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Sample records for adsorption takes place

  1. The Net Will BE the Place where Most Interactions Will Take Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldarelli, Guido

    As society becomes more and more interconnected (we just started to add our environment to the net with the Internet of Things revolution), the net will be the place where most inter actions will take place...

  2. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Where does an alcohol test take place? 40.221... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Testing Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in Alcohol Testing § 40.221 Where does an alcohol test take place? (a) A DOT alcohol test must take place at...

  3. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Where does an alcohol test take place? 40.221... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Testing Sites, Forms, Equipment and Supplies Used in Alcohol Testing § 40.221 Where does an alcohol test take place? (a) A DOT alcohol test must take place at...

  4. Kiwifruit: taking its place in the global fruit bowl.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol; Courtney, David

    2013-01-01

    While the world total production of kiwifruit has increased by over 50% during the last decade, the kiwifruit remains a niche fruit, taking up an estimated 0.22% of the global fruit bowl, which is dominated by apples, oranges, and bananas. Even though kiwifruit's share of the global fruit bowl has remained largely unchanged over the past 15 years, the scope for growth in the category is significant, with the nutritional and production characteristics of kiwifruit being on the right side of key global consumer trends around health and sustainability. Taking advantage of these consumer trends is one of two key challenges for the global kiwifruit industry. The second challenge is to harness the diverse natural and cultivated range of kiwifruit varieties (colors, flavors, sizes, and shapes) to stimulate the interest of consumers and grow the share of kiwifruit in the fruit basket through selecting cultivars that can develop meaningful market segments and meet consumer demand.

  5. 2012 CCCC Chair's Address: Stories Take Place--A Performance in One Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Malea

    2012-01-01

    This is a written version of the address that Malea Powell gave at the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) Convention in St. Louis, Missouri, on Thursday, March 22, 2012. This address is a collection of stories. According to her, stories take place. Stories practice place into space. Stories produce habitable spaces. She…

  6. Studying Activities That Take Place in Speech Interactions: A Theoretical and Methodological Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint-Dizier de Almeida, Valérie; Colletta, Jean-Marc; Auriac-Slusarczyk, Emmanuelle; Specogna, Antonietta; Simon, Jean-Pascal; Fiema, Gabriela; Luxembourger, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes a theoretical and methodological framework based on a pluralistic, concerted approach to the study of activities that take place in and through speech interactions. The framework has a general scope, applying to any collective activity taking form through language interactions. It contributes to a fuller understanding of the…

  7. Questions and Answers Regarding Actions to Take When Ending Shelter-in-Place

    SciTech Connect

    Shumpert, B.

    2003-12-30

    Shelter-in-place has found increasing acceptance as an effective protective action option for communities participating in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program. Studies have confirmed that it can provide optimum protection under certain accident conditions. However, emergency managers and planners, as well as the public, continue to be troubled by the need to end sheltering when the plume has passed in order to avoid sustained exposure to the small amount of agent that has penetrated the shelter. One of the concerns posed by this necessity is uncertainty regarding what hazards will then be faced in the environment outside the shelter and what actions can be taken to avoid those hazards. This report attempts to address those uncertainties. It recognizes that there is an extremely low probability that the environment outside the shelter will be contaminated with chemical agent residue. However, as people comply with an official recommendation to leave their shelters, they probably can't be certain that the environment is free from contamination. Therefore, this report identifies and explains specific and simple actions they can take to avoid the possibility of exposure to chemical agent hazards outside their shelters. It addresses such issues as the actions people should take upon ending shelter-in-place, what clothing they should wear, how they should handle animals, and what they should do about food in their homes and produce in their gardens.

  8. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after... What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? Certain types.... These communication methods are optional. Type of information exchange When Purpose Parties involved...

  9. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  10. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  11. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  12. 49 CFR 40.41 - Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test... in DOT Urine Collections § 40.41 Where does a urine collection for a DOT drug test take place? (a) A urine collection for a DOT drug test must take place in a collection site meeting the requirements...

  13. [Marketing approval and market surveillance of medical devices in Germany: Where does policy integration take place?].

    PubMed

    Lang, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Since 2011 new regulatory measures regarding medical devices have been set up with the aim to eliminate obstacles to innovations and to find more coordinated ways to marketing authorisation and market surveillance. This essay investigates whether these new and existing coordination mechanisms build up to a Joined-up Government approach. The analysis shows that the regulatory process should be adjusted along several dimensions. First, many organisations lack awareness regarding their stakeholders and focus solely on their immediate organisational activities. Second, the regulatory process (marketing authorisation and market surveillance) is too fragmented for an effective communication to take place. Finally, the underlying strategy process is an ad-hoc approach lacking continuity and continued involvement of, in particular, the responsible federal ministries.

  14. The 'taking place' of health and wellbeing: towards non-representational theory.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin J; Chen, Sandra; Myers, Samantha

    2014-05-01

    For the last two decades health geography has focused on the dynamics between health and place. Although the social constructivist perspective of much research has provided many insights into the meanings of health and health care arguably, mirroring progress in the parent discipline of human geography, there could be a far more serious engagement with non-representational theory and the 'taking place' of health and health care. To showcase the importance and potential of this broadly, the idea of wellbeing is re-approached. The paper reflects on the ways wellbeing has been treated in research primarily as a meaningful and relatively prescribed state of life, to the neglect of process. Based on this critique, a qualitative study then illustrates the most immediate and everyday ways wellbeing might arise through 'affect'; the pre-personal mobile energies and intensities that result from physical encounters within assemblages of bodies and objects. Indeed, theoretically the findings support the proposition that, at one level, wellbeing might not be taken from environment but instead might emerge as the affective environment. They certainly raise awareness of how much in health might originate at the surface, prior to meaning, within life's infinite spatial doings, and thus they launch some final thoughts on the wider challenges and opportunities for non-representational health geographies.

  15. DSC studies of retrogradation and amylose lipid complex transition taking place in gamma irradiated wheat starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, K.; Eliasson, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation ( 60Co) with doses of 5-30 kGy on the amylose-lipid complex transition and retrogradation occurring in gels containing ca. 50% and ca. 20% wheat starch was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) during heating-cooling-heating cycles (up to three cycles). Transition of the amylose-lipid complex occurs in all the irradiated samples at a lower temperature as compared to the non-irradiated starch. That effect was larger when the radiation dose was higher. A further thermal treatment causes a decrease of the transition temperature in the irradiated samples, with no effect or increase of that temperature observed for the non-irradiated ones. Irradiation hinders retrogradation taking place in 50% gels but facilitates the process occurring in 20% gels. The differences between the irradiated and the non-irradiated samples are more evident in the every next heating or cooling cycle as well as after storage and in the case of ca. 50% suspensions as compared to ca. 20% suspensions. The results point out to the deterioration of the structure of the complexes formed in the irradiated starch as compared to the non-irradiated one.

  16. What it Takes to Successfully Implement Technology for Aging in Place: Focus Groups With Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Eveline JM; Luijkx, Katrien G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus JM

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by the fact that multiple stakeholder groups are involved. Goals and motives of stakeholders may not always be transparent or aligned, yet research on convergent and divergent positions of stakeholders is scarce. Objective To provide insight into the positions of stakeholder groups involved in the implementation of technology for aging in place by answering the following questions: What kind of technology do stakeholders see as relevant? What do stakeholders aim to achieve by implementing technology? What is needed to achieve successful implementations? Methods Mono-disciplinary focus groups were conducted with participants (n=29) representing five groups of stakeholders: older adults (6/29, 21%), care professionals (7/29, 24%), managers within home care or social work organizations (5/29, 17%), technology designers and suppliers (6/29, 21%), and policy makers (5/29, 17%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Stakeholders considered 26 different types of technologies to be relevant for enabling independent living. Only 6 out of 26 (23%) types of technology were mentioned by all stakeholder groups. Care professionals mentioned fewer different types of technology than other groups. All stakeholder groups felt that the implementation of technology for aging in place can be considered a success when (1) older adults’ needs and wishes are prioritized during development and deployment of the technology, (2) the technology is accepted by older adults, (3) the technology provides benefits to older adults, and (4) favorable prerequisites for the use of technology by older adults exist. While stakeholders seemed to have identical aims, several underlying

  17. OECD Global Science Forum's Astronomy Workshop to take place in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-11-01

    members of the national astronomical community. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) are explicitly represented. Experts from the world-wide astronomy community have been invited to set the stage and provide input for the discussions. The choice by Germany and the OECD to make Munich the venue of this Global Science Forum Workshop is no coincidence. It is a recognition of the important role played by many institutions in the Munich region in the field of Astronomy and Astrophysics. They include the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität where the Workshop will take place, the Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik and the European Southern Observatory. These institutions are all participating in large programmes and projects in astronomy. ESO, for its part, is at the leading edge of world astronomy with its flagship facility, the Very Large Telescope in Paranal (Chile) and the newly started ALMA project at Chajnantor (Chile), being carried out in partnership between Europe and North America. Public Talks (Munich) on December 1, 2003 As a prelude to the Workshop, two public keynote presentations will take place on December 1 at the Deutsches Museum in Munich at 18:00 CET. The speakers are Malcolm Longair, Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy and Head of Laboratory, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (UK) and Martin Harwit, Professor Emeritus of Astronomy, Cornell University, and former Director of the National Air and Space Museum, Washington, DC (USA). The talks will be given in English and the entry to this public event is free. Professor Longair will speak on "Astrophysics and Cosmology in the Twenty-First Century" and Professor Harwit will speak on "The Growth of Understanding of our Universe". You can find more informaton on the Public Talks web page.

  18. Posttranslational N-glycosylation takes place during the normal processing of human coagulation factor VII.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Gert; Kristensen, Claus; Steenstrup, Thomas Dock

    2005-05-01

    N-glycosylation is normally a cotranslational process that occurs during translocation of the nascent protein to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the present study, however, we demonstrate posttranslational N-glycosylation of recombinant human coagulation factor VII (FVII) in CHO-K1 and 293A cells. Human FVII has two N-glycosylation sites (N145 and N322). Pulse-chase labeled intracellular FVII migrated as two bands corresponding to FVII with one and two N-glycans, respectively. N-glycosidase treatment converted both of these band into a single band, which comigrated with mutated FVII without N-glycans. Immediately after pulse, most labeled intracellular FVII had one N-glycan, but during a 1-h chase, the vast majority was processed into FVII with two N-glycans, demonstrating posttranslational N-glycosylation of FVII. Pulse-chase analysis of N-glycosylation site knockout mutants demonstrated cotranslational glycosylation of N145 but primarily or exclusively posttranslational glycosylation of N322. The posttranslational N-glycosylation appeared to take place in the same time frame as the folding of nascent FVII into a secretion-competent conformation, indicating a link between the two processes. We propose that the cotranslational conformation(s) of FVII are unfavorable for glycosylation at N332, whereas a more favorable conformation is obtained during the posttranslational folding. This is the first documentation of posttranslational N-glycosylation of a non-modified protein in mammalian cells with an intact N-glycosylation machinery. Thus, the present study demonstrates that posttranslational N-glycosylation can be a part of the normal processing of glycoproteins.

  19. Lycopene isomerisation takes place within enterocytes during absorption in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Richelle, Myriam; Sanchez, Belén; Tavazzi, Isabelle; Lambelet, Pierre; Bortlik, Karlheinz; Williamson, Gary

    2010-06-01

    Lycopene in fruits and vegetables occurs mostly (80-97 %) in the all-E configuration, whereas a considerable proportion of lycopene in the human body is present as Z-isomers. The Z-isomers offer potentially better health benefits and show improved antioxidant activity in vitro when compared with the all-E-isomer. The absorption of dietary lycopene is a complex process involving transfer of the carotenoid from the food matrix into micelles, uptake by enterocytes, packaging into chylomicrons and finally secretion into plasma. Isomerisation could take place at any of these individual steps. By exploiting in vitro and in vivo models, we traced lycopene isomerisation during absorption using various methods to mimic gastric and duodenal conditions, incorporation into mixed micelles, absorption and metabolism by various Caco-2 cell clones, and performed a postprandial study in human subjects to identify the profile of lycopene isomers in plasma chylomicrons. We demonstrate that all-E-lycopene remains unchanged during its passage in the gastrointestinal tract, including its incorporation into mixed micelles. The key site of lycopene isomerisation is inside the intestinal cells resulting in 29 % of lycopene as Z-isomers. Lycopene isomerisation in the various Caco-2 cell clones is consistent with that observed in human chylomicrons formed in a postprandial state. There is no selection in the release of lycopene isomers from enterocytes. Although there is a huge inter-individual variability of total lycopene absorption reported both in in vitro intestinal cell lines as well as in human chylomicrons, the lycopene isomer profile is quite similar.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of the Process of Isotope Exchange that Takes Place when Heavy Water Is Exposed to the Atmosphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeney, F. A.; O'Leary, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    We have used the recently developed method for rapid measurement of maximum density temperature to determine the rate at which hydrogen and deuterium isotope exchange takes place when a sample of heavy water is exposed to the atmosphere. We also provide a simple explanation for the observed linear rate of transition. (Contains 2 figures.)

  1. 23 CFR 636.402 - What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place after the release of the RFP document? 636.402 Section 636.402 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges §...

  2. Advice from Rural Elders: What It Takes to Age in Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Cheryl J.; Willoughby, Deborah F.; Battisto, Dina G.

    2011-01-01

    Older adults prefer to age in place (AIP), and there are psychological, physiological, and economic benefits in doing so. However, it is especially challenging to AIP in rural communities. AIP models have been tested in urban settings and age-segregated communities, but they are not appropriate for rural communities. This paper presents rural AIP…

  3. 23 CFR 636.401 - What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place prior... What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document? Verbal or written information exchanges (such as in the first-phase of a two-phase selection procedure) must...

  4. LIDAR for remote sensing of contaminations on water and earth surfaces taking place during oil-gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashayev, A.; Tagiyev, B.; Allahverdiyev, K.; Musayev, A.; Sadikhov, I.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of contaminations on water and earth surfaces (oil spills, films) taking place during oil-gas extraction is an interesting and actual problem. This problem may be solved by using different methods of optical spectroscopy, including: •Raman scattering; •light induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS); •fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) LIDARs are successfully used for remote sensing of chemical and biological substances at atmosphere. A new laser induced fluorescence (LIF) KA-14 LIDAR system for detecting of oil spills on the sea surface was employed at the National Aviation Academy of Azerbaijan. LIDAR's parameters are as follows: •laser CFR 200- type QUANTEL, λ = 355 nm, beam Ø = 5.35 mm, f = 20 Hz, pulse duration τ = 7 ns, pulse power 60 mJ; •diameter of Newtonian- type telescope is 200 mm; •collimator expansion of the laser beam diameter- not less than 3; •angle range of telescope measurements relative to horizon: from -20 to +20 degree; •spectral range of measurements: from 380 to 750 nm, number of spectral channels- 32; •maximum range of measurements- not less than 250 m. This LIDAR is the first performing these kind of research not only on the Azerbaijan beach of Caspian sea, but also on the earth places of Absheron peninsula, where oil-gas production takes place. We hope that the performance of LIDAR will have an International recognition and will make noticeable input on the International Research of Caspian sea surfaces.

  5. Organelle import of proteins with dual targeting properties into mitochondria and chloroplasts takes place by the general import pathways.

    PubMed

    Langner, Uwe; Baudisch, Bianca; Klösgen, Ralf Bernd

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of the endosymbiotic gene transfer, most mitochondrial and chloroplastic proteins are nuclear encoded and synthesized in the cytosol as precursor proteins with transit peptides mediating transport to their subcellular destination. It is often assumed that these transit peptides are strictly monospecific for a single organelle. But in recent years more and more proteins have been identified which carry transit peptides that are capable of mediating transport into both mitochondria and chloroplasts. In a recent study we showed with a combination of in silico, in organello, and in vivo approaches that the frequency of such proteins is apparently much higher than usually anticipated.(1) Here we demonstrate with in organello competition experiments that the import of 2 of these dually targeted proteins (GrpE and EF-Tu) takes place by the same import pathways that are used by organelle proteins with "typical" monospecific targeting properties.

  6. Evidence That Both Normal and Immune Elimination of Schistosoma mansoni Take Place at the Lung Stage of Migration Prior to Parasite Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    AD-A265 56 \\1 PUBLICATION REPORT 1740 18/93 EVIDENCE THAT BOTH NORMAL AND IMMUNE ELIMINATION OFSCHISTOSOMA MANSONI TAKE PLACE AT THE LUNG STAGE OF...Anct,•,n Society Md T•pical Mcld•dm &W I1,lit EVIDENCE THAT BOTH NORMAL AND IMMUNE ELIMINATION OF SCIIISTOSOMA MANSONI TAKE PLACE AT THE LUNG STAGE OF...distribution of autoradiographic foci observed in this and previous studies following percutaneous infection with 1$Se-labeled Schistosoma mansoni

  7. miRNA repression of translation in vitro takes place during 43S ribosomal scanning

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Emiliano P.; Limousin, Taran; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Rubilar, Paulina S.; Decimo, Didier; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2013-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression at multiple levels by repressing translation, stimulating deadenylation and inducing the premature decay of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Although the mechanism by which miRNAs repress translation has been widely studied, the precise step targeted and the molecular insights of such repression are still evasive. Here, we have used our newly designed in vitro system, which allows to study miRNA effect on translation independently of deadenylation. By using specific inhibitors of various stages of protein synthesis, we first show that miRNAs target exclusively the early steps of translation with no effect on 60S ribosomal subunit joining, elongation or termination. Then, by using viral proteases and IRES-driven mRNA constructs, we found that translational inhibition takes place during 43S ribosomal scanning and requires both the poly(A) binding protein and eIF4G independently from their physical interaction. PMID:23161679

  8. Young People Take Their Rightful Places as Full and Contributing Members of a World Class Workforce: Philadelphia Youth Network Annual Report 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Youth Network, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The title of this year's annual report has particular meaning for all of the staff at the Philadelphia Youth Network. The phrase derives from Philadelphia Youth Network's (PYN's) new vision statement, developed as part of its recent strategic planning process, which reads: All of our city's young people take their rightful places as full and…

  9. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  11. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.465 - May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on... § 1000.465 May a Tribe/Consortium negotiate AFA provisions on conflicts of interest to take the place of this subpart? (a) A Tribe/Consortium and the Secretary may agree to AFA provisions, concerning...

  14. 23 CFR 636.401 - What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What types of information exchange may take place prior to the release of the RFP document? 636.401 Section 636.401 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS DESIGN-BUILD CONTRACTING Exchanges §...

  15. Placing the power of real options analysis into the hands of natural resource managers - taking the next step.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Rohan; Howden, Mark; Hayman, Peter

    2013-07-30

    This paper explores heuristic methods with potential to place the analytical power of real options analysis into the hands of natural resource managers. The complexity of real options analysis has led to patchy or ephemeral adoption even by corporate managers familiar with the financial-market origins of valuation methods. Intuitively accessible methods for estimating the value of real options have begun to evolve, but their evaluation has mostly been limited to researcher-driven applications. In this paper we work closely with Bush Heritage Australia to evaluate the potential of real options analysis to support the intuitive judgement of conservation estate managers in covenanting land with uncertain future conservation value due to climate change. The results show that modified decision trees have potential to estimate the option value of covenanting individual properties while time and ongoing research resolves their future conservation value. Complementing this, Luehrman's option space has potential to assist managers with limited budgets to increase the portfolio value of multiple properties with different conservation attributes.

