribution of biopolymers (MWP and Ps) to the interfacial properties of mixed systems was evaluated on the basis of their individual surface molecular characteristics. Biopolymer bulk concentration capable of saturating the air-water interface was estimated from surface pressure isotherms. Under conditions of interfacial saturation, dynamic adsorption behaviour (surface pressure and dilatational rheological characteristics) of MWP/Ps systems was discussed from a kinetic point of view, in terms of molecular diffusion, penetration and configurational rearrangement at the air-water interface. The main adsorption mechanism in MWP/LMP mixtures might be the MWP interfacial segregation due to the thermodynamic incompatibility between MWP and LMP (synergistic mechanism); while the interfacial adsorption in MWP/HMP mixtures could be characterized by a competitive mechanism between MWP and HMP at the air-water interface (antagonistic mechanism). The magnitude of these phenomena could be closely related to differences in molecular composition and/or aggregation state of MWP (β-LG and WPC). PMID:21440425

  17. Molecular simulation of fibronectin adsorption onto polyurethane surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyethylene glycol-based polyurethanes have been widely used in biomedical applications, however are prone to swelling. A natural polyol, castor oil can be incorporated into these polyurethanes to control the degree of the swelling, which alters mechanical properties and protein adsorption characte...

  18. Indigo adsorption on a silicate surface: a theoretical density functional study.

    PubMed

    Iuga, Cristina; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Ortíz, Elba; Vivier-Bunge, Annik

    2014-07-01

    The applicability of naturally available low-cost and eco-friendly adsorbent materials for the removal of hazardous dyes from aqueous waste is of increasing environmental interest. Among the adsorption treatments available, clays seem to be economically attractive due to their abundance and adsorption capabilities. Indeed, many ancient coloring materials utilized clays mixed with natural dyes (e.g., indigo in Maya Blue). In this work, we performed a quantum-mechanical theoretical study of the adsorption of the indigo molecule onto the (001) surface of a phyllosilicate. Different methods and approaches were applied and compared. We found that the presence of a tetrahedral charge and a sodium counterion significantly increased the adsorption energy of the indigo molecule. The vibrational spectrum of the dye-surface system was also studied, and some interesting shifts in the frequencies of the main vibrational modes of indigo due to its interaction with the surface of the clay mineral were identified. PMID:24958302

  19. Predicting enzyme adsorption to lignin films by calculating enzyme surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Sammond, Deanne W; Yarbrough, John M; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Bomble, Yannick J; Hobdey, Sarah E; Decker, Stephen R; Taylor, Larry E; Resch, Michael G; Bozell, Joseph J; Himmel, Michael E; Vinzant, Todd B; Crowley, Michael F

    2014-07-25

    The inhibitory action of lignin on cellulase cocktails is a major challenge to the biological saccharification of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Although the mechanism remains unclear, hydrophobic interactions between enzymes and lignin are hypothesized to drive adsorption. Here we evaluate the role of hydrophobic interactions in enzyme-lignin binding. The hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface was quantified using an estimation of the clustering of nonpolar atoms, identifying potential interaction sites. The adsorption of enzymes to lignin surfaces, measured using the quartz crystal microbalance, correlates to the hydrophobic cluster scores. Further, these results suggest a minimum hydrophobic cluster size for a protein to preferentially adsorb to lignin. The impact of electrostatic contribution was ruled out by comparing the isoelectric point (pI) values to the adsorption of proteins to lignin surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability to predict enzyme-lignin adsorption and could potentially be used to design improved cellulase cocktails, thus lowering the overall cost of biofuel production. PMID:24876380

  20. Adsorption of heterobifunctional 4-nitrophenol on the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shong, Bonggeun; Hellstern, Thomas R.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2016-08-01

    We report the adsorption chemistry of a heterobifunctional molecule, 4-nitrophenol, on the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface. X-ray photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy experiments and density functional theory calculations were used to determine the adsorption products. The results show that 4-nitrophenol reacts with the Ge surface through either one or both of the sbnd OH or sbnd NO2 functionalities. It was found that the fraction of dually and singly tethered adsorbates varies according to reaction conditions: namely, singly tethered adsorbates are favored at higher adsorbate coverages and lower adsorption temperatures. These variations are explained by a two-step adsorption mechanism for 4-nitrophenol, in which geometrical limitations of the adsorbates on the surface affect the product distribution.

  1. Predicting Enzyme Adsorption to Lignin Films by Calculating Enzyme Surface Hydrophobicity*

    PubMed Central

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Yarbrough, John M.; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Bomble, Yannick J.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Taylor, Larry E.; Resch, Michael G.; Bozell, Joseph J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory action of lignin on cellulase cocktails is a major challenge to the biological saccharification of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Although the mechanism remains unclear, hydrophobic interactions between enzymes and lignin are hypothesized to drive adsorption. Here we evaluate the role of hydrophobic interactions in enzyme-lignin binding. The hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface was quantified using an estimation of the clustering of nonpolar atoms, identifying potential interaction sites. The adsorption of enzymes to lignin surfaces, measured using the quartz crystal microbalance, correlates to the hydrophobic cluster scores. Further, these results suggest a minimum hydrophobic cluster size for a protein to preferentially adsorb to lignin. The impact of electrostatic contribution was ruled out by comparing the isoelectric point (pI) values to the adsorption of proteins to lignin surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability to predict enzyme-lignin adsorption and could potentially be used to design improved cellulase cocktails, thus lowering the overall cost of biofuel production. PMID:24876380

  2. Adsorption of nonmetallic elements on defect-free MgO(001) surface - DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašti, Igor A.; Baljozović, Miloš; Skorodumova, Natalia V.

    2015-02-01

    Adsorption of 11 non-metals (H, B, C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl and Br) on defect-free MgO(001) surface was investigate using DFT approach. Adsorption energies were found to be between - 0.56 eV (hydrogen adsorption) and - 2.63 eV (carbon adsorption). Charge transfer from substrate to adsorbate was observed to follow the periodicity in the Periodic Table of Elements, as increases from left to right and decreases from top to bottom. All investigated adsorbates prefer oxygen sites on MgO surface. The analysis of adsorbate-MgO(001) electronic structure suggested that the electronic structure of the O adsorption center and adsorbate atom is molecule-like and there is no strong interaction with MgO electronic bands. Based on the obtained dataset for adsorption energies of selected non-metallic adsorbates (X) the reactivity of MgO towards the bond cleavage in the cases of X-X, H-X and HO-X bonds was discussed. Obtained results point to weak reactivity of MgO(001) towards atomic adsorption and low activity for bond cleavage. However, these results can be used as a starting point for the functionalization of MgO, particularly in the cases where bond cleavage activity and surface-mediated stabilization of dissociation products are desired.

  3. Adsorption of 2-propanol on MgO surface: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuente, Silvia A.; Ferretti, Cristián A.; Domancich, Nicolás F.; Díez, Verónica K.; Apesteguía, Carlos R.; Di Cosimo, J. Isabel; Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Castellani, Norberto J.

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of 2-propanol (or isopropanol) on MgO was studied using infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) simulations. The analysis of IR spectra indicates that the molecule can adsorb either molecularly or dissociatively. DFT calculations show that the adsorption mode depends on the active site of the catalyst. While on perfect terrace it adsorbs non-dissociatively, on edge and on threefold coordinated O anion (O-corner sites) the adsorption occurs dissociatively by breaking the Osbnd H bond without activation barrier giving 2-propoxide and a surface hydroxyl group. Calculations also suggest that vacant oxygen centers on terrace, edge and corner are also possible sites for non-dissociative adsorption. On Mg ions located at corners the adsorption is strong but non-dissociative, while on a Mg vacancy at the same position the molecule easily dissociates. Frequency modes are also calculated and compared in detail with experimental IR spectra.

  4. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-06

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M=Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M=Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  5. The effects of Concentration and Salinity on Polymer Adsorption Isotherm at Sandstone Rock Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M.; Ben Mahmud, H.

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) polymers on sandstone rock surface was studied by static adsorption experiments. Total of 10 Runs of static experiments were conducted in test tubes by mixing the desired solution with crushed rock sample, at temperature of 25 °C, and salinity range from 0-4 wt%. The results are in conformity with Langmuir's isotherm. Ten different isotherms were generated at each Run. The initial polymer concentration was varied from 0.3-2.1 g/l. The effects of salinity have been studied by observation on Langmuir adsorption coefficients (Y and K). The results show that the adsorption coefficient (Y) was found to have linear relationship with salinity. The adsorption coefficient (K) was found to be related to salinity by a quadratic relationship.

  6. Effective diffusion in the region between two surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero Valdes, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a formula for the effective diffusion operator obtained by projecting the three-dimensional diffusion equation onto a two-dimensional plane, assuming reflective boundary conditions at two surfaces in three-dimensional space and a finite transversal stabilization rate.

  7. Effective diffusion in the region between two surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valero Valdes, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a formula for the effective diffusion operator obtained by projecting the three-dimensional diffusion equation onto a two-dimensional plane, assuming reflective boundary conditions at two surfaces in three-dimensional space and a finite transversal stabilization rate. PMID:27627260

  8. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations. PMID:24811649

  9. Observation of adsorption behavior of biomolecules on ferroelectric crystal surfaces with polarization domain patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoaki; Isobe, Akiko; Ogino, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    Lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) is one of the ferroelectric crystals that exhibit spontaneous polarization domain patterns on its surface. We observed the polarization-dependent adsorption of avidin molecules, which are positively charged in a buffer solution at pH 7.0, on LiTaO3 surfaces caused by electrostatic interaction at an electrostatic double layer using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Avidin adsorption in the buffer solution was confirmed by scratching the substrate surfaces using the AFM cantilever, and the adsorption patterns were found to depend on the avidin concentration. When KCl was added to the buffer solution to weaken the electrostatic double layer interaction between avidin molecules and LiTaO3 surfaces, adsorption domain patterns disappeared. From the comparison between the adsorption and chemically etched domain patterns, it was found that avidin molecule adsorption is enhanced on negatively polarized domains, indicating that surface polarization should be taken into account in observing biomolecule behaviors on ferroelectric crystals.

  10. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations.

  11. Effect of Surface Adsorption on Temporal and Spatial Broadening in Micro Free Flow Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Matthew; Harstad, Rachel K; Bowser, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    Analyte adsorption onto surfaces presents a challenge for many separations, often becoming a significant source of peak broadening and asymmetry. We have shown that surface adsorption has no effect on peak position or spatial broadening in micro free flow electrophoresis (μFFE) separations. Surface adsorption does affect the time it takes an analyte to travel through the μFFE separation channel and therefore contributes to temporal broadening. These results were confirmed using μFFE separations of fluorescein, rhodamine 110, and rhodamine 123 in a low ionic strength buffer to promote surface adsorption. Peak widths and asymmetries were measured in both the temporal and spatial dimensions. Under these conditions rhodamine 123 exhibited significant interactions with the separation channel surface, causing increased peak broadening and asymmetry in the temporal dimension. Broadening or asymmetry in the spatial dimension was not significantly different than that of fluorescein, which did not interact with the capillary surface. The effect of strong surface interactions was assessed using μFFE separations of Chromeo P503 labeled myoglobin and cytochrome c. Myoglobin and cytochrome c were well resolved and gave rise to symmetrical peaks in the spatial dimension even under conditions where permanent adsorption onto the separation channel surface occurred. PMID:26496470

  12. Imaging of Formaldehyde Adsorption and Diffusion on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhenrong; Tang, Miru; Wang, Zhitao; Ke, Zhu; Xia, Yaobiao; Park, Kenneth T.; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Ge, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Surface reactions of formaldehyde with reduced TiO2(110) surfaces have been studied using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT). STM results show that formaldehyde preferably adsorbs on the bridging bonded oxygen (Ob) vacancy (VO) defect site. Bias-dependent STM images show that both the Ti-bound CH2O and the VO-bound CH2O are positioned between the Ob row and the Ti row. The VO-bound formaldehyde rotates at 95 K. It starts to diffuse along the Ob row as –CH2– at ~170 K and starts to diffuse along the Ti row as a molecule at ~215 K. However, the stabilities and the configurations of the Ti-bound and the VO-bound formaldehyde calculated using DFT are not in line with the experimental results. The values of diffusion barriers determined experimentally and theoretically are also different. The discrepancy between the experiment and theory indicates the presence of a complex charge distribution related to the defects.

  13. Ion beam microtexturing and enhanced surface diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed with particular emphasis on microtexturing induced by the deliberate deposition of controllable amounts of an impurity material onto a solid surface while simultaneously sputtering the surface with an ion beam. Experimental study of the optical properties of microtextured surfaces is described. Measurements of both absorptance as a function of wavelength and emissivity are presented. A computer code is described that models the sputtering and ion reflection processes involved in microtexture formation.

  14. Ab-initio study of the Y adsorption and YN formation on the GaN(000 1 bar): Diffusion pathways and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-08-01

    Yttrium (Y) adsorption and yttrium nitride (YN) thin film formation on the GaN(000 1 bar) surface are investigated using first principles total energy calculations. Results show that for Ga rich conditions the most stable configuration for Y adsorption is at a Bridge site. Nudged elastic band calculations show that the Y diffusion through the GaN surface is possible with low energy barriers. However, the most stable configuration corresponds to the geometry in which the Y atom migrates in to the first layer, forming an YN pair and displacing a Ga atom to the T4(2) site. Also, it is found that the increase of Y atoms up to a full monolayer is not energetically favorable, then the formation of an Y layer on top of the surface is not possible. However, under N-rich conditions the formation of a cubic-like YN bilayer above the surface becomes stable. Total and partial density of states show that the formation of YN on top of the Ga-terminated surface modify the electronic properties. Nevertheless, metallic behavior remains after YN formation.

  15. Selective adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on functional TiO2 nano-adsorbents: surface physic-chemical properties determined adsorption activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shiguang; Zhang, Jianghua; Shao, Mingxue; Zhang, Xia; Liu, Yufeng; Xu, Junli; Meng, Hao; Han, Yide

    2015-04-01

    Surface functionalized nanoparticles are efficient adsorbents which have shown good potential for protein separation. In this work, we chose two different types of organic molecules, oleic acid (OA) and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GPTMS), to functionalize the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles, and we studied the effects of this modification on their surface physicochemical properties in correlation with their selective adsorption of proteins. The results showed that the surface zeta potential and the surface water wettability of the modified TiO2 were significantly changed in comparison with the original TiO2 nanoparticles. The adsorption activities of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on these functionalized TiO2 samples were investigated under different conditions, including pH values, contact time, ion strength, and initial protein concentration. In comparison with the non-specific adsorption of original TiO2, however, both the OA-TiO2 and GPTMS-TiO2 exhibited increased BHb adsorption and decreased BSA adsorption at the same time. Using a binary protein mixture as the adsorption object, a higher separation factor (SF) was obtained for OA-TiO2 under optimum conditions. The different adsorption activities of BHb and BSA on the modified TiO2 were correlated with different interactions at the protein/solid interface, and the chemical force as well as the electrostatic force played an important role in the selective adsorption process.

  16. Adsorption of Poly(methyl methacrylate) on Concave Al2O3 Surfaces in Nanoporous Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nunnery, Grady; Hershkovits, Eli; Tannenbaum, Allen; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of polymer molecular weight and surface curvature on the adsorption of polymers onto concave surfaces. Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) of various molecular weights was adsorbed onto porous aluminum oxide membranes having various pore sizes, ranging from 32 to 220 nm. The surface coverage, expressed as repeat units per unit surface area, was observed to vary linearly with molecular weight for molecular weights below ~120 000 g/mol. The coverage was independent of molecular weight above this critical molar mass, as was previously reported for the adsorption of PMMA on convex surfaces. Furthermore, the coverage varied linearly with pore size. A theoretical model was developed to describe curvature-dependent adsorption by considering the density gradient that exists between the surface and the edge of the adsorption layer. According to this model, the density gradient of the adsorbed polymer segments scales inversely with particle size, while the total coverage scales linearly with particle size, in good agreement with experiment. These results show that the details of the adsorption of polymers onto concave surfaces with cylindrical geometries can be used to calculate molecular weight (below a critical molecular weight) if pore size is known. Conversely, pore size can also be determined with similar adsorption experiments. Most significantly, for polymers above a critical molecular weight, the precise molecular weight need not be known in order to determine pore size. Moreover, the adsorption developed and validated in this work can be used to predict coverage also onto surfaces with different geometries. PMID:19415910

  17. Effect of bulk aging on surface diffusion of glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brian, Caleb W.; Zhu, Lei; Yu, Lian

    2014-02-01

    The effect of physical aging on surface diffusion has been determined for two organic glasses, Indomethacin and Nifedipine. The two systems exhibit similar aging kinetics typical of organic glasses. Surface diffusivity remains unchanged despite significant bulk aging that nearly equilibrates the systems and increases the bulk relaxation time by orders of magnitude. The finding is relevant for understanding the stability of amorphous materials and the formation of low-energy glasses by vapor deposition.

  18. Curved and diffuse interface effects on the nuclear surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomietz, V. M.; Lukyanov, S. V.; Sanzhur, A. I.

    2012-08-01

    We redefine the surface tension coefficient for a nuclear Fermi-liquid drop with a finite diffuse layer. Following the Gibbs-Tolman concept, we introduce the equimolar radius Re of the droplet surface at which the surface tension is applied and the radius of tension surface Rs which provides the minimum of the surface tension coefficient σ. This procedure allows us to derive both the surface tension and the corresponding curvature correction (Tolman length) correctly for the curved and diffuse interface. We point out that the curvature correction depends significantly on the finite diffuse interface. We show that Tolman's length ξ is negative for a nuclear Fermi-liquid drop. The value of the Tolman length is only slightly sensitive to the Skyrme force parametrization and equals ξ=-0.36 fm.

  19. Benchmark Experimental Data Set and Assessment of Adsorption Free Energy for Peptide-Surface Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing interest in protein adsorption in fields ranging from bionanotechnology to biomedical engineering, there is a growing need to understand protein-surface interactions at a fundamental level, such as the interaction between individual amino acid residues of a protein and functional groups presented by a surface. However, relatively little data are available that experimentally provide a quantitative, comparative measure of these types of interactions. To address this deficiency, the objective of this study was to generate a database of experimentally measured standard state adsorption free energy (ΔGoads) values for a wide variety of amino acid residue-surface interactions using a host-guest peptide and alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with polymer-like functionality as the model system. The host-guest amino acid sequence was synthesized in the form of TGTG-X-GTGT where G & T are glycine and threonine amino acid residues and X represents a variable residue. In this paper, we report ΔGoads values for the adsorption of twelve different types of the host-guest peptides on a set of nine different SAM surfaces, for a total of 108 peptide-surface systems. The ΔGoads values for these 108 peptide-surface combinations show clear trends in adsorption behavior that are dependent on both peptide composition and surface chemistry. These data provide a benchmark experimental data set from which fundamental interactions that govern peptide and protein adsorption behavior can be better understood and compared. PMID:19432493

  20. Adsorption behavior of antimony(III) oxyanions on magnetite surface in aqueous organic acid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Vinit K.; Bera, Santanu; Narasimhan, S. V.; Velmurugan, S.

    2013-02-01

    Antimony(III) adsorption is observed on magnetite (Fe3O4) surface under acidic and reducing condition through surface hydroxyl (SOH) groups bonding on Fe3O4 surface. Desorption of adsorbed Sb(III) is observed from Fe3O4 surface along with iron release in organic acid at 85 °C after 5 h of experiment. Tartaric acid (TA) shows minimum Sb(III) adsorption on Fe3O4 among the organic acid studied. The reason is TA having two sets of adjacent functional groups viz. Odbnd Csbnd OH and Csbnd OH which are responsible for the formation of five-membered bidendate chelate with Sb(III). Other oxyanions, cations or complexing agents along with TA influences the Sb(III) adsorption on Fe3O4. The surface of magnetite is modified by the addition of fatty acids viz. Lauric acid, benzoic acid to bind the Ssbnd OH groups present on the surface. This results in delaying the process of adsorption without changing the quantity of saturation adsorption of Sb(III) on Fe3O4 surface.

  1. Adsorption and dissociation of molecular hydrogen on the (0001) surface of double hexagonal close packed americium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dholabhai, P. P.; Ray, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen molecule adsorption on the (0001) surface of double hexagonal packed americium has been studied in detail within the framework of density functional theory using a full-potential all-electron linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbitals method (FP-L/APW+lo). Weak molecular hydrogen adsorptions were observed. Adsorption energies were optimized with respect to the distance of the adsorbates from the surface for three approach positions at three adsorption sites, namely t1 (one-fold top), b2 (two-fold bridge), and h3 (three-fold hollow) sites. Adsorption energies were computed at the scalar-relativistic level (no spin-orbit coupling NSOC) and at the fully relativistic level (with spin-orbit coupling SOC). The most stable configuration corresponds to a horizontal adsorption with the molecular approach being perpendicular to a lattice vector. The surface coverage is equivalent to one-fourth of a monolayer (ML), with the adsorption energies at the NSOC and SOC theoretical levels being 0.0997 eV and 0.1022 eV, respectively. The respective distance of the hydrogen molecule from the surface and hydrogen-hydrogen distance was found to be 2.645 Å and 0.789 Å, respectively. The work functions decreased and the net magnetic moments remained almost unchanged in all cases compared with the corresponding quantities of bare dhcp Am (0001) surface. The adsorbate-substrate interactions have been analyzed in detail using the partial charges inside the muffin-tin spheres, difference charge density distributions, and the local density of states. The effects of adsorption on the Am 5f electron localization-delocalization characteristics have been discussed. Reaction barrier for the dissociation of hydrogen molecule has been presented.

  2. A semiflexible alternating copolymer chain adsorption on a flat and a fluctuating surface.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pramod Kumar

    2010-04-21

    A lattice model of a directed self-avoiding walk is used to investigate adsorption properties of a semiflexible alternating copolymer chain on an impenetrable flat and fluctuating surface in two (square, hexagonal and rectangular lattice) and three dimensions (cubic lattice). In the cubic lattice case the surface is two-dimensional impenetrable flat and in two dimensions the surface is a fluctuating impenetrable line (hexagonal lattice) and also flat impenetrable line (square and rectangular lattice). Walks of the copolymer chains are directed perpendicular to the plane of the surface and at a suitable value of monomer surface attraction, the copolymer chain gets adsorbed on the surface. To calculate the exact value of the monomer surface attraction, the directed walk model has been solved analytically using the generating function method to discuss results when one type of monomer of the copolymer chain has attractive, repulsive or no interaction with the surface. Results obtained in the flat surface case show that, for a stiffer copolymer chain, adsorption transition occurs at a smaller value of monomer surface attraction than a flexible copolymer chain while in the case of a fluctuating surface, the adsorption transition point is independent of bending energy of the copolymer chain. These features are similar to that of a semiflexible homopolymer chain adsorption. PMID:21389548

  3. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  4. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S

    2015-02-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  5. The temperature effect on the adsorption mechanism of polyacrylamide on the silica surface and its stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The influence of temperature on the adsorption mechanism of polyacrylamide (PAM) on the silica surface was studied in the temperature range 15-35 °C. The structure of polymer adsorption layer was determined from spectrophotometric, viscosity, surface charge and zeta potential measurements. These methods enable determination of the following parameters: adsorbed amount of polymer, macromolecules conformation in the solution and thickness of the polymer adsorption layer, surface charge density and zeta potential of SiO2 particles in the absence and presence of PAM. The measurements of stability of silica suspension without and with adsorbed polyacrylamide were also carried out. The obtained results indicate that temperature influences the conformation of PVA chains in the solution and the structure of polymer adsorption layer. The temperature rise causes polymer coils developing which results in: the decrease of polymer adsorption, the increase of linear dimensions of PAM chains in the solution, the creation of thicker adsorption layer of the polymer on the solid surface and the slight lowering of zeta potential of solid particles. Taking into account the conformational changes of polymer chains with the increasing temperature main reasons responsible for stability of the investigated system were given.

  6. Protein PEGylation attenuates adsorption and aggregation on a negatively charged and moderately hydrophobic polymer surface.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sheetal S; Przybycien, Todd M; Tilton, Robert D

    2010-12-01

    Covalent grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) chains to proteins ("PEGylation") is emerging as an effective technique to increase the in vivo circulation time and efficacy of protein drugs. PEGylated protein adsorption at a variety of solid/aqueous interfaces is a critical aspect of their manufacture, storage, and delivery. A special category of block copolymer, PEGylated proteins have one or more water-soluble linear polymer (PEG) blocks and a single globular protein block that each exert distinct intermolecular and surface interaction forces. We report the impact of PEGylation on protein adsorption at the interface between aqueous solutions and solid films of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG), a moderately hydrophobic and negatively charged polymer. Using the model protein lysozyme with controlled degrees of PEGylation, we employ total internal reflection fluorescence techniques to measure adsorption isotherms, adsorption reversibility, and the extent of surface-induced aggregation. Lysozyme PEGylation reduces the extent of protein adsorption and surface-induced aggregation and increases the reversibility of adsorption compared to the unconjugated protein. Results are interpreted in terms of steric forces among grafted PEG chains and their effects on protein-protein interactions and protein orientation on the surface. PMID:21067142

  7. Theoretical Study of Trimethylacetic Acid Adsorption on CeO 2 (111) Surface

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Weina; Thevuthasan, S.; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-11

    We investigated trimethylacetic acid (TMAA) adsorption on stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient CeO2(111) surfaces using density functional theory that accounts for the on-site Coulomb interaction via a Hubbard term (DFT+U) and long-range dispersion correction. Both the molecular state and dissociative state (TMAA → TMA– + H+) were identified on stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient CeO2(111) surfaces. For the stoichiometric surface, two thermodynamically favorable configurations with adsorption energies of the order of -30 kcal/mol are identified; one is a molecule adsorption state, and the other one is a dissociative state. For the oxygen-deficient surface, dissociative states are more favorable than molecular states. Moreover, the mostmore » favorable configuration is the dissociative adsorption of TMAA with the adsorption energy of the order of -77 kcal/mol. The dissociated TMA moiety takes the position of oxygen vacancy, forming three Ce–O bonds. The signature vibrational frequencies for these thermodynamically stable structures are reported as well as their electronic structures. The effects of long-range dispersion interactions are found to be negligible for geometries but important for adsorption energies.« less

  8. p-Chlorophenol adsorption on activated carbons with basic surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenc-Grabowska, Ewa; Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Machnikowski, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption of p-chlorophenol (PCP) from aqueous solution on activated carbons (ACs) with basic surface properties has been studied. The ACs were prepared by two methods. The first method was based on the modification of a commercial CWZ AC by high temperature treatment in an atmosphere of ammonia, nitrogen and hydrogen. The second approach comprised the carbonization followed by activation of N-enriched polymers and coal tar pitch using CO 2 and steam as activation agent. The resultant ACs were characterized in terms of porous structure, elemental composition and surface chemistry (pH PZC, acid/base titration, XPS). The adsorption of PCP was carried out from an aqueous solution in static conditions. Equilibrium adsorption isotherm was of L2 type for polymer-based ACs, whereas L3-type isotherm was observed for CWZ ACs series. The Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity was related to the porous structure and the amount of basic sites. A good correlation was found between the adsorption capacity and the volume of micropores with a width < 1.4 nm for polymer-based ACs. Higher nitrogen content, including that in basic form, did not correspond to the enhanced adsorption of PCP from aqueous solution. The competitive effect of water molecule adsorption on the PCP uptake is discussed.

