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Sample records for adsorption surface diffusion

  1. Adsorption rate of phenol from aqueous solution onto organobentonite: surface diffusion and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Perez, Raul; Leyva-Ramos, Roberto; Mendoza-Barron, Jovita; Guerrero-Coronado, Rosa M

    2011-12-01

    The concentration decay curves for the adsorption of phenol on organobentonite were obtained in an agitated tank batch adsorber. The experimental adsorption rate data were interpreted with diffusional models as well as first-order, second-order and Langmuir kinetic models. The surface diffusion model adjusted the data quite well, revealing that the overall rate of adsorption was controlled by surface diffusion. Furthermore, the surface diffusion coefficient increased raising the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium and was independent of the particle diameter in the range 0.042-0.0126 cm. It was demonstrated that the overall rate of adsorption was essentially not affected by the external mass transfer. The second-order and the Langmuir kinetic models fitted the experimental data quite well; however, the kinetic constants of both models varied without any physical meaning while increasing the particle size and the mass of phenol adsorbed at equilibrium.

  2. First-principles study of oxygen adsorption and diffusion on the UN(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. L.; Ao, L.; Zu, X. T.; Huang, H.; Liu, K. Z.

    2015-12-01

    First-principles calculations have been performed to study the interaction of oxygen with UN(001) surface. The molecule oxygen was found to dissociate spontaneously on all considered adsorption sites on the surface. Atomic oxygen (O) preferred to adsorb on a hollow site or the top of uranium ions, which were energetically degenerate. Adsorption on top of nitrogen (N) ion was found to be unstable which may be attributed to the repulsion of negatively charged O with the N anions. In comparison with those on α-U(001)surface at the same coverage, the adsorption of O on UN(001) surface was found to be less stable, being about 0.7 eV higher in adsorption energy. The diffusion barrier for O on the surface was found to be ∼0.5 eV, similar to those of α-U(001)surface. The penetration of O into the substrate was difficult with a high barrier of 2.86 eV. Analysis on the density of states (DOS) has shown that the adsorbed oxygen has strong chemical interaction with surface ions, characterized by the hybridization of O 2p states with N 2p and U 6d, U 5f states.

  3. Adsorption of protein-coated lipid droplets to mixed biopolymer hydrogel surfaces: role of biopolymer diffusion.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Maria; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, D Julian

    2007-12-18

    The adsorption of charged particles to hydrogel surfaces is important in a number of natural and industrial processes. In this study, the adsorption of cationic lipid droplets to the surfaces of anionic hydrogels was examined. An oil-in-water emulsion containing cationic beta-lactoglobulin-coated lipid droplets was prepared (d32=0.24 microm, zeta=+74 mV, pH 3.0). An anionic hydrogel containing 0.1 wt % beet pectin and 1.5 wt % agar (pH 3.0) was prepared. Emulsions containing different lipid droplet concentrations (0.3-5 wt %) were brought into contact with the hydrogel surfaces for different times (0-24 h). The adsorption of lipid droplets to the hydrogel surfaces could not be explained by a typical adsorption isotherm. We found that the electrical charge on the nonadsorbed lipid droplets became less positive or even became negative in the presence of the hydrogel and that extensive droplet aggregation occurred, which was attributed to the ability of pectin molecules to diffuse through the hydrogels and interact with the lipid droplets. These results may have important consequences for understanding certain industrial and biological processes, as well as for the design of controlled or triggered release systems.

  4. Hydrogen Adsorption, Dissociation and Diffusion on the α-U(001) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, JL; Xiao, H. Y.; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Gao, Fei

    2008-11-05

    First-principles pseudopotential plane wave calculations based on density functional theory and the generalized gradient approximation have been used to study the adsorption, dissociation, and diffusion of hydrogen on the α-U(001) surface. Weak molecular chemisorption was observed for H2 approaching with its molecular axis parallel to the surface. The optimization of the adsorption geometries on the threefold hollow sites yields final configurations with H2 molecules move towards the top site at both coverages of 0.25 and 0.5 monolayer. A low dissociation barrier of 0.081 eV was determined for H2 dissociated from onefold top site with the H atoms falling into the two adjacent threefold hollow sites. The density of states analysis along the dissociation paths show that the hybridization of U 5f and H 1s states only occurs when H2 molecule is dissociated.

  5. Adsorption, vibration, and diffusion of O atoms on Rh low-index and (711) stepped defective surfaces.

    PubMed

    Diao, Zhao Yu; Hao, Ce; Wang, Ze Xin; Dong, Chen Chu; Pang, Xue Hui

    2005-06-30

    The adsorption, vibration, and diffusion of O atoms on Rh(100), Rh(111), Rh(110), and Rh(711) surfaces were studied using the 5-parameter Morse potential (5-MP) of interaction between an adatom and a metal surface cluster. Our theoretical calculations provide information about adsorption sites, adsorption geometry, binding energy, and eigenvibration. Our results agreed very well with experimental results. Four major results follow. First, the theoretical calculation showed that on the Rh(100) surface the 4-fold hollow site is the only adsorption site. Second, on the O-Rh(111) system, the 3-fold hollow site is the stable adsorption site. Third, on the Rh(110) surface at low coverage, the O atom is adsorbed preferably on the pseudo-3-fold site, while with increasing coverage, the O atom is adsorbed not only on the pseudo-3-fold site but also on the long bridge site. Last, as for the Rh(711) stepped surface, the 3-fold site on the (111) step is metastable, whereas the 4-fold sites on the (100) terrace are stable, which enables the O atoms to diffuse easily from the 3-fold to the 4-fold site at low coverage. Therefore, the O atoms are adsorbed preferrably on the stable 4-fold sites of the (100) terrace and then later as coverage increases on the metastable 3-fold site of the (110) step.

  6. The computational study of amino group impregnation on the zeolite surface toward the behaviors of adsorption and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Sooho; Lee, Kwang Soon; Lee, Won Bo

    2014-03-01

    The molecular dynamic and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulation study were conducted to investigate the adsorption and diffusion behaviors of mixture of CO2 and N2. Pure silicalite structures of zeolites TON, AFI, and LTL were selected as the host materials to be evaluated in this study. The effect of surface modification of TON, realized by impregnating the amino functional group on TON surface, on the adsorption and the diffusion were analyzed and compared with the normal TON structure. The results show that, in the adsorption behaviors, the modified TON adsorbs more CO2 than the normal TON structure, however, at high pressure regions, CO2 uptake is lower than the normal TON due to reductions of pore volume. This effect was quantitatively analyzed for the various amino functional group; methyl-, ethylamine, and ammonia. In the diffusion behaviors, the mixture in the modified TON has a lower diffusivity than the mixture in the normal TON due to additional attractive interaction between the amino group and mixture. In addition, the single file mobilities as well as the self-diffusion coefficients were employed to describe the observed diffusion behaviors.

  7. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems.

  8. Optical luminescence studies of diffusion times at the potassium ethyl xanthate adsorption layer on the surface of sphalerite minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Anitas, E. M.; Szakács, Zs

    2016-08-01

    We propose reflectance measurements as a method for the evaluation of the kinetics of adsorption processes, to compute the diffusion times of the adsorption products at the thin layers formed at the sphalerite natural mineral-potassium ethyl xanthate solution interface. The method is based on the intensity measurement of the reflected monochromatic radiation obtained from the mineral-xanthate thin layer as a function of time. These determinations were made at the thin layer formed between the sphalerite or activated sphalerite natural minerals with potassium ethyl xanthate, for different solutions concentrations and pH values at constant temperature. Diffusion times of desorbed molecular species into the liquid bring important information about the global kinetics of the ions in this phase during adsorption processes at interfaces. Analysing the time dependence of this parameter one concluded on the diffusion properties of the xanthate molecule in the solution depending on its concentration and pH, knowing that at the initial time these molecules had a uniform spread. This method enabled us to determine that, in time interval of approximately 35 minutes to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the formation of the interface layer, one had three different kinetic behaviours of our systems. In the first 5-8 min one had highly adsorbent character, the state of equilibrium is followed by low adsorbent properties. Gaining information on the adsorption kinetics in the case of xanthate on mineral surface leads to the optimization of the industrial froth flotation process.

  9. Adsorption of water monomer and clusters on platinum(111) terrace and related steps and kinks II. Surface diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Árnadóttir, Líney; Stuve, Eric M.; Jónsson, Hannes

    2012-02-01

    Surface diffusion of water monomer, dimer, and trimer on the (111) terrace, (221) and (322) stepped, and (763) and (854) kinked surfaces of platinum was studied by density functional theory using the PW91 approximation to the energy functional. Monomer diffusion on the terrace is facile, with an activation barrier of 0.20 eV, while dimer and trimer diffusions are restricted due to their high activation barriers of 0.43 and 0.48 eV, respectively. During monomer diffusion on the terrace the O-Pt distance increases by 0.54 Å, about 23% of the initial distance of 2.34 Å. The calculated rate of monomer diffusion hops is in good agreement with the onset temperature of diffusion measurements of Daschbach et al., J. Chem. Phys., 120 (2004) 1516. Alternative monomer diffusion pathways, in which the molecule rolls or flips, were also found. These pathways have diffusion barriers of 0.22 eV. During dimer diffusion on the terrace, the donor molecule rises 0.4 Å at the saddle point, while the acceptor rises by only 0.03 Å. Monomer diffusion up to steps and kinks, with activation barriers of 0.11-0.13 eV, facilitate chain formation on top of step edges. The energy landscape of monomer diffusion from terrace to step to kink sites is downhill with a maximum activation barrier of 0.26 eV. A model for water adsorption is presented in which monomer diffusion leads to concurrent formation of terrace clusters and population of steps/kinks, the latter consistent with the STM measurements of Morgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 77 (1996) 703.

  10. Adsorption of Water Monomer and Clusters on Platinum(111) Terrace and Related Steps and Kinks II. Surface Diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Arnadottir, Liney; Stuve, Eric M.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2012-02-01

    Surface diffusion of water monomer, dimer, and trimer on the (111) terrace, (221) and (322) stepped, and (763) and (854) kinked surfaces of platinum was studied by density functional theory using the PW91 approximation to the energy functional. Monomer diffusion on the terrace is facile, with an activation barrier of 0.20 eV, while dimer and trimer diffusions are restricted due to their high activation barriers of 0.43 and 0.48 eV, respectively. During monomer diffusion on the terrace the O–Pt distance increases by 0.54 Å, about 23% of the initial distance of 2.34 Å. The calculated rate of monomer diffusion hops is in good agreement with the onset temperature of diffusion measurements of Daschbach et al., J. Chem. Phys., 120 (2004) 1516. Alternative monomer diffusion pathways, in which the molecule rolls or flips, were also found. These pathways have diffusion barriers of 0.22 eV. During dimer diffusion on the terrace, the donor molecule rises 0.4 Å at the saddle point, while the acceptor rises by only 0.03 Å. Monomer diffusion up to steps and kinks, with activation barriers of 0.11–0.13 eV, facilitate chain formation on top of step edges. The energy landscape of monomer diffusion from terrace to step to kink sites is downhill with a maximum activation barrier of 0.26 eV. A model for water adsorption is presented inwhichmonomer diffusion leads to concurrent formation of terrace clusters and population of steps/kinks, the latter consistent with the STMmeasurements ofMorgenstern et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 77 (1996) 703.

  11. Hydrogen Adsorption, Absorption and Diffusion on and in Transition Metal Surfaces: A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, Peter A.; Kandoi, Shampa; Nilekar, Anand U.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2012-01-04

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA(PW91) calculations are used to study the interaction of hydrogen with different facets of seventeen transition metals—the (100) and (111) facets of face-centered cubic (fcc) metals, the (0001) facet of hexagonal-close packed (hcp) metals, and the (100) and (110) facets of body-centered cubic (bcc) metals. Calculated geometries and binding energies for surface and subsurface hydrogen are reported and are, in general, in good agreement with both previous modeling studies and experimental data. There are significant differences between the binding on the close-packed and more open (100) facets of the same metal. Geometries of subsurface hydrogen on different facets of the same metal are generally similar; however, binding energies of hydrogen in the subsurface of the different facets studied showed significant variation. Formation of surface hydrogen is exothermic with respect to gas-phase H₂ on all metals studied with the exception of Ag and Au. For each metal studied, hydrogen in its preferred subsurface state is always less stable than its preferred surface state. The magnitude of the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion from the surface layer into the first subsurface layer is dominated by the difference in the thermodynamic stability of these two states. Diffusion from the first subsurface layer to one layer further into the bulk does not generally have a large thermodynamic barrier but still has a moderate kinetic barrier. Despite the proximity to the metal surface, the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion from the first to the second subsurface layer is generally similar to experimentally-determined activation energies for bulk diffusion found in the literature. There are also some significant differences in the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion into the bulk through different facets of the same metal.

  12. H atom adsorption and diffusion on Si(110)-(1×1) and (2×1) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brázdová, Veronika; Bowler, David R

    2011-06-21

    We present a periodic density-functional study of hydrogen adsorption and diffusion on the Si(110)-(1×1) and (2×1) surfaces, and identify a local reconstruction that stabilizes the clean Si(110)-(1×1) by 0.51 eV. Hydrogen saturates the dangling bonds of surface Si atoms on both reconstructions and the different structures can be identified from their simulated scanning tunneling microscopy/current image tunneling spectroscopy (STM/CITS) images. Hydrogen diffusion on both reconstructions will proceed preferentially along zigzag rows, in between two adjacent rows. The mobility of the hydrogen atom is higher on the (2×1) reconstruction. Diffusion of a hydrogen vacancy on a monohydride Si(110) surface will proceed along one zigzag row and is slightly more difficult (0.2 eV and 0.6 eV on (1×1) and (2×1), respectively) than hydrogen atom diffusion on the clean surface.

  13. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium-sulfur battery design.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides. PMID:27046216

  14. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium-sulfur battery design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.

  15. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium–sulfur battery design

    DOE PAGES

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; et al

    2016-04-05

    Lithium–sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance.more » Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Lastly, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides.« less

  16. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium–sulfur battery design

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium–sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understanding and corresponding selection criteria for the oxides are still lacking. Herein, various nonconductive metal-oxide nanoparticle-decorated carbon flakes are synthesized via a facile biotemplating method. The cathodes based on magnesium oxide, cerium oxide and lanthanum oxide show enhanced cycling performance. Adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations reveal that polysulfide capture by the oxides is via monolayered chemisorption. Moreover, we show that better surface diffusion leads to higher deposition efficiency of sulfide species on electrodes. Hence, oxide selection is proposed to balance optimization between sulfide-adsorption and diffusion on the oxides. PMID:27046216

  17. DFT characterization of adsorption and diffusion mechanisms of H, As, S, and Se on the zinc orthotitanate(0 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rankin, Rees B.; Hao, Shiqiang; Sholl, David S.; Johnson, J. Karl

    2008-05-01

    Zinc orthotitanate (ZTO) is a promising material for removal of multiple contaminant species from fuel gas streams. The ZTO(0 1 0) surface, which consists of both oxygen rich and metal rich sides, was previously predicted to be the lowest energy ZTO surface. We present density functional theory calculations examining adsorption and diffusion of atomic S, Se, As, and H on the oxygen rich and metal rich ZTO(0 1 0) surfaces. S and Se share similar bonding and diffusion mechanisms on the metal rich ZTO(0 1 0) surface, whereas As and H bind in similar ways to the oxygen rich surface. S and Se have adsorption sites involving Zn:Zn bridges whereas As and H prefer to bind at sites involving O:O bridges on the surface. H forms a hydroxyl-like bond with length of 1.0 Å. Se and S have small activation energy barriers for atomic diffusion from the lowest energy adsorption site to the nearest low energy site. At temperatures around 800 K we predict from our results that Se and S are approximately equal in diffusivity while being far more mobile on the surface than either H or As.

  18. Adsorption and diffusion of fluorine on Cr-doped Ni(111) surface: Fluorine-induced initial corrosion of non-passivated Ni-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Cui-Lan; Han, Han; Gong, Wen-Bin; Wang, Cheng-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Cheng; Huai, Ping; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Adsorption and diffusion behaviors of fluorine on Cr-doped Ni(111) surface are investigated by using first-principles simulation. It shows that the Cr in the Cr-doped Ni(111) surface serve a trap site for fluorine with adsorption energy 3.52 eV, which is 1.04 eV higher than that on Ni(111) surface. Moreover, the Cr atom is pulled out the surface for 0.41 Å after the fluorine adsorption, much higher than that on Ni(111) surface. Further diffusion behaviors analysis confirms the conclusion because the fluorine diffusion from neighbored sites onto the Cr top site is an energy barrierless process. Detailed electronic structure analysis shows that a deeper hybrid state of F 2 p-Cr 3 d indicates a strong Fsbnd Cr interaction. The Nisbnd Cr bond is elongated and weakened due to the new formed Fsbnd Cr bonding. Our results help to understanding the basic fluorine-induced initial corrosion mechanism for Ni-based alloy in molten salt environment.

  19. Influence of adsorption or desorption and surface diffusion on the formation kinetics of open half-monolayer coverage.

    PubMed

    Feldman, E P; Stefanovich, L I; Terekhova, Yu V

    2014-06-01

    The formation kinetics of open half-monolayer films on solid substrates is studied by the deposition of particles from a gaseous (vapor) phase to a cold substrate (room temperature) provided the lateral interaction between the particles of adsorbed layer (adlayer) is attractive. A detailed analysis of two limiting cases is presented: when the half-monolayer film formation rate is limited by the adsorption of particles from the gas phase and when the formation of the half-monolayer film surface is determined by the rate of surface diffusion of the adsorbed particles. The asymptotic analysis of the coverage dispersion evolution and the characteristic spatial scale of coverage inhomogeneities at the early and late stages of relaxation of a submonolayer film after quenching under the spinodal is carried out. It is found that separation of the adlayer occurs, so inhomogeneities of submonolayer films at the later stages of the process tend to equilibrium values of coverage in any case. However, asymptotic and numerical analysis shows that in the second case for some relationship between the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the adlayer an intermediate asymptotic relaxation process can be observed. It testifies to a kinetic slowdown of the separation process at the spinodal values of coverages. This fact manifests as the appearance of the intermediate plateau in the evolution curves for the coverage dispersion and nonmonotonic change of the characteristic spatial scale of coverage inhomogeneities. Moreover, at the early stages of the coverage evolution, the incubation period is revealed in the development of its inhomogeneities. It is shown that at the later stages of the separation of the half-monolayer film, the characteristic spatial scale of coverage inhomogeneities increases with time according to the law τ {1/2} and the width of the transition region between enriched and depleted regions of adlayer decreases as 1/τ {1/2}.

  20. Multistage adsorption of diffusing macromolecules and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2007-09-01

    We derive the equations that describe adsorption of diffusing particles onto a surface followed by additional surface kinetic steps before being transported across the interface. Multistage surface kinetics occurs during membrane protein insertion, cell signaling, and the infection of cells by virus particles. For example, viral entry into healthy cells is possible only after a series of receptor and coreceptor binding events occurs at the cellular surface. We couple the diffusion of particles in the bulk phase with the multistage surface kinetics and derive an effective, integrodifferential boundary condition that contains a memory kernel embodying the delay induced by the surface reactions. This boundary condition takes the form of a singular perturbation problem in the limit where particle-surface interactions are short ranged. Moreover, depending on the surface kinetics, the delay kernel induces a nonmonotonic, transient replenishment of the bulk particle concentration near the interface. The approach generalizes that of Ward and Tordai [J. Chem. Phys. 14, 453 (1946)] and Diamant and Andelman [Colloids Surf. A 183-185, 259 (2001)] to include surface kinetics, giving rise to qualitatively new behaviors. Our analysis also suggests a simple scheme by which stochastic surface reactions may be coupled to deterministic bulk diffusion.

  1. First-principles study on the interaction of nitrogen atom with α–uranium: From surface adsorption to bulk diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qiulei; Deng, Huiqiu E-mail: hqdeng@gmail.com; Xiao, Shifang; Li, Xiaofan; Hu, Wangyu; Ao, Bingyun; Chen, Piheng

    2014-04-28

    Experimental studies of nitriding on uranium surfaces show that the modified layers provide considerable protection against air corrosion. The bimodal distribution of nitrogen is affected by both its implantation and diffusion, and the diffusion of nitrogen during implantation is also governed by vacancy trapping. In the present paper, nitrogen adsorption, absorption, diffusion, and vacancy trapping on the surface of and in the bulk of α–uranium are studied with a first-principles density functional theory approach and the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The calculated results indicate that, regardless of the nitrogen coverage, a nitrogen atom prefers to reside at the hollow1 site and octahedral (Oct) site on and below the surface, respectively. The lowest energy barriers for on-surface and penetration diffusion occur at a coverage of 1/2 monolayer. A nitrogen atom prefers to occupy the Oct site in bulk α–uranium. High energy barriers are observed during the diffusion between neighboring Oct sites. A vacancy can capture its nearby interstitial nitrogen atom with a low energy barrier, providing a significant attractive nitrogen-vacancy interaction at the trapping center site. This study provides a reference for understanding the nitriding process on uranium surfaces.

  2. Insights into Surface Interactions between Metal Organic Frameworks and Gases during Transient Adsorption and Diffusion by In-Situ Small Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Dumée, Ludovic F; He, Li; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of molecular gas sieving materials with specific affinities for a single gas species and able to store large quantities of materials at a low or atmospheric pressure is desperately required to reduce the adverse effects of coal and oil usage in carbon capture. Fundamental understanding of the dynamic adsorption of gas, the diffusion mechanisms across thin film membranes, and the impact of interfaces play a vital role in developing these materials. In this work, single gas permeation tests across micro-porous membrane materials, based on metal organic framework crystals grown on the surface of carbon nanotubes (ZiF-8@CNT), were performed for the first time in-situ at the Australian Synchrotron on the small angle X-ray scattering beamline in order to reveal molecular sieving mechanisms and gas adsorption within the material. The results show that specific chemi-sorption of CO₂ across the ZiF-8 crystal lattices affected the morphology and unit cell parameters, while the sieving of other noble or noble like gases across the ZiF-8@CNT membranes was found to largely follow Knudsen diffusion. This work demonstrates for the first time a novel and effective technique to assess molecular diffusion at the nano-scale across sub-nano-porous materials by probing molecular flexibility across crystal lattice and single cell units.

  3. Insights into Surface Interactions between Metal Organic Frameworks and Gases during Transient Adsorption and Diffusion by In-Situ Small Angle X-ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Dumée, Ludovic F; He, Li; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of molecular gas sieving materials with specific affinities for a single gas species and able to store large quantities of materials at a low or atmospheric pressure is desperately required to reduce the adverse effects of coal and oil usage in carbon capture. Fundamental understanding of the dynamic adsorption of gas, the diffusion mechanisms across thin film membranes, and the impact of interfaces play a vital role in developing these materials. In this work, single gas permeation tests across micro-porous membrane materials, based on metal organic framework crystals grown on the surface of carbon nanotubes (ZiF-8@CNT), were performed for the first time in-situ at the Australian Synchrotron on the small angle X-ray scattering beamline in order to reveal molecular sieving mechanisms and gas adsorption within the material. The results show that specific chemi-sorption of CO₂ across the ZiF-8 crystal lattices affected the morphology and unit cell parameters, while the sieving of other noble or noble like gases across the ZiF-8@CNT membranes was found to largely follow Knudsen diffusion. This work demonstrates for the first time a novel and effective technique to assess molecular diffusion at the nano-scale across sub-nano-porous materials by probing molecular flexibility across crystal lattice and single cell units. PMID:27598211

  4. Insights into Surface Interactions between Metal Organic Frameworks and Gases during Transient Adsorption and Diffusion by In-Situ Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Dumée, Ludovic F.; He, Li; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of molecular gas sieving materials with specific affinities for a single gas species and able to store large quantities of materials at a low or atmospheric pressure is desperately required to reduce the adverse effects of coal and oil usage in carbon capture. Fundamental understanding of the dynamic adsorption of gas, the diffusion mechanisms across thin film membranes, and the impact of interfaces play a vital role in developing these materials. In this work, single gas permeation tests across micro-porous membrane materials, based on metal organic framework crystals grown on the surface of carbon nanotubes (ZiF-8@CNT), were performed for the first time in-situ at the Australian Synchrotron on the small angle X-ray scattering beamline in order to reveal molecular sieving mechanisms and gas adsorption within the material. The results show that specific chemi-sorption of CO2 across the ZiF-8 crystal lattices affected the morphology and unit cell parameters, while the sieving of other noble or noble like gases across the ZiF-8@CNT membranes was found to largely follow Knudsen diffusion. This work demonstrates for the first time a novel and effective technique to assess molecular diffusion at the nano-scale across sub-nano-porous materials by probing molecular flexibility across crystal lattice and single cell units. PMID:27598211

  5. Adsorption, Desorption, and Diffusion of Nitrogen in a Model Nanoporous Material: I. Surface Limited Desorption Kinetics in Amorphous Solid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Engstrom, Todd R.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2007-11-14

    The adsorption and desorption kinetics of N2 on porous amorphous solid water (ASW) films were studied using molecular beam techniques, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The ASW films were grown on Pt(111) at 23 K by ballistic deposition from a collimated H2O beam at various incident angles to control the film porosity. The experimental results show that the N2 condensation coefficient is essentially unity until near saturation, independent of the ASW film thickness. This means that N2 transport within the porous films is rapid. The TPD results show that the desorption of a fixed dose of N2 shifts to higher temperature with ASW film thickness. Kinetic analysis of the TPD spectra shows that a film thickness rescaling of the coverage dependent activation energy curve results in a single master curve. Simulation of the TPD spectra using this master curve results in a quantitative fit to the experiments over a wide range of ASW thicknesses (up to 1000 layers, ~0.5 mm). The success of the rescaling model indicates that N2 transport within the porous film is rapid enough to maintain a uniform distribution throughout the film on a time scale faster than desorption.

  6. Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal atoms on the (0001) surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabishchenkova, A. G. Otrokov, M. M.; Kuznetsov, V. M.; Chulkov, E. V.

    2015-09-15

    Ab initio study of the adsorption, diffusion, and intercalation of alkali metal adatoms on the (0001) step surface of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been performed for the case of low coverage. The calculations of the activation energies of diffusion of adatoms on the surface and in van der Waals gaps near steps, as well as the estimate of diffusion lengths, have shown that efficient intercalation through steps is possible only for Li and Na. Data obtained for K, Rb, and Cs atoms indicate that their thermal desorption at high temperatures can occur before intercalation. The results have been discussed in the context of existing experimental data.

  7. Protein adsorption onto ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Takami, Y; Yamane, S; Makinouchi, K; Otsuka, G; Glueck, J; Benkowski, R; Nosé, Y

    1998-04-01

    Ceramics seldom have been used as blood-contacting materials. However, alumina ceramic (Al2O3) and polyethylene are incorporated into the pivot bearings of the Gyro centrifugal blood pump. This material combination was chosen based on the high durability of the materials. Due to the stagnant flow that often occurs in a continuous flow condition inside a centrifugal pump, pivot bearing system is extremely critical. To evaluate the thombogenicity of pivot bearings in the Gyro pump, this study sought to investigate protein adsorption, particularly albumin, IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin onto ceramic surfaces. Al2O3 and silicon carbide ceramic (SiC) were compared with polyethylene (PE) and polyvinylchloride (PVC). Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay revealed that the amount of adsorbed proteins onto Al2O3 and SiC was significantly less than that on PVC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) indicated that numerous proteins adsorbed onto PVC compared to PE, Al2O3, and SiC. Identification of adsorbed proteins by Western immunoblotting revealed that the adsorption of albumin was similar on all four materials tested. Western immunoblotting also indicated lesser amounts of IgG, fibrinogen, and fibronectin on Al2O3 and SiC than on PE and PVC. In conclusion, ceramics (Al2O3 and SiC) are expected to be thromboresistant from the viewpoint of protein adsorption. PMID:9511095

  8. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  9. Adsorption of phenol on wood surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of phenol on aspen and pine wood is investigated. It is shown that adsorption isotherms are described by the Langmuir model. The woods' specific surface areas and adsorption interaction constants are determined. It is found that the sorption of phenol on surfaces of aspen and pine is due to Van der Waals interactions ( S sp = 45 m2/godw for aspen and 85 m2/godw for pine). The difference between the adsorption characteristics is explained by properties of the wood samples' microstructures.

  10. Protein Adsorption on Surfaces with Grafted Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Szleifer, I.

    1997-01-01

    A general theoretical framework for studying the adsorption of protein molecules on surfaces with grafted polymers is presented. The approach is a generalization of the single-chain mean-field theory, in which the grafted polymer-protein-solvent layer is assumed to be inhomogeneous in the direction perpendicular to the grafting surface. The theory enables the calculation of the adsorption isotherms of the protein as a function of the surface coverage of grafted polymers, concentration of protein in bulk, and type of solvent molecules. The potentials of mean force of the protein with the surface are calculated as a function of polymer surface coverage and amount of protein adsorbed. The theory is applied to model lysozyme on surfaces with grafted polyethylene oxide. The protein is modeled as spherical in solution, and it is assumed that the protein-polymer, protein-solvent, and polymer-solvent attractive interactions are all equal. Therefore, the interactions determining the structure of the layer (beyond the bare polymer-surface and protein-surface interactions) are purely repulsive. The bare surface-protein interaction is taken from atomistic calculations by Lee and Park. For surfaces that do not have preferential attractions with the grafted polymer segments, the adsorption isotherms of lysozyme are independent of the polymer length for chains with more than 50 ethylene oxide units. However, the potentials of mean force show strong variations with grafted polymer molecular weight. The competition between different conformations of the adsorbed protein is studied in detail. The adsorption isotherms change qualitatively for surfaces with attractive interactions with ethylene oxide monomers. The protein adsorption is a function of chain length—the longer the polymer the more effective it is in preventing protein adsorption. The structure of the layer and its deformation upon protein adsorption are very important in determining the adsorption isotherms and the

  11. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  12. Adsorption of Polymers on Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, Abishek; Kuppa, Vikram

    2014-03-01

    Most of the surfaces encountered in nature display irregularity and self-similarity at certain length scales. Such real surfaces can be mimicked via fractal surfaces using an algorithm that produces random surfaces. The problem of polymer chains adsorbed on smooth surfaces has been well understood whereas adsorption on rough surfaces still remains unclear due to the complexity involved in equilibration and sampling of molecules in such systems. The enthalpic interactions between the monomers and the entropic penalty arising due to adsorption on rough surfaces are significantly different from smooth surfaces. In this study, we investigate the adsorption of freely rotating polymer chains on fractal surfaces by Monte-Carlo molecular simulations. Random fractal surfaces are generated using the diamond-square algorithm for different values of the Hurst parameter. Properties like monomer-surface interaction, density profiles, chain orientation profiles and distribution of adsorbed chain fractions are investigated. We also demonstrate the significant effect of fractal dimension on adsorption of polymers on rough surfaces.

  13. Sub-Grid Reactive Diffusion and Apparent Uranyl Adsorption/Desorption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Kerisit, S.; Ma, R.; Zheng, C.; Zachara, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption is an important process affecting contaminant fate and transport in subsurface sediments. This presentation will discuss the importance of sub-grid reactive diffusion in both intragranular and inter-grain domains that affect the apparent rates of uranyl adsorption/desorption at the macroscopic scale. Uranyl[U(VI)]-contaminated site at Hanford 300A where U(VI) resides in intragranular domains as surface-complexed species is used as an example in this presentation. Molecular dynamics calculations revealed that uranyl surface complexation reactions are a fast process with a first-order rate constant of 100 per second. Consequently U(VI) adsorption/desorption is treated as an equilibrium process. An equilibrium, Kd-based model, however, significantly over-predicted the historical migration of the uranyl plume at the site. Sub-grain pore-scale simulations and stirred-flow cell experiments indicated that the coupling of intragranular diffusion with surface complexation reactions decreased the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption over 4 order of magnitude. The apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption decreased further over 1 order of magnitude due to the sub-grid pore-scale coupling of diffusive mass transfer and grain-scale U(VI) adsorption/desorption as revealed by column experiments and pore-scale simulations. Field-scale reactive transport models that incorporate the complexity of sub-grid reactive diffusion in the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption were consistent with the slow migration of the U(VI) plume at the site.

  14. Ion adsorption and diffusion in smectite: Molecular, pore, and continuum scale views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinnacher, Ruth M.; Holmboe, Michael; Tournassat, Christophe; Bourg, Ian C.; Davis, James A.

    2016-03-01

    Clay-rich media have been proposed as engineered barrier materials or host rocks for high level radioactive waste repositories in several countries. Hence, a detailed understanding of adsorption and diffusion in these materials is needed, not only for radioactive contaminants, but also for predominant earth metals, which can affect radionuclide speciation and diffusion. The prediction of adsorption and diffusion in clay-rich media, however, is complicated by the similarity between the width of clay nanopores and the thickness of the electrical double layer (EDL) at charged clay mineral-water interfaces. Because of this similarity, the distinction between 'bulk liquid' water and 'surface' water (i.e., EDL water) in clayey media can be ambiguous. Hence, the goal of this study was to examine the ability of existing pore scale conceptual models (single porosity models) to link molecular and macroscopic scale data on adsorption and diffusion in compacted smectite. Macroscopic scale measurements of the adsorption and diffusion of calcium, bromide, and tritiated water in Na-montmorillonite were modeled using a multi-component reactive transport approach while testing a variety of conceptual models of pore scale properties (adsorption and diffusion in individual pores). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out under conditions similar to those of our macroscopic scale diffusion experiments to help constrain the pore scale models. Our results indicate that single porosity models cannot be simultaneously consistent with our MD simulation results and our macroscopic scale diffusion data. A dual porosity model, which allows for the existence of a significant fraction of bulk liquid water-even at conditions where the average pore width is only a few nanometers-may be required to describe both pore scale and macroscopic scale data.

  15. Adsorption of hydroxyacetone on pure ice surfaces.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Mélanie; Darvas, Maria; Picaud, Sylvain; Jedlovszky, Pál; Le Calvé, Stéphane

    2010-12-17

    The adsorption of hydroxyacetone molecules at the surface of ice is investigated by means of flow-tube reactor measurements in the temperature range: 213-253 K. The number of molecules adsorbed per surface unit is conventionally plotted as a function of the absolute gas concentration of hydroxyacetone and is compared to that previously obtained for acetone and ethanol. The enthalpy of adsorption and the monolayer capacity at the ice surface are determined. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to support the experimental results. However, it is shown that the available interaction potential between hydroxyacetone and ice is not accurate enough to allow a robust detailed analysis of the adsorption process. Finally, a rapid estimation of the hydroxyacetone partitioning between the gas phase and ice shows that in the densest ice clouds, up to 29% of hydroxyacetone could be adsorbed on pure ice surfaces at 203 K.

  16. Adsorption of Atmospheric Gases on Pu Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Holliday, K S; Stanford, J A; Grant, W K; Erler, R G; Allen, P G; McLean, W; Roussel, P

    2012-03-29

    Surface adsorption represents a competition between collision and scattering processes that depend on surface energy, surface structure and temperature. The surface reactivity of the actinides can add additional complexity due to radiological dissociation of the gas and electronic structure. Here we elucidate the chemical bonding of gas molecules adsorbed on Pu metal and oxide surfaces. Atmospheric gas reactions were studied at 190 and 300 K using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of the Pu 4f and O 1s core-level states were studied as a function of gas dose rates to generate a set of Langmuir isotherms. Results show that the initial gas dose forms Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Pu metal surface followed by the formation of PuO{sub 2} resulting in a layered oxide structure. This work represents the first steps in determining the activation energy for adsorption of various atmospheric gases on Pu.

  17. A local view of bonding and diffusion at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.

    1996-09-01

    First-principles density functional calculations and corresponding experimental results underline the importance of basic chemical concepts, such as coordination, valence saturation and promotion-hybridization energetics, in understanding bonding and diffusion of atoms at and on metal surfaces. Several examples are reviewed, including outer-layer relaxations of clean hcp(0001) surfaces, liquid-metal-embrittlement energetics, separation energies of metal-adatom dimers, concerted substitutional self-diffusion on fcc(001) surfaces, and adsorption and diffusion barrier sites for adatoms near steps.

  18. pH-dependence of single-protein adsorption and diffusion at a liquid chromatographic interface.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Kourentzi, Katerina; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2016-02-01

    pH is a common mobile phase variable used to control protein separations due to the tunable nature of amino acid and adsorbent charge. Like other column variables such as column density and ligand loading density, pH is usually optimized empirically. Single-molecule spectroscopy extracts molecular-scale data to provide a framework for mechanistic optimization of pH. The adsorption and diffusion of a model globular protein, α-lactalbumin, was studied by single-molecule microscopy at a silica-aqueous interface analogous to aqueous normal phase and hydrophilic interaction chromatography and capillary electrophoresis interfaces at varied pH. Electrostatic repulsion resulting in free diffusion was observed at pH above the isoelectric point of the protein. In contrast, at low pH strong adsorption and surface diffusion with either no (D ∼ 0.01 μm(2) /s) or translational (D ∼ 0.3 μm(2) /s) motion was observed where the protein likely interacted with the surface through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bonding forces. The fraction of proteins immobilized could be increased by lowering the pH. These results show that retention of proteins at the silica interface cannot be viewed solely as an adsorption/desorption process and that the type of surface diffusion, which ultimately leads to ensemble chromatographic separations, can be controlled by tuning long-range electrostatic and short-range hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding forces with pH.

  19. Random sequential adsorption on partially covered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Weroński, Paweł

    1998-06-01

    The random sequential adsorption (RSA) approach was used to analyze adsorption of hard spheres at surfaces precovered with smaller sized particles. Numerical simulations were performed to determine the available surface function φl of larger particles for various particle size ratios λ=al/as and surface concentration of smaller particles θs. It was found that the numerical results were in a reasonable agreement with the formula stemming from the scaled particle theory with the modification for the sphere/sphere geometry. Particle adsorption kinetics was also determined in terms of the RSA simulations. By extrapolating the θl vs τ-1/2 dependencies, the jamming concentrations of larger spheres θl∞ were determined as a function of the initial smaller sphere concentration. It was found that θl∞ were considerably reduced by the presence of smaller sized particles, especially for λ≫1. The pair correlation function g of larger particles in the jamming state was also determined, showing more short range ordering (at the same θl) in comparison with monodisperse systems. The theoretical predictions stemming from our calculations suggest that the presence of trace amounts of very small particles may exert a decisive influence on adsorption of larger particles.

  20. Adsorption and Coupling of 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Irurueta, G.; Martínez, J. I.; Bueno, R.A.; Palomares, F. J.; Salavagione, H. J.; Singh, M. K.; Méndez, J.; Ellis, G. J.; López, M. F.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We have deposited 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and studied the strength of its adsorption through a combination of STM, LEED, XPS and ab initio calculations. Although an ordered (2√3×2√3)R30° phase appears, we have observed that molecule-substrate interaction dominates the adsorption geometry and properties of the system. At RT the high catalytic activity of Pt induces aminophenol to lose the H atom from the hydroxyl group, and a proportion of the molecules lose the complete hydroxyl group. After annealing above 420K, all deposited aminophenol molecules have lost the OH moiety and some hydrogen atoms from the amino groups. At this temperature, short single-molecule oligomer chains can be observed. These chains are the product of a new reaction that proceeds via the coupling of radical species that is favoured by surface diffusion. PMID:27279673

  1. Adsorption of DNA onto anionic lipid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Martín-Molina, Alberto; Luque-Caballero, Germán; Faraudo, Jordi; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maldonado-Valderrama, Julia

    2014-04-01

    Currently self-assembled DNA delivery systems composed of DNA multivalent cations and anionic lipids are considered to be promising tools for gene therapy. These systems become an alternative to traditional cationic lipid-DNA complexes because of their low cytotoxicity lipids. However, currently these nonviral gene delivery methods exhibit low transfection efficiencies. This feature is in large part due to the poorly understood DNA complexation mechanisms at the molecular level. It is well-known that the adsorption of DNA onto like charged lipid surfaces requires the presence of multivalent cations that act as bridges between DNA and anionic lipids. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms behind such adsorption phenomenon still remain unclear. Accordingly a historical background of experimental evidence related to adsorption and complexation of DNA onto anionic lipid surfaces mediated by different multivalent cations is firstly reviewed. Next, recent experiments aimed to characterise the interfacial adsorption of DNA onto a model anionic phospholipid monolayer mediated by Ca(2+) (including AFM images) are discussed. Afterwards, modelling studies of DNA adsorption onto charged surfaces are summarised before presenting preliminary results obtained from both CG and all-atomic MD computer simulations. Our results allow us to establish the optimal conditions for cation-mediated adsorption of DNA onto negatively charged surfaces. Moreover, atomistic simulations provide an excellent framework to understand the interaction between DNA and anionic lipids in the presence of divalent cations. Accordingly,our simulation results in conjunction go beyond the macroscopic picture in which DNA is stuck to anionic membranes by using multivalent cations that form glue layers between them. Structural aspects of the DNA adsorption and molecular binding between the different charged groups from DNA and lipids in the presence of divalent cations are reported in the last part of the study

  2. Surface self-diffusion of organic glasses.

    PubMed

    Brian, Caleb W; Yu, Lian

    2013-12-19

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients have been determined for the organic glass Nifedipine using the method of surface grating decay. The flattening of 1000 nm surface gratings occurs by viscous flow at 12 K or more above the glass transition temperature and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion is at least 10(7) times faster than bulk diffusion, indicating a highly mobile surface. Nifedipine glasses have faster surface diffusion than the previously studied Indomethacin glasses, despite their similar bulk relaxation times. Both glasses exhibit fast surface crystal growth, and its rate scales with surface diffusivity. The observed rate of surface diffusion implies substantial surface rearrangement during the preparation of low-energy glasses by vapor deposition. The Random First Order Transition Theory and the Coupling Model successfully predict the large surface-enhancement of mobility and its increase on cooling, but disagree with the experimental observation of the faster surface diffusion of Nifedipine.

  3. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2012-02-07

    Atomistic simulations were performed to study the diffusion and adsorption of Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3} and of some of its constituent species, i.e., UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, in feldspar nano-sized fractures. Feldspar is important to uranium remediation efforts at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site as it has been found in recent studies to host contaminants within its intragrain fractures. In addition, uranyl carbonate species are known to dominate U(VI) speciation in conditions relevant to the Hanford site. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that the presence of the feldspar surface diminishes the diffusion coefficients of all the species considered in this work and that the diffusion coefficients do not reach their bulk aqueous solution values in the center of a 2.5 nm fracture. Moreover, the MD simulations showed that the rate of decrease in the diffusion coefficients with decreasing distance from the surface is greater for larger adsorbing species. Free energy profiles of the same species adsorbing on the feldspar surface revealed a large exothermic free energy of adsorption for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, which are able to adsorb to the surface with their uranium atom directly bonded to a surface hydroxyl oxygen, whereas adsorption of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} and Ca{sub 2}UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}, which attach to the surface via hydrogen bonding from a surface hydroxyl group to a carbonate oxygen, was calculated to be either only slightly exothermic or endothermic.

  4. Study of lysozyme mobility and binding free energy during adsorption on a graphene surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, C. Masato; Ma, Heng; Wei, Tao

    2015-04-13

    Understanding protein adsorption is a key to the development of biosensors and anti-biofouling materials. Hydration essentially controls the adsorption process on hydrophobic surfaces, but its effect is complicated by various factors. Here, we present an ideal model system to isolate hydration effects—lysozyme adsorption on a flat hydrophobic graphene surface. Our all-atom molecular dynamics and molecular-mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area computation study reveal that lysozyme on graphene displays much larger diffusivity than in bulk water. Protein's hydration free energy within the first hydration shell is dominated by the protein-water electrostatic interactions and acts as an energy barrier for protein adsorption. On the other hand, the surface tension, especially that from the hydrophobic graphene, can effectively weaken the barrier to promote adsorption.

  5. Oxygen Atom Adsorption on and Diffusion into Nb(110) and Nb(100) from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Tafen, De Nyago; Gao, Michael C

    2013-11-01

    In order to understand the dynamics of oxidation of Nb, we examine the adsorption, absorption, and diffusion of an oxygen atom on, in, and into Nb(110) and Nb(100) surfaces, respectively, using density functional theory. Our calculations predict that the oxygen atom adsorbs on the threefold site on Nb(110) and the fourfold hollow site on Nb(100), and the adsorption energy is -5.08 and -5.18 eV respectively. We find the long and short bridge sites to be transition states for O diffusion on Nb(110), while the on top site is a rank-2 saddle point. In the subsurface region, the oxygen atom prefers the octahedral site, as in bulk niobium. Our results also show that the O atom is more stable on Nb(110) subsurface than on Nb(100) subsurface. The diffusion of oxygen atoms into niobium surfaces passes through transition states where the oxygen atom is coordinated to four niobium atoms. The diffusion barriers of the oxygen atom into Nb(110) and Nb(100) are 1.81 and 2.05 eV, respectively. Analysis of the electronic density of states reveals the emergence of well localized electronic states below the lowest states of clean Nb surfaces due to d-p orbital hybridization.

  6. Design of a hybrid advective-diffusive microfluidic system with ellipsometric detection for studying adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhao, Cunlu; Wijnperlé, Daniel; Duits, Michel H G; Mugele, Frieder

    2016-05-01

    Establishing and maintaining concentration gradients that are stable in space and time is critical for applications that require screening the adsorption behavior of organic or inorganic species onto solid surfaces for wide ranges of fluid compositions. In this work, we present a design of a simple and compact microfluidic device based on steady-state diffusion of the analyte, between two control channels where liquid is pumped through. The device generates a near-linear distribution of concentrations. We demonstrate this via experiments with dye solutions and comparison to finite-element numerical simulations. In a subsequent step, the device is combined with total internal reflection ellipsometry to study the adsorption of (cat)ions on silica surfaces from CsCl solutions at variable pH. Such a combined setup permits a fast determination of an adsorption isotherm. The measured optical thickness is compared to calculations from a triple layer model for the ion distribution, where surface complexation reactions of the silica are taken into account. Our results show a clear enhancement of the ion adsorption with increasing pH, which can be well described with reasonable values for the equilibrium constants of the surface reactions. PMID:27375818

  7. Surface Tension and Adsorption without a Dividing Surface.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2015-11-24

    The ingenious concept of a dividing surface of zero thickness that was introduced by Gibbs is the basis of the theory of surface tension and adsorption. However, some fundamental questions, mainly those related to the location of the dividing surface and the proper definition of relative adsorption, have remained open over the years. To avoid these questions, the present paper proposes to analyze an interfacial phase by defining a thermodynamic system of constant, but nonzero thickness. The interfacial phase is analyzed as it really is, namely a nonuniform three-dimensional entity. The current analysis redevelops the equation for calculating surface tension, though with different assumptions. However, the main point in the proposed model is that the thermodynamic interfacial system, due to its fixed thickness, conforms to the requirement of first-order homogeneity of the internal energy. This property is the key that allows using the Gibbs adsorption isotherm. It is also characteristic of the Gibbs dividing surface model, but has not always been discussed with regard to subsequent models. The resulting equation leads to a simple, "natural" expression for the relative adsorption. This expression may be compared with simulations and sophisticated surface concentration measurements, and from which the dependence of interfacial tension on the solution composition can be derived. Finally, it is important to point out that in order to calculate the interfacial tension as well as the relative adsorption from data on the properties of the interfacial phase, there is no need to know its exact thickness, as long as it is bigger than the actual thickness but sufficiently small.

  8. Experimental determination of barium isotope fractionation during diffusion and adsorption processes at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zuilen, Kirsten; Müller, Thomas; Nägler, Thomas F.; Dietzel, Martin; Küsters, Tim

    2016-08-01

    Variations in barium (Ba) stable isotope abundances measured in low and high temperature environments have recently received increasing attention. The actual processes controlling Ba isotope fractionation, however, remain mostly elusive. In this study, we present the first experimental approach to quantify the contribution of diffusion and adsorption on mass-dependent Ba isotope fractionation during transport of aqueous Ba2+ ions through a porous medium. Experiments have been carried out in which a BaCl2 solution of known isotopic composition diffused through u-shaped glass tubes filled with silica hydrogel at 10 °C and 25 °C for up to 201 days. The diffused Ba was highly fractionated by up to -2.15‰ in δ137/134Ba, despite the low relative difference in atomic mass. The time-dependent isotope fractionation can be successfully reproduced by a diffusive transport model accounting for mass-dependent differences in the effective diffusivities of the Ba isotope species (D137Ba /D134Ba =(m134 /m137) β). Values of β extracted from the transport model were in the range of 0.010-0.011. Independently conducted batch experiments revealed that adsorption of Ba onto the surface of silica hydrogel favoured the heavier Ba isotopes (α = 1.00015 ± 0.00008). The contribution of adsorption on the overall isotope fractionation in the diffusion experiments, however, was found to be small. Our results contribute to the understanding of Ba isotope fractionation processes, which is crucial for interpreting natural isotope variations and the assessment of Ba isotope ratios as geochemical proxies.

  9. Protein adsorption kinetics in different surface potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, A.; Mantz, H.; Jacobs, K.; Bellion, M.; Santen, L.

    2008-03-01

    We have studied the adsorption kinetics of the protein amylase at solid/liquid interfaces. Offering substrates with tailored properties, we are able to separate the impact of short- and long-range interactions. By means of a colloidal Monte Carlo approach including conformational changes of the adsorbed proteins induced by density fluctuations, we develop a scenario that is consistent with the experimentally observed three-step kinetics on specific substrates. Our observations show that not only the surface chemistry determines the properties of an adsorbed protein layer but also the van der Waals contributions of a composite substrate may lead to non-negligible effects.

  10. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-impregnated mesoporous silicates: surface structure and behavior of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Woo; Han, James S; Jang, Min; Min, Soo-Hong; Park, Jae Kwang; Rowell, Roger M

    2004-02-01

    Phosphorus from excess fertilizers and detergents ends up washing into lakes, creeks, and rivers. This overabundance of phosphorus causes excessive aquatic plant and algae growth and depletes the dissolved oxygen supply in the water. In this study, aluminum-impregnated mesoporous adsorbents were tested for their ability to remove phosphate from water. The surface structure of the materials was investigated with X-ray diffraction (XRD), a N2 adsorption-desorption technique, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the effect of surface properties on the adsorption behavior of phosphate. The mesoporous materials were loaded with Al components by reaction with surface silanol groups. In the adsorption test, the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials showed fast adsorption kinetics as well as high adsorption capacities, compared with activated alumina. The uniform mesopores of the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials caused the diffusion rate in the adsorption process to increase, which in turn caused the fast adsorption kinetics. High phosphate adsorption capacities of the Al-impregnated mesoporous materials were attributed to not only the increase of surface hydroxyl density on Al oxide due to well-dispersed impregnation of Al components but also the decrease in stoichiometry of surface hydroxyl ions to phosphate by the formation of monodentate surface complexes. PMID:14968882

  11. Adsorption of flexible polyelectrolytes on charged surfaces.

    PubMed

    Subbotin, A V; Semenov, A N

    2016-08-10

    Adsorption of weakly charged polyelectrolyte (PE) chains from dilute solution on an oppositely charged surface is studied using the self-consistent mean-field approach. The structure of the adsorbed polymer layer and its excess charge are analyzed in the most important asymptotic and intermediate regimes both analytically and numerically. Different regimes of surface charge compensation by PE chains including partial and full charge inversion are identified and discussed in terms of physical parameters like the magnitude of specific short-range interactions of PE segments with the surface, solvent quality and ionic strength. The effect of excluded-volume monomer interactions is considered quantitatively both in the marginally good and poor solvent regimes. PMID:27452184

  12. Surface chemistry of ferrihydrite: Part 2. Kinetics of arsenate adsorption and coprecipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, C.C.; Dadis, J.A.; Waychunas, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of As(V) adsorption by ferrihydrite was investigated in coprecipitation and postsynthesis adsorption experiments conducted in the pH range 7.5-9.0. In coprecipitation experiments, As(V) was present in solution during the hydrolysis and precipitation of iron. In adsorption experiments, a period of rapid (<5 min) As(V) uptake from solution was followed by continued uptake for at least eight days, as As(V) diffused to adsorption sites on ferrihydrite surfaces within aggregates of colloidal particles. The time dependence of As(V) adsorption is well described by a general model for diffusion into a sphere if a subset of surface sites located near the exterior of aggregates is assumed to attain adsorptive equilibrium rapidly. The kinetics of As(V) desorption after an increase in pH were also consistent with diffusion as a rate-limiting process. Aging of pure ferrihydrite prior to As(V) adsorption caused a decrease in adsorption sites on the precipitate owing to crystallite growth. In coprecipitation experiments, the initial As(V) uptake was significantly greater than in post-synthesis adsorption experiments, and the rate of uptake was not diffusion limited because As(V) was coordinated by surface sites before crystallite growth and coagulation processes could proceed. After the initial adsorption, As(V) was slowly released from coprecipitates for at least one month, as crystallite growth caused desorption of As(V). Adsorption densities as high as 0.7 mole As(V) per mole of Fe were measured in coprecipitates, in comparison to 0.25 mole As(V) per mole of Fe in post-synthesis adsorption experiments. Despite the high Concentration of As(V) in the precipitates, EXAFS spectroscopy (Waychunas et al., 1993) showed that neither ferric arsenate nor any other As-bearing surface precipitate or solid solution was formed. The high adsorption densities are possible because the ferrihydrite particles are extremely small, approaching the size of small dioctahedral chains at

  13. Modeling and CFD prediction for diffusion and adsorption within room with various adsorption isotherms.

    PubMed

    Murakami, S; Kato, S; Ito, K; Zhu, Q

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents physical models that are used for analyzing numerically the transportation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials in a room. The models are based on fundamental physicochemical principles of their diffusion and adsorption/desorption (hereafter simply sorption) both in building materials and in room air. The performance of the proposed physical models is examined numerically in a test room with a technique supported by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Two building materials are used in this study. One is a VOC emitting material for which the emission rate is mainly controlled by the internal diffusion of the material. The other is an adsorptive material that has no VOC source. It affects the room air concentration of VOCs with its sorption process. The floor is covered with an emission material made of polypropylene styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). An adsorbent material made of coal-based activated carbon is spread over the sidewalls. The results of numerical prediction show that the physical models and their numerical simulations explain well the mechanism of the transportation of VOCs in a room.

  14. Study of water adsorption on activated carbons with different degrees of surface oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-02-15

    A carbon of wood origin was oxidized with different oxidizing agents (nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulfate). The microstructural properties of the starting material and the oxidized samples were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. The surface acidity was determined using Boehm titration and potentiometric titration. The changes in the surface chemistry were also studied by diffuse reflectance FTIR. Water adsorption isotherms were measured at three different temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From the isotherms the heats of adsorption were calculated using a virial equation. The results indicated that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by the surface heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption was equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol).

  15. Volatile organic vapor diffusion and adsorption in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, L.W.; Moldrup, P.; Rolston, D.E.; Yamaguchi, T.

    1994-07-01

    Knowledge of the relationship between D{sub p}/D{sub o} (diffusion coefficient in soil divided by diffusion coefficient in free air) and the volumetric soil-air content, {epsilon}, is important when modeling gaseous movement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soils. The effective diffusion of trichloroethylene (TCE), toluene and freon in Yolo silt loam (fine-silty, mixed, nonacid, thermic Typic Xerorthent) were measured in a two-chamber diffusion apparatus. The experiments were conducted on packed soil cores over a range of water contents. It was found that for water contents higher than four molecular layers of water surface coverage, solid/vapor partition coefficients, K{sub D}; were consistent with values predicted by Henry`s Law constants (K{sub H}), and aqueous/solid partition coefficients, K{sub D}. For less than four molecular layers of water, sorption increased by orders of magnitude. The vapor retardation factors, along with the measured effective diffusion, allowed a calculation of diffusion coefficients (D{sub P}) for the investigated species by using the analytical solution to diffusion in a two-chamber apparatus. Values of the ratio D{sub P}/D{sub O} were generally higher than the values predicted by the Millington-Quirk equation, and lower than the values predicted by the Penman equation. Compared with the nonreactive tracer freon, D{sub P}/D{sub O} values for TCE and toluene agreed very well for higher water contents. Values obtained for air-dry soil, however, were under-predicted. The experimental work for determination of the effective diffusion of reactive tracers can, therefore, for sufficiently high water contents be limited to the determination of D{sub P}/D{sub O-{epsilon}} relations for a nonreactive tracer and measurement of K{sub D}, K{sub D}{sup {prime}}, and K{sub H} values for the reactive tracers. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Adsorption of boron on a Mo(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, Tamerlan T.; Turiev, Anatolij M.; Tsidaeva, Natal'ja I.; Panteleev, Dmitrij G.; Vladimirov, Georgij G.; Rump, Gennadij A.

    2008-12-01

    Adsorption of boron atoms in submonolayer to multilayer coverage on atomically clean Mo(110) surfaces has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and work function measurements. According to Auger results there is a layer-by-layer growth mode of the film on the substrate held at room temperature. In the submonolayer region the work function gradually increases with boron coverage until a saturation value of 5.8 eV is achieved after completion of the first monoatomic layer. The B-Mo(110) adsorbate system formed on the substrate at room temperature is not stable, dominated by a strong tendency of the boron atoms to diffuse into the bulk of the crystal. The latter is manifested by dramatic Mo(110) surface plasmon mode transformation upon boron adsorption, presumably as a result of penetration of boron atoms into the topmost substrate layer even at T = 300 K. Slight annealing up to 450 K facilitates this trend, leading to total dissolution of deposited boron atoms in the bulk of the crystal under further annealing, restoring the initial state of the Mo(110) surface after achieving a temperature of approximately 2000 K.

  17. Surface Adsorption in Nonpolarizable Atomic Models.

    PubMed

    Whitmer, Jonathan K; Joshi, Abhijeet A; Carlton, Rebecca J; Abbott, Nicholas L; de Pablo, Juan J

    2014-12-01

    Many ionic solutions exhibit species-dependent properties, including surface tension and the salting-out of proteins. These effects may be loosely quantified in terms of the Hofmeister series, first identified in the context of protein solubility. Here, our interest is to develop atomistic models capable of capturing Hofmeister effects rigorously. Importantly, we aim to capture this dependence in computationally cheap "hard" ionic models, which do not exhibit dynamic polarization. To do this, we have performed an investigation detailing the effects of the water model on these properties. Though incredibly important, the role of water models in simulation of ionic solutions and biological systems is essentially unexplored. We quantify this via the ion-dependent surface attraction of the halide series (Cl, Br, I) and, in so doing, determine the relative importance of various hypothesized contributions to ionic surface free energies. Importantly, we demonstrate surface adsorption can result in hard ionic models combined with a thermodynamically accurate representation of the water molecule (TIP4Q). The effect observed in simulations of iodide is commensurate with previous calculations of the surface potential of mean force in rigid molecular dynamics and polarizable density-functional models. Our calculations are direct simulation evidence of the subtle but sensitive role of water thermodynamics in atomistic simulations.