  16. Avoidance of plants unsuitable for the symbiotic fungus in leaf-cutting ants: Learning can take place entirely at the colony dump

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Plants initially accepted by foraging leaf-cutting ants are later avoided if they prove unsuitable for their symbiotic fungus. Plant avoidance is mediated by the waste produced in the fungus garden soon after the incorporation of the unsuitable leaves, as foragers can learn plant odors and cues from the damaged fungus that are both present in the recently produced waste particles. We asked whether avoidance learning of plants unsuitable for the symbiotic fungus can take place entirely at the colony dump. In order to investigate whether cues available in the waste chamber induce plant avoidance in naïve subcolonies, we exchanged the waste produced by subcolonies fed either fungicide-treated privet leaves or untreated leaves and measured the acceptance of untreated privet leaves before and after the exchange of waste. Second, we evaluated whether foragers could perceive the avoidance cues directly at the dump by quantifying the visits of labeled foragers to the waste chamber. Finally, we asked whether foragers learn to specifically avoid untreated leaves of a plant after a confinement over 3 hours in the dump of subcolonies that were previously fed fungicide-treated leaves of that species. After the exchange of the waste chambers, workers from subcolonies that had access to waste from fungicide-treated privet leaves learned to avoid that plant. One-third of the labeled foragers visited the dump. Furthermore, naïve foragers learned to avoid a specific, previously unsuitable plant if exposed solely to cues of the dump during confinement. We suggest that cues at the dump enable foragers to predict the unsuitable effects of plants even if they had never been experienced in the fungus garden. PMID:28273083

  17. Avoidance of plants unsuitable for the symbiotic fungus in leaf-cutting ants: Learning can take place entirely at the colony dump.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Andrés; Roces, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Plants initially accepted by foraging leaf-cutting ants are later avoided if they prove unsuitable for their symbiotic fungus. Plant avoidance is mediated by the waste produced in the fungus garden soon after the incorporation of the unsuitable leaves, as foragers can learn plant odors and cues from the damaged fungus that are both present in the recently produced waste particles. We asked whether avoidance learning of plants unsuitable for the symbiotic fungus can take place entirely at the colony dump. In order to investigate whether cues available in the waste chamber induce plant avoidance in naïve subcolonies, we exchanged the waste produced by subcolonies fed either fungicide-treated privet leaves or untreated leaves and measured the acceptance of untreated privet leaves before and after the exchange of waste. Second, we evaluated whether foragers could perceive the avoidance cues directly at the dump by quantifying the visits of labeled foragers to the waste chamber. Finally, we asked whether foragers learn to specifically avoid untreated leaves of a plant after a confinement over 3 hours in the dump of subcolonies that were previously fed fungicide-treated leaves of that species. After the exchange of the waste chambers, workers from subcolonies that had access to waste from fungicide-treated privet leaves learned to avoid that plant. One-third of the labeled foragers visited the dump. Furthermore, naïve foragers learned to avoid a specific, previously unsuitable plant if exposed solely to cues of the dump during confinement. We suggest that cues at the dump enable foragers to predict the unsuitable effects of plants even if they had never been experienced in the fungus garden.

  18. Modulation of Bmp4 signalling in the epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that take place in early thymus and parathyroid development in avian embryos.

    PubMed

    Neves, Hélia; Dupin, Elisabeth; Parreira, Leonor; Le Douarin, Nicole M

    2012-01-15

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are crucial for the development of the endoderm of the pharyngeal pouches into the epithelia of thymus and parathyroid glands. Here we investigated the dynamics of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that take place at the earliest stages of thymic and parathyroid organogenesis using the quail-chick model together with a co-culture system capable of reproducing these early events in vitro. The presumptive territories of thymus and parathyroid epithelia were identified in three-dimensionally preserved pharyngeal endoderm of embryonic day 4.5 chick embryos on the basis of the expression of Foxn1 and Gcm2, respectively: the thymic rudiment is located in the dorsal domain of the third and fourth pouches, while the parathyroid rudiment occupies a more medial/anterior pouch domain. Using in vitro quail-chick tissue associations combined with in ovo transplantations, we show that the somatopleural but not the limb bud mesenchyme, can mimic the role of neural crest-derived pharyngeal mesenchyme to sustain development of these glands up to terminal differentiation. Furthermore, mesenchymal-derived Bmp4 appears to be essential to promote early stages of endoderm development during a short window of time, irrespective of the mesenchymal source. In vivo studies using the quail-chick system and implantation of growth factor soaked-beads further showed that expression of Bmp4 by the mesenchyme is necessary during a 24 h-period of time. After this period however, Bmp4 is no longer required and another signalling factor produced by the mesenchyme, Fgf10, influences later differentiation of the pouch endoderm. These results show that morphological development and cell differentiation of thymus and parathyroid epithelia require a succession of signals emanating from the associated mesenchyme, among which Bmp4 plays a pivotal role for triggering thymic epithelium specification.

  19. The major olive pollen allergen (Ole e I) shows both gametophytic and sporophytic expression during anther development, and its synthesis and storage takes place in the RER.

    PubMed

    de Dios Alché, J; Castro, A J; Olmedilla, A; Fernández, M C; Rodríguez, R; Villalba, M; Rodríguez-García, M I

    1999-08-01

    The distribution of Ole e I (the major olive pollen allergen) and its transcripts was investigated in the anther from premeiotic stages until the dehiscent pollen stage. Crude protein extracts were analyzed by immunoblotting and probed with a monoclonal antibody to Ole e I. The protein, with three variants, was found to accumulate from the early microspore stage onwards. In addition to the previously reported localization of the protein, Ole e I has been immunolocalized for the first time within the pollen wall and in the tapetum. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis using specific oligonucleotides and RNA extracted from whole anthers revealed that the Ole e I gene is expressed from the late tetrad stage onwards. No expression was found in control tissues such as petals, roots or leaves. Light microscopy in situ hybridization on developing flower buds and dehiscent pollen confirmed the transcripts to be present in both the microspores and the sporophytic tissue (tapetum). Labeling was found primarily in the tapetum, reaching the highest concentration in the cytoplasm of the developing and mature pollen, once tapetum started to degenerate. In situ hybridization at the transmission electron microscope level showed the transcripts to accumulate on ribosomes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. These studies, together with others carried out previously by us, indicated that both synthesis and storage of Ole e I take place in the endoplasmic reticulum, coincidentally with the conspicuous changes suffered by this membrane system during pollen development. This process is most likely controlled at the transcriptional level. The localization of the protein in the pollen ectexine bring new insights into the function of the allergen, which are discussed.

  20. Kinetics of phosphate adsorption on goethite: comparing batch adsorption and ATR-IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Antelo, Juan; Avena, Marcelo

    2006-08-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate on goethite has been studied by batch adsorption experiments and by in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy at different pH, initial phosphate concentrations and stirring rates. Batch adsorption results are very similar to those reported by several authors, and show a rather fast initial adsorption taking place in a few minutes followed by a slower process taking place in days or weeks. The adsorption kinetics could be also monitored by integrating the phosphate signals obtained in ATR-IR experiments, and a very good agreement between both techniques was found. At pH 4.5 two surface complexes, the bidentate nonprotonated (FeO)(2)PO(2) and the bidentate protonated (FeO)(2)(OH)PO complexes, are formed at the surface. There are small changes in the relative concentrations of these species as the reaction proceeds, and they seem to evolve in time rather independently. At pH 7.5 and 9 the dominating surface species is (FeO)(2)PO(2), which is accompanied by an extra unidentified species at low concentration. They also seem to evolve independently as the reaction proceeds. The results are consistent with a mechanism that involve a fast adsorption followed by a slow diffusion into pores, and are not consistent with surface precipitation of iron phosphate.

  1. Adsorption and Exchange Kinetics of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Phosphorus Ligands on Gold Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuge, X. Q.; Bian, Z. C.; Luo, Z. H.; Mu, Y. Y.; Luo, K.

    2017-02-01

    The adsorption kinetics process of hydrophobic ligand (triphenylphosphine, PPh3) and hydrophilic ligand (tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine oxide, THPO) on the surface of gold electrode were estimated by using electrical double layer capacitance (EDLC). Results showed that the adsorption process of both ligands included fast and slow adsorption processes, and the fast adsorption process could fit the first order kinetic equation of Langmuir adsorption isotherm. During the slow adsorption process, the surface coverage (θ) of PPh3 was higher than that of THPO due to the larger adsorption kinetic constant of PPh3 than that of THPO, which implied that PPh3 could replace THPO on the gold electrode. The exchange process of both ligands on the surface of gold electrode proved that PPh3 take the place of THPO by testing the variation of EDLC which promote the preparation of Janus gold, and the theoretic simulation explained the reason of ligands exchange from the respect of energy..

  2. Place and Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannatella, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Do places matter educationally? When Edward Casey remarks: "The world is, minimally and forever, a place-world", we might take this statement as presupposing without argument that places exist as a given, that we know what a place is, a point that Aristotle would have never taken for granted and in fact neither does Casey. I find Casey's remark…

  3. Place-focused physical activity research, human agency, and social justice in public health: taking agency seriously in studies of the built environment.

    PubMed

    Blacksher, Erika; Lovasi, Gina S

    2012-03-01

    Built environment characteristics have been linked to health outcomes and health disparities. However, the effects of an environment on behavior may depend on human perception, interpretation, motivation, and other forms of human agency. We draw on epidemiological and ethical concepts to articulate a critique of research on the built environment and physical activity. We identify problematic assumptions and enumerate both scientific and ethical reasons to incorporate subjective perspectives and public engagement strategies into built environment research and interventions. We maintain that taking agency seriously is essential to the pursuit of health equity and the broader demands of social justice in public health, an important consideration as studies of the built environment and physical activity increasingly focus on socially disadvantaged communities. Attention to how people understand their environment and navigate competing demands can improve the scientific value of ongoing efforts to promote active living and health, while also better fulfilling our ethical obligations to the individuals and communities whose health we strive to protect.

  4. Effects of proton irradiation on a gas phase in which condensation takes place. I Negative Mg-26 anomalies and Al-26. [applied to solar and meteoritic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.; Walker, A.; Huss, G.; Morgan, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, isotopic effects in magnesium generated in a proton-irradiated gas phase are examined, taking only (p,n), (p,d), and (p, alpha) reactions in magnesium, aluminum, and silicon into consideration. In the presence of proton radiation, the three elements are 'removed' from the gas phase by condensation. It is required that a value of Al-26/Al-27 greater than 6 times 10 to the -5th must be reached, consistent with the value deduced by Lee Papanastassiou, and Wasserburg (1976) from their studies of the Allende meteorite. The calculations show that fast aluminum condensation reduces the required proton fluence substantially, that a significant fraction of aluminum remains uncondensed when the above value of the Al-26/Al-27 ratio is reached, that a detectable MG-24 excess is very likely to occur, that detectable negative MG-28 anomalies can be generated, and that proton fluxes and irradiation times can be varied simultaneously, and over a wide range of values, without significant changes in the required proton fluence.

  5. A model free method for estimation of complicated adsorption isotherms in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Forssén, Patrik; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-08-28

    Here we show that even extremely small variations in the adsorption isotherm can have a tremendous effect on the shape of the overloaded elution profiles and that the earlier in the adsorption isotherms the variation take place, the larger its impact on the shape of the elution profile. These variations are so small that they can be "hidden" by the discretization and in the general experimental noise when using traditional experimental methods, such as frontal analysis, to measure adsorption isotherms. But as the effects of these variations are more clearly visible in the elution profiles, the Inverse Method (IM) of adsorption isotherm estimation is an option. However, IM usually requires that one selects an adsorption isotherm model prior to the estimation process. Here we show that even complicated models might not be able to estimate the adsorption isotherms with multiple inflection points that small variations might give rise to. We therefore developed a modified IM that, instead of fixed adsorption isotherm models, uses monotone piecewise interpolation. We first validated the method with synthetic data and showed that it can be used to estimate an adsorption isotherm, which accurately predicts an extremely "strange" elution profile. For this case it was impossible to estimate the adsorption isotherm using IM with a fixed adsorption model. Finally, we will give an example of a real chromatographic system where adsorption isotherm with inflection points is estimated by the modified IM.

  6. Leaf processing behaviour in Atta leafcutter ants: 90% of leaf cutting takes place inside the nest, and ants select pieces that require less cutting.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Ryan W; Carlson, Katherine A; Goggans, Matthew Scott; Nesson, Michael H; Shepard, Christopher A; Schofield, Robert M S

    2016-01-01

    Leafcutter ants cut trimmings from plants, carry them to their underground nests and cut them into smaller pieces before inoculating them with a fungus that serves as a primary food source for the colony. Cutting is energetically costly, so the amount of cutting is important in understanding foraging energetics. Estimates of the cutting density, metres of cutting per square metre of leaf, were made from samples of transported leaf cuttings and of fungal substrate from field colonies of Atta cephalotes and Atta colombica. To investigate cutting inside the nest, we made leaf-processing observations of our laboratory colony, A. cephalotes. We did not observe the commonly reported reduction of the leaf fragments into a pulp, which would greatly increase the energy cost of processing. Video clips of processing behaviours, including behaviours that have not previously been described, are linked. An estimated 2.9 (±0.3) km of cutting with mandibles was required to reduce a square metre of leaf to fungal substrate. Only about 12% (±1%) of this cutting took place outside of the nest. The cutting density and energy cost is lower for leaf material with higher ratios of perimeter to area, so we tested for, and found that the laboratory ants had a preference for leaves that were pre-cut into smaller pieces. Estimates suggest that the energy required to transport and cut up the leaf material is comparable to the metabolic energy available from the fungus grown on the leaves, and so conservation of energy is likely to be a particularly strong selective pressure for leafcutter ants.

  7. Leaf processing behaviour in Atta leafcutter ants: 90% of leaf cutting takes place inside the nest, and ants select pieces that require less cutting

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Ryan W.; Carlson, Katherine A.; Goggans, Matthew Scott; Nesson, Michael H.; Shepard, Christopher A.; Schofield, Robert M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Leafcutter ants cut trimmings from plants, carry them to their underground nests and cut them into smaller pieces before inoculating them with a fungus that serves as a primary food source for the colony. Cutting is energetically costly, so the amount of cutting is important in understanding foraging energetics. Estimates of the cutting density, metres of cutting per square metre of leaf, were made from samples of transported leaf cuttings and of fungal substrate from field colonies of Atta cephalotes and Atta colombica. To investigate cutting inside the nest, we made leaf-processing observations of our laboratory colony, A. cephalotes. We did not observe the commonly reported reduction of the leaf fragments into a pulp, which would greatly increase the energy cost of processing. Video clips of processing behaviours, including behaviours that have not previously been described, are linked. An estimated 2.9 (±0.3) km of cutting with mandibles was required to reduce a square metre of leaf to fungal substrate. Only about 12% (±1%) of this cutting took place outside of the nest. The cutting density and energy cost is lower for leaf material with higher ratios of perimeter to area, so we tested for, and found that the laboratory ants had a preference for leaves that were pre-cut into smaller pieces. Estimates suggest that the energy required to transport and cut up the leaf material is comparable to the metabolic energy available from the fungus grown on the leaves, and so conservation of energy is likely to be a particularly strong selective pressure for leafcutter ants. PMID:26909161

  8. Adsorption of deamidated antibody variants on macroporous and dextran-grafted cation exchangers: II. Adsorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yinying; Carta, Giorgio; Ferreira, Gisela; Robbins, David

    2011-03-18

    Single and multicomponent batch adsorption kinetics were obtained for deamidated mAb variants on two commercial cation exchangers, one with an open macroporous structure--UNOsphere S--and the other with charged dextran grafts--Capto S. The adsorption kinetics for the macroporous matrix was found to be controlled largely by pore diffusion. The effective diffusivity estimated from single component data was a fraction of the mAb free solution diffusivity, and its value could be used to accurately predict the adsorption kinetics for two- and three-component systems. In this case, when two or more variants were adsorbed simultaneously, both experimental and predicted results showed a temporary overshoot of the amount adsorbed above the equilibrium value for the more deamidated variant followed by a gradual approach to equilibrium. Adsorption rates on the dextran grafted material were much faster than those observed for the macroporous matrix for both single component and simultaneous adsorption cases. In this case, no significant overshoot was observed for the more deamidated forms. The Capto S adsorption kinetics could be described well by a diffusion model with an adsorbed phase driving force for single component adsorption and for the simultaneous adsorption of multiple variants. However, this model failed to predict the adsorption kinetics when more deamidated forms pre-adsorbed on the resin were displaced by less deamidated ones. In this case, the kinetics of the displacement process was much slower indicating that the pre-adsorbed components severely hindered transport of the more strongly bound variants. Overall, the results indicate that despite the lower capacity, the macroporous resin may be more efficient in process applications where displacement of one variant by another takes place as a result of the faster and more predictable kinetics.

  9. Adsorption of polyetheramines on montmorillonite at high pH.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yannan; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2010-11-16

    Adsorption of a series of polyetheramines on montmorillonite in aqueous suspension was investigated by a range of methods: elemental analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, measurement of pH, conductivity and electrophoretic mobility, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Adsorption proceeds through an ion exchange mechanism. The maximum surface coverage attained is equivalent to about 40% of the cationic exchange capacity of the clay. Adsorption of the poly(oxypropylene) block adjacent to the amine group onto the clay surface may contribute to this. Surprisingly the adsorption takes place at pH conditions well above the pK(a) of the amine surfactants, where they are not protonated in the bulk solution. The surface coverage as a function of molar mass broadly agrees with predictions assuming adsorbed polymers adopt a densely packed mushroom configuration at the clay surface.

  10. Study of char gasification in a reaction/adsorption apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sotirchos, S.V.; Crowley, J.A.

    1987-09-01

    The reaction of an activated carbon (coconut char) with CO/sub 2/ was studied in a reaction/adsorption apparatus which allows successive reactivity and physical adsorption measurements to be made on the same solid sample. Reaction and surface area evolution data were obtained in the temperature range from 800 to 900/sup 0/C. All reaction rate trajectories obtained in this study showed a maximum in the reaction rate, 2-3 times higher than the initial rate, at about 85% conversion. There was no correlation between these results and the evolution of the internal surface area although the reaction appeared to take place initially in the kinetically controlled regime.

  11. Adsorption of N-alkylpyridinium chlorides from water and salt solutions on cellulose acetate ultrafiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, N.A.; Yaroshenko, N.A.; Kondratova, T.B.

    1988-09-01

    A study has been made of the adsorption of three homologues in the N-alkylpyridinium chloride series from water and salt solutions, over a wide range of concentrations, on cellulose acetate ultrafiltration membranes, Grades UAM-500 and UAM-150. When adsorption takes place from true solutions, the membrane surface is hydrophobized. In the region of micellar solutions, nonassociated molecules and micelles are adsorbed in the mesopores and supermicropores, forming a mosaic adsorption layer. The thickness of the modifying layer depends on the length of the hydrophobic radical and on the composition of the system.

  12. When George Washington Takes Second Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Florence Holmes

    This document discusses biographies of women, chosen to appeal to young girls, including "So Young a Queen,""Indian Captive,""Wilderness Wife,""Louisa,""Molly Garfield in the White House,""I Mary,""I Varina,""Pattern for a Heroine: The Life Story of Rebecca Gratz,""Theodosia,""Child of the Silent Night,""The Silent Storm," and "Invincible Louisa."…

  13. Temperature-dependent adsorption of nitrogen on porous vycor glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Tito E.; Tsou, Hsi Lung

    1998-03-01

    Adsorption isotherms of N2 have been measured in the temperature range from 77 to 120 K in samples of porous vycor glass. From the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory the surface layer coverages are determined. These are found to be temperature dependent. When adsorption-isotherm coverage data are expressed as a function of the adsorption potential δμ, the result is roughly temperature independent for coverages ranging from submonolayer to thin film, below capillary condensation. This characteristic curve, which represents the distribution of adsorption sites vs the adsorption potential, is compared with results from two models for the adsorbate: Dubinin's isotherm for microporous solids and its extension to rough surfaces, which places importance on the porosity of the surface, and Halsey's extension of the Frankel-Halsey-Hill isotherm, which takes into account the long-range variations of the substrate adsorption potential. The impact of this work on the interpretation of N2 adsorption data in terms of a surface area is discussed.