  9. Adsorption of sugars on Al- and Ga-doped boron nitride surfaces: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Ahmed A.; Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Badawi, Ashraf; Maarouf, Ahmed A.

    2016-07-01

    Molecular adsorption on surfaces is a key element for many applications, including sensing and catalysis. Non-invasive sugar sensing has been an active area of research due to its importance to diabetes care. The adsorption of sugars on a template surface study is at the heart of matter. Here, we study doped hexagonal boron nitride sheets (h-BNNs) as adsorbing and sensing template for glucose and glucosamine. Using first principles calculations, we find that the adsorption of glucose and glucosamine on h-BNNs is significantly enhanced by the substitutional doping of the sheet with Al and Ga. Including long range van der Waals corrections gives adsorption energies of about 2 eV. In addition to the charge transfer occurring between glucose and the Al/Ga-doped BN sheets, the adsorption alters the size of the band gap, allowing for optical detection of adsorption. We also find that Al-doped boron nitride sheet is better than Ga-doped boron nitride sheet to enhance the adsorption energy of glucose and glucosamine. The results of our work can be potentially utilized when designing support templates for glucose and glucosamine.

  10. Adsorption of plasmid DNA to mineral surfaces and protection against DNase I.

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, G; Lorenz, M G; Wackernagel, W

    1991-01-01

    The adsorption of [3H]thymidine-labeled plasmid DNA (pHC314; 2.4 kb) of different conformations to chemically pure sand was studied in a flowthrough microenvironment. The extent of adsorption was affected by the concentration and valency of cations, indicating a charge-dependent process. Bivalent cations (Mg2+, Ca2+) were 100-fold more effective than monovalent cations (Na+, K+, NH4+). Quantitative adsorption of up to 1 microgram of negatively supercoiled or linearized plasmid DNA to 0.7 g of sand was observed in the presence of 5 mM MgCl2 at pH 7. Under these conditions, more than 85% of DNA adsorbed within 60 s. Maximum adsorption was 4 micrograms of DNA to 0.7 g of sand. Supercoil molecules adsorbed slightly less than linearized or open circular plasmids. An increase of the pH from 5 to 9 decreased adsorption at 0.5 mM MgCl2 about eightfold. It is concluded that adsorption of plasmid DNA to sand depends on the neutralization of negative charges on the DNA molecules and the mineral surfaces by cations. The results are discussed on the grounds of the polyelectrolyte adsorption model. Sand-adsorbed DNA was 100 times more resistant against DNase I than was DNA free in solution. The data support the idea that plasmid DNA can enter the extracellular bacterial gene pool which is located at mineral surfaces in natural bacterial habitats. PMID:1647748

  11. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  12. The adsorption of ethylene on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenjun; Thuening, Theodore; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-04-01

    The surface chemistry of ethylene is explored on model Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces using a combination of temperature-programmed desorption and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. The heat of adsorption of ethylene on the model alloy surface is found to increase monotonically with increasing palladium coverage in the alloy, from ~ 33 kJ/mol for a completely gold-covered surface to ~ 80 kJ/mol as the gold coverage decreases to zero. A large change in heat of adsorption is found for palladium coverages between 0 and ~ 0.35 monolayers, where previous studies have shown that the surface comprises exclusively isolated palladium sites. The heat of adsorption changes more slowly for higher palladium coverages, when palladium-palladium bridge sites appear. Vinyl species are identified for palladium coverages above ~ 0.8 ML from a vibrational mode at ~ 1120 cm- 1, which disappears when the sample is heated to ~ 250 K, due to vinyl decomposition.

  13. Structures of seven molybdenum surfaces and their coverage dependent hydrogen adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Tian, Xinxin; Yang, Yong; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Beller, Matthias; Jiao, Haijun

    2016-02-17

    Systematic density functional theory calculations and ab initio atomistic thermodynamics were applied to investigate the stability of seven metallic Mo surfaces [(110), (211), (111), (321), (310), (210) (100)] and their coverage dependent hydrogen adsorption. Only dissociative hydrogen adsorption is favored on these surfaces up to more than one monolayer saturation coverage. The computed hydrogen desorption temperatures on Mo(100) at 500 K and on Mo(110) at 410 K are in agreement with the available temperature-programmed desorption results. Under the consideration of H2 as the reduction reagent in Mo catalyst preparation, the computed surface morphology of Mo single crystal shows only exposed (110), (211) and (100) at high temperature; and the estimated surface proportion order of (110) > (211) > (100) agrees very well with the X-ray diffraction detected intensity order of (110) > (211) > (100). Surface reconstruction upon hydrogen adsorption has also been discussed. PMID:26838012

  14. First principles investigation of Ti adsorption and migration on Si(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Briquet, Ludovic G. V.; Wirtz, Tom; Philipp, Patrick

    2013-12-28

    The titanium adsorption on Si(100) is investigated using first principles computer modelling methods. Two new subsurface adsorption sites are described. They are located at the edge of the cavity topped by a surface silicon dimer. The migration of the titanium from the surface to the subsurface sites is facilitated when occurring via one of these sites. The ejection of one of the silicon atoms forming the surface dimer is also investigated. The actual step of the ejection requires more energy than previously thought although, when considering the global picture of a titanium atom on the surface leading to the ejection of a silicon atom, the overall rate is compensated by the facilitated migration of the titanium to the subsurface sites. The consecutive adsorption of a second and third titanium atom is also investigated. It is shown that titanium grows evenly on the surface in normal condition, showing no intermixing of the titanium and silicon beyond the silicon layer.

  15. On the thermodynamics of refrigerant + heterogeneous solid surfaces adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Azhar Bin; Li, Ang; Thu, Kyaw; Ng, K C; Chun, Wongee

    2013-11-26

    This Article presents a theoretical framework for the understanding of pressurized adsorption systems using the statistical rate methodology. Utilizing results from the statistical rate theory, basic thermodynamic variables including enthalpy (h(a)), entropy (s(a)), and the specific heat capacity (c(p,a)) of the adsorbed phase are derived using the thermodynamic requirements of chemical equilibrium, Gibbs law, as well as Maxwell relations. A built-in constant (K) describes the adsorbed molecular partition function (q(s)), and it captures the heterogeneous properties of the adsorbent + adsorbate pair at equilibrium states. Improved adsorbed-phase volume considerations were incorporated in the formulations of these variables where they could be utilized with relative ease for analyzing the energetic performances of any practical adsorption system. In this Article, we have demonstrated how derived thermodynamic quantities can bridge the information gap with respect to the states of adsorbed phase, as well as resolved some theoretical inconsistencies that were found in previously derived quantities. Experimentally, the adsorption isotherms of propane (refrigerant) on activated carbon powder (Maxsorb III) for temperatures from 5 to 75 °C and pressures up to 8 bar are presented, and they are used to illustrate the behaviors of the adsorbed-phase during uptakes, temperatures, and pressure excursions or changes. PMID:24191669

  16. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  17. Repulsive interactions induced by specific adsorption: Anomalous step diffusivity and inadequacy of nearest-neighbor Ising model. (part I experimental)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shakran, Mohammad; Kibler, Ludwig A.; Jacob, Timo; Ibach, Harald; Beltramo, Guillermo L.; Giesen, Margret

    2016-09-01

    This is Part I of two closely related papers, where we show that the specific adsorption of anions leads to a failure of the nearest-neighbor Ising model to describe island perimeter curvatures on Au(100) electrodes in dilute KBr, HCl and H2SO4 electrolytes and the therewith derived step diffusivity vs. step orientation. This result has major consequences for theoretical studies aiming at the understanding of growth, diffusion and degradation phenomena. Part I focuses on the experimental data. As shown theoretically in detail in Part II (doi:10.1016/j.susc.2016.03.022), a set of nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interaction energies (ɛNN, ɛNNN) can uniquely be derived from the diffusivity of steps along <100> and <110>. We find strong repulsive next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interaction in KBr and HCl, whereas NNN interaction is negligibly for H2SO4. The NNN repulsive interaction energy ɛNNN therefore correlates positively with the Gibbs adsorption energy of the anions. We find furthermore that ɛNNN increases with increasing Br- and Cl- coverage. The results for ɛNN and ɛNNN are quantitatively consistent with the coverage dependence of the step line tension. We thereby establish a sound experimental base for theoretical studies on the energetics of steps in the presence of specific adsorption.

  18. Hydrogen Bonding Slows Down Surface Diffusion of Molecular Glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinshan; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Lian

    2016-08-18

    Surface-grating decay has been measured for three organic glasses with extensive hydrogen bonding: sorbitol, maltitol, and maltose. For 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the decay occurs by viscous flow in the entire range of temperature studied, covering the viscosity range 10(5)-10(11) Pa s, whereas under the same conditions, the decay mechanism transitions from viscous flow to surface diffusion for organic glasses of similar molecular sizes but with no or limited hydrogen bonding. These results indicate that extensive hydrogen bonding slows down surface diffusion in organic glasses. This effect arises because molecules can preserve hydrogen bonding even near the surface so that the loss of nearest neighbors does not translate into a proportional decrease of the kinetic barrier for diffusion. This explanation is consistent with a strong correlation between liquid fragility and the surface enhancement of diffusion, both reporting resistance of a liquid to dynamic excitation. Slow surface diffusion is expected to hinder any processes that rely on surface transport, for example, surface crystal growth and formation of stable glasses by vapor deposition. PMID:27404465

  19. Scaling Properties of Adsorption Energies for Hydrogen-Containing Molecules on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abild-Pedersen, F.; Greeley, J.; Studt, F.; Rossmeisl, J.; Munter, T. R.; Moses, P. G.; Skúlason, E.; Bligaard, T.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2007-07-01

    Density functional theory calculations are presented for CHx, x=0,1,2,3, NHx, x=0,1,2, OHx, x=0,1, and SHx, x=0,1 adsorption on a range of close-packed and stepped transition-metal surfaces. We find that the adsorption energy of any of the molecules considered scales approximately with the adsorption energy of the central, C, N, O, or S atom, the scaling constant depending only on x. A model is proposed to understand this behavior. The scaling model is developed into a general framework for estimating the reaction energies for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

  20. Diffusion on (110) Surface of Molecular Crystal Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Golfinopoulos, T; Gee, R H; Huang, H

    2007-01-25

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the diffusion mechanisms of admolecules on the (110) surface of molecular crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate. Our results show that (1) admolecules are stable at off lattice sites, (2) admolecules diffuse along close-packed [1{bar 1}1] and [{bar 1}11] directions, and (3) admolecules detach from the surface at 350K and above. Based on the number of diffusion jumps as a function of temperature, we estimate the jump frequency to be v=1.14 x 10{sup 12} e{sup -0.08eV/kT} per second.

  1. Oxalate adsorption at a plagioclase (An47) surface and models for ligand-promoted dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stillings, L.L.; Drever, J.I.; Poulson, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3- 5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was observed at pH 3 and 8 mM total oxalate. Adsorption is dependent upon the activities of both oxalate (C2O42-) and bioxalate (HC2O4-) in solution and can be modeled with either a two-term Langmuir or a two-term Freundlich isotherm. A Freundlich adsorption model provided the best fit to rate data because it was not constrained to a finite number of adsorption sites, as was the Langmuir model. The two-term ligand adsorption model was incorporated into a rate model: R(tot) = k(H-)[H(ads)/+](L) + k(HOx-)[HOx(ads)/-] + k(Ox2- )[Ox2(ads)/-] where R(tot) is the net dissolution rate of the feldspar, [i(ads)] is the concentration of species i adsorbed to the surface, and k(i) is the rate constant for release of the surface complex. The model was fit to data for oxalate-promoted dissolution of andesine, resulting in estimates for the rate constants of k(HOx-) = 1.16 x 10-12, k(Ox2-) = 1.05 x 10-12, and k(H-) = 9.61 x 10-13 mol of feldspar (??mol of i) (??mol of i)-1 s-1.Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3-5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was

  2. Adsorption and recognition characteristics of surface molecularly imprinted polymethacrylic acid/silica toward genistein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Gao, Baojiao; An, Fuqiang; Xu, Zeqing; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-09-12

    In this paper, on the basis of surface-initiated graft polymerization, a new surface molecular imprinting technique is established by molecular design. And molecularly imprinted polymer MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is successfully prepared with genistein as template. The adsorption and recognition characteristics of MIP-PMAA/SiO2 for genistein are studied in depth by using static method, dynamic method and competitive adsorption experiment. The experimental results show that MIP-PMAA/SiO2 possesses very strong adsorption affinity and specific recognition for genistein. The saturated adsorption capacity could reach to 0.36mmolg(-1). The selectivity coefficients relative to quercetin and rutin are 5.4 and 11.8, respectively. Besides, MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is regenerated easily and exhibits excellent reusability. PMID:25085816

  3. Surface modification, characterization and adsorptive properties of a coconut activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xincheng; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Kang; Xie, Xinping; Hu, Yiming

    2012-08-01

    A coconut activated carbon was modified using chemical methods. Different concentration of nitric acid oxidation of the conventional sample produced samples with weakly acidic functional groups. The oxidized samples were characterized by scanning electron micrograph, nitrogen absorption-desorption, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, Bothem method, pH titration, adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and the adsorption mechanism of activated carbons was investigated. The results showed that BET surface area and pore volume of activated carbons were decreased after oxidization process, while acidic functional groups were increased. The surface morphology of oxidized carbons looked clean and eroded which was caused by oxidization of nitric acid. The oxidized carbons showed high adsorption capacity of sodium and formaldehyde, and chemical properties of activated carbon played an important role in adsorption of metal ions and organic pollutants.

  4. Adsorption of surfactants on sand surface in enhanced oil recovery: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Achinta; Kumar, T.; Ojha, Keka; Mandal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto reservoir rock surface may result in the loss and reduction of their concentrations in surfactant flooding, which may render them less efficient or ineffective in practical applications of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. Surfactant flooding for EOR received attraction due to its ability to increase the displacement efficiency by lowering the interfacial tension between oil and water and mobilizing the residual oil. This article highlights the adsorption of surfactants onto sand surface with variation of different influencing factors. It has been experimentally found that adsorption of cationic surfactant on sand surface is more and less for anionic surfactant, while non-ionic surfactant shows intermediate behaviour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of clean sand particles has been made to determine the main component present in the sand particles. The interaction between sand particles and surfactant has been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the sand particles before and after aging with surfactant. Salinity plays an important role in adsorption of anionic surfactant. Batch experiments were also performed to understand the effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the sorption efficiency. The sand particles exhibited high adsorption efficiency at low pH for anionic and nonionic surfactants. But opposite trend was found for cationic surfactant. Adsorption data were analyzed by fitting with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Sips isotherm models. Results show that the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetics models suit the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption on sand surface. Thermodynamics feasibility of the adsorption process was also studied to verify the spontaneity of the process.

  5. Influence of Vacancy Defect on Surface Feature and Adsorption of Cs on GaN(0001) Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanjun; Du, Yujie; Wang, Meishan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Ga and N vacancy defect on the change in surface feature, work function, and characteristic of Cs adsorption on a (2 × 2) GaN(0001) surface have been investigated using density functional theory with a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential method based on first-principles calculations. The covalent bonds gain strength for Ga vacancy defect, whereas they grow weak for N vacancy defect. The lower work function is achieved for Ga and N vacancy defect surfaces than intact surface. The most stable position of Cs adatom on Ga vacancy defect surface is at T1 site, whereas it is at BGa site on N vacancy defect surface. The Eads of Cs on GaN(0001) vacancy defect surface increases compared with that of intact surface; this illustrates that the adsorption of Cs on intact surface is more stable. PMID:25126599

  6. Ab-initio calculation of C and CO adsorption on the Co (110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Shin-Liang; Ionescu, Adrian; Reeve, Robert M.; Cheng, Jun; Barnes, Crispin H. W.

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption energies, structural, electrical and magnetic properties of adsorption of C and CO on the fcc Co (110) surface have been investigated using density functional theory. The preferential adsorption site for the fcc Co (110) has been calculated. For the case of C adsorption, the preferential adsorption site is the long-bridge for both the 0.5 and 1.0 monolayers (ML) coverages. Whilst for the CO case, the preferential adsorption sites are at the atop and short-bridge site for 0.5 and 1.0 ML coverages respectively. Structurally, the first two layers of the bare Co (110) surface expand whereas the second and third layers contract. Upon adsorption of either C or CO, however, the degree of expansion and compression reduces. Magnetically, the adsorbates were found to couple ferrimagnetically to the surface and suppress the magnetic moment of the Co layers beneath them. The C adsorbate has a much stronger suppression effect as compared to the CO adsorbate. At 0.5 ML coverage, the C adatom suppresses up to 47% of the magnetic moment in the surface layer compared to a clean Co (110), whereas the CO adsorbate only suppresses up to 16%. For the 1.0 ML coverage case, both the C and CO adsorbates suppress almost equivalently well at 68% and 63% respectively. We also report on a correlation between the amount of charge transfer and the degree of suppression of the surface magnetic moment. Finally, we observe that the electronic charge is shared in the [001] direction for the C adsorbate and in the [11¯0] direction for the CO adsorbate. This anisotropy of surface bonding, in conjunction with the ligand field theory, explains the mechanism behind the spin reorientation transition that occurs uniquely on the CO/Co(110) system.

  7. On the role of long range interactions for the adsorption of sexithiophene on Ag(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Jeronimo; Rojas, Tomas; Yildirim, Handan E-mail: Abdelkader.Kara@ucf.edu; Kara, Abdelkader E-mail: Abdelkader.Kara@ucf.edu

    2014-04-14

    The adsorption characteristics of the sexithiophene (6T) molecule on Ag(110) are studied using density functional theory with the inclusion of van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The stable adsorption configurations on 6T on Ag(110) as well as the nature of bonding the Ag substrate are evaluated. We also assess the performance of the vdW-DF method in describing the adsorption, energetics, heights, as well as the interface characteristics with the Ag(110) surface. We find two lowest adsorption energy configurations, at which the 6T molecule aligns with its molecular long axis parallel and perpendicular to the [001] direction, to be energetically close to each other, suggesting that they may coexist. Our findings indicate a significant increase in the 6T adsorption energies upon the inclusion of vdW interactions with the highest increase obtained using the opt-type functionals, in particular with the optB86b-vdW functional. The revPBE-vdW and rPW86-vdW2 functionals lead to less enhancement in adsorption energies that is attributed to the strong repulsive nature of these functionals, in agreement with earlier predictions. Upon adsorption of the 6T molecule, the changes in the atomic and electronic structures of the 6T molecule and Ag surface are found to be negligible; there is no charge transfer, and no interface state is observed. The work function is reduced upon adsorption with the largest change is ∼0.6 eV obtained using the optB88-vdW functional. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental observations of the adsorption configurations and the work function changes. Based on our results, we conclude that the nature of bonding for 6T on Ag(110) can be classified as strong physisorption.

  8. Adsorption and Distribution of Fluorescent Solutes near the Articular Surface of Mechanically Injured Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sarah G.A.; Moeini, Mohammad; Chin, Hooi Chuan; Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Quinn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of cartilage-specific imaging agents supports the improvement of tissue assessment by minimally invasive means. Techniques for highlighting cartilage surface damage in clinical images could provide for sensitive indications of posttraumatic injury and early stage osteoarthritis. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that fluorescent solutes interact with cartilage surfaces strongly enough to affect measurement of their partition coefficients within the tissue bulk. In this study, these findings were extended by examining solute adsorption and distribution near the articular surface of mechanically injured cartilage. Using viable cartilage explants injured by an established protocol, solute distributions near the articular surface of three commonly used fluorophores (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC), and carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)) were observed after absorption and subsequent desorption to assess solute-specific matrix interactions and reversibility. Both absorption and desorption processes demonstrated a trend of significantly less solute adsorption at surfaces of fissures compared to adjacent intact surfaces of damaged explants or surfaces of uninjured explants. After adsorption, normalized mean surface intensities of fissured surfaces of injured explants were 6%, 40%, and 32% for FITC, TRITC, and TAMRA, respectively, compared to uninjured surfaces. Similar values were found for sliced explants and after a desorption process. After desorption, a trend of increased solute adsorption at the site of intact damaged surfaces was noted (316% and 238% for injured and sliced explants exposed to FITC). Surface adsorption of solute was strongest for FITC and weakest for TAMRA; no solutes negatively affected cell viability. Results support the development of imaging agents that highlight distinct differences between fissured and intact cartilage surfaces. PMID:24268155

  9. Fluoride adsorption onto amorphous aluminum hydroxide: Roles of the surface acetate anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Xing; Jia, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous aluminum hydroxide with hydroxyl groups, acetate anions and chlorine anions enriched surface was synthesized, and was characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. Batch experiments were performed to study the influence of various experimental parameters such as contact time, initial fluoride concentration, temperature, pH value and the presence of competing anions on the adsorption of fluoride on amorphous aluminum hydroxide. The kinetic data was well fitted to pseudo-second-order model. The fluoride adsorption on the amorphous aluminum hydroxide can be well described by the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 63.94mgg(-1) at pH 7.0. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy, standard enthalpy and standard entropy were calculated, and the results suggested that the adsorption of fluoride on the amorphous aluminum hydroxide was a feasible, spontaneous and exothermic process. The adsorption mechanism was revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The results suggested that the surface acetate anions and surface chlorine anions played important roles in the fluoride removal process. PMID:27565961

  10. Scaling Aspects of Block Co-Polymer Adsorption on Curved Surfaces from Nonselective Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovits, Eli; Tannenbaum, Allen; Tannenbaum, Rina

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we have developed a geometric-based scaling model that describes the adsorption of diblock copolymer chains from good solvents and θ-solvents onto reactive surfaces of varying curvatures. To evaluate the impact of particle size on the adsorption process, we probed the adsorption of poly(styrene-bmethymethacrylate) (PS-PMMA) diblock copolymers from solvents with different degrees of selectivity on aluminum oxide (Al2O3) surfaces belonging to particles of different sizes. When the adsorbed PMMA layer is dense enough (in the case of a θ-solvent for the PMMA block), our results show good correlation between the theory and experimental results, pointing to the formation of a PMMA adsorption layer and a brushlike PS layer. Conversely, when adsorption occurs from a nonpreferential solvent, particularly on particles with high curvature, the PMMA adsorption layer at the surface becomes less dense and the grafted PS moiety exhibits a transitional morphology consisting of several layers of increasingly sparsely spaced blobs. PMID:18399678

  11. A Modular Approach To Study Protein Adsorption on Surface Modified Hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Ozhukil Kollath, Vinayaraj; Van den Broeck, Freya; Fehér, Krisztina; Martins, José C; Luyten, Jan; Traina, Karl; Mullens, Steven; Cloots, Rudi

    2015-07-13

    Biocompatible inorganic nano- and microcarriers can be suitable candidates for protein delivery. This study demonstrates facile methods of functionalization by using nanoscale linker molecules to change the protein adsorption capacity of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder. The adsorption capacity of bovine serum albumin as a model protein has been studied with respect to the surface modifications. The selected linker molecules (lysine, arginine, and phosphoserine) can influence the adsorption capacity by changing the electrostatic nature of the HA surface. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of linker-molecule interactions with the HA surface have been performed by using NMR spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses. Additionally, correlations to theoretical isotherm models have been calculated with respect to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Lysine and arginine increased the protein adsorption, whereas phosphoserine reduced the protein adsorption. The results show that the adsorption capacity can be controlled with different functionalization, depending on the protein-carrier selections under consideration. The scientific knowledge acquired from this study can be applied in various biotechnological applications that involve biomolecule-inorganic material interfaces. PMID:26096378

  12. Density functional study of CO adsorption on d-metal surface using TPSS functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianwei; Perdew, John

    2009-03-01

    Feibelman et al^[1] presented the puzzle of CO at the Pt(111) surface, showing that the LDA and Perdew-type GGA put the molecule at the wrong, high-coordination site. However, a recent study ^[2] showed that the BLYP yielded very satisfactory adsorption energies and the correct adsorption sites for CO adsorption on late 4d and 5d transition metal (111) surfaces, although at the price of large errors in the volume of the d metals. Since PBE and BLYP have similar accuracy, it seems the probable reason for the wrong adsorption site is due to the fact that the LDA and Perdew-type GGA's are ``jellium derived'' and hence prefer a more delocalized bonding, rather than that the LDA and GGA inaccurately describe the CO molecule's chemical bond. TPSS meta-GGA is also ``jellium derived'', but improves accuracy for molecules^[3]. Therefore, as a possible candidate to identify the major reason for the wrong adsorption site, TPSS is used to calculate the adsorption energies and sites of CO on the d-metal surface in the more accurate geometric structure obtained by PBEsol^[4]. [1] P.J. Feibelman et al, J. Phys. Chem. 105, 4018(2001). [2] A. Stroppa and G. Kresse, New Journal of Physics 10, 063020(2008). [3] V.N. Staroverov et al, J. Chem. Phys., 119, 12129(2003). [4] J.P. Perdew et al, Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 136406(2008).