  18. A first-principles study of sodium adsorption and diffusion on phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Wen, Yanwei; Chen, Zhengzheng; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-07-01

    The structural, electronic, electrochemical as well as diffusion properties of Na doped phosphorene have been investigated based on first-principles calculations. The strong binding energy between Na and phosphorene indicates that Na could be stabilized on the surface of phosphorene without clustering. By comparing the adsorption of Na atoms on one side and on both sides of phosphorene, it has been found that Na-Na exhibits strong repulsion at the Na-Na distance of less than 4.35 Å. The Na intercalation capacity is estimated to be 324 mA h g(-1) and the calculated discharge curve indicates quite a low Na(+)/Na voltage of phosphorene. Moreover, the diffusion energy barrier of Na atoms on the phosphorene surface at both low and high Na concentrations is as low as 40-63 meV, which implies the high mobility of Na during the charge/discharge process.

  19. Control of gold surface diffusion on si nanowires.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Martien I; Rouviere, Jean-Luc; Dhalluin, Florian; Desré, Pierre J; Gentile, Pascal; Ferret, Pierre; Oehler, Fabrice; Baron, Thiery

    2008-05-01

    Silicon nanowires (NW) were grown by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism using gold as the catalyst and silane as the precursor. Gold from the catalyst particle can diffuse over the wire sidewalls, resulting in gold clusters decorating the wire sidewalls. The presence or absence of gold clusters was observed either by high angle annular darkfield scanning transmission electron microscopy images or by scanning electron microscopy. We find that the gold surface diffusion can be controlled by two growth parameters, the silane partial pressure and the growth temperature, and that the wire diameter also affects gold diffusion. Gold clusters are not present on the NW side walls for high silane partial pressure, low temperature, and small NW diameters. The absence or presence of gold on the NW sidewall has an effect on the sidewall morphology. Different models are qualitatively discussed. The main physical effect governing gold diffusion seems to be the adsorption of silane on the NW sidewalls. PMID:18422363

  20. Deposition at glancing angle, surface roughness, and protein adsorption: Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Rechendorff, Kristian; Hovgaard, Mads B; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2008-06-19

    To generate rough surfaces in Monte Carlo simulations, we use the 2 + 1 solid-on-solid model of deposition with rapid transient diffusion of newly arrived atoms supplied at glancing angle. The surfaces generated are employed to scrutinize the effect of surface roughness on adsorption of globular and anisotropic rodlike proteins. The obtained results are compared with the available experimental data for Ta deposition at glancing angle and for the bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen uptake on the corresponding Ta films.

  1. Adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose onto cellulose model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Johannes; Maurer, Reinhard J; Sax, Alexander F

    2014-07-31

    Reliable simulation of molecular adsorption onto cellulose surfaces is essential for the design of new cellulose nanocomposite materials. However, the applicability of classical force field methods to such systems remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we present the adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose on model surfaces of crystalline cellulose Iα and Iβ. The adsorption of the two large carbohydrates was simulated with the GLYCAM06 force field. To validate this approach, quantum theoretical calculations for the adsorption of glucose were performed: Equilibrium geometries were studied with density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion-corrected DFT, whereas the adsorption energies were calculated with two standard density functional approximations and five dispersion-containing DFT approaches. We find that GLYCAM06 gives a good account of geometries and, in most cases, accurate adsorption energies when compared to dispersion-corrected DFT energies. Adsorption onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iα is, in general, stronger than onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iβ. Contrary to intuition, the adsorption energy is not directly correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds; rather, it is dominated by dispersion interactions. Especially for bigger adsorbates, a neglect of these interactions leads to a dramatic underestimation of adsorption energies.

  2. Adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose onto cellulose model surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoja, Johannes; Maurer, Reinhard J; Sax, Alexander F

    2014-07-31

    Reliable simulation of molecular adsorption onto cellulose surfaces is essential for the design of new cellulose nanocomposite materials. However, the applicability of classical force field methods to such systems remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we present the adsorption of glucose, cellobiose, and cellotetraose on model surfaces of crystalline cellulose Iα and Iβ. The adsorption of the two large carbohydrates was simulated with the GLYCAM06 force field. To validate this approach, quantum theoretical calculations for the adsorption of glucose were performed: Equilibrium geometries were studied with density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion-corrected DFT, whereas the adsorption energies were calculated with two standard density functional approximations and five dispersion-containing DFT approaches. We find that GLYCAM06 gives a good account of geometries and, in most cases, accurate adsorption energies when compared to dispersion-corrected DFT energies. Adsorption onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iα is, in general, stronger than onto the (100) surface of cellulose Iβ. Contrary to intuition, the adsorption energy is not directly correlated with the number of hydrogen bonds; rather, it is dominated by dispersion interactions. Especially for bigger adsorbates, a neglect of these interactions leads to a dramatic underestimation of adsorption energies. PMID:25036217

  3. Surfaces of Microparticles in Colloids: Structure and Molecular Adsorption Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hai-Lung

    2002-03-01

    Surfaces of micron and sub-micron size particles in liquid solution are probed by second harmonic generation (SHG) facilitated with femtosecond laser pulses. The particles probed include inorganic objects such as carbon black and color pigments, polymeric species like polystyrene beads, and biological systems such as blood cells and ecoli. In the experiments, dye molecules are first adsorbed onto the particle surface to allow generation of second harmonics upon light irradiation. Competition for adsorption between these surface dye molecules and the molecules of interest in the solution is then monitored by the SHG signal to reveal the molecular adsorption kinetics and surface structure. Specifically, surfactant adsorption on polymer surfaces, the structure of carbon black surface, and protein adsorption on biological surfaces, monitored by this technique, will be discussed.

  4. The role of electrostatic interactions in protease surface diffusion and the consequence for interfacial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Feller, Bob E; Kellis, James T; Cascão-Pereira, Luis G; Robertson, Channing R; Frank, Curtis W

    2010-12-21

    This study examines the influence of electrostatic interactions on enzyme surface diffusion and the contribution of diffusion to interfacial biocatalysis. Surface diffusion, adsorption, and reaction were investigated on an immobilized bovine serum albumin (BSA) multilayer substrate over a range of solution ionic strength values. Interfacial charge of the enzyme and substrate surface was maintained by performing the measurements at a fixed pH; therefore, electrostatic interactions were manipulated by changing the ionic strength. The interfacial processes were investigated using a combination of techniques: fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, surface plasmon resonance, and surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy. We used an enzyme charge ladder with a net charge ranging from -2 to +4 with respect to the parent to systematically probe the contribution of electrostatics in interfacial enzyme biocatalysis on a charged substrate. The correlation between reaction rate and adsorption was determined for each charge variant within the ladder, each of which displayed a maximum rate at an intermediate surface concentration. Both the maximum reaction rate and adsorption value at which this maximum rate occurs increased in magnitude for the more positive variants. In addition, the specific enzyme activity increased as the level of adsorption decreased, and for the lowest adsorption values, the specific enzyme activity was enhanced compared to the trend at higher surface concentrations. At a fixed level of adsorption, the specific enzyme activity increased with positive enzyme charge; however, this effect offers diminishing returns as the enzyme becomes more highly charged. We examined the effect of electrostatic interactions on surface diffusion. As the binding affinity was reduced by increasing the solution ionic strength, thus weakening electrostatic interaction, the rate of surface diffusion increased considerably. The enhancement in specific activity achieved at

  5. The effects of surface chemistry of mesoporous silica materials and solution pH on kinetics of molsidomine adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinina, E.S.; Parfenyuk, E.V.

    2014-01-15

    Adsorption kinetics of molsidomine on mesoporous silica material (UMS), the phenyl- (PhMS) and mercaptopropyl-functionalized (MMS) derivatives from solution with different pH and 298 K was studied. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model for all studied silica materials and pH. Effects of surface functional groups and pH on adsorption efficiency and kinetic adsorption parameters were investigated. At all studied pH, the highest molsidomine amount is adsorbed on PhMS due to π–π interactions and hydrogen bonding between surface groups of PhMS and molsidomine molecules. An increase of pH results in a decrease of the amounts of adsorbed molsidomine onto the silica materials. Furthermore, the highest adsorption rate kinetically evaluated using a pseudo-second-order model, is observed onto UMS and it strongly depends on pH. The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion and Boyd kinetic film–diffusion models. The results showed that the molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials is controlled by film diffusion. Effect of pH on the diffusion parameters is discussed. - Graphical abstract: The kinetic study showed that the k{sub 2} value, the rate constant of pseudo-second order kinetic model, is the highest for molsidomine adsorption on UMS and strongly depends on pH because it is determined by availability and accessibility of the reaction sites of the adsorbents molsidomine binding. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The adsorption capacities of UMS, PhMS and MMS were dependent on the pH. • At all studied pH, the highest molsidomine amount is adsorbed on PhMS. • The highest adsorption rate, k{sub 2}, is observed onto UMS and strongly depends on pH. • Film diffusion was the likely rate-limiting step in the adsorption process.

  6. Adsorption mode of cinchonidine on Cu(111) surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing-Min; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun; Bai, Chun-Li; Wang, Yuan

    2002-12-01

    The adsorption mode of cinchonidine on Cu(111) was directly obtained by in situ STM. The molecules were found to adsorb on the substrate surface and form a long-range ordered adlayer with (4 x 4) symmetry. While the quinoline rings lie parallel to Cu(111), the chiral quinuclidine moiety extends out of the surface. The enantioselectivity of catalysts may relate to this special adsorption conformation of cinchonidine on the surface.

  7. Selective Adsorption and Selective Transport Diffusion of CO2-CH4 Binary Mixture in Coal Ultramicropores.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongliang; Feng, Yanhui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    The adsorption and diffusion of the CO2-CH4 mixture in coal and the underlying mechanisms significantly affect the design and operation of any CO2-enhanced coal-bed methane recovery (CO2-ECBM) project. In this study, bituminous coal was fabricated based on the Wiser molecular model and its ultramicroporous parameters were evaluated; molecular simulations were established through Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) and Molecular Dynamic (MD) methods to study the effects of temperature, pressure, and species bulk mole fraction on the adsorption isotherms, adsorption selectivity, three distinct diffusion coefficients, and diffusivity selectivity of the binary mixture in the coal ultramicropores. It turns out that the absolute adsorption amount of each species in the mixture decreases as temperature increases, but increases as its own bulk mole fraction increases. The self-, corrected, and transport diffusion coefficients of pure CO2 and pure CH4 all increase as temperature or/and their own bulk mole fractions increase. Compared to CH4, the adsorption and diffusion of CO2 are preferential in the coal ultramicropores. Adsorption selectivity and diffusivity selectivity were simultaneously employed to reveal that the optimal injection depth for CO2-ECBM is 800-1000 m at 308-323 K temperature and 8.0-10.0 MPa. PMID:27518119

  8. Chlorine adsorption on the InAs (001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bakulin, A. V.; Eremeev, S. V.; Tereshchenko, O. E.; Kulkova, S. E.

    2011-01-15

    Chlorine adsorption on the In-stabilized InAs(001) surface with {zeta}-(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) and {beta}3 Prime -(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) reconstructions and on the Ga-stabilized GaAs (001)-{zeta}-(4 Multiplication-Sign 2) surface has been studied within the electron density functional theory. The equilibrium structural parameters of these reconstructions, surface atom positions, bond lengths in dimers, and their changes upon chlorine adsorption are determined. The electronic characteristics of the clean surface and the surface with adsorbed chlorine are calculated. It is shown that the most energetically favorable positions for chlorine adsorption are top positions over dimerized indium or gallium atoms. The mechanism of chlorine binding with In(Ga)-stabilized surface is explained. The interaction of chlorine atoms with dimerized surface atoms weakens surface atom bonds and controls the initial stage of surface etching.

  9. Surface conservation laws at microscopically diffuse interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kevin T; Bazant, Martin Z

    2007-11-01

    In studies of interfaces with dynamic chemical composition, bulk and interfacial quantities are often coupled via surface conservation laws of excess surface quantities. While this approach is easily justified for microscopically sharp interfaces, its applicability in the context of microscopically diffuse interfaces is less theoretically well-established. Furthermore, surface conservation laws (and interfacial models in general) are often derived phenomenologically rather than systematically. In this article, we first provide a mathematically rigorous justification for surface conservation laws at diffuse interfaces based on an asymptotic analysis of transport processes in the boundary layer and derive general formulae for the surface and normal fluxes that appear in surface conservation laws. Next, we use nonequilibrium thermodynamics to formulate surface conservation laws in terms of chemical potentials and provide a method for systematically deriving the structure of the interfacial layer. Finally, we derive surface conservation laws for a few examples from diffusive and electrochemical transport.

  10. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  11. Diffusion mediated localization on membrane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using the model of a cell membrane of a spherical surface in which membrane components may diffuse, the rate of localization due to trapping under diffusion control has been estimated by computing an analytical expression for the mean trapping time including the possibilities of a trapping probability less than one and/or the establishment of an equilibrium at the trap boundary.

  12. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-28

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C{sub 6}-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ∼0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. This in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001)

  13. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom inmore » the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).« less

  14. Adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on Ru(0001)-supported graphene: Large-scale first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yong; Evans, James W.

    2015-10-27

    Large-scale first-principles density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the adsorption and diffusion of Ru adatoms on monolayer graphene (G) supported on Ru(0001). The G sheet exhibits a periodic moiré-cell superstructure due to lattice mismatch. Within a moiré cell, there are three distinct regions: fcc, hcp, and mound, in which the C6-ring center is above a fcc site, a hcp site, and a surface Ru atom of Ru(0001), respectively. The adsorption energy of a Ru adatom is evaluated at specific sites in these distinct regions. We find the strongest binding at an adsorption site above a C atom in the fcc region, next strongest in the hcp region, then the fcc-hcp boundary (ridge) between these regions, and the weakest binding in the mound region. Behavior is similar to that observed from small-unit-cell calculations of Habenicht et al. [Top. Catal. 57, 69 (2014)], which differ from previous large-scale calculations. We determine the minimum-energy path for local diffusion near the center of the fcc region and obtain a local diffusion barrier of ~0.48 eV. We also estimate a significantly lower local diffusion barrier in the ridge region. These barriers and information on the adsorption energy variation facilitate development of a realistic model for the global potential energy surface for Ru adatoms. Furthermore, this in turn enables simulation studies elucidating diffusion-mediated directed-assembly of Ru nanoclusters during deposition of Ru on G/Ru(0001).

  15. Albumin adsorption on CoCrMo alloy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2015-12-01

    Proteins can adsorb on the surface of artificial joints immediately after being implanted. Although research studying protein adsorption on medical material surfaces has been carried out, the mechanism of the proteins’ adsorption which affects the corrosion behaviour of such materials still lacks in situ observation at the micro level. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on CoCrMo alloy surfaces was studied in situ by AFM and SKPFM as a function of pH and the charge of CoCrMo alloy surfaces. Results showed that when the specimens were uncharged, hydrophobic interaction could govern the process of the adsorption rather than electrostatic interaction, and BSA molecules tended to adsorb on the surfaces forming a monolayer in the side-on model. Results also showed that adsorbed BSA molecules could promote the corrosion process for CoCrMo alloys. When the surface was positively charged, the electrostatic interaction played a leading role in the adsorption process. The maximum adsorption occurred at the isoelectric point (pH 4.7) of BSA.

  16. Albumin adsorption on CoCrMo alloy surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu; Yang, Hongjuan; Su, Yanjing; Qiao, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Proteins can adsorb on the surface of artificial joints immediately after being implanted. Although research studying protein adsorption on medical material surfaces has been carried out, the mechanism of the proteins’ adsorption which affects the corrosion behaviour of such materials still lacks in situ observation at the micro level. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on CoCrMo alloy surfaces was studied in situ by AFM and SKPFM as a function of pH and the charge of CoCrMo alloy surfaces. Results showed that when the specimens were uncharged, hydrophobic interaction could govern the process of the adsorption rather than electrostatic interaction, and BSA molecules tended to adsorb on the surfaces forming a monolayer in the side-on model. Results also showed that adsorbed BSA molecules could promote the corrosion process for CoCrMo alloys. When the surface was positively charged, the electrostatic interaction played a leading role in the adsorption process. The maximum adsorption occurred at the isoelectric point (pH 4.7) of BSA. PMID:26673525

  17. Nanoscale topography influences polymer surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng; He, Chunlin; Stoykovich, Mark P; Schwartz, Daniel K

    2015-02-24

    Using high-throughput single-molecule tracking, we studied the diffusion of poly(ethylene glycol) chains at the interface between water and a hydrophobic surface patterned with an array of hexagonally arranged nanopillars. Polymer molecules displayed anomalous diffusion; in particular, they exhibited intermittent motion (i.e., immobilization and "hopping") suggestive of continuous-time random walk (CTRW) behavior associated with desorption-mediated surface diffusion. The statistics of the molecular trajectories changed systematically on surfaces with pillars of increasing height, exhibiting motion that was increasingly subdiffusive and with longer waiting times between diffusive steps. The trajectories were well-described by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of CTRW motion in the presence of randomly distributed permeable obstacles, where the permeability (the main undetermined parameter) was conceptually related to the obstacle height. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of interfacial transport in the presence of obstacles and on nanotopographically patterned surfaces. PMID:25621372

  18. The adsorption of aromatic acids onto the graphite basal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, David S.

    2003-06-01

    The adsorption of benzoic acid, toluic acid, and salicylic acid from solution onto the graphite basal surface has been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). A systematic study of these three related planar aromatic acids is conducted in order to observe the influence of the functional side-group upon adsorption. It is found that upon adsorption all three acids orient with the benzene ring parallel to the graphite surface. On the graphite terraces, the benzoic acid decoration follows a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode whereas toluic acid follows Volmer-Weber growth. Salicylic acid forms a fibrous aggregate network. In addition to the terraces, graphite steps and near-surface bulk defects are found to be important sites for adsorption. The AFM tip is used to create irreversible nanoscale modifications of adsorbate structures.

  19. Protein adsorption to organosiloxane surfaces studied by acoustic wave sensor.

    PubMed

    Cavic, B A; Thompson, M

    1998-10-01

    Surfaces of the two organosiloxanes, polymercaptopropylmethylsiloxane and octaphenylcyclotetrasiloxane, were prepared on the gold electrodes of thickness-shear mode acoustic wave sensors. Compounds containing the siloxane bond are important in the fabrication of medical implants. The flow-through adsorption of the proteins: human serum albumin, alpha-chymotripsinogen A, cytochrome c, fibrinogen, hemoglobin, immunoglobulin G and apo-transferrin to the two siloxane surfaces and a gold electrode were detected by acoustic network analysis. With the exception of minor wash-off by buffer flow, the adsorption of all proteins to the three surfaces is irreversible. Differences observed for the magnitudes of adsorption for the various cases are ascribed to the role played by molecular interactions at the liquid/solid interface. The results confirm that changes in series resonant frequencies caused by macromolecular adsorption differ significantly from the widely accepted "mass based" model usually employed to characterize the response of this type of acoustic wave device.

  20. IR surface electromagnetic-wave measurement of hydrogen adsorption and surface reconstruction on W(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Hanssen, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    Both the clean and hydrogen covered W(100) surfaces are probed with an inhomogenous electromagnetic mode which is bound to the metal surface. This Surface Electromagnetic Wave (SEW) is generated from a plane-wave spectrum by means of a grating directly etched into the metal surface. A second grating, spaced about 5 cm from the first, transforms the SEW back into a plane wave infrared beam. Near room temperature, the temperature dependence of the magnitude of the SEW signal agrees with the Drude model prediction using the d.c. resistivity. At high temperatures (>1000K) however, SEW signal is attenuated to such a large extent that plane wave radiation generated at the first grating can be detected as well. The first SEW spectrum of surface reconstruction was observed upon hydrogen adsorption on a W(100) sample maintained near room temperature. The reconstruction of the W(100)-H surface is checked and calibrated through LEED observations and thermal desorption measurements. The SEW signal is found to follow a sigmoid curve as a function of coverage. Intensity changes as large as 30% of the clean surface value occur as the state of the W(100)-H surface changes. This extreme sensitivity of the SEW attentuation length to surface reconstruction is shown to be consistent with changes in the diffuse surface scattering component of the conduction electron scattering time.

  1. Adsorption of ammonia on treated stainless steel and polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaittinen, O.; Metsälä, M.; Persijn, S.; Vainio, M.; Halonen, L.

    2014-05-01

    Adsorption of dynamically diluted ammonia at part-per-billion to low part-per-million concentrations in dry nitrogen was studied with treated and non-treated stainless steel and polymer test tubes. The treatments included electropolishing and two types of coatings based on amorphous silicon. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an external cavity diode laser operating in the near-infrared wavelength range was used to monitor the adsorption process in real time in continuous-flow conditions to obtain quantitative assessment of the adsorptive properties of the studied surfaces. The investigated polymers were all less adsorptive than any of the treated or non-treated stainless steel surfaces. Some of the commercial coatings reduced the adsorption loss of stainless steel by a factor of ten or more. Polyvinylidene fluoride was found to be superior (less adsorption) to the four other studied polymer coatings. The number of adsorbed ammonia molecules per surface area obtained at different ammonia gas phase concentrations was modeled with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The time behavior of the adsorption-desorption process occurring in the time scale of seconds and minutes was simulated with a simple kinetic model.

  2. Flexible star polymer chain adsorption by a flat surface: a molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenak, Siham; Guenachi, Aicha; Sabeur, Sid Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we have studied the adsorption of a single flexible star polymer chain by a flat surface. The molecular dynamics simulation has been validated for the case of a free star polymer chain using the diffusion experiment. The scaling laws found are in agreement with the Flory theory predictions and the Rouse model. For the adsorption, preliminary results were obtained for chains of different sizes N=31 to N=199 and different functionalities (f=3,4,6,8,10). For the case of semi-flexible star polymer chains, further investigation is needed to locate the critical point of adsorption when varying the potential interaction strength between the chain and the surface.

  3. Surface topography effects in protein adsorption on nanostructured carbon allotropes.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2013-04-16

    We report a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of protein adsorption on the surface of nanosized carbon allotropes, namely single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) considering both the convex outer surface and the concave inner surface, together with a graphene sheet for comparison. These systems are chosen to investigate the effect of the surface curvature on protein adsorption at the same surface chemistry, given by sp(2) carbon atoms in all cases. The simulations show that proteins do favorably interact with these hydrophobic surfaces, as previously found on graphite which has the same chemical nature. However, the main finding of the present study is that the adsorption strength does depend on the surface topography: in particular, it is slightly weaker on the outer convex surfaces of SWNT and is conversely enhanced on the inner concave SWNT surface, being therefore intermediate for flat graphene. We additionally find that oligopeptides may enter the cavity of common SWNT, provided their size is small enough and the tube diameter is large enough for both entropic and energetic reasons. Therefore, we suggest that proteins can effectively be used to solubilize in water single-walled (and by analogy also multiwalled) carbon nanotubes through adsorption on the outer surface, as indeed experimentally found, and to functionalize them after insertion of oligopeptides within the cavity of nanotubes of appropriate size. PMID:23517008

  4. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, Sylva; Bolanz, Ralph M; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Siddique, Jamal A; Komárek, Michael

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3-10), ionic strengths (0.001-0.1M KNO3), sorbate concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6)M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50-500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes.

  5. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, Sylva; Bolanz, Ralph M; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Siddique, Jamal A; Komárek, Michael

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3-10), ionic strengths (0.001-0.1M KNO3), sorbate concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6)M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50-500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes. PMID:27450335

  6. Molecular Simulation studies of adsorption of polymers on non-planar surfaces: Influence of surface characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, Abishek; Shim, Anne; Frost, Aquil; Lewnard, John; Kuppa, Vikram

    2015-03-01

    Molecular simulations are employed to investigate the adsorption of freely rotating polymer chains adsorbing on to non-planar surfaces. Adsorption studies on planar surfaces have been studied extensively and fairly well understood. However, in reality, surfaces are non-planar and cannot be represented using smooth surface models. We investigate the effect of surface characteristics on adsorption via molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo molecular simulations in the NVT ensemble. Both regular (uniform) and irregular (self-affine) roughness parameters are studied. The adsorbed polymer chains are characterized by density and orientation profiles, adsorbed fraction and chain topologies. Our results elucidate the extent to which surface roughness influences adsorption, in competition with other factors such as chain length and monomer-surface interaction. We also demonstrate how both adsorption and desorption can be controlled solely by tuning surface inhomogeneities.

  7. Adsorption of antimony onto iron oxyhydroxides: adsorption behavior and surface structure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuejun; Wu, Zhijun; He, Mengchang; Meng, Xiaoguang; Jin, Xin; Qiu, Nan; Zhang, Jing

    2014-07-15

    Antimony is detected in soil and water with elevated concentration due to a variety of industrial applications and mining activities. Though antimony is classified as a pollutant of priority interest by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and Europe Union (EU), very little is known about its environmental behavior and adsorption mechanism. In this study, the adsorption behaviors and surface structure of antimony (III/V) on iron oxides were investigated using batch adsorption techniques, surface complexation modeling (SCM), X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). The adsorption isotherms and edges indicated that the affinity of Sb(V) and Sb(III) toward the iron oxides depended on the Sb species, solution pH, and the characteristics of iron oxides. Sb(V) adsorption was favored at acidic pH and decreased dramatically with increasing pH, while Sb(III) adsorption was constant over a broad pH range. When pH is higher than 7, Sb(III) adsorption by goethite and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was greater than Sb(V). EXAFS analysis indicated that the majority of Sb(III), either adsorbed onto HFO or co-precipitated by FeCl3, was oxidized into Sb(V) probably due to the involvement of O2 in the long duration of sample preservation. Only one Sb-Fe subshell was filtered in the EXAFS spectra of antimony adsorption onto HFO, with the coordination number of 1.0-1.9 attributed to bidentate mononuclear edge-sharing ((2)E) between Sb and HFO.

  8. Particle tracking single protein-functionalized quantum dot diffusion and binding at silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rife, Jack C; Long, James P; Wilkinson, John; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2009-04-01

    We evaluate commercial QD585 and QD605 streptavidin-functionalized quantum dots (QDs) for single-particle tracking microscopy at surfaces using total internal reflectance fluorescence and measure single QD diffusion and nonspecific binding at silica surfaces in static and flow conditions. The QD diffusion coefficient on smooth, near-ideal, highly hydroxylated silica surfaces is near bulk-solution diffusivity, as expected for repulsive surfaces, but many QD trajectories on rougher, less-than-ideal surfaces or regions display transient adsorptions. We attribute the binding to defect sites or adsorbates, possibly in conjunction with protein conformation changes, and estimate binding energies from the transient adsorption lifetimes. We also assess QD parameters relevant to tracking, including hydrodynamic radius, charge state, signal levels, blinking reduction with reducing solutions, and photoinduced blueing and bleaching.

  9. Stochastic models for surface diffusion of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2014-07-28

    We derive a stochastic model for the surface diffusion of molecules, starting from the classical equations of motion for an N-atom molecule on a surface. The equation of motion becomes a generalized Langevin equation for the center of mass of the molecule, with a non-Markovian friction kernel. In the Markov approximation, a standard Langevin equation is recovered, and the effect of the molecular vibrations on the diffusion is seen to lead to an increase in the friction for center of mass motion. This effective friction has a simple form that depends on the curvature of the lowest energy diffusion path in the 3N-dimensional coordinate space. We also find that so long as the intramolecular forces are sufficiently strong, memory effects are usually not significant and the Markov approximation can be employed, resulting in a simple one-dimensional model that can account for the effect of the dynamics of the molecular vibrations on the diffusive motion.

  10. The adsorption of cesium on lanthanum hexaboride surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. R.; Swanson, L. W.; Chambers, S. A.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption/desorption characteristics of cesium on clean and oxygen-covered LaB6 (100) surfaces were studied using various surface analysis techniques. On the initially clean surface (phi = 2.77 eV), adsorption produces a minimum work function of 1.96 eV and a saturation work function of 2.07 eV. For the oxygen-saturated surface, the cesium adsorption curve shows no minimum, the lowest work function (1.35 eV) occurring at cesium saturation. The utility of LaB6 (100) as an emitter or collector in thermionic converter applications (particularly for space nuclear electric propulsion) is evaluated.

  11. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions.

  12. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  13. Adsorption of charged albumin subdomains on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2006-03-01

    We report some new molecular dynamics simulation results about the adsorption on a hydrophobic graphite surface of two albumin subdomains, each formed by three different alpha-helices, considering the correctly charged side groups at pH = 7 instead of the neutral ones as done in our previous exploratory paper (Raffaini and Ganazzoli, Langmuir 2003;19:3403-3412). We find that the presence of charges affects somewhat the initial adsorption stage on the electrostatically neutral surface, but not the final one. Thus, we recover the result that a monolayer of aminoacids is eventually formed, with a rough parallelism of distant strands to optimize both the intramolecular and the surface interactions. This feature is consistent with the adsorption on the hydrophobic surface being driven by dispersion forces only, and with the "soft" nature of albumin. Additional optimizations of the final monolayer carried out at pH = 3 and 11 do not modify appreciably this picture, suggesting that adsorption on graphite is basically independent of pH. The enhanced hydration of the final adsorption state due to the (delocalized) charges of the side groups is also discussed in comparison with similar results of the neutralized subdomains.

  14. Theory of quasicrystal surfaces: Probing the chemical reactivity by atomic and molecular adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajčí, M.; Hafner, J.

    The adsorption of oxygen and carbon atoms and of carbon monoxide molecules on a fivefold surface of icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystals has been investigated using ab initio density-functional calculations. The quasicrystalline surface has been modeled by periodically repeated slabs cut from rational approximants to the quasicrystalline structure. Atomic and molecular adsorption have been studied for a large number of possible adsorption sites by performing three-dimensional static relaxations of the adsorbate/substrate complex. Four different scenarios for the dissociative adsorption of the CO molecule have been investigated via nudged-elastic band calculations of the transition states. Al and Mn-metal atoms present at the surface bind C and O atoms rather strongly, while Pd atoms are unstable adsorption sites: during relaxation, the adsorbate drifts to the nearest strong-binding site. The chemical reactivity with respect to a CO molecule varies very strongly across the surface. The adsorption close to Mn sites is promoted by rather strong covalent effects, but CO is only physisorbed at Al sites via weak polarization forces. On the basis of the observed local variations of the adsorption strength, we develop scenarios for dissociation and determine the potential energy barriers for this processes. We find that CO adsorbed close to a transition-metal atom can dissociate via an activated process, but the dissociation rate is expected to be rather low because of a high dissociation barrier and a "late" transition state. CO adsorbed close to Al atoms will desorb before dissociation. Surface vacancies present as a consequence of the irregular coordination of the Mackay cluster in the quasiperiodic structure will act as strongly attractive traps for diffusing molecules. Mn surface atoms are located in the center of truncated Mackay clusters. In scanning tunneling electron microscopy (STM) these truncated clusters are imaged as "white flowers". Surface vacancies are

  15. Structural Determinants for Protein adsorption/non-adsorption to Silica Surface

    PubMed Central

    Mathé, Christelle; Devineau, Stéphanie; Aude, Jean-Christophe; Lagniel, Gilles; Chédin, Stéphane; Legros, Véronique; Mathon, Marie-Hélène; Renault, Jean-Philippe; Pin, Serge; Boulard, Yves; Labarre, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the interaction of proteins with inorganic surfaces is of major interest in both fundamental research and applications such as nanotechnology. However, despite intense research, the mechanisms and the structural determinants of protein/surface interactions are still unclear. We developed a strategy consisting in identifying, in a mixture of hundreds of soluble proteins, those proteins that are adsorbed on the surface and those that are not. If the two protein subsets are large enough, their statistical comparative analysis must reveal the physicochemical determinants relevant for adsorption versus non-adsorption. This methodology was tested with silica nanoparticles. We found that the adsorbed proteins contain a higher number of charged amino acids, particularly arginine, which is consistent with involvement of this basic amino acid in electrostatic interactions with silica. The analysis also identified a marked bias toward low aromatic amino acid content (phenylalanine, tryptophan, tyrosine and histidine) in adsorbed proteins. Structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations of proteins from the two groups indicate that non-adsorbed proteins have twice as many π-π interactions and higher structural rigidity. The data are consistent with the notion that adsorption is correlated with the flexibility of the protein and with its ability to spread on the surface. Our findings led us to propose a refined model of protein adsorption. PMID:24282583

  16. Water and Carbon Dioxide Adsorption at Olivine Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-11-14

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to simulate water and carbon dioxide adsorption at the (010) surface of five olivine minerals, namely, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), calcio-olivine (Ca2SiO4), tephroite (Mn2SiO4), fayalite (Fe2SiO4), and Co-olivine (Co2SiO4). Adsorption energies per water molecule obtained from energy minimizations varied from -78 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -128 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine at sub-monolayer coverage and became less exothermic as coverage increased. In contrast, carbon dioxide adsorption energies at sub-monolayer coverage ranged from -20 kJ mol-1 for fayalite to -59 kJ mol-1 for calcio-olivine. Therefore, the DFT calculations show a strong driving force for carbon dioxide displacement by water at the surface of all olivine minerals in a competitive adsorption scenario. Additionally, adsorption energies for both water and carbon dioxide were found to be more exothermic for the alkaline-earth (AE) olivines than for the transition-metal (TM) olivines and to not correlate with the solvation enthalpies of the corresponding divalent cations. However, a correlation was obtained with the charge of the surface divalent cation indicating that the more ionic character of the AE cations in the olivine structure relative to the TM cations leads to greater interactions with adsorbed water and carbon dioxide molecules at the surface and thus more exothermic adsorption energies for the AE olivines. For calcio-olivine, which exhibits the highest divalent cation charge of the five olivines, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations showed that this effect leads both water and carbon dioxide to react with the surface and form hydroxyl groups and a carbonate-like species, respectively.

  17. New method for the simultaneous determination of diffusion and adsorption of dyes in silica hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Perullini, Mercedes; Jobbágy, Matías; Japas, María Laura; Bilmes, Sara A

    2014-07-01

    The fine tuning of porosity in sol gel based devices makes possible the design of novel applications in which the transport of molecules through the oxide gel plays a crucial role. In this work we develop a new method for the simultaneous analysis of diffusion and adsorption of small diffusing probes, as anionic and cationic dyes, through silica mesoporous hydrogels synthesized by sol-gel. The novelty of the work resides in the simplicity of acquisition of the experimental data (by means of a desk scanner) and further mathematical modeling, which is in line with high throughput screening procedures, enabling rapid and simultaneous determination of relevant diffusion and adsorption parameters. Net mass transport and adsorption properties of the silica based hydrogels were contrasted to dye adsorption isotherms and textural characterization of the wet gels by SAXS, as well as that of the corresponding aerogels determined by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and N2 adsorption. Thus, the validation of the results with well-established characterization methods demonstrates that our approach is robust enough to give reliable physicochemical information on these systems.

  18. Diffusion and Surface Reaction in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiker, A.; Richarz, W.

    1978-01-01

    Ethylene hydrogenation on a platinum catalyst, electrolytically applied to a tube wall, is a good system for the study of the interactions between diffusion and surface reaction in heterogeneous catalysis. Theoretical background, apparatus, procedure, and student performance of this experiment are discussed. (BB)

  19. Unsaturated fatty acids in alkane solution: adsorption to steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Sarah M; Persson, Karin; Mueller, Gregor; Kronberg, Bengt; Clarke, Jim; Chtaib, Mohammed; Claesson, Per M

    2007-10-01

    The adsorption of the unsaturated fatty acids oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acid on steel surfaces has been investigated by means of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Two different solvents were used, n-hexadecane and its highly branched isomer, viz., 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane. The area occupied per molecule of oleic acid at 1 wt % corresponds to what is needed for adsorption parallel to the surface. At the same concentration, the adsorbed amount of linoleic acid and linolenic acid indicates that they adsorb in multilayers. The chemisorbed amount estimated from static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements was found to be similar for the three unsaturated fatty acids. In the case of linolenic acid, it was found that the presence of water significantly alters the adsorption, most likely because of the precipitation of fatty acid/water aggregates. Furthermore, static SIMS results indicate that the amount of water used here inhibits the chemisorption of linolenic acid.

  20. Thermodynamic, kinetic and conformational analysis of proteins diffusion-sorption on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Sanfeld, Albert; Royer, Catherine; Steinchen, Annie

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we examine particularly some of the more fundamental properties of protein conformational changes at a solid surface coupled with diffusion from the bulk of an aqueous solution and with the adsorption-desorption processes. We focus our attention on adsorbed protein monolayers upon a solid surface using a thermodynamic and kinetic analytical development. Account is also taken of the effects on the overall rate of the conformational change on a solid surface of deviation from ideality, of protein flexibility, of surface free energy and of interaction with reactive solid sites. Our theory applied to steady states is illustrated by examples such as folding-misfolding-unfolding of RNase and SNase on a solid surface after diffusion and adsorption from an aqueous solution. For this purpose, we put forward the determining steps which shall lead to the steady state. The existence of three situations is highlighted according to the values of the typical constants relevant for the protein considered: reaction rate determining step, diffusion and sorption determining steps, mixed adsorption diffusion and reaction rate. Finally, we have tried to link the developments of our theories to a large literature based on experimental results encountered during proteins diffusion-sorption-reaction processes, fundamental topics that has been since long investigated by Miller's team in MPKG.

  1. Water Adsorption on the LaMnO3 Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billman, Chris; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    Studying the adsorption of water on the metallic LaMnO3 surface can provide insight into this complicated surface-adsorbate interaction. Using density functional theory, we investigated the adsorption of a water monomer, dimer, trimer and a monolayer on the surface. The electronic structure of ground state configurations is explored using analysis of density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital overlap populations. We found that the interaction between the surface and water molecules is stronger than hydrogen bonding between molecules, which facilitates wetting of the surface. Adsorbed water molecules form very strong hydrogen bonds, with substantially shifted OH stretch modes. For the monolayer of adsorbed water, a hint of a bilayer is observed with a height separation of only 0.2 Å. However, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images and vibrational spectra suggest a significant difference between the two layers due to intermolecular bonding and interaction with the substrate.

  2. Water adsorption on the LaMnO3 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billman, Chris R.; Wang, Yan; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Studying the adsorption of water on the metallic LaMnO3 surface can provide insight into this complicated surface-adsorbate interaction. Using density functional theory, we investigated the adsorption of a water monomer, dimer, trimer, and a monolayer on the surface. The electronic structure of ground state configurations is explored using analysis of density of states, charge density, and crystal orbital overlap populations. We found that the interaction between the surface and water molecules is stronger than hydrogen bonding between molecules, which facilitates wetting of the surface. Adsorbed water molecules form very strong hydrogen bonds, with substantially shifted OH stretch modes. For the monolayer of adsorbed water, a hint of a bilayer is observed with a height separation of only 0.2 A˚. However, simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images and vibrational spectra suggest a significant difference between the two layers due to intermolecular bonding and interaction with the substrate.

  3. The adsorption and oxidation of cyanogen on copper surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, A. F.; Chinn, M.; Parkinson, C. R.

    2003-07-01

    The adsorption of cyanogen on clean and oxygen pre-treated graphite supported copper films, and a polycrystalline copper surface, and the co-adsorption of cyanogen and oxygen on graphite supported copper films, and a polycrystalline copper surface has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cyanogen dissociates on the copper surfaces at 300 K, yielding an adsorbed cyano group, CN (a). On the oxygen pre-treated copper surface cyanogen reacts quantitatively with the adsorbed oxygen at 300 K to form a surface cyanate species, NCO. On annealing to 600 K this species decomposes, leaving only N adatoms and residual adsorbed CN on the surface. The co-adsorption of cyanogen and oxygen from a cyanogen-oxygen mixture enhances the formation of NCO to the extent that all available surface oxygen is consumed to form NCO on annealing at 450 K. In the absence of available atomic surface oxygen NCO does not decompose at temperatures up to 600 K. NCO and NCO 2 are shown to be the intermediates in the oxidation of cyanogen on copper films and a polycrystalline copper foil.

  4. Diffusion of silver over atomically clean silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Ol'shanetskii, B. Z.

    2013-06-15

    The diffusion of silver the (111), (100), and (110) silicon surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The mechanisms of diffusion over the (111) and (110) surfaces are revealed, and the temperature dependences of diffusion coefficients are measured. An anisotropy of silver diffusion over the (110) surface is detected.

  5. A chemical equilibrium model for metal adsorption onto bacterial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Jeremy B.; Daughney, Christopher J.; Yee, Nathan; Davis, Thomas A.

    1997-08-01

    This study quantifies metal adsorption onto cell wall surfaces of Bacillus subtilis by applying equilibrium thermodynamics to the specific chemical reactions that occur at the water-bacteria interface. We use acid/base titrations to determine deprotonation constants for the important surface functional groups, and we perform metal-bacteria adsorption experiments, using Cd, Cu, Pb, and Al, to yield site-specific stability constants for the important metal-bacteria surface complexes. The acid/base properties of the cell wall of B. subtilis can best be characterized by invoking three distinct types of surface organic acid functional groups, with pK a values of 4.82 ± 0.14, 6.9 ± 0.5, and 9.4 ± 0.6. These functional groups likely correspond to carboxyl, phosphate, and hydroxyl sites, respectively, that are displayed on the cell wall surface. The results of the metal adsorption experiments indicate that both the carboxyl sites and the phosphate sites contribute to metal uptake. The values of the log stability constants for metal-carboxyl surface complexes range from 3.4 for Cd, 4.2 for Pb, 4.3 for Cu, to 5.0 for Al. These results suggest that the stabilities of the metal-surface complexes are high enough for metal-bacterial interactions to affect metal mobilities in many aqueous systems, and this approach enables quantitative assessment of the effects of bacteria on metal mobilities.

  6. Reversible Adsorption Kinetics of Near Surface Dimer Colloids.

    PubMed

    Salipante, Paul F; Hudson, Steven D

    2016-08-30

    We investigate the effect of shape on reversible adsorption kinetics using colloidal polystyrene dimers near a solid glass surface as a model system. The interaction between colloid and wall is tuned using electrostatic, depletion, and gravity forces to produce a double-well potential. The dwell time in each of the potential wells is measured from long duration particle trajectories. The height of each monomer relative to the glass surface is measured to a resolution of <20 nm by in-line holographic microscopy. The measured transition probability distributions are used in kinetic equations to describe the flux of particles to and from the surface. The dimers are compared to independent isolated monomers to determine the effects of shape on adsorption equilibria and kinetics. To elucidate these differences, we consider both mass and surface coverage and two definitions of surface coverage. The results show that dimers with single coverage produce slower adsorption, lower surface coverage, and higher mass coverage in comparison to those of monomers, while dimers with double coverage adsorb faster and result in higher surface coverage. PMID:27483023

  7. Numerical computation of diffusion on a surface

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Peter; Adalsteinsson, David; Colella, Phillip; Arkin, Adam Paul; Onsum, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    We present a numerical method for computing diffusive transport on a surface derived from image data. Our underlying discretization method uses a Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for computing the volume transport in a region consisting of all points a small distance from the surface. We obtain a representation of this region from image data by using a front propagation computation based on level set methods for solving the Hamilton–Jacobi and eikonal equations. We demonstrate that the method is second-order accurate in space and time and is capable of computing solutions on complex surface geometries obtained from image data of cells. PMID:16076952

  8. Numerical Computation of Diffusion on a Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Peter; Adalsteinsson, David; Colella, Phillip; Arkin, Adam Paul; Onsum, Matthew

    2005-02-24

    We present a numerical method for computing diffusive transport on a surface derived from image data. Our underlying discretization method uses a Cartesian grid embedded boundary method for computing the volume transport in region consisting of all points a small distance from the surface. We obtain a representation of this region from image data using a front propagation computation based on level set methods for solving the Hamilton-Jacobi and eikonal equations. We demonstrate that the method is second-order accurate in space and time, and is capable of computing solutions on complex surface geometries obtained from image data of cells.

  9. Differential adsorption of CHON isomers at interstellar grain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattelais, M.; Pauzat, F.; Ellinger, Y.; Ceccarelli, C.

    2015-06-01

    Context. The CHON generic chemical formula covers different isomers such as isocyanic acid (HNCO), cyanic acid (HOCN), fulminic acid (HCNO), and isofulminic acid (HONC); the first three have been identified in a large variety of environments in the interstellar medium (ISM). Several phenomena could be at the origin of the observed abundances, such as different pathways of formation and destruction involving gas phase reactions with different possible activation barriers and/or surface processes depending on the local temperature and the nature of the support. Aims: The scope of this article is to shed some light on the interaction of the CHON isomers with interstellar grains as a function of the nature of the surface and to determine the corresponding adsorption energies in order to find whether this phenomenon could play a role in the abundances observed in the ISM. Methods: The question was addressed by means of numerical simulations using first principle periodic density functional theory (DFT) to represent the grain support as a solid of infinite dimension. Results: Regardless of the nature of the model surface (water ice, graphene, silica), two different classes of isomers were identified: weakly bound (HNCO and HCNO) and strongly bound (HOCN and HONC), with the adsorption energies of the latter group being about twice those of the former. The range of the adsorption energies is (from highest to lowest) HOCN > HONC > HNCO > HCNO. They are totally disconnected from the relative stabilities, which range from HNCO > HOCN > HCNO > HONC. Conclusions: The possibility of hydrogen bonding is the discriminating factor in the trapping of CHON species on grain surfaces. Whatever the environment, differential adsorption is effective and its contribution to the molecular abundances should not be ignored. The theoretical adsorption energies provided here could be profitably used for a more realistic modeling of molecule-surfaces interactions.

  10. Surface silylation of natural mesoporous/macroporous diatomite for adsorption of benzene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenbin; Deng, Liangliang; Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Yuan, Weiwei; Liu, Peng; He, Hongping; Li, Zhaohui; Chen, Fanrong

    2015-06-15

    Naturally occurring porous diatomite (Dt) was functionalized with phenyltriethoxysilane (PTES), and the PTES-modified diatomite (PTES-Dt) was characterized using diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. After silylation, a functional group (-C6H5, phenyl) was successfully introduced onto the surface of Dt. PTES-Dt exhibited hydrophobic properties with a water contact angle (WCA) as high as 120°±1°, whereas Dt was superhydrophilic with a WCA of 0°. The benzene adsorption data on both Dt and PTES-Dt fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The Langmuir adsorption capacity of benzene on PTES-Dt is 28.1 mg/g, more than 4-fold greater than that on Dt. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics results show that equilibrium was achieved faster for PTES-Dt than for Dt, over the relative pressure range of 0.118-0.157. The excellent benzene adsorption performance of PTES-Dt is attributed to strong π-system interactions between the phenyl groups and the benzene molecules as well as to the macroporosity of the PTES-Dt. These results show that the silylated diatomite could be a new and inexpensive adsorbent suitable for use in benzene emission control. PMID:25792477

  11. Surface silylation of natural mesoporous/macroporous diatomite for adsorption of benzene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenbin; Deng, Liangliang; Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Yuan, Weiwei; Liu, Peng; He, Hongping; Li, Zhaohui; Chen, Fanrong

    2015-06-15

    Naturally occurring porous diatomite (Dt) was functionalized with phenyltriethoxysilane (PTES), and the PTES-modified diatomite (PTES-Dt) was characterized using diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. After silylation, a functional group (-C6H5, phenyl) was successfully introduced onto the surface of Dt. PTES-Dt exhibited hydrophobic properties with a water contact angle (WCA) as high as 120°±1°, whereas Dt was superhydrophilic with a WCA of 0°. The benzene adsorption data on both Dt and PTES-Dt fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The Langmuir adsorption capacity of benzene on PTES-Dt is 28.1 mg/g, more than 4-fold greater than that on Dt. Moreover, the adsorption kinetics results show that equilibrium was achieved faster for PTES-Dt than for Dt, over the relative pressure range of 0.118-0.157. The excellent benzene adsorption performance of PTES-Dt is attributed to strong π-system interactions between the phenyl groups and the benzene molecules as well as to the macroporosity of the PTES-Dt. These results show that the silylated diatomite could be a new and inexpensive adsorbent suitable for use in benzene emission control.

  12. Effect of surface strain on oxygen adsorption on Zr (0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xing; Khafizov, Marat; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2014-02-01

    The effect of surface strain on oxygen adsorption on Zr (0 0 0 1) surface is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that both surface strain and interactions between oxygen adsorbates influence the adsorption process. Oxygen binding to zirconium becomes stronger as the strain changes from compressive to tensile. When oxygen coverage is low and the oxygen interactions are negligible, surface face-centered cubic sites are the most stable for O binding. At high coverage and under compression, octahedral sites between second and third Zr layers become most favorable because the interactions between adsorbates are weakened by positive charge screening. Calculations with both single-layer adsorption model and multiple-layer adsorption model demonstrate that compressive strain at the Zr/oxide interface will provide a thermodynamic driving force for oxygen to incorporate from the surface into the bulk of Zr, while binding oxygen to the Zr surface will be easier when tensile strain is applied.

  13. Surface adsorption of Cs137 ions on quartz crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antkiw, Stephen; Waesche, H.; Senftle, F.

    1954-01-01

    Adsorption tests were made on four large synthetic and three natural quartz crystals to see if surface defects might be detected by subsequent autoradiography techniques. The adsorbent used was radioactive Cs137 in a solution of Cs 137Cl. Natural quartz crystals adsorbed more cesium than the synthetic crystals. Certain surface defects were made evident by this method, but twinning features could not be detected.

  14. Surface free energy analysis of adsorbents used for radioiodine adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-García, C. M.; Román, S.; González, J. F.; Sabio, E.; Ledesma, B.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the surface free energy of biomass-based activated carbons, both fresh and impregnated with triethylenediamine, has been evaluated. The contribution of Lifshitz van der Waals components was determined by the model proposed by van Oss et al. The results obtained allowed predicting the most probable configurations of the impregnant onto the carbon surface and its influence on the subsequent adsorption of radioactive methyl iodide.

  15. Zwitteration: Coating Surfaces with Zwitterionic Functionality to Reduce Nonspecific Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coating surfaces with thin or thick films of zwitterionic material is an effective way to reduce or eliminate nonspecific adsorption to the solid/liquid interface. This review tracks the various approaches to zwitteration, such as monolayer assemblies and polymeric brush coatings, on micro- to macroscopic surfaces. A critical summary of the mechanisms responsible for antifouling shows how zwitterions are ideally suited to this task. PMID:24754399

  16. Diffusing colloidal probes of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-25

    Measurements and analyses are reported to quantify dynamic and equilibrium interactions between colloidal particles and live cell surfaces using dark field video microscopy. Two-dimensional trajectories of micron-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated silica colloids relative to adherent epithelial breast cancer cell perimeters are determined allowing measurement of position dependent diffusivities and interaction potentials. PEG was chosen as the material system of interest to assess non-specific interactions with cell surfaces and establishes a basis for investigation of specific interactions in future studies. Analysis of measured potential energies on cell surfaces reveals the spatial dependence in cell topography. With the measured cell topography and models for particle-cell surface hydrodynamic interactions, excellent agreement is obtained between theoretical and measured colloidal transport on cell surfaces. Quantitative analyses of association lifetimes showed that PEG coatings act to stabilize colloids above the cell surface through net repulsive, steric interactions. Our results demonstrate a self-consistent analysis of diffusing colloidal probe interactions due to conservative and non-conservative forces to characterize biophysical cell surface properties. PMID:27117575

  17. Diffusing colloidal probes of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-25

    Measurements and analyses are reported to quantify dynamic and equilibrium interactions between colloidal particles and live cell surfaces using dark field video microscopy. Two-dimensional trajectories of micron-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated silica colloids relative to adherent epithelial breast cancer cell perimeters are determined allowing measurement of position dependent diffusivities and interaction potentials. PEG was chosen as the material system of interest to assess non-specific interactions with cell surfaces and establishes a basis for investigation of specific interactions in future studies. Analysis of measured potential energies on cell surfaces reveals the spatial dependence in cell topography. With the measured cell topography and models for particle-cell surface hydrodynamic interactions, excellent agreement is obtained between theoretical and measured colloidal transport on cell surfaces. Quantitative analyses of association lifetimes showed that PEG coatings act to stabilize colloids above the cell surface through net repulsive, steric interactions. Our results demonstrate a self-consistent analysis of diffusing colloidal probe interactions due to conservative and non-conservative forces to characterize biophysical cell surface properties.

  18. CO adsorption on cobalt: Prediction of stable surface phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunasooriya, G. T. Kasun Kalhara; van Bavel, Alexander P.; Kuipers, Herman P. C. E.; Saeys, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Adsorption is often described by a Langmuir isotherm, sometimes accounting for a gradual decrease in the adsorption energy with coverage. Using density functional theory, we show that CO adsorption on cobalt does not follow this typical behavior. Instead, adsorption on Co(0001) is dominated by two surface phases. At low pressures, the (√3 × √3)R30°-CO structure is the stable phase, and CO forms (√3 × √3)R30°-CO islands for coverages below 1/3 ML because of attractive CO-CO interactions. Increasing the pressure does not gradually increase the coverage beyond 1/3 ML. Instead, a transition to a high coverage (2√3 × 2√3)R30°-7CO surface structure occurs at 0.1 mbar at room temperature and at 21 bar at 500 K. These two phases are also the dominant structures that have been characterized experimentally on Co(0001), and the conditions where each phase was observed match the first principle surface phase diagram.

  19. Surface Analysis of 4-Aminothiophenol Adsorption at Polycrystalline Platinum Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Fachini, Estevao R.; Contes, Enid J.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2008-01-01

    Formation of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been studied by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Raman spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments give an idea about the packing quality of the monolayer. RAIR and Raman spectra for 4-ATP modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for neat 4-ATP indicating the adsorption of 4-ATP molecules on platinum surface. The adsorption on platinum was also evidenced by the presence of sulfur and nitrogen peaks by XPS survey spectra of the modified platinum electrodes. High resolution XPS studies and RAIR spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption gives up an amino terminated SAM. Thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses. Derivatization of 4-ATP SAM was performed using 16-Br hexadecanoic acid.

  20. Collective Surface Diffusion Measurements with the STM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tringides, Michael C.

    1996-03-01

    Time dependent processes in surface overlayers at finite coverage are described in terms of the collective diffusion coefficient D_c. Dc can be measured from the time dependent correlation function C(t), of an initial concentration fluctuation formed in a probe area A. C(t) follows a characteristic 1/D_ct time dependence at long times. The STM can be easily used^1 to measure C(t) and, therefore, Dc by monitoring the current fluctuations with the tip fixed over a location (i.e, by suspending the scanning process). The probe area A is defined by the tunneling region. Experiments on O/Si(111) at low coverage will be described that show a dramatic increase of the current fluctuations (when compared to the clean surface) with the addition of oxygen. The analysis of the current fluctuations obtained at different temperatures is consistent with the 1/D_ct form of the correlation function. This method of measuring collective surface diffusion has the unique advantage of ultrafast speed (limited only by the electronics) and can be used to test predictions about the statistical mechanics of surface diffusion in an ensemble of particles. * Ames Laboratory is operated for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-82. 1. M. L. Lozano and M. C. Tringides, Europhys. Lett. 30 , 537 (1995).

  1. Surface complexation modeling of Cu(II) adsorption on mixtures of hydrous ferric oxide and kaolinite

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Tracy J; Koretsky, Carla M; Landry, Christopher J; Schaller, Melinda S; Das, Soumya

    2008-01-01

    Background The application of surface complexation models (SCMs) to natural sediments and soils is hindered by a lack of consistent models and data for large suites of metals and minerals of interest. Furthermore, the surface complexation approach has mostly been developed and tested for single solid systems. Few studies have extended the SCM approach to systems containing multiple solids. Results Cu adsorption was measured on pure hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), pure kaolinite (from two sources) and in systems containing mixtures of HFO and kaolinite over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, sorbate/sorbent ratios and, for the mixed solid systems, using a range of kaolinite/HFO ratios. Cu adsorption data measured for the HFO and kaolinite systems was used to derive diffuse layer surface complexation models (DLMs) describing Cu adsorption. Cu adsorption on HFO is reasonably well described using a 1-site or 2-site DLM. Adsorption of Cu on kaolinite could be described using a simple 1-site DLM with formation of a monodentate Cu complex on a variable charge surface site. However, for consistency with models derived for weaker sorbing cations, a 2-site DLM with a variable charge and a permanent charge site was also developed. Conclusion Component additivity predictions of speciation in mixed mineral systems based on DLM parameters derived for the pure mineral systems were in good agreement with measured data. Discrepancies between the model predictions and measured data were similar to those observed for the calibrated pure mineral systems. The results suggest that quantifying specific interactions between HFO and kaolinite in speciation models may not be necessary. However, before the component additivity approach can be applied to natural sediments and soils, the effects of aging must be further studied and methods must be developed to estimate reactive surface areas of solid constituents in natural samples. PMID:18783619

  2. Ethanol adsorption on the Si (111) surface: First principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilenko, Alexander V.; Bonner, Carl E.; Gavrilenko, Vladimir I.

    2012-03-01

    Equilibrium atomic configurations and electron energy structure of ethanol adsorbed on the Si (111) surface are studied by the first principles density functional theory. Geometry optimization is performed by the total energy minimization method. Equilibrium atomic geometries of ethanol, both undissociated and dissociated, on the Si (111) surface are found and analysed. Reaction pathways and predicted transition states are discussed in comparison with available experimental data in terms of the feasibility of the reactions occurring. Analysis of atom and orbital resolved projected density of states indicates substantial modifications of the Si surface valence and conduction electron bands due to the adsorption of ethanol affecting the electronic properties of the surface.

  3. Initial Processes of Sulfur Adsorption on Si(100) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li; Wang, Jian-Guang; Wang, Guang-Hou

    2005-10-01

    The adsorption of one monolayer S atoms on ideal Si(100) surface is studied by using the self-consistent tight binding linear muffin-tin orbital method. Energies of adsorption systems of S atoms on different sites are calculated. It is found that the adsorbed S atoms are more favorable on B1 site (bridge site) with a distance 0.131 nm above the Si surface. The S, Si mixed layer might exist at S/Si(100) interface. The layer projected density of states are calculated and compared with that of the clean surface. The charge transfers are also investigated. The project supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 90206033 and 10274031

  4. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed.