  14. STRUCTURAL EFFECTS ON THE HIGH TEMPERATURE ADSORPTION OF CO2 ON A SYNTHETIC HYDROTALCITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlcs) are solid sorbents that may potentially be used for high temperature separation and capture of CO2. The high-temperature adsorption of CO2 on Mg-Al-CO3 HTlc is affected by structural changes that take place upo...

  15. Adsorption behavior of hydrothermally treated municipal sludge & pulp and paper industry sludge.

    PubMed

    Alatalo, Sara-Maaria; Repo, Eveliina; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Vakkilainen, Esa; Sillanpää, Mika

    2013-11-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate how hydrothermal carbonization changes adsorption efficiency toward metal ions of typical sludges. Hydrothermal carbonization is a novel and green method of treating biomasses. Reactions take place in an aqueous environment at relatively mild temperature and high pressure resulting a different end biomass structure than obtained from traditional pyrolysis. Anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) and pulp and paper industry sludge (INS) were utilized as a feedstock. Adsorption behavior of ADS and INS was examined towards Pb(II), Cr(III), Cr(VI), As(III) and As(V). Both ADS and INS were found to remove Pb(II) effectively and followed Sips adsorption isotherm. Adsorption kinetics was fast and followed pseudo-second order model. Furthermore, intraparticle diffusion was observed to be partly responsible in the adsorption process. Hydrothermal carbonization indicated high potential for the production of novel carbonaceous materials for metal removal from waters.

  16. Intraparticle heat and mass transfer characteristics of silica-gel/water vapor adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Eri; Watanabe, Fujio; Hasatani, Masanobu

    1999-07-01

    Recently, highly efficient energy utilization systems which extensively employ adsorption phenomena such as pressure swing adsorption, heat storage, adsorption heat pump, etc. are being regarded as one of the countermeasures for environmental issues such as green house effect and ozone layer destruction. An Adsorption Heat Pump (AHP) has been investigated as one of the important techniques via which cold heat energy is obtained from waste thermal energy below 373K without using electricity and CFCs. An AHP normally consists of an adsorber and an evaporator/condenser and cold heat energy is generated by latent heat of evaporation during adsorption process. For realizing the AHP technology, it has been pointed out that the development of an adsorber with optimum heat and mass transfer characteristics is essentially important. In this study, experimental studies were carried out which was based on the data of temperature inside the adsorbent particle and adsorptivity profiles at the adsorption/desorption process by volumetric method. To clarify adsorption mechanism relatively large silica-gel particle (7 mm f) was used. Temperature distribution in the particle is determined at the center, at one half radius in the radial direction and at the surface by using very thin (30 mm f) thermocouples. The temperatures at these points simultaneously increase/decrease as soon as the adsorption/desorption started, reached their respective maximum/minimum values and then return to initial temperature. The temperature profiles for the adsorption process show that the temperature at the surface is initially slightly higher than the other two points. All three points reached their respective maximum temperature at the same time with the temperature at the center point the highest and at the surface the lowest. The temperature profiles during the desorptive process are almost exactly the opposite to that of the adsorption process. This shows that the adsorption phenomena can take

  17. Adsorption of arsenate on untreated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, G M; Mehawej, M

    2007-09-05

    Raw dolomite powder was evaluated for its efficiency in adsorbing As(V) from water. An experimental setup comprised of a fluidized dolomite powder bed was used to assess the impact of various test variables on the efficiency of removal of As(V). Test influents including distilled water (DW), synthetic groundwater (SGW) and filtered sewage effluent (FSE) were employed to assess the effect of influent parameters on the adsorption process and the quality of the effluent generated. Dolomite exhibited good As(V) removal levels for distilled water (>92%) and synthetic ground water (>84%) influents at all initial As(V) concentrations tested (0.055-0.600 ppm). Breakthrough of dolomite bed occurred after 45 bed volumes for DW and 20 bed volumes for SGW influents with complete breakthrough taking place at more than 300 bed volumes. As(V) removal from FSE influents was relatively unsuccessful as compared to the DW and SGW influents. Partial removal in the order of 32% from filtered sewage effluent at initial concentration of 0.6 mg/L started at 75 bed volumes and gradually stopped at 165 bed volumes. Varying degrees of As(V) adsorption capacities were observed by the different test influents employed, which indicate that the adsorption of As(V) is adversely affected by competing species, mainly sulfates and phosphates present in the influent. The adsorptive behavior of dolomite was described by fitting data generated from the study into the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Both models described well the adsorption of dolomite. The average isotherm adsorptive capacity was determined at 5.02 mug/g. Regeneration of the dolomite bed can be achieved with the use of caustic soda solution at a pH of 10.5.

  18. Adsorption hysteresis in nanopores

    PubMed

    Neimark; Ravikovitch; Vishnyakov

    2000-08-01

    Capillary condensation hysteresis in nanopores is studied by Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory. Comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data on low temperature sorption of nitrogen and argon in cylindrical channels of mesoporous siliceous molecular sieves of MCM-41 type, we have revealed four qualitatively different sorption regimes depending on the temperature and pore size. As the pore size increases at a given temperature, or as the temperature decreases at a given pore size, the following regimes are consequently observed: volume filling without phase separation, reversible stepwise capillary condensation, irreversible capillary condensation with developing hysteresis, and capillary condensation with developed hysteresis. We show that, in the regime of developed hysteresis (pores wider than 5 nm in the case of nitrogen sorption at 77 K), condensation occurs spontaneously at the vaporlike spinodal while desorption takes place at the equilibrium. A quantitative agreement is found between the modeling results and the experimental hysteresis loops formed by the adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the general behavior of confined fluids and the specifics of sorption and phase transitions in nanomaterials.

  19. Adsorption of Benzoic Compounds onto Stainless Steel Particles

    PubMed

    Suzuki; Shibata; Inoue

    1997-09-15

    Equilibrium experiment was conducted to investigate the factors determining the adsorption of benzoic acid (BA) and its derivatives, m- and p-hydroxy BA, onto SUS316L stainless steel particles of 8-10 &mgr;m diameter and under 100 mesh. Adsorption isotherms of these benzoic compounds were determined in the presence of 0.05 M NaCl at pH 4 and 30°C. The adsorptions of the these compounds were described well by a Langmuirian model for both adsorbents. When the maximum number of the benzoic compound adsorption sites was expressed on the basis of unit surface area (N, mol/m2), the N values were relatively constant, while the greatest value of the affinity (K, ml/&mgr;mol) was obtained for p-hydroxy BA, although its value was in the same range as that of the other two adsorbates. Diffuse-reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectra of the fine adsorbent (8-10 &mgr;m diameter) after equilibration suggest that the adsorption mainly takes place through the carboxyl group of the adsorbate-stainless steel surface interaction for all adsorbates, whereas concomitant interaction occurs in part with participation of the phenolic hydroxyl group for p-OH BA adsorbate, accounting for the difference in adsorption properties. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  20. Modeling diffusion and adsorption in compacted bentonite: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Bourg, Alain C. M.; Sposito, Garrison

    2003-03-01

    The current way of describing diffusive transport through compacted clays is a simple diffusion model coupled to a linear adsorption coefficient ( Kd). To fit the observed results of cation diffusion, this model is usually extended with an adjustable "surface diffusion" coefficient. Description of the negative adsorption of anions calls for a further adjustment through the use of an "effective porosity". The final model thus includes many fitting parameters. This is inconvenient where predictive modeling is called for (e.g., for waste confinement using compacted clay liners). The diffusion/adsorption models in current use have been derived from the common hydrogeological equation of advection/dispersion/adsorption. However, certain simplifications were also borrowed without questioning their applicability to the case of compacted clays. Among these simplifications, the assumption that the volume of the adsorbed phase is negligible should be discussed. We propose a modified diffusion/adsorption model that accounts for the volume of the adsorbed phase. It suggests that diffusion through highly compacted clay takes place through the interlayers (i.e., in the adsorbed phase). Quantitative prediction of the diffusive flux will necessitate more detailed descriptions of surface reactivity and of the mobility of interlayer species.

  1. Places to Go: Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Educators are becoming increasingly interested in alternatives to learning management systems (LMS) Blackboard and WebCT. Stephen Downes's column Places to Go turns to one internationally popular open source LMS--Moodle. Downes takes the reader through Moodle's Web site, which is simultaneously a Web site about its LMS and an example of what its…

  2. Sanctified Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnisch, Cynthia S.

    2010-01-01

    Cynthia Harnisch shares her unique perspective on the revered place that museums and community arts organizations occupy in the lives of the people they serve. She relates how, as vice president of the Autry National Center in 1994, she came to be introduced to Inner-City Arts and through that introduction discovered a new respect and recognition…

  3. Temperature-dependent adsorption of hydrogen, deuterium, and neon on porous Vycor glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, T. E.; Scardino, D.; Tsou, H. L.

    1995-10-01

    Adsorption isotherms of H2, D2, and Ne have been measured in the temperature range from 15 K to the corresponding critical points in samples of porous Vycor glass. From the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory the surface layer coverages are determined. These are found to be temperature dependent. A model-independent approach allows us to fit the data for coverages ranging from submonolayer to thin film, below capillary condensation, for each adsorbate at all temperatures with a temperature-independent curve. This characteristic curve represents the distribution of adsorption sites versus the adsorption potential. In the intermediate coverage range, the isotherms exhibit the modified Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) behavior. The adsorption saturates for low-adsorption potentials. The characteristic curve is a useful universal curve since it is roughly the same for the three species investigated. We examine the relative strengths of the surface potentials and densities of the two isotopic modifications of hydrogen and of the more classical Ne adsorbed on porous Vycor glass. The characteristic adsorption curve is compared with results from two models for the adsorbate: Dubinin's isotherm for microporous solids and its extension to rough surfaces which places importance on the porosity of the surface, and Halsey's model, which is an extension of the FHH isotherm that takes into account the long-range variations of substrate adsorption potential.

  4. Adsorption and desorption of arsenate on sandy sediments from contaminated and uncontaminated saturated zones: Kinetic and equilibrium modeling.

    PubMed

    Hafeznezami, Saeedreza; Zimmer-Faust, Amity G; Dunne, Aislinn; Tran, Tiffany; Yang, Chao; Lam, Jacquelyn R; Reynolds, Matthew D; Davis, James A; Jay, Jennifer A

    2016-08-01

    Application of empirical models to adsorption of contaminants on natural heterogeneous sorbents is often challenging due to the uncertainty associated with fitting experimental data and determining adjustable parameters. Sediment samples from contaminated and uncontaminated portions of a study site in Maine, USA were collected and investigated for adsorption of arsenate [As(V)]. Two kinetic models were used to describe the results of single solute batch adsorption experiments. Piecewise linear regression of data linearized to fit pseudo-first order kinetic model resulted in two distinct rates and a cutoff time point of 14-19 h delineating the biphasic behavior of solute adsorption. During the initial rapid adsorption stage, an average of 60-80% of the total adsorption took place. Pseudo-second order kinetic models provided the best fit to the experimental data (R(2) > 0.99) and were capable of describing the adsorption over the entire range of experiments. Both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms provided reasonable fits to the adsorption data at equilibrium. Langmuir-derived maximum adsorption capacity (St) of the studied sediments ranged between 29 and 97 mg/kg increasing from contaminated to uncontaminated sites. Solid phase As content of the sediments ranged from 3.8 to 10 mg/kg and the As/Fe ratios were highest in the amorphous phase. High-pH desorption experiments resulted in a greater percentage of solid phase As released into solution from experimentally-loaded sediments than from the unaltered samples suggesting that As(V) adsorption takes place on different reversible and irreversible surface sites.

  5. Privileged Girls: The Place of Femininity and Femininity in Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahey, Johannah

    2014-01-01

    Constructions of femininity and attendant notions of feminism are being produced in different ways in different places around the world. This is a complicated global process that cannot be reduced to analyses that take place in nation states. This paper seeks to respond to and enhance Angela McRobbie's compelling argument about understandings of…

  6. Surface and adsorption properties of α-tricalcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xilin; Stott, M. J.

    2006-03-01

    The interaction between bone replacement bioceramic materials and the body will take place at the surface of the material. In the present ab initio study, we have investigated surfaces of biologically important α-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and adsorption of biological species including a Ca atom, an H2O molecule, and a SiO2 fragment on the surfaces. The results show that all these species adsorb on the surfaces. The Ca atoms are strongly chemisorbed with newly created Ca-O bonds similar to those in α-TCP bulk in bond length; a water molecule is adsorbed and in some cases also dissociated on the surfaces with the dissociative adsorption, the predominant process; a SiO2 fragment initially linear, strongly interacted with two oxygens of different PO4 groups and eventually forms a tetrahedral SiO4-like species which might be a precursor of the silicate present in Si-TCP materials.

  7. Taking Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... remembering to take them. Some over-the-counter products, supplements, or natural remedies can interfere with the effectiveness of your prescribed medicines. Tell your diabetes educator about ANY supplements you are taking so ...

  8. Fibrinogen adsorption onto 316L stainless steel under polarized conditions.

    PubMed

    Gettens, Robert T T; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption of the plasma protein fibrinogen onto electrically polarized 316L stainless steel was observed and quantified using both in situ and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. Significant differences in fibrinogen adsorption were observed across voltages. Ex situ studies showed significantly lower area coverage (theta) and height of adsorbed Fb on cathodically polarized surfaces when compared to anodically polarized surfaces. Conformational differences in the protein may explain the distinctions in Fb surface area coverage (theta) and height between the anodic and cathodic cases. In situ studies showed significantly slower kinetics of Fb adsorption onto surfaces below -100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) compared to surfaces polarized above -100 mV. Electrochemical current density data showed large charge transfer processes (approximately 1 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-4) A/cm(2)) taking place on the 316L SS surfaces at voltages below -100 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl). These relatively large current densities point to flux of ionic species away from the surface as a major source of the reduction in adsorption kinetics rather than just hydrophilic or electrostatic effects.

  9. Adsorption behavior of hydrophobin and hydrophobin/surfactant mixtures at the solid-solution interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoli L; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Bent, Julian; Cox, Andrew

    2011-09-06

    The adsorption of surface-active protein hydrophobin, HFBII, and HFBII/surfactant mixtures at the solid-solution interface has been studied by neutron reflectivity, NR. At the hydrophilic silicon surface, HFBII adsorbs reversibly in the form of a bilayer at the interface. HFBII adsorption dominates the coadsorption of HFBII with cationic and anionic surfactants hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide, CTAB, and sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS, at concentrations below the critical micellar concentration, cmc, of conventional cosurfactants. For surfactant concentrations above the cmc, HFBII/surfactant solution complex formation dominates and there is little HFBII adsorption. Above the cmc, CTAB replaces HFBII at the interface, but for SDS, there is no affinity for the anionic silicon surface hence there is no resultant adsorption. HFBII adsorbs onto a hydrophobic surface (established by an octadecyl trimethyl silane, OTS, layer on silicon) irreversibly as a monolayer, similar to what is observed at the air-water interface but with a different orientation at the interface. Below the cmc, SDS and CTAB have little impact upon the adsorbed layer of HFBII. For concentrations above the cmc, conventional surfactants (CTAB and SDS) displace most of the HFBII at the interface. For nonionic surfactant C(12)E(6), the pattern of adsorption is slightly different, and although some coadsorption at the interface takes place, C(12)E(6) has little impact on the HFBII adsorption.

  10. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  11. Adsorption of micelle-forming surfactants from aqueous solutions on disperse titanium boride

    SciTech Connect

    Grodskii, A.S.; Komleva, E.A.; Frolov, Yu.G.

    1988-08-10

    Adsorption studies showed that nonionogenic and cationic surfactants are adsorbed on the surface of disperse titanium boride. Anionic surfactants are virtually not adsorbed due to the negative charge of the particles. It was found that in the region of low concentrations of surfactants in the solution, adsorption of Sintanols takes place in lyophobic regions and the surface of the particles becomes hydrophilic. The Sintamid molecules are adsorbed on the entire interface, including both hydrophobic and hydrophilic sections, with subsequent formation of bimolecular layers by adsorption on hydrophobic sections. Catamine-AB is adsorbed on hydrophilic sections of the surface also with the formation of bimolecular layers. Developed polymolecular layers up to 10-15 nm thick are formed on titanium boride particles from micellar solutions of nonionigenic and cationic surfactants.

  12. TiC-carbide derived carbon electrolyte adsorption study by ways of X-ray scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    Trognko, Lorie; Lecante, Pierre; Ratel-Ramond, Nicolas; Rozier, Patrick; Daffos, Barbara; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice

    Understanding ion adsorption in nanoporous carbon electrodes is of great importance for designing the next-generation of high energy density electrical double-layer capacitors. In this work, X-ray scattering is used for investigating the impregnation of nanoporous carbons with electrolytes in the absence of applied potential. We are able to show that interactions between the carbon surface and electrolytes allow adsorption to take place in sub-nanopores, thus confirming experimentally for the first time the results predicted by molecular dynamic simulations.

  13. A Sense of Place

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Labeled image for A Sense of Place

    NASA's Mars Exploration rover Spirit continues to descend along the east side of the 'Columbia Hills,' taking panoramic views of surrounding terrain at the end of each day of driving. This helps members of the science team get a sense of place before proceeding, kind of the way a hiker pauses now and then to view the scenery. Scientists and engineers use panoramas like this to select interesting rocks and soils for further study and to plan a safe path for the rover.

    In this image mosaic, Spirit is pausing to take a good look around while descending due east toward a ridge nicknamed 'Haskin Ridge.' Before driving the rest of the way down, Spirit will take a panoramic image of the large, deep basin to the left of the ridge, labeled 'East Basin,' which was not visible from the summit. A longer-term destination is the prominent, round, platform-like feature labeled 'Home Plate.'

    This 360-degree panorama was assembled from images Spirit took with its navigation camera on the 651st martian day, or sol (Nov. 2, 2005), of its exploration of Gusev Crater on Mars. The view is presented in a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  14. Temperature effect on the zeta potential and fluoride adsorption at the alpha-Al2O3/aqueous solution interface.

    PubMed

    López Valdivieso, A; Reyes Bahena, J L; Song, S; Herrera Urbina, R

    2006-06-01

    The effect of temperature and pH on the zeta potential of alpha-Al2O3 and adsorption of fluoride ions at the alpha-Al2O3/aqueous solution interface has been investigated through electrophoretic mobility measurements and adsorption studies, to delineate mechanisms involved in the removal of fluoride ions from water using alumina as adsorbent. When the temperature increases from 10 to 40 degrees C, the pH of the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) shifts to smaller values, indicating proton desorption from the alumina surface. The pH(pzc) increases linearly with 1/T, which allowed estimation of the standard enthalpy change for the surface-deprotonation process. Fluoride ion adsorption follows a Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm and is affected by the electric charge at the alpha-Al2O3/aqueous solution interface and the surface density of hydroxyl groups. Such adsorption occurs through an exchange between fluoride ions and surface-hydroxyl groups and it depends on temperature, pH, and initial fluoride ion concentration. At 25 and 40 degrees C, maximum fluoride adsorption density takes place between pH 5 and 6. Increasing the temperature from 25 to 40 degrees C lowers the adsorption density of fluoride.

  15. Community and the Politics of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmis, Daniel

    The preamble to Montana's constitution, which expresses gratitude for Montana's landscape, reflects an understanding that the political culture of a place is not something apart from the place itself. By the same token, the strengthening of political culture must take place and must be studied in the context of very specific places and the people…

  16. Adsorption of Candida rugosa lipase at water-polymer interface: The case of poly( DL)lactide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Gihan; Bordi, Federico; Chronopoulou, Laura; Lupi, Stefano; Palocci, Cleofe; Sennato, Simona; Verdes, Pedro V.