  13. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Ion Adsorption to the Basal Surfaces of Kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2008-06-06

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of various ions to the basal surfaces of kaolinite. Analysis of simulation data indicates that cations and anions adsorb preferably on the siloxane and gibbsite surfaces of kaolinite, respectively. Strong inner-sphere adsorption of chlorine at aluminum vacancies on the gibbsite surface and the occurrence of chlorine-driven inner-sphere adsorption of cesium and sodium on the gibbsite surface for high ionic strengths are observed. Cesium ions form strong inner-sphere complexes at ditrigonal cavities on the siloxane surface. Outer-sphere cesium is highly mobile and only weak adsorption may occur. A small amount of sodium adsorbs on the siloxane surface as inner-sphere complexes at less clearly defined sites. Like cesium, sodium only forms very weak outer-sphere complexes on this surface. Inner-sphere complexes of cadmium and lead do not occur on either surface. Relatively strong outer-sphere cadmium and lead complexes are present on the siloxane surface at ditrigonal cavities.

  14. Theoretical study of adsorption of nitrogen-containing environmental contaminants on kaolinite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Scott, Andrea Michalkova; Burns, Elizabeth A; Hill, Frances C

    2014-08-01

    The adsorption of nitrogen-containing compounds (NCCs) including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN), and 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) on kaolinite surfaces was investigated. The M06-2X and M06-2X-D3 density functionals were applied with the cluster approximation. Several different positions of NCCs relative to the adsorption sites of kaolinite were examined, including NCCs in perpendicular and parallel orientation toward both surface models of kaolinite. The binding between the target molecules and kaolinite surfaces was analyzed and bond energies were calculated applying the atoms in molecules (AIM) method. All NCCs were found to prefer a parallel orientation toward both kaolinite surfaces, and were bound more strongly to the octahedral than to the tetrahedral site. TNT exhibited the strongest interaction with the octahedral surface and DNAN with the tetrahedral surface of kaolinite. Hydrogen bonding was shown to be the dominant non-covalent interaction for NCCs interacting with the octahedral surface of kaolinite with a small stabilizing effect of dispersion interactions. In the case of adsorption on the tetrahedral surface, kaolonite-NCC binding was shown to be governed by the balance between hydrogen bonds and dispersion forces. The presence of water as a solvent leads to a significant decrease in the adsorption strength for all studied NCCs interacting with both kaolinite surfaces. PMID:25031081

  15. U-series dating of bone using the diffusion-adsorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, A. W. G.; Hedges, R. E. M.; Van calsteren, P.

    2002-12-01

    U-series dating of bone has suffered problems of reliability since its inception because bone remains an open system with respect to uranium. Commonly applied a priori assumptions of U uptake, such as early uptake or linear uptake, are inadequate because they have no physical or chemical bases, no means of demonstrating which model is suitable for a particular bone, and no intrinsic tests of reliability. Despite this and numerous examples of anomalous U-series dates, such assumptions are still routinely applied. We address this problem using the diffusion-adsorption (D-A) model of U uptake (Millard and Hedges, 1996), which incorporates a physicochemical description of U uptake. Using this model, we show how the U uptake of a bone responds to geochemical changes in the burial environment, which can lead to phenomena such as the removal of U from bones ("leaching") or U uptake late in their burial history ("recent uptake"), and we show how the overall uptake history is reflected in distributions (profiles) of U and U-series isotopes across a bone section. We present measurements of U concentration profiles, and 230Th/ 234U profiles on archeological bone from a number of different sites and burial environments and compare the results to profiles predicted by the D-A model. Bones that have undergone complex uptake histories (which include U leaching or recent uptake) are identified on the basis of these profiles and rejected as unsuitable for dating. For bones that appear to have undergone uptake under constant geochemical conditions, the D-A model is applied to calculate U-series dates, with much improved reliability.

  16. Surface adsorption of zwitterionic surfactants: n-alkyl phosphocholines characterised by surface tensiometry and neutron reflection.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, M; Wang, Y; Su, T J; Lu, J R

    2005-08-15

    The surface adsorption of n-dodecyl phosphocholine (C12PC) has been characterised by a combined measurement of surface tension and neutron reflectivity. The critical micellar concentration (CMC) was found to be 0.91 mM at 25 degrees C in pure water. At the CMC, the limiting area per molecule (A(cmc)) was found to be 52+/-3 A2 and the surface tension (gamma(cmc)) to be ca. 40.0+/-0.5 mN/m. The parallel study of chain isomer n-hexadecyl phosphocholine (C16PC) showed a decrease of the CMC to 0.012 mM and a drop of gamma(cmc) to 38.1+/-0.5 mN/m. However, A(cmc) for C16PC was found to be 54+/-3 A2, showing that increase in alkyl chain length by four methylene groups has little effect on A(cmc). The almost constant A(cmc) suggested that the limiting area per molecule was determined by the bulky PC head group. It was further found that the surface tension and related key physical parameters did not vary much with temperature, salt addition, solution pH or any combination of these, thus showing that surface adsorption and solution aggregation from PC surfactants is largely similar to the zwitterionic betaine surfactants and is distinctly different from ionic and non-ionic surfactants. The thickness of the adsorbed monolayers measured from both dC12hPC and dC16hPC was found to be 20-22 A at the CMC from neutron reflectivity. Neither A(cmc) nor layer thickness varied with alkyl chain length, indicating that as the alkyl chain length became longer it was further tilted away from the surface normal direction and the layer packing density increased. It was also observed that the thickness of the layer varied little with surfactant concentration, indicating that the average conformational orientation of the alkyl chain remained unchanged against varying surface coverage. PMID:15927600

  17. Comment on ``High temperature adsorption of nitrogen on a polycrystalline nickel surface''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauleau, Y.

    1995-08-01

    The effect of the nitrogen partial pressure on the deposition rate of nickel lines produced by laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) from nickel tetracarbonyl, Ni(CO)4, was investigated and discussed by Boughaba and Auvert on the basis of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model valid for heterogeneous chemical reactions with competitive adsorption of reactant gases on the surface. From these experimental results, it can be demonstrated that the adsorption energy of nitrogen molecules on the nickel surface is negligible; as a result, it can be concluded that the residence time of nitrogen molecules as adspecies on the polycrystalline nickel surface is negligible, and the adsorption of nickel molecules on the nickel surface does not occur.

  18. The adsorption of methyl methacrylate and vinyl acetate polymers on α-quartz surface: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lijing; Yang, Yan; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Bingjian; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation was used to investigate the adsorption of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyvinyl acetate (PVA), the commonly used surface coating materials, on α-quartz surface. The objective is to understand the interactions between quartz surface and polymers. The results clearly show adsorption of both polymers onto the quartz surface. Carbonyl group plays a significant role in the adsorption process. The adsorption energies of PMMA and PVA on α-quartz surface did not show significant difference, however, more hydrogen bonds were observed on the PVA/quartz system than PMMA/quartz. These observations might offer some insights on the polymer-quartz adhesion and its failure mechanism.

  19. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  20. Effect of zeta potentials on bovine serum albumin adsorption to hydroxyapatite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Nahoko; Sato, Toru; Maki, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to hydroxyapatite surfaces by means of zeta potential. The electrophoretic mobility of both hydroxyapatite and BSA were negative, with BSA itself less negative than hydroxyapatite. The zeta potential of the surface of BSA-adsorbed hydroxyapatite was significantly more negative than that of hydroxyapatite alone (p<0.0001). The BSA histogram indicated two negative peaks, and the zeta potential of BSA-adsorbed hydroxyapatite also showed two similar negative peaks. These results suggest that BSA adsorption to hydroxyapatite surfaces is related to electrostatic interaction. PMID:23903580

  1. Theory of polyelectrolyte adsorption on heterogeneously charged surfaces applied to soluble protein-polyelectrolyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, R.; Weinbreck, F.; de Kruif, C. G.

    2003-03-01

    Existing theoretical approaches to polymer adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces are applied to the problems of polyelectrolyte and polyampholyte adsorption on randomly charged surfaces. Also, analytical estimates are developed for the critical pH at which weakly charged polyelectrolytes and globular proteins start forming soluble complexes. Below a critical salt concentration, soluble complexes form "on the wrong side" of the protein isoelectric point due to the heterogeneity of the protein surface charge distribution. The analytical estimates are consistent with experimental data on soluble complexes in mixtures of gum arabic and whey protein isolate.

  2. Adsorption of peptide nucleic acid and DNA decamers at electrically charged surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Fojta, M; Vetterl, V; Tomschik, M; Jelen, F; Nielsen, P; Wang, J; Palecek, E

    1997-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and DNA decamers (GTAGATCACT and the complementary sequence) on a mercury surface was studied by means of AC impedance measurements at a hanging mercury drop electrode. The nucleic acid was first attached to the electrode by adsorption from a 5-microliter drop of PNA (or DNA) solution, and the electrode with the adsorbed nucleic acid layer was then washed and immersed in the blank background electrolyte where the differential capacity C of the electrode double layer was measured as a function of the applied potential E. It was found that the adsorption behavior of the PNA with an electrically neutral backbone differs greatly from that of the DNA (with a negatively charged backbone), whereas the DNA-PNA hybrid shows intermediate behavior. At higher surface coverage PNA molecules associate at the surface, and the minimum value of C is shifted to negative potentials because of intermolecular interactions of PNA at the surface. Prolonged exposure of PNA to highly negative potentials does not result in PNA desorption, whereas almost all of the DNA is removed from the surface at these potentials. Adsorption of PNA decreases with increasing NaCl concentration in the range from 0 to 50 mM NaCl, in contrast to DNA, the adsorption of which increases under the same conditions. PMID:9129832

  3. The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W A; Johnson, J Karl

    2012-10-03

    Adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces is determined by weak interactions. We applied two versions of the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to compute adsorption energies of Ar, Kr, and Xe on Pt(111), Pd(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) metal surfaces. We have compared our results with data obtained using other density functional approaches, including the semiempirical vdW corrected DFT-D2. The vdW-DF results show considerable improvements in the description of adsorption energies and equilibrium distances over other DFTbased methods, giving good agreement with experiments. We have also calculated perpendicular vibrational energies for noble gases on the metal surfaces using vdWDF data and found excellent agreement with available experimental results. Our vdW-DF calculations show that adsorption of noble gases on low-coordination sites is energetically favored over high-coordination sites, but only by a few meV. Analysis of the 2-dimensional potential energy surface shows that the high-coordination sites are local maxima on the 2-dimensional potential energy surface and therefore unlikely to be observed in experiments, which provides an explanation of the experimental observations. The DFT-D2 approach with the standard parameterization was found to overestimate the dispersion interactions, and to give the wrong adsorption site preference for four of the nine systems we studied.

  4. Effect of Dopants on the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Ceria Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Meijun; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-25

    Here, high-surface-area nanosized CeO2 and M-doped CeO2 (M=Cu, La, Zr, and Mg) prepared by a surfactant-templated method were tested for CO2 adsorption. Cu, La, and Zr are doped into the lattice of CeO2, whereas Mg is dispersed on the CeO2 surface. The doping of Cu and La into CeO2 leads to an increase of the CO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the doping of Zr has little or no effect. The addition of Mg causes a decrease of the CO2 adsorption capacity at a low Mg content and a gradual increase at a higher content. The CO2 adsorption capacity follows the sequencemore » Cu-CeO2>La-CeO2>Zr-CeO2≈CeO2>Mg-CeO2 at low dopant contents, in line with the relative amount of defect sites in the samples. It is the defect sites on the surface, not in the bulk of CeO2, modified by the dopants that play the vital role in CO2 chemisorption. Lastly, the role of surface oxygen vacancies is further supported by an in situ IR spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry during CO2 adsorption on the doped CeO2.« less

  5. DFT simulation of the adsorption of sodium silicate species on kaolinite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yonghua; Liu, Wenli; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of Si(OH)4 molecules and the SiO(OH)3- anion on kaolinite surfaces was studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the dispersion mechanism of sodium silicate on kaolinite particles. The calculated results demonstrate that Si(OH)4 and SiO(OH)3- primarily adsorb on kaolinite Al-terminated (0 0 1) surfaces. Both Si(OH)4 and SiO(OH)3- bond with the Al-terminated surface by hybridization of the O2p orbital and H1s orbital. The unbonded O atom of SiO(OH)3- is notably active. The SiO(OH)3- anion can add more electrons and form a stronger electrostatic interaction with the Al surface. The adsorption of SiO(OH)3- is more stable than the adsorption of Si(OH)4. After adsorption of sodium silicate, the surfaces of kaolinite can become more hydrophilic and carry more negative charge. Therefore, the adsorption of silicate species makes the fine particles of kaolinite disperse in aqueous solution more easily.

  6. Electrochemical and surface characterization of 4-aminothiophenol adsorption at polycrystalline platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I; Fachini, Estevao R; Hernández, Jessica; Pérez-Davis, Marla E; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2006-07-01

    The formation of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been characterized by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry, Raman spectroscopy, reflection-absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). CV was used to study the dependence of the adsorption time and 4-ATP solution concentration on the relative degree of coverage of 4-ATP monolayers on polycrystalline Pt electrodes. The adsorption time range probed was 24-72 h. The optimal concentration of 4-ATP needed to obtain the highest surface at the lowest adsorption time was 10 mM. RAIR and Raman spectroscopy for 4-ATP-modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for 4-ATP, such as nuNH, nuCH(arom), and nuCS(arom), indicating the adsorption on the platinum surface. The XPS spectra for the modified Pt surface presented the binding energy peaks of sulfur and nitrogen. High energy resolution XPS studies, RAIR, and Raman spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that the molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of a S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption leads to an amino-terminated electrode surface. The thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses, giving a value of 8 A. As evidence of the terminal amino group on the electrode surface, the chemical derivatization of the 4-ATP SAM was done with 16-Br hexadecanoic acid. This surface reaction was followed by RAIR spectroscopy. PMID:16800665

  7. Adsorption of malachite green by magnetic litchi pericarps: A response surface methodology investigation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Qi, Jinqiu; Jiang, Ruixue; Gao, Yan; Li, Xiaochen

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we synthesized a novel magnetic adsorbent containing litchi pericarps, denoted as MLP, for the removal of malachite green (MG) from solution. The factors influencing MG adsorption, such as contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial dye concentration, were optimized using the Box-Behnken response surface methodology (RSM). The adsorption isotherms as well as the kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption of MG onto MLP are discussed. The results showed that MLP has a maximum adsorption efficiency of 99.5% when the temperature, pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial MG concentration were optimally set as 25 °C, 6.0, 66.69 min, 5.14 g/L, and 150 mg/L, respectively. The best model to describe this process is the Langmuir isotherm, with the maximum adsorption capacity being 70.42 mg/g. In addition, the kinetics of MG adsorption onto MLP followed a pseudo-second-order model; moreover, thermodynamic analysis suggested that MG adsorption onto MLP is spontaneous and endothermic. Finally, it was found that the new magnetic adsorbent can be separated easily and rapidly from mixed solutions in the presence of an external magnetic field. PMID:26254991

  8. A Multiscale Analysis of Diffusions on Rapidly Varying Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, A. B.; Elliott, C. M.; Pavliotis, G. A.; Stuart, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules on surfaces plays a very important role in various biological processes, including lipid transport across the cell membrane, synaptic transmission, and other phenomena such as exo- and endocytosis, signal transduction, chemotaxis, and cell growth. In many cases, the surfaces can possess spatial inhomogeneities and/or be rapidly changing shape. Using a generalization of the model for a thermally excited Helfrich elastic membrane, we consider the problem of lateral diffusion on quasi-planar surfaces, possessing both spatial and temporal fluctuations. Using results from homogenization theory, we show that, under the assumption of scale separation between the characteristic length and timescales of the membrane fluctuations and the characteristic scale of the diffusing particle, the lateral diffusion process can be well approximated by a Brownian motion on the plane with constant diffusion tensor that depends on a highly nonlinear way on the detailed properties of the surface. The effective diffusion tensor will depend on the relative scales of the spatial and temporal fluctuations, and for different scaling regimes, we prove the existence of a macroscopic limit in each case.

  9. Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis of Histidine-Tagged F1-ATPase Surface Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jenifer K.; Richter, Mark L.; Berrie, Cindy L.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of the rotational activity of the enzymatic core (α3β3γ) of the F1-ATPase motor protein have relied on binding the enzyme to NTA-coated glass surfaces via polyhistidine tags engineered into the C-termini of each of the three α or β subunits. Those studies revealed the rotational motion of the central γ subunit by monitoring the motion of attached micron-long actin filaments or spherical nanoparticles. However, only a small percentage of the attached filaments or particles were observed to rotate, likely due, at least in part, to non-uniform surface attachment of the motor proteins. In this study, we have applied surface plasmon resonance to monitor the kinetics and affinity of binding of the His-tagged motor protein to NTA-coated gold sensor surfaces. The binding data, when fit to a heterogeneous binding model, exhibit two sets of adsorption-desorption rate constants with two dissociation constants of 4.0 × 10-9 M and 8.6 × 10-11 M for 6His-α3β3γ binding to the nickel ion-activated NTA surface. The data are consistent with mixed attachment of the protein via two (bimodal) and three (trimodal) NTA/Ni2+-His-tag interactions, respectively, with the less stable bimodal interaction dominating. The results provide a partial explanation for the low number of surface-attached F1 motors previously observed in rotation studies and suggest alternative approaches to uniform F1 motor surface attachment for future fabrication of motor-based nanobiodevices and materials.

  10. Self-Catalyzed Carbon Dioxide Adsorption by Metal-Organic Chains on Gold Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Min; Sun, Hao; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-08-26

    Efficient capture of CO2 by chemical means requires a microscopic understanding of the interactions of the molecule-substrate bonding and adsorption-induced collective phenomena. By molecule-resolved imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we investigate self-catalyzed CO2 adsorption on one-dimensional (1D) substrates composed of self-assembled metal-organic chains (MOCs) supported on gold surfaces. CO2 adsorption turns on attractive interchain interactions, which induce pronounced surface structural changes; the initially uniformly dispersed chains gather into close packed bundles, which are held together by highly ordered, single molecule wide CO2 ranks. CO2 molecules create more favorable adsorption sites for further CO2 adsorption by mediating the interchain attraction, thereby self-catalyzing their capture. The release of CO2 molecules by thermal desorption returns the MOCs to their original structure, indicating that the CO2 capture and release are reversible processes. The real space microscopic characterization of the self-catalyzed CO2 adsorption on 1D substrates could be exploited as platform for design of molecular materials for CO2 capture and reduction.

  11. Interfacial thermodynamics of gallic acid adsorption on a chargeable hydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Giannakopoulos, Evangelos; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2011-06-15

    The thermodynamics of adsorption of gallic acid (GA, 3,4,5-trihydroxylbenzoic acid) on the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) surface was studied by temperature-dependent stripping voltammetry (TD-SV), at physiological pH 7.4. The thermodynamic parameters, e.g., Gibbs free energy, ΔG(ADS), enthalpy, ΔΗ(ADS) and entropy, ΔS(ADS), of adsorption have been determined at physiological temperatures 2-40 °C. Chemisorption of the radical species ≡[GA(OH)(2)(O(-))]* is the energetically important reaction. The thermodynamic data show a complex mechanism of adsorption of GA on the electrode surface, which is strongly dependent on temperature. At low-temperatures T<12 °C, adsorption is controlled by enthalpy, while at T>22 °C, adsorption is entropy driven. In the temperature range 12 °C and 22 °C, a combined enthalpy-entropy stabilization occurs. A mechanism is proposed which analyses the implication of thermodynamics to the interfacial adsorption of polyphenols with cell membranes under physiological conditions. PMID:21481893

  12. Adsorption of uranium by amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile, using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Tilong; Chen, Xia; Liu, Xunyue; Ding, Xingcheng

    2015-05-01

    The amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile (CTS-g-PAO) was prepared for the adsorption of uranium from water. The effects of pH, concentration of uranium and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of uranium by CTS-g-PAO were optimized using Doehlert design of response surface methodology (RSM). The adsorption capacity and removal efficiency achieved 312.06 mg/g and 86.02%, respectively. The adsorption process attained equilibrium only in 120 min. More than 80% of the absorbed uranium could be desorbed by 0.1 mol/l HCl or EDTA-Na, and CTS-g-PAO could be reused at least 3 times. The CTS-g-PAO and U(VI) ions formed a chelate complex due to FTIR spectral analysis. The surface morphology of CTS-g-PAO was also investigated by SEM. The adsorption process was better described by Langmuir isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Results obtained indicated that CTS-g-PAO was very promising in adsorption of uranium from water. PMID:25659674

  13. Krypton Adsorption on Zeolite-Templated Carbon and Anomalous Surface Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Murialdo, Maxwell; Stadie, Nicholas P; Ahn, Channing C; Fultz, Brent

    2015-07-28

    Krypton adsorption was measured at eight temperatures between 253 and 433 K on a zeolite-templated carbon and two commercial carbons. The data were fitted using a generalized Langmuir isotherm model and thermodynamic properties were extracted. Differing from that on commercial carbons, krypton adsorption on the zeolite-templated carbon is accompanied by an increasing isosteric enthalpy of adsorption, rising by up to 1.4 kJ mol(-1) as a function of coverage. This increase is a result of enhanced adsorbate-adsorbate interactions promoted by the ordered, nanostructured surface of the adsorbent. An assessment of the strength and nature of these adsorbate-adsorbate interactions is made by comparing the measured isosteric enthalpies of adsorption (and other thermodynamic quantities) to fundamental metrics of intermolecular interactions of krypton and other common gases. PMID:26136159

  14. Adsorption and desorption of NO and CO on a Pt(111)Ge surface alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.; Murata, Y.; Terakura, K.

    1996-08-01

    Adsorption of NO and CO on Pt(111) alloyed with a few per cent of Ge is investigated by reflection—absorption infrared spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Both molecules exclusively occupy the on-top site in contrast to bridge and on-top adsorption on clean Pt(111). The adsorption energy of NO is dramatically reduced compared with that on clean Pt(111). Photodesorption of CO observed on the clean Pt(111) is noticeably suppressed on the Pt(111)Ge surface alloy, while NO desorption is induced by photon irradiation. The rotational and translational temperatures of photodesorbed No are similar to those on clean Pt(111). The change in chemical properties of Pt(111) for molecular adsorption is discussed in terms of d-band filling of the substrate.

  15. Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanocubes with Ultrahigh Surface Areas for Efficient CO2 Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Renyuan; Liu, Yong; Wang, Wenxing; Ling, Yun; El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2016-02-01

    Ultrahigh surface area single-crystals of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMOs) with uniform cubic or truncated-cubic morphology and organic/inorganic components homogeneously distributed over the whole frameworks have successfully been prepared by a sol-gel surfactant-templating method. By tuning the porous feature and polymerization degree, the surface areas of the obtained PMO nanocubes can reach as high as 2370 m2/g, which is the highest for silica-based mesoporous materials. The ultrahigh surface area of the obtained PMO single crystals is mainly resulted from abundant micropores in the mesoporous frameworks. Furthermore, the diameter of the nanocubes can also be well controlled from 150 to 600 nm. The materials show ultrahigh CO2 adsorption capacity (up to 1.42 mmol/g at 273 K) which is much higher than other porous silica materials and comparable to some carbonaceous materials. The adsorption of CO2 into the PMO nanocubes is mainly in physical interaction, therefore the adsorption-desorption process is highly reversible and the adsorption capacity is much dependent on the surface area of the materials. Moreover, the selectivity is also very high (~11 times to N2) towards CO2 adsorption.