  5. Molecular Modeling of Diffusion on a Crystalline PETN Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P; Khare, R; Gee, R H; Weeks, B L

    2007-07-13

    Surface diffusion on a PETN crystal was investigated by treating the surface diffusion as an activated process in the formalism of transition state theory. In particular, surface diffusion on the (110) and (101) facets, as well as diffusion between these facets, were considered. We successfully obtained the potential energy barriers required for PETN surface diffusion. Our results show that the (110) surface is more thermally active than the (101) surface and PETN molecules mainly diffuses from the (110) to (101) facet. These results are in good agreement with experimental observations and previous simulations.

  6. Reversible adsorption of hydrogen chloride to ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Stefan; Kippenberger, Matthias; Crowley, John

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen chloride is the most important reservoir of gaseous, reactive chlorine in the atmosphere. Although several laboratory investigations of the interaction of HCl with ice surfaces have been conducted, there is still great uncertainty associated with the adsorption isotherms of HCl on ice, which is largely a consequence of most previous studies being unable to work at concentrations relevant for the atmosphere and to explore the non-saturated part of the isotherm at sub-monolayer coverage. We have conducted experiments on HCl uptake on ice surfaces at temperatures between 190 and 220 K, using a coated wall flow tube. HCl at concentrations as low as 2 × 109 molecule cm3 (~10-8 Torr) was detected using a chemical-ionization, quadrupole mass spectrometer. The equilibrium surface coverage of HCl on ice could be interpreted using the Langmuir-model to derive partition coefficients (KLang). We find that the dissociative Langmuir isotherm describes our data significantly better than the non-dissociative type. Surprisingly, and in contrast to the behavior of the majority of traces-gases which adsorb reversibly on ice surfaces, the partition-coefficients we derive for HCl do not show a systematic dependence on temperature, precluding the simple derivation of an adsorption enthalpy and indicating the presence of more complex adsorption and desorption mechanisms for strong acids ionizing on the surface compared to H-bonded trace gases.

  7. Silver diffusion over silicon surfaces with adsorbed tin atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Olshanetskii, B. Z.

    2015-02-15

    Silver diffusion over the (111), (100), and (110) surfaces of silicon with preliminarily adsorbed tin atoms is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Diffusion is observed only on the surface of Si(111)-2√3 × 2√3-Sn. The diffusion mechanism is established. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends on the concentration of diffusing atoms. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing silver concentration, while the activation energy and the preexponential factor increase.

  8. Influence of pH and Surface Chemistry on Poly(L-lysine) Adsorption onto Solid Supports Investigated by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Linardy, Eric; Dreaden, Erik C; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Hammond, Paula T; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-08-20

    Poly(L-lysine) (PLL) adsorption onto various materials has been widely applied as a surface modification strategy and layer-by-layer fabrication method. Considering the role of electrostatic charges, a detailed understanding of the influence of solution pH on PLL adsorption process is important for optimization of PLL coating protocols. Herein, PLL adsorption onto different polar and hydrophilic substrates—silica, an amine-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold, and a carboxyl-terminated SAM on gold—across a range of pH conditions was investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. The adsorption kinetics consisted of an initial rapid phase, followed by a second phase where adsorption rate gradually decelerated. These features were interpreted by applying a mean-field kinetic model implying diffusion-limited adsorption in the first phase and reconfiguration of adsorbed PLL molecules in the second phase. The adsorption kinetics and uptake were found to be sensitive to the pH condition, surface chemistry, and flow rate. The strongest PLL adsorption occurred at pH 11 on all three surfaces while weak PLL adsorption generally occurred under acidic conditions. The surface morphology and roughness of adsorbed PLL layers were investigated using atomic force microscopy, and strong PLL adsorption is found to produce a uniform and smooth adlayer while weak adsorption formed a nonuniform and rough adlayer.

  9. Influence of pH and Surface Chemistry on Poly(L-lysine) Adsorption onto Solid Supports Investigated by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Linardy, Eric; Dreaden, Erik C; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Hammond, Paula T; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-08-20

    Poly(L-lysine) (PLL) adsorption onto various materials has been widely applied as a surface modification strategy and layer-by-layer fabrication method. Considering the role of electrostatic charges, a detailed understanding of the influence of solution pH on PLL adsorption process is important for optimization of PLL coating protocols. Herein, PLL adsorption onto different polar and hydrophilic substrates—silica, an amine-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold, and a carboxyl-terminated SAM on gold—across a range of pH conditions was investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. The adsorption kinetics consisted of an initial rapid phase, followed by a second phase where adsorption rate gradually decelerated. These features were interpreted by applying a mean-field kinetic model implying diffusion-limited adsorption in the first phase and reconfiguration of adsorbed PLL molecules in the second phase. The adsorption kinetics and uptake were found to be sensitive to the pH condition, surface chemistry, and flow rate. The strongest PLL adsorption occurred at pH 11 on all three surfaces while weak PLL adsorption generally occurred under acidic conditions. The surface morphology and roughness of adsorbed PLL layers were investigated using atomic force microscopy, and strong PLL adsorption is found to produce a uniform and smooth adlayer while weak adsorption formed a nonuniform and rough adlayer. PMID:26061703

  10. Effect of Polarity of Activated Carbon Surface, Solvent and Adsorbate on Adsorption of Aromatic Compounds from Liquid Phase.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsuru; Amano, Yoshimasa; Machida, Motoi; Imazeki, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, introduction of acidic functional groups onto a carbon surface and their removal were carried out through two oxidation methods and outgassing to investigate the adsorption mechanism of aromatic compounds which have different polarity (benzene and nitrobenzene). Adsorption experiments for these aromatics in aqueous solution and n-hexane solution were conducted in order to obtain the adsorption isotherms for commercial activated carbon (BAC) as a starting material, its two types of oxidized BAC samples (OXs), and their outgassed samples at 900 °C (OGs). Adsorption and desorption kinetics of nitrobenzene for the BAC, OXs and OGs in aqueous solution were also examined. The results showed that the adsorption of benzene molecules was significantly hindered by abundant acidic functional groups in aqueous solution, whereas the adsorbed amount of nitrobenzene on OXs gradually increased as the solution concentration increased, indicating that nitrobenzene can adsorb favourably on a hydrophilic surface due to its high dipole moment, in contrast to benzene. In n-hexane solution, it was difficult for benzene to adsorb on any sample owing to the high affinity between benzene and n-hexane solvent. On the other hand, adsorbed amounts of nitrobenzene on OXs were larger than those of OGs in n-hexane solution, implying that nitrobenzene can adsorb two adsorption sites, graphene layers and surface acidic functional groups. The observed adsorption and desorption rate constants of nitrobenzene on the OXs were lower than those on the BAC due to disturbance of diffusion by the acidic functional groups.

  11. Arginine Inhibits Adsorption of Proteins on Polystyrene Surface

    PubMed Central

    Shikiya, Yui; Tomita, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Nonspecific adsorption of protein on solid surfaces causes a reduction of concentration as well as enzyme inactivation during purification and storage. However, there are no versatile inhibitors of the adsorption between proteins and solid surfaces at low concentrations. Therefore, we examined additives for the prevention of protein adsorption on polystyrene particles (PS particles) as a commonly-used material for vessels such as disposable test tubes and microtubes. A protein solution was mixed with PS particles, and then adsorption of protein was monitored by the concentration and activity of protein in the supernatant after centrifugation. Five different proteins bound to PS particles through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and aromatic interactions, causing a decrease in protein concentration and loss of enzyme activity in the supernatant. Among the additives, including arginine hydrochloride (Arg), lysine hydrochloride, guanidine hydrochloride, NaCl, glycine, and glucose, Arg was most effective in preventing the binding of proteins to PS particles as well as activity loss. Moreover, even after the mixing of protein and PS particles, the addition of Arg caused desorption of the bound protein from PS particles. This study demonstrated a new function of Arg, which expands the potential for application of Arg to proteins. PMID:23967100

  12. A framework to analyze cerebral mean diffusivity using surface guided diffusion mapping in diffusion tensor imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Oh-Hun; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Sang-Won; Na, Duk L.; Lee, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    The mean diffusivity (MD) value has been used to describe microstructural properties in Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) in cortical gray matter (GM). Recently, researchers have applied a cortical surface generated from the T1-weighted volume. When the DTI data are analyzed using the cortical surface, it is important to assign an accurate MD value from the volume space to the vertex of the cortical surface, considering the anatomical correspondence between the DTI and the T1-weighted image. Previous studies usually sampled the MD value using the nearest-neighbor (NN) method or Linear method, even though there are geometric distortions in diffusion-weighted volumes. Here we introduce a Surface Guided Diffusion Mapping (SGDM) method to compensate for such geometric distortions. We compared our SGDM method with results using NN and Linear methods by investigating differences in the sampled MD value. We also projected the tissue classification results of non-diffusion-weighted volumes to the cortical midsurface. The CSF probability values provided by the SGDM method were lower than those produced by the NN and Linear methods. The MD values provided by the NN and Linear methods were significantly greater than those of the SGDM method in regions suffering from geometric distortion. These results indicate that the NN and Linear methods assigned the MD value in the CSF region to the cortical midsurface (GM region). Our results suggest that the SGDM method is an effective way to correct such mapping errors. PMID:26236180

  13. Diffusion-limited aggregation on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Crowdy, D.; Bazant, M. Z.

    2010-08-01

    We develop a general theory of transport-limited aggregation phenomena occurring on curved surfaces, based on stochastic iterated conformal maps and conformal projections to the complex plane. To illustrate the theory, we use stereographic projections to simulate diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on surfaces of constant Gaussian curvature, including the sphere (K>0) and the pseudo-sphere (K<0), which approximate "bumps" and "saddles" in smooth surfaces, respectively. Although the curvature affects the global morphology of the aggregates, the fractal dimension (in the curved metric) is remarkably insensitive to curvature, as long as the particle size is much smaller than the radius of curvature. We conjecture that all aggregates grown by conformally invariant transport on curved surfaces have the same fractal dimension as DLA in the plane. Our simulations suggest, however, that the multifractal dimensions increase from hyperbolic (K<0) to elliptic (K>0) geometry, which we attribute to curvature-dependent screening of tip branching.

  14. Adsorption of Amelogenin onto Self-Assembled and Fluoroapatite Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Lea, Alan S.; Bernt, William; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2009-02-19

    Abstract. The interactions of proteins at surfaces are of great importance to biomineralizaton processes and to the development and function of biomaterials. Amelogenin is a unique biomineralization protein because it self-assembles to form supramolecular structures called “nanospheres,” spherical aggregates of monomers that are 20-60 nm in diameter. Although the nanosphere quaternary structure has been observed in solution, the quaternary structure of amelogenin adsorbed onto surfaces is also of great interest because the surface structure is critical to its function. We report studies of the adsorption of the amelogenin onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with COOH and CH3 end group functionality and single crystal fluoroapatite (FAP). Dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments showed that the solutions contained nanospheres and aggregates of nanospheres. Protein adsorption onto the various substrates was evidenced by null ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and external reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ERFTIR). Although only nanospheres were observed in solution, ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated that the protein adsorbates were much smaller structures than the original nanospheres, from monomers to small oligomers in size. Monomer adsorption was promoted onto the CH3 surfaces and small oligomer adsorption was promoted onto the COOH and FAP substrates. In some cases, remnants of the original nanospheres adsorbed as multilayers on top of the underlying subnanosphere layers. This work suggests that amelogenin can adsorb by the “shedding” or disassembling of substructures from the nanospheres onto substrates and indicates that amelogenin may have a range of possible quaternary structures depending on whether it is in solution or interacting with surfaces.

  15. Surface-modified magnetic colloids for affinity adsorption of immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Fernanda; Pinho, Samantha C.; Zollner, Terezinha C. A.; Zollner, Ricardo L.; de Cuyper, Marcel; Santana, Maria Helena A.

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and in vitro adsorption tests of surface-modified magnetoliposomes for affinity binding of (i) anticardiolipin (isotype G) antibodies and (ii) specific isotype E antibodies generated by hypersensitivity reactions in humans with respiratory allergy. In the first case, cardiolipin embedded in the bilayer of magnetoliposomes was used as specific ligand. In the second case, antigenic proteins present in an extract of Dermatophagoids pteronyssinus and Blomia tropicalis mites were covalently coupled on the surface of magnetoliposomes via a diglycolic spacer arm, and used as specific ligands for IgE. Antibody adsorption was performed in a high-gradient magnetophoresis system, using either sera of healthy individuals or a pool of sera from autoimmune or allergic patients. The selectivity and capacity of the system were quantified by a frontal analysis in a capillary column, and by constructing breakthrough curves. The results show that the highest yield and selectivity were obtained if the ligand was extended into the aqueous layer surrounding the magnetoliposome surface. A 100% selectivity was obtained for adsorption of specific IgE, and 8% for IgG. These results demonstrate the potentialities of both types of surface-modified magnetic biocolloids in the field of in vitro diagnosis tests for allergic or autoimmune conditions.

  16. Atomic hydrogen adsorption on lithium-doped graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Allouche, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The effects of lithium doping of pristine and defective graphite surfaces on hydrogen adsorption are studied by the first-principles Plane-Wave Density Functional Theory. The surface defects are simulated by a single atomic vacancy. The DFT calculation is corrected for long-range effects through semi-empirical London terms for each constituent of the system. The lithium doping of the graphite surfaces notably reinforces hydrogen atom binding. Qualitative comparison with experimental results is given using the lithium 1s energy level shifts induced by the atomic vacancy and/or hydrogen trapping.

  17. Adsorption structure of water molecules on the Be(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yu; Li, Yanfang; Wang, Shuangxi; Zhang, Ping

    2014-06-07

    By using density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the adsorption of water molecules at different coverages on the Be(0001) surface. The coverage dependence of the prototype water structures and energetics for water adlayer growth are systematically studied. The structures, energetics, and electronic properties are calculated and compared with other available studies. Through our systematic investigations, we find that water molecules form clusters or chains on the Be(0001) surface at low coverages. When increasing the water coverage, water molecules tend to form a 2 × 2 hexagonal network on the Be(0001) surface.

  18. Study of Gas Adsorption on Biphasic Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader, Rami; Hamieh, Tayssir; Villieras, Frédéric; Angelina. Razafitianamaharav; Toufaily, Joumana; Mcheik, Ali S.; Thomas, Fabien

    This work has carried out on grafted nanoparticles oxide silica to determine the possible existence of "nanoeffect". The textural properties and heterogeneity of surface of the samples were studied at the interface solid-gas. The Geometric properties were discussed in terms of the surface area while the energy properties were discussed in terms of the reactive sites of the surface.In the framework of this study, firstly, the sample was used in the non-grafted state and then in the grafted state using a hydrophilic molecule and a hydrophobic molecule. Several techniques have been used: Infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction, the point by point volumetric technique, which enable us to study the interactions between the adsorbate and the solid surface. Finally we have determined the size and electro thermal mobility using zestasizer (Nano ZS). The results obtained show that there are two types of groups silanols and siloxanes on the silica OX5 giving a composite hydrophilic-hydrophobic. This character causes a singular behavior in adsorptive material, the presence of hydrophilic groups, strongly polarized, and is detected by infrared spectroscopy. These groups cause significant differences depending on the polarizability of the probe molecules, and the adsorption of argon shows no heterogeneity of the surface, while nitrogen is adsorbed on the polar sites at low relative pressure, While the volumetric continues to adsorption of argon and nitrogen on combustion silica to obtain and to highlight sites of high energy and polar surface sites. The combustion silica which has been used as adsorbent in this study has an amorphous surface, virtually free of impurities indicates that the sample is not micro porous and grafting of the molecules makes a decrease in high energy sites or to a relative increase in surface low energy.

  19. Adsorption of Te on the Si(001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Prasenjit; Batra, Inder P.; Grein, C. H.; Fong, C. Y.; Ciraci, S.

    2001-03-01

    To understand the interface between CdTe and Si and to reveal the atomistic mechanism for the surfactant behavior of adsorbed Te we have investigated the adsorption of Te on the Si(001) surface. This interface is also of crucial importance in developing CdTe/Si as a composite substance for the growth of HgCdTe. We carried out first-principles plane wave calculations within density-functional theory. The adsorption sites and corresponding binding energies are calculated on fully relaxed geometries by using the conjugate gradient method. We found that, at monolayer coverage, Te adatoms do not dimerize. At very low coverage, the top site above the Si-Si surface dimer bond is energetically favorable relative to cave, hollow and bridge sites. Finally, the atomistic mechanism of the surfactant role of Te has been investigated by finite temperature ab-initio molecular dynamics calculations.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Simulation of Water Vapor Adsorption and Diffusion in Shale Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Cihan, A.; Wan, J.; Zheng, L.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in deep horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have lead to large increases in production from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. Despite the success of this technology, uncertainties associated with basic transport processes require understanding in order to improve efficiency and minimize environmental impacts. The hydraulic fracturing process introduces large volumes of water into shale gas reservoirs. Most of the fracturing water remains in reservoirs to interfere with gas production. The quantification of the amount of water retained in shale gas reservoirs is crucial for predicting gas shale formation productivity and for optimizing extraction conditions. In this study, water vapor adsorption isotherms were gravimetrically measured on granular fractions of Woodford formation shales sieved after crushing. The isotherms were obtained at 30℃ and 50℃, for relative humidities from 11.1% to 97.0%. Water adsorption in these shale grains conformed to the typeⅡisotherm, and were nearly identical for the two experimental temperatures. In order to better understand the isotherms, a computational model based on the Maxwell-Stefan Diffusion equations (MSDM) was constructed to analyze the water adsorption and gas diffusion in shale grains. Based on the experimental results, the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) isotherm model for gas adsorption was included in the model.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption and diffusion of gases in silicon-carbide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Malek, Kourosh; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are new materials with excellent properties, such as high thermal stability and mechanical strength, which are much improved over those of their carboneous counterparts, namely, carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Gas separation processes at high temperatures and pressures may be improved by developing mixed-matrix membranes that contain SiCNTs. Such nanotubes are also of interest in other important processes, such as hydrogen production and its storage, as well as separation by supercritical adsorption. The structural parameters of the nanotubes, i.e., their diameter, curvature, and chirality, as well as the interaction strength between the gases and the nanotubes' walls, play a fundamental role in efficient use of the SiCNTs in such processes. We employ molecular dynamics simulations in order to examine the adsorption and diffusion of N(2), H(2), CO(2), CH(4), and n-C(4)H(10) in the SiCNTs, as a function of the pressure and the type of the nanotubes, namely, the zigzag, armchair, and chiral tubes. The simulations indicate the strong effect of the nanotubes' chirality and curvature on the pressure dependence of the adsorption isotherms and the self-diffusivities. Detailed comparison is made between the results and those for the CNTs. In particular, we find that the adsorption capacity of the SiCNTs for hydrogen is higher than the CNTs' under the conditions that we have studied.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of adsorption and diffusion of gases in silicon-carbide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Kourosh; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) are new materials with excellent properties, such as high thermal stability and mechanical strength, which are much improved over those of their carboneous counterparts, namely, carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Gas separation processes at high temperatures and pressures may be improved by developing mixed-matrix membranes that contain SiCNTs. Such nanotubes are also of interest in other important processes, such as hydrogen production and its storage, as well as separation by supercritical adsorption. The structural parameters of the nanotubes, i.e., their diameter, curvature, and chirality, as well as the interaction strength between the gases and the nanotubes' walls, play a fundamental role in efficient use of the SiCNTs in such processes. We employ molecular dynamics simulations in order to examine the adsorption and diffusion of N2, H2, CO2, CH4, and n-C4H10 in the SiCNTs, as a function of the pressure and the type of the nanotubes, namely, the zigzag, armchair, and chiral tubes. The simulations indicate the strong effect of the nanotubes' chirality and curvature on the pressure dependence of the adsorption isotherms and the self-diffusivities. Detailed comparison is made between the results and those for the CNTs. In particular, we find that the adsorption capacity of the SiCNTs for hydrogen is higher than the CNTs' under the conditions that we have studied.

  3. Defect-Mediated Lithium Adsorption and Diffusion on Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoli; Wang, Zhiguo; Fu, Y. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Monolayer Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its high capacities. In this work, first principle calculations based on spin density functional theory were performed to investigate adsorption and diffusion of lithium on monolayer MoS2 with defects, such as single- and few-atom vacancies, antisite, and grain boundary. The values of adsorption energies on the monolayer MoS2 with the defects were increased compared to those on the pristine MoS2. The presence of defects causes that the Li is strongly bound to the monolayer MoS2 with adsorption energies in the range between 2.81 and 3.80 eV. The donation of Li 2s electron to the defects causes an enhancement of adsorption of Li on the monolayer MoS2. At the same time, the presence of defects does not apparently affect the diffusion of Li, and the energy barriers are in the range of 0.25–0.42 eV. The presence of the defects can enhance the energy storage capacity, suggesting that the monolayer MoS2 with defects is a suitable anode material for the Li-ion batteries. PMID:26692345

  4. Adsorption and desorption studies of cesium on sapphire surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, K.R.; Ing, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption were studied using combined surface analytical techniques. An approximate initial sticking coefficient for Cs on sapphire was measured using reflection mass spectrometry and found to be 0.9. Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometry (TDMS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) were used to verify that a significant decrease in sticking coefficient occurs as the Cs coverage reaches a critical submonolayer value. TDMS analysis demonstrates that Cs is stabilized on a clean sapphire surface at temperatures (1200 K) in excess of the temperatures experienced by sapphire in a TOPAZ-2 thermionic fuel element (TFE). Surface contaminants on sapphire can enhance Cs adsorption relative to the clean surface. C contamination eliminates the high temperature state of Cs desorption found on clean sapphire but shifts the bulk of the C desorption from 400 to 620 K. Surface C is a difficult contaminant to remove from sapphire, requiring annealing above 1400 K. Whether Cs is stabilized on sapphire in a TFE environment will most likely depend on relation between surface contamination and surface structure.

  5. Surface Modifications by Field Induced Diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Martin; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    By applying a voltage pulse to a scanning tunneling microscope tip the surface under the tip will be modified. We have in this paper taken a closer look at the model of electric field induced surface diffusion of adatoms including the van der Waals force as a contribution in formations of a mound on a surface. The dipole moment of an adatom is the sum of the surface induced dipole moment (which is constant) and the dipole moment due to electric field polarisation which depends on the strength and polarity of the electric field. The electric field is analytically modelled by a point charge over an infinite conducting flat surface. From this we calculate the force that cause adatoms to migrate. The calculated force is small for voltage used, typical 1 pN, but due to thermal vibration adatoms are hopping on the surface and even a small net force can be significant in the drift of adatoms. In this way we obtain a novel formula for a polarity dependent threshold voltage for mound formation on the surface for positive tip. Knowing the voltage of the pulse we then can calculate the radius of the formed mound. A threshold electric field for mound formation of about 2 V/nm is calculated. In addition, we found that van der Waals force is of importance for shorter distances and its contribution to the radial force on the adatoms has to be considered for distances smaller than 1.5 nm for commonly used voltages. PMID:22253894

  6. Water adsorption on etched hydrophobic surfaces of L-, D- and DL-valine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, J. J.; Verdaguer, A.; Fraxedas, J.

    2014-03-01

    The adsorption of water on etched (001) surfaces of L-, D- and DL-valine crystals has been characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) using different operational modes (contact, non-contact and electrostatic) above and below the dew point, the temperature at which water vapor from humid air condenses into liquid water at constant atmospheric pressure. The analysis of the images suggests the formation of aggregates of solvated valine molecules that easily diffuse on the hydrophobic terraces only constrained by step barriers of the well-defined chiral parallelepipedic patterns induced by the etching process.

  7. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities.

  8. DNA adsorption onto calcium aluminate and silicate glass surfaces.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Krista; Flick, Lisa; Hall, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A common technique for small-scale isolation of genomic DNA is via adsorption of the DNA molecules onto a silica scaffold. In this work, the isolation capacities of calcium aluminate based glasses were compared against a commercially available silica scaffold. Silica scaffolds exhibit a negative surface at the physiological pH values used during DNA isolation (pH 5-9), while the calcium aluminate glass microspheres exhibit a positive surface charge. Isolation data demonstrates that the positively charged surface enhanced DNA adsorption over the negatively charged surface. DNA was eluted from the calcium aluminate surface by shifting the pH of the solution to above its IEP at pH 8. Iron additions to the calcium aluminate glass improved the chemical durability without compromising the surface charge. Morphology of the glass substrate was also found to affect DNA isolation; 43-106 μm diameter soda lime silicate microspheres adsorbed a greater quantity of genomic DNA than silica fibers with an average diameter of ∼2 μm.

  9. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins

  10. Polyamide-thallium selenide composite materials via temperature and pH controlled adsorption-diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanauskas, Remigijus; Samardokas, Linas; Mikolajunas, Marius; Virzonis, Darius; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2014-10-01

    Composite materials based on III-VI elements are promising in designing efficient photoelectronic devices, such as thin film organic-inorganic solar cells. In this work, TlSe composite materials were synthesized on a model polymer polyamide using temperature and pH controlled adsorption-diffusion method via (a) selenization followed by (b) the exposure to the group III metal (Tl) salt solution and their surface morphological, chemical and crystalline phase information was determined with particular focus on their corresponding structure-optical property relationship. XRD analysis yielded a complex crystalline phase distribution which correlated well with the optical and surface morphological properties measured. pH 11.3 and 80 °C yielded well defined, low structural disorder composite material surface. After annealing in N2 at 100 °C, polycrystalline PA-TlxSey composite materials yielded a single TlSe phase due to the enhanced diffusion and reaction of thallium ions into the polymer. The method described here can be used to synthesize variety of binary III-VI compounds diffused into the polymer at relatively low temperatures and low overall cost, thus providing for a flexible synthesis route for novel composite solar energy harvesting materials.

  11. DFT modelling of hydrogen sulphide adsorption on α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Frank; Stashans, Arvids

    2016-05-01

    Density functional theory has been used to predict properties of hydrogen sulphide, H2S, adsorption on the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface. Five energetically most favourable adsorption configurations have been selected for the study. Our work reveals adsorption geometries as well as discusses electronic and magnetic properties of the adsorbate on chromium oxide surface. It is shown that two different adsorption types, namely molecular adsorption and dissociative adsorption, can take place leading to two sets of adsorption energies. The most favourable arrangement is found to correspond to the case of dissociative adsorption with molecular hydrogen forming OH group at the α-Cr2O3 (0001) surface. Initial geometry for the adsorption configurations

  12. Halogens on Semiconductor Surfaces: Adsorption, Oxidation, and Etching.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepniak, Frank

    This dissertation presents studies of Si, GaAs, and InP surfaces following exposure to the halogens Cl _2 and Br_2. Synchrotron radiation photoemission is used to investigate the oxidation states of Si near the Si/SiO_2 interface as a function of Cl_2 exposure. Oxidation of highly ordered surfaces shows no dependence of the oxidation state concentration on Cl_2 inclusion in the gas mixture. For less-than-ideal Si surfaces, oxidation with O_2 -only results in a broader transition region, and presumably, inferior electrical properties. The addition of Cl_2 in the oxidizing gas reduced the concentration of intermediate oxides by a factor of two for these disordered starting Si surfaces. A new feature is also measured from Cl-Si bonds that we associate with passivation of Si defects at the oxide interface. The adsorption and reactivity of Br_2 and Cl_2 on GaAs(110) and InP(110) was studied in the temperature range of 25 K < T < 625 K with photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Initial halogen adsorption was dissociative at all temperatures and we find that a simple model where the halogen atoms bond to a single Ga or As surface site can not account for the complex surface chemistry and morphology. Thermally-activated etching was observed after warming a surface with chemisorbed Br or Cl. Etching resulted from the formation and eventual temperature dependent desorption of the trihalides of Ga and As. For halogen exposures where T < 650 K, monohalide-like surface bonding persist during the etching process and the etched surface is rough. For T > 700 K, the surface is essentially free of halogen and etching occurs in a nearly layer-by-layer fashion.

  13. Zinc isotope fractionation during surface adsorption by bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafantaris, F. A.; Borrok, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The cycling and transport of zinc (Zn) in natural waters is partly controlled by its adsorption and uptake by bacterial communities. These reactions are reflected in changes in the ratios of stable Zn isotopes; however, the magnitudes and directions of these changes are largely unconstrained. In the current work, we attempt to define Zn isotope fractionation factors for bacteria-Zn interactions by performing adsorption experiments with representative Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Pseudomonas mendocina) bacteria. Experiments included, (1) pH-dependent adsorption using differing bacteria:Zn ratios, (2) Zn loading at constant pH, and (3) kinetics and reversibility experiments. Results indicate that Zn adsorption is fully reversible for both bacterial species. Moreover, under the same experimental conditions both bacterial species adsorbed Zn to similar extents. Initial isotopic analysis (using a Nu Instruments MC-ICP-MS) demonstrates that, as the extent of adsorption increases, the heavier Zn isotopes are preferentially incorporated as bacterial-surface complexes. Under conditions of low bacteria:Zn ratio, the Δ66Znbacteria-solution was about 0.3% for both bacterial species. This separation factor is similar to that found in other studies involving the complexation of Zn with biologic or organic components. For example, the complexation of Zn with Purified Humic Acid (PHA) resulted in a Δ66ZnPHA-solution of +0.24% [1], and sorption of Zn onto two separate diatom species resulted in Δ66Znsolid-solution of +0.43% and +0.27%, respectively [2]. These results suggest that Zn complexation with functional groups common to bacteria and natural organic matter may be a process that universally incorporates the heavier Zn isotopes. Our current work is focused on quantifying Zn isotope fractionation during metabolic incorporation by separating this effect from surface adsorption reactions. [1] Jouvin et al., (2009) Environ. Sci. Technol., 43(15) 5747

  14. Enhanced laminin adsorption on nanowires compared to flat surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hammarin, Greger; Persson, Henrik; Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Prinz, Christelle N

    2014-10-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are widely used to interface living cells, and numerous nanowire-based devices have been developed to manipulate or sense cell behavior. We have, however, little knowledge on the nature of the cell-nanowire interface. Laminin is an extracellular matrix protein promoting cell attachment and growth. Here, we used a method based on fluorescence microscopy and measured the relative amount of laminin adsorbed on nanowires compared to flat surfaces. The amount of adsorbed laminin per surface area is up to 4 times higher on 55nm diameter gallium phosphide nanowires compared to the flat gallium phosphide surface between the nanowires. We show that this enhanced adsorption on nanowires cannot be attributed to electrostatic effects, nor to differences in surface chemistry, but possibly to pure geometrical effects, as increasing the nanowire diameter results in a decreased amount of adsorbed protein. The increased adsorption of laminin on nanowires may explain the exceptionally beneficial properties of nanowire substrates for cellular growth reported in the literature since laminin is often used as surface coating prior to cell cultures in order to promote cell growth, and also because primary cell suspensions contain endogenous laminin.

  15. The mathematical model of dye diffusion and adsorption on modified cellulose with triazine derivatives containing cationic and anionic groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, K.; Hou, A.; Chen, Y.

    2008-02-01

    Cellulose fabric is chemically modified with the compounds containing cationic and anionic groups. The molecular chains of modified cellulose have both cationic and anionic groups. Dye diffusion properties on modified cellulose are discussed. The dye adsorption and diffusion on modified cellulose are higher than those on unmodified cellulose. The diffusion properties of dyes at different temperature are discussed. Compared with unmodified cellulose, the diffusion processing of dyes in the modified cotton cellulose shows significant change.

  16. Molecular Simulations of Adsorption and Diffusion of RDX in IRMOF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Xong, Ruichang Xong; Fern, Jared T.; Keffer, David J.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Nicholson, Don M

    2009-01-01

    In order to test the feasibility of using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to pre-concentrate explosive molecules for detection, molecular simulations of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) within IRMOF-1 were performed. Grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations were used to generate adsorption isotherms for pure RDX, RDX in dry air, and RDX in wet air. In addition to the isotherms, the GCMC simulations provide adsorption energies and density distributions of the adsorbates within the MOF. Molecular dynamics simulations calculate diffusivities and provide a detailed understanding of the change in conformation of the RDX molecule upon adsorption. The presence of dry air has little influence on the amount of RDX that adsorbs. The presence of wet air increases the amount of RDX that adsorbs due to favorable interactions between RDX and water. We found a Henry's law constant of 21.2 mol/kg/bar for both pure RDX and RDX in dry air. The RDX adsorption sites are located (i) in big cages, (ii) near a vertex, and (iii) between benzene rings. The energy of adsorption of RDX at infinite dilution was found to be - 9.2 kcal/mol. The distributions of bond lengths, bond angles and torsion angles in RDX are uniformly slightly broader in the gas phase than in the adsorbed phase, but not markedly so. The self-diffusivity of RDX in IRMOF-1 is a strong function of temperature, with an activation energy of 6.0 kcal/mol.

  17. Structural phases of adsorption for flexible polymers on nanocylinder surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gross, Jonathan; Vogel, Thomas; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-11-11

    By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations, we investigate the thermodynamic behavior of a flexible, elastic polymer model in the presence of an attractive nanocylinder. We systematically identify the structural phases that are formed by competing monomer-monomer and monomer-substrate interactions. The influence of the relative surface attraction strength on the structural phases in the hyperphase diagram, parameterized by cylinder radius and temperature, is discussed as well. In the limiting case of the infinitely large cylinder radius, our results coincide with previous outcomes of studies of polymer adsorption on planar substrates.

  18. Density functional theory study of mercury adsorption on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Steckel, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Density functional theory _DFT_ calculations are used to characterize the interaction of mercury with copper, nickel, palladium, platinum, silver, and gold surfaces. Mercury binds relatively strongly to all the metal surfaces studied, with binding energies up to _1 eV for Pt and Pd. DFT calculations underestimate the energy of adsorption with respect to available experimental data. Plane-wave DFT results using the local density approximation and the Perdew-Wang 1991 and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrizations of the generalized gradient approximation indicate that binding of mercury at hollow sites is preferred over binding at top orbridge sites. The interaction with mercury in order of increasing reactivity over the six metals studied is Ag_Au_Cu_Ni_Pt_Pd. Binding is stronger on the _001_ faces of the metal surfaces, where mercury issituated in fourfold hollow sites as opposed to the threefold hollow sites on _111_ faces. In general, mercury adsorption leads to decreases in the work function; adsorbate-induced work function changes are particularly dramatic on Pt.

  19. Density functional theory study of mercury adsorption on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Steckel, Janice A.

    2008-03-10

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to characterize the interaction of mercury with copper, nickel, palladium, platinum, silver, and gold surfaces. Mercury binds relatively strongly to all the metal surfaces studied, with binding energies up to ~1eV for Pt and Pd. DFT calculations underestimate the energy of adsorption with respect to available experimental data. Plane-wave DFT results using the local density approximation and the Perdew-Wang 1991 and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrizations of the generalized gradient approximation indicate that binding of mercury at hollow sites is preferred over binding at top or bridge sites. The interaction with mercury in order of increasing reactivity over the six metals studied is Agsurfaces, where mercury is situated in fourfold hollow sites as opposed to the threefold hollow sites on (111) faces. Finally, in general, mercury adsorption leads to decreases in the work function; adsorbate-induced work function changes are particularly dramatic on Pt.

  20. Diffusion of adatoms on face-centered cubic transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.

    1994-05-10

    Mechanisms and associated energetics for adatom diffusion on the (100) and (110) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag are investigated. Self-diffusion was studied on (100) and (I 10) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Pd and Ag using corrected effective medium method (CEM) and approximation to CEM used for molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo studies (MD/MC-CEM). Self-diffusion on Pd(100), Ag(100), Ni(110), Cu(110), Pd(110), and Ag(110) is accomplished by classical diffusion: the adatom hops from its equilibrium adsorption site over an intervening bridge site to an adjacent equilibrium site. Self-diffusion on Ni(100) and Cu(100) proceeds by atomic-exchange diffusion: the adatom on the surface displaces an atom in the first surface layer. Aside from explicit inclusion of the kinetic-exchange-correlation energy, it is critical to include enough movable atoms in the calculation to insure correct energetics. Distortions induced by these diffusion mechanisms, especially atomic exchange, are long ranged in surface plane, owing to small distortions of many atoms being energetically favored over large distortions of few atoms. Energetics and rates of heterogeneous adatom diffusion on the (100) surfaces of Ni, Cu, Rh, Pd, and Ag show that the final state energies differ due to variation of metallic bonding with coordination for different types of metal atoms. The surface energies of the 2 metals can be used to correlate the amount of energy gained or released when the adatom displaces a surface atom. This difference in energetic stability of final configurations determines whether bridge hopping diffusion or atomic displacement is the dominant kinetic process in these heterogeneous systems.

  1. Study of DNA adsorption on mica surfaces using a surface force apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Yajing; Tan, Qiyan; Wu, Gensheng; Si, Wei; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-02-01

    We report our studies on the adsorption properties of double-stranded DNA molecules on mica surfaces in a confined environment using a surface force apparatus. Specifically, we studied the influence of cation species and concentrations on DNA adsorption properties. Our results indicated that divalent cations (Mg2+ and Co2+) preferred to form uniform and moderately dense DNA layers on a mica substrate. By measuring the interactions between DNA-coated mica and bare mica in an aqueous solution, obvious adhesion was observed in a cobalt chloride solution, possibly due to the ion-correlation attraction between negatively charged DNA and the mica surface. Furthermore, the interaction differences that were observed with MgCl2 and CoCl2 solutions reveal that the specific adsorption behaviors of DNA molecules on a mica substrate were mediated by these two salts. Our results are helpful to elucidate the dynamics of DNA binding on a solid substrate.

  2. Study of DNA adsorption on mica surfaces using a surface force apparatus.

    PubMed

    Kan, Yajing; Tan, Qiyan; Wu, Gensheng; Si, Wei; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-02-13

    We report our studies on the adsorption properties of double-stranded DNA molecules on mica surfaces in a confined environment using a surface force apparatus. Specifically, we studied the influence of cation species and concentrations on DNA adsorption properties. Our results indicated that divalent cations (Mg(2+) and Co(2+)) preferred to form uniform and moderately dense DNA layers on a mica substrate. By measuring the interactions between DNA-coated mica and bare mica in an aqueous solution, obvious adhesion was observed in a cobalt chloride solution, possibly due to the ion-correlation attraction between negatively charged DNA and the mica surface. Furthermore, the interaction differences that were observed with MgCl2 and CoCl2 solutions reveal that the specific adsorption behaviors of DNA molecules on a mica substrate were mediated by these two salts. Our results are helpful to elucidate the dynamics of DNA binding on a solid substrate.

  3. A Relation for Nanodroplet Diffusion on Smooth Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu; Huang, Jizu; Li, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the diffusion of nanodroplets on smooth surfaces through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and theoretical analyses. Molecular dynamics simulations show that nanodroplet surface diffusion is different from that of single molecules and solid particles. The dependence of nanodroplet diffusion coefficient on temperature undergoes a transition from linear to nonlinear as the surface wettability is weakened due to the coupling of temperature and surface energy. We also develop a simple relation for the diffusion coefficient by using the contact angle and contact radius of the droplet. It works well for a wide range of surface wettabilities and different sized nanodroplets, as confirmed by MD simulations. PMID:27215471

  4. Atomistic simulation of nanoporous layered double hydroxide materials and their properties. II. Adsorption and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nayong; Harale, Aadesh; Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2007-12-01

    Nanoporous layered double hydroxide (LDH) materials have wide applications, ranging from being good adsorbents for gases (particularly CO2) and liquid ions to membranes and catalysts. They also have applications in medicine, environmental remediation, and electrochemistry. Their general chemical composition is [M1-xIIMxIII(OH-)2]x+[Xn/mm -•nH2O], where M represents a metallic cation (of valence II or III), and Xn/mm - is an m-valence inorganic, or heteropolyacid, or organic anion. We study diffusion and adsorption of CO2 in a particular LDH with MII=Mg, MIII=Al, and x ≃0.71, using an atomistic model developed based on energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulations, together with a modified form of the consistent-valence force field. The adsorption isotherms and self-diffusivity of CO2 in the material are computed over a range of temperature, using molecular simulations. The computed diffusivities are within one order of magnitude of the measured ones at lower temperatures, while agreeing well with the data at high temperatures. The measured and computed adsorption isotherms agree at low loadings, but differ by about 25% at high loadings. Possible reasons for the differences between the computed properties and the experimental data are discussed, and a model for improving the accuracy of the computed properties is suggested. Also studied are the material's hydration and swelling properties. As water molecules are added to the pore space, the LDH material swells to some extent, with the hydration energy exhibiting interesting variations with the number of the water molecules added. The implications of the results are discussed.

  5. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin on amorphous carbon surfaces studied with dip pen nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Pradeep K.; McKavanagh, Fiona; Maguire, Paul D.; Lemoine, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    This article reports the use of dip pen nanolithography (DPN) for the study of adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins on amorphous carbon surfaces; tetrahedral amorphous carbon (t-aC) and silicon doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:Si). Contact angle study shows that the BSA proteins reduce the contact angle on both carbon materials. We also noticed that the drop volume dependence is consistent with a negative line tension, i.e. due to an attractive protein/surface interaction. The DPN technique was used to write short-spaced (100 nm) BSA line patterns on both samples. We found a line merging effect, stronger in the case of the a-C:H:Si material. We discuss possible contributions from tip blunting, scratching, cross-talk between lever torsion and bending and nano-shaving of the patterns. We conclude that the observed effect is caused in large measure by the diffusion of BSA proteins on the amorphous carbon surfaces. This interpretation of the result is consistent with the contact angle data and AFM force curve analysis indicating larger tip/surface adhesion and spreading for the a-C:H:Si material. We conclude by discussing the advantages and limitations of DPN lithography to study biomolecular adsorption in nanoscale wetting environments.

  6. Jump rates for surface diffusion of large molecules from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2015-04-21

    We apply a recently developed stochastic model for the surface diffusion of large molecules to calculate jump rates for 9,10-dithioanthracene on a Cu(111) surface. The necessary input parameters for the stochastic model are calculated from first principles using density functional theory (DFT). We find that the inclusion of van der Waals corrections to the DFT energies is critical to obtain good agreement with experimental results for the adsorption geometry and energy barrier for diffusion. The predictions for jump rates in our model are in excellent agreement with measured values and show a marked improvement over transition state theory (TST). We find that the jump rate prefactor is reduced by an order of magnitude from the TST estimate due to frictional damping resulting from energy exchange with surface phonons, as well as a rotational mode of the diffusing molecule.

  7. Adsorption of annealed branched polymers on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jef; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya

    2015-12-16

    The behavior of annealed branched polymers near adsorbing surfaces plays a fundamental role in many biological and industrial processes. Most importantly single stranded RNA in solution tends to fold up and self-bind to form a highly branched structure. Using a mean field theory, we both perturbatively and numerically examine the adsorption of branched polymers on surfaces of several different geometries in a good solvent. Independent of the geometry of the wall, we observe that as branching density increases, surface tension decreases. However, we find a coupling between the branching density and curvature in that a further lowering of surface tension occurs when the wall curves towards the polymer, but the amount of lowering of surface tension decreases when the wall curves away from the polymer. We find that for branched polymers confined into spherical cavities, most of branch-points are located in the vicinity of the interior wall and the surface tension is minimized for a critical cavity radius. For branch polymers next to sinusoidal surfaces, we find that branch-points accumulate at the valleys while end-points on the peaks.

  8. Adsorption study of antibiotics on silver nanoparticle surfaces by surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filgueiras, Aline Luciano; Paschoal, Diego; Dos Santos, Hélio F.; Sant'Ana, Antonio C.

    2015-02-01

    In this work the adsorption of the antibiotics levofloxacin (LV), tetracycline (TC) and benzylpenicillin (BP) on the surface of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) have been investigated through both surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and UV-VIS-NIR spectroscopies. The SERS spectra were obtained using 1064 nm exciting radiation. Theoretical models for the antibiotic molecules were obtained from DFT calculations, and used in the vibrational assignment. The adsorption geometries were proposed based on the changes in the spectral patterns. The LV compound adsorbs through carboxylate group, TC compound interacts with silver atoms through carbonyl from intermediate ring, and BP compound adsorbs by carbonyl moieties from carboxylate and acyclic amide.

  9. Protonation of water clusters induced by hydroperoxyl radical surface adsorption.

    PubMed

    Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Ruiz-Lopez, Manuel F; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Anglada, Josep M

    2011-04-26

    We have investigated the HO(2) adsorption and acid dissociation process on the surface of (H(2)O)(20) and (H(2)O)(21) clusters by using quantum-chemistry calculations. Our results show that the radical forms a stable hydrogen-bond complex on the cluster. The HO(2) acid dissociation is more favorable in the case of the (H(2)O)(21) cluster, for which the inner water molecule plays a crucial role. In fact, acid dissociation of HO(2) is found to occur in two steps. The first step involves H(2) O autoionization in the cluster, and the second one involves the proton transfer from the HO(2) radical to the hydroxide anion. The presence of the HO(2) radicals on the surface of the cluster facilitates water autoionization in the cluster. PMID:21433120

  10. Rainfastness and adsorption of herbicides on hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Spanoghe, Pieter; Claeys, Johan; Pinoy, Luc; Steurbaut, Walter

    2005-08-01

    Herbicides are still used to control weeds on hard surfaces, including municipal, private and industrial sites. Used under unfavourable conditions, especially when rain occurs shortly after application, herbicides may run off to surface waters. Such losses of herbicides from hard surfaces are estimated to be much higher than for herbicides used in arable fields. In this study, three kinds of hard surface were evaluated: asphalt, concrete surface and gravel (fine and coarse). Three herbicides were applied: glyphosate, diuron and diflufenican. Adsorption isotherms of diuron and diflufenican to the three surfaces were determined. At different times after treatment with the herbicides, rainfall was simulated by use of a rain-droplet spray nozzle, and the run-off was collected for analysis. After this run-off event, the materials were immersed in water to measure desorption which, together with the compound in the run-off, gave a measure of the dislodgable residues. The apolar herbicides diuron and especially diflufenican adsorbed strongly to asphalt. The polar herbicide glyphosate lost 75% in run-off from asphalt but was adsorbed strongly to soil and concrete pavement.

  11. Adsorption of V on a Hematite (0001) Surface and its Oxidation: Submonolayer Coverage

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.; Ma, X.; Kim, C.-Y.; Ellis, D.E.; Bedzyk, M.J.

    2008-10-06

    The adsorption of submonolayer V on an idealized model hematite (0 0 0 1) surface and subsequent oxidation under atomic O adsorption are studied by density functional theory. The preferred adsorption sites, adsorption energy and configuration changes due to V and O adsorption are investigated. It is found that in most cases V forms threefold bonds with surface O atoms, inducing a large geometry change at the hematite surface and near surface region and a bond stretch between surface Fe and O. The adsorption energy is mainly decided by interplay between adsorbed metal-surface oxygen bonding and adsorbed metal - subsurface metal interaction. The relative energy of subsequent O adsorption and geometry depends on the reformed V/hematite structure. Electronic properties such as projected densities of states and chemical state change upon V adsorption are studied through both periodic slab and embedded cluster localized orbital calculations; both strong vanadium-oxygen and vanadium-iron interactions are found. While V generally donates electrons to a hematite surface, causing nearby Fe to be partially reduced, the Fe and V oxidization state depends very much on the coverage and detailed adsorption configuration. When the V/hematite system is exposed to atomic O, V is further oxidized and surface/near surface Fe is re-oxidized. Our theoretical results are compared with X-ray surface standing wave and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The influence of d-electron correlation on the predicted structures is briefly discussed, making use of the DFT + U scheme.

  12. Insights on finite size effects in ab initio study of CO adsorption and dissociation on Fe 110 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Aurab; Bouhali, Othmane; Mousseau, Normand; Becquart, Charlotte S.; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa

    2016-08-01

    Adsorption and dissociation of hydrocarbons on metallic surfaces represent crucial steps on the path to carburization, eventually leading to dusting corrosion. While adsorption of CO molecules on Fe surface is a barrier-less exothermic process, this is not the case for the dissociation of CO into C and O adatoms and the diffusion of C beneath the surface that are found to be associated with large energy barriers. In practice, these barriers can be affected by numerous factors that combine to favour the CO-Fe reaction such as the abundance of CO and other hydrocarbons as well as the presence of structural defects. From a numerical point of view, studying these factors is challenging and a step-by-step approach is necessary to assess, in particular, the influence of the finite box size on the reaction parameters for adsorption and dissociation of CO on metal surfaces. Here, we use density functional theory (DFT) total energy calculations with the climbing-image nudged elastic band method to estimate the adsorption energies and dissociation barriers for different CO coverages with surface supercells of different sizes. We further compute the effect of periodic boundary condition for DFT calculations and find that the contribution from van der Waals interaction in the computation of adsorption parameters is important as they contribute to correcting the finite-size error in small systems. The dissociation process involves carbon insertion into the Fe surface causing a lattice deformation that requires a larger surface system for unrestricted relaxation. We show that, in the larger surface systems associated with dilute CO-coverages, C-insertion is energetically more favourable, leading to a significant decrease in the dissociation barrier. This observation suggests that a large surface system with dilute coverage is necessary for all similar metal-hydrocarbon reactions in order to study their fundamental electronic mechanisms, as an isolated phenomenon, free from

  13. Surface diffusion in reversed-phase liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, Kanji; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, Giddings pointed out in 'Dynamics of Chromatography' that surface diffusion should become an important research topic in the kinetics of chromatographic phenomena. However, few studies on surface diffusion in adsorbents used in chromatography were published since then. Most scientists use ordinary rate equations to study mass transfer kinetics in chromatography. They take no account of surface diffusion and overlook the significant contributions of this mass transfer process to chromatographic behavior and to column efficiency at high mobile phase flow rate. Only recently did the significance of surface diffusion in separation processes begin to be recognized in connection with the development of new techniques of fast flow, high efficiency chromatography. In this review, we revisit the reports on experimental data on surface diffusion and introduce a surface-restricted molecular diffusion model, derived as a first approximation for the mechanism of surface diffusion, on the basis of the absolute rate theory. We also explain how this model accounts for many intrinsic characteristics of surface diffusion that cannot properly be explained by the conventional models of surface diffusion.

  14. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  15. Adsorption and diffusion of fluids in well-characterized adsorbent materials. Renewal progress report, August 1, 1995 to January 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbins, Keith E.; Cracknell, R.F.; Maddox, M.; Nicholson, D.

    1999-08-01

    This is an invited review paper describing recent advances in molecular simulation and theory of fluids confined within well-characterized porous materials. Methods and intermolecular potential models are described. This is followed by showing results for several examples, including supercritical methane adsorption in carbons, adsorption and diffusion of argon in VPI-5, adsorption of argon in silicalite-1, nitrogen adsorption in MCM-41, and adsorption of argon and nitrogen in carbon nanotubes.

  16. Swelling, diffusion, network parameters and adsorption properties of IPN hydrogel of chitosan and acrylic copolymer.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Bidyadhar; Ray, Samit Kumar

    2014-11-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) type hydrogels of a biopolymer and a synthetic polymer were prepared from chitosan and crosslink copolymer of acrylic acid, sodium acrylate and hydroxyethyl methacrylate. Acrylic acid, sodium acrylate, hydroxyethyl methacrylate and N'N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) monomers were free radically copolymerized and crosslinked in aqueous solution of chitosan. Several IPN hydrogels were prepared by varying concentrations of initiator, crosslinker (MBA) and weight% of chitosan . These hydrogels were characterized by free acid content, pH at point of zero charge (PZC), FTIR, DTA-TGA, SEM and XRD. The swelling and diffusion characteristics, network parameters and adsorption of cationic methyl violet (MV) and anionic congo red (CR) dyes by these hydrogels were studied. The hydrogels showed high adsorption (9.5-119 mg/g for CR and 9.2-98 mg/g for MV) and removal% (98-73% for CR and 94-66% for MV) over the feed concentration of 10-140 mg/l dye in water. The isotherms and kinetics of dye adsorption by the hydrogels were also studied.

  17. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Study of Kinetics and Thermodynamics of IgG Adsorption on the Polystyrene Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Bo; Feng, Xi; Xie, Xiaomei; Wang, Caiyun; Zhang, Mengxue; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2015-03-01

    Polystyrene (PS) is a common substrate material for protein adsorption on biosensors and bioassays. By employing a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique, we studied the kinetics and thermodynamics of anti-HBeAg adsorption on this substrate in situ. First, a thin PS film was deposited on the interface between the liquid and the quartz crystal wafer. Second, a solution containing anti-HBeAg was introduced into the holding tank. Third, we measured the change in the oscillation frequency of the quartz that was induced by the antibody-PS binding, which in turn depended on macroscopic parameters, such as antibody concentration and solution temperature, as well as on microscopic parameters, such as the diffusion type and the change in Gibb's free energy. The adsorption rate and capacity of anti-HBeAg on the PS surface were quantified and fitted using the conventional Langmuir model. It was shown that this model was applicable to protein-PS interface system. Approximately 250 nm2 of the surface area was occupied by a single antibody molecule at 298 K when the concentration was 90 μg/mL. The adsorption process might have been controlled by both liquid film and particle diffusions.

  18. Screening of ferroelectric domains on BaTiO3(001) surface by ultraviolet photo-induced charge and dissociative water adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. L.; Vilquin, B.; Barrett, N.

    2012-08-01

    The surface potential contrast between oppositely polarized ferroelectric domains of a BaTiO3(001) single crystal under ultraviolet (UV) illumination before and after the dissociative adsorption of water is measured using the transition from mirror electron microscopy to low-energy electron microscopy. Both photo-generated free charge carriers and dissociative adsorption of water are effective screening mechanisms of the surface polarization charge. The screening rate is dominated by drift, whereas the relaxation in the absence of UV light is driven by thermal diffusion. Surface chemistry plays an important role in the surface charge dynamics.

  19. Surface diffusion and surface crystal growth of tris-naphthyl benzene glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shigang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Ye; Ediger, M. D.; Yu, Lian

    2016-08-01

    Surface self-diffusion coefficients of α,α,β-tris-naphthyl benzene (TNB) glasses have been measured using the method of surface grating decay. For 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the decay occurs by viscous flow at temperatures above Tg + 15 K, where Tg is the glass transition temperature (347 K), and by surface diffusion at lower temperatures. Surface diffusion of TNB is vastly faster than bulk diffusion, by a factor of 107 at Tg. Comparing TNB with other molecular glasses, each evaluated at its own Tg, we find that surface diffusion has a greater system-to-system variation than bulk diffusion, slowing down with increasing molecular size and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Experimentally determined surface diffusion coefficients are in reasonable agreement with those from simulations and theoretical predictions. TNB and other molecular glasses show fast crystal growth on the free surface and the growth velocity is nearly proportional to the surface diffusion coefficient, indicating that the process is supported by surface mobility.

  20. Bacterial locomotion, adsorption and growth over chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali, Maryam; Molaei, Mehdi; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Complex dynamic interactions between bacteria and chemically patched interface that mimics the heterogeneous energy landscape of a real-life interfacial environment are studied in the paper. We explore effects of these spatially varying chemical patches on bacterial locomotion, adsorption, biofilm formation and the film growth rate. Using micro-fabrication and soft-lithography, we have fabricated PDMS microfluidic channels with a solid substrate covered by micro-scale chemical patches. Arrays of 2D geometries of characteristic scales varying from 10 to 50 μm are transferred onto a glass substrate by soft-lithography. The substrate is functionalized to generate alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions and bonded with the channel. The 3D swimming characteristics near these surfaces, such as swimming velocity, linear and angular dispersions, are measured in-situ using 3D digital holographic microscopy. The observations are used to examine the mechanisms involved in adsorption and desorption of swimming bacteria onto the substrate. Long-term experiments are conducted to quantify the growth rate and structures of colony. A correlation between various length scales of the substrate and bacteria motility are observed.

  1. Lipidation Effect on Surface Adsorption and Associated Fibrillation of the Model Protein Insulin.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Sofie Fogh; Cárdenas, Marité; Barker, Robert; Jorgensen, Lene; van de Weert, Marco

    2016-07-19

    Lipidation of proteins is used in the pharmaceutical field to increase the therapeutic efficacy of proteins. In this study, we investigate the effect of a 14-carbon fatty acid modification on the adsorption behavior of human insulin to a hydrophobic solid surface and the subsequent fibrillation development under highly acidic conditions and elevated temperature by comparing to the fibrillation of human insulin. At these stressed conditions, the lipid modification accelerates the rate of fibrillation in bulk solution. With the use of several complementary surface-sensitive techniques, including quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and neutron reflectivity (NR), we show that there are two levels of structurally different protein organization at a hydrophobic surface for both human insulin and the lipidated analogue: a dense protein layer formed within minutes on the surface and a diffuse outer layer of fibrillar structures which took hours to form. The two layers may only be weakly connected, and proteins from both layers are able to desorb from the surface. The lipid modification increases the protein surface coverage and the thickness of both layer organizations. Upon lipidation not only the fibrillation extent but also the morphology of the fibrillar structures changes from fibril clusters on the surface to a more homogeneous network of fibrils covering the entire hydrophobic surface. PMID:27348237

  2. Response mechanism for surface acoustic wave gas sensors based on surface-adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiansheng; Lu, Yanyan

    2014-04-16

    A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent's method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator) and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC) analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data.

  3. Adsorption-Induced Surface Stresses of the Water/Quartz Interface: Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Gor, Gennady Y; Bernstein, Noam

    2016-05-31

    Adsorption-induced deformation is expansion or contraction of a solid due to adsorption on its surface. This phenomenon is important for a wide range of applications, from chemomechanical sensors to methane recovery from geological formations. The strain of the solid is driven by the change of the surface stress due to adsorption. Using ab initio molecular dynamics, we calculate the surface stresses for the dry α-quartz surfaces, and investigate how these stresses change when the surfaces are exposed to water. We find that the nonhydroxylated surface shows small and approximately isotropic changes in stress, while the hydroxylated surface, which interacts more strongly with the polar water molecules, shows larger and qualitatively anisotropic (opposite sign in xx and yy) surface stress changes. All of these changes are several times larger than the surface tension of water itself. The anisotropy and possibility of positive surface stress change can explain experimentally observed surface area contraction due to adsorption.

  4. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  5. Diffusion Kinetics in the Pd/Cu(001) Surface Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    GRANT,M.L.; SWARTZENTRUBER,BRIAN S.; BARTELT,NORMAN C.; HANNON,J.B.