    2011-12-01

    Insights into the interactions between biological macromolecules and polymeric surfaces are of great interest because of potential uses in developing biotechnologies. In this study we focused on the adsorption of a model lipolytic enzyme, Candida rugosa lipase (CRL), on poly-(D,L)-lactic acid (PDLLA) polymer with the aim to gain deeper insights into the interactions between the enzyme and the carrier. Such studies are of particular relevance in order to establish the optimal conditions for enzyme immobilization and its applications. We employed two different approaches; by analyzing the influence of adsorbed CRL molecules on the thermodynamic behavior of Langmuir films of PDLLA deposited at air-water interface, we gained interesting information on the molecular interactions between the protein and the polymer. Successively, by a systematic analysis of the adsorption of CRL on PDLLA nanoparticles, we showed that the adsorption of a model lipase, CRL, on PDLLA is described in terms of a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior. In this model, only monomolecular adsorption takes place (i.e. only a single layer of the protein adsorbs on the support) and the interactions between adsorbed molecules and surface are short ranged. Moreover, both the adsorption and desorption are activated processes, and the heat of adsorption (the difference between the activation energy for adsorption and desorption) is independent from the surface coverage of the adsorbing species. Finally, we obtained an estimate of the number of molecules of the protein adsorbed per surface unit on the particles, a parameter of a practical relevance for applications in biocatalysis, and a semi-quantitative estimate of the energies (heat of adsorption) involved in the adsorption process.

  17. Taking Risks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merson, Martha, Ed.; Reuys, Steve, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Following an introduction on "Taking Risks" (Martha Merson), this journal contains 11 articles on taking risks in teaching adult literacy, mostly by educators in the Boston area. The following are included: "My Dreams Are Bigger than My Fears Now" (Sharon Carey); "Making a Pitch for Poetry in ABE [Adult Basic…

  18. Taking antacids

    MedlinePlus

    ... magnesium may cause diarrhea. Brands with calcium or aluminum may cause constipation. Rarely, brands with calcium may ... you take large amounts of antacids that contain aluminum, you may be at risk for calcium loss, ...

  19. Homogeneous Diffusion Solid Model as a Realistic Approach to Describe Adsorption onto Materials with Different Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabio, E.; Zamora, F.; González-García, C. M.; Ledesma, B.; Álvarez-Murillo, A.; Román, S.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the adsorption kinetics of p-nitrophenol (PNP) onto several commercial activated carbons (ACs) with different textural and geometrical characteristics was studied. For this aim, a homogeneous diffusion solid model (HDSM) was used, which does take the adsorbent shape into account. The HDSM was solved by means of the finite element method (FEM) using the commercial software COMSOL. The different kinetic patterns observed in the experiments carried out can be described by the developed model, which shows that the sharp drop of adsorption rate observed in some samples is caused by the formation of a concentration wave. The model allows one to visualize the changes in concentration taking place in both liquid and solid phases, which enables us to link the kinetic behaviour with the main features of the carbon samples.

  20. Homogeneous Diffusion Solid Model as a Realistic Approach to Describe Adsorption onto Materials with Different Geometries.

    PubMed

    Sabio, E; Zamora, F; González-García, C M; Ledesma, B; Álvarez-Murillo, A; Román, S

    2016-12-01

    In this work, the adsorption kinetics of p-nitrophenol (PNP) onto several commercial activated carbons (ACs) with different textural and geometrical characteristics was studied. For this aim, a homogeneous diffusion solid model (HDSM) was used, which does take the adsorbent shape into account. The HDSM was solved by means of the finite element method (FEM) using the commercial software COMSOL. The different kinetic patterns observed in the experiments carried out can be described by the developed model, which shows that the sharp drop of adsorption rate observed in some samples is caused by the formation of a concentration wave. The model allows one to visualize the changes in concentration taking place in both liquid and solid phases, which enables us to link the kinetic behaviour with the main features of the carbon samples.

  1. An intrinsically shielded hydrogel for the adsorptive recovery of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Rongsheng; Eisenthal, Robert; Hubble, John

    2006-07-01

    The present paper addresses the selective recovery of lysozyme from egg white using CM-dextran (carboxymethyldextran)-based hydrogels containing Cibacron Blue as an affinity ligand and co-immobilized BSA intended to act as a shielding agent to reduce non-specific adsorption. Initial studies using pure lysozyme were conducted that indicated that the adsorption capacity increased with ligand density and that adsorption was well described by a Langmuir-type isotherm. The inclusion of BSA as a putative shielding agent did not decrease the adsorption capacity for lysozyme in single-adsorbate experiments. To assess the effectiveness of the shielding strategy, subsequent experiments were conducted with both defined lysozyme/ovalbumin mixtures and hen's-egg white. From these studies, the optimal operating conditions for lysozyme recovery have been determined. These include: optimal initial egg-white concentration [a 10% (v/v) solution of native egg white in the chosen buffer], affinity-ligand density (1.86 mM) and ligand-to-shielding-agent ratio (4:1). The purity of lysozyme obtained from egg white was improved from 69% with a non-shielded hydrogel to 94% with an intrinsically shielded hydrogel. Finally, the possibility of using a protein, rather than dextran-backbone-based, hydrogel was investigated. It was found that BSA could take the place of CM-dextran as the gel backbone in a simplified synthesis, producing a gel which also proved effective for lysozyme recovery with a 30% lysozyme in egg-white solution purified to approx. 92% in a single adsorption-desorption cycle.

  2. Mountain Hike North of Big Cottonwood Canyon Road, Begining at the S-Turn at Mill B., Near Hidden Falls, and Taking Trail Leading to Mt. Raymond and Other Intersting Places.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Keith L.

    2004-11-01

    Our first objective is to leave the highway via Mill B North Fork by taking the Big Cottonwood Canyon trail that leads to Maxfield Basin, where 3 trails intersect, just s. of Mount Raymond (Elev. 10,241 ft.) the n. trail takes us down to the Mill Creek Canyon Road, at about 1 mi. (+) east of intersection with Church Park Picnic Ground road. At Maxfield Basin, again, the east trail skirts around Mt. Raymond and has another intersection with a trail running n. thru the area of Gobblers Knob (elev. 10,246 ft.), to White Fir Pass and turns w. at Bowman Fk. until it connects with Porter Fork and then the Mill Creek Road. The remaining trail at Mill A Basin, just e. of Mount Raymond, long before Gobblers Knob is seen, runs east past a spring, and connects to Butler Fork (which begins at 3.775 mi., measured along highway from Mill B, North Fork), which leads directly to Dog Lake. Evidently both Dog Lake and Lake Desolation (changing U.S. Geological Survey maps from Mount Aire, Utah to Park City West, Utah) have connected outlets, at least during certain times of the year. Following the trail s. e. (down) that follows near Summit Co. and Salt Lake County, we pass by the radio transmitters shown on Park City, West, Utah, map and finally enter the Brighton, Utah map with Scott Hill, Scott Pass, the important highway leading to Midway Reservoir, and beyond, Bloods Lake ( 9500 ft.), Clayton Peak (10,721 ft.) and Lake Lackawaxen ( 9980 ft.), our final destination showing through. One may easily walk the distance to lake Lackawaxen from Bloods Lake by staying south of the ridgecrest and by following the hollow down for a while. This completes our destination. Recall that the main roadway here was already passed over about 1/2 mile n. of Bloods Lake; this thoroughfare has its beginning at about 0.4 miles below (or North) of the Brighton Loop, where the road to city of Midway leaves the main Big Cottonwood Highway going n. and runs e., on the average, going past Midway Reservoir

  3. What is taking place in science classrooms?: A case study analysis of teaching and learning in seventh-grade science of one Alabama school and its impact on African American student learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Lashaunda Renea

    This qualitative case study investigated the teaching strategies that improve science learning of African American students. This research study further sought the extent the identified teaching strategies that are used to improve African American science learning reflect culturally responsive teaching. Best teaching strategies and culturally responsive teaching have been researched, but there has been minimal research on the impact that both have on science learning, with an emphasis on the African American population. Consequently, the Black-White achievement gap in science persists. The findings revealed the following teaching strategies have a positive impact on African American science learning: (a) lecture-discussion, (b) notetaking, (c) reading strategies, (d) graphic organizers, (e) hands-on activities, (f) laboratory experiences, and (g) cooperative learning. Culturally responsive teaching strategies were evident in the seventh-grade science classrooms observed. Seven themes emerged from this research data: (1) The participating teachers based their research-based teaching strategies used in the classroom on all of the students' learning styles, abilities, attitudes towards science, and motivational levels about learning science, with no emphasis on the African American student population; (2) The participating teachers taught the state content standards simultaneously using the same instructional model daily, incorporating other content areas when possible; (3) The participating African American students believed their seventh-grade science teachers used a variety of teaching strategies to ensure science learning took place, that science learning was fun, and that science learning was engaging; (4) The participating African American students genuinely liked their teacher; (5) The participating African American students revealed high self-efficacy; (6) The African American student participants' parents value education and moved to Success Middle School

  4. Combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the CO 2 adsorption on LaMnO 3+y perovskite oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, Ramzi; Batis, Habib; Minot, Christian

    2009-10-01

    The surface interaction of CO 2 with the perovskite-type oxide LaMnO 3+y has been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations and experimental measurements of adsorption isotherms in the temperature range 298-473 K. A (1 0 0) oriented slab of the cubic structure was used for modeling CO 2 adsorption. The reference unit cell contains alternating LaO + layers and MnO2- layers; one slab is LaO +-terminated and the opposite surface is MnO2- terminated. A Freundlich isotherm fitted the experimental data satisfactorily. Analysis of the isosteric heat revealed an energetically heterogeneous character for the lanthanum manganite oxide surface, mainly due to the degree of heterogeneity of the adsorption center and due to the adsorbate-adsorbate lateral interactions. Considering theoretical calculations and thermodynamical approaches, two types of active sites were found to be responsible for irreversible and reversible adsorption of CO 2 as a function of surface coverage and O 2 treatment. Strong adsorption takes place on the surface containing La cations. The strongest adsorption is associated with surface oxygen vacancies, Fs° center. The next strongest adsorption, a flat adaptation of CO 2 molecules with respect to the surface sites, with a strong binding to a surface oxygen, leads to chemisorbed carbonate species. These adsorption modes are chiefly indicative of a high basic character of the lanthanum manganite oxide surface. Several cationic sites formed by lanthanum and manganese cations are able to weakly adsorb CO 2 molecules in perpendicular or bridged forms. The latter adsorption modes suggest a weak acidic character of the manganite adsorbent.

  5. Adsorption of cationic monomeric and gemini surfactants on montmorillonite and adsolubilization of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Nakajima, Erimi; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Sharma, Suraj C; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Yoshimura, Tomokazu; Esumi, Kunio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of a cationic gemini surfactant (1,2-bis(dodecyldimethylammonio) ethane dibromide, 12-2-12) and the corresponding monomeric surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, DTAB) on montmorillonite has been characterized with a combination of adsorption isotherm, interlayer spacing and FT-IR spectroscopic data. Adsolubilization of vitamin E into the adsorbed surfactant layers has also been studied. The adsorption isotherm data reveal that the adsorption of the two surfactants is driven by the two factors: one is the cation exchange that occurs on the interlayer basal planes and the other is the hydrophobic interaction between hydrocarbon chains of the surfactants. Although the adsorbed amount measured in the saturation region (in mol g(-1)) is almost identical for the two surfactants, the conformation of the intercalated surfactant molecules differs significantly from each other. The adsorption of DTAB results in a lateral bilayer arrangement in the limited interlayer space, whereas 12-2-12 gives a normal bilayer arrangement in the expanded interlayer space. Adsolubilization of vitamin E takes place into the adsorbed surfactant layers, and interestingly, all the vitamin E molecules added in the montmorillonite suspensions are hybridized at lower surfactant concentrations due to the great specific surface area of the clay material. Since the maximum adsolubilization amount is usually obtained just below the critical micelle concentration, the gemini surfactant is deemed to be more efficient than the corresponding monomeric one to achieve the great adsolubilization amount.

  6. Ammonia adsorption and its effects on framework stability of MOF-5 and MOF-177.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipendu; Deng, Shuguang

    2010-08-15

    Ammonia adsorption equilibrium and kinetics on MOF-5 and MOF-177 were measured volumetrically at 298 K and ammonia pressures up to 800 torr. This study allowed us to determine the ammonia adsorption properties and stability of both MOFs after exposure to ammonia. MOF-177 adsorbed more ammonia than MOF-5 at ammonia pressures below 150 torr and the ammonia adsorption capacity on both MOFs at 800 torr was about the same (12.2 mmol/g). It can be inferred from the adsorption results that physical adsorption of ammonia on both MOFs dominated at ammonia pressures below 150 torr after which chemical reactions between ammonia and MOF frameworks take place. After exposure to ammonia both MOFs lost majority of their pore textures as evidenced by a drastic decrease of specific surface area and pore volume. The X-ray diffraction study suggested a complete loss of crystallinity of both MOFs, and the FT-IR and Raman spectral analyses showed the generation of free organic ligands within both MOF-5 and MOF-177 after they were exposed to ammonia. Ammonia molecules are proposed to destroy the MOF frameworks by forming hydrogen bonds with Zn(4)O clusters of MOFs.

  7. Double Take

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Leadership, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper begins by discussing the results of two studies recently conducted in Australia. According to the two studies, taking a gap year between high school and college may help students complete a degree once they return to school. The gap year can involve such activities as travel, service learning, or work. Then, the paper presents links to…

  8. Taking Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Two people take turns selecting from an even number of items. Their relative preferences over the items can be described as a permutation, then tools from algebraic combinatorics can be used to answer various questions. We describe each person's optimal selection strategies including how each could make use of knowing the other's preferences. We…

  9. Brazilian physicists take centre stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    With the FIFA World Cup taking place in Brazil this month, Susan Curtis travels to South America's richest nation to find out how its physicists are exploiting recent big increases in science funding.

  10. Adsorption mechanisms of RNA mononucleotides on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Miljanić, Snežana; Dijanošić, Adriana; Matić, Ivona

    2015-02-25

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of four RNA mononucleotides (AMP, GMP, CMP and UMP) has been studied on the citrate-reduced silver colloid aggregated with sodium sulfate. Concentration dependent spectra in the range of 1×10(-7)-1×10(-4) mol dm(-3) were obtained, assigned and interpreted according to the surface selection rules. For purine mononucleotides, AMP and GMP, adsorption onto the silver nanoparticles through the six-membered ring of the nitrogenous base was suggested. Concentration dependent splitting of the ring breathing band in the spectra of AMP indicated coexistence of two species on the silver surface, which differed in contribution of the adenine N1 atom and the exocyclic NH2 group in binding. Unlike the AMP spectra, the spectra of GMP implied only one mode of adsorption of the molecules onto the silver nanoparticles, taking place through the guanine N1H and C=O group. Weak SERS spectra of pyrimidine mononucleotides, CMP and UMP, pointed to involvement of carbonyl oxygen in adsorption process, whereby the molecules adopted the position on the nanoparticles with ribose close to the metal surface. Intense bands in the low wavenumber region, associated with stretching of the formed Ag-N and/or Ag-O bonds, supported chemical binding of the RNA mononucleotides with the silver surface.

  11. Does adsorption in a single nanogroove exhibit hysteresis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2012-12-01

    A simple fluid, in a microscopic capillary capped at one end, is studied by means of fundamental measure density functional. The model represents a single, infinitely long nanogroove with long-range wall-fluid attractive (dispersion) forces. It is shown that the presence or absence of hysteresis in adsorption isotherms is determined by wetting properties of the wall as follows: Above wetting temperature, Tw, appropriate to a single wall of the groove, the adsorption is a continuous process corresponding to a rise of a meniscus from the capped to the open end of the groove. For a sufficiently deep capillary, the meniscus rise is shown to be a steep, yet continuous process taking place near the capillary condensation of a corresponding slit. However, for temperatures lower than Tw the condensation exhibits a first-order transition accompanied by hysteresis of the adsorption isotherm. Finally, it is shown that hysteresis may occur even for T > Tw as a consequence of prewetting on the side and bottom walls of the groove.

  12. Optimizing available phosphorus in calcareous soils fertilized with diammonium phosphate and phosphoric acid using Freundlich adsorption isotherm.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Asif; Akhtar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Waqar

    2013-01-01

    In calcareous soils, phosphorus (P) retention and immobilization take place due to precipitation and adsorption. Since soil pH is considered a major soil variable affecting the P sorption, an acidic P fertilizer could result in low P adsorption compared to alkaline one. Therefore, P adsorption from DAP and phosphoric acid (PA) required to produce desired soil solution P concentration was estimated using Freundlich sorption isotherms. Two soils from Faisalabad and T. T. Singh districts were spiked with 0, 10, and 20 % CaCO3 for 15 days. Freundlich adsorption isotherms (P = aC(b/a)) were constructed, and theoretical doses of PA and DAP to develop a desired soil solution P level (i.e., 0.20 mg L(-1)) were calculated. It was observed that P adsorption in soil increased with CaCO3. Moreover, at all the levels of CaCO3, P adsorption from PA was lower compared to that from DAP in both the soils. Consequently, lesser quantity of PA was required to produce desired solution P, 0.2 mg L(-1), compared to DAP. However, extrapolating the developed relationship between soil CaCO3 contents and quantity of fertilizer to other similar textured soils needs confirmation.

  13. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods.

  14. ISS and TPD study of the adsorption and interaction of CO and H2 on polycrystalline Pt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melendez, Orlando; Hoflund, Gar B.; Schryer, David R.

    1990-01-01

    The adsorption and interaction of CO and H2 on polycrystalline Pt has been studied using ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The ISS results indicate that the initial CO adsorption on Pt takes place very rapidly and saturates the Pt surface with coverage close to a monolayer. ISS also shows that the CO molecules adsorb at an angular orientation from the surface normal and perhaps parallel to the surface. A TPD spectrum obtained after coadsorbing C-12 O-16 and C-13 O-18 on Pt shows no isotopic mixing, which is indicative of molecular CO adsorption. TPD spectra obtained after coadsorbing H2 and CO on polycrystalline Pt provides evidence for the formation of a CO-H surface species.

  15. Adsorption of water on O(2x2)/Ru(0001): thermal stability and inhibition of dissociation by H2O-O bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Arnau, Andres; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-08-01

    The effect of preadsorbed oxygen on the subsequent adsorption and reactions of water on Ru(0001) has been studied using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and DFT calculations. Experiments were carried out for O coverages close to 0.25 ML. It was found that no dissociation of water takes place up to the desorption temperature of {approx}180-230 K. DFT calculations show that intact water on O(2x2)/Ru(0001) is {approx} 0.49 eV more stable than the dissociation products, H and OH, at their preferred fcc and top adsorption sites.

  16. Adsorption Removal of Environmental Hormones of Dimethyl Phthalate Using Novel Magnetic Adsorbent

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Ji, Dar-Ren; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Lu, De-Sheng; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Yuan, Min-Hao; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Chiou, Chyow-San; Chen, Yi-Hung; Shie, Je-Lueng

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic polyvinyl alcohol adsorbent M-PVAL was employed to remove and concentrate dimethyl phthalate DMP. The M-PVAL was prepared after sequential syntheses of magnetic Fe3O4 (M) and polyvinyl acetate (M-PVAC). The saturated magnetizations of M, M-PVAC, and M-PVAL are 57.2, 26.0, and 43.2 emu g−1 with superparamagnetism, respectively. The average size of M-PVAL by number is 0.75 μm in micro size. Adsorption experiments include three cases: (1) adjustment of initial pH (pH0) of solution to 5, (2) no adjustment of pH0 with value in 6.04–6.64, and (3) adjusted pH0 = 7. The corresponding saturated amounts of adsorption of unimolecular layer of Langmuir isotherm are 4.01, 5.21, and 4.22 mg g−1, respectively. Values of heterogeneity factor of Freundlich isotherm are 2.59, 2.19, and 2.59 which are greater than 1, revealing the favorable adsorption of DMP/M-PVAL system. Values of adsorption activation energy per mole of Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm are, respectively, of low values of 7.04, 6.48, and 7.19 kJ mol−1, indicating the natural occurring of the adsorption process studied. The tiny size of adsorbent makes the adsorption take place easily while its superparamagnetism is beneficial for the separation and recovery of micro adsorbent from liquid by applying magnetic field after completion of adsorption. PMID:26258169

  17. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  18. Sex steroid hormone metabolism takes place in human ocular cells.