  16. Effect of surface acidity and basicity of aluminas on asphaltene adsorption and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Nashaat N; Hassan, Azfar; Pereira-Almao, Pedro

    2011-08-01

    This study investigates the effect of surface acidity and basicity of aluminas on asphaltene adsorption followed by air oxidation. Equilibrium batch adsorption experiments were conducted at 25°C with solutions of asphaltenes in toluene at concentrations ranging from 100 to 3000 g/L using three conventional alumina adsorbents with different surface acidity. Data were found to better fit to the Freundlich isotherm model showing a multilayer adsorption. Results showed that asphaltene adsorption is strongly affected by the surface acidity, and the adsorption capacities of asphaltenes onto the three aluminas followed the order acidic>basic and neutral. Asphaltenes adsorbed over aluminas were subjected to oxidation in air up to 600°C in a thermogravimetric analyzer to study the catalytic effect of aluminas with different surface acidity. A correlation was found between Freundlich affinity constant (1/n) and the catalytic activity. Basic alumina that has the lowest 1/n value, depicting strongest interactions, has the highest catalytic activity, followed by neutral and acidic aluminas, respectively. PMID:21571295

  17. Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanocubes with Ultrahigh Surface Areas for Efficient CO2 Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yong; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Renyuan; Liu, Yong; Wang, Wenxing; Ling, Yun; El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh surface area single-crystals of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMOs) with uniform cubic or truncated-cubic morphology and organic/inorganic components homogeneously distributed over the whole frameworks have successfully been prepared by a sol-gel surfactant-templating method. By tuning the porous feature and polymerization degree, the surface areas of the obtained PMO nanocubes can reach as high as 2370 m2/g, which is the highest for silica-based mesoporous materials. The ultrahigh surface area of the obtained PMO single crystals is mainly resulted from abundant micropores in the mesoporous frameworks. Furthermore, the diameter of the nanocubes can also be well controlled from 150 to 600 nm. The materials show ultrahigh CO2 adsorption capacity (up to 1.42 mmol/g at 273 K) which is much higher than other porous silica materials and comparable to some carbonaceous materials. The adsorption of CO2 into the PMO nanocubes is mainly in physical interaction, therefore the adsorption-desorption process is highly reversible and the adsorption capacity is much dependent on the surface area of the materials. Moreover, the selectivity is also very high (~11 times to N2) towards CO2 adsorption. PMID:26868049

  18. Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanocubes with Ultrahigh Surface Areas for Efficient CO₂ Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Renyuan; Liu, Yong; Wang, Wenxing; Ling, Yun; El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh surface area single-crystals of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMOs) with uniform cubic or truncated-cubic morphology and organic/inorganic components homogeneously distributed over the whole frameworks have successfully been prepared by a sol-gel surfactant-templating method. By tuning the porous feature and polymerization degree, the surface areas of the obtained PMO nanocubes can reach as high as 2370 m(2)/g, which is the highest for silica-based mesoporous materials. The ultrahigh surface area of the obtained PMO single crystals is mainly resulted from abundant micropores in the mesoporous frameworks. Furthermore, the diameter of the nanocubes can also be well controlled from 150 to 600 nm. The materials show ultrahigh CO2 adsorption capacity (up to 1.42 mmol/g at 273 K) which is much higher than other porous silica materials and comparable to some carbonaceous materials. The adsorption of CO2 into the PMO nanocubes is mainly in physical interaction, therefore the adsorption-desorption process is highly reversible and the adsorption capacity is much dependent on the surface area of the materials. Moreover, the selectivity is also very high (~11 times to N2) towards CO2 adsorption. PMID:26868049

  19. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Quantification and Speciation Modeling of Sulfate Adsorption on Ferrihydrite Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunhao; Wang, Zimeng; Kubicki, James D; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Mengqiang

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate adsorption on mineral surfaces is an important environmental chemical process, but the structures and respective contribution of different adsorption complexes under various environmental conditions are unclear. By combining sulfur K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy, quantum chemical calculations, and surface complexation modeling (SCM), we have shown that sulfate forms both outer-sphere complexes and bidentate-binuclear inner-sphere complexes on ferrihydrite surfaces. The relative fractions of the complexes vary with pH, ionic strength (I), and sample hydration degree (wet versus air-dried), but their structures remained the same. The inner-sphere complex adsorption loading decreases with increasing pH while remaining unchanged with I. At both I = 0.02 and 0.1 M, the outer-sphere complex loading reaches maximum at pH ∼5 and then decreases with pH, whereas it monotonically decreases with pH at I = 0.5 M. These observations result from a combination of the ionic-strength effect, the pH dependence of anion adsorption, and the competition between inner- and outer-sphere complexation. Air-drying drastically converts the outer-sphere complexes to the inner-sphere complexes. The respective contributions to the overall adsorption loading of the two complexes were directly modeled with the extended triple layer SCM by implementing the bidentate-binuclear inner-sphere complexation identified in the present study. These findings improve our understanding of sulfate adsorption and its effects on other environmental chemical processes and have important implications for generalizing the adsorption behavior of anions forming both inner- and outer-sphere complexes on mineral surfaces. PMID:27377619

  20. A study of molecular adsorption of a cationic surfactant on complex surfaces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, I; Zorn, G; Nichols, J M

    2016-02-01

    The study of molecular adsorption on solid surfaces is of broad interest. However, so far the study has been restricted to idealized flat smooth rigid surfaces which are rarely the case in real world applications. Here we describe a study of molecular adsorption on a complex surface of the submicron fibers of a fibrous membrane of regenerated cellulose in aqueous media. We use a cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), as the adsorbing molecule. We study the equilibrium adsorption of CTAC molecules on the same area of the fibers by sequentially immersing the membrane in pure water, 1 mM and then a 20 mM solution of CTAC. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is applied to study the adsorption. The force-volume mode is used to record the force-deformation curves of the adsorbed molecules on the fiber surface. We suggest a model to separate the forces due to the adsorbed molecules from the elastic deformation of the fiber. Interestingly, knowledge of the surface geometry is not required in this model provided the surface is made of elastically homogeneous material. Different models are investigated to estimate the amount of the adsorbed molecules based on the obtained force curves. The exponential steric repulsion model fits the force data the best. The amount of the adsorbed surfactant molecules and its dependence on the concentration are found to be reasonable compared to the data previously measured by means of Raman scattering done on a flat surface of silica. PMID:26730682

  1. Shear-enhanced adsorption of a homopolymeric globule mediated by surface catch bonds.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Matthias; Netz, Roland R

    2015-06-01

    The adsorption of a single collapsed homopolymer onto a planar smooth surface in shear flow is investigated by means of Brownian hydrodynamics simulation. While cohesive intra-polymer forces are modeled by Lennard-Jones potentials, surface-monomer interactions are described by stochastic bonds whose two-state kinetics is characterized by three parameters: bond formation rate, bond dissociation rate and an effective catch bond parameter that describes how the force acting on a surface-monomer bond influences the dissociation rate. We construct adsorption state diagrams as a function of shear rate and all three surface-monomer bond parameters. We find shear-induced adsorption in a small range of parameters for low dissociation and association rates and only when the surface-monomer bond is near the transition between slip and catch bond behavior. By mapping on a simple surface-monomer interaction model with conservative pair potentials we try to estimate the conservative potential parameters necessary to observe shear-induced surface adsorption phenomena. PMID:26123772

  2. Nisin adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces: evidence of its interactions and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Karam, Layal; Jama, Charafeddine; Nuns, Nicolas; Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2013-06-01

    Study of peptides adsorption on surfaces remains a current challenge in literature. A complementary approach, combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to investigate the antimicrobial peptide nisin adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The native low density polyethylene was used as hydrophobic support and it was grafted with acrylic acid to render it hydrophilic. XPS permitted to confirm nisin adsorption and to determine its amount on the surfaces. ToF-SIMS permitted to identify the adsorbed bacteriocin type and to observe its distribution and orientation behavior on both types of surfaces. Nisin was more oriented by its hydrophobic side to the hydrophobic substrate and by its hydrophilic side to the outer layers of the adsorbed peptide, in contrast to what was observed on the hydrophilic substrate. A correlation was found between XPS and ToF-SIMS results, the types of interactions on both surfaces and the observed antibacterial activity. Such interfacial studies are crucial for better understanding the peptides interactions and adsorption on surfaces and must be considered when setting up antimicrobial surfaces. PMID:23625525

  3. Phytic acid adsorption on the copper surface: Observation of electrochemistry and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shu; Guo, Xiao-yu; Song, Ping; Pan, Ying-Cheng; Wang, Hao-qiong; Wen, Ying; Yang, Hai-Feng

    2013-07-01

    The adsorption of phytic acid (PA) on copper was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), electrochemical polarization measurement and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. Electrochemical results indicated that inhibition efficiency of PA film for copper from corrosion in 3 wt% NaCl solution was beyond 80% at an optimum self-assembly concentration of 0.1 mM for 6 h. Electrochemical polarization indicated that PA functioned as a cathodic inhibitor. In addition, Raman studies showed that PA adsorbed on the copper surface formed via P-O groups. Finally, the value of ΔGads (-39.96 kJ mol-1) was close to -40 kJ mol-1, suggesting that the adsorption of PA on the copper surface was the chemical adsorption.

  4. Surface treatments of silver rods with enhanced iodide adsorption for I-125 brachytherapy seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hee; Choi, Kang Hyuk; Yu, Kook Hyun

    2014-02-01

    This study described an effective method to load (125)I on silver rods for the preparation of a brachytherapy source. We tested various ligands on the silver rod surface to screen the one with the highest adsorption and specific radioactivity. In addition, we investigated the effect of surface etching to increase the adsorption capability followed by the extended surface area. We also found that the use of an oxidant during iodide adsorption can increase the loading significantly. The maximum activity of 137.90MBq/rod (3.7269mCi/rod) was achieved on the etched silver rods with phosphate ligand and hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant. In addition, this is 4.5-fold higher than that of the conventional chloride treatment method. PMID:24393812

  5. Quantum Chemical Study of Water Adsorption on the Surfaces of SrTiO3 Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Andrei V; Kuruch, Dmitry D; Evarestov, Robert A

    2015-07-20

    We have studied the adsorption of water molecules on the inner and outer surfaces of nanotubes generated by rolling (001) layers of SrTiO3 cubic crystals. The stability and the atomic and electronic structures of the adsorbed layers are determined by using hybrid density functional theory. The absorption energy and the preferred adsorbate structure are essentially governed by the nature of the surface of the nanotube. Dissociative adsorption prevails on the outer nanotube surfaces. The stability of the adsorbed layers on the inner surfaces is related to the possibility of the formation of hydrogen bonds between water molecules and surface oxygen atoms, and depends on the surface curvature. The presence of water molecules on the inner surface of the nanotubes leads to an increase of the electronic band gap. Externally TiO2 -terminated nanotubes could be used for the photocatalytic decomposition of water by ultraviolet radiation. PMID:26010751

  6. On modeling biomolecular-surface nonbonded interactions: application to nucleobase adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotube surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdim, B.; Pachter, R.; Day, P. N.; Kim, S. S.; Naik, R. R.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we explored the selectivity of single nucleobases towards adsorption on chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by density functional theory calculations. Specifically, the adsorption of molecular models of guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), and cytosine (C), as well as of AT and GC Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs on chiral SWCNT C(6, 5), C(9, 1) and C(8, 3) model structures, was analyzed in detail. The importance of correcting the exchange-correlation functional for London dispersion was clearly demonstrated, yet limitations in modeling such interactions by considering the SWCNT as a molecular model may mask subtle effects in a molecular-macroscopic material system. The trend in the calculated adsorption energies of the nucleobases on same diameter C(6, 5) and C(9, 1) SWCNT surfaces, i.e. G > A > T > C, was consistent with related computations and experimental work on graphitic surfaces, however contradicting experimental data on the adsorption of single-strand short homo-oligonucleotides on SWCNTs that demonstrated a trend of G > C > A > T (Albertorio et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 395101). A possible role of electrostatic interactions in this case was partially captured by applying the effective fragment potential method, emphasizing that the interplay of the various contributions in modeling nonbonded interactions is complicated by theoretical limitations. Finally, because the calculated adsorption energies for Watson-Crick base pairs have shown little effect upon adsorption of the base pair farther from the surface, the results on SWCNT sorting by salmon genomic DNA could be indicative of partial unfolding of the double helix upon adsorption on the SWCNT surface.

  7. Tubular carbon nanotube-based gas diffusion electrode removes persistent organic pollutants by a cyclic adsorption - Electro-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Roth, Hannah; Gendel, Youri; Buzatu, Pompilia; David, Oana; Wessling, Matthias

    2016-04-15

    We report a novel tubular electrochemical cell which is operated in a cyclic adsorption - electro-Fenton process and by this means overcomes the drawbacks of the traditional electro-Fenton process. A microtube made only of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) functions as a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) and highly porous adsorber. In the process, the pollutants were first removed electroless from the wastewater by adsorption on the MWCNT-GDE. Subsequently, the pollutants are electrochemically degraded in a defined volume of electrolyte solution using the electro-Fenton process. Oxygen was supplied into the lumen of the saturated microtubular GDE which was surrounded by a cylindrical anode made of Ti-felt coated with Pt/IrO2 catalysts. For the proof of concept the model pollutant Acid Red 14 (AR14), an azo dye, was used. The decomposition of AR14 was studied at different applied current densities and initial concentrations of ferrous iron in the electrolyte solution. At optimal conditions, complete regeneration of the adsorption capacity of the MWCNT-GDE, complete decolorization and TOC and COD removal rates of 50% and 70% were achieved, respectively. The MWCNT-GDE is regenerated and again available for adsorption. This approach allows water treatment independent of its composition, thus does not require any addition of chemicals to the wastewater. PMID:26775104

  8. Adsorption of ethanol on V2O5 (010) surface for gas-sensing applications: Ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Cui, Mengyang; Ye, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of ethanol on V2O5 (010) surface was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) with a combined generalized gradient approximation (GGA) plus Hubbard U approach to exploit the potential sensing applications. The adsorption configurations were first constructed by considering different orientations of ethanol molecule to V and O sites on the "Hill"- and "Valley"-like regions of corrugated (010) surface. It is found that ethanol molecule can adsorb on whole surface in multiple stable configurations. Nevertheless the molecular adsorption on the "Hill"-like surface is calculated to occur preferentially, and the single coordinated oxygen on "Hill"-like surface (O1(H)) acting as the most energetically favorable adsorption site shows the strongest adsorption ability to ethanol molecule. Surface adsorption of ethanol tunes the electronic structure of V2O5 and cause an n-doping effect. As a consequence, the Fermi levels shift toward the conductive bond increasing the charge carrier concentration of electrons in adsorbed V2O5. The sensitive electronic structure and the multiple stable configurations to ethanol adsorption highlight the high adsorption activity and then the potential of V2O5 (010) surface applied to high sensitive sensor for ethanol vapor detection. Further Mulliken population and Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations quantify the electron transfer from the adsorbed ethanol to the surface, and correlates the adsorption ability of surface sites with the charge donation and dispersion.

  9. Surface reaction and pore diffusion in flow-tube reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, Leon F.; Moore, Steven B.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of gas diffusion with surface reaction in porous solids is discussed and applied specifically to heterogeneous rate measurements in flow-tube reactors. External diffusion to the outer surface of a reactive solid, internal diffusion within the pores, surface reaction, and laminar flow are considered. A procedure is developed to correct observed surface rate constants for the interaction of these processes. Measured surface areas and bulk densities are used to construct a semiempirical model for porous diffusion in vapor-formed HNO3-H2O ices which are used to simulate polar stratospheric cloud surfaces. The model is tested experimentally by varying the thickness of these ices from about 15 to 120 microns. The results are consistent with the model predictions and show that the HNO3-H2O ices used are highly porous, and the internal surface must be considered in calculating kinetic parameters from observed loss rates. The best fit of the data yields a tortuosity factor of 3.3 +/-1.1 for the ice substrates.

  10. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  11. Wetting, spreading, and adsorption on randomly rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Herminghaus, S

    2012-06-01

    The wetting properties of solid substrates with customary (i.e., macroscopic) random roughness are considered as a function of the microscopic contact angle of the wetting liquid and its partial pressure in the surrounding gas phase. Analytic expressions are derived which allow for any given lateral correlation function and height distribution of the roughness to calculate the wetting phase diagram, the adsorption isotherms, and to locate the percolation transition in the adsorbed liquid film. Most features turn out to depend only on a few key parameters of the roughness, which can be clearly identified. It is shown that a first-order transition in the adsorbed film thickness, which we term "Wenzel prewetting", occurs generically on typical roughness topographies, but is absent on purely Gaussian roughness. It is thereby shown that even subtle deviations from Gaussian roughness characteristics may be essential for correctly predicting even qualitative aspects of wetting. PMID:22661267

  12. Dynamics of polyelectrolyte adsorption on surfaces: Applications in the detection of iron in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammana, Madhira N.

    Layer by layer (LbL) self assembly is a simple multilayer thin (nanometer scale) film fabricating technique. The mechanism of film growth remains a topic of much controversy. For example, several models have been proposed to explain the origin of linear and exponential film growth that are attributed to differences in the dynamic processes that occur at the molecular level during film formation. The problem is that there are no methods that directly measure the dynamics of polymer formation during LbL film formation. In this thesis, I describe the essential elements of an ATR-IR spectroscopic method that was developed to enable measurement of the dynamics of the mass adsorbed and polyelectrolyte conformation during the formation of PEM's. In particular, I followed the sequential adsorption of Sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) and Poly (diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDADMAC) from deionized (DI) water and as a function of ionic strength to show that polymer diffusion occurs between layers when adsorbed from DI water. In contrast, a denser layer occurs with no polymer interdiffusion for deposition from 0.02M ionic strength solutions of NaPA and PDADMAC. While the mass deposited increased with ionic strength, linear multilayer growth in films were observed in all cases. This finding disputes a common viewpoint that interdiffusion of polymer layers is a key feature of exponential film growth. The theme of polymer layer adsorption was used in the detection of Fe 3+ in seawater. A new approach, developed previously in Tripp's group, utilized "vertical amplification" in which a block copolymer assembled on membranes provided multiple anchoring points extending from the surface for attaching a siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFB). The Fe3+ chelates with the siderophore producing a red color that can be quantified by visible spectroscopy. However, the rate of Fe3+ uptake was found to be dependent on flow rate. The origin of this flow rate dependence was identified by the work

  13. II. Inhibited Diffusion Driven Surface Transmutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Talbot A.

    2006-02-01

    This paper is the second of a set of three papers dealing with the role of coherent partitioning as a common element in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR), by which is meant cold-fusion related processes. This paper discusses the first step in a sequence of four steps that seem to be necessary to explain Iwamura 2-α-addition surface transmutations. Three concepts are examined: salt-metal interface states, sequential tunneling that transitions D+ ions from localized interstitial to Bloch form, and the general applicability of 2-dimensional vs. 3-dimensional symmetry hosting networks.

  14. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  15. Molecular adsorption and methanol synthesis on the oxidized Cu/ZnO(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyle, Matthew J.; Warschkow, Oliver; Delley, Bernard; Stampfl, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Cu/ZnO is an important catalyst used in the industrial synthesis of methanol from syngas. Many aspects of the functional synergy between the Cu and ZnO components in this system require further understanding. This work uses density functional theory calculations to examine the adsorption of various reactants of methanol synthesis to a recently proposed copper-oxide overlayer reconstruction on the ZnO(0001) surface. We identify the preferred binding configurations as a function of adsorbate coverage and compare the energetics of adsorption to that on the clean ZnO(0001) surface. The relevance of our results to methanol synthesis is discussed.

  16. Gas adsorption and accumulation on hydrophobic surfaces: Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qing-Qun; Yang, Jie-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations show that the gas dissolved in water can be adsorbed at a hydrophobic interface and accumulates thereon. Initially, a water depletion layer appears on the hydrophobic interface. Gas molecules then enter the depletion layer and form a high-density gas-enriched layer. Finally, the gas-enriched layer accumulates to form a nanobubble. The radian of the nanobubble increases with time until equilibrium is reached. The equilibrium state arises through a Brenner-Lohse dynamic equilibrium mechanism, whereby the diffusive outflux is compensated by an influx near the contact line. Additionally, supersaturated gas also accumulates unsteadily in bulk water, since it can diffuse back into the water and is gradually adsorbed by a solid substrate. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21376161).

  17. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Esteves-Villanueva, Jose; Soudy, Rania; Kaur, Kamaljit; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-). The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine) and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol) was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers) in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides. PMID:26262621

  18. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Esteves-Villanueva, Jose; Soudy, Rania; Kaur, Kamaljit; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−. The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine) and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol) was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers) in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides. PMID:26262621

  19. Infrared spectroscopic studies of galvanic effect influence on surface modification of sulfide minerals by surfactant adsorption.

    PubMed

    Mielczarski, Ela; Mielczarski, Jerzy A

    2005-08-15

    The influence of interaction between mineral components in natural mixtures on the adsorption of organic and inorganic species on the mineral surfaces is recognized. However, the surface phenomena have been meagerly investigated. In this study the formation of different surface species of surfactant (amyl xanthate, C5H11OC(S)S-) adsorbed on FeS2, PbS, and CuFeS2 has been spectroscopically investigated in single-mineral and complex systems. The type and amount of adsorbed species were determined directly on each mineral surface by infrared external reflection spectroscopy. Galvanic interaction between grains of different minerals could have tremendous consequence on the adsorption of surfactants on each mineral component and their future reactivity. The detected changes are dramatic, from no adsorption to the formation of several layers of hydrophobic or hydrophilic surface products depending on which minerals are in contact. It has been documented that even very short contact time between different mineral grains by collision is sufficient to produce dramatic modification of the surface composition and structure. The results obtained indicate clearly that the observations and conclusions aboutthe surfactant adsorption made in a single mineral system cannot be simply extrapolated to describe the real situation in natural multicomponent mineral systems. The obtained information on sulfide mineral interaction in complex systems is indispensable to understand processes taking place in nature at mineral-water interfaces (dissolution of heavy metals). An additional benefit is the improved ability to design efficient separation processes of these minerals. PMID:16173571

  20. First principles study of nanoscale mechanism of oxygen adsorption on lanthanum zirconate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Wu, Linmin; Zhang, Yi; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) is a rare-earth pyrochlore material, which has been proposed as a promising thermal barrier coating (TBC) material due to its low thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability. At elevated temperatures, degradation of La2Zr2O7 may occur due to adsorption of oxygen (O2) on La2Zr2O7 surfaces. This paper investigates nanoscale mechanism of O2 adsorption on La2Zr2O7 coating surfaces using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. La2Zr2O7 surface energies on (001), (011) and (111) planes are calculated. The surface free energy of (011) plane is lower than those of (001) and (111) planes. On (001), (011) and (111) planes of La2Zr2O7, the lowest adsorption energy occurs at 4-fold site, bridge site, and 3-fold-FCC site, respectively. Among all calculated cases, the lowest adsorption energy site is 3-fold-FCC on (111) plane, which is confirmed by the Bader charge transfer analyses. Charge density difference analyses show that the 3-fold-FCC site on (111) surface has the largest charge density, suggesting the strongest interaction between O2 and La2Zr2O7 surface.

  1. Adsorption of branched and dendritic polymers onto flat surfaces: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, J.-U.; Kłos, J. S.; Mironova, O. N.

    2013-12-28

    Using Monte Carlo simulations based on the bond fluctuation model we study the adsorption of starburst dendrimers with flexible spacers onto a flat surface. The calculations are performed for various generation number G and spacer length S in a wide range of the reduced temperature τ as the measure of the interaction strength between the monomers and the surface. Our simulations indicate a two-step adsorption scenario. Below the critical point of adsorption, τ{sub c}, a weakly adsorbed state of the dendrimer is found. Here, the dendrimer retains its shape but sticks to the surface by adsorbed spacers. By lowering the temperature below a spacer-length dependent value, τ*(S) < τ{sub c}, a step-like transition into a strongly adsorbed state takes place. In the flatly adsorbed state the shape of the dendrimer is well described by a mean field model of a dendrimer in two dimensions. We also performed simulations of star-polymers which display a simple crossover-behavior in full analogy to linear chains. By analyzing the order parameter of the adsorption transition, we determine the critical point of adsorption of the dendrimers which is located close to the critical point of adsorption for star-polymers. While the order parameter for the adsorbed spacers displays a critical crossover scaling, the overall order parameter, which combines both critical and discontinuous transition effects, does not display simple scaling. The step-like transition from the weak into the strong adsorbed regime is confirmed by analyzing the shape-anisotropy of the dendrimers. We present a mean-field model based on the concept of spacer adsorption which predicts a discontinuous transition of dendrimers due to an excluded volume barrier. The latter results from an increased density of the dendrimer in the flatly adsorbed state which has to be overcome before this state is thermodynamically stable.

  2. A systematic DFT study of hydrogen diffusion on transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristinsdóttir, Lilja; Skúlason, Egill

    2012-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations of the diffusion of hydrogen atoms on 23 transition metal surfaces in their closed-packed structure have been carried out. The d-metals chosen are all the metals in the 4th, 5th and 6th periods, from Sc to Au, except Mn, Tc, and Hf. Potential energy surfaces of H atom on these metals are constructed and the diffusion barrier from one minima to another is compared with nudged elastic band calculations. Most of the minimum energy paths have a single activation barrier, except on two surfaces where a dip in the bridge position (W and Pt) is observed. Trends in the adsorption and activation energies are observed where the former is explained with the d-band model. All the activation energies for diffusion are relatively low, or from 0.04 eV for Pt to 0.28 eV on Y and Zr. Finally, we estimate the temperature where tunneling effects should start to take place.

  3. Shield effect of silicate on adsorption of proteins onto silicon-doped hydroxyapatite (100) surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Wu, Tao; Wang, Qi; Shen, Jia-Wei

    2008-05-01

    Protein adsorption-desorption on nanoscale surface plays a key role in biomaterials, cell adhesion, biosensors, biofuel cells and biomineralization. Silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite (SiHA) is one of the most interesting bioceramics in the field of bioactive hard tissue implants. In this paper, the adsorption-desorption behaviors of leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) on a series of SiHA (100) surfaces were investigated using the molecular dynamics (MD), steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It was found that the silicate ions on SiHA (100) surface cause a shield effect, which was composed of the charge repulsion and the steric hindrance of silicates. These findings suggest that surface engineering technologies can be potentially used to directly control/manufacture the nanoscale surface texture and the composition of material surfaces, thereby to mediate the interaction of proteins with biomaterials. PMID:18299149

  4. Water adsorption induced in-plane domain switching on BaTiO{sub 3} surface

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Wang, B. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study, the influences of the adsorption of water molecules on the changes in the atomic and electric structures of BaTiO{sub 3} surface were investigated using ab initio calculation. Water molecules are molecularly and dissociatively adsorbed on the BaTiO{sub 3} surface, which makes electrons transfer from water molecules to the BaTiO{sub 3} surface. The redistribution of electrons in the BaTiO{sub 3} surface layers weakens the Ba-O interactions and strengthens the Ti-O interactions, so that the Ti atom shifts in TiO{sub 2} plane, i.e., an in-plane domain switching. The adsorption of water molecules on BaTiO{sub 3} surfaces also results in a reduction in the surface rumpling.

  5. Adsorption of anionic and cationic polymers on porous and non-porous calcium carbonate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorklund, Robert B.; Arwin, Hans; Järnström, Lars

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption of anionic and cationic polymers onto calcium carbonate surfaces was studied by ellipsometry. Sodium polyacrylate was observed to both adsorb on and promote dissolution of polished limestone surfaces in 5 mM CaSO 4 solution at pH 10.3. It was not possible to differentiate between the two processes when they occurred simultaneously. Cationic starch adsorbed on the limestone surfaces at low concentrations and caused mineral dissolution at higher concentrations. The adsorbed amount of starch was higher on surfaces which were first made porous by partial dissolution than on freshly polished surfaces. Surfaces created by cleavage of Iceland spar calcite were quite stable against dissolution and the amount of starch adsorbed determined by ellipsometry agreed well with the adsorbed mass determined from batch adsorption experiments on ground calcite.