    2000-12-08

    We use atom-tracking scanning tunneling microscopy to study the diffusion of Pd in the Pd/Cu(001) surface alloy. By following the motion of individual Pd atoms incorporated in the surface, we show that Pd diffuses by a vacancy-exchange, mechanism. We measure an effective activation energy for the diffusion of incorporated Pd atoms of 0.88 eV, which is consistent with an ab initio calculated barrier of 0.94 eV.

  6. Anomalous surface diffusion of protons on lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Maarten G; Grubmüller, Helmut; Groenhof, Gerrit

    2014-07-01

    The cellular energy machinery depends on the presence and properties of protons at or in the vicinity of lipid membranes. To asses the energetics and mobility of a proton near a membrane, we simulated an excess proton near a solvated DMPC bilayer at 323 K, using a recently developed method to include the Grotthuss proton shuttling mechanism in classical molecular dynamics simulations. We obtained a proton surface affinity of -13.0 ± 0.5 kJ mol(-1). The proton interacted strongly with both lipid headgroup and linker carbonyl oxygens. Furthermore, the surface diffusion of the proton was anomalous, with a subdiffusive regime over the first few nanoseconds, followed by a superdiffusive regime. The time- and distance dependence of the proton surface diffusion coefficient within these regimes may also resolve discrepancies between previously reported diffusion coefficients. Our simulations show that the proton anomalous surface diffusion originates from restricted diffusion in two different surface-bound states, interrupted by the occasional bulk-mediated long-range surface diffusion. Although only a DMPC membrane was considered in this work, we speculate that the restrictive character of the on-surface diffusion is highly sensitive to the specific membrane conditions, which can alter the relative contributions of the surface and bulk pathways to the overall diffusion process. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings for the energy machinery.

  7. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  8. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  9. Modeling Adsorption and Reactions of Organic Molecules at Metal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdWsurf method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  10. Adsorption of imidazole on Au(111) surface: Dispersion corrected density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izzaouihda, Safia; Mahjoubi, Khaled; Abou El Makarim, Hassna; Komiha, Najia; Benoit, David M.

    2016-10-01

    We use density functional theory in the generalized gradient approximation to study the adsorption of imidazole on the Au(111) surface and account for dispersion effect using Grimme's empirical dispersion correction technique. Our results show that the adsorption energy of imidazole depends on the slab size and on the adsorption site. In agreement with other studies, we find the largest adsorption energy for imidazole on a top site of Au(111). However, we also note that the adsorption energy at other sites is substantial.

  11. Defatted algal biomass as a non-conventional low-cost adsorbent: surface characterization and methylene blue adsorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sarat Chandra, T; Mudliar, S N; Vidyashankar, S; Mukherji, S; Sarada, R; Krishnamurthi, K; Chauhan, V S

    2015-05-01

    The present study investigates the use of defatted algal biomass (DAB) as a non-conventional low cost adsorbent. The maximum adsorption capacity of biomass (raw, defatted and sulfuric acid pretreated DAB) was determined by liquid phase adsorption studies in batch mode for the removal of methylene blue present at various concentrations (1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mg L(-1)) from aqueous solutions. The data was well fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The maximum adsorption capacity for raw, defatted and sulfuric acid pretreated DAB was found to be 6.0, 7.73 and 7.80 mg g(-1), respectively. The specific surface area of raw, defatted and sulfuric acid pretreated DAB was estimated to be 14.70, 18.94, and 19.10 m(2) g(-1), respectively. To evaluate the kinetic mechanism that controls the adsorption process, pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, intraparticle diffusion and particle diffusion has been tested. The data fitted quite well with pseudo-second order kinetic model.

  12. Atomic hydrogen adsorption and incipient hydrogenation of the Mg(0001) surface: a density-functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfang; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Bo; Yang, Yu; Wei, Yinghui

    2009-07-21

    We investigate the atomic hydrogen adsorption on Mg(0001) by using density-functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation and a supercell approach. The coverage dependence of the adsorption structures and energetics is systematically studied for a wide range of coverage Theta [from 0.11 to 2.0 monolayers (ML)] and adsorption sites. In the coverage range 0 < Theta < 1.0, the most stable among all possible adsorption sites is the on-surface fcc site followed by the hcp site, and the binding energy increases with the coverage, thus indicating the higher stability of on-surface adsorption and a tendency to the formation of H islands (clusters) when increasing the coverage within the region 0 < Theta < 1.0. The on-surface diffusion path energetics of atomic hydrogen as well as the activation barriers for hydrogen penetration from the on-surface to the subsurface sites are also presented at low coverage. At high coverage of 1.0 < Theta < or = 2.0, it is found that the coadsorption configuration with 1.0 monolayer of H residing on the surface fcc sites and the remaining (Theta-1.0) monolayer of H occupying the subsurface tetra-I sites is most energetically favorable. The resultant H-Mg-H sandwich structure for this most stable coadsorption configuration displays similar spectral features to the bulk hydride MgH(2) in the density of states. The other properties of the H/Mg(0001) system including the charge distribution, the lattice relaxation, the work function, and the electronic density of states are also studied and discussed in detail. It is pointed out that the H-Mg chemical bonding during surface hydrogenation displays a mixed ionic/covalent character.

  13. Surface stoichiometry of zinc sulfide and its effect on the adsorption behaviors of xanthate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the surface stoichiometry, acid-base properties as well as the adsorption of xanthate at ZnS surfaces were studied by means of potentiometric titration, adsorption and solution speciation modeling. The surface proton binding site was determined by using Gran plot to evaluate the potentiometric titration data. Testing results implied that for stoichiometric surfaces of zinc sulfide, the proton and hydroxide determine the surface charge. For the nonstoichiometric surfaces, the surface charge is controlled by proton, hydroxide, zinc and sulfide ions depending on specific conditions. The xanthate adsorption decreases with increasing solution pH, which indicates an ion exchange reaction at the surfaces. Based on experimental results, the surface protonation, deprotonation, stoichiometry and xanthate adsorption mechanism were discussed. PMID:22112283

  14. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide onto activated carbon fibers: effect of pore structure and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Kwon, Seokjoon; Borguet, Eric; Vidic, Radisav

    2005-12-15

    To understand the nature of H2S adsorption onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas. Surface pretreatments, including oxidation and heattreatment, were conducted before adsorption/desorption tests in a fixed-bed reactor. Raw ACFs with higher surface area showed greater adsorption and retention of sulfur, and heat treatment further enhanced adsorption and retention of sulfur. The retained amount of hydrogen sulfide correlated well with the amount of basic functional groups on the carbon surface, while the desorbed amount reflected the effect of pore structure. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the retained sulfurous compounds were strongly bonded to the carbon surface. In addition, surface chemistry of the sorbent might determine the predominant form of adsorbate on the surface. PMID:16475362

  15. Adsorption of hydrogen sulfide onto activated carbon fibers: effect of pore structure and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenguo; Kwon, Seokjoon; Borguet, Eric; Vidic, Radisav

    2005-12-15

    To understand the nature of H2S adsorption onto carbon surfaces under dry and anoxic conditions, the effects of carbon pore structure and surface chemistry were studied using activated carbon fibers (ACFs) with different pore structures and surface areas. Surface pretreatments, including oxidation and heattreatment, were conducted before adsorption/desorption tests in a fixed-bed reactor. Raw ACFs with higher surface area showed greater adsorption and retention of sulfur, and heat treatment further enhanced adsorption and retention of sulfur. The retained amount of hydrogen sulfide correlated well with the amount of basic functional groups on the carbon surface, while the desorbed amount reflected the effect of pore structure. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the retained sulfurous compounds were strongly bonded to the carbon surface. In addition, surface chemistry of the sorbent might determine the predominant form of adsorbate on the surface.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Initial Adsorption Stages of Fibrinogen on Mica and Graphite Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Stephan; Schmid, Friederike; Settanni, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Fibrinogen, a blood glycoprotein of vertebrates, plays an essential role in blood clotting by polymerizing into fibrin when activated. Upon adsorption on material surfaces, it also contributes to determine their biocompatibility and has been implicated in the onset of thrombosis and inflammation at medical implants. Here we present the first fully atomistic simulations of the initial stages of the adsorption process of fibrinogen on mica and graphite surfaces. The simulations reveal a weak adsorption on mica that allows frequent desorption and reorientation events. This adsorption is driven by electrostatic interactions between the protein and the silicate surface as well as the counterion layer. Preferred adsorption orientations for the globular regions of the protein are identified. The adsorption on graphite is found to be stronger with fewer reorientation and desorption events and shows the onset of denaturation of the protein.

  17. A unifying model for adsorption and nucleation of vapors on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari

    2015-04-23

    Vapor interaction with solid surfaces is traditionally described with adsorption isotherms in the undersaturated regime and with heterogeneous nucleation theory in the supersaturated regime. A class of adsorption isotherms is based on the idea of vapor molecule clustering around so-called active sites. However, as the isotherms do not account for the surface curvature effects of the clusters, they predict an infinitely thick adsorption layer at saturation and do not recognize the existence of the supersaturated regime. The classical heterogeneous nucleation theory also builds on the idea of cluster formation, but describes the interactions between the surface and the cluster with a single parameter, the contact angle, which provides limited information compared with adsorption isotherms. Here, a new model of vapor adsorption on nonporous solid surfaces is derived. The basic assumption is that adsorption proceeds via formation of molecular clusters, modeled as liquid caps. The equilibrium of the individual clusters with the vapor phase is described with the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption theory modified with the Kelvin equation that corrects for the curvature effect on vapor pressure. The new model extends the FHH adsorption isotherm to be applicable both at submonolayer surface coverages and at supersaturated conditions. It shows good agreement with experimental adsorption data from 12 different adsorbent-adsorbate systems. The model predictions are also compared against heterogeneous nucleation data, and they show much better agreement than predictions of the classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. PMID:25831213

  18. Exploring Pd adsorption, diffusion, permeation, and nucleation on bilayer SiO2/Ru as a function of hydroxylation and precursor environment: From UHV to catalyst preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomp, Sascha; Kaden, William E.; Sterrer, Martin; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The hydroxylation-dependent permeability of bilayer SiO2 supported on Ru(0001) was investigated by XPS and TDS studies in a temperature range of 100 K to 600 K. For this, the thermal behavior of Pd evaporated at 100 K, which results in surface and sub-surface (Ru-supported) binding arrangements, was examined relative to the extent of pre-hydroxylation. Samples containing only defect-mediated hydroxyls showed no effect on Pd diffusion through the film at low temperature. If, instead, the concentration of strongly bound hydroxyl groups and associated weakly bound water molecules was enriched by an electron-assisted hydroxylation procedure, the probability for Pd diffusion through the film is decreased via a pore-blocking mechanism. Above room temperature, all samples showed similar behavior, reflective of particle nucleation above the film and eventual agglomeration with any metal atoms initially binding beneath the film. When depositing Pd onto the same SiO2/Ru model support via adsorption of [Pd(NH3)4]Cl2 from alkaline (pH 12) precursor solution, we observe notably different adsorption and nucleation mechanisms. The resultant Pd adsorption complexes follow established decomposition pathways to produce model catalyst systems compatible with those created exclusively within UHV despite lacking the ability to penetrate the film due to the increased size of the initial Pd precursor groups.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  20. Surface Charge Transfer Doping of Monolayer Phosphorene via Molecular Adsorption.

    PubMed

    He, Yuanyuan; Xia, Feifei; Shao, Zhibin; Zhao, Jianwei; Jie, Jiansheng

    2015-12-01

    Monolayer phosphorene has attracted much attention owing to its extraordinary electronic, optical, and structural properties. Rationally tuning the electrical transport characteristics of monolayer phosphorene is essential to its applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, we study the electronic transport behaviors of monolayer phosphorene with surface charge transfer doping of electrophilic molecules, including 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ), NO2, and MoO3, using density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. F4TCNQ shows optimal performance in enhancing the p-type conductance of monolayer phosphorene. Static electronic properties indicate that the enhancement is originated from the charge transfer between adsorbed molecule and phosphorene layer. Dynamic transport behaviors demonstrate that additional channels for hole transport in host monolayer phosphorene were generated upon the adsorption of molecule. Our work unveils the great potential of surface charge transfer doping in tuning the electronic properties of monolayer phosphorene and is of significance to its application in high-performance devices.

  1. [Adsorption of Cu on Core-shell Structured Magnetic Particles: Relationship Between Adsorption Performance and Surface Properties].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-mei; Chen, Jing; Li, Hai-ning; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Gao-sheng

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between the adsorption performance of adsorbents and their compositions, structure, and surface properties, the core-shell structured Fe₃O₄/MnO2 and Fe-Mn/Mn₂2 magnetic particles were systematically characterized using multiple techniques and their Cu adsorption behaviors as well as mechanism were also investigated in details. It was found that both Fe₃O4 and Fe-Mn had spinel structure and no obvious crystalline phase change was observed after coating with MnO₂. The introduction of Mn might improve the affinity between the core and the shell, and therefore enhanced the amount and distribution uniformity of the MnO₂ coated. Consequently, Fe-Mn/MnO₂ exhibited a higher BET specific surface area and a lower isoelectric point. The results of sorption experiments showed that Fe-Mn had a higher maximal Cu adsorption capacity of 33.7 mg · g⁻¹ at pH 5.5, compared with 17.5 mg · g⁻¹ of Fe₃O4. After coating, the maximal adsorption capacity of Fe-Mn/MnO₂ was increased to 58.2 mg · g⁻¹, which was 2.6 times as high as that of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ and outperformed the majority of magnetic adsorbents reported in literature. In addition, a specific adsorption of Cu occurred at the surface of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ or Fe-Mn/MnO₂ through the formation of inner-sphere complexes. In conclusion, the adsorption performance of the magnetic particles was positively related to their compositions, structure, and surface properties. PMID:27011990

  2. [Adsorption of Cu on Core-shell Structured Magnetic Particles: Relationship Between Adsorption Performance and Surface Properties].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-mei; Chen, Jing; Li, Hai-ning; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Gao-sheng

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between the adsorption performance of adsorbents and their compositions, structure, and surface properties, the core-shell structured Fe₃O₄/MnO2 and Fe-Mn/Mn₂2 magnetic particles were systematically characterized using multiple techniques and their Cu adsorption behaviors as well as mechanism were also investigated in details. It was found that both Fe₃O4 and Fe-Mn had spinel structure and no obvious crystalline phase change was observed after coating with MnO₂. The introduction of Mn might improve the affinity between the core and the shell, and therefore enhanced the amount and distribution uniformity of the MnO₂ coated. Consequently, Fe-Mn/MnO₂ exhibited a higher BET specific surface area and a lower isoelectric point. The results of sorption experiments showed that Fe-Mn had a higher maximal Cu adsorption capacity of 33.7 mg · g⁻¹ at pH 5.5, compared with 17.5 mg · g⁻¹ of Fe₃O4. After coating, the maximal adsorption capacity of Fe-Mn/MnO₂ was increased to 58.2 mg · g⁻¹, which was 2.6 times as high as that of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ and outperformed the majority of magnetic adsorbents reported in literature. In addition, a specific adsorption of Cu occurred at the surface of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ or Fe-Mn/MnO₂ through the formation of inner-sphere complexes. In conclusion, the adsorption performance of the magnetic particles was positively related to their compositions, structure, and surface properties.

  3. A diffusion-adsorption model of uranium uptake by archaeological bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Andrew R.; Hedges, Robert E. M.

    1996-06-01

    An argument for the possibility of uranium uptake by buried bone taking place through the adsorption of uranyl species on bone mineral is advanced. In the light of this a diffusion-adsorption model for uranium uptake by buried bone is developed, the necessary constants are evaluated from the literature and from laboratory measurements of the partition coefficient between solution and bone mineral. The geochemical and hydrological parameters which control uptake are discussed. The predictions of the model are shown to be in general accordance with the timescale, magnitude, and distribution of uranium uptake in archaeological bone. Using the model, specific predictions of the variation of apparent uranium-series ages in bone can be made, and bone is shown clearly not to conform to the closed system assumption. When the model is extended to tooth enamel it is found to be incompatible with the early uptake model used for ESR dating, but to fall between the early uptake and linear uptake models. Similarly, it suggests that uranium-series dates on enamel assuming a closed system are liable to underestimate the true age by at least one-third.

  4. Adsorption and dynamics of group IV, V atoms and molecular oxygen on semiconductor group IV (0 0 1) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, T

    2016-08-10

    In this review we address (1) the co-adsorption of group V (As, Sb, Bi) atoms and molecular oxygen on the Si(0 0 1) surface and (2) the adsorption and dynamics of Sb, Bi, Si and Ge ad-dimers on the Si(0 0 1) and Ge(0 0 1) surfaces. The adsorption and diffusion processes of group IV and V atoms on the (0 0 1) surfaces of group IV semiconductor surfaces have been studied using multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and density functional theory calculations. Results obtained by various types of first-principle total energy calculations are mutually compared and discussed. Our results demonstrate the capability of these quantum chemistry methods to provide relevant and reliable information on the interaction between adsorbate and semiconductor surfaces.

  5. Adsorption and dynamics of group IV, V atoms and molecular oxygen on semiconductor group IV (0 0 1) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasieva, T.

    2016-08-01

    In this review we address (1) the co-adsorption of group V (As, Sb, Bi) atoms and molecular oxygen on the Si(0 0 1) surface and (2) the adsorption and dynamics of Sb, Bi, Si and Ge ad-dimers on the Si(0 0 1) and Ge(0 0 1) surfaces. The adsorption and diffusion processes of group IV and V atoms on the (0 0 1) surfaces of group IV semiconductor surfaces have been studied using multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and density functional theory calculations. Results obtained by various types of first-principle total energy calculations are mutually compared and discussed. Our results demonstrate the capability of these quantum chemistry methods to provide relevant and reliable information on the interaction between adsorbate and semiconductor surfaces.

  6. High coverage hydrogen adsorption on the Fe3O4(1 1 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaohu; Zhang, Xuemei; Wang, Shengguang

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on the A and B termination layers of the Fe3O4(1 1 0) surface at different coverage has been systematically studied by density functional theory calculations including an on-site Hubbard term (GGA + U). The adsorption of hydrogen prefers surface oxygen atoms on both layers. The more stable A layer has stronger adsorption energy than the less stable B layer. The saturation coverage has two dissociatively adsorbed H2 on the A layer, and one dissociatively adsorbed H2 on the B layer. The adsorption mechanism has been analyzed on the basis of projected density of states (PDOS).

  7. A DFT study of water adsorption on rutile TiO2 (110) surface: The effects of surface steps.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Chunya; Chen, Mingjun; Zhang, Yu; Cummings, Peter T

    2016-07-28

    The associative and dissociative adsorption of water molecules at low-coverage situations on rutile TiO2 (110) surface with step defects was investigated by the density functional theory calculations. Structural optimization of the hydroxylated/hydrated configurations at step edges along the 11̄1 crystal directions and the dynamic process of water dissociation were discussed to get a better description of the water/TiO2 interface. Our results indicate that steps on the TiO2 (110) surface could be an active site for water dissociation. The results of geometry optimization suggest that the stability of hydroxylated configuration is largely dependent on the locations of the H species and the recombination of water molecules from hydroxyls is observed in the fully hydroxylated condition. However, these hydroxyls can be stabilized by the associatively absorbed water nearby by forming competitive intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The dynamics of water dissociation and hydrogen diffusion were studied by the first principles molecular dynamics simulation and our results suggest that the hydrogen released by water dissociation can be transferred among the adsorbates, such as the unsaturated oxygen atoms-H2O-hydroxyl (TiO-H2O-OH) complex at step edges, or gradually diffuses to the bulk water system in the form of hydronium (H3O(+)) at higher water coverage. PMID:27475381

  8. A DFT study of water adsorption on rutile TiO2 (110) surface: The effects of surface steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ting; Wu, Chunya; Chen, Mingjun; Zhang, Yu; Cummings, Peter T.

    2016-07-01

    The associative and dissociative adsorption of water molecules at low-coverage situations on rutile TiO2 (110) surface with step defects was investigated by the density functional theory calculations. Structural optimization of the hydroxylated/hydrated configurations at step edges along the <" separators="1 1 ¯ 1 > crystal directions and the dynamic process of water dissociation were discussed to get a better description of the water/TiO2 interface. Our results indicate that steps on the TiO2 (110) surface could be an active site for water dissociation. The results of geometry optimization suggest that the stability of hydroxylated configuration is largely dependent on the locations of the H species and the recombination of water molecules from hydroxyls is observed in the fully hydroxylated condition. However, these hydroxyls can be stabilized by the associatively absorbed water nearby by forming competitive intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The dynamics of water dissociation and hydrogen diffusion were studied by the first principles molecular dynamics simulation and our results suggest that the hydrogen released by water dissociation can be transferred among the adsorbates, such as the unsaturated oxygen atoms-H2O-hydroxyl (TiO-H2O-OH) complex at step edges, or gradually diffuses to the bulk water system in the form of hydronium (H3O+) at higher water coverage.

  9. Cd adsorption onto Anoxybacillus flavithermus: Surface complexation modeling and spectroscopic investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, Peta-Gaye; Daughney, Christopher J.; Peak, Derek

    2008-06-09

    Several recent studies have applied surface complexation theory to model metal adsorption behaviour onto mesophilic bacteria. However, no investigations have used this approach to characterise metal adsorption by thermophilic bacteria. In this study, we perform batch adsorption experiments to quantify cadmium adsorption onto the thermophile Anoxybacillus flavithermus. Surface complexation models (incorporating the Donnan electrostatic model) are developed to determine stability constants corresponding to specific adsorption reactions. Adsorption reactions and stoichiometries are constrained using spectroscopic techniques (XANES, EXAFS, and ATR-FTIR). The results indicate that the Cd adsorption behaviour of A. flavithermus is similar to that of other mesophilic bacteria. At high bacteria-to-Cd ratios, Cd adsorption occurs by formation of a 1:1 complex with deprotonated cell wall carboxyl functional groups. At lower bacteria-to-Cd ratios, a second adsorption mechanism occurs at pH > 7, which may correspond to the formation of a Cd-phosphoryl, CdOH-carboxyl, or CdOH-phosphoryl surface complex. X-ray absorption spectroscopic investigations confirm the formation of the 1:1 Cd-carboxyl surface complex, but due to the bacteria-to-Cd ratio used in these experiments, other complexation mechanism(s) could not be unequivocally resolved by the spectroscopic data.

  10. Oxygen adsorption on the Al₉Co₂(001) surface: first-principles and STM study.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, S Alarcón; Loli, L N Serkovic; Ledieu, J; Fournée, V; Gille, P; Dubois, J-M; Gaudry, E

    2013-09-01

    Atomic oxygen adsorption on a pure aluminum terminated Al9Co2(001) surface is studied by first-principle calculations coupled with STM measurements. Relative adsorption energies of oxygen atoms have been calculated on different surface sites along with the associated STM images. The local electronic structure of the most favourable adsorption site is described. The preferential adsorption site is identified as a 'bridge' type site between the cluster entities exposed at the (001) surface termination. The Al-O bonding between the adsorbate and the substrate presents a covalent character, with s-p hybridization occurring between the states of the adsorbed oxygen atom and the aluminum atoms of the surface. The simulated STM image of the preferential adsorption site is in agreement with experimental observations. This work shows that oxygen adsorption generates important atomic relaxations of the topmost surface layer and that sub-surface cobalt atoms strongly influence the values of the adsorption energies. The calculated Al-O distances are in agreement with those reported in Al2O and Al2O3 oxides and for oxygen adsorption on Al(111). PMID:23883551

  11. Oxygen adsorption on the Al₉Co₂(001) surface: first-principles and STM study.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, S Alarcón; Loli, L N Serkovic; Ledieu, J; Fournée, V; Gille, P; Dubois, J-M; Gaudry, E

    2013-09-01

    Atomic oxygen adsorption on a pure aluminum terminated Al9Co2(001) surface is studied by first-principle calculations coupled with STM measurements. Relative adsorption energies of oxygen atoms have been calculated on different surface sites along with the associated STM images. The local electronic structure of the most favourable adsorption site is described. The preferential adsorption site is identified as a 'bridge' type site between the cluster entities exposed at the (001) surface termination. The Al-O bonding between the adsorbate and the substrate presents a covalent character, with s-p hybridization occurring between the states of the adsorbed oxygen atom and the aluminum atoms of the surface. The simulated STM image of the preferential adsorption site is in agreement with experimental observations. This work shows that oxygen adsorption generates important atomic relaxations of the topmost surface layer and that sub-surface cobalt atoms strongly influence the values of the adsorption energies. The calculated Al-O distances are in agreement with those reported in Al2O and Al2O3 oxides and for oxygen adsorption on Al(111).

  12. Effect of the surface oxygen groups on methane adsorption on coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shixiong; Wen, Jie; Yu, Xiaopeng; Chu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the influence of surface oxygen groups on methane adsorption on coals, one bituminous coal was modified with H2O2, (NH4)2S2O8 and HNO3 respectively, to prepare coal samples with different surface properties. The oxygen groups on coal surface were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The textures of the coal samples were investigated by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Their surface morphologies were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The methane adsorption behaviors of these coal samples were measured at 303 K in pressure range of 0-5.3 MPa by volumetric method. The adsorption data of methane were fitted to the Langmuir model and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) model. The fitting results showed that the D-A model fitted the isotherm data better than the Langmuir model. It was observed that there was, in general, a positive correlation between the methane saturated adsorption capacity and the micropore volume of coals while a negative correlation between methane saturated adsorption capacity and the Ototal/Ctotal. The methane adsorption capacity was determined by the coal surface chemistry when the microporosity parameters of two samples were similar. Coal with a higher amount of oxygen surface groups, and consequently with a less hydrophobic character, had lower methane adsorption capacity.

  13. Initial heats of H{sub 2}S adsorption on activated carbons: Effect of surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Bagreev, A.; Adib, F.; Bandosz, T.J.

    1999-11-15

    The sorption of hydrogen sulfide was studied on activated carbons of various origins by means of inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution. The conditions of the experiment were dry and anaerobic. Prior to the experiments the surface of some carbon samples was oxidized using either nitric acid or ammonium persulfate. Then the structural parameters of carbons were evaluated from the sorption of nitrogen. From the IGC experiments at various temperatures, heats of adsorption were calculated. The results showed that the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption under dry anaerobic conditions does not depend on surface chemistry. The dependence of the heat of adsorption on the characteristic energy of nitrogen adsorption calculated from the Dubinin-Raduskevich equation was found. This correlation can be used to predict the heat of H{sub 2}S adsorption based on the results obtained from nitrogen adsorption.

  14. Fermi level pinning and the charge transfer contribution to the energy of adsorption at semiconducting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krukowski, Stanisław; Kempisty, Paweł; Strak, Paweł; Sakowski, Konrad

    2014-01-28

    It is shown that charge transfer, the process analogous to formation of semiconductor p-n junction, contributes significantly to adsorption energy at semiconductor surfaces. For the processes without the charge transfer, such as molecular adsorption of closed shell systems, the adsorption energy is determined by the bonding only. In the case involving charge transfer, such as open shell systems like metal atoms or the dissociating molecules, the energy attains different value for the Fermi level differently pinned. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulation of species adsorption at different surfaces, such as SiC(0001) or GaN(0001) confirms these predictions: the molecular adsorption is independent on the coverage, while the dissociative process adsorption energy varies by several electronvolts.

  15. The dynamics of adsorption on clean and adsorbate-modified transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Madix, R.J.

    1991-06-01

    Research is being carried out on both nondissociative and dissociative adsorption of gases on transition metal surfaces, with emphasis on alkanes. Particular attention is be placed on understanding the effects of adsorbed species on adsorption probabilities and on clarifying the role of energy exchange processes at the surface in both dissociative and nondissociative adsorption. Molecular beam methods are coupled with methods of surface science to gain the greatest control of the variables of the problem, including the incident kinetic energy, vibrational energy and angle of incidence of the incoming molecules. The dynamics of both direct and precursor-influenced dissociative adsorption routes are examined. Surface intermediates formed by activated adsorption are identified by vibrational spectroscopy and temperature programmed reaction. Emphasis is on comparative studies of low molecular weight alkanes in order to understand the origin of the differences in their reactivities on different metals.

  16. Diffuse emission and control of copper in urban surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Boller, M A; Steiner, M

    2002-01-01

    Copper washed off from roofs and roads is considered to be a major contribution to diffuse copper pollution of urban environments. In order to guarantee sustainable protection of soils and water, the long-term strategy is to avoid or replace copper containing materials on roofs and fagades. Until achievement of this goal, a special adsorber system is suggested to control the diffuse copper fluxes by retention of copper by a mixture of granulated iron-hydroxide (GEH) and calcium carbonate. Since future stormwater runoff concepts are based on decentralised runoff infiltration into the underground, solutions are proposed which provide for copper retention in infiltration sites using GEH adsorption layers. The example of a large copper façade of which the runoff is treated in an adsorption trench reveals the first full-scale data on façade runoff and adsorber performance. During the first year of investigation average façade runoff concentrations in the range of 1-10 mg Cu/l are reduced by 96-99% in the adsorption ditch. PMID:12380989

  17. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica: Surface structure and adsorption behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Weiya; Li, Dan; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Kai; Li, Jianqiang; Han, Boping; Zhang, Yuanming

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Al-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica for phosphate removal. • It had the maximum adsorption capacity of 23.59 mg P/g. • Over 95% of the final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min. - Abstract: In this study, Al(III)-coordinated diamino-functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Because of well-defined and interconnecting macroporous–mesoporous networks, the resulting adsorbent (MM-SBA) exhibited a significantly better phosphate adsorption performance and faster removal rate, as compared with the mesoporous adsorbent (M-SBA). Based on the Freundlich and Langmuir models, the phosphate adsorption capacity and the maximum adsorption capacity of MM-SBA were 7.99 mg P/g and 23.59 mg P/g, respectively. In the kinetic study of MM-SBA, over 95% of its final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min; whereas that of M-SBA was less than 79%.

  18. Adsorption and surface-enhanced Raman of dyes on silver and gold sols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.C.; Meisel, D.

    1982-08-19

    Several negatively charged dyes were investigated for their possible adsorption on the surface of silver and gold colloidal particles. Those dyes that were found to adsorb on the particles were then checked for surface enhancement of Raman scattering. Highly efficient surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was observed from a carbocyanine dye in both sols. Excitation-dependence studies as well as adsorption studies confirm the SERS nature of the Raman spectra obtained. The dye is probably aggregated on adsorption and is probably attached through the naphthalene side moiety to the surface. Less efficient SERS was also observed for copper phthalocyanine.

  19. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system.

  20. Co-adsorption of phosphate and zinc(II) on the surface of ferrihydrite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Zhu, Runliang; Xu, Tianyuan; Xu, Yin; Ge, Fei; Xi, Yunfei; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping

    2016-02-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is of great importance in affecting the migration and transformation of heavy-metal cations and oxyanions. To advance the understanding of co-adsorption reactions on Fh surface, the co-adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) from aqueous solution to a synthesized Fh was determined. The batch experiments demonstrated a synergistic adsorption of phosphate and Zn(II) on Fh. In the pH range of 3.5-6, the adsorption of the two contaminants showed strong pH dependence in the single solute adsorption systems, but the dependence alleviated in the simultaneous adsorption system. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the chemical shifts of Zn 2p1/2 and Zn 2p3/2 binding energies were more significant than that of P 2p in the single and simultaneous adsorption systems. On the other side, in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) observed increased formation of outer- and inner-sphere complexes of phosphate in the simultaneous system. Thus, the synergistic adsorption of the two contaminants could be attributed to the formation of ternary complexes as well as electrostatic interactions, while surface precipitation could not be completely ruled out. On the basis of the results from both the batch adsorption experiments and structural characterization, these two contaminants were likely to form phosphate-bridged ternary complexes (≡Fe-P-Zn) in the simultaneous adsorption system. PMID:26461439

  1. Dual diffusion and finite mass exchange model for adsorption kinetics in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Do, D.D.; Wang, K.

    1998-01-01

    A model allowing for the finite mass exchange between the two phases is proposed for the description of adsorption kinetics in activated carbon. This model based on Do`s earlier structural model for activated carbon involves three mass-transfer processes: pore diffusion, adsorbed phase diffusion, and finite mass interchange between the fluid and adsorbed phases. The solid phase is heterogeneous, which is characterized by the micropore size distribution. The interaction between the adsorbate molecule and the micropore is calculated from the Lennard-Jones potential theory. The model developed for nonpolar adsorbates is tested with the experimental data of seven adsorbates (paraffin gases, aromatics, carbon dioxide, and sulfur dioxide) on pellets of different shapes and sizes and at various operating conditions. The finite kinetics play an important role in the overall kinetics. Failure to account for this finite kinetics makes the model unable to describe correctly the desorption behavior, since under such conditions, the ability of the particle to release adsorbed molecules is dictated mostly by the resistance at the pore mouth of the micropore.

  2. Hydrogen Reactivity on Highly-hydroxylated TiO2(110) Surfaces Prepared via Carboxylic Acid Adsorption and Photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Wang, Zhitao; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2012-02-27

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, photo stimulated desorption, and density functional theory studies have probed the formation and reactivity of highly-hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, which were prepared via a novel, photochemical route using trimethyl acetic acid (TMAA) dissociative adsorption and subsequent photolysis at 300 K. Deprotonation of TMAA molecules upon adsorption produces both surface bridging hydroxyls (OHb) and bidentate trimethyl acetate (TMA) species with a saturation coverage of near 0.5 monolayer (ML). Ultra-violet light irradiation selectively removes TMA species, producing a highly-hydroxylated surface with up to ~0.5 ML OHb coverage. At high coverages, the OHb species typically occupy second-nearest neighbor sites along the bridging oxygen row locally forming linear (2×1) structures of different lengths, although the surface is less ordered on a long scale. The annealing of the highly-hydroxylated surface leads to hydroxyl recombination and H2O desorption with ~100% yield, thus ruling out the diffusion of H into the bulk that has been suggested in the literature. In agreement with experimental data, theoretical results show that the recombinative H2O desorption is preferred over both H bulk diffusion and H2 desorption processes.

  3. A Study of DNA Adsorption Kinetics on OTS Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Joseph; Fang, Xiaohua; Li, Bingquan; Seo, Young-Soo; Samuilov, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan

    2003-03-01

    The evaporation kinetics of droplets containing DNA were studied as a function of DNA molecular weight, DNA concentration, and buffer concentration.The contact angle and overall droplet morphology were observed using a KSV contact angle goniometer as a function of time. Simultaneously, the DNA distribution and adsorption kinetics were measured with confocal microscopy. The DNA droplets were deposited on hydrophobic OTS-covered silicon surfaces and stained with ethidium bromide solution. Up to three stages were found during DNA droplet drying process, depending on the DNA concentration. The results also show that a ring is formed at the air/solid /liquid interface in a manner similar to that reported for a colloidal suspension by Robert D. Deegan et.a. [Physical Review E, Vol 62, No.1, July 2000, p756-765] The absorbed amount of DNA was obtained by measuring the intensity in the ring. The dynamics and DNA morphology are affected by both the molecular weight and the DNA concentration. Supported by NSF-MRSEC program (DMR-9632525)

  4. Effective diffusion in the region between two surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero Valdes, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a formula for the effective diffusion operator obtained by projecting the three-dimensional diffusion equation onto a two-dimensional plane, assuming reflective boundary conditions at two surfaces in three-dimensional space and a finite transversal stabilization rate.

  5. Effective diffusion in the region between two surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valero Valdes, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a formula for the effective diffusion operator obtained by projecting the three-dimensional diffusion equation onto a two-dimensional plane, assuming reflective boundary conditions at two surfaces in three-dimensional space and a finite transversal stabilization rate.

  6. Effective diffusion in the region between two surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valero Valdes, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a formula for the effective diffusion operator obtained by projecting the three-dimensional diffusion equation onto a two-dimensional plane, assuming reflective boundary conditions at two surfaces in three-dimensional space and a finite transversal stabilization rate. PMID:27627260

  7. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O.; Siegel, M.D.

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  8. Ion beam microtexturing and enhanced surface diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ion beam interactions with solid surfaces are discussed with particular emphasis on microtexturing induced by the deliberate deposition of controllable amounts of an impurity material onto a solid surface while simultaneously sputtering the surface with an ion beam. Experimental study of the optical properties of microtextured surfaces is described. Measurements of both absorptance as a function of wavelength and emissivity are presented. A computer code is described that models the sputtering and ion reflection processes involved in microtexture formation.

  9. The effects of pH and surface composition on Pb adsorption to natural freshwater biofilms.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A R; Lion, L W; Nelson, Y M; Shuler, M L; Ghiorse, W C

    2001-08-01

    Two dominant variables that control the adsorption of toxic trace metals to suspended particulate materials and aquatic surface coatings are surface composition and solution pH. A model for the pH-dependent adsorption of Pbto heterogeneous particulate surface mixtures was derived from experimental evaluation of Pb adsorption to laboratory-derived surrogates. The surrogate materials were selected to represent natural reactive surface components. Pb adsorption to both the laboratory surrogates and natural biofilms was determined in chemically defined solutions under controlled laboratory conditions. Pb adsorption was measured over a pH range of 5-8, with an initial Pb concentration in solution of 2.0 microM. The surface components considered include amorphous Fe oxide, biogenic Mn oxide produced by a Mn(II) oxidizing bacterium (Leptothrix discophora SS-1), Al oxide, the common green alga Chlorella vulgaris, and Leptothrix discophora SS-1 cells. A linearization of Pb adsorption data for each adsorbent was used to quantify the relationship between Pb adsorption and pH. The parameters for individual adsorbents were incorporated into an additive model to predict the total Pb adsorption in multiple-adsorbent natural surface coatings that were collected from Cayuga Lake, NY. Pb adsorption experiments on the natural surface coatings at variable pH were utilized to verify the additive model predictions based on the pH dependent behavior of the experimental laboratory surrogates. Observed Pb adsorption is consistent with the model predictions (within 1-24%) over the range of solution pH values considered. The experimental results indicate that the combination of Fe and biogenic Mn oxides can contribute as much as 90% of Pb adsorbed on Cayuga Lake biofilms, with the dominant adsorbent switching from Mn to Fe oxide with increasing pH. PMID:11505999

  10. Adsorption of the antimicrobial peptide tritrpticin onto solid and liquid surfaces: Ion-specific effects.

    PubMed

    Salay, Luiz C; Petri, Denise F S; Nakaie, Clovis R; Schreier, Shirley

    2015-12-01

    Developing functional biointerfaces is important for technological applications. We investigated the interaction and adsorption of the antimicrobial peptide tritrpticin (VRRFPWWWPFLRR, TRP3) onto solid and liquid surfaces and the influence of ions on these processes by several techniques. Surface tension measurements showed that salt addition to TRP3 solution causes a high decrease of surface tension due to the adsorption of TRP3 at air-liquid surface. Ellipsometry studies show the TRP3 adsorption on silicon surfaces forming nanometric films that are able to further interact with liposomes. Contact angle measurements gave insight on the nature of thin film and its roughness. AFM shows the topology of the film on the solid substrates. In addition, those techniques also showed that anions can act as modulators on adsorption phenomena and are correlated with the Hofmeister series. The findings of the current work are relevant for the development of functional interfaces such as biocidal surfaces. PMID:26529674

  11. Surface modification of chitin using ultrasound-assisted and supercritical CO2 technologies for cobalt adsorption.

    PubMed

    Dotto, Guilherme L; Cunha, Jeanine M; Calgaro, Camila O; Tanabe, Eduardo H; Bertuol, Daniel A

    2015-09-15

    Ultrasound-assisted (UA) and supercritical CO2 technologies (SCO2) were used to modify the chitin surface and, improve its adsorption characteristics regarding to cobalt. Chitin, before and after the treatments, was characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms (BET), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Unmodified and surface modified chitins were used as adsorbents to remove cobalt from aqueous solutions. The adsorption study was performed by equilibrium isotherms and kinetic curves. The chitin particle characteristics, such as, surface area, pore volume and porosity were improved by the UA and SCO2 treatments. The crystallinity index decreased after the UA and SCO2 treatments, and also, intense surface modifications were observed. Langmuir and Freundlich models were adequate to represent the adsorption equilibrium. The maximum adsorption capacities were 50.03, 83.94 and 63.08 mg g(-1) for unmodified chitin, UA surface modified chitin and SCO2 surface modified chitin. The adsorption kinetic curves were well represented by the pseudo-second order model. UA and SCO2 technologies are alternatives to modify the chitin surface and improve its adsorption characteristics.

  12. [Surface characteristics of alkali modified activated carbon and the adsorption capacity of methane].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng-Zhu; Li, Lin; Liu, Jun-Xin; Sun, Yong-Jun; Li, Guo-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Coconut shell based activated carbon was modified by alkali with different concentrations. The surface structures of tested carbons were observed and analyzed by SEM and BET methods. Boehm's titration and SEM/EDS methods were applied to assay the functional groups and elements on the carbon surface. The adsorption of methane on tested carbons was investigated and adsorption behavior was described by the adsorption isotherms. Results showed that surface area and pore volume of modified carbon increased and surface oxygen groups decreased as the concentration of the alkali used increased, with no obvious change in pore size. When concentration of alkali was higher than 3.3 mol x L(-1), the specific surface area and pore volume of modified carbon was larger than that of original carbon. Methane adsorption capacity of alkali modified carbon increased 24%. Enlargement of surface area and pore volume, reduction of surface oxygen groups will benefit to enhance the methane adsorption ability on activated carbon. Adsorption behavior of methane followed the Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption coefficient was 163.7 m3 x mg(-1).

  13. Site-Specific Scaling Relations for Hydrocarbon Adsorption on Hexagonal Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Montemore, Matthew M.; Medlin, James W.

    2013-10-03

    Screening a large number of surfaces for their catalytic performance remains a challenge, leading to the need for simple models to predict adsorption properties. To facilitate rapid prediction of hydrocarbon adsorption energies, scaling relations that allow for calculation of the adsorption energy of any intermediate attached to any symmetric site on any hexagonal metal surface through a carbon atom were developed. For input, these relations require only simple electronic properties of the surface and of the gas-phase reactant molecules. Determining adsorption energies consists of up to four steps: (i) calculating the adsorption energy of methyl in the top site using density functional theory or by simple relations based on the electronic structure of the surface; (ii) using modified versions of classical scaling relations to scale between methyl in the top site and C₁ species with more metal-surface bonds (i.e., C, CH, CH₂) in sites that complete adsorbate tetravalency; (iii) using gas-phase bond energies to predict adsorption energies of longer hydrocarbons (i.e., CR, CR₂, CR₃); and (iv) expressing energetic changes upon translation of hydrocarbons to various sites in terms of the number of agostic interactions and the change in the number of carbon-metal bonds. Combining all of these relations allows accurate scaling over a wide range of adsorbates and surfaces, resulting in efficient screening of catalytic surfaces and a clear elucidation of adsorption trends. The relations are used to explain trends in methane reforming, hydrocarbon chain growth, and propane dehydrogenation.

  14. Influence of activated carbon characteristics on toluene and hexane adsorption: Application of surface response methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo, Mª Teresa; de Yuso, Alicia Martínez; Valenciano, Raquel; Rubio, Begoña; Pino, Mª Rosa

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption capacity of toluene and hexane over activated carbons prepared according an experimental design, considering as variables the activation temperature, the impregnation ratio and the activation time. The response surface methodology was applied to optimize the adsorption capacity of the carbons regarding the preparation conditions that determine the physicochemical characteristics of the activated carbons. The methodology of preparation produced activated carbons with surface areas and micropore volumes as high as 1128 m2/g and 0.52 cm3/g, respectively. Moreover, the activated carbons exhibit mesoporosity, ranging from 64.6% to 89.1% the percentage of microporosity. The surface chemistry was characterized by TPD, FTIR and acid-base titration obtaining different values of surface groups from the different techniques because the limitation of each technique, but obtaining similar trends for the activated carbons studied. The exhaustive characterization of the activated carbons allows to state that the measured surface area does not explain the adsorption capacity for either toluene or n-hexane. On the other hand, the surface chemistry does not explain the adsorption results either. A compromise between physical and chemical characteristics can be obtained from the appropriate activation conditions, and the response surface methodology gives the optimal activated carbon to maximize adsorption capacity. Low activation temperature, intermediate impregnation ratio lead to high toluene and n-hexane adsorption capacities depending on the activation time, which a determining factor to maximize toluene adsorption.

  15. Computer simulations of adsorption and diffusion for binary mixtures of methane and hydrogen in titanosilicates.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Martha C; Gallo, Marco; Nenoff, Tina M

    2004-07-22

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of equimolar mixtures of hydrogen and methane were performed in three different titanosilicates: naturally occurring zorite and two synthetic titanosilicates, ETS-4 and ETS-10. In addition, single-component MD simulations and adsorption isotherms generated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations were performed to support the mixture simulations. The goal of this study was to determine the best membrane material to carry out hydrogen/methane separations. ETS-10 has a three-dimensional pore network. ETS-4 and zorite have two-dimensional pore networks. The simulations carried out in this study show that the increased porosity of ETS-10 results in self-diffusion coefficients for both hydrogen and methane that are higher in ETS-10 than in either ETS-4 or zorite. Methane only showed appreciable displacement in ETS-10. The ability of the methane molecules to move in all three directions in ETS-10 was demonstrated by the high degree of isotropy shown in the values of the x, y, and z components of the self-diffusion coefficient for methane in ETS-10. From our simulations we conclude that ETS-10 would be better suited for fast industrial separations of hydrogen and methane. However, the separation would not result in a pure hydrogen stream. In contrast, ETS-4 and zorite would act as true molecular sieves for separations of hydrogen and methane, as the methane would not move through membranes made of these materials. This was indicated by the near-zero self-diffusion coefficient of methane in ETS-4 and zorite. PMID:15260743

  16. Adsorption of lysozyme on base metal surfaces in the presence of an external electric potential.

    PubMed

    Ei Ei, Htwe; Nakama, Yuhi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Imamura, Koreyoshi

    2016-11-01

    The impact of external electric potential on the adsorption of a protein to base metal surfaces was examined. Hen egg white lysozyme (LSZ) and six types of base metal plates (stainless steel SUS316L (St), Ti, Ta, Zr, Cr, or Ni) were used as the protein and adsorption surface, respectively. LSZ was allowed to adsorb on the surface under different conditions (surface potential, pH, electrolyte type and concentration, surface material), which was monitored using an ellipsometer. LSZ adsorption was minimized in the potential range above a certain threshold and, in the surface potential range below the threshold, decreasing the surface potential increased the amount of protein adsorbed. The threshold potential for LSZ adsorption was shifted toward a positive value with increasing pH and was lower for Ta and Zr than for the others. A divalent anion salt (K2SO4) as an electrolyte exhibited the adsorption of LSZ in the positive potential range while a monovalent salt (KCl) did not. A comprehensive consideration of the obtained results suggests that two modes of interactions, namely the electric force by an external electric field and electrostatic interactions with ionized surface hydroxyl groups, act on the LSZ molecules and determine the extent of suppression of LSZ adsorption. All these findings appear to support the view that a base metal surface can be controlled for the affinity to a protein by manipulating the surface electric potential as has been reported on some electrode materials. PMID:27478958

  17. Adsorption of lysozyme on base metal surfaces in the presence of an external electric potential.

    PubMed

    Ei Ei, Htwe; Nakama, Yuhi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Imamura, Koreyoshi

    2016-11-01

    The impact of external electric potential on the adsorption of a protein to base metal surfaces was examined. Hen egg white lysozyme (LSZ) and six types of base metal plates (stainless steel SUS316L (St), Ti, Ta, Zr, Cr, or Ni) were used as the protein and adsorption surface, respectively. LSZ was allowed to adsorb on the surface under different conditions (surface potential, pH, electrolyte type and concentration, surface material), which was monitored using an ellipsometer. LSZ adsorption was minimized in the potential range above a certain threshold and, in the surface potential range below the threshold, decreasing the surface potential increased the amount of protein adsorbed. The threshold potential for LSZ adsorption was shifted toward a positive value with increasing pH and was lower for Ta and Zr than for the others. A divalent anion salt (K2SO4) as an electrolyte exhibited the adsorption of LSZ in the positive potential range while a monovalent salt (KCl) did not. A comprehensive consideration of the obtained results suggests that two modes of interactions, namely the electric force by an external electric field and electrostatic interactions with ionized surface hydroxyl groups, act on the LSZ molecules and determine the extent of suppression of LSZ adsorption. All these findings appear to support the view that a base metal surface can be controlled for the affinity to a protein by manipulating the surface electric potential as has been reported on some electrode materials.

  18. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA.

  19. Surface modification of activated carbon for enhanced adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the research was to examine the effect of increasing carbon surface basicity on uptake of perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) by activated carbon. Granular activated carbons made from coal, coconut shell, wood, and phenolic-polymer-based activated carbon fibers were modified through high-temperature and ammonia gas treatments to facilitate systematical evaluation of the impact of basicity of different origins. Comparison of adsorption isotherms and adsorption distribution coefficients showed that the ammonia gas treatment was more effective than the high-temperature treatment in enhancing surface basicity. The resultant higher point of zero charges and total basicity (measured by total HCl uptake) correlated with improved adsorption affinity for PFOS and PFOA. The effectiveness of surface modification to enhance adsorption varied with carbon raw material. Wood-based carbons and activated carbon fibers showed enhancement by one to three orders of magnitudes while other materials could experience reduction in adsorption towards either PFOS or PFOA. PMID:26469934

  20. Surface Structural Ion Adsorption Modeling of Competitive Binding of Oxyanions by Metal (Hydr)oxides.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra; Van Riemsdijk WH

    1999-02-01

    Spectroscopy has provided a progressive flow of information concerning the binding mechanism(s) of ions and their surface-complex structure. An important challenge in surface complexation models (SCM) is to connect the molecular microscopic reality to macroscopic adsorption phenomena. This is important because SCM alone provide insufficient insight in the binding mechanisms, and moreover, it is a priori not obvious that SCM, which describe the pH dependent adsorption correctly in simple systems, will predict the ion interaction under multicomponent conditions. This study elucidates the primary factor controlling the adsorption process by analysing the adsorption and competition of PO4, AsO4, and SeO3. We show that the structure of the surface-complex acting in the dominant electrostatic field can be ascertained as the primary controlling adsorption factor. The surface species of arsenate are identical with those of phosphate and the adsorption behavior is very similar. On the basis of the selenite adsorption, we show that the commonly used 2pK models are incapable to incorporate in the adsorption modeling the correct bidentate binding mechanism found by spectroscopy. The use of the bidentate mechanism leads to a proton-oxyanion ratio and corresponding pH dependency that are too large. The inappropriate intrinsic charge attribution to the primary surface groups and the condensation of the inner sphere surface complex to a point charge are responsible for this behavior of commonly used 2pK models. Both key factors are differently defined in the charge distributed multi site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model and are based in this model on a surface structural approach. The CD-MUSIC model can successfully describe the macroscopic adsorption phenomena using the surface speciation and binding mechanisms as found by spectroscopy. The model is also able to predict the anion competition well. The charge distribution in the interface is in agreement with the observed structure

  1. Anomalous Surface Diffusion in Nanoscale Direct Deposition Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, P.; Jang, J.; Schatz, G. C.; Ratner, M. A.; Hong, S.

    2003-03-01

    We report the first observation of anomalous diffusion in nanometer scale direct deposition processes utilizing dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). DPN permits quite general nanostructure patterns to be drawn on flat surfaces. Here we demonstrate experimentally, and discuss theoretically, the situation in which the molecular ink in DPN binds weakly to the surface. We observe, for the weak-binding case of 1-dodecylamine on mica, that anomalous diffusion occurs, leading to nearly fractal deposition patterns.

  2. [In situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy study of CO adsorption on Ni2P/mesoporous molecule sieve catalysts].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian-qian; Ji, Sheng-fu; Wu, Ping-yi; Hu, Lin-hua; Huang, Xiao-fan; Zhu, Ji-qin; Li, Cheng-yue

    2009-05-01

    Abstract The supported nickel phosphate precursors were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using nickel nitrate as nickel source, diammonium hydrogen phosphate as phosphorus source, and MCM-41, MCM-48, SBA-15 and SBA-16 as supports, respectively. Then, the supported Ni2 P catalysts were prepared by temperature-programmed reduction in flowing Hz from their nickel phosphate precursors. The in situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis with the probe molecule CO was carried out to characterize the surface properties. The results indicated that there were significant differences in the spectral features of the samples. The upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on mesoporous molecule sieve was attributed to weak physical adsorption. There are four different kinds of upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on Ni2 P/MCM-41 catalyst with the following assignments: (1) the formation of Ni(CO)4 at 2055 cm(-1). (2) CO terminally bonded to cus Ni(delta+) (0adsorption on Ni2P/MCM-48, Ni2P/SBA-15 and Ni2P/SBA-16 catalysts is due to the formation of Ni(CO)4 species. The other upsilon absorbances observed at 2093-2096 cm(-1) was attributed to CO terminally bonded to cus Ni(delta+) (0

  3. Specific surface area effect on adsorption of chlorpyrifos and TCP by soils and modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adsorption of chlorpyrifos and TCP (3,5,6, trichloro-2-pyridinol) was determined in four soils (Mollisol, Inceptisol, Entisol, Alfisol) having different specific surface areas (19–84 m2/g) but rather similar organic matter content (2.4–3.5%). Adsorption isotherms were derived from batch equilibr...

  4. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption will be presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model w...

  5. Surface-water Interface Induces Conformational Changes Critical for Protein Adsorption: Implications for Monolayer Formation of EAS Hydrophobin

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Kamron; Christofferson, Andrew; Penna, Matthew; Winkler, Dave; Maclaughlin, Shane; Yarovsky, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The class I hydrophobin EAS is part of a family of small, amphiphilic fungal proteins best known for their ability to self-assemble into stable monolayers that modify the hydrophobicity of a surface to facilitate further microbial growth. These proteins have attracted increasing attention for industrial and biomedical applications, with the aim of designing surfaces that have the potential to maintain their clean state by resisting non-specific protein binding. To gain a better understanding of this process, we have employed all-atom molecular dynamics to study initial stages of the spontaneous adsorption of monomeric EAS hydrophobin on fully hydroxylated silica, a commonly used industrial and biomedical substrate. Particular interest has been paid to the Cys3-Cys4 loop, which has been shown to exhibit disruptive behavior in solution, and the Cys7-Cys8 loop, which is believed to be involved in the aggregation of EAS hydrophobin at interfaces. Specific and water mediated interactions with the surface were also analyzed. We have identified two possible binding motifs, one which allows unfolding of the Cys7-Cys8 loop due to the surfactant-like behavior of the Cys3-Cys4 loop, and another which has limited unfolding due to the Cys3-Cys4 loop remaining disordered in solution. We have also identified intermittent interactions with water which mediate the protein adsorption to the surface, as well as longer lasting interactions which control the diffusion of water around the adsorption site. These results have shown that EAS behaves in a similar way at the air-water and surface-water interfaces, and have also highlighted the need for hydrophilic ligand functionalization of the silica surface in order to prevent the adsorption of EAS hydrophobin. PMID:26636091

  6. Adsorption of alkenyl succinic anhydride from solutions in carbon tetrachloride on a fine magnetite surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmasova, O. V.; Ramazanova, A. G.; Korolev, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of alkenyl succinic anhydride from a solution in carbon tetrachloride on a fine magnetite surface at a temperature of 298.15 K is studied using fine magnetite, which forms the basis of magnetic fluids, as the adsorbent. An adsorption isotherm is recorded and interpreted in terms of the theory of the volume filling of micropores (TVFM). Adsorption process parameters are calculated on the basis of the isotherm. It is shown that at low equilibrium concentrations, the experimental adsorption isotherm is linear in the TVFM equation coordinates.

  7. Application of surface complexation models to anion adsorption by natural materials.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    Various chemical models of ion adsorption are presented and discussed. Chemical models, such as surface complexation models, provide a molecular description of anion adsorption reactions using an equilibrium approach. Two such models, the constant capacitance model and the triple layer model, are described in the present study. Characteristics common to all the surface complexation models are equilibrium constant expressions, mass and charge balances, and surface activity coefficient electrostatic potential terms. Methods for determining parameter values for surface site density, capacitances, and surface complexation constants also are discussed. Spectroscopic experimental methods of establishing ion adsorption mechanisms include vibrational spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray reflectivity. Experimental determinations of point of zero charge shifts and ionic strength dependence of adsorption results and molecular modeling calculations also can be used to deduce adsorption mechanisms. Applications of the surface complexation models to heterogeneous natural materials, such as soils, using the component additivity and the generalized composite approaches are described. Emphasis is on the generalized composite approach for predicting anion adsorption by soils. Continuing research is needed to develop consistent and realistic protocols for describing ion adsorption reactions on soil minerals and soils. The availability of standardized model parameter databases for use in chemical speciation-transport models is critical. PMID:24619924

  8. Hydrogen Bonding Slows Down Surface Diffusion of Molecular Glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinshan; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Lian

    2016-08-18

    Surface-grating decay has been measured for three organic glasses with extensive hydrogen bonding: sorbitol, maltitol, and maltose. For 1000 nm wavelength gratings, the decay occurs by viscous flow in the entire range of temperature studied, covering the viscosity range 10(5)-10(11) Pa s, whereas under the same conditions, the decay mechanism transitions from viscous flow to surface diffusion for organic glasses of similar molecular sizes but with no or limited hydrogen bonding. These results indicate that extensive hydrogen bonding slows down surface diffusion in organic glasses. This effect arises because molecules can preserve hydrogen bonding even near the surface so that the loss of nearest neighbors does not translate into a proportional decrease of the kinetic barrier for diffusion. This explanation is consistent with a strong correlation between liquid fragility and the surface enhancement of diffusion, both reporting resistance of a liquid to dynamic excitation. Slow surface diffusion is expected to hinder any processes that rely on surface transport, for example, surface crystal growth and formation of stable glasses by vapor deposition. PMID:27404465

  9. Diffusion on (110) Surface of Molecular Crystal Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Golfinopoulos, T; Gee, R H; Huang, H

    2007-01-25

    Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the diffusion mechanisms of admolecules on the (110) surface of molecular crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate. Our results show that (1) admolecules are stable at off lattice sites, (2) admolecules diffuse along close-packed [1{bar 1}1] and [{bar 1}11] directions, and (3) admolecules detach from the surface at 350K and above. Based on the number of diffusion jumps as a function of temperature, we estimate the jump frequency to be v=1.14 x 10{sup 12} e{sup -0.08eV/kT} per second.