    PubMed

    Coca-Prados, Miguel; Ghosh, Sikha; Wang, Yugang; Escribano, Julio; Herrala, Annakaisa; Vihko, Pirkko

    2003-08-01

    Steroids are potentially important mediators in the pathophysiology of ocular diseases. In this study, we report on the gene expression in the human eye of a group of enzymes, the 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (17HSDs), involved in the biosynthesis and inactivation of sex steroid hormones. In the eye, the ciliary epithelium, a neuroendocrine secretory epithelium, co-expresses the highest levels of 17HSD2 and 5 mRNAs, and in lesser level 17HSD7 mRNA. The regulation of gene expression of these enzymes was investigated in vitro in cell lines, ODM-C4 and chronic open glaucoma (GCE), used as cell models of the human ciliary epithelium. The estrogen, 17beta-estradiol (10(-7) M) and androgen agonist, R1881 (10(-8) M) elicited in ODM-C4 and GCE cells over a 24 h time course a robust up-regulation of 17HSD7 mRNA expression. 17HSD2 was up-regulated by estradiol in ODM-C4 cells, but not in GCE cells. Under steady-state conditions, ODM-C4 cells exhibited a predominant 17HSD2 oxidative enzymatic activity. In contrast, 17HSD2 activity was low or absent in GCE cells. Our collective data suggest that cultured human ciliary epithelial cells are able to metabolize estrogen, androgen and progesterone, and that 17HSD2 and 7 in these cells are sex steroid hormone-responsive genes and 17HSD7 is responsible to keep on intra/paracrine estrogenic milieu.

  19. Using Personalized Education to Take the Place of Standardized Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Pengyu

    2014-01-01

    Economic model has been greatly shifted from labor demanding to innovation demanding, which requires education system has to produce creative people. This paper illustrates how traditional education model accrued and developed based on satisfying the old economic model for labor demanding but did not meet the new social requirement for innovation…

  20. Can Quality Program Evaluation Really Take Place in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Jerry A.

    High-stakes assessments are those in which the results of tests or other measures can lead to decisions that may affect school administrators, teachers, and students substantially. Whether high-stakes assessment results in misleading information due to extraneous factors associated with the conditions under which the assessment occurs is explored.…

  1. Toluene, Methanol and Benzaldehyde Removal from Gas Streams by Adsorption onto Natural Clay and Faujasite-Y type Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Zaitan, Hicham; Mohamed, Elham F; Valdés, Héctor; Nawdali, Mostafa; Rafqah, Salah; Manero, Marie Hélène

    2016-12-01

    A great number of pollution problems come as a result of the emission of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) into the environment and their control becomes a serious challenge for the global chemical industry. Adsorption is a widely used technique for the removal of VOCs due to its high efficiency, low cost, and convenient operation. In this study, the feasibility to use a locally available clay, as adsorbent material to control VOCs emissions is evaluated. Natural clay is characterised by different physical-chemical methods and adsorptive interaction features between VOCs and natural clay are identified. Toluene (T), methanol (M) and benzaldehyde (B) are used here as representatives of three different kinds of VOCs. Adsorption isotherms onto natural clay and faujasite-Y type zeolite (Fau Y) are obtained at room temperature. According to Langmuir model data, maximum adsorption capacities (qm) of Fez natural clay and zeolite toward methanol (M), toluene (T) and benzaldehyde (B) at 300 K are 8, 0.89 and 3.1 mmol g-1, and 15, 1.91 and 13.9 mmol g-1 respectively. In addition, the effect of temperature on the adsorption of toluene onto natural clay is evaluated in the range from 300 to 323K. An increase on temperature reduces the adsorption capacity of natural clay toward toluene, indicating that an exothermic physical adsorption process takes place. The enthalpy of adsorption of toluene onto Fez natural clay was found to be -54 kJ mol-1. A preliminary cost analysis shows that natural clay could be used as an alternative low cost adsorbent in the control of VOCs from contaminated gas streams with a cost of US$ 0.02 kg-1 compared to Fau Y zeolite with US$ 10 kg-1.

  2. Adsorption-induced crystallization of U-rich nanocrystals on nano-Mg(OH)(2) and the aqueous uranyl enrichment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Zhuang, Zanyong; Cao, Qing; Pan, Xiaohong; Guan, Xiong; Lin, Zhang

    2014-01-22

    The mechanism of the interaction between nano-Mg(OH)2 adsorbent and uranyl in water was studied. At trace levels, the uranyl is adsorbed as a monolayer on nano-Mg(OH)2, and occupied a small proportion of the adsorption sites. As the uranyl concentration crosses over a threshold, continuous increase of adsorption capacity takes place. It indicates that, by taking the pre-adsorbed uranyl as the nucleation centers, the additional uranyl crystallizes and forms U-rich nanocrystals well-scattered on the surface of nano-Mg(OH)2. A strategy of inducing fast crystal growth of nano-Mg(OH)2 to micrometer-sized Na2Mg(CO3)2 enables the desorption and enrichment of uranyl. The recycling and reuse of nano-Mg(OH)2 can be achieved simultaneously. The finding in this work provides fundamental understanding of the efficient usage of nano-Mg(OH)2 in practical applications.

  3. Places for Pedagogies, Pedagogies for Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhn, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Working with an understanding of assemblage as the ad hoc groupings of vibrant materials and elements, this article argues that conceptualizing place as an assemblage opens possibilities for bridging the gap between subjects and objects that continue to structure pedagogy. Considering "place" as an assemblage of humans and their multiple…

  4. Adsorption of C20 on two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. B.; Xu, L. H.; Xu, Y. X.; Wu, S. Q.; Zhu, Z. Z.

    2017-03-01

    We considered the geometric and electronic properties of C20 molecule adsorbed on various two-dimensional (2D) substrates surfaces, such as graphene, silicene, germanene, stanene, BN and MoS2 by using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory. For each case, we have considered three adsorption configurations of C20 molecule, i.e. top-site (T), hallow-site (H) and bridge site (B), respectively. Our results show that C20's are strongly bound to silicene, germanene and stanene, however, the adsorbed C20 molecules have only weak interactions with graphene, BN and MoS2 substrates. Moreover, charge density plot implies substantial charge transfer taking place between the constituents of C20 and the substrate of silicene, germanene and stanene. Results indicate that the buckling structure of the 2D material plays important role in determining the reactivity of a 2D substrate.

  5. Re(Place) Your Typical Writing Assignment: An Argument for Place-Based Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Elliot

    2011-01-01

    Place-based writing affords students an opportunity to write meaningfully about themselves, grounded in a place that they know. Place-based writing is versatile and can be additive--taking just a week or two within a semester of different projects--or transformative, if positioned as the theme for an entire course. If students can learn to write…

  6. Analysis of Scanning Electron Microscopy Images To Investigate Adsorption Processes Responsible for Detection of Cancer Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Valquiria da Cruz; Comin, Cesar H; Soares, Juliana Coatrini; Soares, Andrey Coatrini; Melendez, Matias Eliseo; Fregnani, José Humberto T G; Carvalho, André Lopes; Costa, Luciano da F; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2017-02-22

    Adsorption processes are responsible for detection of cancer biomarkers in biosensors (and immunosensors), which can be captured with various principles of detection. In this study, we used a biosensor made with nanostructured films of polypyrrole and p53 antibodies, and image analysis of scanning electron microscopy data made it possible to correlate morphological changes of the biosensor with the concentration of cells containing the cancer biomarker p53. The selectivity of the biosensor was proven by distinguishing images obtained with exposure of the biosensor to cells containing the biomarker from those acquired with cells that did not contain it. Detection was confirmed with cyclic voltammetry measurements, while the adsorption of the p53 biomarker was probed with polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption (PM-IRRAS) and a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Adsorption is described using the Langmuir-Freundlich model, with saturation taking place at a concentration of 100 Ucells/mL. Taken together, our results point to novel ways to detect biomarkers or any type of analyte for which detection is based on adsorption as is the case of the majority of biosensors.

  7. Adsorption of o-, m- and p-nitrophenols onto organically modified bentonites.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Hülya; Yıldız, Nuray; Salgın, Uğur; Köroğlu, Fatmanur; Calımlı, Ayla

    2011-01-30

    Experiments were conducted on the adsorption characteristics of o-, m- and p-nitrophenols by organically modified bentonites at different temperatures. Two organobentonites (HDTMA-B and PEG-B) were synthesized using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMABr) and poly(ethylene glycol) butyl ether (PEG). Synthesized HDTMA-B and PEG-B were characterized by XRD, FTIR and DTA-TG analyses and their specific surface area, particle size and pore size distributions were determined. BET surface areas and basal spacings (d(001)) of the HDTMA-B and PEG-B were found to be 38.71 m(2)g(-1), 69.04 m(2)g(-1) and 21.96 Å, 15.17 Å, respectively. Increased adsorption with temperature indicates that the process is endothermic for o-nitrophenol. On the other hand m- and p-nitrophenols exhibited lower rates of adsorption at higher temperatures suggesting a regular exothermic process taking place. Results were analyzed according to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich (D-R) isotherm equations using linearized correlation coefficient at different temperatures. R(L) separation factors for Langmuir and the n values for Freundlich isotherms showed that m- and p-nitrophenols are favorably adsorbed by HDTMA-B and, p-nitrophenol is favored by PEG-B. Adsorption of o-, m- and p-nitrophenols as single components or from their binary mixtures on HDTMA-B and, p-nitrophenol on PEG-B are all defined to be physical in nature.

  8. Sulphur adsorption and effects of sulphur poisoning on RhCu bimetallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foord, J. S.; Reynolds, A. E.

    1985-04-01

    Sulphur adsorption on Cu covered Rh(111) surfaces, prepared as models of "bimetallic cluster" catalysts, was studied and the effects of preadsorbed sulphur on the chemisorption of CO and C 2H 2 on Rh(111)-Cu surfaces examined. In the initial stages of the interaction of sulphur with the metal, strongly bound adsorbate overlayers are formed, while epitaxial sulphide growth takes place at higher sulphur exposures. Sulphur adsorbs indiscriminately on the two components in the bimetallic interface during overlayer formation; preferential formation of Rh 2S 3 is observed, however, at higher sulphur loadings. Sulphur overlayers block the chemisorption of CO and C 2H 2 although blocking is not complete at sulphur concentrations below 8.0 × 10 18 atoms m -2. The extent of adsorption of C 2H 2 falls much more rapidly with increased sulphur coverage than does CO chemisorption, showing that C 2H 2 adsorption requires the larger ensemble size of Rh atoms. Sulphur produces a weakening of the CO adsorption bond by 29 kJ mol -1 but has no effect on the energetics of ethylidyne decomposition.

  9. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jun-Jun; Yang, Qing-Sheng; Yan, Xiao-Hui; He, Xiao-Qiao; Liew, Kim-Meow

    2016-01-01

    A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment. PMID:28335306

  10. Adsorption and Chemical Modification of Phenols on a Silver Surface.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cortés; García-Ramos

    2000-11-01

    The adsorption of phenols of different natures on silver colloidal particles is studied here by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The studied compounds can be classified in three groups: (a) cinnamic acic derivatives: caffeic and isoferulic acids; (b) catechol; and (c) the phenols derived from benzoic acid: m- and p-hydroxybenzoic acids and salicylic, vanillic, and gallic acids. The interest of these compounds lies in the fact that they are naturally occurring molecules with significant importance in relation to plant metabolism, soil chemistry, and vegetal food stability. In addition, many of these compounds have antioxidant properties derived from their high affinity toward atmospheric oxygen. They exhibit high reactivity that may be enhanced in the presence of a metal surface such as those employed for SERS spectroscopy. From the SERS results it can be deduced that a clear chemical change of caffeic and gallic acid and catechol occurred. The chemical modification consists mainly of polymerization connected to existence in the molecule of o-diphenol moieties. In the case of m-hydroxybenzoic acid the chemical change may occur at low pH at which a reorientation of the molecule on the surface takes place, while in the o-hydroxybenzoic acid the only chemical change seems to be the internal H bond breakdown induced by the complexation with the metal. Finally, isoferulic and p-hydroxybenzoic acids do not show any chemical modification upon adsorption on the metal, which takes place through the carboxylate group adopting the molecule a standing up orientation. The case of vanillic acid is not so clear, although possible chemical modification is also possible for this adsorbate. From the results found in this work it can be inferred that the factors influencing possible chemical modification are the chemical structure of the adsorbate and its orientation and interaction with the surface. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Efficient and rapid adsorption characteristics of templating modified guar gum and silica nanocomposite toward removal of toxic reactive blue and Congo red dyes.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sagar; Patra, Abhay Shankar; Ghorai, Soumitra; Sarkar, Amit Kumar; Mahato, Vivekananda; Sarkar, Supriyo; Singh, R P

    2015-09-01

    The present study highlights the potentiality of sol-gel synthesized guar gum-graft-poly (acrylamide)/silica (g-GG/SiO2) hybrid nanocomposite toward the rapid removal of toxic reactive blue 4 (RB) and Congo red (CR) dyes from aqueous solution. Various physicochemical characterizations support the feasibility of the functionalized guar gum matrix as efficient template for the formation of homogeneous nanoscale silica particles. The composite demonstrates rapid and superior adsorption efficiency of RB (Qmax: 579.01 mg g(-1) within 40 min) and CR (Qmax: 233.24 mg g(-1) within 30 min) dyes from aqueous environment. Here, the pH driven adsorption process depends strongly on the ionic strength of the salt solution. The adsorption kinetics data predicts that pseudo second-order (surface adsorption) and intraparticle diffusion take place simultaneously. The adsorption equilibrium is in good agreement with the Langmuir isotherm, while the thermodynamics study confirms spontaneous nature of the adsorption process. Desorption study predicts the excellent regenerative efficacy of nanocomposite.

  12. How to Cope with Sheltering in Place

    MedlinePlus

    ... your own or a relative’s home, school, or work. Sheltering in place may be required because of an emergency such ... things to keep yourself calm while sheltering in place. Relax your body often by doing things that work for you—take deep breaths, stretch, meditate or ...

  13. Place and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, David

    2013-01-01

    David Orr's classic article links education to living in the outdoors and studying all disciplines through the unifying lens of place. Pedagogy of place counters abstraction, it is the natural world embodying principles of learning that involve direct observation, investigation, experimentation, and manual skills. Place is the laboratory providing…

  14. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  15. 48 CFR 1346.503 - Place of acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....503 Section 1346.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Acceptance 1346.503 Place of acceptance. Insert a clause substantially similar to 1352... supplies and/or services will take place....

  16. 48 CFR 1346.503 - Place of acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....503 Section 1346.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Acceptance 1346.503 Place of acceptance. Insert a clause substantially similar to 1352... supplies and/or services will take place....

  17. 48 CFR 1346.503 - Place of acceptance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....503 Section 1346.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Acceptance 1346.503 Place of acceptance. Insert a clause substantially similar to 1352... supplies and/or services will take place....

  18. Comparative adsorption of arsenic, boron, chromium, molybdenum and selenium on fresh and weathered fly ash.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Donahoe, R. J.; Graham, E. Y.; Patel, D. V.

    2004-12-01

    Coal-fired electric power plants in the US generated over 130 million tons of fly ash and other combustion waste materials last year. While approximately 35% of the produced coal combustion by-products (CCBs) are recycled for beneficial use, the majority of the waste is impounded in lagoons and landfills located throughout the country. The EPA is currently re-evaluating these disposal facilities for regulation under Subtitle D. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the adsorption capacities of fresh and weathered fly ash for the toxic metals arsenic, boron, chromium, molybdenum, and selenium in order to evaluate the long-term mobility of these metals in the ash disposal environment. Two power plant sites were selected for study, one producing acidic ash and the other alkaline ash. Weathered ash samples were collected at each site from cores drilled from the surface through the bottom of ponds that have been closed for more than 35 years. Fresh fly ash was obtained directly from the power plants. Batch experiments were performed to study the competitive adsorption of As, B, Cr, Mo and Se on fresh and weathered ash materials. Experiments performed at pH values of 3, 4, 6, 8 and 10, using initial metal concentrations of 5 mg/L, show similar adsorption behavior for both ash compositions. The metal selectivity sequence for fresh fly ash is As >> Mo > Cr ~ Se ~ B. Maximum arsenic adsorption on fresh fly ash occurs at pH = 6 with almost 100% removal, while maximum arsenic adsorption on weathered ash takes place at pH = 3. Maximum adsorption of B, Cr, Mo and Se occurs at pH = 3 for both fresh and weathered ash. The experiments indicate that the adsorption capacity of fly ash for the metals of interest is reduced by weathering. Experiments are currently underway to compare the adsorption capacity of fresh and weathered fly ash for varying initial metal concentrations, ionic strength and solid/liquid ratio.

  19. Impact of humate complexation on the adsorption of REE onto Fe oxyhydroxide.

    PubMed

    Davranche, Mélanie; Pourret, Olivier; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2004-09-15

    Adsorption experiments of rare-earth elements (REE) onto hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) were performed to evaluate the impact of organic complexation on both REE(III) adsorption and the Ce(III) oxidation rate. Scavenging experiments were performed at pH 5.2 with NaCl and NaNO3 solutions containing either free REE (III) or REE(III)-humate complexes. The log K(d)(REE) patterns obtained from HFO suspensions exhibit a slight positive Ce anomaly and an M-type lanthanide tetrad effect, in contrast with the partitioning between REE(III)-humate complexes and HFO, which yields completely flat distribution patterns. The "organic" partitioning runs yield log K(d)(REEorganic)/log K(d)(DOC) ratios (DOC = dissolved organic carbon) close to 1.0, implying that the REE(III) and humate remain bound to each other during the adsorption experiment. The lack of any positive Ce anomaly or M-type lanthanide tetrad effect in the organic experiments seems to reflect an anionic adsorption of the REE-humate complex. Adsorption onto HFO takes place via the humate side of the REE(III)-humate complexes. The oxidation of Ce(III) by Fe(III) and the proportion of surface hydroxyl groups coordinated to REE(III) at the HFO surface are the two most commonly invoked processes for explaining the development of positive Ce anomalies and the M-type tetrad lanthanide effect. However, such processes cannot proceed since the REE are not in direct contact with the HFO suspensions, the latter being shielded by PHA. The present results further complicate the use of Ce anomalies as reliable paleoredox proxies in natural precipitates. They are also further demonstration that organic matter may inhibit the lanthanide tetrad effect in geological samples.

  20. The value of place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-03-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate environment is clear, and we are presented with examples of how they strive to make connections between the content and what they are familiar with—namely their surroundings. "Place" is identified as a term with complex meanings and interpretations, even in the scope of place-based science education, and understanding how the term is used in any given scenario is essential to understanding the implications of place-based education. Is place used as a location, locale or a sense of place? To understand "place" is to acknowledge that for the individual, it is highly situational, cultural and personal. It is just such attributes that make place-based education appealing, and potentially powerful, pedagogically on one hand, yet complex for implementation on the other. The argument is posed that place is particularly important in the context of education about the environment, which in its simplest manifestation, connects formal science curriculum to resources that are local and tangible to students. The incorporation of place in such a framework seeks to bridge the gap between formal school science subjects and students' lived experiences, yet acknowledges the tensions that can arise between accommodating place meanings and the desire to acculturate students into the language of the scientific community. The disconnect between guiding policy frameworks and the reality of the Next Generation Science Standards is addressed opening an avenue for further discussion of the importance of socio-cultural frameworks of science learning in an ever increasing era of accountability.