  6. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-07

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  7. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Erikat, I A; Hamad, B A

    2013-11-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir-C and Ir-Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule. PMID:24206318

  8. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir-C and Ir-Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  9. Effects of solution conditions and surface chemistry on the adsorption of three recombinant botulinum neurotoxin antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Vessely, Christina; Estey, Tia; Randolph, Theodore W; Henderson, Ian; Nayar, Rajiv; Carpenter, John F

    2007-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a biological warfare threat. Protein antigens have been developed against the seven major BoNT serotypes for the development of a recombinant protein vaccine. This study is an evaluation of adsorption profiles for three of the recombinant protein antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants in the development of a trivalent vaccine against BoNT. Adsorption profiles were obtained over a range of protein concentrations. The results document that charge-charge interactions dominate the adsorption of antigen to adjuvant. Optimal conditions for adsorption were determined. However, potency studies and solution stability studies indicated the necessity of using aluminum hydroxide adjuvant at low pH. To improve the adsorption profiles to AlOH adjuvant, phosphate ions were introduced into the adsorption buffers. The resulting change in the adjuvant chemistry led to an improvement of adsorption of the BoNT antigens to aluminum hydroxide adjuvant while maintaining potency. Competitive adsorption profiles were also determined, and showed changes in maximum adsorption from mixed solutions compared to adsorption from individual protein solutions. The adsorption profiles for each protein varied due to differences in adsorption mechanism and affinity for the adjuvant surface. These results emphasize the importance of evaluating competitive adsorption in the development of multivalent vaccine products. PMID:17518359

  10. Introduction of a sink-diffusion model to describe the interaction between volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, R B; Dokka, T H; Bjørseth, O

    2000-03-01

    A sink-diffusion model to describe the interaction between material surfaces and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air has been introduced. The model is based on adsorption/desorption on the material surfaces and diffusion into the materials. Test chamber experiments with exposure of nylon carpet and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) covering against alpha-pinene and toluene were used to validate the model and to make comparisons with a sink model based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The results showed that the sink-diffusion model gave a better description of the desorption curve than the Langmuir model. The model predictions improved with increasing sorption effect. The Langmuir model gave good predictions of relative weak sorption effects, whereas the sink-diffusion model improved the predictions for stronger sorption effects. In this case, nylon carpet showed substantial stronger sorption than PVC covering and alpha-pinene showed stronger sorption than toluene. Controlled field experiments with combinations of building materials and a mixture of VOCs, encountered in real indoor environments, are needed to further validate the sink-diffusion model. PMID:10842458

  11. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  12. Methanol adsorption on magnesium oxide surface with defects: a DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branda, M. M.; Ferullo, R. M.; Belelli, P. G.; Castellani, N. J.

    2003-03-01

    The methanol adsorption on several defects of the magnesium oxide surface were studied. Structural and electronic study with geometrical optimization and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis were performed using a density functional theory (DFT) method. Oxygen and magnesium with different coordination numbers have very different reactivity in this surface producing dissociated and non-dissociated species. These results are in agreement with infrared spectroscopy observations where CH 3OH, OCH 3 and OH species were found in defective MgO surfaces.

  13. Studies of surface diffusion by second harmonic fluctuation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiaolin; Goh, M.C.; Subrahmanyan, S.; Eisenthal, K.B. )

    1990-05-03

    The authors have shown how the fluctuations in the signal from surface second harmonic generation can be utilized for the study of a heterogeneous surface such as palmitic acid (C{sub 15}H{sub 31}COOH) spread on the air/water interface, under conditions of gas-liquid coexistence. The authors report observations of time-correlated fluctuations in the SH signal, with decay constant of approximately 6 s. This is attributed to motions of the liquidlike clusters of palmitic acid. If the motion is diffusive, a diffusion constant of about 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s is estimated for these clusters.

  14. Effects of surface diffusion on high temperature selective emitters.

    PubMed

    Peykov, Daniel; Yeng, Yi Xiang; Celanovic, Ivan; Joannopoulos, John D; Schuh, Christopher A

    2015-04-20

    Using morphological and optical simulations of 1D tantalum photonic crystals at 1200K, surface diffusion was determined to gradually reduce the efficiency of selective emitters. This was attributed to shifting resonance peaks and declining emissivity caused by changes to the cavity dimensions and the aperture width. Decreasing the structure's curvature through larger periods and smaller cavity widths, as well as generating smoother transitions in curvature through the introduction of rounded cavities, was found to alleviate this degradation. An optimized structure, that shows both high efficiency selective emissivity and resistance to surface diffusion, was presented. PMID:25969039

  15. In situ laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chan, W S; Khan, S U

    1978-08-01

    Report is made on an in situ method of laser reflectance measurement of diffuse surfaces by using a GaAs laser and off-the-shelf optical components not involving radiation integration over a hemisphere as with most conventional reflectometers. The design features and limitations are described. Several diffuse surfaces were evaluated by this method, and the reflectance results obtained were in good agreement with those determined by the method of integrating sphere that used MgCO(3) surface as a standard. The main advantages of this method are: the elimination of the need of a surface standard; the avoidance of having the surfaces in close contact with the measuring equipment; the accuracy better than 10%; and the relatively straightforward alignment. PMID:20203783

  16. Theoretical studies of the adsorption of hydroxymethylidyne (COH) on Pt-alloy surfaces using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahyanto, Wahyu Tri; Widanarto, Wahyu; Shukri, Ganes; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-02-01

    We present density functional calculations for the adsorption of hydroxymethylidyne (COH) on Pt, PtRu, and PtRuMo (111) surfaces. Here we clarify the adsorption mechanism by using a charge transfer analysis related to the adsorption energy. We observe that the preferred binding sites for COH are the hcp hollow Pt-Pt-Pt, hcp hollow Pt-Ru-Pt, and hcp hollow Pt-Ru-Pt adsorption sites for Pt, PtRu, and PtRuMo, respectively. Addition of Ru to form a PtRu surface increases the adsorption energy, while addition of Mo to form a PtRuMo surface decreases it. Our analyses show that the adsorption energy is determined by electron transfer between the molecular COH and the metal surfaces associated with bonding.

  17. Mechanism and energetics of O and O2 adsorption on polar and non-polar ZnO surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G.; Ertekin, Elif

    2016-05-01

    Polar surfaces of semiconducting metal oxides can exhibit structures and chemical reactivities that are distinct from their non-polar surfaces. Using first-principles calculations, we examine O adatom and O2 molecule adsorption on 8 different known ZnO reconstructions including Zn-terminated (Zn-ZnO) and O-terminated (O-ZnO) polar surfaces, and non-polar surfaces. We find that adsorption tendencies are largely governed by the thermodynamic environment, but exhibit variations due to the different surface chemistries of various reconstructions. The Zn-ZnO surface reconstructions which appear under O-rich and H-poor environments are found to be most amenable to O and O2 adsorption. We attribute this to the fact that on Zn-ZnO, the O-rich environments that promote O adsorption also simultaneously favor reconstructions that involve adsorbed O species. On these Zn-ZnO surfaces, O2 dissociatively adsorbs to form O adatoms. By contrast, on O-ZnO surfaces, the O-rich conditions required for O or O2 adsorption tend to promote reconstructions involving adsorbed H species, making further O species adsorption more difficult. These insights about O2 adsorption on ZnO surfaces suggest possible design rules to understand the adsorption properties of semiconductor polar surfaces.

  18. Mechanism and energetics of O and O2 adsorption on polar and non-polar ZnO surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Prashun; Seebauer, Edmund G; Ertekin, Elif

    2016-05-14

    Polar surfaces of semiconducting metal oxides can exhibit structures and chemical reactivities that are distinct from their non-polar surfaces. Using first-principles calculations, we examine O adatom and O2 molecule adsorption on 8 different known ZnO reconstructions including Zn-terminated (Zn-ZnO) and O-terminated (O-ZnO) polar surfaces, and non-polar surfaces. We find that adsorption tendencies are largely governed by the thermodynamic environment, but exhibit variations due to the different surface chemistries of various reconstructions. The Zn-ZnO surface reconstructions which appear under O-rich and H-poor environments are found to be most amenable to O and O2 adsorption. We attribute this to the fact that on Zn-ZnO, the O-rich environments that promote O adsorption also simultaneously favor reconstructions that involve adsorbed O species. On these Zn-ZnO surfaces, O2 dissociatively adsorbs to form O adatoms. By contrast, on O-ZnO surfaces, the O-rich conditions required for O or O2 adsorption tend to promote reconstructions involving adsorbed H species, making further O species adsorption more difficult. These insights about O2 adsorption on ZnO surfaces suggest possible design rules to understand the adsorption properties of semiconductor polar surfaces. PMID:27179501

  19. Oriented adsorption of purple membrane to cationic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K A; Yanagimoto, K; Stoeckenius, W

    1978-05-01

    We have investigated the orientation of isolated fragments of Halobacterium halobium purple membrane (PM) adsorbed to poly-L-lysine-treated glass (PL-glass), by quanitative electron microscopy. Three lines of evidence support the conclusion that the cytoplasmic side of the membrane is preferentially absorbed. First, monolayer freeze-fracture reveals nonrandom orientation; more fracture faces (89%) are particulate than smooth. Second, the amount of each membrane surface present can be assayed using polycationic ferritin; 90% of all adsorbed membrane fragments are labeled. Third, it is possible to distinguish two surfaces, "cracked" (the extracellular surface) and "pitted" (the cytoplasmic surface) , in slowly air-dried, platinum-carbon-shadowed membranes. When applied under standard conditions, more than 80% appear cracked. Selection for the cytoplasmic by the cationic substrate suggests that the isolated PM, buffered at pH 7.4 and in the light, has a higher negative charge on its cytoplasmic surface than on its extracellular surface. Nevertheless, cationic ferritin (CF) preferentially adsorbs to the extracellular surface. Orientation provides a striking example of biomembrane surface asymmetry as well as the means to examine the chemical reactivity and physical properties of surfaces of a purified, nonvesicular membrane fragment. PMID:649662

  20. Synthesis of mesoporous maghemite with high surface area and its adsorptive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asuha, S.; Zhao, Y. M.; Zhao, S.; Deligeer, W.

    2012-07-01

    Mesoporous maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) with high surface area was prepared by the thermal decomposition of Fe-urea complex ([Fe(CON2H4)6](NO3)3) with the aid of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and its adsorption ability for the removal of fluoride was investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements, transmission electron micrograph (TEM) observations, and magnetic measurements show that the γ-Fe2O3 has a mesoporous structure and its crystallite size, specific surface area, and magnetic properties can be controlled by varying the content of CTAB in [Fe(CON2H4)6](NO3)3. The maximum adsorption capacity of the mesoporous γ-Fe2O3 for fluoride is estimated to be 7.9 mg/g, which suggests that the mesoporous γ-Fe2O3 is an excellent adsorbent for fluoride.

  1. Glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles: a surface ligand for minimizing serum protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Liu, Jinbin; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Mengxiao; Yang, Shengyang; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Shasha; Dean, Andrew; Sun, Xiankai; Zheng, Jie

    2014-08-13

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs' protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins. PMID:25029478

  2. Glutathione-Coated Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles: A Surface Ligand for Minimizing Serum Protein Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs’ protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins. PMID:25029478

  3. Goethite surface reactivity: III. Unifying arsenate adsorption behavior through a variable crystal face - Site density model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Camacho, Carlos; Villalobos, Mario

    2010-04-01

    We developed a model that describes quantitatively the arsenate adsorption behavior for any goethite preparation as a function of pH and ionic strength, by using one basic surface arsenate stoichiometry, with two affinity constants. The model combines a face distribution-crystallographic site density model for goethite with tenets of the Triple Layer and CD-MUSIC surface complexation models, and is self-consistent with its adsorption behavior towards protons, electrolytes, and other ions investigated previously. Five different systems of published arsenate adsorption data were used to calibrate the model spanning a wide range of chemical conditions, which included adsorption isotherms at different pH values, and adsorption pH-edges at different As(V) loadings, both at different ionic strengths and background electrolytes. Four additional goethite-arsenate systems reported with limited characterization and adsorption data were accurately described by the model developed. The adsorption reaction proposed is: lbond2 FeOH +lbond2 SOH +AsO43-+H→lbond2 FeOAsO3[2-]…SOH+HO where lbond2 SOH is an adjacent surface site to lbond2 FeOH; with log K = 21.6 ± 0.7 when lbond2 SOH is another lbond2 FeOH, and log K = 18.75 ± 0.9, when lbond2 SOH is lbond2 Fe 2OH. An additional small contribution of a protonated complex was required to describe data at low pH and very high arsenate loadings. The model considered goethites above 80 m 2/g as ideally composed of 70% face (1 0 1) and 30% face (0 0 1), resulting in a site density for lbond2 FeOH and for lbond2 Fe 3OH of 3.125/nm 2 each. Below 80 m 2/g surface capacity increases progressively with decreasing area, which was modeled by considering a progressively increasing proportion of faces (0 1 0)/(1 0 1), because face (0 1 0) shows a much higher site density of lbond2 FeOH groups. Computation of the specific proportion of faces, and thus of the site densities for the three types of crystallographic surface groups present in

  4. Surface complexation modeling of Cr(VI) adsorption at the goethite-water interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jinyu; Gu, Xueyuan; Tong, Fei; Zhao, Yanping; Tan, Yinyue

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a charge distribution multisite surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC) for adsorption of chromate onto goethite was carefully developed. The adsorption of Cr(VI) on goethite was firstly investigated as a function of pH, ionic strength and Cr(VI) concentration. Results showed that an inner-sphere complexation mechanism was involved because the retention of Cr(VI) was little influenced by ionic strength. Then two surface species: a bidentate complex (≡Fe2O2CrOOH) and a monodentate complex (≡FeOCrO3(-3/2)), which is constrained by prior spectroscopic evidence were proposed to fit the macroscopic adsorption data. Modeling results showed that the bidentate complex was found to be the dominant species at low pH, whereas, with increasing pH, monodentate species became more pronounced. The model was then verified by prediction of competitive adsorption of chromate and phosphate at various ratios and ionic strengths. The model successfully predicted the inhibition of chromate with the presence of phosphate, suggesting phosphate has higher affinity to goethite surface than Cr(VI). Results showed that the model developed in this study for Cr(VI) onto goethite was applicable for various conditions. It is a useful supplement for the surface complexation model database for oxyanions onto goethite surfaces. PMID:26057103

  5. Density functional study of H2O molecule adsorption on α-U(001) surface.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shanqisong; Zeng, Xiu-Lin; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Ju, Xuehai

    2016-04-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption of H2O on U(001) surface. The metallic nature of uranium atom and different adsorption sites of U(001) surface play key roles in the H2O molecular dissociate reaction. The long-bridge site is the most favorable site of H2O-U(001) adsorption configuration. The triangle-center site of the H atom is the most favorable site of HOH-U(001) adsorption configuration. The interaction between H2O and U surface is more evident on the first layer than that on any other two sub-layers. The dissociation energy of one hydrogen atom from H2O is -1.994 to -2.215 eV on U(001) surface, while the dissociating energy decreases to -3.351 to -3.394 eV with two hydrogen atoms dissociating from H2O. These phenomena also indicate that the Oads can promote the dehydrogenation of H2O. A significant charge transfer from the first layer of the uranium surface to the H and O atoms is also found to occur, making the bonding partly ionic. PMID:26994022

  6. Carbon-monoxide adsorption and dissociation on Nb(1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Hua; Lan, Zhi-Qiang; Guo, Jin; Tan, Ming-Qiu

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of CO on the Nb(1 1 0) surface has been studied by using the density-functional theory with total-energy calculations. In addition to the adsorption geometries, the vibrational properties, surface electronic structures, and dissociation pathways of CO adsorption on the Nb(1 1 0) surface have been investigated. The Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE), meta generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA), and hybrid functional (HSE06) functionals were applied to discuss the site preference in the Nb-p(1 × 1) surface. Results showed that the inclined CO adsorbed on the hollow sites is the most stable structure from total-energies using different functionals. Furthermore, at lower coverage, CO molecules adsorbed on the Nb(1 1 0)-p(2 × 2) surface are easy to dissociate to forming the atomic adsorption from NBE calculations. PDOS showed that in the cases of CO adsorbed on hollow and bridge sites, the σ orbitals of CO molecule hybridize with d orbitals of Nb atom apparently, while on top sites, the 2π* orbitals of CO molecule interact with Nb d orbitals intensely.

  7. Determination of colloidal gold nanoparticle surface areas, concentrations, and sizes through quantitative ligand adsorption.

    PubMed

    Gadogbe, Manuel; Ansar, Siyam M; He, Guoliang; Collier, Willard E; Rodriguez, Jose; Liu, Dong; Chu, I-Wei; Zhang, Dongmao

    2013-01-01

    Determination of the true surface areas, concentrations, and particle sizes of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is a challenging issue due to the nanoparticle morphological irregularity, surface roughness, and size distributions. A ligand adsorption-based technique for determining AuNP surface areas in solution is reported. Using a water-soluble, stable, and highly UV-vis active organothiol, 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI), as the probe ligand, we demonstrated that the amount of ligand adsorbed is proportional to the AuNP surface area. The equivalent spherical AuNP sizes and concentrations were determined by combining the MBI adsorption measurement with Au(3+) quantification of aqua regia-digested AuNPs. The experimental results from the MBI adsorption method for a series of commercial colloidal AuNPs with nominal diameters of 10, 30, 50, and 90 nm were compared with those determined using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and localized surface plasmonic resonance methods. The ligand adsorption-based technique is highly reproducible and simple to implement. It only requires a UV-vis spectrophotometer for characterization of in-house-prepared AuNPs. PMID:23092965

  8. Study on Super-Hydrophobic and Oleophobic Surfaces Prepared by Chemical Adsorption Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Issei; Ohkubo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazufumi

    2009-04-01

    Preparation techniques for super-hydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces were studied by forming a fractally roughened surface and preparing a hydrophobic monolayer. In this study, the fractal structure on the surface of an aluminum substrate was formed by combining sand-blasting with electrolytical etching. Then, a hydrophobic monolayer was prepared on the roughened surface, without decreasing roughness. The surface of the treated substrate can be evaluated by contact angle measurement and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The surface treated by a technique combining chemical adsorption, sandblasting, and electrolytical etching was super-hydrophobic and highly oleophobic.

  9. Surface modification influencing adsorption of red wine constituents: The role of functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption of wine constituents at solid surfaces is important in applications such as filtration and membrane fouling, binding to tanks and fittings and interactions with processing aids such as bentonite. The interaction of wine constituents with surfaces is mediated through adsorbed wine components, where the type of constituents, amount, orientation, and conformation are of consequence for the surface response. This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of red wine constituents. Plasma-polymerized films rich in amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, formyl and methyl functional groups were generated on solid substrates whereas, glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride was covalently attached to allylamine plasma-polymer modified surface and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) was electrostatically adsorbed to an amine plasma-polymerized surface. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ability of different substrates to adsorb red wine constituents was evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that substrates modified with -SO3H and -COOH groups can adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds whereas -NH2 and -NR3 groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. Red wine constituents after filtration were adsorbed in higher extend on -NR3 and -CHO surfaces. The -OH modified surfaces had the lowest ability to absorb wine components.

  10. Strong and weak adsorption of CO2 on PuO2 (1 1 0) surfaces from first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. L.; Deng, X. D.; Li, G.; Lai, X. C.; Meng, D. Q.

    2014-10-01

    The CO2 adsorption on plutonium dioxide (PuO2) (1 1 0) surface was studied using projector-augmented wave (PAW) method based on density-functional theory corrected for onsite Coulombic interactions (GGA + U). It is found that CO2 has several different adsorption features on PuO2 (1 1 0) surface. Both weak and strong adsorptions exist between CO2 and the PuO2 (1 1 0) surface. Further investigation of partial density of states (PDOS) and charge density difference on two typical absorption sites reveal that electrostatic interactions were involved in the weak interactions, while covalent bonding was developed in the strong adsorptions.

  11. Adsorption of CO2 on Cu2O (1 1 1) oxygen-vacancy surface: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huanwen; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Hongming; Hong, Sanguo

    2013-05-01

    The adsorption of CO2 on Cu2O (1 1 1) oxygen-vacancy surface has been investigated by using the first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT). The geometry, adsorption energy, charge population and projected density of states (PDOS) were calculated. The results show dissociative adsorption of CO2 on the surface is thermodynamically unfeasible. The oxygen vacancy has the negative effects on the adsorption of CO2 at the coordinately unsaturated surface copper and oxygen (CuCUS and OCUS) sites. Oxygen vacancies are the active sites. CO2 can be directly adsorbed and converted into CO2δ- radical anion species at these sites.

  12. Controlling surface adsorption to enhance the selectivity of porphyrin based gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evyapan, M.; Dunbar, A. D. F.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports an enhancement in the selectivity of the vapor sensing properties of free base porphyrin 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[3,4-bis(2-ethylhexyloxy)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine (EHO) Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) films. These sensors respond by changing color upon adsorption of the analyte gas to the sensor surface. The enhanced selectivity is achieved by adding selective barrier layers of 4-tert-Butylcalix[4]arene, 4-tert-Butylcalix[6]arene and 4-tert-Butylcalix[8]arene embedded in PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate)) on top of the porphyrin sensor films to control the gaseous adsorption onto the sensor surface. The Langmuir properties of EHO, PMMA and calix[n]arene monolayers were investigated by surface pressure-area (Π-A) isotherms in order to determine the most efficient transfer pressure. Six layer EHO films were transferred onto glass and silicon substrates to investigate their optical and structural characteristics. The three different calix[n]arenes were embedded within PMMA layers to act as the selective barrier layers which were deposited on top of the six layer EHO films. The different calix[n]arene molecules vary in size and each was mixed with PMMA in specific ratios in order to control the selectivity of the resulting barrier layers. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements were carried out to analyze the structure of the porous barrier layers. It was found that the orientation of the calix[8]arene molecules was well controlled within the Langmuir layers such that molecular ring lies flat on the EHO layers when deposited. However, the calix[6]arene and calix[4]arene molecules were quite not so reliably oriented. The sensor films (with and without the addition of the different selective barrier layers) were exposed to various carboxylic acid vapors. More specifically, acetic acid, butyric acid and hexanoic acid were chosen due to their different molecular sizes. The uncovered EHO films were highly sensitive to all the

  13. Adsorption and functionality of fibrinogen on triblock copolymer-coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Stephen Moss

    To assess the influence of the surface microenvironment on the adsorption and biologic activity of fibrinogen, a series of poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide) triblock copolymers were adsorbed to solid, hydrophobic polystyrene-divinylbenzene beads. The copolymers, which were of the form PEOsb{b}PPOsb{a}PEOsb{b}, varied in their hydrophile/lipophile balances (HLB) due only to differences in their PEO chain length (5 to 129 EO units) as the hydrophobic PPO core segment was of fixed length (56 or 69 PO units). The surface coverage of copolymers was determined first and after exposing the beads to fibrinogen or to human plasma, the total amount of protein adsorbed to their surface was measured. The functionality of fibrinogen bound to copolymer-modified beads was assessed in terms of fibrin clot formation and by the adherence of macrophages (THP-1 tumor cells). Enzymatic processing was used to probe the surface orientation of fibrinogen. The copolymers appear to adsorb in an expanded fashion, a conclusion supported by surface pressure-area isotherms of the copolymers spread at the air-water interface. As compared to copolymer-free surfaces, protein adsorption decreases by up to 90% as the PEO chain length of the copolymers increases. The copolymer coatings appear to lower fibrinogen adsorption by limiting the available surface area. On surfaces coated with the hydrophobic versions of the copolymers, the biologic assays demonstrate that fibrinogen is as reactive/coagulable as for surfaces with saturated coverages of fibrin despite that these copolymer-coated surfaces have 60% less fibrinogen adsorbed to them. When adsorbed at the same low surface concentration in the absence of copolymer, fibrinogen is not active. Enzymatic processing of bound fibrinogen suggests that the presence of the copolymers promote the adsorption of the protein in end-on fashion. It is proposed here, that when adsorbed end-on, fibrinogen is functional because its reactive sites are

  14. Oxalic acid adsorption states on the clean Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Carboxylic acids are known to assume a variety of configurations on metallic surfaces. In particular oxalic acid on the Cu(110) surface has been proposed to assume a number of upright configurations. Here we explore with DFT calculations the possible structures that oxalic acid can form on copper 110 at different protonation states, with particular attention at the possibility of forming structures composed of vertically standing molecules. In its fully protonated form it is capable of anchoring itself on the surface thanks to one of its hydrogen-free oxygens. We show the monodeprotonated upright molecule with two oxygens anchoring it on the surface to be the lowest energy conformation of a single oxalic molecules on the Cu(110) surface. We further show that it is possible for this configuration to form dense hexagonally arranged patterns in the unlikely scenario in which adatoms are not involved.

  15. Thiol Adsorption on and Reduction of Copper Oxide Particles and Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Im, Jisun; Soares, Jason W; Steeves, Diane M; Whitten, James E

    2016-04-26

    The adsorption of 1-dodecanethiol at room temperature and at 75 °C on submicron cuprous and cupric oxide particles suspended in ethanol has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Thiol adsorption occurs in all cases via Cu-S bond formation, with partial dissolution of CuO at 75 °C and formation of a copper-thiolate complex replacement layer. Regardless of temperature, the surface of the CuO particles is essentially completely reduced to either Cu2O or metallic copper, as evidenced by loss of the characteristic Cu(2+) XPS features of dried powder samples. Companion ultrahigh-vacuum studies have been performed by dosing clean, oxygen-dosed, and ozone-treated single crystal Cu(111) with methanethiol (MT) gas at room temperature. In the latter case, the surface corresponds to CuO/Cu(111). XPS confirms MT adsorption in all cases, with an S 2p peak binding energy of 162.9 ± 0.1 eV, consistent with methanethiolate adsorption. Heating of MT-covered Cu(111) and oxygen-dosed Cu(111) leads to decomposition/desorption of the MT by 100 °C and formation of copper sulfide with an S 2p binding energy of 161.8 eV. Dosing CuO/Cu(111) with 50-200 L of MT leads to only partial reduction/removal of the CuO surface layers prior to methanethiolate adsorption. This is confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), which measures the occupied states near the Fermi level. For both the colloidal CuO and single crystal CuO/Cu(111) studies, the reduction of the Cu(2+) surface is believed to occur by formation and desorption of the corresponding dithiol prior to thiolate adsorption. PMID:27036074

  16. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  17. Diffusion of tungsten clusters on tungsten (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Yang, Jianyu; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian; Gao, Fei

    2009-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation and modified analytic embedded-atom method, we have investigated the self-diffusion of clusters on a tungsten (110) surface. As compared to the linear-chain configuration, the close-packed islands for tungsten clusters containing more than nine adatoms have been predicted to be more stable with the relatively lower binding energies. The migration energies show an interesting and oscillating behavior with increasing cluster size. The tetramer, hexamer and octamer have obviously higher migration energies than the others. The different atomic configurations and diffusion mechanisms have been determined during the diffusion processes. It is clear that the dimer-shearing mechanism occurs inside the hexamer, while it occurs at the periphery of heptamer. The successive hopping mechanism of individual atom is of critical importance in the migration of the clusters containing five or fewer adatoms. In addition, the diffusion of a cluster with nine adatoms is achieved through the changes of the cluster shape.