  10. Adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids by carbonaceous adsorbents: Effect of carbon surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption by carbonaceous sorbents is among the most feasible processes to remove perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) from drinking and ground waters. However, carbon surface chemistry, which has long been recognized essential for dictating performance of such sorbents, has never been considered for PFOS and PFOA adsorption. Thus, the role of surface chemistry was systematically investigated using sorbents with a wide range in precursor material, pore structure, and surface chemistry. Sorbent surface chemistry overwhelmed physical properties in controlling the extent of uptake. The adsorption affinity was positively correlated carbon surface basicity, suggesting that high acid neutralizing or anion exchange capacity was critical for substantial uptake of PFOS and PFOA. Carbon polarity or hydrophobicity had insignificant impact on the extent of adsorption. Synthetic polymer-based Ambersorb and activated carbon fibers were more effective than activated carbon made of natural materials in removing PFOS and PFOA from aqueous solutions.

  11. Designing transition metal surfaces for their adsorption properties and chemical reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemore, Matthew M.

    Many technological processes, such as catalysis, electrochemistry, corrosion, and some materials synthesis techniques, involve molecules bonding to and/or reacting on surfaces. For many of these applications, transition metals have proven to have excellent chemical reactivity, and this reactivity is strongly tied to the surface's adsorption properties. This thesis focuses on predicting adsorption properties for use in the design of transition metal surfaces for various applications. First, it is shown that adsorption through a particular atom (e.g, C or O) can be treated in a unified way. This allows predictions of all C-bound adsorbates from a single, simple adsorbate, such as CH3. In particular, consideration of the adsorption site can improve the applicability of previous approaches, and gas-phase bond energies correlate with adsorption energies for similarly bound adsorbates. Next, a general framework is presented for understanding and predicting adsorption through any atom. The energy of the adsorbate's highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) determines the strength of the repulsion between the adsorbate and the surface. Because adsorbates with similar HOMO energies behave similarly, their adsorption energies correlate. This can improve the efficiency of predictions, but more importantly it constrains catalyst design and suggests strategies for circumventing these constraints. Further, the behavior of adsorbates with dissimilar HOMO energies varies in a systematic way, allowing predictions of adsorption energy differences between any two adsorbates. These differences are also useful in surface design. In both of these cases, the dependence of adsorption energies on surface electronic properties is explored. This dependence is used to justify the unified treatments mentioned above, and is used to gain further insight into adsorption. The properties of the surface's d band and p band control variations in adsorption energy, as does the strength of the

  12. Adsorption of hyaluronic acid on solid supports: role of pH and surface chemistry in thin film self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Linardy, Eric; Dreaden, Erik C; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Hammond, Paula T; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-06-15

    Owing to its biocompatibility, resistance to biofouling, and desirable physicochemical and biological properties, hyaluronic acid (HA) has been widely used to modify the surface of various materials. The role of various physicochemical factors in HA adsorption remains, however, to be clarified. Herein, we employed quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) in order to investigate HA adsorption at different pH conditions onto three substrates-silicon oxide, amine-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold, and carboxylic acid-terminated SAM on gold. The QCM-D experiments indicated specific pH conditions where either strong or weak HA adsorption occurs. The morphology of the adsorbed HA layers was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and we identified that strong HA adsorption produced a complete, homogenous and smooth HA layer, while weak HA adsorption resulted in rough and inhomogeneous HA layers. The observed specifics of the kinetics of HA adsorption, including a short initial linear phase and subsequent long non-linear phase, were described by using a mean-field kinetic model taking HA diffusion limitations and reconfiguration in the adsorbed state into account. The findings extend the physicochemical background of design strategies for improving the use of passive HA adsorption for surface modification applications.

  13. Kinetics and mechanisms for the adsorption, dissociation, and diffusion of hydrogen in Ni and Ni/YSZ slabs: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meng Hsiung; Chen, Hsin-Tsung; Wang, Yao-Chun; Ju, Shin-Pon; Chang, Jee-Gong; Lin, M C

    2012-04-01

    The adsorption, dissociation, and diffusion of hydrogen in Ni(100) and Ni(100)/YSZ(100) slabs with two different interfaces (Ni/cation and Ni/O interface) have been studied by the density functional theory (DFT) with the Perdew-Wang functional. The H(2) molecule is found to preferentially absorb on a Top (T) site with side-on configuration on the Ni(100) surface, while the H-atom is strongly bound at a fcc Hollow (H) site. The barrier for the H(2) dissociation on both surfaces is calculated to be only ~0.1 eV. The potential energy pathways of H diffusion on pure Ni and Ni/YSZ with the two different interfaces are studied. Our calculated results show that the H-atom diffusion occurs via surface path rather than the bulk path. For the bulk path in Ni/YSZ, H-atom migration can occur more readily at the Ni/cation interface compared to the Ni/O interface. The existence of vacancy in the interface region is found to improve the mobility of H-atoms at the interface of Ni/YSZ slab. The rate constants for hydrogen dissociation and diffusion in pure Ni and Ni/YSZ are predicted.

  14. Surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence during adsorption of oxygen on magnesium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2015-12-28

    The dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecules on magnesium surfaces represents a non-adiabatic reaction exhibiting exoelectron emission, chemicurrent generation, and weak chemiluminescence. Using thin film Mg/Ag/p-Si(111) Schottky diodes with 1 nm Mg on a 10-60 nm thick Ag layer as 2π-photodetectors, the chemiluminescence is internally detected with a much larger efficiency than external methods. The chemically induced photoyield shows a maximum for a Ag film thickness of 45 nm. The enhancement is explained by surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence, i.e., surface plasmon polaritons are effectively excited in the Ag layer by the oxidation reaction and decay radiatively leading to the observed photocurrent. Model calculations of the maximum absorption in attenuated total reflection geometry support the interpretation. The study demonstrates the extreme sensitivity and the practical usage of internal detection schemes for investigating surface chemiluminescence.

  15. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  16. Ion-beam-induced topography and surface diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. S.; Rossnagel, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the development of surface topography along with enhanced surface and bulk diffusion processes accompanying ion bombardment have generated growing interest among users of ion beams and plasmas for thin film or material processing. Interest in these processes stems both from attempts to generate topographic changes for specific studies or applications and from the need to suppress or control undesirable changes. The present investigation provides a summary of the current status of impurity-induced texturing, with emphasis on recent developments. Particular attention is given to the texturing accompanying deposition of an impurity material onto a solid surface while simultaneously etching the surface with an ion beam. A description of experimental considerations is provided, and a thermal-diffusion model is discussed along with the development of sputter cones, and aspects of impact-enhanced surface diffusion.

  17. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  18. Sputter deposited bioceramic coatings: surface characterisation and initial protein adsorption studies using surface-MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Boyd, A R; Burke, G A; Duffy, H; Holmberg, M; O' Kane, C; Meenan, B J; Kingshott, P

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto calcium phosphate (Ca-P) bioceramics utilised in hard tissue implant applications has been highlighted as one of the key events that influences the subsequent biological response, in vivo. This work reports on the use of surface-matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry (Surface-MALDI-MS) as a technique for the direct detection of foetal bovine serum (FBS) proteins adsorbed to hybrid calcium phosphate/titanium dioxide surfaces produced by a novel radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering method incorporating in situ annealing between 500°C and 700°C during deposition. XRD and XPS analysis indicated that the coatings produced at 700°C were hybrid in nature, with the presence of Ca-P and titanium dioxide clearly observed in the outer surface layer. In addition to this, the Ca/P ratio was seen to increase with increasing annealing temperature, with values of between 2.0 and 2.26 obtained for the 700°C samples. After exposure to FBS solution, surface-MALDI-MS indicated that there were significant differences in the protein patterns as shown by unique peaks detected at masses below 23.1 kDa for the different surfaces. These adsorbates were assigned to a combination of growth factors and lipoproteins present in serum. From the data obtained here it is evident that surface-MALDI-MS has significant utility as a tool for studying the dynamic nature of protein adsorption onto the surfaces of bioceramic coatings, which most likely plays a significant role in subsequent bioactivity of the materials.

  19. A combined QCM and XPS investigation of asphaltene adsorption on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rudrake, Amit; Karan, Kunal; Horton, J Hugh

    2009-04-01

    To investigate asphaltene-metal interactions, a combined quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of asphaltene adsorption on a gold surface was conducted. Adsorption experiments were conducted at 25 degrees C with solutions of asphaltenes in toluene at concentrations ranging from 50 to 1500 ppm. QCM measurements yielded information on the kinetics of adsorption and further assessment of the data allowed the estimation of equilibrium adsorption levels. XPS analysis of adsorbed and bulk asphaltene demonstrated the presence of carboxylic, thiophenic, sulfide, pyridinic and pyrrolic type functional groups. The intensity of the main carbon (C-H) peak was related to surface coverage of adsorbed asphaltene as a function of asphaltene concentration by a simple mathematical model. The mass adsorption data from the QCM experiments also allowed estimation of the surface coverage, which was compared to those from XPS analyses. Surface coverage estimates as a function of asphaltene concentration could be described by a Langmuir (type-I) isotherm. The free energy of asphaltene adsorption was estimated to be -26.8+/-0.1 and -27.3+/-0.1 kJ/mol from QCM and XPS data, respectively assuming asphaltene molar mass of 750 g/gmol. QCM and XPS data was also analyzed to estimate adsorbed layer thickness after accounting for surface coverage. The thickness of the adsorbed asphaltene estimated from both XPS and QCM data analyses ranged from 6-8 nm over the entire range of adsorption concentrations investigated.

  20. Adsorption of chlorophenols from aqueous solutions by pristine and surface functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ding, Han; Li, Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaojian; Chen, Chao

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of six kinds of chlorophenols on pristine, hydroxylated and carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been investigated. Pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models were used to describe the kinetic data. All adsorption isotherms were well fitted with Langmuir, Freundlich and Polanyi-Manes models, due to surface adsorption dominating the adsorption process. The close linear relationship between logKow and logKd suggested that hydrophobicity played an important role in the adsorption. The SWCNTs' adsorption capacity for chlorophenols was weakened by addition of oxygen-containing functional groups on the surface, due to the loss of specific surface area, the increase of hydrophilicity and the reduction of π-π interaction. The best adsorption capacity of pristine SWCNTs, SWCNT-OH and SWCNT-COOH for six chlorophenols varied from 19 to 84mg/g, from 19 to 65mg/g and from 17 to 65mg/g, respectively. The effect of pH on the adsorption of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), was also studied. When pH is over the pKa of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP), its removal dropped sharply. When ionic strength increased (NaCl or KCl concentration from 0 to 0.02mmol/L), the adsorption capacity of 2,6-DCP on pristine SWCNTs decreased slightly. The comparison of chlorophenols adsorption by SWCNTs, MWCNTs and PAC was made, indicating that the adsorption rate of CNTs was much faster than that of PAC. The results provide useful information about the feasibility of SWCNTs as an adsorbent to remove chlorophenols from aqueous solutions.

  1. Adsorption of oxygen atom on MoSi2 (110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. P.; Li, X. P.; Wang, H. J.; Jiang, Y.; Yi, D. Q.

    2016-09-01

    The adsorption energy, structural relaxation and electronic properties of oxygen atom on MoSi2 (110) surface have been investigated by first-principles calculations. The energetic stability of MoSi2 low-index surfaces was analyzed, and the results suggested that MoSi2 (110) surface had energetically stability. The site of oxygen atom adsorbed on MoSi2 (110) surface were discussed, and the results indicated that the preference adsorption site of MoSi2 (110) surface for oxygen atom was H site (hollow position). Our calculated work should help to understand further the interaction between oxygen atoms and MoSi2 surfaces.

  2. Selective homopolymer adsorption on structured surfaces as a model for pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Gemünden, Patrick; Behringer, Hans

    2013-01-14

    Homopolymer adsorption onto chemically structured periodic surfaces and its potential for pattern recognition is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. To analyze the surface-induced selective adsorption on a fundamental geometric level polymer chains are represented by freely jointed chains with a fixed bond length whose monomers are attracted by the sites of regular lattice patterns. The structural properties of the adsorbed low-temperature state are comprehensively discussed for different lattices by looking at the radius of gyration and the inter bond angle distributions. These observables show a non-trivial dependence on the commensurability of characteristic lengths given by the lattice constant and by the bond length. Reasons for this behavior are given by exploiting geometric and entropic arguments. The findings are examined in the context of pattern recognition by polymer adsorption. Furthermore, the adsorption transition is discussed briefly. For certain incommensurable situations the adsorption occurs in two steps due to entropic restrictions.

  3. On the hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on Cu surfaces and nanorows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Falcón, Leny; Viñes, Francesc; Notario-Estévez, Almudena; Illas, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Here we present a thorough density functional theory study, including and excluding dispersive forces interaction description, on the adsorption and dissociation of H2 molecule on the low-index Miller Cu (111), (100), and (110) surfaces and two different surface Cu nanorows, all displaying a different number of surface nearest neighbors, nn. The computational setup has been optimized granting an accuracy below 0.04 eV. Surface and nanorow energies-for which a new methodology to extract them is presented- are found to follow the nn number. However, the adsorption strength is found not to. Thus, the adsorption energies seem to be governed by a particular orbital ↔ band interaction rather than by the simple nn surface saturation. The van der Waals (vdW) forces are found to play a key role in the adsorption of H2, and merely an energetic adjustment on chemisorbed H adatoms. Neither clear trends are observed for H2 and H adsorption energies, and H2 dissociation energy with respect nn, and nor Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi, making H2 adsorption and dissociation a trend outlier compared to other cases. H2 is found to adsorb and dissociate on Cu(100) surface. On the Cu(111) surface, the rather small H2 adsorption energy would prevent H2 dissociation, regardless if it is thermodynamically driven. On Cu(110) surface, the H2 dissociation process would be endothermic and achievable if adsorption energy is released on surpassing the dissociation energy barrier. On low-coordinated sites on Cu nanorows, vdW plays a key role in the H2 dissociation process, which otherwise is found to be endothermic. Indeed, dispersive forces turn the process markedly exothermic. Nanoparticle Cu systems must display Cu(100) surfaces or facets in order to dissociate H2, vital in many hydrogenation processes.

  4. Periodic Density Functional Theory Study of Water Adsorption on the a-Quartz (101) Surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Bandura, Andrei V.; Kubicki, James D.; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2011-01-01

    Plane wave density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the atomic structure, preferred H2O adsorption sites, adsorption energies, and vibrational frequencies for water adsorption on the R-quartz (101) surface. Surface energies and atomic displacements on the vacuum-reconstructed, hydrolyzed, and solvated surfaces have been calculated and compared with available experimental and theoretical data. By considering different initial positions of H2O molecules, the most stable structures of water adsorption at different coverages have been determined. Calculated H2O adsorption energies are in the range -55 to -65 kJ/mol, consistent with experimental data. The lowest and the highest O-H stretching vibrational bands may be attributed to different states of silanol groups on the watercovered surface. The dissociation energy of the silanol group on the surface covered by the adsorption monolayer is estimated to be 80 kJ/mol. The metastable states for the protonated surface bridging O atoms (Obr), which may lead to hydrolysis of siloxane bonds, have been investigated. The calculated formation energy of a Q2 center from a Q3 center on the (101) surface with 2/3 dense monolayer coverage is equal to 70 kJ/mol which is in the range of experimental activation energies for quartz dissolution.

  5. Laboratory Studies of Perchlorate Deliquescence and Water Adsorption at the Surface of Mars with Raman Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    Laser Raman scattering has been applied in order to experimentally study the exchange of water between the surface and atmosphere on Mars. Results show that both deliquescence of salts and adsorption by minerals are likely currently active processes.

  6. A Multiscale Analysis of Diffusions on Rapidly Varying Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, A. B.; Elliott, C. M.; Pavliotis, G. A.; Stuart, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    Lateral diffusion of molecules on surfaces plays a very important role in various biological processes, including lipid transport across the cell membrane, synaptic transmission, and other phenomena such as exo- and endocytosis, signal transduction, chemotaxis, and cell growth. In many cases, the surfaces can possess spatial inhomogeneities and/or be rapidly changing shape. Using a generalization of the model for a thermally excited Helfrich elastic membrane, we consider the problem of lateral diffusion on quasi-planar surfaces, possessing both spatial and temporal fluctuations. Using results from homogenization theory, we show that, under the assumption of scale separation between the characteristic length and timescales of the membrane fluctuations and the characteristic scale of the diffusing particle, the lateral diffusion process can be well approximated by a Brownian motion on the plane with constant diffusion tensor that depends on a highly nonlinear way on the detailed properties of the surface. The effective diffusion tensor will depend on the relative scales of the spatial and temporal fluctuations, and for different scaling regimes, we prove the existence of a macroscopic limit in each case.

  7. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  8. Imaging of Formaldehyde Adsorption and Diffusion on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhenrong; Tang, Miru; Wang, Zhitao; Ke, Zhu; Xia, Yaobiao; Park, Kenneth T.; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Ge, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Surface reactions of formaldehyde with reduced TiO2(110) surfaces have been studied using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT). STM results show that formaldehyde preferably adsorbs on the bridging bonded oxygen (Ob) vacancy (VO) defect site. Bias-dependent STM images show that both the Ti-bound CH2O and the VO-bound CH2O are positioned between the Ob row and the Ti row. The VO-bound formaldehyde rotates at 95 K. It starts to diffuse along the Ob row as –CH2– at ~170 K and starts to diffuse along the Ti row as a molecule at ~215 K. However, the stabilities and the configurations of the Ti-bound and the VO-bound formaldehyde calculated using DFT are not in line with the experimental results. The values of diffusion barriers determined experimentally and theoretically are also different. The discrepancy between the experiment and theory indicates the presence of a complex charge distribution related to the defects.

  9. Adsorption of oxazole and isoxazole on BNNT surface: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasleen; Singla, Preeti; Goel, Neetu

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption behavior of oxazole and isoxazole heterocycles over the (6,0) zigzag and (5,5) armchair boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) has been studied within the formalism of density functional theory (DFT). The adsorption energies, the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) analysis and the structural changes at the adsorption site are indicative of covalent adsorption on the zigzag BNNT surface, while the adsorption is physical in nature on the armchair BNNT surface. The role of solvent in improving the adsorption properties over the BNNT surface is elucidated by reoptimizing the structures in aqueous phase. The solvation energy is indicative of remarkable increase in the solubility of BNNTs after adsorption of heterocyclic rings. The Density of states (DOS) Plots, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and the quantum molecular descriptors (QMD) are witness to the substantial changes in the electronic properties of the BNNT systems following the attachment of these heterocycles with the tube surface. The study envisages the functionalization of the BNNT as well as its applicability as carrier of the drugs containing heterocyclic rings oxazole and isoxazole with marked sensitivity to the type of adsorbate and the adsorbent.

  10. Effect of surface property of activated carbon on adsorption of nitrate ion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tatsuya; Amano, Yoshimasa; Machida, Motoi; Imazeki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the removal of acidic functional groups and introduction of basic groups/sites on activated carbons (ACs) by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment were respectively carried out to enhance the nitrate ion adsorption in aqueous solution. Then, the relationships between nitrate ion adsorption and solution pH as well as surface charge of AC were investigated to understand the basic mechanisms of nitrate ion adsorption by AC. The result showed that the nitrate ion adsorption depended on the equilibrium solution pH (pHe) and the adsorption amount was promoted with decreasing pHe. The ACs treated by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment showed larger amount of nitrate ion adsorption than that by untreated AC. These results indicated that, since basic groups/sites could adsorb protons in the solution, the AC surface would be charged positively, and that the nitrate ion would be electrically interacted with positively charged carbon surface. Accordingly, it was concluded that basic groups/sites on the surface of AC could promote nitrate ion adsorption.

  11. Surface structural ion adsorption modeling of competitive binding of oxyanions by metal (hydr)oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-02-01

    An important challenge in surface complexation models (SCM) is to connect the molecular microscopic reality to macroscopic adsorption phenomena. This study elucidates the primary factor controlling the adsorption process by analyzing the adsorption and competition of PO{sub 4}, AsO{sub 4}, and SeO{sub 3}. The authors show that the structure of the surface-complex acting in the dominant electrostatic field can be ascertained as the primary controlling adsorption factor. The surface species of arsenate are identical with those of phosphate and the adsorption behavior is very similar. On the basis of the selenite adsorption, The authors show that the commonly used 1pK models are incapable to incorporate in the adsorption modeling the correct bidentate binding mechanism found by spectroscopy. The use of the bidentate mechanism leads to a proton-oxyanion ratio and corresponding pH dependence that are too large. The inappropriate intrinsic charge attribution to the primary surface groups and the condensation of the inner sphere surface complex to a point charge are responsible for this behavior of commonly used 2pK models. Both key factors are differently defined in the charge distributed multi-site complexation (CD-MUSIC) model and are based in this model on a surface structural approach. The CD-MUSIC model can successfully describe the macroscopic adsorption phenomena using the surface speciation and binding mechanisms as found by spectroscopy. The model is also able to predict the anion competition well. The charge distribution in the interface is in agreement with the observed structure of surface complexes.

  12. Homogenization of reconstructed crystal surfaces: Fick's law of diffusion.

    PubMed

    Margetis, Dionisios

    2009-05-01

    Fick's law for the diffusion of adsorbed atoms (adatoms) on crystal surfaces below roughening is generalized to account for surface reconstruction. In this case, material parameters vary spatially at the microscale, and the coarse graining for crystal steps via Taylor expansions is not strictly applicable. By invoking elements of the theory of composites in one independent space dimension, we homogenize the microscale description to derive the macroscopic adatom flux from step kinetics. This approach relies on a multiscale expansion for the adatom density. The effective surface diffusivity is determined through appropriate discrete averages of microscale kinetic parameters.

  13. Glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles: a surface ligand for minimizing serum protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Liu, Jinbin; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Mengxiao; Yang, Shengyang; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Shasha; Dean, Andrew; Sun, Xiankai; Zheng, Jie

    2014-08-13

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs' protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins.

  14. Adsorption of boric acid trimethyl ester on silica surface studied by FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianke; Ying, Pinliang; Xin, Qin; Li, Can

    1998-04-01

    Adsorption of boric acid trimethyl ester (BATE) on high-surface-area silica has been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. It is found that surface hydroxyls remaining after outgassing at high temperatures act as weak basic sites for BATE adsorption. Coordinate interaction of BATE with isolated hydroxyls dominates the adsorption and induces two splitting B-O vibrational bands at 1375 and 1345 cm -1. In addition, a small amount of BATE reacts with hydrogen-bonded hydroxyls and strained oxygen generated after high-temperature dehydroxylation.

  15. Adsorption of PTCDA on Si(001) − 2 × 1 surface

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Takayuki Yagyu, Kazuma; Tochihara, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Yoshihide

    2015-03-14

    Adsorption structures of the 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) molecule on the clean Si(001) − 2 × 1 surface were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) experiments in conjunction with first principles theoretical calculations. Four dominant adsorption structures were observed in the STM experiments and their atomic coordinates on the Si(001) surface were determined by comparison between the experimental STM images and the theoretical simulations. Maximizing the number of the Si—O bonds is more crucial than that of the Si—C bonds in the PTCDA adsorption.

  16. An ion-beam technique for measuring surface diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, P. M.; Labanda, J. G. C.; Barnett, S. A.

    1999-03-01

    The effective surface diffusion coefficient of Ga along the [110] direction on vicinal GaAs(001)2×4 surfaces during molecular-beam epitaxy was measured using specular ion current measurements. In this technique, 3 keV Ar ions were impinged upon the surface at a glancing angle (typically 3°), and the specularly scattered ion current was measured. Since specular reflections require a locally flat surface, adatoms cause a decrease in the measured current, allowing an average adatom density measurement. The time dependence of the Ga adatom population was measured during and after Ga deposition. Diffusion coefficients, obtained from the adatom lifetimes using a simple model of diffusion to the step edges, were fit well by the expression D=2×10-9 exp(-0.73 eV/kT)cm2/s from 400 to 600 °C.

  17. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Study of the Effects of Surface Hydrophilicity on Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2016-09-13

    The adsorption of streptavidin is studied on two surfaces, graphite and titanium dioxide, using accelerated molecular dynamics. Adsorption on graphite leads to strong conformational changes while the protein spreads out over the surface. Interestingly, also adsorption on the highly hydrophilic rutile surface induces considerable spreading of the protein. We pin down the cause for this unfolding to the interaction of the protein with the ordered water layers above the rutile surface. For special orientations, the protein penetrates the ordered water layers and comes into direct contact with the surface where the positively charged amino acids settle in places adjacent to the negatively charged top surface atom layer of rutile. We conclude that for both surface materials studied, streptavidin changes its conformation so strongly that it loses its potential for binding biotin. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental studies. PMID:27533302

  18. [Surface properties and adsorption characteristics for fluoride of goethite, kaolinite and their association].

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-Yong; Yang, Xiao-Hong

    2010-09-01

    The basic properties of goethite, kaolinite and their association were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) , scanning electron microscopes (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), potentiometric titrations, specific surface area (SSA) and micropore analysis. Moreover, the adsorption capacity and adsorption models of fluoride by the investigated samples were studied. Results show that when kaolinite and goethite presented simultaneously in the same suspension system, goethite was apt to coat the surface of kaolinite and the interactions between them could occur rapidly. As a result, the binary association containing kaolinite and goethite was formed. The binary association possessed the pore diameter of 0.42 nm and 0.61 nm, specific surface area of 34.08 m2/g, surface fractal dimension of D = 2.726 and the pH(PZNPC) (pH of point of zero net proton charge) in the range of 5.50-6.50. At the initial pH 6. 00, the maximum adsorption capacity (q(max) of goethite, kaolinite and association was 4.506, 0.608 and 3.520 mg/g respectively. The adsorption of fluoride by the single kaolinite or goethite could be attributed to monolayer adsorption and the data of isotherm adsorption could be well fitted by Langmuir model (R2 = 0.991 and R2 = 0.964 respectively). The Freundlich model was suitable for describing the adsorption of fluoride by the binary association (R2 = 0.995), which indicated that the surface of the binary association is heterogeneous and is probably provided with multilayer adsorption sites. The adsorption mechanisms for fluoride by the investigated samples include anion ligand exchange, surface coordination and electrostatic attraction. In addition, F acting as a bond bridge between the surfaces of kaolinite and goethite contributed to the adsorption of fluoride too. Compared to the single goethite or kaolinite, the binary association exhibited the higher specific surface area, surface fractal dimension and adsorption capacity for fluoride

  19. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration.

  20. Random sequential adsorption of human adenovirus 2 onto polyvinylidene fluoride surface influenced by extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ruiqing; Li, Qi; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2016-03-15

    Virus removal by membrane bioreactors depends on virus-membrane and virus-foulant interactions. The adsorption of human adenovirus 2 (HAdV-2) on polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and a major membrane foulant, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), were measured in a quartz crystal microbalance. In 3-100mM CaCl2 solutions, irreversible adsorption of HAdV-2 was observed on both pristine and EPS-fouled PVDF surfaces. The HAdV-2 adsorption kinetics was successfully fitted with the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model. The applicability of the RSA model for HAdV-2 adsorption is confirmed by comparing the two fitting parameters, adsorption rate constant k(a) and area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle a, with experimentally measured parameters. A linear correlation between the fitting parameter k(a) and the measured attachment efficiency was found, suggesting that the RSA model correctly describes the interaction forces dominating the HAdV-2 adsorption. By comparing the fitting parameter d(ads) with the hydrodynamic diameter of HAdV-2, we conclude that virus-virus and virus-surface interactions determine the area occupied by each adsorbed HAdV-2 particle, and thus influence the adsorption capacity. These results provide insights into virus retention and will benefit improving virus removal in membrane filtration. PMID:26720514

  1. Ab-initio study of the Y adsorption and YN formation on the GaN(000 1 bar): Diffusion pathways and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-08-01

    Yttrium (Y) adsorption and yttrium nitride (YN) thin film formation on the GaN(000 1 bar) surface are investigated using first principles total energy calculations. Results show that for Ga rich conditions the most stable configuration for Y adsorption is at a Bridge site. Nudged elastic band calculations show that the Y diffusion through the GaN surface is possible with low energy barriers. However, the most stable configuration corresponds to the geometry in which the Y atom migrates in to the first layer, forming an YN pair and displacing a Ga atom to the T4(2) site. Also, it is found that the increase of Y atoms up to a full monolayer is not energetically favorable, then the formation of an Y layer on top of the surface is not possible. However, under N-rich conditions the formation of a cubic-like YN bilayer above the surface becomes stable. Total and partial density of states show that the formation of YN on top of the Ga-terminated surface modify the electronic properties. Nevertheless, metallic behavior remains after YN formation.

  2. Surface Curvature Relation to Protein Adsorption for Carbon-based Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Chong, Yu; Ge, Cuicui; Weber, Jeffrey K.; Bell, David R.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-06-01

    The adsorption of proteins onto carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is dictated by hydrophobic and π-π interactions between aliphatic and aromatic residues and the conjugated CBN surface. Accordingly, protein adsorption is highly sensitive to topological constraints imposed by CBN surface structure; in particular, adsorption capacity is thought to increase as the incident surface curvature decreases. In this work, we couple Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with fluorescence spectroscopy experiments to characterize this curvature dependence in detail for the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). By studying BSA adsorption onto carbon nanotubes of increasing radius (featuring descending local curvatures) and a flat graphene sheet, we confirm that adsorption capacity is indeed enhanced on flatter surfaces. Naïve fluorescence experiments featuring multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), however, conform to an opposing trend. To reconcile these observations, we conduct additional MD simulations with MWCNTs that match those prepared in experiments; such simulations indicate that increased mass to surface area ratios in multi-walled systems explain the observed discrepancies. In reduction, our work substantiates the inverse relationship between protein adsorption capacity and surface curvature and further demonstrates the need for subtle consideration in experimental and simulation design.

  3. Surface energetics of alkaline-earth metal oxides: Trends in stability and adsorption of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Nørskov, Jens K.; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    We present a systematic theoretical investigation of the surface properties, stability, and reactivity of rocksalt type alkaline-earth metal oxides including MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The accuracy of commonly used exchange-correlation density functionals (LDA, PBE, RPBE, PBEsol, BEEF-vdW, and hybrid HSE) and random-phase approximation (RPA) is evaluated and compared to existing experimental values. Calculated surface energies of the four most stable surface facets under vacuum conditions, the (100) surface, the metal and oxygen terminated octopolar (111), and the (110) surfaces, exhibit a monotonic increase in stability from MgO to BaO. On the MgO(100) surface, adsorption of CO, NO, and CH4 is characterized by physisorption while H2O chemisorbs, which is in agreement with experimental findings. We further use the on-top metal adsorption of CO and NO molecules to map out the surface energetics of each alkaline-earth metal oxide surface. The considered functionals all qualitatively predict similar adsorption energy trends. The ordering between the adsorption energies on different surface facets can be attributed to differences in the local geometrical surface structure and the electronic structure of the metal constituent of the alkaline-earth metal oxide. The striking observation that CO adsorption strength is weaker than NO adsorption on the (100) terraces as the period of the alkaline-earth metal in the oxide increases is analyzed in detail in terms of charge redistribution within the σ and π channels of adsorbates. Finally, we also present oxygen adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies in these oxide systems.

  4. Germanium nanowire growth controlled by surface diffusion effects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidtbauer, Jan; Bansen, Roman; Heimburger, Robert; Teubner, Thomas; Boeck, Torsten; Fornari, Roberto

    2012-07-23

    Germanium nanowires (NWs) were grown onto Ge(111) substrates by the vapor-liquid-solid process using gold droplets. The growth was carried out in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber at substrate temperatures between 370 Degree-Sign C and 510 Degree-Sign C. The resulting nanowire growth rate turns out to be highly dependent on the substrate temperature exhibiting the maximum at T = 430 Degree-Sign C. The temperature dependence of growth rate can be attributed to surface diffusion both along the substrate and nanowire sidewalls. Analyzing the diffusive material transport yields a diffusion length of 126 nm at a substrate temperature of 430 Degree-Sign C.

  5. Surface reaction and pore diffusion in flow-tube reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, Leon F.; Moore, Steven B.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of gas diffusion with surface reaction in porous solids is discussed and applied specifically to heterogeneous rate measurements in flow-tube reactors. External diffusion to the outer surface of a reactive solid, internal diffusion within the pores, surface reaction, and laminar flow are considered. A procedure is developed to correct observed surface rate constants for the interaction of these processes. Measured surface areas and bulk densities are used to construct a semiempirical model for porous diffusion in vapor-formed HNO3-H2O ices which are used to simulate polar stratospheric cloud surfaces. The model is tested experimentally by varying the thickness of these ices from about 15 to 120 microns. The results are consistent with the model predictions and show that the HNO3-H2O ices used are highly porous, and the internal surface must be considered in calculating kinetic parameters from observed loss rates. The best fit of the data yields a tortuosity factor of 3.3 +/-1.1 for the ice substrates.

  6. Surface Reactivity of Iron Oxide Pigmentary Powders toward Atmospheric Components: XPS and Gravimetry of Oxygen and Water Vapor Adsorption

    PubMed

    Ismail; Cadenhead; Zaki

    1996-11-10

    The adsorption of oxygen and water vapor on a number of specially prepared alpha-Fe2O3 samples was measured gravimetrically at 25°C. The samples themselves were prepared from a steel-pickling chemical waste (97 wt% FeSO4·7H2O) by roasting the original material at 700°C for 5 h in air, oxygen, and nitrogen. Estimated surface coverages by the adsorbed oxygen and water vapor were made on the basis of nitrogen-adsorption-based surface areas, while the nature of the sample surfaces was investigated by both X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field emission SEM (FESEM) techniques. In addition a depth profiling study utilizing a sputtering argon beam and XPS was undertaken. Morphological studies using FESEM showed that, while the surface areas were essentially the same (27-29 m2/g) for all three samples, the sample prepared in nitrogen had a significantly larger particle size than the other two. These studies also indicated that neither oxygen nor water vapor adsorption caused any significant structural changes. The differing sample preparations resulted in differing oxygenated surfaces for the alpha-Fe2O3 samples, with the degree of oxygenation decreasing in the order of preparatory gases: oxygen, (wet) air, nitrogen. The amounts of both oxygen and water vapor adsorbed were in inverse proportion to the original degree of surface oxygenation, though the amounts of both represented fractional coverage at best. While the water vapor adsorption was always greater than that of oxygen, the former was more weakly adsorbed, as was indicated by the ease of desorption. Depth profiling failed to indicate any bulk diffusion of oxygen but could not be considered reliable since even the attenuated argon beam used here still brought about reduction of surface iron. Both oxygen and dissociative water adsorption are thought to involve surface sites of high coordination unsaturation. Oxygen is postulated to adsorb on such poorly oxygenated sites primarily as O-2; however, O2

  7. Molecular simulation of fibronectin adsorption onto polyurethane surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyethylene glycol-based polyurethanes have been widely used in biomedical applications, however are prone to swelling. A natural polyol, castor oil can be incorporated into these polyurethanes to control the degree of the swelling, which alters mechanical properties and protein adsorption characte...

  8. Predicting enzyme adsorption to lignin films by calculating enzyme surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Sammond, Deanne W; Yarbrough, John M; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Bomble, Yannick J; Hobdey, Sarah E; Decker, Stephen R; Taylor, Larry E; Resch, Michael G; Bozell, Joseph J; Himmel, Michael E; Vinzant, Todd B; Crowley, Michael F

    2014-07-25

    The inhibitory action of lignin on cellulase cocktails is a major challenge to the biological saccharification of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Although the mechanism remains unclear, hydrophobic interactions between enzymes and lignin are hypothesized to drive adsorption. Here we evaluate the role of hydrophobic interactions in enzyme-lignin binding. The hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface was quantified using an estimation of the clustering of nonpolar atoms, identifying potential interaction sites. The adsorption of enzymes to lignin surfaces, measured using the quartz crystal microbalance, correlates to the hydrophobic cluster scores. Further, these results suggest a minimum hydrophobic cluster size for a protein to preferentially adsorb to lignin. The impact of electrostatic contribution was ruled out by comparing the isoelectric point (pI) values to the adsorption of proteins to lignin surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability to predict enzyme-lignin adsorption and could potentially be used to design improved cellulase cocktails, thus lowering the overall cost of biofuel production. PMID:24876380

  9. Predicting Enzyme Adsorption to Lignin Films by Calculating Enzyme Surface Hydrophobicity*

    PubMed Central

    Sammond, Deanne W.; Yarbrough, John M.; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Bomble, Yannick J.; Hobdey, Sarah E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Taylor, Larry E.; Resch, Michael G.; Bozell, Joseph J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory action of lignin on cellulase cocktails is a major challenge to the biological saccharification of plant cell wall polysaccharides. Although the mechanism remains unclear, hydrophobic interactions between enzymes and lignin are hypothesized to drive adsorption. Here we evaluate the role of hydrophobic interactions in enzyme-lignin binding. The hydrophobicity of the enzyme surface was quantified using an estimation of the clustering of nonpolar atoms, identifying potential interaction sites. The adsorption of enzymes to lignin surfaces, measured using the quartz crystal microbalance, correlates to the hydrophobic cluster scores. Further, these results suggest a minimum hydrophobic cluster size for a protein to preferentially adsorb to lignin. The impact of electrostatic contribution was ruled out by comparing the isoelectric point (pI) values to the adsorption of proteins to lignin surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability to predict enzyme-lignin adsorption and could potentially be used to design improved cellulase cocktails, thus lowering the overall cost of biofuel production. PMID:24876380

  10. DFT MODELING OF BENZOYL PEROXIDE ADSORPTION ON α-Cr2O3 (0001) SURFACE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Frank; Stashans, Arvids

    2016-04-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) has been used to investigate possible adsorption configurations of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) molecule on the chromium oxide (α-Cr2O3) (0001) surface. Two configurations are found to lead to the molecular adsorption with corresponding adsorption energies being equal to -0.16 and -0.48eV, respectively. Our work describes in detail atomic displacements for both crystalline surface and adsorbate as well as discusses electronic and magnetic properties of the system. The most favorable adsorption case is found when the chemical bond between one of the molecular oxygens and one of the surface Cr atoms has been formed.

  11. Adsorption of heterobifunctional 4-nitrophenol on the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shong, Bonggeun; Hellstern, Thomas R.; Bent, Stacey F.

    2016-08-01

    We report the adsorption chemistry of a heterobifunctional molecule, 4-nitrophenol, on the Ge(100)-2 × 1 surface. X-ray photoelectron and infrared spectroscopy experiments and density functional theory calculations were used to determine the adsorption products. The results show that 4-nitrophenol reacts with the Ge surface through either one or both of the sbnd OH or sbnd NO2 functionalities. It was found that the fraction of dually and singly tethered adsorbates varies according to reaction conditions: namely, singly tethered adsorbates are favored at higher adsorbate coverages and lower adsorption temperatures. These variations are explained by a two-step adsorption mechanism for 4-nitrophenol, in which geometrical limitations of the adsorbates on the surface affect the product distribution.

  12. High-temperature adsorption of n-octane, benzene, and chloroform onto silica gel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bilinski, B.

    2000-05-01

    The adsorption properties of silica gel surface for compounds differing in types of intermolecular interactions were studied under conditions in which the same silica was investigated by means of a gas phase titration method, i.e., at high temperature and low surface coverage. Adsorption isotherms of n-octane, benzene, and chloroform were determined at 373, 363, and 353 K. Based on these isotherms the isosteric heat of adsorption was calculated. Moreover, the adsorption energy distribution function and the derivative of film pressure with respect to the adsorbed amount were computed from the isotherms determined at 373 K. The obtained results were compared to those determined by gas phase titration. It was stated that on the dependencies of film pressure derivative some linear sections appeared that corresponded to the inflection points on gas phase titration curves. The results are discussed in terms of both the type and the strength of surface-molecule interactions.

  13. Adsorption at the liquid-vapor surface of a binary liquid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmer, J. K.; Kiselev, S. B.; Law, B. M.

    2005-11-01

    In a binary liquid mixture, the component possessing the lowest surface tension preferentially adsorbs at the liquid-vapor surface. In the past this adsorption behavior has been extensively investigated for critical binary liquid mixtures near the mixture's critical temperature Tc. In this fluctuation-dominated regime the adsorption is described by a universal function of the dimensionless depth z /ξ where ξ is the bulk correlation length. Fewer studies have quantitatively examined adsorption for off-critical mixtures because, in this case, one must carefully account for both the bulk and surface crossover from the fluctuation-dominated regime (close to Tc) to the mean-field dominated regime (far from Tc). In this paper we compare extensive liquid-vapor ellipsometric adsorption measurements for the mixture aniline+cyclohexane at a variety of critical and noncritical compositions with the crossover theory of Kiselev and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 3370 (2000)].

  14. Experimental design based response surface methodology optimization of ultrasonic assisted adsorption of safaranin O by tin sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roosta, M.; Ghaedi, M.; Daneshfar, A.; Sahraei, R.

    2014-03-01

    In this research, the adsorption rate of safranine O (SO) onto tin sulfide nanoparticle loaded on activated carbon (SnS-NPAC) was accelerated by the ultrasound. SnS-NP-AC was characterized by different techniques such as SEM, XRD and UV-Vis measurements. The present results confirm that the ultrasound assisted adsorption method has remarkable ability to improve the adsorption efficiency. The influence of parameters such as the sonication time, adsorbent dosage, pH and initial SO concentration was examined and evaluated by central composite design (CCD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF). Conducting adsorption experiments at optimal conditions set as 4 min of sonication time, 0.024 g of adsorbent, pH 7 and 18 mg L-1 SO make admit to achieve high removal percentage (98%) and high adsorption capacity (50.25 mg g-1). A good agreement between experimental and predicted data in this study was observed. The experimental equilibrium data fitting to Langmuir, Freundlich, Tempkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich models show that the Langmuir model is a good and suitable model for evaluation and the actual behavior of adsorption. Kinetic evaluation of experimental data showed that the adsorption processes followed well pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models.

  15. Surface modification of electrospun cellulose acetate nanofibers via RAFT polymerization for DNA adsorption.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Serkan; Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2014-11-26

    We report on a facile and robust method by which surface of electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers can be chemically modified with cationic polymer brushes for DNA adsorption. The surface of CA nanofibers was functionalized by growing poly[(ar-vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride)] [poly(VBTAC)] brushes through a multi-step chemical sequence that ensures retention of mechanically robust nanofibers. Initially, the surface of the CA nanofibers was modified with RAFT chain transfer agent. Poly(VBTAC) brushes were then prepared via RAFT-mediated polymerization from the nanofiber surface. DNA adsorption capacity of CA nanofibrous web surface functionalized with cationic poly(VBTAC) brushes was demonstrated. The reusability of these webs was investigated by measuring the adsorption capacity for target DNA in a cyclic manner. In brief, CA nanofibers surface-modified with cationic polymer brushes can be suitable as membrane materials for filtration, purification, and/or separation processes for DNA.

  16. II. Inhibited Diffusion Driven Surface Transmutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Talbot A.

    2006-02-01

    This paper is the second of a set of three papers dealing with the role of coherent partitioning as a common element in Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR), by which is meant cold-fusion related processes. This paper discusses the first step in a sequence of four steps that seem to be necessary to explain Iwamura 2-α-addition surface transmutations. Three concepts are examined: salt-metal interface states, sequential tunneling that transitions D+ ions from localized interstitial to Bloch form, and the general applicability of 2-dimensional vs. 3-dimensional symmetry hosting networks.

  17. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations. PMID:24811649

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of free and forced BSA adsorption on a hydrophobic graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2011-11-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto a hydrophobic graphite surface is studied using molecular-dynamics simulation. In addition to the free, that is, unsteered, adsorption, we also investigate forced adsorption, in which the action of an AFM tip pushing the protein with constant force to the surface is modeled. Using an implicit inviscid water model, the adsorption dynamics and energetics are monitored for two different initial protein orientations toward the surface. In all cases, we find that the protein partially unfolds and spreads on the surface. The spreading is in agreement with the well-known high biocompatibility of graphite-based implants. The denaturation is, however, greatly enhanced in the case of forced adsorption. We follow the position of the so-called lipid-binding pocket found in subdomain IIIA (Sudlow site II) during adsorption and find that it is tilted and moved toward the graphite surface in all cases, in agreement with its hydrophobic character. The relevance of our findings for the common measurement procedure of studying protein adhesion using AFM experiments is discussed.

  19. Protein adsorption on a hydrophobic surface: a molecular dynamics study of lysozyme on graphite.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2010-04-20

    Adsorption of human lysozyme on hydrophobic graphite is investigated through atomistic computer simulations with molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. The chosen strategy follows a simulation protocol proposed by the authors to model the initial and the final adsorption stage on a bare surface. Adopting an implicit solvent and considering 10 starting molecular orientations so that all the main sides of the protein can face the surface, we first carry out an energy minimization to investigate the initial adsorption stage, and then long MD runs of selected arrangements to follow the surface spreading of the protein maximizing its adsorption strength. The results are discussed in terms of the kinetics of surface spreading, the interaction energy, and the molecular size, considering both the footprint and the final thickness of the adsorbed protein. The structural implications of the final adsorption geometry for surface aggregation and nanoscale structural organization are also pointed out. Further MD runs are carried out in explicit water for the native structure and the most stable adsorption state to assess the local stability of the geometry obtained in implicit solvent, and to calculate the statistical distribution of the water molecules around the whole lysozyme and its backbone.

  20. Observation of adsorption behavior of biomolecules on ferroelectric crystal surfaces with polarization domain patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Tomoaki; Isobe, Akiko; Ogino, Toshio

    2016-08-01

    Lithium tantalate (LiTaO3) is one of the ferroelectric crystals that exhibit spontaneous polarization domain patterns on its surface. We observed the polarization-dependent adsorption of avidin molecules, which are positively charged in a buffer solution at pH 7.0, on LiTaO3 surfaces caused by electrostatic interaction at an electrostatic double layer using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Avidin adsorption in the buffer solution was confirmed by scratching the substrate surfaces using the AFM cantilever, and the adsorption patterns were found to depend on the avidin concentration. When KCl was added to the buffer solution to weaken the electrostatic double layer interaction between avidin molecules and LiTaO3 surfaces, adsorption domain patterns disappeared. From the comparison between the adsorption and chemically etched domain patterns, it was found that avidin molecule adsorption is enhanced on negatively polarized domains, indicating that surface polarization should be taken into account in observing biomolecule behaviors on ferroelectric crystals.

  1. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations.

  2. Polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent counterions: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Caballero, Germán; Martín-Molina, Alberto; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Both experiments and theory have evidenced that multivalent cations can mediate the interaction between negatively charged polyelectrolytes and like-charged objects, such as anionic lipoplexes (DNA-cation-anionic liposome complexes). In this paper, we use Monte Carlo simulations to study the electrostatic interaction responsible for the trivalent-counterion-mediated adsorption of polyelectrolytes onto a like-charged planar surface. The evaluation of the Helmholtz free energy allows us to characterize both the magnitude and the range of the interaction as a function of the polyelectrolyte charge, surface charge density, [3:1] electrolyte concentration, and cation size. Both polyelectrolyte and surface charge favor the adsorption. It should be stressed, however, that the adsorption will be negligible if the surface charge density does not exceed a threshold value. The effect of the [3:1] electrolyte concentration has also been analyzed. In certain range of concentrations, the counterion-mediated attraction seems to be independent of this parameter, whereas very high concentrations of salt weaken the adsorption. If the trivalent cation diameter is doubled the adsorption moderates due to the excluded volume effects. The analysis of the integrated charge density and ionic distributions suggests that a delicate balance between charge inversion and screening effects governs the polyelectrolyte adsorption onto like-charged surfaces mediated by trivalent cations.

  3. First-principles study toward CO adsorption on Au/Ni surface alloys.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu Cheng; Du, Jin Yan; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Su Fan

    2012-12-01

    The introduction of a second metal, gold, into a nickel matrix can effectively improve the catalytic performance and thermal stability of the catalysts toward steam reforming of methane. To investigate the effect of Au on the adsorption properties and electronic structure of the Ni(111) surface, we chose CO as a probe molecule and examined CO adsorption on various Au/Ni surfaces. It was revealed that Au addition weakened the absorbate-substrate interactions on the Ni(111) surface. With increasing gold concentration, the binding energy declines further. The variation of the binding energies has been interpreted by exploring the electronic structure of surface nickel atoms. The effect of gold can be quantitatively characterized by the slopes of the fitting equations between the binding energy and the number of gold atoms surrounding the adsorption site. Our results show that the binding energy at top sites can be approximately estimated by counting the number of surrounding gold atoms. On one specific surface, the relative magnitude of the binding energy can be simply judged by the distance between gold and the geometrical center of the adsorption site. This empirical rule holds true for C, H, and O adsorption on the Au/Ni surface. It may be applicable to a system in which a doped atom of larger atomic size is incorporated into the host metal surface by forming a surface alloy. PMID:23047643

  4. Human plasma protein adsorption onto dextranized surfaces: a two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Irene Y; Tomczyk, Nancy; Eckmann, Joshua I; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2011-05-01

    Protein adsorption is fundamental to thrombosis and to the design of biocompatible materials. We report a two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry study to characterize multiple human plasma proteins adsorbed onto four different types of model surfaces: silicon oxide, dextranized silicon, polyurethane and dextranized polyurethane. Dextran was grafted onto the surfaces of silicon and polyurethane to mimic the blood-contacting endothelial cell glycocalyx surface. Surface topography and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity were determined and analyzed using atomic force microscopy and water contact angle measurements, respectively. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis, we show that, relative to the unmodified surfaces, dextranization significantly inhibits the adsorption of several human plasma proteins including IGHG1 protein, fibrinogen, haptoglobin, Apo A-IV, Apo A-I, immunoglobulin, serum retinal-binding protein and truncated serum albumin. We further demonstrate the selectivity of plasma protein adsorbed onto the different functionalized surfaces and the potential to control and manipulate proteins adsorption on the surfaces of medical devices, implants and microfluidic devices. This result shows that adsorption experiments using a single protein or a binary mixture of proteins are consistent with competitive protein adsorption studies. In summary, these studies indicate that coating blood-contacting biomedical applications with dextran is an effective route to reduce thrombo-inflammatory responses and to surface-direct biological activities. PMID:21277175

  5. Adsorption of a cell-adhesive oligopeptide on polymer surfaces irradiated by ion beams.

    PubMed

    Satriano, C; Manso, M; Gambino, G L; Rossi, F; Marletta, G

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of H-Arg-Gly-Asp-OH (RGD) oligopeptide on ion-irradiated polymer surfaces has been studied. The RGD-incubated surfaces of poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) and poly(hydroxymethylsiloxane) (PHMS) thin films, before and after irradiation with 50 keV Ar+ to 1x10(15) ions/cm2, were investigated by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy. It was found that no significant adsorption occurs on PET, while a measurable amount of RGD is preferentially adsorbed onto irradiated PHMS surfaces. The evaluated surface coverage was found to range between 5 and 12%. In situ adsorption measurements performed by using the Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring technique showed that the irradiation induced remarkable changes of mass uptake with respect to the unirradiated surfaces, mostly attributed to the change in the water adsorption capability of the irradiated surfaces. The adsorption results are discussed in terms of the ion-induced changes on the morphology, chemical structure and composition, surface free energy and surface charge. PMID:15623933

  6. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  7. Repulsive interactions induced by specific adsorption: Anomalous step diffusivity and inadequacy of nearest-neighbor Ising model. (part I experimental)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shakran, Mohammad; Kibler, Ludwig A.; Jacob, Timo; Ibach, Harald; Beltramo, Guillermo L.; Giesen, Margret

    2016-09-01

    This is Part I of two closely related papers, where we show that the specific adsorption of anions leads to a failure of the nearest-neighbor Ising model to describe island perimeter curvatures on Au(100) electrodes in dilute KBr, HCl and H2SO4 electrolytes and the therewith derived step diffusivity vs. step orientation. This result has major consequences for theoretical studies aiming at the understanding of growth, diffusion and degradation phenomena. Part I focuses on the experimental data. As shown theoretically in detail in Part II (doi:10.1016/j.susc.2016.03.022), a set of nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interaction energies (ɛNN, ɛNNN) can uniquely be derived from the diffusivity of steps along <100> and <110>. We find strong repulsive next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interaction in KBr and HCl, whereas NNN interaction is negligibly for H2SO4. The NNN repulsive interaction energy ɛNNN therefore correlates positively with the Gibbs adsorption energy of the anions. We find furthermore that ɛNNN increases with increasing Br- and Cl- coverage. The results for ɛNN and ɛNNN are quantitatively consistent with the coverage dependence of the step line tension. We thereby establish a sound experimental base for theoretical studies on the energetics of steps in the presence of specific adsorption.

  8. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-01

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M =Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M =Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  9. Dissociative adsorption of O2 on unreconstructed metal (100) surfaces: Pathways, energetics, and sticking kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Da-Jiang; Evans, James W.

    2014-05-06

    An accurate description of oxygen dissociation pathways and kinetics for various local adlayer environments is key for an understanding not just of the coverage dependence of oxygen sticking, but also of reactive steady states in oxidation reactions. Density functional theory analysis for M(100) surfaces with M=Pd, Rh, and Ni, where O prefers the fourfold hollow adsorption site, does not support the traditional Brundle-Behm-Barker picture of dissociative adsorption onto second-nearest-neighbor hollow sites with an additional blocking constraint. Rather adsorption via neighboring vicinal bridge sites dominates, although other pathways can be active. The same conclusion also applies for M=Pt and Ir, where oxygen prefers the bridge adsorption site. Statistical mechanical analysis is performed based on kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of a multisite lattice-gas model consistent with our revised picture of adsorption. This analysis determines the coverage and temperature dependence of sticking for a realistic treatment of the oxygen adlayer structure.

  10. SERS, XPS, and DFT Study of Adenine Adsorption on Silver and Gold Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pagliai, Marco; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Pratesi, Giovanni; Schettino, Vincenzo

    2012-01-19

    The adsorption of adenine on silver and gold surfaces has been investigated combining density functional theory calculations with surface-enhanced Raman scattering and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, obtaining useful insight into the orientation and interaction of the nucleobase with the metal surfaces.

  11. Selective adsorption of bovine hemoglobin on functional TiO2 nano-adsorbents: surface physic-chemical properties determined adsorption activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shiguang; Zhang, Jianghua; Shao, Mingxue; Zhang, Xia; Liu, Yufeng; Xu, Junli; Meng, Hao; Han, Yide

    2015-04-01

    Surface functionalized nanoparticles are efficient adsorbents which have shown good potential for protein separation. In this work, we chose two different types of organic molecules, oleic acid (OA) and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxy silane (GPTMS), to functionalize the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles, and we studied the effects of this modification on their surface physicochemical properties in correlation with their selective adsorption of proteins. The results showed that the surface zeta potential and the surface water wettability of the modified TiO2 were significantly changed in comparison with the original TiO2 nanoparticles. The adsorption activities of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on these functionalized TiO2 samples were investigated under different conditions, including pH values, contact time, ion strength, and initial protein concentration. In comparison with the non-specific adsorption of original TiO2, however, both the OA-TiO2 and GPTMS-TiO2 exhibited increased BHb adsorption and decreased BSA adsorption at the same time. Using a binary protein mixture as the adsorption object, a higher separation factor (SF) was obtained for OA-TiO2 under optimum conditions. The different adsorption activities of BHb and BSA on the modified TiO2 were correlated with different interactions at the protein/solid interface, and the chemical force as well as the electrostatic force played an important role in the selective adsorption process.

  12. Optical surface wave in a crystal with diffusion photorefractive nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Chetkin, S A; Akhmedzhanov, I M

    2011-11-30

    We consider a steady-state nonlinear photorefractive surface wave (PR SW) with TE or TM polarisation when the refractive index of the photorefractive crystal (PRC) depends on the strength of the diffusion crystal electric field emerging upon the wave propagation. We have determined the phase trajectory and transverse structure of the PR SW intensity distribution for different values of the diffusion photorefractive nonlinearity. We have investigated a photorefractive diffraction grating, which arises in the surface PRC layer during propagation of the nonlinear PR SW.

  13. Density functional theory calculations and molecular dynamics simulations of the adsorption of biomolecules on graphene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wu; Li, Xin; Bian, Wen-Wen; Fan, Xiu-Juan; Qi, Jing-Yao

    2010-02-01

    There is increasing attention in the unique biological and medical properties of graphene, and it is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. Despite the importance of biomolecules-graphene interactions, a detailed understanding of the adsorption mechanism and features of biomolecules onto the surfaces of graphene is lacking. To address this, we have performed density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) methods exploring the adsorption geometries, adsorption energies, electronic band structures, adsorption isotherms, and adsorption dynamics of l-leucine (model biomolecule)/graphene composite system. DFT calculations confirmed the energetic stability of adsorption model and revealed that electronic structure of graphene can be controlled by the adsorption direction of l-leucine. MD simulations further investigate the potential energy and van der Waals energy for the interaction processes of l-leucine/graphene system at different temperatures and pressures. We find that the van der Waals interaction between the l-leucine and the graphene play a dominant role in the adsorption process under a certain range of temperature and pressure, and the l-leucine molecule could be adsorbed onto graphene spontaneously in aqueous solution. PMID:19880174

  14. Adsorption behavior of antimony(III) oxyanions on magnetite surface in aqueous organic acid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Vinit K.; Bera, Santanu; Narasimhan, S. V.; Velmurugan, S.

    2013-02-01

    Antimony(III) adsorption is observed on magnetite (Fe3O4) surface under acidic and reducing condition through surface hydroxyl (SOH) groups bonding on Fe3O4 surface. Desorption of adsorbed Sb(III) is observed from Fe3O4 surface along with iron release in organic acid at 85 °C after 5 h of experiment. Tartaric acid (TA) shows minimum Sb(III) adsorption on Fe3O4 among the organic acid studied. The reason is TA having two sets of adjacent functional groups viz. Odbnd Csbnd OH and Csbnd OH which are responsible for the formation of five-membered bidendate chelate with Sb(III). Other oxyanions, cations or complexing agents along with TA influences the Sb(III) adsorption on Fe3O4. The surface of magnetite is modified by the addition of fatty acids viz. Lauric acid, benzoic acid to bind the Ssbnd OH groups present on the surface. This results in delaying the process of adsorption without changing the quantity of saturation adsorption of Sb(III) on Fe3O4 surface.