  1. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  2. Schooling Out of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaghy, Cathryn

    2006-01-01

    Education in rural communities is an interesting site for an analysis of the relationship between place and the cultural politics of schooling. In particular the movements of people, ideas and practices to and from, and also within, rural places suggest the need for theorizing on rural education to consider the relevance of new mobility…

  3. Place as Library?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Digital technology is redrawing the library's blueprint. Planners are thinking in new ways about how to design libraries as places for learning rather than primarily as storehouses of information. This thinking has given rise to much discussion--and to many publications--about the "library as place." In this article, the author asks why not also…

  4. The Case for Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Carlucci

    2012-01-01

    Bookstores, record stores, libraries, Facebook: these places--both physical and virtual--demonstrate an established and essential purpose as centers of community, expertise, convenience, immediacy, and respect. Yet as digital, mobile, and social shifts continue to transform culture and interactions, these spaces and places transform, too.…

  5. Adsorption kinetics of an engineered gold binding Peptide by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Tamerler, Candan; Oren, Ersin Emre; Duman, Memed; Venkatasubramanian, Eswaranand; Sarikaya, Mehmet

    2006-08-29

    The adsorption kinetics of an engineered gold binding peptide on gold surface was studied by using both quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy systems. The gold binding peptide was originally selected as a 14-amino acid sequence by cell surface display and then engineered to have a 3-repeat form (3R-GBP1) with improved binding characteristics. Both sets of adsorption data for 3R-GBP1 were fit to Langmuir models to extract kinetics and thermodynamics parameters. In SPR, the adsorption onto the surface shows a biexponential behavior and this is explained as the effect of bimodal surface topology of the polycrystalline gold substrate on 3R-GBP1 binding. Depending on the concentration of the peptide, a preferential adsorption on the surface takes place with different energy levels. The kinetic parameters (e.g., K(eq) approximately 10(7) M(-1)) and the binding energy (approximately -8.0 kcal/mol) are comparable to synthetic-based self-assembled monolayers. The results demonstrate the potential utilization of genetically engineered inorganic surface-specific peptides as molecular substrates due to their binding specificity, stability, and functionality in an aqueous-based environment.

  6. Theoretical predictions of properties and volatility of chlorides and oxychlorides of group-4 elements. II. Adsorption of tetrachlorides and oxydichlorides of Zr, Hf, and Rf on neutral and modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pershina, V; Borschevsky, A; Iliaš, M; Türler, A

    2014-08-14

    With the aim to interpret results of gas-phase chromatography experiments on volatility of group-4 tetrachlorides and oxychlorides including those of Rf, adsorption enthalpies of these species on neutral, and modified quartz surfaces were estimated on the basis of relativistic, two-component Density Functional Theory calculations of MCl4, MOCl2, MCl6(-), and MOCl4(2) with the use of adsorption models. Several mechanisms of adsorption were considered. In the case of physisorption of MCl4, the trend in the adsorption energy in the group should be Zr > Hf > Rf, so that the volatility should change in the opposite direction. The latter trend complies with the one in the sublimation enthalpies, ΔH(sub), of the Zr and Hf tetrachlorides, i.e., Zr < Hf. On the basis of a correlation between these quantities, ΔH(sub)(RfCl4) was predicted as 104.2 kJ/mol. The energy of physisorption of MOCl2 on quartz should increase in the group, Zr < Hf < Rf, as defined by increasing dipole moments of these molecules along the series. In the case of adsorption of MCl4 on quartz by chemical forces, formation of the MOCl2 or MOCl4(2-) complexes on the surface can take place, so that the sequence in the adsorption energy should be Zr > Hf > Rf, as defined by the complex formation energies. In the case of adsorption of MCl4 on a chlorinated quartz surface, formation of the MCl6(2-) surface complexes can occur, so that the trend in the adsorption strength should be Zr ≤ Hf < Rf. All the predicted sequences, showing a smooth change of the adsorption energy in the group, are in disagreement with the reversed trend Zr ≈ Rf < Hf, observed in the "one-atom-at-a-time" gas-phase chromatography experiments. Thus, currently no theoretical explanation can be found for the experimental observations.

  7. A high throughput approach to quantify protein adsorption on combinatorial metal/metal oxide surfaces using electron microprobe and spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, T.; Lohstreter, L.; Filiaggi, M. J.; Bai, Zhijun; Dahn, J. R.

    2008-09-01

    Although metallic biomaterials are widely used, systematic studies of protein adsorption onto such materials are generally lacking. Combinatorial binary films of Al 1-xTi x and Al 1-xNb x (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 1) and corresponding pure element films were produced on glass substrates using a unique magnetron sputtering technique. Fibrinogen and albumin adsorption amounts were measured by wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) equipment, both high throughput techniques with automated motion stage capabilities. X-ray diffraction revealed that the binary films have crystalline phases present near the ends of the compositional gradient with an amorphous region throughout the interior of the gradient. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy provided the surface chemistry along the binary films and showed that Al 2O 3 preferentially formed at the surface. Protein adsorption onto these films was found to be closely correlated to the alumina surface fraction, with high alumina content at the surface leading to low amounts of adsorbed fibrinogen and albumin. Protein adsorption amounts obtained with WDS and SE were in excellent agreement for all films. This suggests that this combinatorial materials approach combined with these state-of-the-art, automated high throughput instruments provides a novel way to accurately monitor protein adsorption taking place at the surfaces of these metal/metal oxide materials.

  8. Nano-Bio Interactions of Porous and Nonporous Silica Nanoparticles of Varied Surface Chemistry: A Structural, Kinetic, and Thermodynamic Study of Protein Adsorption from RPMI Culture Medium.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Sean E; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A; Grassian, Vicki H; Larsen, Sarah C

    2016-01-26

    Understanding complex chemical changes that take place at nano-bio interfaces is of great concern for being able to sustainably implement nanomaterials in key applications such as drug delivery, imaging, and environmental remediation. Typical in vitro assays use cell viability as a proxy to understanding nanotoxicity but often neglect how the nanomaterial surface can be altered by adsorption of solution-phase components in the medium. Protein coronas form on the nanomaterial surface when incubated in proteinaceous solutions. Herein, we apply a broad array of techniques to characterize and quantify protein corona formation on silica nanoparticle surfaces. The porosity and surface chemistry of the silica nanoparticles have been systematically varied. Using spectroscopic tools such as FTIR and circular dichroism, structural changes and kinetic processes involved in protein adsorption were evaluated. Additionally, by implementing thermogravimetric analysis, quantitative protein adsorption measurements allowed for the direct comparison between samples. Taken together, these measurements enabled the extraction of useful chemical information on protein binding onto nanoparticles in solution. Overall, we demonstrate that small alkylamines can increase protein adsorption and that even large polymeric molecules such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) cannot prevent protein adsorption in these systems. The implications of these results as they relate to further understanding nano-bio interactions are discussed.

  9. About Maggie's Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmens, Carol E.

    1982-01-01

    Describes "Maggie's Place," the library computer system of the Pikes Peak Library District, Colorado Springs, Colorado, noting its use as an electronic card catalog and community information file, accessibility by home users and library users, and terminal considerations. (EJS)

  10. Gateway to New Atlantis Attraction Takes Shape

    NASA Video Gallery

    The home of space shuttle Atlantis continues taking shape at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Crews placed the nose cone atop the second of a replica pair of solid rocket boosters. A life-...

  11. Separation of chiral nanotubes with an opposite handedness by chiral oligopeptide adsorption: A molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2015-12-18

    The separation of enantiomeric chiral nanotubes that can form non-covalent complexes with an unlike stability upon adsorption of chiral molecules is a process of potential interest in different fields and applications. Using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we report in this paper a theoretical study of the adsorption and denaturation of an oligopeptide formed by 16 chiral amino acids having a helical structure in the native state on both the inner and the outer surface of the chiral (10, 20) and (20, 10) single-walled carbon nanotubes having an opposite handedness, and of the armchair (16, 16) nanotube with a similar diameter for comparison. In the final adsorbed state, the oligopeptide loses in all cases its native helical conformation, assuming elongated geometries that maximize its contact with the surface through all the 16 amino acids. We find that the complexes formed by the two chiral nanotubes and the chosen oligopeptide have a strongly unlike stability both when adsorption takes place on the outer convex surface of the nanotube, and when it occurs on the inner concave surface. Thus, our molecular simulations indicate that separation of chiral, enantiomeric carbon nanotubes for instance by chromatographic methods can indeed be carried out using oligopeptides of a sufficient length.

  12. Scanning probe microscopy studies on the adsorption of selected molecular dyes on titania

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Lukasz; Olszowski, Piotr; Jöhr, Res; Hinaut, Antoine; Glatzel, Thilo; Such, Bartosz; Meyer, Ernst; Szymonski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide, or titania, sensitized with organic dyes is a very attractive platform for photovoltaic applications. In this context, the knowledge of properties of the titania–sensitizer junction is essential for designing efficient devices. Consequently, studies on the adsorption of organic dyes on titania surfaces and on the influence of the adsorption geometry on the energy level alignment between the substrate and an organic adsorbate are necessary. The method of choice for investigating the local environment of a single dye molecule is high-resolution scanning probe microscopy. Microscopic results combined with the outcome of common spectroscopic methods provide a better understanding of the mechanism taking place at the titania–sensitizer interface. In the following paper, we review the recent scanning probe microscopic research of a certain group of molecular assemblies on rutile titania surfaces as it pertains to dye-sensitized solar cell applications. We focus on experiments on adsorption of three types of prototypical dye molecules, i.e., perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), phtalocyanines and porphyrins. Two interesting heteromolecular systems comprising molecules that are aligned with the given review are discussed as well. PMID:28144513

  13. Adsorption of Paraquat dichloride from aqueous solution by activated carbon derived from used tires.

    PubMed

    Hamadi, Nadhem K; Sri Swaminathan; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2004-08-09

    The removal of pesticide from wastewater under different batch experimental conditions, using a car tire derived activated carbon was investigated. The pesticide utilized in the study was Paraquat dichloride (1,1-dimethyl-4,4-bipyridyl dichloride), which is a well known herbicide. The adsorbent was produced from the pyrolysis and activation of used tires (TAC). The performances of this adsorbent and a commercial activated carbon F300 (CAC) have been compared. It was determined that the adsorption of Paraquat was weakly pH dependent. The effects of particle size, carbon dosage, temperature and the initial concentration of the Paraquat were studied. Further experiments investigating the regeneration capabilities of the tire-supplied carbon were performed. The regenerated carbons that were washed with basic pH solution were found to have the best sorption capacity recovery. It was found that the rate of sorption of Paraquat onto the carbon is very fast with almost 90% of the maximum possible adsorption taking place in the first 5 min. Nevertheless, the batch sorption kinetics was fitted for a first-order reversible reaction, a pseudo-first-order reaction and a pseudo-second-order reaction. The pseudo-second-order chemical reaction model appears to provide the best correlation. The applicability of the Langmuir isotherm for the present system has been evaluated at different temperatures. The isotherms show that the sorption capacity of CAC decreases with temperature and the dominant mechanism of CAC adsorption is physical sorption.

  14. Biodegradation of persistent organics can overcome adsorption-desorption hysteresis in biological activated carbon systems.

    PubMed

    Abromaitis, V; Racys, V; van der Marel, P; Meulepas, R J W

    2016-04-01

    In Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) systems, persistent organic pollutants can be removed through a combination of adsorption, desorption and biodegradation. These processes might be affected by the presence of other organics, especially by the more abundant easily-biodegradable organics, like acetate. In this research these relations are quantified for the removal of the persistent pharmaceutical metoprolol. Acetate did not affect the adsorption and desorption of metoprolol, but it did greatly enhance the metoprolol biodegradation. At least part of the BAC biomass growing on acetate was also able to metabolise metoprolol, although metoprolol was only converted after the acetate was depleted. The presence of easily-degradable organics like acetate in the feeding water is therefore beneficial for the removal of metoprolol in BAC systems. The isotherms obtained from metoprolol adsorption and desorption experiments showed that BAC systems are subject to hysteresis; for AC bioregeneration to take place the microbial biomass has to reduce the concentration at the AC-biomass interface 2.7 times compared to the concentration at which the carbon was being loaded. However, given the threshold concentration of the MET degrading microorganisms (<0.08 μg/L) versus the average influent concentration (1.3 μg/L), bioregeneration is feasible.

  15. Gas adsorption, energetics and electronic properties of boron- and nitrogen-doped bilayer graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Saito, Susumu

    2016-10-01

    We study stabilities and electronic properties of several environmental polluting or toxic gas molecules (CO, CO2, NO, and NO2) adsorbed on B and N atoms in bilayer graphene using first-principles electronic-structure calculations. We find that NO and NO2 molecules can be bound chemically on B-doped bilayer graphene with large adsorption energies, while CO and CO2 molecules are not adsorbed chemically on B-doped one. In the case of the N-doped graphene, all four gases do not bind with chemical bonds but adsorb rather physically with small adsorption energies at long distances between gases and graphene. The adsorptions of NO and NO2 molecules on B-doped bilayer graphene induce the acceptor states above the Fermi energy, and we also find that the charge transfer takes place when the NO and the NO2 molecules are adsorbed. Thereby, the B-doped bilayer graphene is expected to be useful for NO and NO2 gas sensor materials.

  16. Scanning probe microscopy studies on the adsorption of selected molecular dyes on titania.

    PubMed

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S; Zajac, Lukasz; Olszowski, Piotr; Jöhr, Res; Hinaut, Antoine; Glatzel, Thilo; Such, Bartosz; Meyer, Ernst; Szymonski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide, or titania, sensitized with organic dyes is a very attractive platform for photovoltaic applications. In this context, the knowledge of properties of the titania-sensitizer junction is essential for designing efficient devices. Consequently, studies on the adsorption of organic dyes on titania surfaces and on the influence of the adsorption geometry on the energy level alignment between the substrate and an organic adsorbate are necessary. The method of choice for investigating the local environment of a single dye molecule is high-resolution scanning probe microscopy. Microscopic results combined with the outcome of common spectroscopic methods provide a better understanding of the mechanism taking place at the titania-sensitizer interface. In the following paper, we review the recent scanning probe microscopic research of a certain group of molecular assemblies on rutile titania surfaces as it pertains to dye-sensitized solar cell applications. We focus on experiments on adsorption of three types of prototypical dye molecules, i.e., perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), phtalocyanines and porphyrins. Two interesting heteromolecular systems comprising molecules that are aligned with the given review are discussed as well.

  17. Artist Place Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Art history can be a little dry at times, but the author is always trying to incorporate new ways of teaching it. In this article, she describes a project in which students were to create a place setting out of clay that had to be unified through a famous artist's style. This place setting had to consist of at least five pieces (dinner plate, cup…

  18. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  19. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  20. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  1. Improved selective cholesterol adsorption by molecularly imprinted poly(methacrylic acid)/silica (PMAA-SiO₂) hybrid material synthesized with different molar ratios.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Débora Nobile; Pires, Igor Matheus Ruiz; Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira

    2014-11-01

    The present paper describes the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer - poly(methacrylic acid)/silica and reports its performance feasibility with desired adsorption capacity and selectivity for cholesterol extraction. Two imprinted hybrid materials were synthesized at different methacrylic acid (MAA)/tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) molar ratios (6:1 and 1:5) and characterized by FT-IR, TGA, SEM and textural data. Cholesterol adsorption on hybrid materials took place preferably in apolar solvent medium, especially in chloroform. From the kinetic data, the equilibrium time was reached quickly, being 12 and 20 min for the polymers synthesized at MAA/TEOS molar ratio of 6:1 and 1:5, respectively. The pseudo-second-order model provided the best fit for cholesterol adsorption on polymers, confirming the chemical nature of the adsorption process, while the dual-site Langmuir-Freundlich equation presented the best fit to the experimental data, suggesting the existence of two kinds of adsorption sites on both polymers. The maximum adsorption capacities obtained for the polymers synthesized at MAA/TEOS molar ratios of 6:1 and 1:5 were found to be 214.8 and 166.4 mg g(-1), respectively. The results from isotherm data also indicated higher adsorption capacity for both imprinted polymers regarding to corresponding non-imprinted polymers. Nevertheless, taking into account the retention parameters and selectivity of cholesterol in the presence of structurally analogue compounds (5-α-cholestane and 7-dehydrocholesterol), it was observed that the polymer synthesized at the MAA/TEOS molar ratio of 6:1 was much more selective for cholesterol than the one prepared at the ratio of 1:5, thus suggesting that selective binding sites ascribed to the carboxyl group from MAA play a central role in the imprinting effect created on MIP.

  2. Take Steps Toward a Healthier Life | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is promoting wellness by encouraging individuals to take the stairs. In an effort to increase participation in this program, NIH has teamed up with Occupational Health Services (OHS). OHS is placing NIH-sponsored “Take the Stairs” stickers on stair entrances, stair exits, and elevators.

  3. SToPV: A Five Minute Assessment of Place Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Jeanette

    2011-01-01

    Place value underpins much of what people do in number. In this article, the author describes some simple tasks that may be used to assess students' understanding of place value. This set of tasks, the Six Tasks of Place Value (SToPV), takes five minutes to administer and can give direct insight into a student's understanding of the number system…

  4. Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.

    2001-01-01

    Closing the oxygen loop in an air revitalization system based on four-bed molecular sieve and Sabatier reactor technology requires a vacuum pump-compressor that can take the low-pressure CO, from the 4BMS and compress and store for use by a Sabatier reactor. NASA Ames Research Center proposed a solid-state temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compressor that appears to meet performance requirements, be quiet and reliable, and consume less power than a comparable mechanical compressor/accumulator combination. Under this task, TSA compressor technology is being advanced through development of a complete prototype system. A liquid-cooled TSA compressor has been partially tested, and the rest of the system is being fabricated. An air-cooled TSA compressor is also being designed.