  18. Adsorption of plasmid DNA to mineral surfaces and protection against DNase I

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowski, G.; Lorenz, M.G.; Wackernagel, W. )

    1991-04-01

    The adsorption of ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled plasmid DNA (pHC314; 2.4 kb) of different conformations to chemically pure sand was studied in a flowthrough microenvironment. The extent of adsorption was affected by the concentration and valency of cations, indicating a charge-dependent process. Bivalent cations (Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}) were 100-fold more effective than monovalent cations (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}). Quantitative adsorption of up to 1 {mu}g of negatively supercoiled or linearized plasmid DNA to 0.7 g of sand was observed in the presence of 5 mm MgCl{sub 2} at pH 7. Under these conditions, more than 85% of DNA adsorbed within 60 s. Maximum adsorption was 4 {mu}g of DNA to 0.7 g of sand. Supercoil molecules adsorbed slightly less than linearized or open circular plasmids. An increase of the pH from 5 to 9 decreased adsorption at 0.5 mM MgCl{sub 2} about eightfold. It is concluded that adsorption of plasmid DNA to sand depends on the neutralization of negative charges on the DNA molecules and the mineral surfaces by cations. The results are discussed on the grounds of the polyelectrolyte adsorption model. Sand-adsorbed DNA was 100 times more resistant against DNase I than was DNA free in solution. The data support the idea that plasmid DNA can enter the extracellular bacterial gene pool which is located at mineral surfaces in natural bacterial habitats.

  19. Surface plasmon resonance phase imaging measurements of patterned monolayers and DNA adsorption onto microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Aaron R.; Chen, Yulin; Corn, Robert M.; Kim, Donghyun

    2011-01-01

    The optical technique of surface plasmon resonance phase imaging (SPR-PI) is implemented in a linear microarray format for real-time measurements of surface bioaffinity adsorption processes. SPR-PI measures the phase shift of p-polarized light incident at the SPR angle reflected from a gold thin film in an ATR Kretschmann geometry by creating an interference fringe image on the interface with a polarizer-quartz wedge depolarizer combination. The position of the fringe pattern in this image changes upon the adsorption of biomolecules to the gold thin film. By using a linear array of 500 μm biosensor element lines that are perpendicular to the interference fringe image, multiple bioaffinity adsorption measurements can be performed in real time. Two experiments were performed to characterize the sensitivity of the SPR-PI measurement technique; first, a ten line pattern of a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecamine (MUAM) was created via photopatterning to verify that multiple phase shifts could be measured simultaneously. A phase shift difference (Δφ) of Δφ = 182.08 ± 0.03° was observed for the 1.8-nm MUAM monolayer; this value agrees with the phase shift difference calculated from a combination of Fresnel equations and Jones matrices for the depolarizer. In a second demonstration experiment, the feasibility of SPR-PI for in situ bioaffinity adsorption measurements was confirmed by detecting the hybridization and adsorption of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) onto a six component DNA line microarray patterned monolayer. Adsorption of a full DNA monolayer produced a phase shift difference of Δφ = 28.80 ± 0.03° at the SPR angle of incidence and the adsorption of the ssDNA was monitored in real time with the SPR-PI. These initial results suggest that SPR-PI should have a detection limit roughly 100 times lower than traditional intensity-based SPR imaging measurements. PMID:21355546

  20. Evaluation of various substances to prevent adsorption of tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) to glass surfaces*

    PubMed Central

    Landi, S.; Held, H. R.; Tseng, M. C.

    1970-01-01

    It is well known that a dilute tuberculin PPD solution (1 IU or 5 IU per dose) very rapidly loses its potency owing to adsorption of tuberculoprotein to the wall of the container into which it is dispensed. The amount of tuberculoprotein adsorbed per cm2 of glass surface has been measured for phosphate-buffered saline over a wide pH range (pH 1 to pH 10). The maximum adsorption was found at pH 4 (0.31 μg/cm2) and the least at between pH 6 and pH 10 (0.15 μg/cm2). The rate of adsorption of tuberculoprotein to glass was not changed when the phosphate-buffered saline was replaced by borate-buffered saline. Tuberculin PPD prepared by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method, by the trichloroacetic acid precipitation method and by a combination of both methods adsorbed equally well to glass and no difference in the rate of adsorption for these tuberculoproteins was found. Forty-two substances in addition to Tween 80 were tested for their property to prevent adsorption of tuberculoprotein to glass in dilute tuberculin PPD solutions (50 IU/ml of 14C-labelled PPD). The most efficient anti-adsorption agents were found to be nonionic surfactants, some ionic surfactants and some colloidal substances; polypeptides and non-surface-active substances of low molecular weight showed little or no anti-adsorption property. The labelling of PPD with 14C has proved to be a valuable tool, particularly for long-term adsorption studies and for screening substances to be used as efficient anti-adsorption agents. These studies have permitted the selection of agents which could be added to dilute solutions of tuberculin PPD (10 IU/ml to 500 IU/ml or 0.2 μg/ml to 10 μg/ml respectively) in order to avoid loss of potency due to adsorption. PMID:5312323

  1. Adsorption and Diffusion of Hydrogen in a New Metal-Organic Framework Material: [Zn(bdc)(ted)0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Lee, J.Y.; Pan, L.; Obermyer, R.T.; Simizu, S.; Zande, B.; Li, J.; Sankar, S.G.; Johnson, J.K

    2008-02-28

    We have experimentally measured hydrogen isotherms at 77 and 298 K up to a hydrogen pressure of 50 bar in a recently developed metal-organic framework material, [Zn(bdc)(ted)0.5] (bdc ) benzenedicarboxylate, ted ) triethylenediamine). This material has a tetragonal structure and relatively small pores. We have used atomically detailed simulations to compute adsorption isotherms of hydrogen over the same temperature and pressure ranges studied experimentally. The agreement between experiments and simulations is very good. We have included quantum effects through the Feynman-Hibbs effective potential approach; quantum effects must be included at 77 K to achieve agreement with experiments. We have used equilibrium molecular dynamics to compute self- and transport diffusivities of hydrogen in [Zn(bdc)(ted)0.5] at both 77 and 298 K over a range of pore loadings. Quantum effects are found to decrease the self-diffusivity compared with classical simulations at fixed loading. Conversely, at fixed pressure, quantum effects lead to a lower loading and therefore a higher self-diffusion coefficient compared with classical simulation results. Transport diffusivities with and without quantum corrections are essentially indistinguishable. The diffusivities for H2 in [Zn(bdc)-(ted)0.5] are comparable to H2 in IRMOF-1 at 298 K.

  2. Effect of surface area and chemisorbed oxygen on the SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether activated char produced from Illinois coal could be used effectively to remove sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. Chars were prepared from a high-volatile Illinois bituminous coal under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. A novel char preparation technique was developed to prepare chars with SO2 adsorption capacities significantly greater than that of a commercial activated carbon. In general, there was no correlation between SO2 adsorption capacity and surface area. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) was used to determine the nature and extent of carbon-oxygen (C-O) complexes formed on the char surface. TPD data revealed that SO2 adsorption was inversely proportional to the amount of C-O complex. The formation of a stable C-O complex during char preparation may have served only to occupy carbon sites that were otherwise reactive towards SO2 adsorption. A fleeting C(O) complex formed during SO2 adsorption is postulated to be the reaction intermediate necessary for conversion of SO2 to H2SO4. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Atomic diffusion in laser surface modified AISI H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of AISI H13 steel using 0.09 and 0.4 mm of laser spot sizes with an aim to increase surface hardness and investigate elements diffusion in laser modified surface. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and overlap percentage. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. Metallographic study and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were performed to observe presence of elements and their distribution in the sample surface. Maximum hardness achieved in the modified surface was 1017 HV0.1. Change of elements composition in the modified layer region was detected in the laser modified samples. Diffusion possibly occurred for C, Cr, Cu, Ni, and S elements. The potential found for increase in surface hardness represents an important method to sustain tooling life. The EDXS findings signify understanding of processing parameters effect on the modified surface composition.

  4. Complexity and diffusion of magnetic flux surfaces in anisotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Ruffolo, D.; Oughton, S.

    2014-04-10

    The complexity of magnetic flux surfaces is investigated analytically and numerically in static homogeneous magnetic turbulence. Magnetic surfaces are computed to large distances in magnetic fields derived from a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. The question addressed is whether one can define magnetic surfaces over large distances when turbulence is present. Using a flux surface spectral analysis, we show that magnetic surfaces become complex at small scales, experiencing an exponential thinning that is quantified here. The computation of a flux surface is of either exponential or nondeterministic polynomial complexity, which has the conceptual implication that global identification of magnetic flux surfaces and flux exchange, e.g., in magnetic reconnection, can be intractable in three dimensions. The coarse-grained large-scale magnetic flux experiences diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established explicitly through multiple scale analysis. The Kubo number controls both large and small scale limits. These results have consequences for interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in astrophysical plasmas.

  5. Surface morphology of orthorhombic Mo2C catalyst and high coverage hydrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tian, Xinxin; Yang, Yong; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Beller, Matthias; Jiao, Haijun

    2016-09-01

    High coverage hydrogen adsorption on twenty two terminations of orthorhombic Mo2C has been systematically studied by using density functional theory and ab initio thermodynamics. Hydrogen stable coverage on the surfaces highly depends on temperatures and H2 partial pressure. The estimated hydrogen desorption temperatures under ultra-high vacuum condition on Mo2C are in reasonable agreement with the available temperature-programmed desorption data. Obviously, hydrogen adsorption can affect the surface stability and therefore modify the surface morphology of Mo2C. Upon increasing the chemical potential of hydrogen which can be achieved by increasing the H2 partial pressure and/or decreasing the temperature, the proportions of the (001), (010), (011) and (100) surfaces increase, while those of the (101), (110) and (111) surfaces decrease. Among these surfaces, the (100) surface is most sensitive upon hydrogen adsorption and the (111) surface is most exposed under a wide range of conditions. Our study clearly reveals the role of hydrogen on the morphology of orthorhombic Mo2C catalyst in conjugation with hydro-treating activity.

  6. Synthesis and adsorption of polymers: Control of polymer and surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Stoichet, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A simple and versatile technique to introduce carboxylic acid functionality to the surfaces of three fluoropolymer film samples is described. The adsorption of neutral poly(L-lysine) (PLL) from solution to the water-fluoropolymer interface is described. The methods of surface modification are combined and the adsorption of charged PLL to carboxylic acid-functionalized fluoropolymer film surface is discussed. The hydrophobic interaction as a driving force for adsorption is further studied where the synthesis and adsorption of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and its derivatives are discussed. The synthesis of carboxylic acid-functionalized fluoropolymer films rely upon a two step mechanism where unsaturation is oxidatively removed. Contact angles of the acid-functionalized fluoropolymer films decrease with increasing pH. The adsorption of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) to the water-FEP interface was controlled by pH of the aqueous solution and PLL solution conformation. Only neutral [alpha]-helical PLL adsorbed to FEP (FEP-PLL). The adsorption of PLL to FEP-CO[sub 2]H was controlled by an electrostatic interaction. Both FEP-PLL and FEP-CO[sub 2]H-PLL are more hydrophilic than FEP. FEP-PLL-[epsilon]-amine reacts with 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl chloride in 65% yield whereas FEP-CO[sub 2]H-PLL-[epsilon]-amine reacts in 100% yield. Adsorption of PLL to FEP and FEP-CO[sub 2]H improves the peel strength of adhesive joints prepared with these substrates and the adhesion and growth of biological cells on these film samples. PEO was synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of ethylene oxide and was end-capped (PEO-R) by reaction with a (perfluoro)alkyl acid chloride. A polar interaction between substrate and segment controlled adsorption at the fluoropolymer-water interface. PEO and PEO-R adsorbed to the polystyrene latex-water interface. PEO-R showed increase surface activity over PEO at the air-water interface; PEO-perfluorodecanoate decreased the surface tension of water to 35 dyn/cm.

  7. The impact of the competitive adsorption of ions at surface sites on surface free energies and surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Drew F.; Salis, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between surface charge and surface potential at the solid-liquid interface is often determined by a charge regulation process, the chemisorption of a potential determining ion such as H+. A subtle ion-specific effect can be observed when other ions compete with the primary potential determining ion to bind to a surface site. Site competition may involve alternative ions competing for a first binding site, e.g., metals ions competing with H+ to bind to a negatively charged oxide or carboxyl site. Second-binding sites with site competition may also be found, including amphoteric OH2+ sites, or anion binding to amine groups. In this work, a general theoretical model is developed to describe the competitive adsorption of ions at surface sites. Applied to the calculation of forces, the theory predicts a 20% increase in repulsion between titania surfaces in 1 mM NaCl, and a 25% reduction in repulsion between silica surfaces in 0.1M NaCl compared to calculations neglecting ion site competition.

  8. The impact of the competitive adsorption of ions at surface sites on surface free energies and surface forces.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Drew F; Salis, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between surface charge and surface potential at the solid-liquid interface is often determined by a charge regulation process, the chemisorption of a potential determining ion such as H(+). A subtle ion-specific effect can be observed when other ions compete with the primary potential determining ion to bind to a surface site. Site competition may involve alternative ions competing for a first binding site, e.g., metals ions competing with H(+) to bind to a negatively charged oxide or carboxyl site. Second-binding sites with site competition may also be found, including amphoteric OH2 (+) sites, or anion binding to amine groups. In this work, a general theoretical model is developed to describe the competitive adsorption of ions at surface sites. Applied to the calculation of forces, the theory predicts a 20% increase in repulsion between titania surfaces in 1 mM NaCl, and a 25% reduction in repulsion between silica surfaces in 0.1M NaCl compared to calculations neglecting ion site competition. PMID:25854258

  9. Molecular controls on kaolinite surface charge and organic acid adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, P.V.; Cygan, R.T.; Nagy, K.L.; Ward, D.B.

    1996-10-01

    pH-dependent multi-site kaolinite surface charge can be explained by proton donor-acceptor reactions occurring simultaneously on Si and Al sites exposed on edge sites. Si site acidity at the kaolinite-solution interface differs minimally from that of pure SiO{sub 2}, whereas Al sites became appreciably more acidic when a part of the kaolinite matrix. Independent evidence from scanning force microscopy points to a higher percentage of edge surface area due to thicker particles and basal surface steps than previously assumed. Molecular modeling of the proton-relaxed kaolinite structure has been used to establish the elevated acidity of edge Al sites, to independently confirm the crystallochemical controls on surface acidity, and to establish likely bonding geometries for adsorbed organic acids, such as oxalate.

  10. Diffusion in Entangled and Surface Modified Polymer Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tead, Stanley Fromm

    Ion beam analysis techniques were used to measure the concentration vs. depth profiles of deuterium labelled polymer molecules in unlabeled and/or chemically dissimilar polymer melts, for several polymer systems. In the first polymer system, the tracer diffusion coefficient of deuterated polystyrene (d-PS) molecules was measured in polystyrene (PS) matrices which were blends of high molecular weight (volume fraction phi) and low molecular weight PS. The dependence of the d-PS diffusion coefficient on phi was quantitatively predicted by the models of reptation and constraint release. In the second polymer system, diffusion of polystyrenes was studied with ring shaped chains substituted (instead of linear ones) in the tracer and/or matrix roles. The diffusion of linear tracers into ring matrices was nearly identical to linear tracer diffusion in linear matrices, a result not predicted by any current theories. Dry etching of polystyrene by four different ion and plasma methods crosslinked the exposed surface monolayer, immobilizing it and reducing its permeability to diffusion by unetched tracer molecules. The integrated thickness of the immobile layer is decreased for an increased ratio of chain scission to crosslinking. The ratio is smallest for reactive ion beam etching, intermediate for reactive ion etching, and largest for the pure plasma techniques. Diffusion was investigated in systems of the polymer polyimide (PI), produced by the imidization of polyamic acid at a temperature T_{rm i }. The effects of thermal processing (imidization) of the polymer and exposure to solvents were studied. The diffusion of deuterated polyamic acid in PI was reduced to negligible levels for T_{rm i}'s at or above 200^circ C; purely thermally activated diffusion (in the absence of solvents) was not seen for any combination of annealing temperatures up to 400^circ C. Ion beam analysis methods were developed to measure the kinetics and depth dependence of the imidization reaction in

  11. Creep rate induced by surface diffusion of porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. C.; Li, Y. D.; Wang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Holes in materials can cause improved or unique performance of the material when the sizes, shapes, and orientation of holes as well as grains are controlled in materials. In the paper, a computational method for creep rate induced by hole surface diffusion of porous materials is presented. The driven force for diffusional mass transport along the hole surface is the surface diffusion energy of hole and the strain energy acting on the surface, which is obtained from rigorous elastic theory. In order to apply the present solution to the realistic porous materials the scale effect is considered by using finite element method based on two-dimensional unit cell for porous materials under uniaxial tension.

  12. THE EFFECT OF ACTIVATED CARBON SURFACE MOISTURE ON LOW TEMPERATURE MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments with elemental mercury (Hg0) adsorption by activated carbons were performed using a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor at room temperature (27 degrees C) to determine the role of surface moisture in capturing Hg0. A bituminous-coal-based activated carbon (BPL) and an activ...

  13. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  14. Protein adsorption on nano-scaled, rippled TiO2 and Si surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, Jana; Richter, Jessica; Niepelt, Raphael; Kosan, Stefanie; Keller, Thomas F; Jandt, Klaus D; Ronning, Carsten

    2012-12-01

    We synthesized nano-scaled periodic ripple patterns on silicon and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) surfaces by xenon ion irradiation, and performed adsorption experiments with human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) on such surfaces as a function of the ripple wavelength. Atomic force microscopy showed the adsorption of HPF in mostly globular conformation on crystalline and amorphous flat Si surfaces as well as on nano-structured Si with long ripple wavelengths. For short ripple wavelengths the proteins seem to adsorb in a stretched formation and align across or along the ripples. In contrast to that, the proteins adsorb in a globular assembly on flat and long-wavelength rippled TiO(2), but no adsorbed proteins could be observed on TiO(2) with short ripple wavelengths due to a decrease of the adsorption energy caused by surface curvature. Consequently, the adsorption behavior of HPF can be tuned on biomedically interesting materials by introducing a nano-sized morphology while not modifying the stoichiometry/chemistry. PMID:22956465

  15. Permeability and kinetic coefficients for mesoscale BCF surface step dynamics: Discrete two-dimensional deposition-diffusion equation analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Renjie; Evans, James W.; Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, a discrete version of deposition-diffusion equations appropriate for description of step flow on a vicinal surface is analyzed for a two-dimensional grid of adsorption sites representing the stepped surface and explicitly incorporating kinks along the step edges. Model energetics and kinetics appropriately account for binding of adatoms at steps and kinks, distinct terrace and edge diffusion rates, and possible additional barriers for attachment to steps. Analysis of adatom attachment fluxes as well as limiting values of adatom densities at step edges for nonuniform deposition scenarios allows determination of both permeability and kinetic coefficients. Behavior of these quantities is assessedmore » as a function of key system parameters including kink density, step attachment barriers, and the step edge diffusion rate.« less

  16. Surface-Energetic Heterogeneity of Nanoporous Solids for CO2 and CO Adsorption: The Key to an Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity at Low Pressures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Hyeon; Cho, Il Hum; Choi, Sang Ok; Lee, In Soo

    2016-05-01

    This study has been focused on surface energetic heterogeneity of zeolite (H-mordenite, "HM"), activated carbon ("RB2") and metal-organic framework family ("Z1200") materials and their isotherm features in adsorption of CO2 and CO at 25 degrees C and low pressures ≤ 850 Torr. The nanoporous solids showed not only distinctive shape of adsorption isotherms for CO2 with relatively high polarizability and quadrupole moment but also different capacities in the CO2 adsorption. These differences between the adsorbents could be well correlated with their surface nonuniformity. The most heterogeneous surfaces were found with the HM that gave the highest CO2 uptake at all pressures allowed, while the Z1200 consisted of completely homogeneous surfaces and even CO2 adsorption linearly increased with pressure. An intermediate character was indicated on the surface of RB2 and thus this sorbent possessed isotherm features between the HM and Z1200 in CO2 adsorption. Such different surface energetics was fairly consistent with changes in CO2/CO selectivity on the nanoporous adsorbents up to equilibrated pressures near 850 Torr. PMID:27483776

  17. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of high surface area biomass-based activated carbons].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Sang, Da-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    High surface area activated carbons were prepared with Spartina alterniflora and cotton stalk as raw materials and KOH as activating agent. Effects of materials type, impregnation ratio, activation temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The properties and pore structure of the carbons were characterized with nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffractometry (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Main pore characteristics of activated carbons were analyzed by BET equation, Horvath-Kawazoe BET method and DFT method. The considerable preparation conditions are obtained as follows: impregnation ratio of 3: 1, an activation temperature of 800 degrees C and an activation time of 1.5 h. The BET surface area of activated carbon prepared from Spartina alterniflora reached 2 825 m2 x g(-1) when its total pore volume, yield, iodine number and methylene blue adsorption were 1.374 cm3 x g(-1), 16.36%, 1797 mg x g(-1) and 495 mg x g(-1) respectively under above conditions. The activated carbon from cotton stalk was prepared with BET surface area of 2 135 m2 x g(-1), total pore volume of 1.038 cm3 x g(-1), yield of 11.22%, methylene blue adsorption of 1 251 mg x g(-1), and iodine number of 478 mg x g(-1), respectively. The methylene blue adsorption and iodine number are much higher than the national first level for activated carbon. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of 2,4-dinitrophenol on the two carbons were 932 mg x g(-1) and 747 mg x g(-1), respectively, which are superior to ordinary activated carbon and activated carbon fiber. PMID:23487959

  18. A Theoretical Study of Bulk and Surface Diffusion Processes for Semiconductor Materials Using First Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehl, Jason L.

    Diffusion of point defects on crystalline surfaces and in their bulk is an important and ubiquitous phenomenon affecting film quality, electronic properties and device functionality. A complete understanding of these diffusion processes enables one to predict and then control those processes. Such understanding includes knowledge of the structural, energetic and electronic properties of these native and non-native point defect diffusion processes. Direct experimental observation of the phenomenon is difficult and microscopic theories of diffusion mechanisms and pathways abound. Thus, knowing the nature of diffusion processes, of specific point defects in given materials, has been a challenging task for analytical theory as well as experiment. The recent advances in computing technology have been a catalyst for the rise of a third mode of investigation. The advent of tremendous computing power, breakthroughs in algorithmic development in computational applications of electronic density functional theory now enables direct computation of the diffusion process. This thesis demonstrates such a method applied to several different examples of point defect diffusion on the (001) surface of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and the bulk of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium sulfide (CdS). All results presented in this work are ab initio, total-energy pseudopotential calculations within the local density approximation to density-functional theory. Single particle wavefunctions were expanded in a plane-wave basis and reciprocal space k-point sampling was achieved by Monkhorst-Pack generated k-point grids. Both surface and bulk computations employed a supercell approach using periodic boundary conditions. Ga adatom adsorption and diffusion processes were studied on two reconstructions of the GaAs(001) surface including the c(4x4) and c(4x4)-heterodimer surface reconstructions. On the GaAs(001)- c(4x4) surface reconstruction, two distinct sets of minima and transition sites were

  19. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  20. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-01

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  1. Aniline adsorption, hydrogenation, and hydrogenolysis on the Ni(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.X.; Gland, J.L.; Fischer, D.A.

    1996-06-13

    The bonding and reactions of adsorbed aniline have been characterized on the Ni(100) surface both in hydrogen and in vacuum with a combination of surface spectroscopies. The structure of adsorbed aniline and derived intermediates has been characterized by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS). The dominant surface reactions have been studied using temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) and in-situ temperature-programmed fluorescence yield near- edge spectroscopy (TP FYNES). Competition between hydrogenation, hydrogenolysis, and dehydrogenation of aniline in the 300-400 K temperature range depends markedly on hydrogen pressures in the vacuum to 0.01 Torr range. In the absence of external hydrogen, dehydrogenation dominates with increasing temperature. Both hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis of aniline-derived surface intermediates are enhanced dramatically by hydrogen atmospheres. For aniline coverages up to 1 monolayer, hydrogenolysis to form benzene at 475 K is dominant over a broad hydrogen pressure range (> 10{sup -6} Torr). Ultrasoft X-ray absorption spectra above the carbon K edge of the aniline-derived surface intermediates reveal that the precursor for hydrogenolysis is a hydrogenated aniline-derived species indistinguishable from cyclohexylamine. 34 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  3. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus.

  4. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  5. Unrestricted density functional study on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule on nickel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwatari, Ryo; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2005-02-01

    The adsorption of hydrogen molecule on Ni(100) and (111) surfaces is studied by unrestricted hybrid density functional calculation. Ni6 and Ni8 clusters are used as small single layer models, while Ni13 cluster as a model containing the second layer. The total energy of triplet state is most stable for both Ni6 (100) fourfold and Ni8 (111) threefold sites. We have found that the optimized geometrical parameters become closer to the experimental values, as the multiplicity increases from singlet to quintet states. Our adsorption energy on Ni13 (100) bridge site gives in reasonable agreement with the experimental value.

  6. Adsorption of vapreotide on gold colloids studied by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J. A.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejia Ospino, E.

    2016-02-01

    Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) has been used to investigate the somatostatin (SST) analogue Vapreotide (VAP) in gold colloids. The optimum conditions to detect SERS signals of VAP have been studied. The observed SERS bands correspond to different vibrational modes of the peptide; being the most dominant SERS signals the ones derived from the aromatic amino acids Tryptophan (Trp), Phenylalanine (Phe) and Tyrosine (Tyr). Changes in enhancement and wavenumber of the proper bands upon adsorption on gold colloid are consistent with VAP adsorption, primarily through Tryptophan residues.