  15. [Preparation of surface molecularly imprinted polymers for penicilloic acid, and its adsorption properties].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Penglei; Luo, Zhimin; Chang, Ruimiao; Ge, Yanhui; Du, Wei; Chang, Chun; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    On account of the specificity and reproducibility for the determination of penicilloic acid in penicillin, this study aims to prepare penicilloic acid imprinted polymers (PEOA-MIPs) by surface polymerization method at the surface of modified silica particles by using penicilloic acid (PEOA) as the template molecule, methacrylic acid (MAA) as the functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate ( EGDMA) as the cross linker, and methanol/acetonitrile as the solvents. The synthesis conditions were optimized, and PEOA-MIPs had the best adsorption capacity when the molar ratio of template molecule/functional monomer was 1 :4, cross linking degree was 85% and the solvent ratio of methanol/acetonitrile was 1 :1 (v/v). The adsorption properties were evaluated by adsorption experiments, including the adsorption isotherms, kinetics and selectivity. The adsorption process between PEOA-MIPs and PEOA fitted the Langmuir adsorption isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacity of 122. 78 mg/g and the pseudo-second-order reaction kinetics with fast adsorption kinetics (the equilibrium time of 45 min). The as-synthesized PEOA-MIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The results indicated that the MIPs layer has been successfully grafted on the surface of SiO2 microparticles and the PEOA-MIPs had the excellent thermal stability. The PEOA-MIPs showed the highest selective recognition for PEOA. The PEOA-MIPs possess a high adsorption capacity, rapid mass-transfer rate and high selectivity to PEOA when compared with non-imprinted polymers (PEOA-NIPs). The PEOA-MIPs was expected to be used as the solid phase extraction medium and this study provides the potential applications for fast recognition and analysis of the penicilloic acid in penicillin. PMID:26753284

  16. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S.

    2015-01-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  17. Theoretical Study of Trimethylacetic Acid Adsorption on CeO 2 (111) Surface

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Weina; Thevuthasan, S.; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-11

    We investigated trimethylacetic acid (TMAA) adsorption on stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient CeO2(111) surfaces using density functional theory that accounts for the on-site Coulomb interaction via a Hubbard term (DFT+U) and long-range dispersion correction. Both the molecular state and dissociative state (TMAA → TMA– + H+) were identified on stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient CeO2(111) surfaces. For the stoichiometric surface, two thermodynamically favorable configurations with adsorption energies of the order of -30 kcal/mol are identified; one is a molecule adsorption state, and the other one is a dissociative state. For the oxygen-deficient surface, dissociative states are more favorable than molecular states. Moreover, the mostmore » favorable configuration is the dissociative adsorption of TMAA with the adsorption energy of the order of -77 kcal/mol. The dissociated TMA moiety takes the position of oxygen vacancy, forming three Ce–O bonds. The signature vibrational frequencies for these thermodynamically stable structures are reported as well as their electronic structures. The effects of long-range dispersion interactions are found to be negligible for geometries but important for adsorption energies.« less

  18. Chemistry-specific surface adsorption of the barnacle settlement-inducing protein complex.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Luigi; Aldred, Nick; Emami, Kaveh; Enander, Karin; Ederth, Thomas; Clare, Anthony S

    2015-02-01

    Gregarious settlement in barnacle larvae (cyprids) is induced by a contact pheromone, the settlement-inducing protein complex (SIPC). The SIPC has been identified both in the cuticle of adult barnacles and in the temporary adhesive secretion (footprint) of cyprids. Besides acting as a settlement inducer, the presence of the SIPC in footprints points to its additional involvement in the adhesion process. SIPC adsorption behaviour was therefore investigated on a series of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) by surface plasmon resonance at the pH of seawater (8.3). Fibrinogen and α2-macroglobulin (A2M) (blood complement protease inhibitors with which the SIPC shares 29% sequence homology) were used in the adsorption experiments as positive and negative standards, respectively. The mass uptake of the SIPC was comparable to that of fibrinogen, with adsorption observed even on the protein-resistant oligo(ethylene glycol) surface. Notably, on the positively charged SAM the SIPC showed a kinetic overshoot, indicating a metastable configuration causing the amount of adsorbed protein to temporarily exceed its equilibrium value. A2M adsorption was low or negligible on all SAMs tested, except for the positively charged surface, indicating that A2M adsorption is mainly driven by electrostatics. Evaluation of SIPC non-specific adsorption kinetics revealed that it adsorbed irreversibly and non-cooperatively on all surfaces tested. PMID:25657832

  19. First principles investigation of Ti adsorption and migration on Si(100) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Briquet, Ludovic G. V.; Wirtz, Tom; Philipp, Patrick

    2013-12-28

    The titanium adsorption on Si(100) is investigated using first principles computer modelling methods. Two new subsurface adsorption sites are described. They are located at the edge of the cavity topped by a surface silicon dimer. The migration of the titanium from the surface to the subsurface sites is facilitated when occurring via one of these sites. The ejection of one of the silicon atoms forming the surface dimer is also investigated. The actual step of the ejection requires more energy than previously thought although, when considering the global picture of a titanium atom on the surface leading to the ejection of a silicon atom, the overall rate is compensated by the facilitated migration of the titanium to the subsurface sites. The consecutive adsorption of a second and third titanium atom is also investigated. It is shown that titanium grows evenly on the surface in normal condition, showing no intermixing of the titanium and silicon beyond the silicon layer.

  20. The adsorption of ethylene on Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenjun; Thuening, Theodore; Tysoe, Wilfred T.

    2016-04-01

    The surface chemistry of ethylene is explored on model Au/Pd(100) alloy surfaces using a combination of temperature-programmed desorption and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. The heat of adsorption of ethylene on the model alloy surface is found to increase monotonically with increasing palladium coverage in the alloy, from ~ 33 kJ/mol for a completely gold-covered surface to ~ 80 kJ/mol as the gold coverage decreases to zero. A large change in heat of adsorption is found for palladium coverages between 0 and ~ 0.35 monolayers, where previous studies have shown that the surface comprises exclusively isolated palladium sites. The heat of adsorption changes more slowly for higher palladium coverages, when palladium-palladium bridge sites appear. Vinyl species are identified for palladium coverages above ~ 0.8 ML from a vibrational mode at ~ 1120 cm- 1, which disappears when the sample is heated to ~ 250 K, due to vinyl decomposition.

  1. Tunable and sizable band gap in silicene by surface adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Quhe, Ruge; Fei, Ruixiang; Liu, Qihang; Zheng, Jiaxin; Li, Hong; Xu, Chengyong; Ni, Zeyuan; Wang, Yangyang; Yu, Dapeng; Gao, Zhengxiang; Lu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Opening a sizable band gap without degrading its high carrier mobility is as vital for silicene as for graphene to its application as a high-performance field effect transistor (FET). Our density functional theory calculations predict that a band gap is opened in silicene by single-side adsorption of alkali atom as a result of sublattice or bond symmetry breaking. The band gap size is controllable by changing the adsorption coverage, with an impressive maximum band gap up to 0.50 eV. The ab initio quantum transport simulation of a bottom-gated FET based on a sodium-covered silicene reveals a transport gap, which is consistent with the band gap, and the resulting on/off current ratio is up to 108. Therefore, a way is paved for silicene as the channel of a high-performance FET. PMID:23152944

  2. Adsorption of sugars on Al- and Ga-doped boron nitride surfaces: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Ahmed A.; Fadlallah, Mohamed M.; Badawi, Ashraf; Maarouf, Ahmed A.

    2016-07-01

    Molecular adsorption on surfaces is a key element for many applications, including sensing and catalysis. Non-invasive sugar sensing has been an active area of research due to its importance to diabetes care. The adsorption of sugars on a template surface study is at the heart of matter. Here, we study doped hexagonal boron nitride sheets (h-BNNs) as adsorbing and sensing template for glucose and glucosamine. Using first principles calculations, we find that the adsorption of glucose and glucosamine on h-BNNs is significantly enhanced by the substitutional doping of the sheet with Al and Ga. Including long range van der Waals corrections gives adsorption energies of about 2 eV. In addition to the charge transfer occurring between glucose and the Al/Ga-doped BN sheets, the adsorption alters the size of the band gap, allowing for optical detection of adsorption. We also find that Al-doped boron nitride sheet is better than Ga-doped boron nitride sheet to enhance the adsorption energy of glucose and glucosamine. The results of our work can be potentially utilized when designing support templates for glucose and glucosamine.

  3. Adsorption of cadmium ions on oxygen surface sites in activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Y.F.; Thomas, K.M.

    2000-02-08

    Various types of oxygen functional groups were introduced onto the surface of coconut shell derived activated carbon by oxidation using nitric acid. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), and selective neutralization were used to characterize the surface oxygen functional groups. The oxidized carbons were also heat treated to provide a suite of carbons where the oxygen functional groups of various thermal stabilities were varied progressively. The adsorption of cadmium ions was enhanced dramatically by oxidation of the carbon. The ratio of released protons to adsorbed cadmium ions on oxidized carbon was approximately 2, indicating cation exchange was involved in the process of adsorption. Na{sup +} exchange studies with the oxidized carbon gave a similar ratio. After heat treatment of the oxidized carbons to remove oxygen functional groups, the ratio of H{sup +} released to Cd{sup 2+} adsorbed and the adsorption capacity decreased significantly. Both reversible and irreversible processes were involved in cadmium ion adsorption with reversible adsorption having higher enthalpy. The irreversible adsorption resulted from cation exchange with carboxylic acid groups, whereas the reversible adsorption probably involved physisorption of the partially hydrated cadmium ion.

  4. Adsorption of plasmid DNA to mineral surfaces and protection against DNase I.

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, G; Lorenz, M G; Wackernagel, W

    1991-01-01

    The adsorption of [3H]thymidine-labeled plasmid DNA (pHC314; 2.4 kb) of different conformations to chemically pure sand was studied in a flowthrough microenvironment. The extent of adsorption was affected by the concentration and valency of cations, indicating a charge-dependent process. Bivalent cations (Mg2+, Ca2+) were 100-fold more effective than monovalent cations (Na+, K+, NH4+). Quantitative adsorption of up to 1 microgram of negatively supercoiled or linearized plasmid DNA to 0.7 g of sand was observed in the presence of 5 mM MgCl2 at pH 7. Under these conditions, more than 85% of DNA adsorbed within 60 s. Maximum adsorption was 4 micrograms of DNA to 0.7 g of sand. Supercoil molecules adsorbed slightly less than linearized or open circular plasmids. An increase of the pH from 5 to 9 decreased adsorption at 0.5 mM MgCl2 about eightfold. It is concluded that adsorption of plasmid DNA to sand depends on the neutralization of negative charges on the DNA molecules and the mineral surfaces by cations. The results are discussed on the grounds of the polyelectrolyte adsorption model. Sand-adsorbed DNA was 100 times more resistant against DNase I than was DNA free in solution. The data support the idea that plasmid DNA can enter the extracellular bacterial gene pool which is located at mineral surfaces in natural bacterial habitats. PMID:1647748

  5. p-Chlorophenol adsorption on activated carbons with basic surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenc-Grabowska, Ewa; Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Machnikowski, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption of p-chlorophenol (PCP) from aqueous solution on activated carbons (ACs) with basic surface properties has been studied. The ACs were prepared by two methods. The first method was based on the modification of a commercial CWZ AC by high temperature treatment in an atmosphere of ammonia, nitrogen and hydrogen. The second approach comprised the carbonization followed by activation of N-enriched polymers and coal tar pitch using CO 2 and steam as activation agent. The resultant ACs were characterized in terms of porous structure, elemental composition and surface chemistry (pH PZC, acid/base titration, XPS). The adsorption of PCP was carried out from an aqueous solution in static conditions. Equilibrium adsorption isotherm was of L2 type for polymer-based ACs, whereas L3-type isotherm was observed for CWZ ACs series. The Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity was related to the porous structure and the amount of basic sites. A good correlation was found between the adsorption capacity and the volume of micropores with a width < 1.4 nm for polymer-based ACs. Higher nitrogen content, including that in basic form, did not correspond to the enhanced adsorption of PCP from aqueous solution. The competitive effect of water molecule adsorption on the PCP uptake is discussed.

  6. The influence of the surface properties of silicon-fluorine hydrogel on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haijiao; Zhao, Zhengbai; An, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Yong

    2015-12-01

    A range of fluorinated hydrogels were synthesized using the copolymerization of 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 3-hexafluoroisopropyl methacrylate (HFMA) or 1H, 1H, 7H-dodecafluoroheptyl methacrylate (DFMA) with hydrophilic monomers. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme (LZM) were chosen as model proteins to investigate the performance of protein adsorption on the surface of these fluorinated hydrogels. It was found that the performance of the fluorinated hydrogels toward protein adsorption was different for different proteins; simultaneously, the amount of protein adsorption was related to but not linear with the fluorine content on the hydrogel surface. With increasing HFMA content, the mass of BSA adsorption increased in the first stage and then decreased, meanwhile the mass of LZM adsorption exhibited an upward trend in general. In addition, the amount of protein adsorption was also related to the type and length of the fluorinated groups. The hydrogels made from DFMA behaved better than HFMA hydrogels in terms of reducing protein adsorption. This study might provide further reference in choosing fluorine monomer to prepare protein-repelling hydrogels.

  7. Optical reflectivity changes induced by adsorption on metal surfaces: The origin and applications to monitoring adsorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Joseph; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2000-01-01

    It is observed that when a monolayer of CO and acetylene is chemisorbed on the Cu(100) surface, the reflectivity of the metal surface at the He-Ne laser wavelength of 632 nm is reduced on the order of 1%, while the physisorption of water, methanol, and acetone induces a reflectivity change on the order of 0.01%. The small reflectivity change induced by physisorption can be described by a three-layer model taking into account the molecular layer refractive index. The much bigger reflectivity change induced by the chemisorbed adsorbates, on the other hand, is a result of bonding perturbations to the electronic structure of the metal surface layer. The latter is supported by an electron scattering model description of the reflectivity change up to 1.96 eV on Cu. For both CO and acetylene, the optical reflectivity change is found to be linearly proportional to the submonolayer coverage. The phenomenon thus offers an excellent method to measure surface kinetics. It is found from the reflectivity change measurements that the initial sticking coefficient for both adsorbates is nearly unity at 110 K; 0.85 for CO and 1.0 for acetylene. The temperature and coverage dependence of the sticking coefficient shows that the adsorption behavior of both molecules is well described as direct adsorption mediated with an extrinsic precursor. For acetylene adsorption, the sticking coefficient shows little dependence on the substrate temperature suggesting that the "extrinsic precursor" is not a thermally equilibrated species. For CO, the transition into a compression phase beyond 0.5 ML results in a corresponding change in the sticking coefficient deduced from the reflectivity data.

  8. Adsorption and Pattern Recognition of Polymers at Complex Surfaces with Attractive Stripelike Motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möddel, Monika; Janke, Wolfhard; Bachmann, Michael

    2014-04-01

    We construct the complete structural phase diagram of polymer adsorption at substrates with attractive stripelike patterns in the parameter space spanned by the adsorption affinity of the stripes and temperature. Results were obtained by extensive generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo simulations of a generic model for the hybrid organic-inorganic system. By comparing with adhesion properties at homogeneous substrates, we find substantial differences in the formation of adsorbed polymer structures if translational invariance at the surface is broken by a regular pattern. Beside a more specific understanding of polymer adsorption processes, our results are potentially relevant for the design of macromolecular pattern recognition devices such as sensors.

  9. Scaling Properties of Adsorption Energies for Hydrogen-Containing Molecules on Transition-Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abild-Pedersen, F.; Greeley, J.; Studt, F.; Rossmeisl, J.; Munter, T. R.; Moses, P. G.; Skúlason, E.; Bligaard, T.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2007-07-01

    Density functional theory calculations are presented for CHx, x=0,1,2,3, NHx, x=0,1,2, OHx, x=0,1, and SHx, x=0,1 adsorption on a range of close-packed and stepped transition-metal surfaces. We find that the adsorption energy of any of the molecules considered scales approximately with the adsorption energy of the central, C, N, O, or S atom, the scaling constant depending only on x. A model is proposed to understand this behavior. The scaling model is developed into a general framework for estimating the reaction energies for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation reactions.

  10. Introduction of a sink-diffusion model to describe the interaction between volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and material surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, R B; Dokka, T H; Bjørseth, O

    2000-03-01

    A sink-diffusion model to describe the interaction between material surfaces and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air has been introduced. The model is based on adsorption/desorption on the material surfaces and diffusion into the materials. Test chamber experiments with exposure of nylon carpet and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) covering against alpha-pinene and toluene were used to validate the model and to make comparisons with a sink model based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The results showed that the sink-diffusion model gave a better description of the desorption curve than the Langmuir model. The model predictions improved with increasing sorption effect. The Langmuir model gave good predictions of relative weak sorption effects, whereas the sink-diffusion model improved the predictions for stronger sorption effects. In this case, nylon carpet showed substantial stronger sorption than PVC covering and alpha-pinene showed stronger sorption than toluene. Controlled field experiments with combinations of building materials and a mixture of VOCs, encountered in real indoor environments, are needed to further validate the sink-diffusion model. PMID:10842458

  11. Oxalate adsorption at a plagioclase (An47) surface and models for ligand-promoted dissolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stillings, L.L.; Drever, J.I.; Poulson, S.R.

    1998-01-01

    Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3- 5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was observed at pH 3 and 8 mM total oxalate. Adsorption is dependent upon the activities of both oxalate (C2O42-) and bioxalate (HC2O4-) in solution and can be modeled with either a two-term Langmuir or a two-term Freundlich isotherm. A Freundlich adsorption model provided the best fit to rate data because it was not constrained to a finite number of adsorption sites, as was the Langmuir model. The two-term ligand adsorption model was incorporated into a rate model: R(tot) = k(H-)[H(ads)/+](L) + k(HOx-)[HOx(ads)/-] + k(Ox2- )[Ox2(ads)/-] where R(tot) is the net dissolution rate of the feldspar, [i(ads)] is the concentration of species i adsorbed to the surface, and k(i) is the rate constant for release of the surface complex. The model was fit to data for oxalate-promoted dissolution of andesine, resulting in estimates for the rate constants of k(HOx-) = 1.16 x 10-12, k(Ox2-) = 1.05 x 10-12, and k(H-) = 9.61 x 10-13 mol of feldspar (??mol of i) (??mol of i)-1 s-1.Previous work on adsorption of oxalate at aluminosilicate surfaces suggests that maximum adsorption occurs through a bidentate attachment of the organic ligand, at near-neutral pH. Rates of ligand-promoted dissolution are expected to be greatest at this pH as well. We tested this model by measuring oxalate adsorption on the surface of andesine (An47), in solutions of pH 3-5 and total oxalate concentrations of 0-8 mM. Contrary to expectation, the greatest adsorption density of 24 ??mol m-2 total oxalate was

  12. Adsorption and recognition characteristics of surface molecularly imprinted polymethacrylic acid/silica toward genistein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Gao, Baojiao; An, Fuqiang; Xu, Zeqing; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-09-12

    In this paper, on the basis of surface-initiated graft polymerization, a new surface molecular imprinting technique is established by molecular design. And molecularly imprinted polymer MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is successfully prepared with genistein as template. The adsorption and recognition characteristics of MIP-PMAA/SiO2 for genistein are studied in depth by using static method, dynamic method and competitive adsorption experiment. The experimental results show that MIP-PMAA/SiO2 possesses very strong adsorption affinity and specific recognition for genistein. The saturated adsorption capacity could reach to 0.36mmolg(-1). The selectivity coefficients relative to quercetin and rutin are 5.4 and 11.8, respectively. Besides, MIP-PMAA/SiO2 is regenerated easily and exhibits excellent reusability. PMID:25085816

  13. Tailoring band gaps of insulators by adsorption at surface defects: Benzoic acids on NaCl surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Tegenkamp, Christoph; Pfnür, Herbert; Bredow, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    The adsorption of benzoic acid and its OH-substituted derivatives, namely, salicylic acid (SA) and parasalicylic acid on various NaCl surfaces has been investigated by density-functional theory with hybrid exchange-correlation functional. The ideal NaCl(100) surface is chemically inert as evidenced by the low binding energies. The molecular adsorption can be enhanced by both an anion vacancy and a surface step site. The bonding between the surface Na and the carboxylic O atom is of covalent character for all adsorption geometries. Our calculations show that the adsorption of SA has the largest binding energy of all three acids due to the additional interaction between Na and the phenolic O atom. Charge transfer between the molecule and the surface is generally very small, except in the presence of an anion vacancy where the unpaired electron is mostly transferred to the adsorbate. Surface defects generally have a strong influence on the electronic structure of the adsorbed molecules. Specifically, the adsorption of SA at [011]-oriented steps can significantly reduce the effective band gap to 1.6 eV due to the up shift of the Cl3p levels at the undercoordinated step edge. Implications of these results to the contact charging effect between wide-band-gap insulators will be discussed.

  14. Uranium(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite: Application of a surface complexation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, T.D.; Davis, J.A.; Payne, T.E.; Waychunas, G.A.; Xu, N.

    1994-01-01

    A study of U(VI) adsorption by ferrihydrite was conducted over a wide range of U(VI) concentrations, pH, and at two partial pressures of carbon dioxide. A two-site (strong- and weak-affinity sites, FesOH and FewOH, respectively) surface complexation model was able to describe the experimental data well over a wide range of conditions, with only one species formed with each site type: an inner-sphere, mononuclear, bidentate complex of the type (FeO2)UO2. The existence of such a surface species was supported by results of uranium EXAFS spectroscopy performed on two samples with U(VI) adsorption density in the upper range observed in this study (10 and 18% occupancy of total surface sites). Adsorption data in the alkaline pH range suggested the existence of a second surface species, modeled as a ternary surface complex with UO2CO30 binding to a bidentate surface site. Previous surface complexation models for U(VI) adsorption have proposed surface species that are identical to the predominant aqueous species, e.g., multinuclear hydrolysis complexes or several U(VI)-carbonate complexes. The results demonstrate that the speciation of adsorbed U(VI) may be constrained by the coordination environment at the surface, giving rise to surface speciation for U(VI) that is significantly less complex than aqueous speciation. ?? 1994.

  15. Role of proton ordering in adsorption preference of polar molecule on ice surface.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoru; Pan, Ding; Xu, Limei; Wang, Enge

    2012-08-14

    Adsorption of polar monomers on ice surface, relevant to the physical/chemical reaction in ice clouds as well as growth of ice, remains an open issue partially due to the unusual surface characteristics with protons at the top layer of ice. Using first-principle calculations, we explore the adsorption properties of ice surface in terms of a surface proton order parameter, which characterizes the inhomogeneity of the dangling atoms on ice surface. We show that, due to an effective electric field created by dangling OH bonds and lone pairs of water molecules not only directly neighboring but also further away from the adsorbed polar molecule on the ice surface, the adsorption energy of polar monomer on ice surface exhibits large variance and a strong correlation with the proton order parameter of ice surface. Our results about the positive correlation between the inhomogeneity of ice surface and adsorption energies suggest that the physical/chemical reactions as well as the growth of ice may prefer to occur firstly on surfaces with larger proton order parameter.

  16. Influence of Vacancy Defect on Surface Feature and Adsorption of Cs on GaN(0001) Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yanjun; Du, Yujie; Wang, Meishan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Ga and N vacancy defect on the change in surface feature, work function, and characteristic of Cs adsorption on a (2 × 2) GaN(0001) surface have been investigated using density functional theory with a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential method based on first-principles calculations. The covalent bonds gain strength for Ga vacancy defect, whereas they grow weak for N vacancy defect. The lower work function is achieved for Ga and N vacancy defect surfaces than intact surface. The most stable position of Cs adatom on Ga vacancy defect surface is at T1 site, whereas it is at BGa site on N vacancy defect surface. The Eads of Cs on GaN(0001) vacancy defect surface increases compared with that of intact surface; this illustrates that the adsorption of Cs on intact surface is more stable. PMID:25126599

  17. Influence of vacancy defect on surface feature and adsorption of Cs on GaN(0001) surface.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanjun; Du, Yujie; Wang, Meishan

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Ga and N vacancy defect on the change in surface feature, work function, and characteristic of Cs adsorption on a (2 × 2) GaN(0001) surface have been investigated using density functional theory with a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential method based on first-principles calculations. The covalent bonds gain strength for Ga vacancy defect, whereas they grow weak for N vacancy defect. The lower work function is achieved for Ga and N vacancy defect surfaces than intact surface. The most stable position of Cs adatom on Ga vacancy defect surface is at T1 site, whereas it is at B(Ga) site on N vacancy defect surface. The E(ads) of Cs on GaN(0001) vacancy defect surface increases compared with that of intact surface; this illustrates that the adsorption of Cs on intact surface is more stable.

  18. Adsorption of a biosurfactant on surfaces to enhance the disinfection of surfaces contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Meylheuc, T; Renault, M; Bellon-Fontaine, M N

    2006-05-25

    The effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide (PAH) on the inactivation of adherent Listeria monocytogenes LO28 cells were examined. The surfaces tested were stainless steel and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) conditioned or not with an anionic biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens. Dilution-neutralization methods were used to assess the effectiveness of sanitizer solutions on planktonic and adherent cells. Tests were performed on L. monocytogenes cultivated at 37 degrees Celsius (body temperature) or 20 degrees Celsius (ambient temperature). The results demonstrated that i) a total deficiency in nutrients induced by the incubation of cells in 0.15 M NaCl favored the action of NaOCl and PAH on planktonic cells; ii) by reducing the number of cells adhering to stainless steel, pre-conditioning of the surface with the biosurfactant reduced the level of contamination of the surface and thus favored the bactericidal activities of the disinfectants; and iii) the weak binding energies involved in the adsorption of the biosurfactant on PTFE surfaces resulted in there being no reduction by the polymer of the surface contamination. Furthermore, this study confirmed that adherent cells exhibited increased resistance to the actions of the disinfectants when compared to the resistance of planktonic cells. PMID:16488496

  19. Methane adsorption on the surface of a model of shale: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuan-qiang; Su, Hong; Jing, Ya; Guo, Jianchun; Tang, Junlei

    2016-11-01

    As a model of shale, one part of polycyclic aromatic ring was used to represent the kerogen surface with the structural heterogeneity. The adsorption mechanisms of methane on the surface of the kerogen were investigated by M06-2× functional with D3 dispersion correction. Nine stable adsorption sites and the orientations of methane (CH4) on the surface of the kerogen were systematically considered. Information from different methods lead to the same conclusion that methane prefers to be adsorbed on the sites directly above the carbon atoms of the kerogen rather than above the center of the six-membered rings. The interactions between methane and the surface of the kerogen are the van der Waals interactions. The interaction energies with the basis set superposition error (BSSE) corrections are around 14 kJ mol-1 at the M06-2×-D3/Jun-cc-pVDZ level. The RDG scatter graphs and the RDG gradient isosurface further illustrate that the interactions between methane and the surface of the kerogen belong to the van der Waals interactions. The weak interactions indicate that the adsorption of methane on the surface of the kerogen is physical adsorption and it slightly depends upon the adsorption sites on kerogen as well as the orientations of methane. These results are helpful for the understanding of the microcosmic mechanism of methane-shale interactions and for the exploitation of shale gas.

  20. Atomic diffusion in laser surface modified AISI H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of AISI H13 steel using 0.09 and 0.4 mm of laser spot sizes with an aim to increase surface hardness and investigate elements diffusion in laser modified surface. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and overlap percentage. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. Metallographic study and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were performed to observe presence of elements and their distribution in the sample surface. Maximum hardness achieved in the modified surface was 1017 HV0.1. Change of elements composition in the modified layer region was detected in the laser modified samples. Diffusion possibly occurred for C, Cr, Cu, Ni, and S elements. The potential found for increase in surface hardness represents an important method to sustain tooling life. The EDXS findings signify understanding of processing parameters effect on the modified surface composition.

  1. Complexity and diffusion of magnetic flux surfaces in anisotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Ruffolo, D.; Oughton, S.

    2014-04-10

    The complexity of magnetic flux surfaces is investigated analytically and numerically in static homogeneous magnetic turbulence. Magnetic surfaces are computed to large distances in magnetic fields derived from a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model. The question addressed is whether one can define magnetic surfaces over large distances when turbulence is present. Using a flux surface spectral analysis, we show that magnetic surfaces become complex at small scales, experiencing an exponential thinning that is quantified here. The computation of a flux surface is of either exponential or nondeterministic polynomial complexity, which has the conceptual implication that global identification of magnetic flux surfaces and flux exchange, e.g., in magnetic reconnection, can be intractable in three dimensions. The coarse-grained large-scale magnetic flux experiences diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established explicitly through multiple scale analysis. The Kubo number controls both large and small scale limits. These results have consequences for interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in astrophysical plasmas.

  2. Adsorption of surfactants on sand surface in enhanced oil recovery: Isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Achinta; Kumar, T.; Ojha, Keka; Mandal, Ajay

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption of surfactants onto reservoir rock surface may result in the loss and reduction of their concentrations in surfactant flooding, which may render them less efficient or ineffective in practical applications of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) techniques. Surfactant flooding for EOR received attraction due to its ability to increase the displacement efficiency by lowering the interfacial tension between oil and water and mobilizing the residual oil. This article highlights the adsorption of surfactants onto sand surface with variation of different influencing factors. It has been experimentally found that adsorption of cationic surfactant on sand surface is more and less for anionic surfactant, while non-ionic surfactant shows intermediate behaviour. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study of clean sand particles has been made to determine the main component present in the sand particles. The interaction between sand particles and surfactant has been studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the sand particles before and after aging with surfactant. Salinity plays an important role in adsorption of anionic surfactant. Batch experiments were also performed to understand the effects of pH and adsorbent dose on the sorption efficiency. The sand particles exhibited high adsorption efficiency at low pH for anionic and nonionic surfactants. But opposite trend was found for cationic surfactant. Adsorption data were analyzed by fitting with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Sips isotherm models. Results show that the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second order kinetics models suit the equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption on sand surface. Thermodynamics feasibility of the adsorption process was also studied to verify the spontaneity of the process.

  3. First-principles calculation of self-diffusion, arsenic diffusion, and surface segregation in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centoni, Scott A.

    Integrated circuit device densities have increased more than 2000 times since Gordon Moore's observation of exponential growth in 1965. Modern devices are thus sensitive to minute variations in diffusion, such as the transient-enhanced diffusivity resulting from ion implantation, concentration-dependent diffusivity of dopants due to changes in the Fermi level, and the effects of high stresses and stress gradients (resulting from thermal oxidation and other surface treatments). Arsenic diffusion and self-diffusion in Si are caused by both types of intrinsic defects, vacancies and self-interstitials. Surprisingly, the mechanisms of Si self-diffusion remain unclear: equilibrium defect concentrations are too low to measure, and defect diffusivities are obscured by the relatively large concentrations of C and O traps. The aim of the present work is to develop a physically based, quantitative understanding of dopant diffusion during IC processing, as well as the non-equilibrium limits to dopant concentrations. Density functional theory, a first-principles techniques, has been used (with the PW91 functional) to calculate properties of intrinsic defects not directly accessible to experiment. Density functional calculations of the formation enthalpies and volumes of vacancies and interstitials in silicon are presented in each low-energy geometry and charge state. The effect of pressure (up to 30 kbar) and doping (moving the Fermi level from the valence band maximum to the conduction band minimum) on the stability and diffusivity of defects is discussed. In the presence of electronic or optical excitation, both defects are mobile even at cryogenic temperatures. Vacancy diffusion is found to be enhanced by n-type doping, while p-type doping inhibits interstitial migration. Relaxation volume tensors extracted from these calculations express the response of the defects to non-hydrostatic stress states. The interstitial-mediated diffusion of As is shown to have a similar

  4. Adsorption and Distribution of Fluorescent Solutes near the Articular Surface of Mechanically Injured Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Sarah G.A.; Moeini, Mohammad; Chin, Hooi Chuan; Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Quinn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of cartilage-specific imaging agents supports the improvement of tissue assessment by minimally invasive means. Techniques for highlighting cartilage surface damage in clinical images could provide for sensitive indications of posttraumatic injury and early stage osteoarthritis. Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that fluorescent solutes interact with cartilage surfaces strongly enough to affect measurement of their partition coefficients within the tissue bulk. In this study, these findings were extended by examining solute adsorption and distribution near the articular surface of mechanically injured cartilage. Using viable cartilage explants injured by an established protocol, solute distributions near the articular surface of three commonly used fluorophores (fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC), and carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA)) were observed after absorption and subsequent desorption to assess solute-specific matrix interactions and reversibility. Both absorption and desorption processes demonstrated a trend of significantly less solute adsorption at surfaces of fissures compared to adjacent intact surfaces of damaged explants or surfaces of uninjured explants. After adsorption, normalized mean surface intensities of fissured surfaces of injured explants were 6%, 40%, and 32% for FITC, TRITC, and TAMRA, respectively, compared to uninjured surfaces. Similar values were found for sliced explants and after a desorption process. After desorption, a trend of increased solute adsorption at the site of intact damaged surfaces was noted (316% and 238% for injured and sliced explants exposed to FITC). Surface adsorption of solute was strongest for FITC and weakest for TAMRA; no solutes negatively affected cell viability. Results support the development of imaging agents that highlight distinct differences between fissured and intact cartilage surfaces. PMID:24268155

  5. Unravelling nonspecific adsorption of complex protein mixture on surfaces with SPR and MS.

    PubMed

    Breault-Turcot, Julien; Chaurand, Pierre; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2014-10-01

    Characterization of protein adsorption to surfaces has implications from biosensing to protective biocoatings. While research studies have principally focused on determining the magnitude of protein adsorption to surfaces, the proteins involved in the process remains only broadly identified and has not been investigated on several surfaces. To further elucidate the nonspecific adsorption process of serum to surfaces, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) were used in combination to obtain quantitative and qualitative information about the process of protein adsorption to surfaces. To validate the technique, crude serum was nonspecifically adsorbed on four self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold: 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid (16-MHA), 11-mercaptoundecane(ethylene glycol)3-COOH (PEG), 3-MPA-LHDLHD-OH, and 3-MPA-HHHDD-OH. Direct MS analysis of the nonspecifically adsorbed proteins suggested the presence of a variety of protein (BSA, IgG, and apolipoprotein A-1). Performing a trypsin digestion of the nonspecifically adsorbed proteins confirmed the presence of BSA and apolipoprotein A-1 and further revealed the complexity of the process by detecting the presence of complement C3, SHC-transforming protein 1, and kininogen 2. The level of nonspecific adsorption on different surfaces measured by SPR sensing directly correlated with the intensity of the serum protein and indirectly with the tryptic peptides measured by MS. Detailed analysis of the BSA peptides digested on 16-MHA and for BSA digested in solution was used to investigate the orientation of BSA on this surface. The combination of SPR and MS allows the quantitative and qualitative understanding of protein adsorption processes to surfaces. PMID:25287274

  6. Electrochemistry of ferrocene derivatives on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG): quantification and impacts of surface adsorption.

    PubMed

    Cuharuc, Anatolii S; Zhang, Guohui; Unwin, Patrick R

    2016-02-14

    Cyclic voltammetry of three ferrocene derivatives - (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium (FcTMA(+)), ferrocenecarboxylic acid (FcCOOH), and ferrocenemethanol (FcCH2OH) - in aqueous solutions shows that the reduced form of the first two redox species weakly adsorbs onto freshly cleaved surfaces of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), with the fractional surface coverage being in excess of 10% of a monolayer at a bulk concentration level of 0.25 mM for both compounds. FcCH2OH was found to exhibit greater and stronger adsorption (up to a monolayer) for the same bulk concentration. The adsorption of FcTMA(+) on freshly cleaved surfaces of high quality (low step edge density) and low quality (high step edge density) HOPG is the same within experimental error, suggesting that the amount of step edges has no influence on the adsorption process. The amount of adsorption of FcTMA(+) is the same (within error) for low quality HOPG, irrespective of whether the surface is freshly cleaved or left in air for up to 12 hours, while - with aging - high quality HOPG adsorbs notably more FcTMA(+). The formation of an airborne contaminating film is proposed to be responsible for the enhanced entrapment of FcTMA(+) on aged high quality HOPG surfaces, while low quality surfaces appear less prone to the accumulation of such films. The impact of the adsorption of ferrocene derivatives on graphite for voltammetric studies is discussed. Adsorption is quantified by developing a theory and methodology to process cyclic voltammetry data from peak current measurements. The accuracy and applicability, as well as limits of the approach, are demonstrated for various adsorption isotherms.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Ion Adsorption to the Basal Surfaces of Kaolinite

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, Igor F.; Bunker, Bruce A.; Cygan, Randall T.

    2008-06-06

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the mechanisms involved in the adsorption of various ions to the basal surfaces of kaolinite. Analysis of simulation data indicates that cations and anions adsorb preferably on the siloxane and gibbsite surfaces of kaolinite, respectively. Strong inner-sphere adsorption of chlorine at aluminum vacancies on the gibbsite surface and the occurrence of chlorine-driven inner-sphere adsorption of cesium and sodium on the gibbsite surface for high ionic strengths are observed. Cesium ions form strong inner-sphere complexes at ditrigonal cavities on the siloxane surface. Outer-sphere cesium is highly mobile and only weak adsorption may occur. A small amount of sodium adsorbs on the siloxane surface as inner-sphere complexes at less clearly defined sites. Like cesium, sodium only forms very weak outer-sphere complexes on this surface. Inner-sphere complexes of cadmium and lead do not occur on either surface. Relatively strong outer-sphere cadmium and lead complexes are present on the siloxane surface at ditrigonal cavities.

  8. A Modular Approach To Study Protein Adsorption on Surface Modified Hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Ozhukil Kollath, Vinayaraj; Van den Broeck, Freya; Fehér, Krisztina; Martins, José C; Luyten, Jan; Traina, Karl; Mullens, Steven; Cloots, Rudi

    2015-07-13

    Biocompatible inorganic nano- and microcarriers can be suitable candidates for protein delivery. This study demonstrates facile methods of functionalization by using nanoscale linker molecules to change the protein adsorption capacity of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder. The adsorption capacity of bovine serum albumin as a model protein has been studied with respect to the surface modifications. The selected linker molecules (lysine, arginine, and phosphoserine) can influence the adsorption capacity by changing the electrostatic nature of the HA surface. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of linker-molecule interactions with the HA surface have been performed by using NMR spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses. Additionally, correlations to theoretical isotherm models have been calculated with respect to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Lysine and arginine increased the protein adsorption, whereas phosphoserine reduced the protein adsorption. The results show that the adsorption capacity can be controlled with different functionalization, depending on the protein-carrier selections under consideration. The scientific knowledge acquired from this study can be applied in various biotechnological applications that involve biomolecule-inorganic material interfaces. PMID:26096378

  9. A Modular Approach To Study Protein Adsorption on Surface Modified Hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Ozhukil Kollath, Vinayaraj; Van den Broeck, Freya; Fehér, Krisztina; Martins, José C; Luyten, Jan; Traina, Karl; Mullens, Steven; Cloots, Rudi

    2015-07-13

    Biocompatible inorganic nano- and microcarriers can be suitable candidates for protein delivery. This study demonstrates facile methods of functionalization by using nanoscale linker molecules to change the protein adsorption capacity of hydroxyapatite (HA) powder. The adsorption capacity of bovine serum albumin as a model protein has been studied with respect to the surface modifications. The selected linker molecules (lysine, arginine, and phosphoserine) can influence the adsorption capacity by changing the electrostatic nature of the HA surface. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of linker-molecule interactions with the HA surface have been performed by using NMR spectroscopy, zeta-potential measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analyses. Additionally, correlations to theoretical isotherm models have been calculated with respect to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Lysine and arginine increased the protein adsorption, whereas phosphoserine reduced the protein adsorption. The results show that the adsorption capacity can be controlled with different functionalization, depending on the protein-carrier selections under consideration. The scientific knowledge acquired from this study can be applied in various biotechnological applications that involve biomolecule-inorganic material interfaces.

  10. Surface heterogeneity analysis of MCM-41 metallosilicates by using nitrogen adsorption data

    SciTech Connect

    Kruk, M.; Jaroniec, M.; Sayari, A.

    1999-08-31

    MCM-41 silicas with framework-incorporated aluminum and boron heteroatoms were studied using nitrogen adsorption at 77K over a wide range of relative pressures. It was shown that despite significant differences in surface area, pore sizes, and widths of pore size distributions, the framework-substituted MCM-41 materials studied exhibited very similar low-pressure relative adsorption curves and adsorption energy distributions. This indicates that the presence of heteroatoms does not lead to significant changes in the surface properties with respect to nitrogen molecules. However, small but detectable and systematic changes in the low-pressure adsorption were observed for two series of samples with different contents of heteroatoms prepared under similar conditions. It was concluded that low-pressure nitrogen adsorption exhibits rather low sensitivity toward framework-incorporated aluminum and boron heteroatoms, but it may provide some information about contents of heteroatoms for samples prepared under the same conditions. Because of the similarity of nitrogen adsorption processes on surfaces of siliceous ordered mesoporous materials with and without framework-substituted heteroatoms, the methods of micropore analysis (e.g., the comparative plot method) and mesopore size analysis developed and/or calibrated for pure-silica materials are expected to be fully applicable for samples with different kinds of incorporated heteroatoms.

  11. Fluoride adsorption onto amorphous aluminum hydroxide: Roles of the surface acetate anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Xing; Jia, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous aluminum hydroxide with hydroxyl groups, acetate anions and chlorine anions enriched surface was synthesized, and was characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. Batch experiments were performed to study the influence of various experimental parameters such as contact time, initial fluoride concentration, temperature, pH value and the presence of competing anions on the adsorption of fluoride on amorphous aluminum hydroxide. The kinetic data was well fitted to pseudo-second-order model. The fluoride adsorption on the amorphous aluminum hydroxide can be well described by the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 63.94mgg(-1) at pH 7.0. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy, standard enthalpy and standard entropy were calculated, and the results suggested that the adsorption of fluoride on the amorphous aluminum hydroxide was a feasible, spontaneous and exothermic process. The adsorption mechanism was revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The results suggested that the surface acetate anions and surface chlorine anions played important roles in the fluoride removal process. PMID:27565961

  12. On the role of long range interactions for the adsorption of sexithiophene on Ag(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Jeronimo; Rojas, Tomas; Yildirim, Handan E-mail: Abdelkader.Kara@ucf.edu; Kara, Abdelkader E-mail: Abdelkader.Kara@ucf.edu

    2014-04-14

    The adsorption characteristics of the sexithiophene (6T) molecule on Ag(110) are studied using density functional theory with the inclusion of van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The stable adsorption configurations on 6T on Ag(110) as well as the nature of bonding the Ag substrate are evaluated. We also assess the performance of the vdW-DF method in describing the adsorption, energetics, heights, as well as the interface characteristics with the Ag(110) surface. We find two lowest adsorption energy configurations, at which the 6T molecule aligns with its molecular long axis parallel and perpendicular to the [001] direction, to be energetically close to each other, suggesting that they may coexist. Our findings indicate a significant increase in the 6T adsorption energies upon the inclusion of vdW interactions with the highest increase obtained using the opt-type functionals, in particular with the optB86b-vdW functional. The revPBE-vdW and rPW86-vdW2 functionals lead to less enhancement in adsorption energies that is attributed to the strong repulsive nature of these functionals, in agreement with earlier predictions. Upon adsorption of the 6T molecule, the changes in the atomic and electronic structures of the 6T molecule and Ag surface are found to be negligible; there is no charge transfer, and no interface state is observed. The work function is reduced upon adsorption with the largest change is ∼0.6 eV obtained using the optB88-vdW functional. The results are in good agreement with the available experimental observations of the adsorption configurations and the work function changes. Based on our results, we conclude that the nature of bonding for 6T on Ag(110) can be classified as strong physisorption.

  13. Interaction of mineral surfaces with simple organic molecules by diffuse reflectance IR spectroscopy (DRIFT)

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Joan E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2008-06-01

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to characterize multi-layers of lysine, glutamic acid and salicylic acid on -alumina and kaolinite surfaces. The results agreed well with those previously obtained by ATR-IR in aqueous media where available, indicating that DRIFT may be regarded as effectively an in-situ spectroscopy for these materials. In the case of salicylic acid adsorption onto γ-alumina, DRIFTS was used to identify monolayer coverage and to detect molecules down to coverage of 3% of a monolayer. The spectroscopic results as to coverage were confirmed by analysis of the solutions used for treatment. The spectra obtained allowed identification of changes in the bonding environment with increasing surface coverage. DRIFTS, offers several advantages in terms of materials, experimental technique and data treatment, motivating further investigations.

  14. The adsorption of methyl methacrylate and vinyl acetate polymers on α-quartz surface: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lijing; Yang, Yan; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Bingjian; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The molecular dynamics simulation was used to investigate the adsorption of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polyvinyl acetate (PVA), the commonly used surface coating materials, on α-quartz surface. The objective is to understand the interactions between quartz surface and polymers. The results clearly show adsorption of both polymers onto the quartz surface. Carbonyl group plays a significant role in the adsorption process. The adsorption energies of PMMA and PVA on α-quartz surface did not show significant difference, however, more hydrogen bonds were observed on the PVA/quartz system than PMMA/quartz. These observations might offer some insights on the polymer-quartz adhesion and its failure mechanism.

  15. Theory of polyelectrolyte adsorption on heterogeneously charged surfaces applied to soluble protein-polyelectrolyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, R.; Weinbreck, F.; de Kruif, C. G.

    2003-03-01

    Existing theoretical approaches to polymer adsorption on heterogeneous surfaces are applied to the problems of polyelectrolyte and polyampholyte adsorption on randomly charged surfaces. Also, analytical estimates are developed for the critical pH at which weakly charged polyelectrolytes and globular proteins start forming soluble complexes. Below a critical salt concentration, soluble complexes form "on the wrong side" of the protein isoelectric point due to the heterogeneity of the protein surface charge distribution. The analytical estimates are consistent with experimental data on soluble complexes in mixtures of gum arabic and whey protein isolate.

  16. Effect of zeta potentials on bovine serum albumin adsorption to hydroxyapatite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Nahoko; Sato, Toru; Maki, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to hydroxyapatite surfaces by means of zeta potential. The electrophoretic mobility of both hydroxyapatite and BSA were negative, with BSA itself less negative than hydroxyapatite. The zeta potential of the surface of BSA-adsorbed hydroxyapatite was significantly more negative than that of hydroxyapatite alone (p<0.0001). The BSA histogram indicated two negative peaks, and the zeta potential of BSA-adsorbed hydroxyapatite also showed two similar negative peaks. These results suggest that BSA adsorption to hydroxyapatite surfaces is related to electrostatic interaction. PMID:23903580

  17. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-01

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  18. Surface self-diffusion of silicon during high temperature annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta-Alba, Pablo E.; Kononchuk, Oleg; Gourdel, Christophe; Claverie, Alain

    2014-04-07

    The atomic-scale mechanisms driving thermally activated self-diffusion on silicon surfaces are investigated by atomic force microscopy. The evolution of surface topography is quantified over a large spatial bandwidth by means of the Power Spectral Density functions. We propose a parametric model, based on the Mullins-Herring (M-H) diffusion equation, to describe the evolution of the surface topography of silicon during thermal annealing. Usually, a stochastic term is introduced into the M-H model in order to describe intrinsic random fluctuations of the system. In this work, we add two stochastic terms describing the surface thermal fluctuations and the oxidation-evaporation phenomenon. Using this extended model, surface evolution during thermal annealing in reducing atmosphere can be predicted for temperatures above the roughening transition. A very good agreement between experimental and theoretical data describing roughness evolution and self-diffusion phenomenon is obtained. The physical origin and time-evolution of these stochastic terms are discussed. Finally, using this model, we explore the limitations of the smoothening of the silicon surfaces by rapid thermal annealing.

  19. Surface properties and adsorption characteristics to methylene blue and iodine of adsorbents from sludge.

    PubMed

    Deng, L Y; Xu, G R; Li, G B

    2010-01-01

    Adsorbent materials created from wastewater sludge have unique surface characteristics and could be effective in adsorption applications. In this research, the sludge-adsorbents were generated by pyrolyzing mixtures of sewage sludge and H(2)SO(4). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) were used to analyze the properties of sludge-adsorbent. XPS results show that the adsorbent surface functional groups with high contents of oxygen-containing groups serve as active sites for the adsorption and affect the surface characteristics; the adsorption mechanism of methylene blue (MB) is mainly Brönsted acid-base reaction between the adsorbent surface and MB; and iodine atoms are bonded to the surface of the adsorbent mainly by dispersive interactions rather than by electrostatic interactions. The results also show that H(2)SO(4) level, pyrolysis temperature and sulfuric acid/sludge weight ratio actually affected the adsorption characteristics. Using the conditions (H(2)SO(4) level of 1-18 M, pyrolysis temperature of 650°C, and weight ratio of 0.8), the adsorption capacities for MB and iodine were 74.7-62.3 mg g(-1) and 169.5-209.3 mg g(-1), respectively.

  20. The role of van der Waals interactions in the adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, De-Li; Al-Saidi, W A; Johnson, J Karl

    2012-10-03

    Adsorption of noble gases on metal surfaces is determined by weak interactions. We applied two versions of the nonlocal van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) to compute adsorption energies of Ar, Kr, and Xe on Pt(111), Pd(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) metal surfaces. We have compared our results with data obtained using other density functional approaches, including the semiempirical vdW corrected DFT-D2. The vdW-DF results show considerable improvements in the description of adsorption energies and equilibrium distances over other DFTbased methods, giving good agreement with experiments. We have also calculated perpendicular vibrational energies for noble gases on the metal surfaces using vdWDF data and found excellent agreement with available experimental results. Our vdW-DF calculations show that adsorption of noble gases on low-coordination sites is energetically favored over high-coordination sites, but only by a few meV. Analysis of the 2-dimensional potential energy surface shows that the high-coordination sites are local maxima on the 2-dimensional potential energy surface and therefore unlikely to be observed in experiments, which provides an explanation of the experimental observations. The DFT-D2 approach with the standard parameterization was found to overestimate the dispersion interactions, and to give the wrong adsorption site preference for four of the nine systems we studied.

  1. Effect of Dopants on the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Ceria Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Meijun; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-25

    Here, high-surface-area nanosized CeO2 and M-doped CeO2 (M=Cu, La, Zr, and Mg) prepared by a surfactant-templated method were tested for CO2 adsorption. Cu, La, and Zr are doped into the lattice of CeO2, whereas Mg is dispersed on the CeO2 surface. The doping of Cu and La into CeO2 leads to an increase of the CO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the doping of Zr has little or no effect. The addition of Mg causes a decrease of the CO2 adsorption capacity at a low Mg content and a gradual increase at a higher content. The CO2 adsorption capacity follows the sequencemore » Cu-CeO2>La-CeO2>Zr-CeO2≈CeO2>Mg-CeO2 at low dopant contents, in line with the relative amount of defect sites in the samples. It is the defect sites on the surface, not in the bulk of CeO2, modified by the dopants that play the vital role in CO2 chemisorption. Lastly, the role of surface oxygen vacancies is further supported by an in situ IR spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry during CO2 adsorption on the doped CeO2.« less

  2. DFT simulation of the adsorption of sodium silicate species on kaolinite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yonghua; Liu, Wenli; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of Si(OH)4 molecules and the SiO(OH)3- anion on kaolinite surfaces was studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the dispersion mechanism of sodium silicate on kaolinite particles. The calculated results demonstrate that Si(OH)4 and SiO(OH)3- primarily adsorb on kaolinite Al-terminated (0 0 1) surfaces. Both Si(OH)4 and SiO(OH)3- bond with the Al-terminated surface by hybridization of the O2p orbital and H1s orbital. The unbonded O atom of SiO(OH)3- is notably active. The SiO(OH)3- anion can add more electrons and form a stronger electrostatic interaction with the Al surface. The adsorption of SiO(OH)3- is more stable than the adsorption of Si(OH)4. After adsorption of sodium silicate, the surfaces of kaolinite can become more hydrophilic and carry more negative charge. Therefore, the adsorption of silicate species makes the fine particles of kaolinite disperse in aqueous solution more easily.

  3. Surface Plasmon Resonance Analysis of Histidine-Tagged F1-ATPase Surface Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Jenifer K.; Richter, Mark L.; Berrie, Cindy L.

    2015-11-01

    Studies of the rotational activity of the enzymatic core (α3β3γ) of the F1-ATPase motor protein have relied on binding the enzyme to NTA-coated glass surfaces via polyhistidine tags engineered into the C-termini of each of the three α or β subunits. Those studies revealed the rotational motion of the central γ subunit by monitoring the motion of attached micron-long actin filaments or spherical nanoparticles. However, only a small percentage of the attached filaments or particles were observed to rotate, likely due, at least in part, to non-uniform surface attachment of the motor proteins. In this study, we have applied surface plasmon resonance to monitor the kinetics and affinity of binding of the His-tagged motor protein to NTA-coated gold sensor surfaces. The binding data, when fit to a heterogeneous binding model, exhibit two sets of adsorption-desorption rate constants with two dissociation constants of 4.0 × 10-9 M and 8.6 × 10-11 M for 6His-α3β3γ binding to the nickel ion-activated NTA surface. The data are consistent with mixed attachment of the protein via two (bimodal) and three (trimodal) NTA/Ni2+-His-tag interactions, respectively, with the less stable bimodal interaction dominating. The results provide a partial explanation for the low number of surface-attached F1 motors previously observed in rotation studies and suggest alternative approaches to uniform F1 motor surface attachment for future fabrication of motor-based nanobiodevices and materials.

  4. Echo thresholds for reflections from acoustically diffusive architectural surfaces.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip W; Walther, Andreas; Faller, Christof; Braasch, Jonas

    2013-10-01

    When sound reflects from an irregular architectural surface, it spreads spatially and temporally. Extensive research has been devoted to prediction and measurement of diffusion, but less has focused on its perceptual effects. This paper examines the effect of temporal diffusion on echo threshold. There are several notable differences between the waveform of a reflection identical to the direct sound and one from an architectural surface. The onset and offset are damped and the energy is spread in time; hence, the reflection response has a lower peak amplitude, and is decorrelated from the direct sound. The perceptual consequences of these differences are previously undocumented. Echo threshold tests are conducted with speech and music signals, using direct sound and a simulated reflection that is either identical to the direct sound or has various degrees of diffusion. Results indicate that for a speech signal, diffuse reflections are less easily detectable as a separate auditory event than specular reflections of the same total energy. For a music signal, no differences are observed between the echo thresholds for reflections with and without temporal diffusion. Additionally, echo thresholds are found to be shorter for speech than for music, and shorter for spatialized than for diotic presentation of signals.

  5. A Theoretical Study of Bulk and Surface Diffusion Processes for Semiconductor Materials Using First Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehl, Jason L.

    Diffusion of point defects on crystalline surfaces and in their bulk is an important and ubiquitous phenomenon affecting film quality, electronic properties and device functionality. A complete understanding of these diffusion processes enables one to predict and then control those processes. Such understanding includes knowledge of the structural, energetic and electronic properties of these native and non-native point defect diffusion processes. Direct experimental observation of the phenomenon is difficult and microscopic theories of diffusion mechanisms and pathways abound. Thus, knowing the nature of diffusion processes, of specific point defects in given materials, has been a challenging task for analytical theory as well as experiment. The recent advances in computing technology have been a catalyst for the rise of a third mode of investigation. The advent of tremendous computing power, breakthroughs in algorithmic development in computational applications of electronic density functional theory now enables direct computation of the diffusion process. This thesis demonstrates such a method applied to several different examples of point defect diffusion on the (001) surface of gallium arsenide (GaAs) and the bulk of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium sulfide (CdS). All results presented in this work are ab initio, total-energy pseudopotential calculations within the local density approximation to density-functional theory. Single particle wavefunctions were expanded in a plane-wave basis and reciprocal space k-point sampling was achieved by Monkhorst-Pack generated k-point grids. Both surface and bulk computations employed a supercell approach using periodic boundary conditions. Ga adatom adsorption and diffusion processes were studied on two reconstructions of the GaAs(001) surface including the c(4x4) and c(4x4)-heterodimer surface reconstructions. On the GaAs(001)- c(4x4) surface reconstruction, two distinct sets of minima and transition sites were

  6. Permeability and kinetic coefficients for mesoscale BCF surface step dynamics: Discrete two-dimensional deposition-diffusion equation analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Renjie; Evans, James W.; Oliveira, Tiago J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, a discrete version of deposition-diffusion equations appropriate for description of step flow on a vicinal surface is analyzed for a two-dimensional grid of adsorption sites representing the stepped surface and explicitly incorporating kinks along the step edges. Model energetics and kinetics appropriately account for binding of adatoms at steps and kinks, distinct terrace and edge diffusion rates, and possible additional barriers for attachment to steps. Analysis of adatom attachment fluxes as well as limiting values of adatom densities at step edges for nonuniform deposition scenarios allows determination of both permeability and kinetic coefficients. Behavior of these quantities is assessedmore » as a function of key system parameters including kink density, step attachment barriers, and the step edge diffusion rate.« less

  7. Adsorption of malachite green by magnetic litchi pericarps: A response surface methodology investigation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Qi, Jinqiu; Jiang, Ruixue; Gao, Yan; Li, Xiaochen

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we synthesized a novel magnetic adsorbent containing litchi pericarps, denoted as MLP, for the removal of malachite green (MG) from solution. The factors influencing MG adsorption, such as contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial dye concentration, were optimized using the Box-Behnken response surface methodology (RSM). The adsorption isotherms as well as the kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption of MG onto MLP are discussed. The results showed that MLP has a maximum adsorption efficiency of 99.5% when the temperature, pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial MG concentration were optimally set as 25 °C, 6.0, 66.69 min, 5.14 g/L, and 150 mg/L, respectively. The best model to describe this process is the Langmuir isotherm, with the maximum adsorption capacity being 70.42 mg/g. In addition, the kinetics of MG adsorption onto MLP followed a pseudo-second-order model; moreover, thermodynamic analysis suggested that MG adsorption onto MLP is spontaneous and endothermic. Finally, it was found that the new magnetic adsorbent can be separated easily and rapidly from mixed solutions in the presence of an external magnetic field. PMID:26254991

  8. Adsorption of malachite green by magnetic litchi pericarps: A response surface methodology investigation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Qi, Jinqiu; Jiang, Ruixue; Gao, Yan; Li, Xiaochen

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we synthesized a novel magnetic adsorbent containing litchi pericarps, denoted as MLP, for the removal of malachite green (MG) from solution. The factors influencing MG adsorption, such as contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial dye concentration, were optimized using the Box-Behnken response surface methodology (RSM). The adsorption isotherms as well as the kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption of MG onto MLP are discussed. The results showed that MLP has a maximum adsorption efficiency of 99.5% when the temperature, pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, and initial MG concentration were optimally set as 25 °C, 6.0, 66.69 min, 5.14 g/L, and 150 mg/L, respectively. The best model to describe this process is the Langmuir isotherm, with the maximum adsorption capacity being 70.42 mg/g. In addition, the kinetics of MG adsorption onto MLP followed a pseudo-second-order model; moreover, thermodynamic analysis suggested that MG adsorption onto MLP is spontaneous and endothermic. Finally, it was found that the new magnetic adsorbent can be separated easily and rapidly from mixed solutions in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  9. Surface-Bound Casein Modulates the Adsorption and Activity of Kinesin on SiO2 Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Tomomitsu; Verma, Vivek; Uppalapati, Maruti; Suzuki, Yukiko; Nakamura, Mikihiko; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Hancock, William O.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Conventional kinesin is routinely adsorbed to hydrophilic surfaces such as SiO2. Pretreatment of surfaces with casein has become the standard protocol for achieving optimal kinesin activity, but the mechanism by which casein enhances kinesin surface adsorption and function is poorly understood. We used quartz crystal microbalance measurements and microtubule gliding assays to uncover the role that casein plays in enhancing the activity of surface-adsorbed kinesin. On SiO2 surfaces, casein adsorbs as both a tightly bound monolayer and a reversibly bound second layer that has a dissociation constant of 500 nM and can be desorbed by washing with casein-free buffer. Experiments using truncated kinesins demonstrate that in the presence of soluble casein, kinesin tails bind well to the surface, whereas kinesin head binding is blocked. Removing soluble casein reverses these binding profiles. Surprisingly, reversibly bound casein plays only a moderate role during kinesin adsorption, but it significantly enhances kinesin activity when surface-adsorbed motors are interacting with microtubules. These results point to a model in which a dynamic casein bilayer prevents reversible association of the heads with the surface and enhances association of the kinesin tail with the surface. Understanding protein-surface interactions in this model system should provide a framework for engineering surfaces for functional adsorption of other motor proteins and surface-active enzymes. PMID:19383474

  10. Water adsorption behavior on metal surfaces and its influence on surface potential studied by in situ SPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L. Q.; Zhao, X. M.; Bai, Y.; Qiao, L. J.