  5. The Right Place, The Right Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, William G.; Irish, Charles M.

    2006-01-01

    Superintendents are in the right place at the right time to take advantage of a golden opportunity to reverse a trend that threatens the nation's schools and communities. They are now uniquely positioned to stop the retreat of good-hearted, well-intentioned citizens from public life. In this article, the authors present perpetual traps that…

  6. The Laboratory: A Place to Investigate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, John W., Ed.

    The contributors to this volume take the position that the undergraduate biology laboratory should be a place where students conduct their own investigations rather than follow recipes supplied by the instructor. The first part of the collection discusses the need for this reform, with special consideration given to both majors and nonmajors. A…

  7. Finding Place in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Chris

    2011-01-01

    As a society, we are less and less comfortable in our localities. We have embraced the idea of a globalized placelessness, where everything, everywhere, resonates with a sameness. What do we lose, educationally and in society at large, when we reduce our inhabited places to those components that provide material wealth alone? If students and…

  8. Narrative in Unexpected Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Proposes to return narrative to a more central place in historical writing. Answers critics who complain that history texts do not properly emphasize democracy and citizenship. Suggests using narrative to tell stories students will remember while including a major theme or conclusion. Warns against overuse, wordiness, and sacrifice of human…

  9. Creativity: Does Place Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Finbarr

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that creativity has the greatest potential to flourish if a learning environment is embedded within a community that emphasises a deep sense of place. Yet in a globalised world, rootedness is often regarded as antithetical to creativity. But far from representing dead artefacts that are anti-modern and non-economic, culture and…

  10. The Pedagogy of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludick, Pat

    2001-01-01

    Examines adolescents' study of place from the perspective of urban and rural Montessori programs. Adolescents are invited into a study of the city or town or even a neighborhood surrounding the school as an opportunity to experience their own community and society. Highlights potential activities and areas for research. (KB)

  11. Designing Places for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Anne, Ed.

    This book presents information about the condition of schools around the United States. It also describes the link between architecture and academic success and offers suggestions for improving the design of existing and future school buildings. Eleven articles look at schools as places of deep meaning and show how that view can alter approaches…

  12. The Value of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentzau, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    This commentary seeks to expand the dialogue on place-based science education presented in Katie Lynn Brkich's article, where the connections fifth grade students make between their formal earth science curriculum and their lived experiences are highlighted. The disconnect between the curriculum the students are offered and their immediate…

  13. Universities Are Funny Places!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawless, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Universities are funny places. They have a strong sense of hierarchy and rank. They have an amazing disparity in salary levels and status between staff, are class conscious, and are run by a large bureaucracy that oils and keeps the machinery going. They operate as educational institutions and yet also are entrepreneurial, marketing themselves in…

  14. Teaching With Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Designed for social studies educators, this theme issue presents 11 articles about historic places that feature a variety of ideas for elementary and secondary lesson plans, curricula, and program development. The articles are: (1) "Where did History Happen?" (Beth M. Boland); (2) "Creating a Partnership" (Carol D. Shull); (3)…

  15. Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for molsidomine adsorption: Thermodynamic study

    SciTech Connect

    Alyoshina, Nonna A.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2013-09-15

    A series of unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials was prepared. The unmodified mesoporous silica was synthesized via sol–gel synthesis in the presence of D-glucose as pore-forming agent. The functionalized by phenyl, aminopropyl and mercaptopropyl groups silica materials were prepared via grafting. The fabricated adsorbent materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and elemental analysis methods. Then their adsorption properties for mesoionic dug molsidomine were investigated at 290–313 K and physiological pH value. Thermodynamic parameters of molsidomine adsorption on the synthesized materials have been calculated. The obtained results showed that the adsorption process of molsidomine on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. The unmodified and mercaptopropyl modified silica materials exhibit significantly higher adsorption capacities and energies for molsidomine than the aminopropyl modified sample. The effects are discussed from the viewpoint of nature of specific interactions responsible for the adsorption. - Graphical abstract: Comparative analysis of the thermodynamic characteristics of molsidomine adsorption showed that the adsorption process on mesoporous silica materials is controlled by chemical nature of surface functional groups. Molsidomine adsorption on the phenyl modified silica is the most quantitatively and energetically favorable. Taking into account ambiguous nature of mesoionic compounds, it was found that molsidomine is rather aromatic than dipolar. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Unmodified and organically modified mesoporous silica materials were prepared. • Molsidomine adsorption on the silica materials was studied. • Phenyl modified silica shows the highest adsorption capacity and favorable energy. • Molsidomine exhibits the lowest affinity to aminopropyl modified silica.

  16. Mechanism of amitriptyline adsorption on Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2).

    PubMed

    Chang, Po-Hsiang; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Li, Zhaohui; Kuo, Chung-Yih; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Chen, Wan-Ru; Lv, Guocheng

    2014-07-30

    The uptake of amitriptyline (AMI) from aqueous environment by Ca-montmorillonite (SAz-2) was studied in a batch system under different physicochemical conditions. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. The AMI adsorption on SAz-2 obeyed the Langmuir isotherm with a capacity of 330mg/g (1.05mmol/g) at pH 6-7. The adsorption kinetics was fast, almost reaching equilibrium in 2h, and followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Desorption of exchangeable cations correlated with the AMI adsorption well, indicating that cation exchange was the major mechanism. X-ray diffraction patterns showing significant expansions of the d001 spacing and characteristic FTIR band shifts toward higher frequencies after AMI adsorption onto SAz-2 indicated that the adsorbed AMI molecules were intercalated into the interlayers of the mineral. Thermodynamic parameters based on partitioning coefficients suggested that the AMI adsorption was an endothermic physisorption at high adsorption levels. At low and higher AMI adsorption levels, the intercalated AMI molecules take a horizontal monolayer and bilayer conformation, respectively. The higher adsorption capacity suggested that SAz-2 could be a good candidate to remove AMI from wastewater and would be an important environmental sink for the fate and transport of AMI in soils and groundwater.

  17. The use of waste mussel shells for the adsorption of dyes and heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Chrysi A.; Krey, Grigorios; Stamatis, Nikolaos; Kallaniotis, Argyris

    2016-04-01

    Mussel culture is very important sector of the Greek agricultural economy. The majority of mussel culture activities take place in the area of Central Macedonia, Greece, 60% of total mussel production in Greece producing almost 12 tons of waste mussels shells on a daily basis. Currently there is no legislation concerning the disposal of mussel shells. In the present study the waste shells were used for the removal of dyes and heavy metals from aqueous solutions while powdered mussel shells were added in activated sludge processes for the removal of hexavalent chromium. Mussel shells were cleaned, dried and then crushed in order to form a powder. Powdered mussels shells were used in standard adsorption experiments for the removal of methylene blue and methyl red as well as for the removal of Cr (VI), Cd and Cu. Moreover the powdered mussel shells were added in laboratory scale activated sludge reactors treating synthetic wastewater with hexavalent chromium, in order investigate the effects in activated sludge processes and their potential attribution to the removal of hexavalent chromium. Adsorption experiments indicated almost 100% color removal, while adsorption was directly proportional to the amount of powdered mussel shells added in each case. The isotherms calculated for the case of methylene blue indicated similar adsorption capacity and properties to those of the commercially available activated carbon SAE 2, Norit. High removal efficiencies were observed for the metals, especially in the case of chromium and copper. The addition of powdered mussel shells in the activated sludge processes enhanced the removal of chromium and phosphorus, while enabled the formation of heavier activated sludge flocs and thus enhanced the settling properties of the activated sludge.

  18. Adsorption of star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.; Joanny, J. F.

    1991-06-01

    The adsorption of star polymers on a flat solid surface is analyzed by means of scalling arguments based on the Daoud-Cotton blob model. For the adsorption of a single star, consisting of f arms comprising each N monomers, we distinguish three regimes determined by the adsorption energy of a monomer at the surface, δ kT. 1) Strong adsorption characterized by the full adsorption of all arms occurs for δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) A “Sombrero” like structure comprising f_ads fully adsorbed arms and f{-}f_ads free arms is obtained for (f/N)^{3/5}> δ > f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. 3) Weakly adsorbed stars retain, essentially, the structure of a free star. This regime occurs for δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. The weakly adsorbed structure may also exist as a metastable state if δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}. Nous étudions l'adsorption de polymères en étoile sur une surface solide en utilisant une approche de lois d'échelles basée sur le modèle de blobs de Daoud et Cotton. Pour une étoile formée de f bras contenant chacun N monomères, nous distinguons trois régimes suivant la valeur de l'énergie d'adsorption d'un monomère sur la surface δ kT. 1) L'adsorption forte caractérisée par une adsorption complète de tous les bras se produit lorsque δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) Une structure en “sombrero” avec f_ads bras adsorbés et f{-}f_ads bras libres est obtenue si f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}δ < (f/N)^{3/5}. 3) Les étoiles faiblement adsorbées gardent une structure très similaire à celle des étoiles libres en solution. Ce régime existe si δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. La structure correspondant aux étoiles faiblement adsorbées peut aussi exister comme un état métastable si δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}.

  19. Study of polyethyleneimine- and amidoxime-functionalized hybrid biomass of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis for adsorption of uranium (VI) ion.

    PubMed

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Akbulut, Aydin; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the potential application of the polyethyleneimine- (PEI) and amidoxime-modified Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis biomasses for the removal of uranium ion in batch mode using the native biomass as a control system. The uranium ion adsorption was also characterized by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra, zeta potential analysis, and surface area measurement studies. The effects of pH, biomass amount, contact time, initial uranium ion concentration, and ionic strength were evaluated by using native and modified algal biomass preparations. The uranium ion removal was rapid, with more than 70% of total adsorption taking place in 40 min, and equilibrium was established within 60 min. From the experimental data, it was found that the amount of adsorption uranium ion on the algal preparations decreased in the following series: amidoxime-modified algal biomass > PEI-modified algal biomass > native algal biomass. Maximum adsorption capacities of amidoxime- and PEI-modified, and native algal biomasses were found to be 366.8, 279.5, and 194.6 mg/g, respectively, in batchwise studies. The adsorption rate of U(VI) ion by amidoxime-modified algal biomass was higher than those of the native and PEI-modified counterparts. The adsorption processes on all the algal biomass preparations followed by the Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) and Temkin isotherms and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The thermodynamic parameters were determined at four different temperatures (i.e., 15, 25, 35, and 45 °C) using the thermodynamics constant of the Temkin isotherm model. The ΔH° and ΔG° values of U(VI) ion adsorption on algal preparations show endothermic heat of adsorption; higher temperatures favor the process. The native and modified algal biomass preparations were regenerated using 10 mM HNO3. These results show that amidoxime-modified algal biomass can be a potential candidate for effective removal of U(VI) ion from

  20. Space Place Prime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Austin J.; Novati, Alexander; Fisher, Diane K.; Leon, Nancy J.; Netting, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Space Place Prime is public engagement and education software for use on iPad. It targets a multi-generational audience with news, images, videos, and educational articles from the Space Place Web site and other NASA sources. New content is downloaded daily (or whenever the user accesses the app) via the wireless connection. In addition to the Space Place Web site, several NASA RSS feeds are tapped to provide new content. Content is retained for the previous several days, or some number of editions of each feed. All content is controlled on the server side, so features about the latest news, or changes to any content, can be made without updating the app in the Apple Store. It gathers many popular NASA features into one app. The interface is a boundless, slidable- in-any-direction grid of images, unique for each feature, and iconized as image, video, or article. A tap opens the feature. An alternate list mode presents menus of images, videos, and articles separately. Favorites can be tagged for permanent archive. Face - book, Twitter, and e-mail connections make any feature shareable.

  1. Every Breath You Take

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As a result of SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) work for Johnson Space Center, KSE, Inc., developed a photocatalytic Adsorption-Integrated-Reaction (AIR) air purification process originally used for air revitalization in life support systems during extended space operations. A unit has been purchased by a commercial customer for control of emissions of airborne chlorinated hydrocarbons at a Superfund site.

  2. Study and numerical solution of a generalized mathematical model of isothermal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Komissarov, Yu.A.; Vetokhin, V.N.; Tsenev, V.A.; Gordeeva, E.L.

    1995-06-01

    A generalized mathematical model of isothermal adsorption that takes into account mass transfer on the surface of a particle, diffusion in micro- and macropores, and dispersion along the length of the apparatus is considered The parameters {lambda} and {var_phi}{sup 2} determine the dominating effect of any of the mass transfer mechanisms of the adsorption process. A numerical algorithm for solving the generalized adsorption model is suggested.

  3. In-place HEPA filter penetration test

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Elliott, J.

    1997-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of conducting penetration tests on high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters as installed in nuclear ventilation systems. The in-place penetration test, which is designed to yield equivalent penetration measurements as the standard DOP efficiency test, is based on measuring the aerosol penetration of the filter installation as a function of particle size using a portable laser particle counter. This in-place penetration test is compared to the current in-place leak test using light scattering photometers for single HEPA filter installations and for HEPA filter plenums using the shroud method. Test results show the in-place penetration test is more sensitive than the in-place leak test, has a similar operating procedure, but takes longer to conduct. Additional tests are required to confirm that the in-place penetration test yields identical results as the standard dioctyl phthalate (DOP) penetration test for HEPA filters with controlled leaks in the filter and gasket and duct by-pass leaks. Further development of the procedure is also required to reduce the test time before the in-place penetration test is practical. 14 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  5. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  6. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  7. Surface adsorption of lattice HP proteins: Thermodynamics and structural transitions using Wang-Landau sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying Wai; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2012-12-01

    Wang-Landau sampling has been applied to investigate the thermodynamics and structural properties of a lattice hydrophobic-polar heteropolymer (the HP protein model) interacting with an attractive substrate. For simplicity, we consider a short HP sequence consisting of only 36 monomers interacting with a substrate which attracts all monomers in the sequence. The conformational “phase transitions” have been identified by a canonical analysis of the specific heat and suitable structural observables. Three major “transitions”, namely, adsorption, hydrophobic core formation and “flattening” of adsorbed structures, are observed. Depending on the surface attractive strength relative to the intra-protein attraction among the H monomers, these processes take place in different sequences upon cooling.

  8. Wang-Landau sampling of protein adsorption using the HP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying-Wai; Landau, D. P.; Wuest, T.

    2011-03-01

    We have applied Wang-Landau sampling with appropriate trial moves to investigate the thermodynamics and structural properties of lattice hydrophobic-polar heteropolymers (commonly known as the HP protein model) interacting with an attractive substrate. We estimate the density of states of the system, from which the partition function and all thermodynamic quantities, e.g. specific heat, radius of gyration, end-to-end distance and surface contacts, can be calculated. ``Transitions'' between ``phases'' are then identified based on a comprehensive analysis of these observables. Generally speaking, three transition processes are observed: adsorption-desorption, collapse (formation of hydrophobic core), and ``flattening'' of adsorbed structures. These have been confirmed by ``snapshots'' of typical states of the system. Depending on the surface attractive strength, these transitions take place in different order upon cooling, giving rise to different thermodynamic behaviors. Such dependence of folding hierarchy on the surface attraction is found to be universal for different HP sequences. Research supported by NSF.

  9. Alternative mechanism for bacteriophage adsorption to the motile bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C.; Viollier, Patrick H.; Ely, Bert; Poindexter, Jeanne S.; Georgieva, Maria; Jensen, Grant J.; Wright, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    2D and 3D cryo-electron microscopy, together with adsorption kinetics assays of ϕCb13 and ϕCbK phage-infected Caulobacter crescentus, provides insight into the mechanisms of infection. ϕCb13 and ϕCbK actively interact with the flagellum and subsequently attach to receptors on the cell pole. We present evidence that the first interaction of the phage with the bacterial flagellum takes place through a filament on the phage head. This contact with the flagellum facilitates concentration of phage particles around the receptor (i.e., the pilus portals) on the bacterial cell surface, thereby increasing the likelihood of infection. Phage head filaments have not been well characterized and their function is described here. Phage head filaments may systematically underlie the initial interactions of phages with their hosts in other systems and possibly represent a widespread mechanism of efficient phage propagation. PMID:21613567

  10. Taking multiple medicines safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000883.htm Taking multiple medicines safely To use the sharing features on this ... directed. Why you may Need More Than one Medicine You may take more than one medicine to ...

  11. Phenolic resin-based porous carbons for adsorption and energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Nilantha P.

    high Cu2+ ion adsorption capacities. Next, Chapter 5 is devoted to carbon materials for supercapacitors. There are mainly two types of electrochemical capacitors namely EDLC and pseudocapacitors. In EDLC, the energy is stored due to electrochemical attraction between electrode and electrolyte interface. To store more ionic charges on to the carbon electrode, it is essential to have high surface area carbon materials. In the case of pseudocapacitors, the energy is stored due to the redox reaction taking place at the electrode and electrolyte interface. Moreover, conductivity of the electrode is also important for the construction of superior electrode materials. To address these vital issues, the electrode materials has been prepared with special emphasis on the enhancement of their surface area to attract more charges at the electrode-electrolyte interface, introducing graphitic moieties to the carbon matrix to improve the conductivity and doping carbons with metal/heteroatoms to improve both capacitance through pseudocapacitive and conductivity.

  12. Role of [FeOx(OH)y] surface sites on the adsorption of β-lactamic antibiotics on Al2O3 supported Fe oxide.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Paula S; Medeiros, Tayline P V; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2016-11-05

    In this work, [FeOx(OH)y]/Al2O3 composites with different Fe oxyhydroxy contents, i.e. 10, 20 and 50wt% treated at 150, 200, 300 and 450°C were investigated as adsorbents of β-lactamic antibiotics, i.e. cephalexin, ceftriaxone and especially amoxicillin, from aqueous solutions. The obtained results showed that the nature of the surface Fe(3+) species play a fundamental role on the adsorption process. The most efficient adsorption was obtained for the sample 150Fe50A (50% [FeOx(OH)y] supported in Al2O3 treated at 150°C) whereas the thermal treatment at higher temperatures caused a strong decrease on the adsorption capacity. Mössbauer, XRD, FTIR, Raman, TG-MS, SEM, CHN and BET of the composite 150Fe50A suggested an approximate composition of FeO0.65(OH)1.7 whereas at 450°C strong dehydroxylation process takes place to form FeO1.4(OH)0.21. These results combined with competitive adsorption using amoxicillin mixed with phosphate or H2O2 suggest that the antibiotic molecules adsorb by complexation on surface sites likely based on FeOx(OH)y by the replacement of the labile OH ligands.

  13. Place memory in crickets

    PubMed Central

    Wessnitzer, Jan; Mangan, Michael; Webb, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Certain insect species are known to relocate nest or food sites using landmarks, but the generality of this capability among insects, and whether insect place memory can be used in novel task settings, is not known. We tested the ability of crickets to use surrounding visual cues to relocate an invisible target in an analogue of the Morris water maze, a standard paradigm for spatial memory tests on rodents. Adult female Gryllus bimaculatus were released into an arena with a floor heated to an aversive temperature, with one hidden cool spot. Over 10 trials, the time taken to find the cool spot decreased significantly. The best performance was obtained when a natural scene was provided on the arena walls. Animals can relocate the position from novel starting points. When the scene is rotated, they preferentially approach the fictive target position corresponding to the rotation. We note that this navigational capability does not necessarily imply the animal has an internal spatial representation. PMID:18230590

  14. Study of the adsorption and electroadsorption process of Cu (II) ions within thermally and chemically modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Macías-García, A; Gómez Corzo, M; Alfaro Domínguez, M; Alexandre Franco, M; Martínez Naharro, J

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this work is to modify the porous texture and superficial groups of a commercial activated carbon through chemical and thermal treatment and subsequently study the kinetics of adsorption and electroadsorption of Cu (II) ion for these carbons. Samples of three activated carbons were used. These were a commercial activated carbon, commercial activated carbon modified thermically (C-N2-900) and finally commercial activated carbon modified chemically C-SO2-H2S-200. The activated carbons were characterized chemically and texturally and the electrical conductivity of them determined. Different kinetic models were applied. The kinetics of the adsorption and electroadsorption process of the Cu (II) ion fits a pseudo second order model and the most likely mechanism takes place in two stages. A first step through transfer of the metal mass through the boundary layer of the adsorbent and distribution of the Cu (II) on the external surface of the activated carbon and a second step that represents intraparticle diffusion and joining of the Cu (II) with the active centres of the activated carbon. Finally, the kinetics of the adsorption process are faster than the kinetics of the electroadsorption but the percentage of the Cu (II) ion retained is much higher in the electroadsorption process.

  15. Biodegradation or simple adsorption to the support material? Development of a simple, fast and low-cost technique.

    PubMed

    Maurício, R; Amaral, L; Santos Coelho, P; Santana, F

    2013-12-01

    Biofilms are present in several areas and are studied in microbiology, medical sciences, biology and, of course, sanitary engineering. Biofilms are used for the treatment of municipal wastewater, and their application was even before the invention of the activated sludge process. The main objective of this work was to develop a simple, fast and low-cost technique to evaluate the nature of the first decay in the concentration of an organic compound in the presence of a solid material. Though simple, the technique developed has allowed the clarification of whether the initial concentration decay is due to adsorption to the support material or a result of biodegradation. The results show that, with two different support materials, adsorption does not take place, and the biodegradation processes are responsible for the first decay in the organic concentration. The technique used offers a fast and low-cost way of studying the existence of adsorption. Two feed concentration solutions and two different support materials were used.