  7. Protein adsorption on surfaces: dynamic contact-angle (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Mondon, M; Ziegler, C

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on gold has been tested at various concentrations in aqueous solution by dynamic contact-angle analysis (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. With the Wilhelmy plate technique advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding hysteresis were measured and correlated with the hydrophilicity and the homogeneity of the surface. With electrical admittance measurements of a gold-coated piezoelectrical quartz crystal, layer mass and viscoelastic contributions to the resonator's frequency shift during adsorption could be separated. A correlation was found between the adsorbed mass and the homogeneity and hydrophilicity of the adsorbed film. PMID:12520439

  8. Effect of Dopants on the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Ceria Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meijun; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-25

    Here, high-surface-area nanosized CeO2 and M-doped CeO2 (M=Cu, La, Zr, and Mg) prepared by a surfactant-templated method were tested for CO2 adsorption. Cu, La, and Zr are doped into the lattice of CeO2, whereas Mg is dispersed on the CeO2 surface. The doping of Cu and La into CeO2 leads to an increase of the CO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the doping of Zr has little or no effect. The addition of Mg causes a decrease of the CO2 adsorption capacity at a low Mg content and a gradual increase at a higher content. The CO2 adsorption capacity follows the sequence Cu-CeO2>La-CeO2>Zr-CeO2≈CeO2>Mg-CeO2 at low dopant contents, in line with the relative amount of defect sites in the samples. It is the defect sites on the surface, not in the bulk of CeO2, modified by the dopants that play the vital role in CO2 chemisorption. Lastly, the role of surface oxygen vacancies is further supported by an in situ IR spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry during CO2 adsorption on the doped CeO2.

  9. Importance of structural and chemical heterogeneity of activated carbon surfaces for adsorption of dibenzothiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Ania, C.O.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2005-08-16

    The performance of various activated carbons obtained from different carbon precursors (i.e., plastic waste, coal, and wood) as adsorbents for the desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels was evaluated. To increase surface heterogeneity, the carbon surface was modified by oxidation with ammonium persulfate. The results showed the importance of activated carbon pore sizes and surface chemistry for the adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) from liquid phase. Adsorption of DBT on activated carbons is governed by two types of contributions: physical and chemical interactions. The former include dispersive interactions in the microporous network of the carbons. While the volume of micropores governs the amount physisorbed, mesopores control the kinetics of the process. On the other hand, introduction of surface functional groups enhances the performance of the activated carbons as a result of specific interactions between the acidic centers of the carbon and the basic structure of DBT molecule as well as sulfur-sulfur interactions.

  10. The adsorption and reaction of vinyl acetate on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhenjun; Calaza, Florencia C; Tysoe, Wilfred

    2012-01-01

    The surface chemistry of vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) is studied on Au/Pd(100) alloys as a function of alloy composition using temperature-programmed desorption and reflection adsorption infrared spectroscopy. VAM adsorbs weakly on isolated palladium sites on the alloy with a heat of adsorption of ~55 kJ/mol, with the plane of the VAM adsorbed close to parallel to the surface. The majority of the VAM adsorbed on isolated sites desorbs molecularly with only a small portion decomposing. At lower gold coverages (below ~0.5 ML of gold), where palladium palladium bridge sites are present, VAM binds to the surface in a distorted geometry via a rehybridized vinyl group. A larger proportion of this VAM decomposes and this reaction is initiated by C\\O bond scission in the VAM to form adsorbed acetate and vinyl species. The implication of this surface chemistry for VAM synthesis on Au/Pd(100) alloys is discussed.

  11. Echo thresholds for reflections from acoustically diffusive architectural surfaces.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip W; Walther, Andreas; Faller, Christof; Braasch, Jonas

    2013-10-01

    When sound reflects from an irregular architectural surface, it spreads spatially and temporally. Extensive research has been devoted to prediction and measurement of diffusion, but less has focused on its perceptual effects. This paper examines the effect of temporal diffusion on echo threshold. There are several notable differences between the waveform of a reflection identical to the direct sound and one from an architectural surface. The onset and offset are damped and the energy is spread in time; hence, the reflection response has a lower peak amplitude, and is decorrelated from the direct sound. The perceptual consequences of these differences are previously undocumented. Echo threshold tests are conducted with speech and music signals, using direct sound and a simulated reflection that is either identical to the direct sound or has various degrees of diffusion. Results indicate that for a speech signal, diffuse reflections are less easily detectable as a separate auditory event than specular reflections of the same total energy. For a music signal, no differences are observed between the echo thresholds for reflections with and without temporal diffusion. Additionally, echo thresholds are found to be shorter for speech than for music, and shorter for spatialized than for diotic presentation of signals. PMID:24116414

  12. Diffusion and surface excess of a confined nanoswimmer dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Song; Wang, Zhengjia; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-11-01

    The diffusivity and surface excess of nanoswimmers which are confined in two plates with the separation H are explored by dissipative particle dynamics. Both mean squared displacement and velocity autocorrelation function methods are used to study the diffusive behavior of nanoswimmers with the Brownian diffusivity D0 and the results obtained from both methods are consistent. The active diffusivity of confined nanoswimmers (D - D0) depends on the wall separation, swimming speed va, and run time τ. Our simulation results show that (D-D0)/va2τ is a function of vaτ/H. The reduction in the diffusivity of active colloids is more significant than that of passive particles. The distribution of nanoswimmers between two parallel walls is acquired and two regions can be identified. The accumulation of nanoswimmers near walls is quantitatively described by the surface excess Γ. It is found that Γ grows as the nanoswimmer concentration cb, swimming speed va, and run time τ are increased. The coupling between the ballistic trajectory of nanoswimmers and the walls results in nanoswimmer accumulation. The simulation outcomes indicate that Γ/Hcb is a function of H/vaτ.

  13. Density functional study of the adsorption of aspirin on the hydroxylated (0 0 1) α-quartz surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, A.; Nadimi, E.; Plänitz, P.; Radehaus, C.

    2009-08-01

    In this study the adsorption geometry of aspirin molecule on a hydroxylated (0 0 1) α-quartz surface has been investigated using DFT calculations. The optimized adsorption geometry indicates that both, adsorbed molecule and substrate are strongly deformed. Strong hydrogen bonding between aspirin and surface hydroxyls, leads to the breaking of the original hydroxyl-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds (Hydrogenbridges) on the surface. In this case new hydrogen bonds on the hydroxylated (0 0 1) α-quartz surface appear which significantly differ from those at the clean surface. The 1.11 eV adsorption energy reveals that the interaction of aspirin with α-quartz is an exothermic chemical interaction.

  14. Studies of H2O on beta-AgI surfaces - An effective pair potential model. [molecular adsorption for ice nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, B. N.; Kiefer, J.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption of a water molecule on surfaces of beta-AgI, the hexagonal crystal believed to be primarily responsible for the ice-nucleating properties of AgI, is studied on the basis of an effective pair potential model. The water molecule is represented by a rigid point charge ST-2 model and the AgI substrate by an array of point atoms, and maximal binding energy surfaces and optimal H2O configurations are generated for the water molecule adsorbed on the rigid and unrelaxed basal and prism faces. Modeling of H2O adsorption above a two-layer ledge, an iodine vacancy and an H2O molecule trapped in the vacancy indicates that H2O adsorption is favored at interstitial sites where no substrate atoms lie directly below. The prism face is found to attract the water molecule more strongly and provide larger energy barriers to surface diffusion than basal face sites, with the ideal basal faces providing hexagonal patterns of adsorption sites for the H2O with preferred dipole moments aligned.

  15. Selectivity and Self Diffusion of CO2 and h2 in a Mixture on a Graphite Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Thuat; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs; Bedeaux, Dick; Hägg, May-Britt

    2013-12-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250 ̶ 550K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2.

  16. Selectivity and self-diffusion of CO2 and H2 in a mixture on a graphite surface

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Thuat T.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Hägg, May-Britt; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250–550 K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields (FFs) and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self-diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2. PMID:24790965

  17. Adsorption and desorption phenomena of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer systems on model surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandani, Pietro

    This thesis reports on the kinetic and equilibrium behavior for the adsorption from solution of a family of copoly(ethyleneoxide-propyleneoxide-ethyleneoxide), PEO-PPO-PEO, triblock copolymers on gold surfaces modified by a methyl terminated self-assembled monolayer of a long chain alkanethiol (CH3(CH 2)10SH) and by a long chain mercaptoalkanoic acid (HOOC(CH 2)10SH). Events at the surface were monitored with a surface plasmon resonance technique with a high time resolution (0.1 s). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the liquid environment was conducted on a selected number of cases to discern the morphology of the copolymer coated surfaces. The data were analyzed in the context a mass transfer corrected Langmuir kinetics model. The model is only able to reproduce the observations for very dilute solutions, or for the initial stages of the process, but it allows to better discriminate the onset of the different mechanisms of adsorption. For the hydrophobic surface, the adsorbed amounts go through a maximum near the critical micelle concentration (CMC) and thus the process is not consistent with a Langmuir isotherm; in addition we the process is partially irreversible. The kinetics show that, for a series of compounds with the same length of the PPO block, the character of the adsorption process is affected by the relative balance of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic content within the copolymer: higher hydrophobic content leads to enhanced adsorption rates past the CMC. AFM observations confirm that globular micelle-like aggregates are present at the surface for the more hydrophobic species. In contrast, a uniform monolayer-like morphology is observed for the more hydrophilic species. For the hydrophilic surface, it is again found that the adsorbed amounts go through a maximum near the critical micelle concentration (CMC), however, in this case, the process is reversible. Enhanced adsorption rates past the CMC are observed irrespective of the relative balance of the

  18. Adsorption of Polyethylene from Solution onto Starch Film Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch films were prepared by jet cooking aqueous dispersions of high-amylose starch and then allowing the jet cooked dispersions to air-dry on Teflon surfaces. When the starch films were immersed in 1 % solutions of PE in 1-dodecanol, dodecane and xylene at 120º C and the solutions were allowed to...

  19. HYDROGEN ADSORPTION ON β-TiAl (001) AND Ni/TiAl (001) SURFACES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mubarak, A. A. Karim; Alelaimi, Mahmoud

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present first principles calculations of the energetic, electronic and magnetic properties of the variant termination of TiAl (001) and Ni/TiAl (001) surfaces with and without hydrogen atoms. The calculations have been performed within the density functional theory using full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method. The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is utilized as the exchange-correlation energy. The octahedral site is the stable absorption site of H atom in the β-TiAl system. This absorption reduces the cohesive energy of β-TiAl system due to increase in the lattice constant. The surface energy for both TiAl (001) terminations is calculated. The stable adsorption site of H atoms on the variant termination of TiAl (001) surface is performed. The adsorption energy of hydrogen on Ti is more energetic than that on Al. The adsorption of H atom on both terminations of H/Ni/TiAl (001) is more preferable at the bridge site. The adsorption energies are enhanced on Ni atom due to the contraction between d-Ni bands and TiAl substrate band.

  20. Effects of surface heterogeneity on the adsorption of CO₂ in microporous carbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Carbon capture combined with utilization and storage has the potential to serve as a near-term option for CO(2) emissions reduction. CO(2) capture by carbon-based sorbents and CO(2) storage in geologic formations such as coal and shale both require a thorough understanding of the CO(2) adsorption properties in microporous carbon-based materials. Complex pore structures for natural organic materials, such as coal and gas shale, in addition to general carbon-based porous materials are modeled as a collection of independent, noninterconnected, functionalized graphitic slit pores with surface heterogeneities. Electronic structure calculations coupled with van der Waals-inclusive corrections have been performed to investigate the electronic properties of functionalized graphitic surfaces. With Bader charge analysis, electronic structure calculations can provide the initial framework comprising both the geometry and corresponding charge information required to carry out statistical modeling. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to determine the adsorption isotherms for a given adsorbent-adsorbate interaction at temperature/pressure conditions relevant to carbon capture applications to focus on the effect of the surface functionalities. On the basis of the current work, oxygen-containing functional groups were predicted to enhance CO(2) adsorption in microporous carbon materials in the absence of water vapor, and the hydrated graphite was found to hinder CO(2) adsorption. PMID:22216997

  1. Surface Engineered Zeolite: An Active Interface for Rapid Adsorption and Degradation of Toxic Contaminants in Water.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Ruchi; Sharma, Richa; Tiwari, Sangeeta; Tiwari, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-05-18

    Zeolite has been surface modified to form novel multifunctional materials having capability for simultaneous and facile removal of heavy metals [Pb(II)], organic pollutants [methylene blue dye], and microorganisms [E. Coli, S. Aureus, and Pseudomonas] from contaminated water. The unique concept involves formation of core-shell particles with a functional core of zeolite and a porous shell of ZnO nanoflakes which not only imparts photocatalytic and antibacterial properties but also renders the surface negatively charged, thereby facilitating rapid adsorption of Pb(II) and MB. The uniform formation of ZnO nanoflakes (shell) on the zeolite (core) surface has been confirmed by XRD, DRS, FE-SEM, and TEM studies. Metal ion adsorption studies under varying conditions of time and concentration indicate that the material follows the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order kinetics with good correlation to the experimental data. The rapid and high adsorption capacity of the material for both Pb (II) and MB has been established while factors responsible for enhanced adsorption have been discussed. The antibacterial studies against Gram negative bacteria (E. Coli and Pseudomonas) and Gram positive bacteria (S. Aureus) showed good zone inhibition characteristics. The material can be regenerated and reused besides having ease of separation using simple techniques. Being multifunctional, efficient, nontoxic, energy neutral, and recyclable with no effluent generation, the material is an efficient and sustainable alternative for water purification. PMID:27093055

  2. Divalent ion encapsulated nano titania on Ti metal as a bioactive surface with enhanced protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Anbazhagan, Esaitamil; Rajendran, Archana; Natarajan, Duraipandy; Kiran, M S; Pattanayak, Deepak K

    2016-07-01

    A novel approach on incorporation of divalent species such as Mg, Ca and Sr into the titania nanostructures formed on Ti metal surface and their comparative study on enhancement of bioactivity, protein adsorption and cell compatibility is reported. When treated with hydrogen peroxide, Ti metal forms hydrogen titanate. On subsequent treatment with Mg or Ca or Sr nitrate solutions, respective ions are incorporated into hydrogen titanate layer, and heat treatment leads to titania decorated with these ions. The resultant heat-treated samples when soaked in simulated body fluid form bone-like apatite which indicates the present surface modification enhances the bioactivity. Further, enhanced protein adsorption in bovine serum albumin is an indication of suitability of these divalent species to form chelate compounds with amino acids, and Ca containing titania nanostructure favours more protein adsorption compared to the others. Cytocompatibility studies using MG-63, human osteosarcoma cell lines shows these divalent ion containing titania nanostructure favours the cell attachment and did not show any cytotoxicity. Bioactivity, enhanced protein adsorption along with cytocompatibility clearly indicates such surface modification approach to be useful to design hard tissue replacement materials in orthopaedic and dental field. PMID:27011351

  3. Adsorption and Diffusion of Fructose in Zeolite HZSM-5: Selection of Models and Methods for Computational Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Assary, Rajeev S.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Kerber, Torsten; Sauer, Joachim

    2011-11-10

    The adsorption and protonation of fructose inHZSM-5 have been studied for the assessment of models for accurate reaction energy calculations and the evaluation of molecular diffusivity. The adsorption and protonation were calculated using 2T, 5T, and 46T clusters as well as a periodic model. The results indicate that the reaction thermodynamics cannot be predicted correctly using small cluster models, such as 2T or 5T, because these small cluster models fail to represent the electrostatic effect of a zeolite cage, which provides additional stabilization to the ion pair formed upon the protonation of fructose. Structural parameters optimized using the 46T cluster model agree well with those of the full periodic model; however, the calculated reaction energies are in significant error due to the poor account of dispersion effects by density functional theory. The dispersion effects contribute -30.5 kcal/mol to the binding energy of fructose in the zeolite pore based on periodic model calculations that include dispersion interactions. The protonation of the fructose ternary carbon hydroxyl group was calculated to be exothermic by 5.5 kcal/mol with a reaction barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol using the periodic model with dispersion effects. Our results suggest that the internal diffusion of fructose in HZSM-5 is very likely to be energetically limited and only occurs at high temperature due to the large size of the molecule.

  4. Adsorption and diffusion of fructose in zeolite HZSM-5: selection of models and methods for computational studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Assary, R. S.; Greeley, J.; Kerber, T.; Sauer, J.

    2011-09-14

    The adsorption and protonation of fructose in HZSM-5 have been studied for the assessment of models for accurate reaction energy calculations and the evaluation of molecular diffusivity. The adsorption and protonation were calculated using 2T, 5T, and 46T clusters as well as a periodic model. The results indicate that the reaction thermodynamics cannot be predicted correctly using small cluster models, such as 2T or 5T, because these small cluster models fail to represent the electrostatic effect of a zeolite cage, which provides additional stabilization to the ion pair formed upon the protonation of fructose. Structural parameters optimized using the 46T cluster model agree well with those of the full periodic model; however, the calculated reaction energies are in significant error due to the poor account of dispersion effects by density functional theory. The dispersion effects contribute -30.5 kcal/mol to the binding energy of fructose in the zeolite pore based on periodic model calculations that include dispersion interactions. The protonation of the fructose ternary carbon hydroxyl group was calculated to be exothermic by 5.5 kcal/mol with a reaction barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol using the periodic model with dispersion effects. Our results suggest that the internal diffusion of fructose in HZSM-5 is very likely to be energetically limited and only occurs at high temperature due to the large size of the molecule.

  5. Effect of surface charge distribution on the adsorption orientation of proteins to lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption orientation of the proteins lysozyme and ribonuclease A (RNase A) to a neutral 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and a negatively charged stearic acid lipid film was investigated by means of X-ray reflectivity. Both proteins adsorbed to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, whereas at the neutral monolayer, no adsorption was observed. For acquiring comprehensive information on the proteins' adsorption, X-ray reflectivity data were combined with electron densities obtained from crystallographic data. With this method, it is possible to determine the orientation of adsorbed proteins in solution underneath lipid monolayers. While RNase A specifically coupled with its positively charged active site to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, lysozyme prefers an orientation with its long axis parallel to the Langmuir film. In comparison to the electrostatic maps of the proteins, our results can be explained by the discriminative surface charge distribution of lysozyme and RNase A. PMID:20707324

  6. Influence of self-assembled monolayer surface chemistry on Candida antarctica lipase B adsorption and specific activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immobilization of Candida antarctica B lipase was examined on gold surfaces modified with either methyl- or hydroxyl-terminated self-assembled alkylthiol monolayers (SAMs), representing hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, respectively. Lipase adsorption was monitored gravimetrically using a quart...

  7. Peptide adsorption on a hydrophobic surface results from an interplay of solvation, surface, and intrapeptide forces.

    PubMed

    Horinek, D; Serr, A; Geisler, M; Pirzer, T; Slotta, U; Lud, S Q; Garrido, J A; Scheibel, T; Hugel, T; Netz, R R

    2008-02-26

    The hydrophobic effect, i.e., the poor solvation of nonpolar parts of molecules, plays a key role in protein folding and more generally for molecular self-assembly and aggregation in aqueous media. The perturbation of the water structure accounts for many aspects of protein hydrophobicity. However, to what extent the dispersion interaction between molecular entities themselves contributes has remained unclear. This is so because in peptide folding interactions and structural changes occur on all length scales and make disentangling various contributions impossible. We address this issue both experimentally and theoretically by looking at the force necessary to peel a mildly hydrophobic single peptide molecule from a flat hydrophobic diamond surface in the presence of water. This setup avoids problems caused by bubble adsorption, cavitation, and slow equilibration that complicate the much-studied geometry with two macroscopic surfaces. Using atomic-force spectroscopy, we determine the mean desorption force of a single spider-silk peptide chain as F = 58 +/- 8 pN, which corresponds to a desorption free energy of approximately 5 k(B)T per amino acid. Our all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulation including explicit water correspondingly yields the desorption force F = 54 +/- 15 pN. This observation demonstrates that standard nonpolarizable force fields used in classical simulations are capable of resolving the fine details of the hydrophobic attraction of peptides. The analysis of the involved energetics shows that water-structure effects and dispersive interactions give contributions of comparable magnitude that largely cancel out. It follows that the correct modeling of peptide hydrophobicity must take the intimate coupling of solvation and dispersive effects into account. PMID:18287007

  8. Adsorption of gold subnano-structures on a magnetite(111) surface and their interaction with CO.

    PubMed

    Pabisiak, Tomasz; Winiarski, Maciej J; Ossowski, Tomasz; Kiejna, Adam

    2016-07-21

    Gold deposited on iron oxide surfaces can catalyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The adsorption of gold subnano-structures on the Fe-rich termination of the magnetite(111) surface has been investigated using density functional theory. The structural, energetic, and electronic properties of gold/magnetite systems have been examined for vertical and flattened configurations of adsorbed Aun (n = 1-4) species. Single gold adatoms strongly bonded to the iron atoms of the Fe3O4(111) surface appear to be negatively charged, and consequently increase the work function. For a more stable class of larger, flattened Aun structures the adsorption binding energy per adatom is substantially increased. The structures exhibit a net positive charge, with the Au atoms binding with the oxide having distinctly cationic character. A charge transfer from the larger gold structures to the substrate is consistent with the lowering of the work function. The bonding of a CO molecule to a Au monomer on the Fe3O4(111) surface has been found nearly as strong as that to the iron site of the bare Fe-terminated surface. However, CO bonding to larger, oxide supported Aun structures is distinctly stronger than that to the bare oxide surface. Upon CO adsorption all Aun structures are cationic and CO shows a tendency to bind to the most cationic atom of the Aun cluster. PMID:27332962

  9. Scalable surface area characterization by electrokinetic analysis of complex anion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Hanaor, Dorian A H; Ghadiri, Maliheh; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Gan, Yixiang

    2014-12-23

    By means of the in situ electrokinetic assessment of aqueous particles in conjunction with the addition of anionic adsorbates, we develop and examine a new approach to the scalable characterization of the specific accessible surface area of particles in water. For alumina powders of differing morphology in mildly acidic aqueous suspensions, the effective surface charge was modified by carboxylate anion adsorption through the incremental addition of oxalic and citric acids. The observed zeta potential variation as a function of the proportional reagent additive was found to exhibit inverse hyperbolic sine-type behavior predicted to arise from monolayer adsorption following the Grahame-Langmuir model. Through parameter optimization by inverse problem solving, the zeta potential shift with relative adsorbate addition revealed a nearly linear correlation of a defined surface-area-dependent parameter with the conventionally measured surface area values of the powders, demonstrating that the proposed analytical framework is applicable for the in situ surface area characterization of aqueous particulate matter. The investigated methods have advantages over some conventional surface analysis techniques owing to their direct applicability in aqueous environments at ambient temperature and the ability to modify analysis scales by variation of the adsorption cross section. PMID:25495551

  10. Surface Modification of a Perfluorinated Ionomer Using a Glow Discharge Deposition Method to Control Protein Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, T.I.; Ciridon, W.; Ratner, B.D.; Bryers, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Nafion™ is the membrane material preferred for in situ glucose sensors. Unfortunately, surface properties of Nafion promote random protein adsorption and eventual foreign body encapsulation thus leading to loss if glucose signal over time. Here we detail surface modifications made by RF plasma deposition to Nafion with the intent to prevent random protein adsorption while providing enough functional sites (hydroxyl groups) to bind a biologically active peptide known to induce cellular adhesion (YRGDS). Nafion surfaces were modified by RF plasma polymerizing five different combinations of (1) tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) and (2) 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA): pure tetraglyme, 2.5% HEMA/97.5% tetraglyme; 5% HEMA/95% tetraglyme, 10% HEMA/90% tetraglyme; and pure HEMA. Resultant surfaces were characterized by XPS (low and high resolution), dynamic contact angle, and atomic force microscopy. Protein adsorption and retention was determined and correlated to surface layer composition. The ability to bind a cell adhesion peptide was also determined and correlated well with surface layer composition. PMID:18155292

  11. Adsorption of protein streptavidin to the plasma treated surface of polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Elersic, Kristina

    2012-05-01

    Immobilization of protein streptavidin to the surface of polystyrene (PS) polymer was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Two different protocols were used to attach streptavidin to the PS surface: physical adsorption and chemical coupling. In both cases the surface properties of PS samples were modified by exposure to cold oxygen plasma for 10 s. Plasma was created in oxygen at 75 Pa by en electrode-less RF discharge. The RF generator operated at 27.12 MHz and the nominal power was about 120 W. The electron temperature was about 3 eV, the plasma density was about 3 × 1015 m-3 and the neutral oxygen atom density was about 3 × 1021 m-3. Oxygen plasma treatment caused formation of O-rich functional groups on the surface of PS. The concentration of oxygen was determined by XPS and was about 28 at.%. A thin film of streptavidin was deposited by physical adsorption and chemical bonding. The appearance of streptavidin on the surface was determined from XPS spectra measuring the ratio between N and C peaks. The plasma treatment caused poor adsorption and but strong chemisorption of streptavidin. The results were explained by specific interaction of protein with polar functional groups on the surface of PS after plasma treatment.

  12. Measurements of water sorption enthalpy on polymer surfaces and its effect on protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonyeong; Qian, Wei; Al-Saigh, Zeki Y.

    2011-02-01

    The molar enthalpy of sorption ( ΔHms`) of water vapor onto three polymer surfaces and its effect on nonspecific protein adsorption were investigated by inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The values of ΔHms measured by IGC were found to be -16.9 ± 1.2, -18.6 ± 1.3, and -29.9 ± 2.4 kJ/mole for polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), respectively, over a temperature range of 333-423 K. Protein adsorption to three polymer-coated substrates was conducted as a function of the bulk protein concentration using lysozyme, fibrinogen, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the amount of adsorbed protein was measured by the solution depletion method. For a given bulk protein concentration, a larger amount of protein is adsorbed on PS and PMMA surfaces which have greater ΔHms than that of PHEMA surfaces. Although ΔHms for PS and PMMA are close to each other, PS surfaces were found to exhibit a higher adsorption affinity than PMMA surfaces over the proteins and concentrations investigated. Our results indicate that the strength of water-polymer interactions and the functional groups on the polymer surface are important factors for controlling the amount of nonspecifically adsorbed protein.

  13. Surfactant-Modified Diffusion on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.; KELLOGG,GARY LEE

    1999-12-01

    Wanting to convert surface impurities from a nuisance to a systematically applicable nano-fabrication tool, we have sought to understand how such impurities affect self-diffusion on transition-metal surfaces. Our field-ion microscope experiments reveal that in the presence of surface hydrogen, self-diffusion on Rh(100) is promoted, while on Pt(100), not only is it inhibited, but its mechanism changes. First-principles calculations aimed at learning how oxygen fosters perfect layerwise growth on a growing Pt(111) crystal contradict the idea in the literature that it does so by directly promoting transport over Pt island boundaries. The discovery that its real effect is to burn off adventitious adsorbed carbon monoxide demonstrates the predictive value of state-of-the-art calculation methods.