    2012-09-01

    The water adsorption behavior on the surfaces of chromium, copper and gold and its effect on the surface potential at various relative humidity were studied by in situ scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) combined with force calibration. The thickness of water layer on different surfaces was obtained from the force-distance curve. It increases with the rise of humidity. The Volta potential map was measured using SKPFM within a wide humidity range of 20-100% as a function of the thickness of water layers. The surface potential decreases with the increasing thickness of water layers on the metal surfaces. The difference in the water adsorption behavior and its effect on surface potential originates from the different surface properties of three metals, such as the roughness and contact angle.

  11. Compact surface-cluster diffusion by concerted rotation and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J. C.; Soerensen, Mads R.; Voter, Arthur F.

    2000-02-15

    First-principles calculations show that a pseudomorphic Ir monolayer on Ir(111) has an unexpected metastable on-top configuration only slightly above the stable fcc configuration. The energy required for any translation of the monolayer parallel to the surface is small. This opens the possibility that whole clusters can move by rotation and/or translation through configurations with many atoms in on-top sites. One such diffusion mechanism, the ''cartwheel shuffle'' could explain otherwise mysterious long jumps and high prefactors seen in the diffusion of 19-atom Ir clusters on Ir(111). (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  12. On modeling biomolecular-surface nonbonded interactions: application to nucleobase adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotube surfaces.

    PubMed

    Akdim, B; Pachter, R; Day, P N; Kim, S S; Naik, R R

    2012-04-27

    In this work we explored the selectivity of single nucleobases towards adsorption on chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by density functional theory calculations. Specifically, the adsorption of molecular models of guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), and cytosine (C), as well as of AT and GC Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs on chiral SWCNT C(6, 5), C(9, 1) and C(8, 3) model structures, was analyzed in detail. The importance of correcting the exchange-correlation functional for London dispersion was clearly demonstrated, yet limitations in modeling such interactions by considering the SWCNT as a molecular model may mask subtle effects in a molecular-macroscopic material system. The trend in the calculated adsorption energies of the nucleobases on same diameter C(6, 5) and C(9, 1) SWCNT surfaces, i.e., G > A > T > C, was consistent with related computations and experimental work on graphitic surfaces, however contradicting experimental data on the adsorption of single-strand short homo-oligonucleotides on SWCNTs that demonstrated a trend of G > C > A > T (Albertorio et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 395101). A possible role of electrostatic interactions in this case was partially captured by applying the effective fragment potential method, emphasizing that the interplay of the various contributions in modeling nonbonded interactions is complicated by theoretical limitations. Finally, because the calculated adsorption energies for Watson-Crick base pairs have shown little effect upon adsorption of the base pair farther from the surface, the results on SWCNT sorting by salmon genomic DNA could be indicative of partial unfolding of the double helix upon adsorption on the SWCNT surface.

  13. Atomic oxygen diffusion on and desorption from amorphous silicate surfaces.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao; Jing, Dapeng; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2014-02-28

    Surface reactions involving atomic oxygen have attracted much attention in astrophysics and astrochemistry, but two of the most fundamental surface processes, desorption and diffusion, are not well understood. We studied diffusion and desorption of atomic oxygen on or from amorphous silicate surfaces under simulated interstellar conditions using a radio-frequency dissociated oxygen beam. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments were performed to study the formation of ozone from reaction of atomic and molecular oxygen deposited on the surface of a silicate. It is found that atomic oxygen begins to diffuse significantly between 40 K and 50 K. A rate equation model was used to study the surface kinetics involved in ozone formation experiments. The value of atomic oxygen desorption energy has been determined to be 152 ± 20 meV (1764 ± 232 K). The newly found atomic oxygen desorption energy, which is much higher than the well-accepted value, might explain the discrepancy in abundance of molecular oxygen in space between observations and chemical models.

  14. Adsorption of uranium by amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile, using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Tilong; Chen, Xia; Liu, Xunyue; Ding, Xingcheng

    2015-05-01

    The amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile (CTS-g-PAO) was prepared for the adsorption of uranium from water. The effects of pH, concentration of uranium and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of uranium by CTS-g-PAO were optimized using Doehlert design of response surface methodology (RSM). The adsorption capacity and removal efficiency achieved 312.06 mg/g and 86.02%, respectively. The adsorption process attained equilibrium only in 120 min. More than 80% of the absorbed uranium could be desorbed by 0.1 mol/l HCl or EDTA-Na, and CTS-g-PAO could be reused at least 3 times. The CTS-g-PAO and U(VI) ions formed a chelate complex due to FTIR spectral analysis. The surface morphology of CTS-g-PAO was also investigated by SEM. The adsorption process was better described by Langmuir isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Results obtained indicated that CTS-g-PAO was very promising in adsorption of uranium from water.

  15. Self-Catalyzed Carbon Dioxide Adsorption by Metal-Organic Chains on Gold Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Min; Sun, Hao; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje

    2014-08-26

    Efficient capture of CO2 by chemical means requires a microscopic understanding of the interactions of the molecule-substrate bonding and adsorption-induced collective phenomena. By molecule-resolved imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we investigate self-catalyzed CO2 adsorption on one-dimensional (1D) substrates composed of self-assembled metal-organic chains (MOCs) supported on gold surfaces. CO2 adsorption turns on attractive interchain interactions, which induce pronounced surface structural changes; the initially uniformly dispersed chains gather into close packed bundles, which are held together by highly ordered, single molecule wide CO2 ranks. CO2 molecules create more favorable adsorption sites for further CO2 adsorption by mediating the interchain attraction, thereby self-catalyzing their capture. The release of CO2 molecules by thermal desorption returns the MOCs to their original structure, indicating that the CO2 capture and release are reversible processes. The real space microscopic characterization of the self-catalyzed CO2 adsorption on 1D substrates could be exploited as platform for design of molecular materials for CO2 capture and reduction.

  16. Adsorption of uranium by amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile, using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Jingjing; Yang, Tilong; Chen, Xia; Liu, Xunyue; Ding, Xingcheng

    2015-05-01

    The amidoximated chitosan-grafted polyacrylonitrile (CTS-g-PAO) was prepared for the adsorption of uranium from water. The effects of pH, concentration of uranium and the solid-liquid ratio on the adsorption of uranium by CTS-g-PAO were optimized using Doehlert design of response surface methodology (RSM). The adsorption capacity and removal efficiency achieved 312.06 mg/g and 86.02%, respectively. The adsorption process attained equilibrium only in 120 min. More than 80% of the absorbed uranium could be desorbed by 0.1 mol/l HCl or EDTA-Na, and CTS-g-PAO could be reused at least 3 times. The CTS-g-PAO and U(VI) ions formed a chelate complex due to FTIR spectral analysis. The surface morphology of CTS-g-PAO was also investigated by SEM. The adsorption process was better described by Langmuir isotherm and pseudo second order kinetic model. Results obtained indicated that CTS-g-PAO was very promising in adsorption of uranium from water. PMID:25659674

  17. Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanocubes with Ultrahigh Surface Areas for Efficient CO2 Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yong; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Renyuan; Liu, Yong; Wang, Wenxing; Ling, Yun; El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2016-01-01

    Ultrahigh surface area single-crystals of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMOs) with uniform cubic or truncated-cubic morphology and organic/inorganic components homogeneously distributed over the whole frameworks have successfully been prepared by a sol-gel surfactant-templating method. By tuning the porous feature and polymerization degree, the surface areas of the obtained PMO nanocubes can reach as high as 2370 m2/g, which is the highest for silica-based mesoporous materials. The ultrahigh surface area of the obtained PMO single crystals is mainly resulted from abundant micropores in the mesoporous frameworks. Furthermore, the diameter of the nanocubes can also be well controlled from 150 to 600 nm. The materials show ultrahigh CO2 adsorption capacity (up to 1.42 mmol/g at 273 K) which is much higher than other porous silica materials and comparable to some carbonaceous materials. The adsorption of CO2 into the PMO nanocubes is mainly in physical interaction, therefore the adsorption-desorption process is highly reversible and the adsorption capacity is much dependent on the surface area of the materials. Moreover, the selectivity is also very high (~11 times to N2) towards CO2 adsorption. PMID:26868049

  18. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  19. Ice-surface adsorption enhanced colligative effect of antifreeze proteins in ice growth inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yougang; Ba, Yong

    2006-09-01

    This Communication describes a mechanism to explain antifreeze protein's function to inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We propose that the adsorption of antifreeze protein (AFP) molecules on an ice surface induces a dense AFP-water layer, which can significantly decrease the mole fraction of the interfacial water and, thus, lower the temperature for a seed ice crystal to grow in a super-cooled AFP solution. This mechanism can also explain the nearly unchanged melting point for the ice crystal due to the AFP's ice-surface adsorption. A mathematical model combining the Langmuir theory of adsorption and the colligative effect of thermodynamics has been proposed to find the equilibrium constants of the ice-surface adsorptions, and the interfacial concentrations of AFPs through fitting the theoretical curves to the experimental thermal hysteresis data. This model has been demonstrated by using the experimental data of serial size-mutated beetle Tenebrio molitor (Tm) AFPs. It was found that the AFP's ice-surface adsorptions could increase the interfacial AFP's concentrations by 3 to 4 orders compared with those in the bulk AFP solutions.

  20. Effects of topology on the adsorption of singly tethered ring polymers to attractive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Sun, Zhao-Yan; An, Li-Jia

    2015-07-14

    We investigate the effect of topology on the equilibrium behavior of singly tethered ring polymers adsorbed on an attractive surface. We focus on the change of square radius of gyration Rg(2), the perpendicular component Rg⊥(2) and the parallel component Rg‖(2) to the adsorbing surface, the mean contacting number of monomers with the surface , and the monomer distribution along z-direction during transition from desorption to adsorption. We find that both of the critical point of adsorption εc and the crossover exponent ϕ depend on the knot type when the chain length of ring ranges from 48 to 400. The behaviors of Rg(2), Rg⊥(2), and Rg‖(2) are found to be dependent on the topology and the monomer-surface attractive strength. At weak adsorption, the polymer chains with more complex topology are more adsorbable than those with simple topology. However, at strong adsorption, the polymer chains with complex topology are less adsorbable. By analyzing the distribution of monomer along z-direction, we give a possible mechanism for the effect of topology on the adsorption behavior.

  1. Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Nanocubes with Ultrahigh Surface Areas for Efficient CO2 Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Renyuan; Liu, Yong; Wang, Wenxing; Ling, Yun; El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2016-02-01

    Ultrahigh surface area single-crystals of periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMOs) with uniform cubic or truncated-cubic morphology and organic/inorganic components homogeneously distributed over the whole frameworks have successfully been prepared by a sol-gel surfactant-templating method. By tuning the porous feature and polymerization degree, the surface areas of the obtained PMO nanocubes can reach as high as 2370 m2/g, which is the highest for silica-based mesoporous materials. The ultrahigh surface area of the obtained PMO single crystals is mainly resulted from abundant micropores in the mesoporous frameworks. Furthermore, the diameter of the nanocubes can also be well controlled from 150 to 600 nm. The materials show ultrahigh CO2 adsorption capacity (up to 1.42 mmol/g at 273 K) which is much higher than other porous silica materials and comparable to some carbonaceous materials. The adsorption of CO2 into the PMO nanocubes is mainly in physical interaction, therefore the adsorption-desorption process is highly reversible and the adsorption capacity is much dependent on the surface area of the materials. Moreover, the selectivity is also very high (~11 times to N2) towards CO2 adsorption.

  2. Adsorption and decomposition of H2O on cobalt surfaces: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, F. F.; Ma, S. H.; Jiao, Z. Y.; Dai, X. Q.

    2016-10-01

    Water adsorption and dissociation on clean and O-covered Co(100), Co(110) and Co(111) surfaces are studied using the density functional theory calculations. The results indicate that molecular water weakly binds to the surfaces and is feasible to desorption from the clean surfaces. Moreover, the pre-adsorption of O atom increases the binding of water to the surfaces, and prominently decreases the activation barriers of water dissociation into OH, especially on Co(110) surface. In contrast, the activation barrier for OH dissociation is slightly affected in the presence of O atom. Overall, this study reveals that O-assisted H2O favorably adsorbs dissociatively, forming OH chemisorbed on the surfaces, which further hinders H2O dissociation, and also illustrates the fact that molecular water dissociation is structure-sensitive on metal surfaces.

  3. Krypton Adsorption on Zeolite-Templated Carbon and Anomalous Surface Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Murialdo, Maxwell; Stadie, Nicholas P; Ahn, Channing C; Fultz, Brent

    2015-07-28

    Krypton adsorption was measured at eight temperatures between 253 and 433 K on a zeolite-templated carbon and two commercial carbons. The data were fitted using a generalized Langmuir isotherm model and thermodynamic properties were extracted. Differing from that on commercial carbons, krypton adsorption on the zeolite-templated carbon is accompanied by an increasing isosteric enthalpy of adsorption, rising by up to 1.4 kJ mol(-1) as a function of coverage. This increase is a result of enhanced adsorbate-adsorbate interactions promoted by the ordered, nanostructured surface of the adsorbent. An assessment of the strength and nature of these adsorbate-adsorbate interactions is made by comparing the measured isosteric enthalpies of adsorption (and other thermodynamic quantities) to fundamental metrics of intermolecular interactions of krypton and other common gases.

  4. Krypton Adsorption on Zeolite-Templated Carbon and Anomalous Surface Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Murialdo, Maxwell; Stadie, Nicholas P; Ahn, Channing C; Fultz, Brent

    2015-07-28

    Krypton adsorption was measured at eight temperatures between 253 and 433 K on a zeolite-templated carbon and two commercial carbons. The data were fitted using a generalized Langmuir isotherm model and thermodynamic properties were extracted. Differing from that on commercial carbons, krypton adsorption on the zeolite-templated carbon is accompanied by an increasing isosteric enthalpy of adsorption, rising by up to 1.4 kJ mol(-1) as a function of coverage. This increase is a result of enhanced adsorbate-adsorbate interactions promoted by the ordered, nanostructured surface of the adsorbent. An assessment of the strength and nature of these adsorbate-adsorbate interactions is made by comparing the measured isosteric enthalpies of adsorption (and other thermodynamic quantities) to fundamental metrics of intermolecular interactions of krypton and other common gases. PMID:26136159

  5. Adsorption and desorption of NO and CO on a Pt(111)Ge surface alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.; Murata, Y.; Terakura, K.

    1996-08-01

    Adsorption of NO and CO on Pt(111) alloyed with a few per cent of Ge is investigated by reflection—absorption infrared spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Both molecules exclusively occupy the on-top site in contrast to bridge and on-top adsorption on clean Pt(111). The adsorption energy of NO is dramatically reduced compared with that on clean Pt(111). Photodesorption of CO observed on the clean Pt(111) is noticeably suppressed on the Pt(111)Ge surface alloy, while NO desorption is induced by photon irradiation. The rotational and translational temperatures of photodesorbed No are similar to those on clean Pt(111). The change in chemical properties of Pt(111) for molecular adsorption is discussed in terms of d-band filling of the substrate.

  6. Nisin adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces: evidence of its interactions and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Karam, Layal; Jama, Charafeddine; Nuns, Nicolas; Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2013-06-01

    Study of peptides adsorption on surfaces remains a current challenge in literature. A complementary approach, combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to investigate the antimicrobial peptide nisin adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The native low density polyethylene was used as hydrophobic support and it was grafted with acrylic acid to render it hydrophilic. XPS permitted to confirm nisin adsorption and to determine its amount on the surfaces. ToF-SIMS permitted to identify the adsorbed bacteriocin type and to observe its distribution and orientation behavior on both types of surfaces. Nisin was more oriented by its hydrophobic side to the hydrophobic substrate and by its hydrophilic side to the outer layers of the adsorbed peptide, in contrast to what was observed on the hydrophilic substrate. A correlation was found between XPS and ToF-SIMS results, the types of interactions on both surfaces and the observed antibacterial activity. Such interfacial studies are crucial for better understanding the peptides interactions and adsorption on surfaces and must be considered when setting up antimicrobial surfaces.

  7. Nisin adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces: evidence of its interactions and antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Karam, Layal; Jama, Charafeddine; Nuns, Nicolas; Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2013-06-01

    Study of peptides adsorption on surfaces remains a current challenge in literature. A complementary approach, combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to investigate the antimicrobial peptide nisin adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The native low density polyethylene was used as hydrophobic support and it was grafted with acrylic acid to render it hydrophilic. XPS permitted to confirm nisin adsorption and to determine its amount on the surfaces. ToF-SIMS permitted to identify the adsorbed bacteriocin type and to observe its distribution and orientation behavior on both types of surfaces. Nisin was more oriented by its hydrophobic side to the hydrophobic substrate and by its hydrophilic side to the outer layers of the adsorbed peptide, in contrast to what was observed on the hydrophilic substrate. A correlation was found between XPS and ToF-SIMS results, the types of interactions on both surfaces and the observed antibacterial activity. Such interfacial studies are crucial for better understanding the peptides interactions and adsorption on surfaces and must be considered when setting up antimicrobial surfaces. PMID:23625525

  8. Groundwater interactions with surface waters: consequences on diffuse pollution pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzellino, Arianna; Salvetti, Roberta; Gorla, Elena; Parati, Paolo; Malagò, Anna; Ragusa, Francesca; Vismara, Renato

    2010-05-01

    The interactions between groundwater and surface water are complex. Surface-waters and groundwaters are, in fact, linked components of a hydrologic continuum. In general, diffuse pollution in surface waters is difficult to quantify since it follows a multitude of pathways and acts on different time scales. During rainfall events most of the diffuse pollutant load follows the surface runoff pathways and, reaches the surface acquifers however, a fraction of this load will follows the sub-surface runoff pathways and it will possibly reach the surface acquifers after a certain time lag. The time scale of the sub-surface runoff pathways is very different from the surface runoff time scale and rarely a subsurface diffuse pollution event can be directly correlated to a specific rainfall event. This is the reason why even though there are models that enable to simulate the groundwater-surface water system (GW-SW), yet the effect of these interactions in terms of diffuse pollution pathways and their correspondent effect on the quality of surface waters to date are largely unknown. To upgrade the conceptual modeling of the "groundwater-surface water" system, a broader perspective of such interactions across and between surfacewater bodies is needed. Multidimensional analyses may help in understanding the effect of such interactions, as the characterization of the hydraulic interface and its spatial variability. To fully understand these interactions, modeling studies need to be coupled to sound and robust monitoring of surface- and ground- water quality data. Modeling can be combined with multivariate statistical techniques (e.g. factor analysis) to improve our capability to "detect" the effect of the sub-surface runoff on the water quality of specific water courses. Aim of this study was to analyse the groundwater contribution to the total nutrient river load of different watersheds that share a very intensive agriculture and landfarming system. The studied watersheds all

  9. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Quantification and Speciation Modeling of Sulfate Adsorption on Ferrihydrite Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gu, Chunhao; Wang, Zimeng; Kubicki, James D; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Mengqiang

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate adsorption on mineral surfaces is an important environmental chemical process, but the structures and respective contribution of different adsorption complexes under various environmental conditions are unclear. By combining sulfur K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy, quantum chemical calculations, and surface complexation modeling (SCM), we have shown that sulfate forms both outer-sphere complexes and bidentate-binuclear inner-sphere complexes on ferrihydrite surfaces. The relative fractions of the complexes vary with pH, ionic strength (I), and sample hydration degree (wet versus air-dried), but their structures remained the same. The inner-sphere complex adsorption loading decreases with increasing pH while remaining unchanged with I. At both I = 0.02 and 0.1 M, the outer-sphere complex loading reaches maximum at pH ∼5 and then decreases with pH, whereas it monotonically decreases with pH at I = 0.5 M. These observations result from a combination of the ionic-strength effect, the pH dependence of anion adsorption, and the competition between inner- and outer-sphere complexation. Air-drying drastically converts the outer-sphere complexes to the inner-sphere complexes. The respective contributions to the overall adsorption loading of the two complexes were directly modeled with the extended triple layer SCM by implementing the bidentate-binuclear inner-sphere complexation identified in the present study. These findings improve our understanding of sulfate adsorption and its effects on other environmental chemical processes and have important implications for generalizing the adsorption behavior of anions forming both inner- and outer-sphere complexes on mineral surfaces. PMID:27377619

  10. A combined streaming-potential optical reflectometer for studying adsorption at the water/solid surface.

    PubMed

    Theodoly, O; Cascão-Pereira, L; Bergeron, V; Radke, C J

    2005-10-25

    A novel in-situ streaming-potential optical reflectometry apparatus (SPOR) was constructed and utilized to probe the molecular architecture of aqueous adsorbates on a negatively charged silica surface. By combining optical reflectometry and electrokinetic streaming potentials, we measure simultaneously the adsorption density, gamma, and zeta potential, zeta, in a rectangular flow cell constructed with one transparent wall. Both dynamic and equilibrium measurements are possible, allowing the study of sorption kinetics and reversibility. Using SPOR, we investigate the adsorption of a classic nonionic surfactant (pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, C12E5), a simple cationic surfactant (hexadecyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) of opposite charge to that of the substrate surface, and two cationic polyelectrolytes (poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate), PDAEMA; (poly(propyl methacrylate) trimethylammonium chloride, MAPTAC). For the polyethylene oxide nonionic surfactant, bilayer adsorption is established above the critical micelle concentration (cmc) both from the adsorption amounts and from the interpretation of the observed zeta potentials. Near adsorption saturation, CTAB also forms bilayer structures on silica. Here, however, we observe a strong charge reversal of the surface. The SPOR data, along with Gouy-Chapman theory, permit assessment of the net ionization fraction of the CTAB bilayer at 10% so that most of the adsorbed CTAB molecules are counterion complexed. The adsorption of both C12E5 and CTAB is reversible. The adsorption of the cationic polymers, however, is completely irreversible to a solvent wash. As with CTAB, both PDAEMA and MAPTAC demonstrate strong charge reversal. For the polyelectrolyte molecules, however, the adsorbed layer is thin and flat. Here also, a Gouy-Chapman analysis shows that less than 20% of the adsorbed layer is ionized. Furthermore, the amount of charge reversal is inversely proportional to the Debye length in agreement

  11. Vacuum ultraviolet treatment of polyethylene to change surface properties and characteristics of protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vasilets, Viktor N; Kuznetsov, Artem V; Sevastianov, Viktor I

    2004-06-01

    The effects of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) treatment on surface chemical composition morphology and albumin adsorption for low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) were investigated. The attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra and contact angle measurements indicated the formation of oxygen-containing polar groups and double bonds under VUV photooxidation in the presence of air or under VUV irradiation in vacuum. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the development of regular structure with the period about 1 microm on the surface of LDPE and HDPE during VUV photooxidation. The correlation between amount of tightly adsorbed albumin and surface concentration of carboxyl groups generated by VUV irradiation was found. The aging effect for protein adsorption during long storage of VUV irradiated samples in air or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was studied. The obtained results prove the VUV irradiation provides a high potential to regulate protein adsorption on polymers for biomedical applications.

  12. Adsorption of V on a Hematite (0001) Surface and its Oxidation: Monolayer Coverage

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.; Ma, X.; Kim, C.-Y.; Ellis, D.E.; Bedzyk, M.J.

    2008-10-06

    The adsorption of a monolayer of V on idealized Fe- and oxygen-terminated hematite (0 0 0 1) surfaces and subsequent oxidation under atomic O adsorption are studied by density functional theory. Theoretical results are compared with X-ray surface standing wave and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements, and interpreted in the light of data on sub-monolayer coverages. Near-surface Fe reduction under V adsorption and accompanying structural relaxation are examined. These effects and subsequent response to oxidation, are found to be highly site specific. A full monolayer of oxygen leads to a V{sup 5+} state and reoxidation of subsurface Fe to the trivalent state, seen in both theory and experiment.

  13. Adsorption of ethanol on V2O5 (010) surface for gas-sensing applications: Ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yuxiang; Cui, Mengyang; Ye, Zhenhua

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of ethanol on V2O5 (010) surface was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) with a combined generalized gradient approximation (GGA) plus Hubbard U approach to exploit the potential sensing applications. The adsorption configurations were first constructed by considering different orientations of ethanol molecule to V and O sites on the "Hill"- and "Valley"-like regions of corrugated (010) surface. It is found that ethanol molecule can adsorb on whole surface in multiple stable configurations. Nevertheless the molecular adsorption on the "Hill"-like surface is calculated to occur preferentially, and the single coordinated oxygen on "Hill"-like surface (O1(H)) acting as the most energetically favorable adsorption site shows the strongest adsorption ability to ethanol molecule. Surface adsorption of ethanol tunes the electronic structure of V2O5 and cause an n-doping effect. As a consequence, the Fermi levels shift toward the conductive bond increasing the charge carrier concentration of electrons in adsorbed V2O5. The sensitive electronic structure and the multiple stable configurations to ethanol adsorption highlight the high adsorption activity and then the potential of V2O5 (010) surface applied to high sensitive sensor for ethanol vapor detection. Further Mulliken population and Natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations quantify the electron transfer from the adsorbed ethanol to the surface, and correlates the adsorption ability of surface sites with the charge donation and dispersion.

  14. Selectivity and self-diffusion of CO2 and H2 in a mixture on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Thuat T; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Hägg, May-Britt; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250-550 K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields (FFs) and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self-diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2.

  15. Selectivity and self-diffusion of CO2 and H2 in a mixture on a graphite surface

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Thuat T.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; Hägg, May-Britt; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2013-01-01

    We performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand the mechanism of adsorption from a gas mixture of CO2 and H2 (mole fraction of CO2 = 0.30) and diffusion along a graphite surface, with the aim to help enrich industrial off-gases in CO2, separating out H2. The temperature of the system in the simulation covered typical industrial conditions for off-gas treatment (250–550 K). The interaction energy of single molecules CO2 or H2 on graphite surface was calculated with classical force fields (FFs) and with Density Functional Theory (DFT). The results were in good agreement. The binding energy of CO2 on graphite surface is three times larger than that of H2. At lower temperatures, the selectivity of CO2 over H2 is five times larger than at higher temperatures. The position of the dividing surface was used to explain how the adsorption varies with pore size. In the temperature range studied, the self-diffusion coefficient of CO2 is always smaller than of H2. The temperature variation of the selectivities and the self-diffusion coefficient imply that the carbon molecular sieve membrane can be used for gas enrichment of CO2. PMID:24790965

  16. Diffusion and Phase Transformations of Transition Metals on Silicon Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ming-Yi.

    The role of surface diffusion and surface phase reaction kinetics of nickel (Ni) and cobalt (Co) on Si(111) and Si(100) are investigated under Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) conditions using Auger Spectroscopy (AES), Reflection High Electron Energy Diffraction (RHEED) and surface X-ray diffraction. The surface segregation phenomenon and the formation conditions for Si(111)-sqrt{19 } x sqrt{19}- rm R+/-23.4^circ phase (hereafter called sqrt{19}) for Ni/Si(111) are studied by RHEED and AES. Quench cooling induces surface segregation which restores the total accumulated dose of Ni to two surfaces of the wafer. The coverage dependence of phases thus produced follows: 7 x 7 to 1 x 1-RC(0.05Ml) to sqrt{19} (0.16Ml) then to B-type NiSi_2. It is found that there are 3 Ni atoms in the sqrt{19 } unit cell. A "race" of bulk diffusion versus surface diffusion for Ni in/on Si(111) is studied by depositing a laterally confined dot of metal on one side of the double side polished and UHV cleaned Si wafer and then measuring the lateral Auger profile on the reverse side following annealing and quenching. Ni reaches the far side of the wafer at temperatures as low as 500C via bulk diffusion with no measurable contribution from the surface paths, which are short-circuited by numerous, fast bulk paths. Similar results are found for Ni and Co on Si(111) and Si(100). The diffusivity and solid solubility calculated from the experiments are close to the bulk values known from the literature. In addition, the thermal stability, phase transformation and different dissolution mechanisms of sqrt {19} and 1 x 1-RC surface phases of Ni/Si(111) are carefully examined. The activation energies of these processes are compared on an Arrhenius plot. These are discussed in terms of the migration and formation mechanisms involved in these phase transformations. An energy level diagram is used to summarize the atomistic kinetics.

  17. Adsorption of Xyloglucan onto Cellulose Surfaces of Different Morphologies: An Entropy-Driven Process.

    PubMed

    Benselfelt, Tobias; Cranston, Emily D; Ondaral, Sedat; Johansson, Erik; Brumer, Harry; Rutland, Mark W; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-09-12

    The temperature-dependence of xyloglucan (XG) adsorption onto smooth cellulose model films regenerated from N-methylmorpholine N-oxide (NMMO) was investigated using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, and it was found that the adsorbed amount increased with increasing temperature. This implies that the adsorption of XG to NMMO-regenerated cellulose is endothermic and supports the hypothesis that the adsorption of XG onto cellulose is an entropy-driven process. We suggest that XG adsorption is mainly driven by the release of water molecules from the highly hydrated cellulose surfaces and from the XG molecules, rather than through hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces as previously suggested. To test this hypothesis, the adsorption of XG onto cellulose was studied using cellulose films with different morphologies prepared from cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), semicrystalline NMMO-regenerated cellulose, and amorphous cellulose regenerated from lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide. The total amount of high molecular weight xyloglucan (XGHMW) adsorbed was studied by quartz crystal microbalance and reflectometry measurements, and it was found that the adsorption was greatest on the amorphous cellulose followed by the CNC and NMMO-regenerated cellulose films. There was a significant correlation between the cellulose dry film thickness and the adsorbed XG amount, indicating that XG penetrated into the films. There was also a correlation between the swelling of the films and the adsorbed amounts and conformation of XG, which further strengthened the conclusion that the water content and the subsequent release of the water upon adsorption are important components of the adsorption process. PMID:27476615

  18. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Erikat, I. A.; Hamad, B. A.

    2013-11-07

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir–C and Ir–Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  19. A first principle study for the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom and the CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Erikat, I A; Hamad, B A

    2013-11-01

    We employ density functional theory to examine the adsorption and absorption of carbon atom as well as the dissociation of carbon monoxide on Ir(100) surface. We find that carbon atoms bind strongly with Ir(100) surface and prefer the high coordination hollow site for all coverages. In the case of 0.75 ML coverage of carbon, we obtain a bridging metal structure due to the balance between Ir-C and Ir-Ir interactions. In the subsurface region, the carbon atom prefers the octahedral site of Ir(100) surface. We find large diffusion barrier for carbon atom into Ir(100) surface (2.70 eV) due to the strong bonding between carbon atom and Ir(100) surface, whereas we find a very small segregation barrier (0.22 eV) from subsurface to the surface. The minimum energy path and energy barrier for the dissociation of CO on Ir(100) surface are obtained by using climbing image nudge elastic band. The energy barrier of CO dissociation on Ir(100) surface is found to be 3.01 eV, which is appreciably larger than the association energy (1.61 eV) of this molecule.

  20. Classically exact surface diffusion constants at arbitrary temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.; Cohen, J.M.

    1989-05-01

    An expression is presented for computing the classical diffusion constant of a point defect (e.g., an adatom) in an infinite lattice of binding sites at arbitrary temperature. The transition state theory diffusion constant is simply multiplied by a dynamical correction factor that is computed from short-time classical trajectories initiated at the site boundaries. The time scale limitations of direct molecular dynamics are thus avoided in the low- and middle-temperature regimes. The expression results from taking the time derivative of the particle mean-square displacement in the lattice-discretized coordinate system. Applications are presented for surface diffusion on fcc(100) and fcc(111) Lennard-Jones crystal faces.

  1. Classically exact surface diffusion constants at arbitrary temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.; Cohen, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    An expression is presented for computing the classical diffusion constant of a point defect (e.g., adatom) in an infinite lattice of binding sites at arbitrary temperature. The transition state theory diffusion constant is simply multiplied by a dynamical correction factor that is computed from short-time classical trajectories initiated at the site boundaries. The time scale limitations of direct molecular dynamics are thus avoided in the low and middle temperature regimes. The expression resulted from taking the time derivative of the particle mean square displacement in the lattice-discretized coordinate system. Applications are presented for surface diffusion on fcc(100) and fcc(111) Lennard-Jones crystal faces. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Adsorption of benzaldehyde at the surface of ice, studied by experimental method and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Petitjean, Mélanie; Hantal, György; Chauvin, Coline; Mirabel, Philippe; Le Calvé, Stéphane; Hoang, Paul N M; Picaud, Sylvain; Jedlovszky, Pál

    2010-06-15

    Adsorption study of benzaldehyde on ice surfaces is performed by combining experimental and theoretical approaches. The experiments are conducted over the temperature range 233-253 K using a coated wall flow tube coupled to a mass spectrometric detector. Besides the experimental way, the adsorption isotherm is also determined by performing a set of grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations at 233 K. The experimental and calculated adsorption isotherms show a very good agreement within the corresponding errors. Besides, both experimental and theoretical studies permit us to derive the enthalpy of adsorption of benzaldehyde on ice surfaces DeltaH(ads), which are in excellent agreement: DeltaH(ads) = -61.4 +/- 9.7 kJ/mol (experimental) and DeltaH(ads) = -59.4 +/- 5.1 kJ/mol (simulation). The obtained results indicate a much stronger ability of benzaldehyde of being adsorbed at the surface of ice than that of small aliphatic aldehydes, such as formaldehyde or acetaldehyde. At low surface coverages the adsorbed molecules exclusively lie parallel with the ice surface. With increasing surface coverage, however, the increasing competition of the adsorbed molecules for the surface area to be occupied leads to the appearance of two different perpendicular orientations relative to the surface. In the first orientation, the benzaldehyde molecule turns its aldehyde group toward the ice phase, and, similarly to the molecules in the lying orientation, forms a hydrogen bond with a surface water molecule. In the other perpendicular orientation the aldehyde group turns to the vapor phase, and its O atom interacts with the delocalized pi system of the benzene ring of a nearby lying benzaldehyde molecule of the second molecular layer. In accordance with this observed scenario, the saturated adsorption layer, being stable in a roughly 1 kJ/mol broad range of chemical potentials, contains, besides the first molecular layer, also traces of the second molecular layer of adsorbed

  3. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  4. Gallium surface diffusion on GaAs (001) surfaces measured by crystallization dynamics of Ga droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Bietti, Sergio Somaschini, Claudio; Esposito, Luca; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Fedorov, Alexey

    2014-09-21

    We present accurate measurements of Ga cation surface diffusion on GaAs surfaces. The measurement method relies on atomic force microscopy measurement of the morphology of nano–disks that evolve, under group V supply, from nanoscale group III droplets, earlier deposited on the substrate surface. The dependence of the radius of such nano-droplets on crystallization conditions gives direct access to Ga diffusion length. We found an activation energy for Ga on GaAs(001) diffusion E{sub A}=1.31±0.15 eV, a diffusivity prefactor of D₀=0.53(×2.1±1) cm² s⁻¹ that we compare with the values present in literature. The obtained results permit to better understand the fundamental physics governing the motion of group III ad–atoms on III–V crystal surfaces and the fabrication of designable nanostructures.

  5. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  6. Ethylene adsorption on regularly stepped copper surface: C 2H 4 on Cu(210)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Daichi; Okada, Michio; Franco, Francisco C., Jr.; Kasai, Toshio

    2011-05-01

    Ethylene adsorption on regularly stepped Cu(210) surface was investigated with infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption. At 90 K, π-bonded ethylene was adsorbed on Cu(210) molecularly and all species were desorbed below 160 K. There were three types of π-bonded ethylene on the surface. Recent experimental studies have suggested that ethylene is dehydrogenated on Cu(410) due to the regular step [Kravchuk et al ., J. Phys. Chem. C, 113 (2009) 20881]. However, neither the formation of di-σ-bonded ethylene nor dehydrogenation occurred on Cu(210).

  7. Surface status and size influences of nickel nanoparticles on sulfur compound adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Chang Hyun; Park, Jung Geun; Park, Ji Chan; Song, Hyunjoon; Han, Sang-Sup; Kim, Jong-Nam

    2007-04-01

    Metallic nickel nanoparticles were incorporated on mesoporous silica to remove sulfur compounds in diesel selectively. In the first method, nickel nanoparticles were formed on mesoporous silica SBA-15 by impregnation and subsequent reduction of nickel nitrate. The sulfur adsorption capacity was strongly dependent on the nickel loading and the average nickel particle size. In the second method, nickel nanoparticles were synthesized in solution in the presence of a capping agent and then incorporated in mesoporous silica MCF by sonication. Although these particles maintain their sizes on the MCF surface after heat treatment, capping agent remaining on the Ni particle surface might interfere the adsorption of sulfur compounds.

  8. Molecular adsorption and methanol synthesis on the oxidized Cu/ZnO(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyle, Matthew J.; Warschkow, Oliver; Delley, Bernard; Stampfl, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Cu/ZnO is an important catalyst used in the industrial synthesis of methanol from syngas. Many aspects of the functional synergy between the Cu and ZnO components in this system require further understanding. This work uses density functional theory calculations to examine the adsorption of various reactants of methanol synthesis to a recently proposed copper-oxide overlayer reconstruction on the ZnO(0001) surface. We identify the preferred binding configurations as a function of adsorbate coverage and compare the energetics of adsorption to that on the clean ZnO(0001) surface. The relevance of our results to methanol synthesis is discussed.

  9. Adsorption of a binary gas mixture which laterally interacts on a random heterogeneous surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.A.

    1992-10-01

    Analytical expressions for the adsorption of a binary gas mixture which laterally interacts on a heterogeneous surface are developed. The lateral interactions are of the Bragg-Williams type and the surface heterogeneity is modeled via a random distribution of sites described by a uniform distribution of Henry`s Law constants. The parametric study shows that complex phase behavior can be predicted, including azeotropes and sigmoidal shaped X-Y diagrams. Also, this model may be useful for modeling and designing adsorption processes as it requires few iterations to simultaneously solve the implicit and coupled algebraic expressions.

  10. Adsorption of a binary gas mixture which laterally interacts on a random heterogeneous surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the adsorption of a binary gas mixture which laterally interacts on a heterogeneous surface are developed. The lateral interactions are of the Bragg-Williams type and the surface heterogeneity is modeled via a random distribution of sites described by a uniform distribution of Henry's Law constants. The parametric study shows that complex phase behavior can be predicted, including azeotropes and sigmoidal shaped X-Y diagrams. Also, this model may be useful for modeling and designing adsorption processes as it requires few iterations to simultaneously solve the implicit and coupled algebraic expressions.

  11. First principles study of nanoscale mechanism of oxygen adsorption on lanthanum zirconate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xingye; Wu, Linmin; Zhang, Yi; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Li, Li; Knapp, James; Zhang, Jing

    2016-09-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) is a rare-earth pyrochlore material, which has been proposed as a promising thermal barrier coating (TBC) material due to its low thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability. At elevated temperatures, degradation of La2Zr2O7 may occur due to adsorption of oxygen (O2) on La2Zr2O7 surfaces. This paper investigates nanoscale mechanism of O2 adsorption on La2Zr2O7 coating surfaces using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. La2Zr2O7 surface energies on (001), (011) and (111) planes are calculated. The surface free energy of (011) plane is lower than those of (001) and (111) planes. On (001), (011) and (111) planes of La2Zr2O7, the lowest adsorption energy occurs at 4-fold site, bridge site, and 3-fold-FCC site, respectively. Among all calculated cases, the lowest adsorption energy site is 3-fold-FCC on (111) plane, which is confirmed by the Bader charge transfer analyses. Charge density difference analyses show that the 3-fold-FCC site on (111) surface has the largest charge density, suggesting the strongest interaction between O2 and La2Zr2O7 surface.

  12. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Esteves-Villanueva, Jose; Soudy, Rania; Kaur, Kamaljit; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−. The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine) and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol) was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers) in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides. PMID:26262621

  13. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi; Olijve, Luuk L. C.

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  14. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Olijve, Luuk L. C.; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2014-12-01

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed 1H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5-10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in faster

  15. Water adsorption induced in-plane domain switching on BaTiO{sub 3} surface

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Bai, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Wang, B. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study, the influences of the adsorption of water molecules on the changes in the atomic and electric structures of BaTiO{sub 3} surface were investigated using ab initio calculation. Water molecules are molecularly and dissociatively adsorbed on the BaTiO{sub 3} surface, which makes electrons transfer from water molecules to the BaTiO{sub 3} surface. The redistribution of electrons in the BaTiO{sub 3} surface layers weakens the Ba-O interactions and strengthens the Ti-O interactions, so that the Ti atom shifts in TiO{sub 2} plane, i.e., an in-plane domain switching. The adsorption of water molecules on BaTiO{sub 3} surfaces also results in a reduction in the surface rumpling.

  16. Additive surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) adsorption onto quartz-sand dominated sediments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenming; Wan, Jiamin

    2014-06-17

    Many aquifers contaminated by U(VI)-containing acidic plumes are composed predominantly of quartz-sand sediments. The F-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina (USA) is an example. To predict U(VI) mobility and natural attenuation, we conducted U(VI) adsorption experiments using the F-Area plume sediments and reference quartz, goethite, and kaolinite. The sediments are composed of ∼96% quartz-sand and 3-4% fine fractions of kaolinite and goethite. We developed a new humic acid adsorption method for determining the relative surface area abundances of goethite and kaolinite in the fine fractions. This method is expected to be applicable to many other binary mineral pairs, and allows successful application of the component additivity (CA) approach based surface complexation modeling (SCM) at the SRS F-Area and other similar aquifers. Our experimental results indicate that quartz has stronger U(VI) adsorption ability per unit surface area than goethite and kaolinite at pH ≤ 4.0. Our modeling results indicate that the binary (goethite/kaolinite) CA-SCM under-predicts U(VI) adsorption to the quartz-sand dominated sediments at pH ≤ 4.0. The new ternary (quartz/goethite/kaolinite) CA-SCM provides excellent predictions. The contributions of quartz-sand, kaolinite, and goethite to U(VI) adsorption and the potential influences of dissolved Al, Si, and Fe are also discussed.

  17. Geometrically nonlinear continuum thermomechanics with surface energies coupled to diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, A. T.; Javili, A.; Steinmann, P.; Bargmann, S.

    2011-10-01

    Surfaces can have a significant influence on the overall response of a continuum body but are often neglected or accounted for in an ad hoc manner. This work is concerned with a nonlinear continuum thermomechanics formulation which accounts for surface structures and includes the effects of diffusion and viscoelasticity. The formulation is presented within a thermodynamically consistent framework and elucidates the nature of the coupling between the various fields, and the surface and the bulk. Conservation principles are used to determine the form of the constitutive relations and the evolution equations. Restrictions on the jump in the temperature and the chemical potential between the surface and the bulk are not a priori assumptions, rather they arise from the reduced dissipation inequality on the surface and are shown to be satisfiable without imposing the standard assumptions of thermal and chemical slavery. The nature of the constitutive relations is made clear via an example wherein the form of the Helmholtz energy is explicitly given.

  18. Effects of solution conditions and surface chemistry on the adsorption of three recombinant botulinum neurotoxin antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Vessely, Christina; Estey, Tia; Randolph, Theodore W; Henderson, Ian; Nayar, Rajiv; Carpenter, John F

    2007-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a biological warfare threat. Protein antigens have been developed against the seven major BoNT serotypes for the development of a recombinant protein vaccine. This study is an evaluation of adsorption profiles for three of the recombinant protein antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants in the development of a trivalent vaccine against BoNT. Adsorption profiles were obtained over a range of protein concentrations. The results document that charge-charge interactions dominate the adsorption of antigen to adjuvant. Optimal conditions for adsorption were determined. However, potency studies and solution stability studies indicated the necessity of using aluminum hydroxide adjuvant at low pH. To improve the adsorption profiles to AlOH adjuvant, phosphate ions were introduced into the adsorption buffers. The resulting change in the adjuvant chemistry led to an improvement of adsorption of the BoNT antigens to aluminum hydroxide adjuvant while maintaining potency. Competitive adsorption profiles were also determined, and showed changes in maximum adsorption from mixed solutions compared to adsorption from individual protein solutions. The adsorption profiles for each protein varied due to differences in adsorption mechanism and affinity for the adjuvant surface. These results emphasize the importance of evaluating competitive adsorption in the development of multivalent vaccine products. PMID:17518359

  19. Controlling surface adsorption to enhance the selectivity of porphyrin based gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evyapan, M.; Dunbar, A. D. F.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports an enhancement in the selectivity of the vapor sensing properties of free base porphyrin 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[3,4-bis(2-ethylhexyloxy)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine (EHO) Langmuir-Schaefer (LS) films. These sensors respond by changing color upon adsorption of the analyte gas to the sensor surface. The enhanced selectivity is achieved by adding selective barrier layers of 4-tert-Butylcalix[4]arene, 4-tert-Butylcalix[6]arene and 4-tert-Butylcalix[8]arene embedded in PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate)) on top of the porphyrin sensor films to control the gaseous adsorption onto the sensor surface. The Langmuir properties of EHO, PMMA and calix[n]arene monolayers were investigated by surface pressure-area (Π-A) isotherms in order to determine the most efficient transfer pressure. Six layer EHO films were transferred onto glass and silicon substrates to investigate their optical and structural characteristics. The three different calix[n]arenes were embedded within PMMA layers to act as the selective barrier layers which were deposited on top of the six layer EHO films. The different calix[n]arene molecules vary in size and each was mixed with PMMA in specific ratios in order to control the selectivity of the resulting barrier layers. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements were carried out to analyze the structure of the porous barrier layers. It was found that the orientation of the calix[8]arene molecules was well controlled within the Langmuir layers such that molecular ring lies flat on the EHO layers when deposited. However, the calix[6]arene and calix[4]arene molecules were quite not so reliably oriented. The sensor films (with and without the addition of the different selective barrier layers) were exposed to various carboxylic acid vapors. More specifically, acetic acid, butyric acid and hexanoic acid were chosen due to their different molecular sizes. The uncovered EHO films were highly sensitive to all the

  20. Study of adsorption of bovine serum albumin to Langmuir Blodgett film coated surfaces using work of adhesion as a tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhya, S.; Lakshmanan, Muthuselvi; Dhathathreyan, A.

    2008-08-01

    This work reports on the use of rate of change of work of adhesion (Δ W) as a tool to study adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to glass and Langmuir-Blodgett film of dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP) and dioctadecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (DOMA) coated surfaces. Pure BSA and BSA with additives - sorbitol and urea - have been adsorbed to bare glass surfaces and DHP and DOMA coated surfaces. The results suggest that an increase in Δ W with time indicates promotion of adsorption while a decrease indicates hindered adsorption. Further adsorption of BSA was most effective on DHP coated surface compared with bare glass and DOMA coated glass. In case of mixtures of BSA with urea and sorbitol, BSA + urea showed hindered adsorption while adsorption of BSA + sorbitol was efficient for all substrates.

  1. Oriented adsorption of purple membrane to cationic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K A; Yanagimoto, K; Stoeckenius, W

    1978-05-01

    We have investigated the orientation of isolated fragments of Halobacterium halobium purple membrane (PM) adsorbed to poly-L-lysine-treated glass (PL-glass), by quanitative electron microscopy. Three lines of evidence support the conclusion that the cytoplasmic side of the membrane is preferentially absorbed. First, monolayer freeze-fracture reveals nonrandom orientation; more fracture faces (89%) are particulate than smooth. Second, the amount of each membrane surface present can be assayed using polycationic ferritin; 90% of all adsorbed membrane fragments are labeled. Third, it is possible to distinguish two surfaces, "cracked" (the extracellular surface) and "pitted" (the cytoplasmic surface) , in slowly air-dried, platinum-carbon-shadowed membranes. When applied under standard conditions, more than 80% appear cracked. Selection for the cytoplasmic by the cationic substrate suggests that the isolated PM, buffered at pH 7.4 and in the light, has a higher negative charge on its cytoplasmic surface than on its extracellular surface. Nevertheless, cationic ferritin (CF) preferentially adsorbs to the extracellular surface. Orientation provides a striking example of biomembrane surface asymmetry as well as the means to examine the chemical reactivity and physical properties of surfaces of a purified, nonvesicular membrane fragment. PMID:649662

  2. Study on Super-Hydrophobic and Oleophobic Surfaces Prepared by Chemical Adsorption Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Issei; Ohkubo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazufumi

    2009-04-01

    Preparation techniques for super-hydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces were studied by forming a fractally roughened surface and preparing a hydrophobic monolayer. In this study, the fractal structure on the surface of an aluminum substrate was formed by combining sand-blasting with electrolytical etching. Then, a hydrophobic monolayer was prepared on the roughened surface, without decreasing roughness. The surface of the treated substrate can be evaluated by contact angle measurement and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The surface treated by a technique combining chemical adsorption, sandblasting, and electrolytical etching was super-hydrophobic and highly oleophobic.

  3. Surface modification influencing adsorption of red wine constituents: The role of functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption of wine constituents at solid surfaces is important in applications such as filtration and membrane fouling, binding to tanks and fittings and interactions with processing aids such as bentonite. The interaction of wine constituents with surfaces is mediated through adsorbed wine components, where the type of constituents, amount, orientation, and conformation are of consequence for the surface response. This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of red wine constituents. Plasma-polymerized films rich in amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, formyl and methyl functional groups were generated on solid substrates whereas, glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride was covalently attached to allylamine plasma-polymer modified surface and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) was electrostatically adsorbed to an amine plasma-polymerized surface. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ability of different substrates to adsorb red wine constituents was evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that substrates modified with -SO3H and -COOH groups can adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds whereas -NH2 and -NR3 groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. Red wine constituents after filtration were adsorbed in higher extend on -NR3 and -CHO surfaces. The -OH modified surfaces had the lowest ability to absorb wine components.

  4. Protein adsorption and cell adhesion on polyurethane/Pluronic surface with lotus leaf-like topography.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Song, Wei; Huang, He; Chen, Hong

    2010-06-01

    Lotus leaf-like polyurethane/Pluronic F-127 surface was fabricated via replica molding using a natural lotus leaf as the template. Water contact angle measurements showed that both the hydrophobicity of the unmodified polyurethane (PU) surface and the hydrophilicity of the PU/Pluronic surface were enhanced by the construction of lotus leaf-like topography. Protein adsorption on the PU/Pluronic surface without topographic modification was significantly lower than on the PU surface. Adsorption was further reduced when lotus leaf-like topography was constructed on the PU/Pluronic surface. Cell culture experiments with L929 cells showed that adhesion on the PU/Pluronic surface with lotus leaf-like topography was low and adherent cells were spherical and of low viability. The PU/Pluronic surface with lotus leaf-like topography thus appears to be resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption and to cell adhesion, and these effects derive from the both chemical composition and topography. The results suggest a new strategy based on surface topography for the design of antifouling materials.

  5. Density functional study of H2O molecule adsorption on α-U(001) surface.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shanqisong; Zeng, Xiu-Lin; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Ju, Xuehai

    2016-04-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption of H2O on U(001) surface. The metallic nature of uranium atom and different adsorption sites of U(001) surface play key roles in the H2O molecular dissociate reaction. The long-bridge site is the most favorable site of H2O-U(001) adsorption configuration. The triangle-center site of the H atom is the most favorable site of HOH-U(001) adsorption configuration. The interaction between H2O and U surface is more evident on the first layer than that on any other two sub-layers. The dissociation energy of one hydrogen atom from H2O is -1.994 to -2.215 eV on U(001) surface, while the dissociating energy decreases to -3.351 to -3.394 eV with two hydrogen atoms dissociating from H2O. These phenomena also indicate that the Oads can promote the dehydrogenation of H2O. A significant charge transfer from the first layer of the uranium surface to the H and O atoms is also found to occur, making the bonding partly ionic. PMID:26994022

  6. DNA adsorption to and elution from silica surfaces: influence of amino acid buffers.

    PubMed

    Vandeventer, Peter E; Mejia, Jorge; Nadim, Ali; Johal, Malkiat S; Niemz, Angelika

    2013-09-19

    Solid phase extraction and purification of DNA from complex samples typically requires chaotropic salts that can inhibit downstream polymerase amplification if carried into the elution buffer. Amino acid buffers may serve as a more compatible alternative for modulating the interaction between DNA and silica surfaces. We characterized DNA binding to silica surfaces, facilitated by representative amino acid buffers, and the subsequent elution of DNA from the silica surfaces. Through bulk depletion experiments, we found that more DNA adsorbs to silica particles out of positively compared to negatively charged amino acid buffers. Additionally, the type of the silica surface greatly influences the amount of DNA adsorbed and the final elution yield. Quartz crystal microbalance experiments with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) revealed multiphasic DNA adsorption out of stronger adsorbing conditions such as arginine, glycine, and glutamine, with DNA more rigidly bound during the early stages of the adsorption process. The DNA film adsorbed out of glutamate was more flexible and uniform throughout the adsorption process. QCM-D characterization of DNA elution from the silica surface indicates an uptake in water mass during the initial stage of DNA elution for the stronger adsorbing conditions, which suggests that for these conditions the DNA film is partly dehydrated during the prior adsorption process. Overall, several positively charged and polar neutral amino acid buffers show promise as an alternative to methods based on chaotropic salts for solid phase DNA extraction.

  7. Goethite surface reactivity: III. Unifying arsenate adsorption behavior through a variable crystal face - Site density model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Camacho, Carlos; Villalobos, Mario

    2010-04-01

    We developed a model that describes quantitatively the arsenate adsorption behavior for any goethite preparation as a function of pH and ionic strength, by using one basic surface arsenate stoichiometry, with two affinity constants. The model combines a face distribution-crystallographic site density model for goethite with tenets of the Triple Layer and CD-MUSIC surface complexation models, and is self-consistent with its adsorption behavior towards protons, electrolytes, and other ions investigated previously. Five different systems of published arsenate adsorption data were used to calibrate the model spanning a wide range of chemical conditions, which included adsorption isotherms at different pH values, and adsorption pH-edges at different As(V) loadings, both at different ionic strengths and background electrolytes. Four additional goethite-arsenate systems reported with limited characterization and adsorption data were accurately described by the model developed. The adsorption reaction proposed is: lbond2 FeOH +lbond2 SOH +AsO43-+H→lbond2 FeOAsO3[2-]…SOH+HO where lbond2 SOH is an adjacent surface site to lbond2 FeOH; with log K = 21.6 ± 0.7 when lbond2 SOH is another lbond2 FeOH, and log K = 18.75 ± 0.9, when lbond2 SOH is lbond2 Fe 2OH. An additional small contribution of a protonated complex was required to describe data at low pH and very high arsenate loadings. The model considered goethites above 80 m 2/g as ideally composed of 70% face (1 0 1) and 30% face (0 0 1), resulting in a site density for lbond2 FeOH and for lbond2 Fe 3OH of 3.125/nm 2 each. Below 80 m 2/g surface capacity increases progressively with decreasing area, which was modeled by considering a progressively increasing proportion of faces (0 1 0)/(1 0 1), because face (0 1 0) shows a much higher site density of lbond2 FeOH groups. Computation of the specific proportion of faces, and thus of the site densities for the three types of crystallographic surface groups present in

  8. A DFT study of adsorption of glycine onto the surface of BC2N nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Alireza; Azmoodeh, Zivar; Javan, Masoud Bezi; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Karami, Leila

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical study of structure and the energy interaction of amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) with BC2N nanotube is crucial for apperception behavior occurring at the nanobiointerface. Herein, we studied the adsorption of glycine in their radical and zwitterionic forms upon the surface of BC2N nanotube using M06 functional and 6-311G** standard basis set. We also considered the different orientations of the glycine amino acid on the surface of adsorbent. Further, we found out that the stability of glycine from its carbonyl group is higher than hydroxyl and amine groups. Our results also indicated that the electronic structure of BC2N nanotube on the adsorption of glycine from its amine group is more altered than the other groups. Our study exhibits that opto-electronic property of adsorbent is changed after the glycine adsorption.