  14. Studies of liquid adsorption, condensation and surface conductivity in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hao

    In the petroleum industry, accurate estimates of hydrocarbon reserve and its producibility are without a doubt among the most important issues. Quantitative estimates require the knowledge of three basic parameters of the rock formation: the porosity φ, the water saturation S w and the permeability k. Electrical conductivity is one of the most commonly made measurements used to deduce these quantities. Some empirical relationships used to make such estimates are quite well established and understood, however, many still lack a sound scientific foundation. Systematic laboratory investigation and theoretical understanding of the underlying petrophysics are much needed. This dissertation consists of three projects aimed at understanding both the surface conductivity observed in shaly sandstone, and the related phenomena of molecular adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces. In the first project, we carried out nitrogen adsorption experiments on three shale samples whose fractal dimensions had been previously characterized by small angle scattering (SANS). We found that analyzing the adsorption isotherm data according to the available theoretical predictions always resulted in D values that are lower than those obtained by SANS. The second project, a numerical simulation of adsorption on fractal surfaces, was designed to understand the origin of discrepancies revealed in the first project. We found that the interplay between van der Waals adsorption and capillary condensation always leads to a crossover between the two theoretical limits. The simulated isotherms exhibit the same general features we observed in our experimental data. The third project was aimed at understanding the surface conduction in porous media. We isolated the surface conductivity by growing water layers on the surface with water adsorption isotherm technique. Some of our results indicate that AC impedance measurement could let us determine the surface conductivity and separate it from that of the

  15. Insights into the superhydrophobicity of metallic surfaces prepared by electrodeposition involving spontaneous adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cao, Ling; Zhao, Wei; Xia, Yue; Huang, Wei; Li, Zelin

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical fabrication of micro/nanostructured metallic surfaces with superhydrophobicity has recently aroused great attention. However, the origin still remains unclear why smooth hydrophilic metal surfaces become superhydrophobic by making micro/nanostructures without additional surface modifications. In this work, several superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured metal surfaces were prepared by a facile one-step electrodeposition process, including non-noble and noble metals such as copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, gold, and palladium with (e.g. Cu) or without (e.g. Au) surface oxide films. We demonstrated by SEM and XPS that both hierarchical micro/nanostructures and spontaneous adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons endowed these surfaces with excellent superhydrophobicity. We revealed by XPS that the adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons at the Ar+-etched clean Au surface was rather quick, such that organic contamination can hardly be prevented in practical operation of surface wetting investigation. We also confirmed by XPS that ultraviolet-O3 treatment of the superhydrophobic metal surfaces did not remove the adsorbed hydrocarbons completely, but mainly oxidized them into hydrophilic oxygen-containing organic substances. We hope our findings here shed new light on deeper understanding of superhydrophobicity for micro/nanostructured metal surfaces with and without surface oxide films.

  16. Modeling of Peptide Adsorption Interactions with a Poly(lactic acid) Surface

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, C. P.; Stuart, S. J.; Bruce, D. A.; Latour, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    The biocompatibility of implanted materials and devices is governed by the conformation, orientation, and composition of the layer of proteins that adsorb to the surface of the material immediately upon implantation, so an understanding of this adsorbed protein layer is essential to the rigorous and methodical design of implant materials. In this study, novel molecular dynamics techniques were employed in order to determine the change in free energy for the adsorption of a solvated nine-residue peptide (GGGG-K-GGGG) to a crystalline polylactide surface in an effort to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms that govern protein adsorption. This system, like many others, involves two distinct types of sampling problems: a spatial sampling problem, which arises due to entropic effects creating barriers in the free energy profile, and a conformational sampling problem, which occurs due to barriers in the potential energy landscape. In a two-step process that addresses each sampling problem in turn, the technique of biased replica exchange molecular dynamics was refined and applied in order to overcome these sampling problems and, using the information available at the atomic level of detail afforded by molecular simulation, both quantify and characterize the interactions between the peptide and a relevant biomaterial surface. The results from these simulations predict a fairly strong adsorption response with an adsorption free energy of -2.5 ± 0.6 kcal/mol (mean ±95% confidence interval), with adsorption primarily due to hydrophobic interactions between the nonpolar groups of the peptide and the PLA surface. As part of a larger and ongoing effort involving both simulation and experimental investigations, this work contributes to the goal of transforming the engineering of biomaterials from one dominated by trial-and-error to one which is guided by an atomic-level understanding of the interactions that occur at the tissue-biomaterial interface. PMID:19360943

  17. Effect of surface adsorption and non-stoichiometry on the workfunction of ZnO surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei; Li, Yun; Jha, Jitendra Kumar; Shepherd, Nigel D.; Du, Jincheng

    2015-04-28

    ZnO has been actively studied for potential usage as a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) for a variety of applications including organic light emitting diodes and solar cells. In these applications, fine-tuning the workfunction of ZnO is critical for controlling interfacial barriers and improving the charge injection (or outcoupling) efficiencies. We have performed plane wave periodic density functional theory calculations to investigate the effect of different surface absorbents and surface defects (including surface non-stoichiometry) on the workfunction of ZnO. The aim was to understand the underlying mechanism of workfunction changes, in order to engineer specific workfunction modifications. Accurate calculations of workfunctions of polar surfaces were achieved by introducing balancing pseudo charges on one side of the surface to remove the dipolar effect. It was found that increasing the surface coverage of hydrocarbons (-CH{sub 3}) decreased the workfunction, while adsorption of highly electronegative-F and -CF{sub 3} groups and increases in surface O/Zn ratio increased the workfunction of ZnO. The increase of workfunction was found to be directly correlated to the enhancement variation of surface dipole moment due to adsorptions or other surface modifications. Introducing surface absorbents that increase surface dipole moment can be an effective way to increase workfunction in ZnO TCOs.

  18. Atomic-scale surface roughness of rutile and implications for organic molecule adsorption.

    PubMed

    Livi, Kenneth J T; Schaffer, Bernhard; Azzolini, David; Seabourne, Che R; Hardcastle, Trevor P; Scott, Andrew J; Hazen, Robert M; Erlebacher, Jonah D; Brydson, Rik; Sverjensky, Dimitri A

    2013-06-11

    Crystal surfaces provide physical interfaces between the geosphere and biosphere. It follows that the arrangement of atoms at the surfaces of crystals profoundly influences biological components at many levels, from cells through biopolymers to single organic molecules. Many studies have focused on the crystal-molecule interface in water using large, flat single crystals. However, little is known about atomic-scale surface structures of the nanometer- to micrometer-sized crystals of simple metal oxides typically used in batch adsorption experiments under conditions relevant to biogeochemistry and the origins of life. Here, we present atomic-resolution microscopy data with unprecedented detail of the circumferences of nanosized rutile (α-TiO2) crystals previously used in studies of the adsorption of protons, cations, and amino acids. The data suggest that one-third of the {110} faces, the largest faces on individual crystals, consist of steps at the atomic scale. The steps have the orientation to provide undercoordinated Ti atoms of the type and abundance for adsorption of amino acids as inferred from previous surface complexation modeling of batch adsorption data. A remarkably uniform pattern of step proportions emerges: the step proportions are independent of surface roughness and reflect their relative surface energies. Consequently, the external morphology of rutile nanometer- to micrometer-sized crystals imaged at the coarse scale of scanning electron microscope images is not an accurate indicator of the atomic smoothness or of the proportions of the steps present. Overall, our data strongly suggest that amino acids attach at these steps on the {110} surfaces of rutile. PMID:23675906

  19. First-principles study of Mn adsorption on Al4C3(0 0 0 1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, L. F.; Li, K.; Zhou, N. G.

    2016-02-01

    First-principle calculation based on the density functional theory was adopted to investigate the adsorption energy, stability, electronic structure and bonding of Mn atom adsorption on Al-terminated and C-terminated Al4C3(0 0 0 1) surface under 0.25 ML and 0.5 ML. Results show that the structure of Mn adsorption on C-terminated Al4C3(0 0 0 1) surface is more stable than that on Al-terminated surface according to the formation energy calculation. For Mn adsorption on Al-terminated surface, Mn is more favorable to reside at the site H1 comparing with other sites. As well, for Mn adsorption on C-terminated surface, the structure of Mn adsorption at site H‧1 is the most stable one. By analyzing the electronic structure and bonding, it is found that the mixed metallic/covalent bonds are formed between Mn atoms and Al-terminated surface, while the covalent bonds are formed between Mn atoms and C-terminated surface. According to the interlayer spacing calculation, Al4C3(0 0 0 1) surfaces are reconstructed after Mn adsorption, which in turn affect the following stacking of Mg atoms on Al4C3(0 0 0 1) surface. The above analysis provided effective theoretical support to the experimental phenomenon that high Mn content has negative influence on the heterogeneous nucleation of Al4C3 particles for α-Mg grains.

  20. Diffusion and Phase Transformations of Transition Metals on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Yi.

    The role of surface diffusion and surface phase reaction kinetics of nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) on Si(111) and Si(100) are investigated under Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) conditions using Auger Spectroscopy (AES), Reflection High Electron Energy Diffraction (RHEED) and surface X-ray diffraction. The surface segregation phenomenon and the formation conditions for Si(111)-sqrt{19 } x sqrt{19}- rm R+/-23.4^circ phase (hereafter called sqrt{19}) for Ni/Si(111) are studied by RHEED and AES. Quench cooling induces surface segregation which restores the total accumulated dose of Ni to two surfaces of the wafer. The coverage dependence of phases thus produced follows: 7 x 7 to 1 x 1-RC(0.05Ml) to sqrt{19} (0.16Ml) then to B-type NiSi_2. It is found that there are 3 Ni atoms in the sqrt{19 } unit cell. A "race" of bulk diffusion versus surface diffusion for Ni in/on Si(111) is studied by depositing a laterally confined dot of metal on one side of the double side polished and UHV cleaned Si wafer and then measuring the lateral Auger profile on the reverse side following annealing and quenching. Ni reaches the far side of the wafer at temperatures as low as 500C via bulk diffusion with no measurable contribution from the surface paths, which are short-circuited by numerous, fast bulk paths. Similar results are found for Ni and Co on Si(111) and Si(100). The diffusivity and solid solubility calculated from the experiments are close to the bulk values known from the literature. In addition, the thermal stability, phase transformation and different dissolution mechanisms of sqrt {19} and 1 x 1-RC surface phases of Ni/Si(111) are carefully examined. The activation energies of these processes are compared on an Arrhenius plot. These are discussed in terms of the migration and formation mechanisms involved in these phase transformations. An energy level diagram is used to summarize the atomistic kinetics.

  1. Overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cano, J V; Sánchez-Polo, M; Messoud, J; Velo-Gala, I; Ocampo-Pérez, R; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2016-03-15

    This study analyzed the overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole, and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells. It was also elucidated whether the overall adsorption rate was controlled by reaction on the adsorbent surface or by intraparticle diffusion. Experimental data of the pollutant concentration decay curves as a function of contact time were interpreted by kinetics (first- and second-order) and diffusion models, considering external mass transfer, surface and/or pore volume diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. The experimental data were better interpreted by a first-order than second-order kinetic model, and the first-order adsorption rate constant varied linearly with respect to the surface area and total pore volume of the adsorbents. According to the diffusion model, the overall adsorption rate is governed by intraparticle diffusion, and surface diffusion is the main mechanism controlling the intraparticle diffusion, representing >90% of total intraparticle diffusion. PMID:26731310

  2. Physical and chemical nature of the scaling relations between adsorption energies of atoms on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, F; Martínez, J I; García-Lastra, J M; Rossmeisl, J; Koper, M T M

    2012-03-16

    Despite their importance in physics and chemistry, the origin and extent of the scaling relations between the energetics of adsorbed species on surfaces remain elusive. We demonstrate here that scalability is not exclusive to adsorbed atoms and their hydrogenated species but rather a general phenomenon between any set of adsorbates bound similarly to the surface. On the example of the near-surface alloys of Pt, we show that scalability is a result of identical variations of adsorption energies with respect to the valence configuration of both the surface components and the adsorbates. PMID:22540492

  3. Effect of complexing ligands on the adsorption of Cu(II) onto the silica gel surface. 1: Adsorption of ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Jung, K.H.; Park, K.K.; Park, K.K.

    1995-04-01

    The adsorption of several ligands on silica gel was investigated in aqueous solutions. The ligands used were 2,2{prime},6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine, pyridine, 3,4-lutidine, 2-aminomethyl pyridine, 2-pyridine methanol, picolinic acid, salicylic acid, and 5-sulfosalicylic acid. The adsorption behaviors of these ligands were interpreted by means of three adsorption modes: ion exchange, hydrogen bonding, and hydrophobic interaction. For 2,2{prime},6{prime},2{double_prime}-terpyridine, pyridine, and 3,4-lutidine, the adsorption maxima appeared near their respective pK{sub a} values and were found to be due mainly to ion exchange, whereas the adsorption of these ligands at low pH was strongly attributed to hydrophobic interaction. The adsorption of 2-aminomethyl pyridine increased with increasing pH over the entire pH range investigated and was due mainly to ion exchange. Picolinic acid was adsorbed mainly by hydrogen bonding either via pyridine N atoms at low pH or via carboxylic O atoms at high pH. 2-Pyridine methanol was adsorbed by hydrophobic interaction at low pH and by hydrogen bonding at high pH. The adsorptions of salicylic and 5-sulfosalicylic acid were very small over the entire pH ranges investigated. For the adsorption mechanism, the Stern model was used to fit adsorption data.

  4. Modeling the Adsorption of Hydrophobic Ethoxylated Urethane (HEUR) Thickeners onto Latex Surfaces using Self-Consistent Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Valeriy; van Dyk, Antony; Chatterjee, Tirtha; Wang, Shihu; Larson, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    Hydrophobic Ethoxylated Urethane (HEUR) polymers are widely used as rheology modifiers (thickeners) in waterborne latex paints. Recently, it has been shown that the thickening effect of HEURs in paints is largely determined by their adsorption onto latex surfaces, this adsorption being a function of polymer structure, latex surface chemistry, and total available latex surface. Here, we describe the application of Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) to calculate adsorption isotherms of several model HEURs onto ideal hydrophobic latex surfaces. Unlike earlier SCFT studies of adsorption, we explicitly take into account the role of HEUR micelles and competition between adsorption and micellization. The results are compared with experimental data and coarse-grained molecular dynamic (CG-MD) simulations, and good qualitative and semi-quantitative agreement is found. This work was supported by The Dow Chemical Company.

  5. Hydrogen Adsorption Studies Using Surface Acoustic Waves on Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    A.B. Phillips; G. Myneni; B.S. Shivaram

    2005-06-13

    Vanadium nanoparticles, on the order of 20 nm, were deposited on a quartz crystal surface acoustic wave resonator (SAW) using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser deposition system. Due to the high Q and resonant frequency of the SAW, mass changes on the order of 0.1 nanogram can be quantitatively measured. Roughly 60 nanogram of V was deposited on the SAW for these experiments. The SAW was then moved into a hydrogen high pressure cell.At room temperature and 1 atmosphere of hydrogen pressure, 1 wt% H, or H/V {approx} 0.5 (atomic ratio) absorption was measured.

  6. Adsorption of fibrinogen on a biomedical-grade stainless steel 316LVM surface: a PM-IRRAS study of the adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics and secondary structure changes.

    PubMed

    Desroches, Marie-Josee; Omanovic, Sasha

    2008-05-14

    Polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) was employed to investigate the interaction of serum protein fibrinogen with a biomedical-grade 316LVM stainless steel surface, in terms of the adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics and secondary structure changes of the protein. Apparent Gibbs energy of adsorption values indicated a highly spontaneous and strong adsorption of fibrinogen onto the surface. The kinetics of fibrinogen adsorption were successfully modeled using a pseudo first-order kinetic model. Deconvolution of the amide I bands indicated that the adsorption of fibrinogen on 316LVM results in significant changes in the protein's secondary structure that occur predominantly within the first minute of adsorption. Among the investigated structures, the alpha-helix structure undergoes the smallest changes, while the beta-sheet and beta-turns structures undergo significant changes. It was shown that lateral interactions between the adsorbed molecules do not play a role in controlling the secondary structure changes. An increase in temperature induced changes in the secondary structure of the protein, characterized by a loss of the alpha-helical content and its transformation into the beta-turns structure. PMID:18446250

  7. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bietti, Sergio Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Fedorov, Alexey

    2014-09-21

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D₀=0.53(×2.1±1) cm² s⁻¹ that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  8. Adsorption of Ar on planar surfaces studied with a density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sartarelli, Salvador A; Szybisz, Leszek

    2009-11-01

    The adsorption of Ar on planar structureless substrates of alkali metals, alkaline-earth metal Mg, CO2 , and Au was analyzed by applying a density functional formalism which includes a recently proposed effective attractive pair potential conditioned to Ar. It is shown that this approach reproduces the experimental surface tension of the liquid-vapor interface over the entire bulk coexistence curve for temperatures T spanning from the triple point Tt up to the critical point Tc. The wetting properties were studied over the entire range temperatures Tt<-->Tc. It was found that Ar wets all the investigated surfaces. The adsorption isotherms for alkali metals exhibit first-order phase transitions. Prewetting lines were resolved even for the less attractive surfaces. In the cases of Mg, CO2 , and Au a continuous growth for T> or =Tt was obtained. A comparison with experimental data and other microscopic calculations is reported. PMID:20365027

  9. A theoretical and experimental investigation on the adsorption of pentacene on the Cu(322) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Jeronimo; Sauvage-Simkin, Michele; Coati, Alessandro; Garreau, Yves; Vlad, Alina; Muller, Kathrin; Bendounan, Azzedine; Kara, Abdelkader

    In this study, complementary techniques including density functional theory (DFT), grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are used to study the surface distortions induced by the adsorption of pentacene on the stepped Cu(322) surface. GIXD measurements are performed for the clean Cu(322) surface and at various coverages of pentacene, up to one monolayer. For the one monolayer case, reciprocal space maps from GIXD measurement suggest the reconstruction of the steps to double the step width and height, with two pentacene molecules present at each terrace. Complementary DFT calculations are carried out, with and without the self-consistent inclusion of vdW interactions, using the optB88-vdW and PBE functionals. Our investigation illustrates a prototype method for conducting future benchmarking studies to assess the accuracy of the current self-consistent vdW functionals when applied to organic molecule adsorption.

  10. Activation and adsorption of CO{sub 2} on copper surfaces and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Seema; Dharmvir, Keya; Goel, Neetu

    2014-04-24

    The activation and adsorption of CO{sub 2} over Cu{sub n} clusters have been investigated by first principle calculations. Results of these calculations are compared with the previous studies of adsorption of CO{sub 2} on Cu (hkl) surfaces [Wang et al. Surface Science 570 (2004) 205–217]. We find that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed over the clusters in comparison with Cu (hkl) surfaces. The Cu13 cluster in particular dissociates the CO{sub 2} molecule adsorbed on the one of the caps of the icosahedron into CO and atomic oxygen. This activated configuration can act as a precursor to reactions leading to hydrocarbon fuels from CO{sub 2}.

  11. Role of particle size and composition in metal adsorption by solids deposited on urban road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Chandima; Egodawatta, Prasanna; Goonetilleke, Ashantha

    2014-01-01

    Despite common knowledge that the metal content adsorbed by fine particles is relatively higher compared to coarser particles, the reasons for this phenomenon have gained little research attention. The research study discussed in the paper investigated the variations in metal content for different particle sizes of solids associated with pollutant build-up on urban road surfaces. Data analysis confirmed that parameters favourable for metal adsorption to solids such as specific surface area, organic carbon content, effective cation exchange capacity and clay forming minerals content decrease with the increase in particle size. Furthermore, the mineralogical composition of solids was found to be the governing factor influencing the specific surface area and effective cation exchange capacity. There is high quartz content in particles >150 μm compared to particles <150 μm. As particle size reduces below 150 μm, the clay forming minerals content increases, providing favourable physical and chemical properties that influence adsorption. PMID:24021928

  12. Bacterial Cell Surface Adsorption of Rare Earth Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Y.; Park, D.; Reed, D.; Fujita, Y.; Yung, M.; Anderko, A.; Eslamimanesh, A.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) play a critical role in many emerging clean energy technologies, including high-power magnets, wind turbines, solar panels, hybrid/electric vehicle batteries and lamp phosphors. In order to sustain demand for such technologies given current domestic REE shortages, there is a need to develop new approaches for ore processing/refining and recycling of REE-containing materials. To this end, we have developed a microbially-mediated bioadsorption strategy with application towards enrichment of REE from complex mixtures. Specifically, the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was genetically engineered to display lanthanide binding tags (LBTs), short peptides that possess high affinity and specificity for rare earth elements, on its cell surface S-layer protein. Under optimal conditions, LBT-displayed cells adsorbed greater than 5-fold more REE than control cells lacking LBTs. Competition binding experiments with a selection of REEs demonstrated that our engineered cells could facilitate separation of light- from heavy- REE. Importantly, binding of REE onto our engineered strains was much more favorable compared to non-REE metals. Finally, REE bound to the cell surface could be stripped off using citrate, providing an effective and non-toxic REE recovery method. Together, this data highlights the potential of our approach for selective REE enrichment from REE containing mixtures.

  13. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Einstein, T. L.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2015-03-01

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species' diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  14. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Bartels, Ludwig; Einstein, T. L.

    2015-03-14

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species’ diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  15. Surface modification on microfluidic devices with 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymers for reducing unfavorable protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sibarani, James; Takai, Madoka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-15

    Surface modification of polymer materials for preparing microfluidic devices including poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) was investigated with phospholipids polymers such as poly(2-methacryloyloxylethyl phosphorylcholine(MPC)-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB) and poly(MPC-co-2-ethylhexyl methacrylate-co-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PMED). The hydrophilicity of every surface on the polymer materials modified with these MPC polymers increased and the value of zeta-potential became close to zero. The protein adsorption on the polymer materials with and without the surface modification was evaluated using a protein mixture of human plasma fibrinogen and serum albumin. Amount of proteins adsorbed on these polymeric materials showed significant reduction by the surface modification with the MPC polymers compared to the uncoated surfaces ranging from 56 to 90%. Furthermore, we successfully prepared PDMS-based microchannel which was modified by simple coating with the PMB and PMED. The modified microchannel also revealed a significant reduction of adsorption of serum albumin. We conclude that the MPC polymers are useful for reducing unfavorable protein adsorption on microfluidic devices. PMID:17112710

  16. In vitro investigation of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on inorganic biomaterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Lü, Xiaoying; Jingwu, Ma; Huang, Nan

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the surface properties, protein adsorption and platelet adhesion behaviors of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium (Ti) films. The surface energy and microstructures of these films were characterized by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). A modified Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) protein assay was used to study the amount of adsorbed proteins. Platelet adhesion was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The AFM results show that the DLC film is smoother than Ti. Protein adsorption results from CBB protein assay show that the ratio of adsorbed albumin (Alb) to IgG ( RA/I) on DLC is larger than Ti, which coincide with the sequence of the ratio of interfacial tension between solid surface and Alb ( γS,Alb) to interfacial tension between surface and IgG ( γS,IgG) ( γS,Alb/ γS,IgG). The DLC film has a preferential adsorption for Alb. The results suggest that the ratio of γS,Alb/ γS,IgG may indicate an Alb/IgG affinity ratio of materials. More platelets adhere on Ti film than on DLC, which may correspond to the surface roughness of materials. The conclusion is the blood compatibility of DLC seems to be better than Ti.

  17. Risedronate adsorption on bioactive glass surface for applications as bone biomaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosbahi, Siwar; Oudadesse, Hassane; Lefeuvre, Bertand; Barroug, Allal; Elfeki, Hafed; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Roiland, Claire; Keskes, Hassib

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the current work is to study the physicochemical interactions between bisphosphonates molecules, risedronate (RIS) and bioactive glass (46S6) after their association by adsorption phenomenon. To more understand the interaction processes of RIS with the 46S6 surface we have used complementary physicochemical techniques such as infrared (FTIR), Raman and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The obtained results suggest that risedronate adsorption corresponds to an ion substitution reaction with silicon ions occurring at the bioactive glass surface. Thus, a pure bioactive glass was synthesized and fully characterized comparing the solids after adsorption (46S6-XRIS obtained after the interaction of 46S6 and X% risedronate). Therefore, based on the spectroscopic results FTIR, Raman and MAS-NMR, it can be concluded that strong interactions have been established between RIS ions and 46S6 surface. In fact, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy illustrate the fixation of risedronate on the bioactive glass surface by the appearance of several bands characterizing risedronate. The 31P MAS-NMR of the composite 46S6-XRIS show the presence of two species at a chemical shift of 15 and 19 ppm demonstrating thus the fixation of the RIS on 46S6 surface.

  18. Adsorption-induced auto-amplification of enantiomeric excess on an achiral surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Yongju; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2015-06-01

    The homochirality of biomolecules is a signature of life on Earth and has significant implications in, for example, the production of pharmaceutical compounds. It has been suggested that biomolecular homochirality may have arisen from the amplification of a spontaneously formed small enantiomeric excess (e.e.). Many minerals exhibit naturally chiral surfaces and so adsorption has been proposed as one possible mechanism for such an amplification of e.e. Here we show that when gas-phase mixtures of D- and L-aspartic acid are exposed to an achiral Cu(111) surface, a small e.e. in the gas phase, e.e.g, leads to an amplification of the e.e. on the surface, e.e.s, under equilibrium conditions. Adsorption-induced amplification of e.e. does not require a chiral surface. The dependence of e.e.s on e.e.g has been modelled successfully using a Langmuir-like adsorption isotherm that incorporates the formation of homochiral adsorbate clusters on the surface.

  19. Cell Penetrating Peptide Adsorption on Magnetite and Silica Surfaces: A Computational Investigation.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Gianvito; Deriu, Marco A; Prat, Maria; Rimondini, Lia; Vernè, Enrica; Follenzi, Antonia; Danani, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent one of the most promising materials as they can act as a vers