  9. Glutathione-Coated Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles: A Surface Ligand for Minimizing Serum Protein Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs’ protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins. PMID:25029478

  10. Glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles: a surface ligand for minimizing serum protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Liu, Jinbin; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Mengxiao; Yang, Shengyang; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Shasha; Dean, Andrew; Sun, Xiankai; Zheng, Jie

    2014-08-13

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs' protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins. PMID:25029478

  11. Transition from distributional to ergodic behavior in an inhomogeneous diffusion process: Method revealing an unknown surface diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Takuma; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion of molecules in cells plays an important role in providing a biological reaction on the surface by finding a target on the membrane surface. The water retardation (slow diffusion) near the target assists the searching molecules to recognize the target. Here, we consider effects of the surface diffusivity on the effective diffusivity, where diffusion on the surface is slower than that in bulk. We show that the ensemble-averaged mean-square displacements increase linearly with time when the desorption rate from the surface is finite, which is valid even when the diffusion on the surface is anomalous (subdiffusion). Moreover, this slow diffusion on the surface affects the fluctuations of the time-averaged mean-square displacements (TAMSDs). We find that fluctuations of the TAMSDs remain large when the measurement time is smaller than a characteristic time, and decays according to an increase of the measurement time for a relatively large measurement time. Therefore, we find a transition from nonergodic (distributional) to ergodic diffusivity in a target search process. Moreover, this fluctuation analysis provides a method to estimate an unknown surface diffusivity.

  12. Oxalic acid adsorption states on the clean Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Carboxylic acids are known to assume a variety of configurations on metallic surfaces. In particular oxalic acid on the Cu(110) surface has been proposed to assume a number of upright configurations. Here we explore with DFT calculations the possible structures that oxalic acid can form on copper 110 at different protonation states, with particular attention at the possibility of forming structures composed of vertically standing molecules. In its fully protonated form it is capable of anchoring itself on the surface thanks to one of its hydrogen-free oxygens. We show the monodeprotonated upright molecule with two oxygens anchoring it on the surface to be the lowest energy conformation of a single oxalic molecules on the Cu(110) surface. We further show that it is possible for this configuration to form dense hexagonally arranged patterns in the unlikely scenario in which adatoms are not involved.

  13. Thiol Adsorption on and Reduction of Copper Oxide Particles and Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Im, Jisun; Soares, Jason W; Steeves, Diane M; Whitten, James E

    2016-04-26

    The adsorption of 1-dodecanethiol at room temperature and at 75 °C on submicron cuprous and cupric oxide particles suspended in ethanol has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Thiol adsorption occurs in all cases via Cu-S bond formation, with partial dissolution of CuO at 75 °C and formation of a copper-thiolate complex replacement layer. Regardless of temperature, the surface of the CuO particles is essentially completely reduced to either Cu2O or metallic copper, as evidenced by loss of the characteristic Cu(2+) XPS features of dried powder samples. Companion ultrahigh-vacuum studies have been performed by dosing clean, oxygen-dosed, and ozone-treated single crystal Cu(111) with methanethiol (MT) gas at room temperature. In the latter case, the surface corresponds to CuO/Cu(111). XPS confirms MT adsorption in all cases, with an S 2p peak binding energy of 162.9 ± 0.1 eV, consistent with methanethiolate adsorption. Heating of MT-covered Cu(111) and oxygen-dosed Cu(111) leads to decomposition/desorption of the MT by 100 °C and formation of copper sulfide with an S 2p binding energy of 161.8 eV. Dosing CuO/Cu(111) with 50-200 L of MT leads to only partial reduction/removal of the CuO surface layers prior to methanethiolate adsorption. This is confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), which measures the occupied states near the Fermi level. For both the colloidal CuO and single crystal CuO/Cu(111) studies, the reduction of the Cu(2+) surface is believed to occur by formation and desorption of the corresponding dithiol prior to thiolate adsorption. PMID:27036074

  14. Thiol Adsorption on and Reduction of Copper Oxide Particles and Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Im, Jisun; Soares, Jason W; Steeves, Diane M; Whitten, James E

    2016-04-26

    The adsorption of 1-dodecanethiol at room temperature and at 75 °C on submicron cuprous and cupric oxide particles suspended in ethanol has been investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Thiol adsorption occurs in all cases via Cu-S bond formation, with partial dissolution of CuO at 75 °C and formation of a copper-thiolate complex replacement layer. Regardless of temperature, the surface of the CuO particles is essentially completely reduced to either Cu2O or metallic copper, as evidenced by loss of the characteristic Cu(2+) XPS features of dried powder samples. Companion ultrahigh-vacuum studies have been performed by dosing clean, oxygen-dosed, and ozone-treated single crystal Cu(111) with methanethiol (MT) gas at room temperature. In the latter case, the surface corresponds to CuO/Cu(111). XPS confirms MT adsorption in all cases, with an S 2p peak binding energy of 162.9 ± 0.1 eV, consistent with methanethiolate adsorption. Heating of MT-covered Cu(111) and oxygen-dosed Cu(111) leads to decomposition/desorption of the MT by 100 °C and formation of copper sulfide with an S 2p binding energy of 161.8 eV. Dosing CuO/Cu(111) with 50-200 L of MT leads to only partial reduction/removal of the CuO surface layers prior to methanethiolate adsorption. This is confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), which measures the occupied states near the Fermi level. For both the colloidal CuO and single crystal CuO/Cu(111) studies, the reduction of the Cu(2+) surface is believed to occur by formation and desorption of the corresponding dithiol prior to thiolate adsorption.

  15. A localized meshless method for diffusion on folded surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Ka Chun; Ling, Leevan; Ruuth, Steven J.

    2015-09-01

    Partial differential equations (PDEs) on surfaces arise in a variety of application areas including biological systems, medical imaging, fluid dynamics, mathematical physics, image processing and computer graphics. In this paper, we propose a radial basis function (RBF) discretization of the closest point method. The corresponding localized meshless method may be used to approximate diffusion on smooth or folded surfaces. Our method has the benefit of having an a priori error bound in terms of percentage of the norm of the solution. A stable solver is used to avoid the ill-conditioning that arises when the radial basis functions (RBFs) become flat.

  16. Evaluation of various substances to prevent adsorption of tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) to glass surfaces*

    PubMed Central

    Landi, S.; Held, H. R.; Tseng, M. C.

    1970-01-01

    It is well known that a dilute tuberculin PPD solution (1 IU or 5 IU per dose) very rapidly loses its potency owing to adsorption of tuberculoprotein to the wall of the container into which it is dispensed. The amount of tuberculoprotein adsorbed per cm2 of glass surface has been measured for phosphate-buffered saline over a wide pH range (pH 1 to pH 10). The maximum adsorption was found at pH 4 (0.31 μg/cm2) and the least at between pH 6 and pH 10 (0.15 μg/cm2). The rate of adsorption of tuberculoprotein to glass was not changed when the phosphate-buffered saline was replaced by borate-buffered saline. Tuberculin PPD prepared by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method, by the trichloroacetic acid precipitation method and by a combination of both methods adsorbed equally well to glass and no difference in the rate of adsorption for these tuberculoproteins was found. Forty-two substances in addition to Tween 80 were tested for their property to prevent adsorption of tuberculoprotein to glass in dilute tuberculin PPD solutions (50 IU/ml of 14C-labelled PPD). The most efficient anti-adsorption agents were found to be nonionic surfactants, some ionic surfactants and some colloidal substances; polypeptides and non-surface-active substances of low molecular weight showed little or no anti-adsorption property. The labelling of PPD with 14C has proved to be a valuable tool, particularly for long-term adsorption studies and for screening substances to be used as efficient anti-adsorption agents. These studies have permitted the selection of agents which could be added to dilute solutions of tuberculin PPD (10 IU/ml to 500 IU/ml or 0.2 μg/ml to 10 μg/ml respectively) in order to avoid loss of potency due to adsorption. PMID:5312323

  17. Surface morphology of orthorhombic Mo2C catalyst and high coverage hydrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Tian, Xinxin; Yang, Yong; Li, Yong-Wang; Wang, Jianguo; Beller, Matthias; Jiao, Haijun

    2016-09-01

    High coverage hydrogen adsorption on twenty two terminations of orthorhombic Mo2C has been systematically studied by using density functional theory and ab initio thermodynamics. Hydrogen stable coverage on the surfaces highly depends on temperatures and H2 partial pressure. The estimated hydrogen desorption temperatures under ultra-high vacuum condition on Mo2C are in reasonable agreement with the available temperature-programmed desorption data. Obviously, hydrogen adsorption can affect the surface stability and therefore modify the surface morphology of Mo2C. Upon increasing the chemical potential of hydrogen which can be achieved by increasing the H2 partial pressure and/or decreasing the temperature, the proportions of the (001), (010), (011) and (100) surfaces increase, while those of the (101), (110) and (111) surfaces decrease. Among these surfaces, the (100) surface is most sensitive upon hydrogen adsorption and the (111) surface is most exposed under a wide range of conditions. Our study clearly reveals the role of hydrogen on the morphology of orthorhombic Mo2C catalyst in conjugation with hydro-treating activity.

  18. Effect of surface area and chemisorbed oxygen on the SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether activated char produced from Illinois coal could be used effectively to remove sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. Chars were prepared from a high-volatile Illinois bituminous coal under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. A novel char preparation technique was developed to prepare chars with SO2 adsorption capacities significantly greater than that of a commercial activated carbon. In general, there was no correlation between SO2 adsorption capacity and surface area. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) was used to determine the nature and extent of carbon-oxygen (C-O) complexes formed on the char surface. TPD data revealed that SO2 adsorption was inversely proportional to the amount of C-O complex. The formation of a stable C-O complex during char preparation may have served only to occupy carbon sites that were otherwise reactive towards SO2 adsorption. A fleeting C(O) complex formed during SO2 adsorption is postulated to be the reaction intermediate necessary for conversion of SO2 to H2SO4. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. Synthesis and adsorption of polymers: Control of polymer and surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Stoichet, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    A simple and versatile technique to introduce carboxylic acid functionality to the surfaces of three fluoropolymer film samples is described. The adsorption of neutral poly(L-lysine) (PLL) from solution to the water-fluoropolymer interface is described. The methods of surface modification are combined and the adsorption of charged PLL to carboxylic acid-functionalized fluoropolymer film surface is discussed. The hydrophobic interaction as a driving force for adsorption is further studied where the synthesis and adsorption of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and its derivatives are discussed. The synthesis of carboxylic acid-functionalized fluoropolymer films rely upon a two step mechanism where unsaturation is oxidatively removed. Contact angles of the acid-functionalized fluoropolymer films decrease with increasing pH. The adsorption of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) to the water-FEP interface was controlled by pH of the aqueous solution and PLL solution conformation. Only neutral [alpha]-helical PLL adsorbed to FEP (FEP-PLL). The adsorption of PLL to FEP-CO[sub 2]H was controlled by an electrostatic interaction. Both FEP-PLL and FEP-CO[sub 2]H-PLL are more hydrophilic than FEP. FEP-PLL-[epsilon]-amine reacts with 3,5-dinitrobenzoyl chloride in 65% yield whereas FEP-CO[sub 2]H-PLL-[epsilon]-amine reacts in 100% yield. Adsorption of PLL to FEP and FEP-CO[sub 2]H improves the peel strength of adhesive joints prepared with these substrates and the adhesion and growth of biological cells on these film samples. PEO was synthesized by anionic ring opening polymerization of ethylene oxide and was end-capped (PEO-R) by reaction with a (perfluoro)alkyl acid chloride. A polar interaction between substrate and segment controlled adsorption at the fluoropolymer-water interface. PEO and PEO-R adsorbed to the polystyrene latex-water interface. PEO-R showed increase surface activity over PEO at the air-water interface; PEO-perfluorodecanoate decreased the surface tension of water to 35 dyn/cm.

  20. Computer simulations for the adsorption of polymers onto surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Polymer-surface interactions are important in every stage of oil and coal production, production of new energy-efficient composite materials, and in medicine. Therefore, it is important to isolate the factors that influence the interfacial activity of polymer chains. We developed theoretical models and computer simulations to determine effects of polymer architecture, solvent quality, and surface morphology on properties of chains at penetrable and impenetrable interfaces. 7 figs, 27 refs.

  1. THE EFFECT OF ACTIVATED CARBON SURFACE MOISTURE ON LOW TEMPERATURE MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments with elemental mercury (Hg0) adsorption by activated carbons were performed using a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor at room temperature (27 degrees C) to determine the role of surface moisture in capturing Hg0. A bituminous-coal-based activated carbon (BPL) and an activ...

  2. The adsorption, reaction and decomposition of propylene on a clean Mo(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luping; Tysoe, W. T.

    1991-04-01

    Propylene adsorbs onto Mo(100) at 110 K via precursor-state kinetics to saturate at a coverage, θ sat(C 3H 6) = 0.63 ± 0.05. Adsorption at lower temperatures results in multilayer adsorption. In contrast to ethylene, which rehybridizes to ~ sp 3 following adsorption at 80 K on Mo(100), propylene adsorbs molecularly at this temperature, rehybridizing only after heating to between 100 and 140 K. Further heating to between 180 and 200 K results in loss of hydrogen from the surface propylenic species and the formation of an aliene- or methylacetylene-like adsorbate which appears to be oriented so that the C-C-C axis is essentially parallel to the surface. Photoelectron spectroscopic data suggests significant carbon-carbon bond cleavage in the adsorbed C 3 species is underway by ~ 270 K. on Mo(100), resulting finally in the formation of adsorbed CH x species on heating the Mo(100) surface to room temperature. This chemistry is closely analogous to that observed following ethylene adsorption onto Mo(100) where a similar carbon-carbon bond cleavage was noted, and is in accord with the catalytic chemistry of molybdenum which catalyzes both olefin metathesis and hydrogenolysis. Further heating to above 400 K completely dehydrogenates the surface leaving chemisorbed, atomic carbon.

  3. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  4. Adsorption and Diffusion of Fructose in Zeolite HZSM-5: Selection of Models and Methods for Computational Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Curtiss, Larry A.; Assary, Rajeev S.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Kerber, Torsten; Sauer, Joachim

    2011-11-10

    The adsorption and protonation of fructose inHZSM-5 have been studied for the assessment of models for accurate reaction energy calculations and the evaluation of molecular diffusivity. The adsorption and protonation were calculated using 2T, 5T, and 46T clusters as well as a periodic model. The results indicate that the reaction thermodynamics cannot be predicted correctly using small cluster models, such as 2T or 5T, because these small cluster models fail to represent the electrostatic effect of a zeolite cage, which provides additional stabilization to the ion pair formed upon the protonation of fructose. Structural parameters optimized using the 46T cluster model agree well with those of the full periodic model; however, the calculated reaction energies are in significant error due to the poor account of dispersion effects by density functional theory. The dispersion effects contribute -30.5 kcal/mol to the binding energy of fructose in the zeolite pore based on periodic model calculations that include dispersion interactions. The protonation of the fructose ternary carbon hydroxyl group was calculated to be exothermic by 5.5 kcal/mol with a reaction barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol using the periodic model with dispersion effects. Our results suggest that the internal diffusion of fructose in HZSM-5 is very likely to be energetically limited and only occurs at high temperature due to the large size of the molecule.

  5. Adsorption and diffusion of fructose in zeolite HZSM-5: selection of models and methods for computational studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.; Curtiss, L. A.; Assary, R. S.; Greeley, J.; Kerber, T.; Sauer, J.

    2011-09-14

    The adsorption and protonation of fructose in HZSM-5 have been studied for the assessment of models for accurate reaction energy calculations and the evaluation of molecular diffusivity. The adsorption and protonation were calculated using 2T, 5T, and 46T clusters as well as a periodic model. The results indicate that the reaction thermodynamics cannot be predicted correctly using small cluster models, such as 2T or 5T, because these small cluster models fail to represent the electrostatic effect of a zeolite cage, which provides additional stabilization to the ion pair formed upon the protonation of fructose. Structural parameters optimized using the 46T cluster model agree well with those of the full periodic model; however, the calculated reaction energies are in significant error due to the poor account of dispersion effects by density functional theory. The dispersion effects contribute -30.5 kcal/mol to the binding energy of fructose in the zeolite pore based on periodic model calculations that include dispersion interactions. The protonation of the fructose ternary carbon hydroxyl group was calculated to be exothermic by 5.5 kcal/mol with a reaction barrier of 2.9 kcal/mol using the periodic model with dispersion effects. Our results suggest that the internal diffusion of fructose in HZSM-5 is very likely to be energetically limited and only occurs at high temperature due to the large size of the molecule.

  6. Anomalously rapid hydration water diffusion dynamics near DNA surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Franck, John M.; Ding, Yuan; Stone, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    The emerging Overhauser effect Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) technique measures the translational mobility of water within the vicinity (5-15 Å) of preselected sites. The work presented here expands the capabilities of the ODNP technique and illuminates an important, previously unseen, property of the translational diffusion dynamics of water at the surface of DNA duplexes. We attach nitroxide radicals (i.e., spin labels) to multiple phosphate backbone positions of DNA duplexes, allowing ODNP to measure the hydration dynamics at select positions along the DNA surface. With a novel approach to ODNP analysis, we isolate the contributions of water molecules at these sites that undergo free translational diffusion from water molecules that either loosely bind to or exchange protons with the DNA. The results reveal that a significant population of water in a localized volume adjacent to the DNA surface exhibits fast, bulk-like characteristics and moves unusually rapidly compared to water found in similar probe volumes near protein and membrane surfaces. Control studies show that the observation of these characteristics are upheld even when the DNA duplex is tethered to streptavidin or the mobility of the nitroxides is altered. This implies that, as compared to protein or lipid surfaces, it is an intrinsic feature of the DNA duplex surface that it interacts only weakly with a significant fraction of a network of surface hydration water. The displacement of this translationally mobile water is energetically less costly than that of more strongly bound water by up to several kBT and thus can lower the activation barrier for interactions involving the DNA surface. PMID:26256693

  7. Anomalously Rapid Hydration Water Diffusion Dynamics Near DNA Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Ding, Yuan; Stone, Katherine; Qin, Peter Z; Han, Songi

    2015-09-23

    The emerging Overhauser effect dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) technique measures the translational mobility of water within the vicinity (5-15 Å) of preselected sites. The work presented here expands the capabilities of the ODNP technique and illuminates an important, previously unseen, property of the translational diffusion dynamics of water at the surface of DNA duplexes. We attach nitroxide radicals (i.e., spin labels) to multiple phosphate backbone positions of DNA duplexes, allowing ODNP to measure the hydration dynamics at select positions along the DNA surface. With a novel approach to ODNP analysis, we isolate the contributions of water molecules at these sites that undergo free translational diffusion from water molecules that either loosely bind to or exchange protons with the DNA. The results reveal that a significant population of water in a localized volume adjacent to the DNA surface exhibits fast, bulk-like characteristics and moves unusually rapidly compared to water found in similar probe volumes near protein and membrane surfaces. Control studies show that the observation of these characteristics are upheld even when the DNA duplex is tethered to streptavidin or the mobility of the nitroxides is altered. This implies that, as compared to protein or lipid surfaces, it is an intrinsic feature of the DNA duplex surface that it interacts only weakly with a significant fraction of the surface hydration water network. The displacement of this translationally mobile water is energetically less costly than that of more strongly bound water by up to several kBT and thus can lower the activation barrier for interactions involving the DNA surface.

  8. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-binding Module on Cellulose*

    PubMed Central

    Nimlos, Mark R.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Matthews, James F.; Bu, Lintao; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 μs of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose. PMID:22496371

  9. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  10. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus.

  11. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus. PMID:27138171

  12. Surface fractal dimension, water adsorption efficiency, and cloud nucleation activity of insoluble aerosol.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Ari; Malila, Jussi; Nenes, Athanasios; Hung, Hui-Ming; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2016-05-03

    Surface porosity affects the ability of a substance to adsorb gases. The surface fractal dimension D is a measure that indicates the amount that a surface fills a space, and can thereby be used to characterize the surface porosity. Here we propose a new method for determining D, based on measuring both the water vapour adsorption isotherm of a given substance, and its ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus when introduced to humidified air in aerosol form. We show that our method agrees well with previous methods based on measurement of nitrogen adsorption. Besides proving the usefulness of the new method for general surface characterization of materials, our results show that the surface fractal dimension is an important determinant in cloud drop formation on water insoluble particles. We suggest that a closure can be obtained between experimental critical supersaturation for cloud drop activation and that calculated based on water adsorption data, if the latter is corrected using the surface fractal dimension of the insoluble cloud nucleus.

  13. Impact of surface steps and oxygen pre-coverage on the adsorption of methylamine on gold.

    PubMed

    Lewoczko, April D; BelBruno, Joseph J

    2013-04-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we report on the adsorption of methylamine on gold and compare its adsorption to a selection of alkylamines, methanol and methanethiol. On the (111) surface, the amines, thiol and alcohol bind in the ontop site with a preference over hollow and bridge sites of 0.3 eV, 0.2 eV and 0.1 eV for methylamine, methanethiol and methanol, respectively. The effect of steps is considered on the (211) surface of gold and we find that methylamine adsorbs 0.2 eV more strongly in the step ontop site of the surface than on the (111) surface. For oxygen atom pre-coverages of 0.04-0.25 ML on the (111) surface, we find cooperative adsorption of amines and oxygen atoms. The energetic costs of adsorbate tilt from the surface normal and of rotation about the gold-heteroatom bond are compared among the studied surfaces and conditions.

  14. Surface-Energetic Heterogeneity of Nanoporous Solids for CO2 and CO Adsorption: The Key to an Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity at Low Pressures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Hyeon; Cho, Il Hum; Choi, Sang Ok; Lee, In Soo

    2016-05-01

    This study has been focused on surface energetic heterogeneity of zeolite (H-mordenite, "HM"), activated carbon ("RB2") and metal-organic framework family ("Z1200") materials and their isotherm features in adsorption of CO2 and CO at 25 degrees C and low pressures ≤ 850 Torr. The nanoporous solids showed not only distinctive shape of adsorption isotherms for CO2 with relatively high polarizability and quadrupole moment but also different capacities in the CO2 adsorption. These differences between the adsorbents could be well correlated with their surface nonuniformity. The most heterogeneous surfaces were found with the HM that gave the highest CO2 uptake at all pressures allowed, while the Z1200 consisted of completely homogeneous surfaces and even CO2 adsorption linearly increased with pressure. An intermediate character was indicated on the surface of RB2 and thus this sorbent possessed isotherm features between the HM and Z1200 in CO2 adsorption. Such different surface energetics was fairly consistent with changes in CO2/CO selectivity on the nanoporous adsorbents up to equilibrated pressures near 850 Torr. PMID:27483776

  15. Adsorption of a PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer on metal oxide surfaces with a view to reducing protein adsorption and further biofouling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Poleunis, C; Románszki, L; Telegdi, J; Dupont-Gillain, C C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Biomolecule adsorption is the first stage of biofouling. The aim of this work was to reduce the adsorption of proteins on stainless steel (SS) and titanium surfaces by modifying them with a poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-poly(propylene oxide) (PPO)-PEO triblock copolymer. Anchoring of the central PPO block of the copolymer is known to be favoured by hydrophobic interaction with the substratum. Therefore, the surfaces of metal oxides were first modified by self-assembly of octadecylphosphonic acid. PEO-PPO-PEO preadsorbed on the hydrophobized surfaces of titanium or SS was shown to prevent the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), fibrinogen and cytochrome C, as monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to characterize the surfaces of the SS and titanium after competitive adsorption of PEO-PPO-PEO and BSA. The results show that the adsorption of BSA is well prevented on hydrophobized surfaces, in contrast to the surfaces of native metal oxides.

  16. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  17. Diffusion on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume: Application to cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor L.; Gao, Fei; Choi, Yung-Sze; Resasco, Diana; Schaff, James C.; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2007-10-01

    An algorithm is presented for solving a diffusion equation on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume, a problem often arising in cell biology. It applies to pixilated surfaces obtained from experimental images and performs at low computational cost. In the method, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is approximated locally by the Laplacian on the tangential plane and then a finite volume discretization scheme based on a Voronoi decomposition is applied. Convergence studies show that mass conservation built in the discretization scheme and cancellation of sampling error ensure convergence of the solution in space with an order between 1 and 2. The method is applied to a cell-biological problem where a signaling molecule, G-protein Rac, cycles between the cytoplasm and cell membrane thus coupling its diffusion in the membrane to that in the cell interior. Simulations on realistic cell geometry are performed to validate, and determine the accuracy of, a recently proposed simplified quantitative analysis of fluorescence loss in photobleaching. The method is implemented within the Virtual Cell computational framework freely accessible at http://www.vcell.org.

  18. Overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cano, J V; Sánchez-Polo, M; Messoud, J; Velo-Gala, I; Ocampo-Pérez, R; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2016-03-15

    This study analyzed the overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole, and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells. It was also elucidated whether the overall adsorption rate was controlled by reaction on the adsorbent surface or by intraparticle diffusion. Experimental data of the pollutant concentration decay curves as a function of contact time were interpreted by kinetics (first- and second-order) and diffusion models, considering external mass transfer, surface and/or pore volume diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. The experimental data were better interpreted by a first-order than second-order kinetic model, and the first-order adsorption rate constant varied linearly with respect to the surface area and total pore volume of the adsorbents. According to the diffusion model, the overall adsorption rate is governed by intraparticle diffusion, and surface diffusion is the main mechanism controlling the intraparticle diffusion, representing >90% of total intraparticle diffusion.

  19. Overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells.

    PubMed

    Flores-Cano, J V; Sánchez-Polo, M; Messoud, J; Velo-Gala, I; Ocampo-Pérez, R; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2016-03-15

    This study analyzed the overall adsorption rate of metronidazole, dimetridazole, and diatrizoate on activated carbons prepared from coffee residues and almond shells. It was also elucidated whether the overall adsorption rate was controlled by reaction on the adsorbent surface or by intraparticle diffusion. Experimental data of the pollutant concentration decay curves as a function of contact time were interpreted by kinetics (first- and second-order) and diffusion models, considering external mass transfer, surface and/or pore volume diffusion, and adsorption on an active site. The experimental data were better interpreted by a first-order than second-order kinetic model, and the first-order adsorption rate constant varied linearly with respect to the surface area and total pore volume of the adsorbents. According to the diffusion model, the overall adsorption rate is governed by intraparticle diffusion, and surface diffusion is the main mechanism controlling the intraparticle diffusion, representing >90% of total intraparticle diffusion. PMID:26731310

  20. Importance of structural and chemical heterogeneity of activated carbon surfaces for adsorption of dibenzothiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Ania, C.O.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2005-08-16

    The performance of various activated carbons obtained from different carbon precursors (i.e., plastic waste, coal, and wood) as adsorbents for the desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels was evaluated. To increase surface heterogeneity, the carbon surface was modified by oxidation with ammonium persulfate. The results showed the importance of activated carbon pore sizes and surface chemistry for the adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) from liquid phase. Adsorption of DBT on activated carbons is governed by two types of contributions: physical and chemical interactions. The former include dispersive interactions in the microporous network of the carbons. While the volume of micropores governs the amount physisorbed, mesopores control the kinetics of the process. On the other hand, introduction of surface functional groups enhances the performance of the activated carbons as a result of specific interactions between the acidic centers of the carbon and the basic structure of DBT molecule as well as sulfur-sulfur interactions.

  1. Density functional study of the adsorption of aspirin on the hydroxylated (0 0 1) α-quartz surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, A.; Nadimi, E.; Plänitz, P.; Radehaus, C.

    2009-08-01

    In this study the adsorption geometry of aspirin molecule on a hydroxylated (0 0 1) α-quartz surface has been investigated using DFT calculations. The optimized adsorption geometry indicates that both, adsorbed molecule and substrate are strongly deformed. Strong hydrogen bonding between aspirin and surface hydroxyls, leads to the breaking of the original hydroxyl-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds (Hydrogenbridges) on the surface. In this case new hydrogen bonds on the hydroxylated (0 0 1) α-quartz surface appear which significantly differ from those at the clean surface. The 1.11 eV adsorption energy reveals that the interaction of aspirin with α-quartz is an exothermic chemical interaction.

  2. Protein adsorption on surfaces: dynamic contact-angle (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Mondon, M; Ziegler, C

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on gold has been tested at various concentrations in aqueous solution by dynamic contact-angle analysis (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. With the Wilhelmy plate technique advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding hysteresis were measured and correlated with the hydrophilicity and the homogeneity of the surface. With electrical admittance measurements of a gold-coated piezoelectrical quartz crystal, layer mass and viscoelastic contributions to the resonator's frequency shift during adsorption could be separated. A correlation was found between the adsorbed mass and the homogeneity and hydrophilicity of the adsorbed film.

  3. Continuum random sequential adsorption of polymer on a flat and homogeneous surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2013-05-01

    Random sequential adsorption (RSA) of polymer, modeled as a chain of identical spheres, is systematically studied. In order to control precisely anisotropy and number of degrees of freedom, two different kinds of polymers are used. In the first one, monomers are placed along a straight line, whereas in the second, relative orientations of particles are random. Such polymers fill a flat homogeneous surface randomly. The paper focuses on maximal random coverage ratio and adsorption kinetics dependence on polymer size, shape anisotropy, and numbers of degrees of freedom. Obtained results were discussed and compared with other numerical experiments and theoretical predictions.

  4. Adsorption of vapreotide on gold colloids studied by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J. A.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejia Ospino, E.

    2016-02-01

    Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) has been used to investigate the somatostatin (SST) analogue Vapreotide (VAP) in gold colloids. The optimum conditions to detect SERS signals of VAP have been studied. The observed SERS bands correspond to different vibrational modes of the peptide; being the most dominant SERS signals the ones derived from the aromatic amino acids Tryptophan (Trp), Phenylalanine (Phe) and Tyrosine (Tyr). Changes in enhancement and wavenumber of the proper bands upon adsorption on gold colloid are consistent with VAP adsorption, primarily through Tryptophan residues.

  5. Distinct binding states in adsorption on a homogeneous surface: Te on W(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Kramer, H. M.; Bauer, E.

    1982-05-01

    The adsorption of Te on a W(100) surface is studied by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and work function change (Δϕ) measurements. Three distinct binding states are observed in the first monolayer corresponding the coverages from 0 to {1}/{2} monolayers (ML), {1}/{2} to {2}/{3} ML and {2}/{3} to 1 ML. Within each state a coverage dependence of the desorption parameters is found. The three binding states are discussed in terms of heterogeneity induced by lateral interactions and in terms of inherently different adsorption sites.

  6. Effect of Dopants on the Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide on Ceria Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meijun; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-25

    Here, high-surface-area nanosized CeO2 and M-doped CeO2 (M=Cu, La, Zr, and Mg) prepared by a surfactant-templated method were tested for CO2 adsorption. Cu, La, and Zr are doped into the lattice of CeO2, whereas Mg is dispersed on the CeO2 surface. The doping of Cu and La into CeO2 leads to an increase of the CO2 adsorption capacity, whereas the doping of Zr has little or no effect. The addition of Mg causes a decrease of the CO2 adsorption capacity at a low Mg content and a gradual increase at a higher content. The CO2 adsorption capacity follows the sequence Cu-CeO2>La-CeO2>Zr-CeO2≈CeO2>Mg-CeO2 at low dopant contents, in line with the relative amount of defect sites in the samples. It is the defect sites on the surface, not in the bulk of CeO2, modified by the dopants that play the vital role in CO2 chemisorption. Lastly, the role of surface oxygen vacancies is further supported by an in situ IR spectroscopic study of the surface chemistry during CO2 adsorption on the doped CeO2.

  7. Diffusion of Cu adatoms and dimers on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mińkowski, Marcin; Załuska-Kotur, Magdalena A.

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion of Cu adatoms and dimers on Cu(111) and Ag(111) surfaces is analyzed based on ab initio surface potentials. Single adatom diffusion is compared with dimer diffusion on both surfaces. Surface geometry makes the adatoms jump alternately between two states in the same way in both systems, whereas dimers undergo more complex diffusion process that combines translational and rotational motion. Small difference in the surface lattice constant between Cu and Ag crystals results in a completely different energy landscape for dimer jumps. As an effect the character of diffusion process changes. Homogeneous Cu dimer diffusion is more difficult and dimers rather rotate within single surface cell, whereas diffusion over Ag surface is faster and happens more smoothly. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient and its parameters: energy barrier and prefactor is calculated and compared for both surfaces.

  8. Peptide adsorption on a hydrophobic surface results from an interplay of solvation, surface, and intrapeptide forces.

    PubMed

    Horinek, D; Serr, A; Geisler, M; Pirzer, T; Slotta, U; Lud, S Q; Garrido, J A; Scheibel, T; Hugel, T; Netz, R R

    2008-02-26

    The hydrophobic effect, i.e., the poor solvation of nonpolar parts of molecules, plays a key role in protein folding and more generally for molecular self-assembly and aggregation in aqueous media. The perturbation of the water structure accounts for many aspects of protein hydrophobicity. However, to what extent the dispersion interaction between molecular entities themselves contributes has remained unclear. This is so because in peptide folding interactions and structural changes occur on all length scales and make disentangling various contributions impossible. We address this issue both experimentally and theoretically by looking at the force necessary to peel a mildly hydrophobic single peptide molecule from a flat hydrophobic diamond surface in the presence of water. This setup avoids problems caused by bubble adsorption, cavitation, and slow equilibration that complicate the much-studied geometry with two macroscopic surfaces. Using atomic-force spectroscopy, we determine the mean desorption force of a single spider-silk peptide chain as F = 58 +/- 8 pN, which corresponds to a desorption free energy of approximately 5 k(B)T per amino acid. Our all-atomistic molecular dynamics simulation including explicit water correspondingly yields the desorption force F = 54 +/- 15 pN. This observation demonstrates that standard nonpolarizable force fields used in classical simulations are capable of resolving the fine details of the hydrophobic attraction of peptides. The analysis of the involved energetics shows that water-structure effects and dispersive interactions give contributions of comparable magnitude that largely cancel out. It follows that the correct modeling of peptide hydrophobicity must take the intimate coupling of solvation and dispersive effects into account.

  9. Adsorption of Polyethylene from Solution onto Starch Film Surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch films were prepared by jet cooking aqueous dispersions of high-amylose starch and then allowing the jet cooked dispersions to air-dry on Teflon surfaces. When the starch films were immersed in 1 % solutions of PE in 1-dodecanol, dodecane and xylene at 120º C and the solutions were allowed to...

  10. Influence of self-assembled monolayer surface chemistry on Candida antarctica lipase B adsorption and specific activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immobilization of Candida antarctica B lipase was examined on gold surfaces modified with either methyl- or hydroxyl-terminated self-assembled alkylthiol monolayers (SAMs), representing hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, respectively. Lipase adsorption was monitored gravimetrically using a quart...

  11. A first-principles study of ZnO polar surface growth: adsorption of Zn(x)O(y) clusters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhunzhun; Pan, Nan; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2013-09-28

    Adsorption of Zn(x)O(y) (x + y = 1-6) clusters on ZnO (000 ± 1) polar surfaces is studied systematically via density function theory (DFT) calculations. Different adsorption behaviors are predicted for these two surfaces. On the (0001)-Zn surface, O atoms adsorb on hollow sites at the initial stage. Then Zn atoms come in, and the stable structure becomes bulk-like for some specific clusters. On the (0001)-O surface, Zn cluster adsorption leads to stable cage structures formed by pulling substrate O out. In clusters with both Zn and O, O atoms avoid directly bonding with the surface, and no energetically favorable bulk-like structure is found. On the basis of the prediction of these surface adsorption behaviors, experimentally observed growth rate and surface roughness differences on these two polar surfaces can be understood. PMID:24089792

  12. A first-principles study of ZnO polar surface growth: Adsorption of ZnxOy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhunzhun; Pan, Nan; Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Jinlong

    2013-09-01

    Adsorption of ZnxOy (x + y = 1-6) clusters on ZnO (000 ± 1) polar surfaces is studied systematically via density function theory (DFT) calculations. Different adsorption behaviors are predicted for these two surfaces. On the (0001)-Zn surface, O atoms adsorb on hollow sites at the initial stage. Then Zn atoms come in, and the stable structure becomes bulk-like for some specific clusters. On the (000overline 1)-O surface, Zn cluster adsorption leads to stable cage structures formed by pulling substrate O out. In clusters with both Zn and O, O atoms avoid directly bonding with the surface, and no energetically favorable bulk-like structure is found. On the basis of the prediction of these surface adsorption behaviors, experimentally observed growth rate and surface roughness differences on these two polar surfaces can be understood.

  13. Scattering, Adsorption, and Langmuir-Hinshelwood Desorption Models for Physisorptive and Chemisorptive Gas-Surface Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, Brook I.

    Surface effects limit the performance of hypersonic vehicles, micro-electro-mechanical devices, and directed energy systems. This research develops methods to predict adsorption, scattering, and thermal desorption of molecules on a surface. These methods apply to physisorptive (adsorption and scattering) and chemisorptive (thermal desorption) gas-surface systems. Engineering and design applications will benefit from these methods, hence they are developed under the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo construct. The novel adsorption and scattering contribution, the Modified Kisliuk with Scattering method, predicts angular and energy distributions, and adsorption probabilities. These results agree more closely with experiment than the state-of-the-art Cercignani-Lampis-Lord scattering kernel. Super-elastic scattering is predicted. Gas-adlayer interactions are included for the first time. Accommodation coefficents can be determined by fitting simulations to experimental data. The new thermal desorption model accurately calculates angular, translational, rotational, and vibrational distributions, and the rotational alignment parameter. The model is validated by comparing with experiments. Multiple transition states are considered in a set of non-dimensionalized equations of motion, linked with temporally-accurate event timing. Initial conditions are chosen from a new truncated Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Run times are improved by eliminating the Gaussian Weighting of desorbing products. The absorption energy barrier is shown to significantly contribute only to the translational energy of desorbing molecules by contributing energy to each adatom in a similar manner.

  14. Adsorption of glycosaminoglycans to the cell surface is responsible for cellular donnan effects.

    PubMed

    Hagenfeld, Daniel; Kathagen, Nadine; Prehm, Peter

    2014-07-01

    In previous publications, we showed that extracellular glycosaminoglycans reduced the membrane potential, caused cell blebbing and swelling and decreased the intracellular pH independently of cell surface receptors. These phenomena were explained by Donnan effects. The effects were so large that they could not be attributed to glycosaminoglycans in solution. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that glycosaminoglycans were concentrated on the cell membrane and analysed the mechanism of adsorption by fluorescent hyaluronan, chondroitin sulphate and heparin. The influence of the CD44 receptor was evaluated by comparing CD44 expressing human fibroblasts with CD44 deficient HEK cells. Higher amounts of glycosaminoglycans adsorbed to fibroblasts than to HEK cells. When the membrane potential was annihilated by substituting NaCl by KCl in the medium, adsorption was reduced and intracellular pH decrease was abolished. To eliminate other cellular interfering factors, potential-dependent adsorption was demonstrated for hyaluronan which adsorbed to inert gold foils in physiological salt concentrations at pH 7.2 and surface potentials up to 120 mV. From these results, we conclude that large cellular Donnan effects of glycosaminoglycans results from receptor mediated, hydrophobic and ionic adsorption to cell surfaces.

  15. Effects of surface heterogeneity on the adsorption of CO₂ in microporous carbons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Carbon capture combined with utilization and storage has the potential to serve as a near-term option for CO(2) emissions reduction. CO(2) capture by carbon-based sorbents and CO(2) storage in geologic formations such as coal and shale both require a thorough understanding of the CO(2) adsorption properties in microporous carbon-based materials. Complex pore structures for natural organic materials, such as coal and gas shale, in addition to general carbon-based porous materials are modeled as a collection of independent, noninterconnected, functionalized graphitic slit pores with surface heterogeneities. Electronic structure calculations coupled with van der Waals-inclusive corrections have been performed to investigate the electronic properties of functionalized graphitic surfaces. With Bader charge analysis, electronic structure calculations can provide the initial framework comprising both the geometry and corresponding charge information required to carry out statistical modeling. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to determine the adsorption isotherms for a given adsorbent-adsorbate interaction at temperature/pressure conditions relevant to carbon capture applications to focus on the effect of the surface functionalities. On the basis of the current work, oxygen-containing functional groups were predicted to enhance CO(2) adsorption in microporous carbon materials in the absence of water vapor, and the hydrated graphite was found to hinder CO(2) adsorption. PMID:22216997

  16. Effect of surface adsorption and non-stoichiometry on the workfunction of ZnO surfaces: A first principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wei; Li, Yun; Jha, Jitendra Kumar; Shepherd, Nigel D.; Du, Jincheng

    2015-04-28

    ZnO has been actively studied for potential usage as a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) for a variety of applications including organic light emitting diodes and solar cells. In these applications, fine-tuning the workfunction of ZnO is critical for controlling interfacial barriers and improving the charge injection (or outcoupling) efficiencies. We have performed plane wave periodic density functional theory calculations to investigate the effect of different surface absorbents and surface defects (including surface non-stoichiometry) on the workfunction of ZnO. The aim was to understand the underlying mechanism of workfunction changes, in order to engineer specific workfunction modifications. Accurate calculations of workfunctions of polar surfaces were achieved by introducing balancing pseudo charges on one side of the surface to remove the dipolar effect. It was found that increasing the surface coverage of hydrocarbons (-CH{sub 3}) decreased the workfunction, while adsorption of highly electronegative-F and -CF{sub 3} groups and increases in surface O/Zn ratio increased the workfunction of ZnO. The increase of workfunction was found to be directly correlated to the enhancement variation of surface dipole moment due to adsorptions or other surface modifications. Introducing surface absorbents that increase surface dipole moment can be an effective way to increase workfunction in ZnO TCOs.

  17. Effect of surface charge distribution on the adsorption orientation of proteins to lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption orientation of the proteins lysozyme and ribonuclease A (RNase A) to a neutral 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and a negatively charged stearic acid lipid film was investigated by means of X-ray reflectivity. Both proteins adsorbed to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, whereas at the neutral monolayer, no adsorption was observed. For acquiring comprehensive information on the proteins' adsorption, X-ray reflectivity data were combined with electron densities obtained from crystallographic data. With this method, it is possible to determine the orientation of adsorbed proteins in solution underneath lipid monolayers. While RNase A specifically coupled with its positively charged active site to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, lysozyme prefers an orientation with its long axis parallel to the Langmuir film. In comparison to the electrostatic maps of the proteins, our results can be explained by the discriminative surface charge distribution of lysozyme and RNase A.

  18. Effect of surface charge distribution on the adsorption orientation of proteins to lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin

    2010-09-01

    The adsorption orientation of the proteins lysozyme and ribonuclease A (RNase A) to a neutral 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and a negatively charged stearic acid lipid film was investigated by means of X-ray reflectivity. Both proteins adsorbed to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, whereas at the neutral monolayer, no adsorption was observed. For acquiring comprehensive information on the proteins' adsorption, X-ray reflectivity data were combined with electron densities obtained from crystallographic data. With this method, it is possible to determine the orientation of adsorbed proteins in solution underneath lipid monolayers. While RNase A specifically coupled with its positively charged active site to the negatively charged lipid monolayer, lysozyme prefers an orientation with its long axis parallel to the Langmuir film. In comparison to the electrostatic maps of the proteins, our results can be explained by the discriminative surface charge distribution of lysozyme and RNase A. PMID:20707324

  19. Theoretical Simulation of isocyanate (NCO) adsorption on the Ag(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boungou, C. C.; N'dollo, M.; Malonda-Boungou, B. R.; Moussounda, P. S.; Dintzer, T.

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of isocyanate (NCO) on a Ag (001) surface with different coverages [θ = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 monolayer (ML)] is studied by using density functional theory and the periodic slab model. Adsorption energies, geometrical parameters and work function changes are calculated. We found that the most energetic sites are the bridge for 0.25 ML and the hollow for 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 ML. The change in the work function depends on both the adsorption site and the NCO coverage. A detailed analysis of the computed local density of states shows that the NCO π and σ states strongly interact with the Ag (pz, dz2) bands.

  20. Adsorption of gold subnano-structures on a magnetite(111) surface and their interaction with CO.

    PubMed

    Pabisiak, Tomasz; Winiarski, Maciej J; Ossowski, Tomasz; Kiejna, Adam

    2016-07-21

    Gold deposited on iron oxide surfaces can catalyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The adsorption of gold subnano-structures on the Fe-rich termination of the magnetite(111) surface has been investigated using density functional theory. The structural, energetic, and electronic properties of gold/magnetite systems have been examined for vertical and flattened configurations of adsorbed Aun (n = 1-4) species. Single gold adatoms strongly bonded to the iron atoms of the Fe3O4(111) surface appear to be negatively charged, and consequently increase the work function. For a more stable class of larger, flattened Aun structures the adsorption binding energy per adatom is substantially increased. The structures exhibit a net positive charge, with the Au atoms binding with the oxide having distinctly cationic character. A charge transfer from the larger gold structures to the substrate is consistent with the lowering of the work function. The bonding of a CO molecule to a Au monomer on the Fe3O4(111) surface has been found nearly as strong as that to the iron site of the bare Fe-terminated surface. However, CO bonding to larger, oxide supported Aun structures is distinctly stronger than that to the bare oxide surface. Upon CO adsorption all Aun structures are cationic and CO shows a tendency to bind to the most cationic atom of the Aun cluster.

  1. Surface Modification of a Perfluorinated Ionomer Using a Glow Discharge Deposition Method to Control Protein Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Valdes, T.I.; Ciridon, W.; Ratner, B.D.; Bryers, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Nafion™ is the membrane material preferred for in situ glucose sensors. Unfortunately, surface properties of Nafion promote random protein adsorption and eventual foreign body encapsulation thus leading to loss if glucose signal over time. Here we detail surface modifications made by RF plasma deposition to Nafion with the intent to prevent random protein adsorption while providing enough functional sites (hydroxyl groups) to bind a biologically active peptide known to induce cellular adhesion (YRGDS). Nafion surfaces were modified by RF plasma polymerizing five different combinations of (1) tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (tetraglyme) and (2) 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA): pure tetraglyme, 2.5% HEMA/97.5% tetraglyme; 5% HEMA/95% tetraglyme, 10% HEMA/90% tetraglyme; and pure HEMA. Resultant surfaces were characterized by XPS (low and high resolution), dynamic contact angle, and atomic force microscopy. Protein adsorption and retention was determined and correlated to surface layer composition. The ability to bind a cell adhesion peptide was also determined and correlated well with surface layer composition. PMID:18155292

  2. Adsorption of gold subnano-structures on a magnetite(111) surface and their interaction with CO.

    PubMed

    Pabisiak, Tomasz; Winiarski, Maciej J; Ossowski, Tomasz; Kiejna, Adam

    2016-07-21

    Gold deposited on iron oxide surfaces can catalyze the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The adsorption of gold subnano-structures on the Fe-rich termination of the magnetite(111) surface has been investigated using density functional theory. The structural, energetic, and electronic properties of gold/magnetite systems have been examined for vertical and flattened configurations of adsorbed Aun (n = 1-4) species. Single gold adatoms strongly bonded to the iron atoms of the Fe3O4(111) surface appear to be negatively charged, and consequently increase the work function. For a more stable class of larger, flattened Aun structures the adsorption binding energy per adatom is substantially increased. The structures exhibit a net positive charge, with the Au atoms binding with the oxide having distinctly cationic character. A charge transfer from the larger gold structures to the substrate is consistent with the lowering of the work function. The bonding of a CO molecule to a Au monomer on the Fe3O4(111) surface has been found nearly as strong as that to the iron site of the bare Fe-terminated surface. However, CO bonding to larger, oxide supported Aun structures is distinctly stronger than that to the bare oxide surface. Upon CO adsorption all Aun structures are cationic and CO shows a tendency to bind to the most cationic atom of the Aun cluster. PMID:27332962

  3. Measurements of water sorption enthalpy on polymer surfaces and its effect on protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joonyeong; Qian, Wei; Al-Saigh, Zeki Y.

    2011-02-01

    The molar enthalpy of sorption ( ΔHms`) of water vapor onto three polymer surfaces and its effect on nonspecific protein adsorption were investigated by inverse gas chromatography (IGC). The values of ΔHms measured by IGC were found to be -16.9 ± 1.2, -18.6 ± 1.3, and -29.9 ± 2.4 kJ/mole for polystyrene (PS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), respectively, over a temperature range of 333-423 K. Protein adsorption to three polymer-coated substrates was conducted as a function of the bulk protein concentration using lysozyme, fibrinogen, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and the amount of adsorbed protein was measured by the solution depletion method. For a given bulk protein concentration, a larger amount of protein is adsorbed on PS and PMMA surfaces which have greater ΔHms than that of PHEMA surfaces. Although ΔHms for PS and PMMA are close to each other, PS surfaces were found to exhibit a higher adsorption affinity than PMMA surfaces over the proteins and concentrations investigated. Our results indicate that the strength of water-polymer interactions and the functional groups on the polymer surface are important factors for controlling the amount of nonspecifically adsorbed protein.

  4. Adsorption of protein streptavidin to the plasma treated surface of polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Elersic, Kristina

    2012-05-01

    Immobilization of protein streptavidin to the surface of polystyrene (PS) polymer was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Two different protocols were used to attach streptavidin to the PS surface: physical adsorption and chemical coupling. In both cases the surface properties of PS samples were modified by exposure to cold oxygen plasma for 10 s. Plasma was created in oxygen at 75 Pa by en electrode-less RF discharge. The RF generator operated at 27.12 MHz and the nominal power was about 120 W. The electron temperature was about 3 eV, the plasma density was about 3 × 1015 m-3 and the neutral oxygen atom density was about 3 × 1021 m-3. Oxygen plasma treatment caused formation of O-rich functional groups on the surface of PS. The concentration of oxygen was determined by XPS and was about 28 at.%. A thin film of streptavidin was deposited by physical adsorption and chemical bonding. The appearance of streptavidin on the surface was determined from XPS spectra measuring the ratio between N and C peaks. The plasma treatment caused poor adsorption and but strong chemisorption of streptavidin. The results were explained by specific interaction of protein with polar functional groups on the surface of PS after plasma treatment.

  5. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Bartels, Ludwig; Einstein, T. L.

    2015-03-14

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species’ diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  6. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Einstein, T. L.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2015-03-01

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species' diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  7. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Einstein, T L; Bartels, Ludwig

    2015-03-14

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species' diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  8. Insights into the superhydrophobicity of metallic surfaces prepared by electrodeposition involving spontaneous adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Cao, Ling; Zhao, Wei; Xia, Yue; Huang, Wei; Li, Zelin

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical fabrication of micro/nanostructured metallic surfaces with superhydrophobicity has recently aroused great attention. However, the origin still remains unclear why smooth hydrophilic metal surfaces become superhydrophobic by making micro/nanostructures without additional surface modifications. In this work, several superhydrophobic micro/nanostructured metal surfaces were prepared by a facile one-step electrodeposition process, including non-noble and noble metals such as copper, nickel, cadmium, zinc, gold, and palladium with (e.g. Cu) or without (e.g. Au) surface oxide films. We demonstrated by SEM and XPS that both hierarchical micro/nanostructures and spontaneous adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons endowed these surfaces with excellent superhydrophobicity. We revealed by XPS that the adsorption of airborne hydrocarbons at the Ar+-etched clean Au surface was rather quick, such that organic contamination can hardly be prevented in practical operation of surface wetting investigation. We also confirmed by XPS that ultraviolet-O3 treatment of the superhydrophobic metal surfaces did not remove the adsorbed hydrocarbons completely, but mainly oxidized them into hydrophilic oxygen-containing organic substances. We hope our findings here shed new light on deeper understanding of superhydrophobicity for micro/nanostructured metal surfaces with and without surface oxide films.

  9. Protein adsorption at calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Sheng, X.; Rimer, J.; Jung, T.; Ward, M.

    2008-03-01

    Calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals are the dominant inorganic phase in most kidney stones, and kidney stones form as aggregates of COM crystals and organic material, principally proteins, but little is known about the molecular level events at COM surfaces that regulate COM aggregation. We have examined the influence of polyelectrolytes on the force of adhesion between chemically modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and selected COM crystal faces in saturated solution. In general, we found that polyanions bind to COM surfaces and block adhesion of a carboxylate functionalized AFM tip, while polycations had no measureable effect on adhesion force under the same conditions. We did observe a unique absence of interaction between poly(glutamic acid) and the COM (100) face compared to other synthetic polyanions, and some native urinary protein structures also exhibited unique face selective interactions, suggesting that simple electrostatic models will not completely explain the data.

  10. Uranyl adsorption and surface speciation at the imogolite-water interface: Self-consistent spectroscopic and surface complexation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arai, Y.; McBeath, M.; Bargar, J.R.; Joye, J.; Davis, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Macro- and molecular-scale knowledge of uranyl (U(VI)) partitioning reactions with soil/sediment mineral components is important in predicting U(VI) transport processes in the vadose zone and aquifers. In this study, U(VI) reactivity and surface speciation on a poorly crystalline aluminosilicate mineral, synthetic imogolite, were investigated using batch adsorption experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and surface complexation modeling. U(VI) uptake on imogolite surfaces was greatest at pH ???7-8 (I = 0.1 M NaNO3 solution, suspension density = 0.4 g/L [U(VI)]i = 0.01-30 ??M, equilibration with air). Uranyl uptake decreased with increasing sodium nitrate concentration in the range from 0.02 to 0.5 M. XAS analyses show that two U(VI) inner-sphere (bidentate mononuclear coordination on outer-wall aluminol groups) and one outer-sphere surface species are present on the imogolite surface, and the distribution of the surface species is pH dependent. At pH 8.8, bis-carbonato inner-sphere and tris-carbonato outer-sphere surface species are present. At pH 7, bis- and non-carbonato inner-sphere surface species co-exist, and the fraction of bis-carbonato species increases slightly with increasing I (0.1-0.5 M). At pH 5.3, U(VI) non-carbonato bidentate mononuclear surface species predominate (69%). A triple layer surface complexation model was developed with surface species that are consistent with the XAS analyses and macroscopic adsorption data. The proton stoichiometry of surface reactions was determined from both the pH dependence of U(VI) adsorption data in pH regions of surface species predominance and from bond-valence calculations. The bis-carbonato species required a distribution of surface charge between the surface and ?? charge planes in order to be consistent with both the spectroscopic and macroscopic adsorption data. This research indicates that U(VI)-carbonato ternary species on poorly crystalline aluminosilicate mineral surfaces may be important in

  11. [Effect of acid-base two steps surface modification on the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shou-xin; Chen, Xiao-yun; Chen, Xi; Sun, Cheng-lin

    2005-11-01

    Effect of HNO3-NaOH two steps surface modification on the adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution onto activated carbon was evaluated. Activated carbon was oxidized in HNO3 aqueous solution at first (AC1), then treated in the mixture of NaOH and NaCl solution (AC2). Batch equilibrium and continuous adsorption experiments were conducted to determine the adsorption characteristics. Boehm titration method, element analysis were used to characterize the surface properties. N2/77 K adsorption isotherm method was used to characterize the pore structure. The results reveal that adsorption capacity and adsorption rate increase significantly, which in the following order: AC2>AC1>AC0. Surface modification caused BET surface area decreased and the total number of surface oxygen acid groups increased. First oxidation modification in HNO3 solution produced positive acid groups on the surface of activated carbon. Subsequent 2nd modification replaced H+ of carbon surface groups by Na+, the acidity of AC2 was decreased. The main cause of higher Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and rate for AC2 was the more oxygen surface acid groups, and suitable solution pH provide by surface groups.

  12. First-principles Analysis of NOx Adsorption on Anhydrous γ-Al2O3 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2009-04-09

    The interaction of nitrogen oxides NOx (x=1-3) with gamma Al2O3 has been investigated using first-principles density functional theory calculations. NO and NO2 weakly physisorb on the clean, dehydrated (100) and (110) surfaces of gamma Al2O3, whereas the adsorption of the NO3 radical is rather strong. Only the basic-like O-down adsorption configurations were found to be stable. The interaction between NOx and gamma Al2O3 can be described as a surface mediated electron transfer process. For single NOx adsorption, greater electron transfer from the surface to the adsorbate (negatively charged) yields stronger interactions between NOx and the surface. The adsorption of four combinations of NOx+NOy (x=1-3, y=2, 3) pairs on the (100) and the (110) facets of gamma Al2O3 were investigated. Except for the NO2+NO2 pair, a strong cooperative effect that substantially enhances the stability of NOx on both gamma Al2O3 surfaces was found. This cooperative effect consists of surface-mediated electron transfer processes resulting in a favorable electrostatic interaction between two adsorbed NOx species. The pair was found to be the thermodynamically most stable state among the co-adsorbed NOx+NOy pairs on both gamma Al2O3 surfaces. The results are used to analyze the experimentally observed NOx evolution during temperature programmed desorption from NO2-saturated gamma Al2O3 substrates. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  13. Atomic-scale surface roughness of rutile and implications for organic molecule adsorption.

    PubMed

    Livi, Kenneth J T; Schaffer, Bernhard; Azzolini, David; Seabourne, Che R; Hardcastle, Trevor P; Scott, Andrew J; Hazen, Robert M; Erlebacher, Jonah D; Brydson, Rik; Sverjensky, Dimitri A

    2013-06-11

    Crystal surfaces provide physical interfaces between the geosphere and biosphere. It follows that the arrangement of atoms at the surfaces of crystals profoundly influences biological components at many levels, from cells through biopolymers to single organic molecules. Many studies have focused on the crystal-molecule interface in water using large, flat single crystals. However, little is known about atomic-scale surface structures of the nanometer- to micrometer-sized crystals of simple metal oxides typically used in batch adsorption experiments under conditions relevant to biogeochemistry and the origins of life. Here, we present atomic-resolution microscopy data with unprecedented detail of the circumferences of nanosized rutile (α-TiO2) crystals previously used in studies of the adsorption of protons, cations, and amino acids. The data suggest that one-third of the {110} faces, the largest faces on individual crystals, consist of steps at the atomic scale. The steps have the orientation to provide undercoordinated Ti atoms of the type and abundance for adsorption of amino acids as inferred from previous surface complexation modeling of batch adsorption data. A remarkably uniform pattern of step proportions emerges: the step proportions are independent of surface roughness and reflect their relative surface energies. Consequently, the external morphology of rutile nanometer- to micrometer-sized crystals imaged at the coarse scale of scanning electron microscope images is not an accurate indicator of the atomic smoothness or of the proportions of the steps present. Overall, our data strongly suggest that amino acids attach at these steps on the {110} surfaces of rutile. PMID:23675906

  14. Bulk and surface controlled diffusion of fission gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.

    2012-08-09

    {sub 2{+-}x}, which compare favorably to available experiments. This is an extension of previous work [13]. In particular, it applies improved chemistry models for the UO{sub 2{+-}x} nonstoichiometry and its impact on the fission gas activation energies. The derivation of these models follows the approach that used in our recent study of uranium vacancy diffusion in UO{sub 2} [14]. Also, based on the calculated DFT data we analyze vacancy enhanced diffusion mechanisms in the intermediate temperature regime. In addition to vacancy enhanced diffusion we investigate species transport on t