  16. β-Cristobalite (001) surface as 4-formaminoantipyrine adsorbent: First principle study of the effect on adsorption of surface modification.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, S; Compañy, A Díaz; Brizuela, G; Juan, A

    2016-12-01

    Silica based materials find applications as excipients and particularly as drug delivery agents for pharmaceutical drugs. Their performance can be crucially affected by surface treatments, as it can modify the adsorption (and release) of these formulations. The role of surface modification on the features of 4-formaminoantipyrine (FAA) adsorbed on β-cristobalite (001) surface is studied by means of simulations based on the Density Functional Theory (DFT). Starting from the results of FAA in interaction with a dehydroxylated surface; a fully hydroxylated surface and a functionalized surface with benzalkonium chloride (BC) surfactant have been added to study the configurational landscape. Calculations suggest that the trend for FAA preferential adsorption on silica surfaces is: dehydroxylated>hydroxylated>BC-functionalized. The potential for hydrogen bonding causes the main contribution to the bonding while dispersion forces present an additional contribution independently of whether the drug is hydrogen-bonded or BC-bonded to the surface. Adsorption takes mainly place through nitrogen atoms in the heterocyclic ring, the carbonyl and amine functional groups. Associated mode's shifts and concurrent changes in bond length are also observed showing accordance between electronic and geometrical structure results. BC surfactant reduces the number of formed H-bonds and lowers the attractive molecule-surface interaction being it useful to prevent particle agglomeration and could favor drug release in therapies that requires faster but controlled delivery.

  17. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  18. Taking centre stage...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    HAMLET (Highly Automated Multimedia Light Enhanced Theatre) was the star performance at the recent finals of the `Young Engineer for Britain' competition, held at the Commonwealth Institute in London. This state-of-the-art computer-controlled theatre lighting system won the title `Young Engineers for Britain 1998' for David Kelnar, Jonathan Scott, Ramsay Waller and John Wyllie (all aged 16) from Merchiston Castle School, Edinburgh. HAMLET replaces conventional manually-operated controls with a special computer program, and should find use in the thousands of small theatres, schools and amateur drama productions that operate with limited resources and without specialist expertise. The four students received a £2500 prize between them, along with £2500 for their school, and in addition they were invited to spend a special day with the Royal Engineers. A project designed to improve car locking systems enabled Ian Robinson of Durham University to take the `Working in industry award' worth £1000. He was also given the opportunity of a day at sea with the Royal Navy. Other prizewinners with their projects included: Jun Baba of Bloxham School, Banbury (a cardboard armchair which converts into a desk and chair); Kobika Sritharan and Gemma Hancock, Bancroft's School, Essex (a rain warning system for a washing line); and Alistair Clarke, Sam James and Ruth Jenkins, Bishop of Llandaff High School, Cardiff (a mechanism to open and close the retractable roof of the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff). The two principal national sponsors of the competition, which is organized by the Engineering Council, are Lloyd's Register and GEC. Industrial companies, professional engineering institutions and educational bodies also provided national and regional prizes and support. During this year's finals, various additional activities took place, allowing the students to surf the Internet and navigate individual engineering websites on a network of computers. They also visited the

  19. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  20. Creating Sacred Places for Children in Grades 4-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian children in grades 4-6 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  1. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 7&8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 7-8 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  2. Creating Sacred Places for Students in Grades 9-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sandra J.

    This guide attempts to help teachers of American Indian students in grades 9-12 provide a culturally relevant education that takes place in the regular classroom, includes content related to Indian students' lives, makes students proud, expands to other experiences, and enhances learning. Creating sacred places means responding appropriately to…

  3. Remembering Places: Student Reliance on Place in Timed Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Donna

    2009-01-01

    This is the story of a research journey that follows the trail of a novel evaluand--"place." I examine place as mentioned by rising juniors in timed exams. Using a hybridized methodology--the qualitative approach of a hermeneutic dialectic process as described by Guba and Lincoln (1989), and the quantitative evidence of place mention--I query…

  4. Modelling the arsenic (V) and (III) adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, I.; Meghea, A.; Peleanu, I.; Gonzalo, A.; Valiente, M.; Zaharescu, M.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic has gained great notoriety historically for its toxic properties. In aquatic environment, arsenic can exist in several oxidation states, as both inorganic and organometallic species. As (V) is less toxic than As (III). Most research has been directed to the control of arsenic pollution of potable water. Various techniques such as precipitation with iron and aluminium hydroxides, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and adsorption are used for As (V) removal from surface and waste waters. Because of the easy handling of sludge, its free operation and regeneration capability, the adsorption technique has secured a place as one of the advanced methods of arsenic removal. A study of As (III) and As (V) sorption onto some different adsorbents (Fe (III) — iminodiacetate resin, nanocomposite materials, Fe(III) — forager sponge) referring to kinetic considerations and modelling of the process will be presented. All the systems studied are better described by Freundlich-Langmuir isotherm and the rate constant evaluation shows a sub-unitary order for the adsorption process.

  5. Generic transition hierarchies of lattice HP protein adsorption: A Wang-Landau study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying Wai; Landau, D. P.; Wüst, T.

    2012-02-01

    We have applied Wang-Landau sampling with appropriate trial movesootnotetextT. W"ust and D. P. Landau, Phy. Rev. Lett. 102, 178101 (2009). to investigate the thermodynamics and structural properties of the HP lattice protein modelootnotetextK. A. Dill, Biochemistry 24, 1501 (1985). interacting with an attractive substrate. The conformational ``phase transitions'' of several benchmark HP sequences have been identified by a comprehensive canonical analysis of the specific heat and structural observables, e. g. radius of gyration and thermal derivatives of number of surface contacts. Three major ``transitions'': adsorption, hydrophobic core formation, and ``flattening'' of adsorbed structures, are observed. Depending on the surface attractive strength relative to the intra-protein attraction among the H monomers, these processes take place in a different order upon cooling. We identify a small number of generic categories that are sufficient to classify the folding hierarchies for different HP chains consisting of assorted sequences and chain lengths, regardless of the monomer type that the surface attracts. We thus believe that this classification scheme is generally applicable to lattice protein adsorption problems.

  6. Temperature effects of adsorption of C60 molecules on Si(111)-(7×7) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Sarid, Dror

    1994-03-01

    The adsorption of submonolayers C60 molecules on Si(111)-(7×7) surfaces, deposited at room temperature and then annealed to various elevated temperatures, is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. For room temperature adsorption, the C60 molecules were observed to favor bonding to adatom bridge sites within a triangular half cell. After annealing to 600 °C, however, they were found to bond dominantly to adatom or restatom sites. The adsorbate-substrate interaction at room temperature is characterized by charge transfer from the substrate to the molecules. After the annealing process, however, the adsorbates bond covalently to the substrate. It is found that the desorption of the submonolayer adsorbates due to the annealing process is minimal. The surface diffusion of the adsorbates begins when annealing the sample to 700 °C, at which point the initial clustering of the adsorbates takes place. When annealing the sample to 850 °C, the C60 molecules decomposed on the sample surface and reacted with the Si atoms to form SiC islands.

  7. The adsorption of acetylene on rhodium-modified colloidal silver, a surface-enhanced Raman study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feilchenfeld, Hannah; Luckier, Miguel; Efron, Leah; Willner, Bilha

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from molecules adsorbed on rhodium-modified colloidal silver particles is reported for the first time. Deposition of thin layers of metallic rhodium on the silver surface led to fast aggregation of the sol and to modifications of its SERS spectrum. An intense new band, assigned to the RhO stretching vibration of citrate ions bound to rhodium sites, appeared at 530 cm -1 in the Raman spectrum after rhodium addition to the suspension. The spectra of acetylene adsorbed on both unmodified silver particles and silver modified by an overlayer of rhodium indicated that acetylene displaced the citrate ions from their adsorption sites. All acetylene spectra were characterized by weak bands at 1990, 2050 and 2150 cm -1 assigned to σ π-complexes between acetylene and silver, by a silver acetylide peak at 1800 cm -1 and by an intense band at 1550 cm -1 due to C=C containing species formed on the surface. However, on the rhodium-modified colloid an additional band, attributed to acetylene σ π-bound to rhodium sites, was observed at 1910-1920 cm -1. The intensity of the new band was a direct function of the amount of rhodium deposited on the silver. It increased immediately after acetylene adsorption, and later slowly diminished, while simultaneously the 1550 cm -1 peak became more important. This time evolution was ascribed to a reaction taking place on the surface.

  8. Adsorptive stripping voltammetry of antibiotics rifamycin SV and rifampicin at renewable pencil electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kawde, Abdel-Nasser; Temerk, Yassein; Farhan, Nasser

    2014-01-01

    Adsorptive stripping voltammetry of antibiotics of rifamycin SV (RSV) and rifampicin (RIF) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry using a renewable pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The nature of the oxidation process of RSV and RIF taking place at the PGE was characterized. The results show that the determination of highly sensitive oxidation peak current is the basis of a simple, accurate and rapid method for quantification of RSV and RIF in bulk forms, pharmaceutical formulations and biological fluids by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPASV). Factors influencing the trace measurement of RSV and RIF at PGE are assessed. The limits of detection for the determination of RSV and RIF in bulk forms are 6.0 × 10(-8) mol/L and 1.3 × 10(-8) mol/L, respectively. Moreover, the proposed procedure was successfully applied to assay both RSV and RIF in pharmaceutical formulations and in biological fluids. The capability of the proposed procedure for simultaneous assay of antibiotics RSV-isoniazid and RIF-isoniazid was achieved. The statistical analysis and calibration curve data for trace determination of RSV and RIF are reported.

  9. Evaluation of lead(II) immobilization by a vermicompost using adsorption isotherms and IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carrasquero-Durán, Armando; Flores, Iraima

    2009-02-01

    The immobilization of lead ions by a vermicompost with calcite added was evaluated by adsorption isotherms and the results were explained on basis of the pH dependent surface charge and by IR spectroscopy. The results showed maximum adsorption values between 113.6 mg g(-1) (33 degrees C) and 123.5mg g(-1) (50 degrees C). The point of zero net charge (PZC) was 7.5+/-0.1, indicating the presence of a positive surface charge at the pH of batch experiments. The differences in the IR spectra at pH 3.8 and 7.0 in the region from 1800 to 1300 cm(-1), were interpreted on the basis of the carboxyl acid ionization, that reduced the band intensity around 1725 cm(-1), producing signals at 1550 cm(-1) and 1390 cm(-1) of carboxylate groups. Similar changes were detected at pH 3.8 when Pb2+ was present suggesting that the ion complexation takes place by a cationic exchange equilibrium, between the protons and Pb2+ ions.

  10. Computation of Adsorption Energies of Some Interstellar Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sil, Milan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Gorai, Prasanta; Etim, Emmanuel; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption energies of surface species are most crucial for chemical complexity of interstellar grain mantle. Aim of this work is to study the variation of the adsorption energies depending upon the nature of adsorbent. We use silicate and carbonaceous grains for the absorbents. For silicate grains, we use very simple crystalline ones, namely, Enstatite (MgSiO_3)_n, Ferrosilite (FeSiO_3)_n, Forsterite (Mg_2SiO_4)_n and Fayalite (Fe_2SiO_4)_n. We use n=1, 2, 4, 8 to study the variation of adsorption energies with the increase in cluster size. For carbonaceous grain, we use Coronene (polyaromatic hydrocarbon surface). Adsorption energy of all these species are calculated by means of quantum chemical calculation using self consistent density functional theory (DFT). MPWB1K hybrid meta-functional is employed since it has been proven useful to study the systems with weak interactions such as van der Waals interactions. Optimization are also carried out with MPWB1K/6-311g(d) and MPWB1K/6311g(d,p) and a comparison of adsorption energies are discussed for these two different basis sets. We use crystalline structure of the adsorbent. The adsorbate is placed in the different site of the grain with a suitable distance. The energy of adsorption for a species on the grain surface is defined as follows: E_a_d_s = E_s_s - (E_s_u_r_f_a_c_e + E_s_p_e_c_i_e_s), where E_a_d_s is the adsorption energy, E_s_s is the optimized energy for species placed in a suitable distance from the grain surface, E_s_u_r_f_a_c_e and E_s_p_e_c_i_e_s respectively are the optimized energies of the surface and species separately.

  11. Human serum albumin adsorption on TiO2 from single protein solutions and from plasma.

    PubMed

    Sousa, S R; Moradas-Ferreira, P; Saramago, B; Melo, L Viseu; Barbosa, M A

    2004-10-26

    In the present work, the adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) on commercially pure titanium with a titanium oxide layer formed in a H(2)O(2) solution (TiO(2) cp) and on TiO(2) sputtered on Si (TiO(2) sp) was analyzed. Adsorption isotherms, kinetic studies, and work of adhesion determinations were carried out. HSA exchangeability was also evaluated. Surface characterization was performed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and wettability studies. The two TiO(2) surfaces have very distinct roughnesses, the TiO(2) sp having a mean R(a) value 14 times smaller than the one of TiO(2) cp. XPS analysis revealed consistent peaks representative of TiO(2) on sputtered samples as well as on Ti cp substrate after 48 h of H(2)O(2) immersion. Nitrogen was observed as soon as protein was present, while sulfur, present in disulfide bonds in HSA, was observed for concentrations of protein higher than 0.30 mg/mL. The work of adhesion was determined from contact angle measurements. As expected from the surface free energy values, the work of adhesion of HSA solution is higher for the TiO(2) cp substrate, the more hydrophilic one, and lower for the TiO(2) sp substrate, the more hydrophobic one. The work of adhesion between plasma and the substrates assumed even higher values for the TiO(2) cp surface, indicating a greater interaction between the surface and the complex protein solutions. Adsorption studies by radiolabeling of albumin ((125)I-HSA) suggest that rapid HSA adsorption takes place on both surfaces, reaching a maximum value after approximately 60 min of incubation. For the higher HSA concentrations in solution, a multilayer coverage was observed on both substrates. After the adsorption step from single HSA solutions, the exchangeability of adsorbed HSA molecules by HSA in solution was evaluated. The HSA molecules adsorbed on TiO(2) sp seem to be more easily exchanged by HSA itself than those adsorbed on TiO(2) cp after 24 h. In

  12. Taking the Long View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Robert B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Legal studies faculty need to take the long view in their academic and professional lives. Taking the long view would seem to be a cliched piece of advice, but too frequently legal studies faculty, like their students, get focused on meeting the next short-term hurdle--getting through the next class, grading the next stack of papers, making it…

  13. Multisite adsorption of cadmium on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, P.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1996-11-10

    Recently a new general ion adsorption model has been developed for ion binding to mineral surfaces (Hiemstra and van Riemsdijk, 1996). The model uses the Pauling concept of charge distribution (CD) and is an extension of the multi-site complexation (MUSIC) approach. In the CD-MUSIC model the charge of an adsorbing ion that forms an inner sphere complex is distributed over its ligands, which are present in two different electrostatic planes. In this paper the authors have applied the CD-MUSIC model to the adsorption of metal cations, using an extended data set for cadmium adsorbing on goethite. The adsorption of cadmium and the cadmium-proton exchange ratio were measured as function of metal ion concentration, pH, and ionic strength. The data could be described well, taking into account the surface heterogeneity resulting from the presence of two different crystal planes (the dominant 110 face and the minor 021 face). The surface species used in the model are consistent with recent EXAFS data. In accordance with the EXAFS results, high-affinity complexes at the 021 face were used in the model.

  14. Adsorptive Separation and Sequestration of Krypton, I and C14 on Diamond Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tushar; Loyalka, Sudarsha; Prelas, Mark; Viswanath, Dabir

    2015-03-31

    The objective of this research proposal was to address the separation and sequestration of Kr and I from each other using nano-sized diamond particles and retaining these in diamond until they decay to the background level or can be used as a byproduct. Following removal of Kr and I, an adsorbent will be used to adsorb and store CO2 from the CO2 rich stream. A Field Enhanced Diffusion with Optical Activation (FEDOA-a large scale process that takes advantage of thermal, electrical, and optical activation to enhance the diffusion of an element into diamond structure) was used to load Kr and I on micron or nano sized particles having a larger relative surface area. The diamond particles can be further increased by doping it with boron followed by irradiation in a neutron flux. Previous studies showed that the hydrogen storage capacity could be increased significantly by using boron-doped irradiated diamond particles. Diamond powders were irradiated for a longer time by placing them in a quartz tube. The surface area was measured using a Quantachrome Autosorb system. No significant increase in the surface area was observed. Total surface area was about 1.7 m2/g. This suggests the existence of very minimal pores. Interestingly it showed hysteresis upon desorption. A reason for this may be strong interaction between the surface and the nitrogen molecules. Adsorption runs at higher temperatures did not show any adsorption of krypton on diamond. Use of a GC with HID detector to determine the adsorption capacity from the breakthrough curves was attempted, but experimental difficulties were encountered.

  15. The role of metal ion-ligand interactions during divalent metal ion adsorption.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Daniel S; Crawford, Russell J; Harding, Ian H

    2015-09-15

    A suite of seven different divalent metal ions (Ca(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Zn(II)) was adsorbed from solution onto two Fe2O3 samples, quartz SiO2 and three different amphoteric polystyrene latices (containing amine and carboxyl functional groups). For the metal oxides, a high correlation was observed between the pH at which 50% of the metal was removed from solution (pH50) and the first hydrolysis constant for the metal ion (pK1). For the polystyrene latices, a much higher correlation was observed between the pH50 and pKc (equilibrium constant describing metal-carboxyl affinity) as opposed to pK1. These observations provide evidence of a strong relationship that exists between a metal's affinity for a particular ligand in solution and for that metal ion's affinity for the same ligand present as part of an adsorbing surface. The isoelectric point of the amphoteric latex surface can be increased by decreasing the carboxyl content of the latex surface. For all 7 metal ions, this resulted in a substantial decrease, for any given pH, in adsorption. We suggest that this may be partly due to the decreased carboxyl content, but is dominantly attributable to the presence of less favorable electrostatic conditions. This, in turn, demonstrates that electrostatics play a controlling role in metal ion adsorption onto amphoteric latex surfaces and, in addition to the nature of the metal ion, also controls the pH at which adsorption takes place.

  16. Gold nanoparticles: role of size and surface chemistry on blood protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, F.; Fedel, M.; Minati, L.; Speranza, G.; Migliaresi, C.

    2013-06-01

    Material interaction with blood proteins is a critical issue, since it could influence the biological processes taking place in the body following implantation/injection. This is particularly important in the case of nanoparticles, where innovative properties, such as size and high surface to volume ratio can lead to a behavioral change with respect to bulk macroscopic materials and could be responsible for a potential risk for human health. The aim of this work was to compare gold nanoparticles (AuNP) and planar surfaces to study the role of surface curvature moving from the macro- to the nano-size in the process of blood protein adsorption. In the course of the study, different protocols were tested to optimize the analysis of protein adsorption on gold nanoparticles. AuNP with different size (10, 60 and 200 nm diameter) and surface coatings (citrate and polyethylene glycol) were carefully characterized. The stabilizing action of blood proteins adsorbed on AuNP was studied measuring the variation of size and solubility of the nanoparticles following incubation with single protein solutions (human serum albumin and fibrinogen) and whole blood plasma. In addition, we developed a method to elute proteins from AuNP to study the propensity of gold materials to adsorb plasma proteins in function of dimensional characteristics and surface chemistry. We showed a different efficacy of the various eluting media tested, proving that even the most aggressive agent cannot provide a complete detachment of the protein corona. Enhanced protein adsorption was evidenced on AuNP if compared to gold laminae (bare and PEGylated) used as macroscopic control, probably due to the superior AuNP surface reactivity.

  17. Effects of surface acidities of MCM-41 modified with MoO3 on adsorptive desulfurization of gasoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xinchao; Zhang, Xiaotong; Yu, Wenguang; Wu, Yuye; Qin, Yucai; Sun, Zhaolin; Song, Lijuan

    2012-12-01

    A series of MCM-41 samples containing molybdenum oxide as active species in the mesoporous channels loaded by spontaneous monolayer dispersion (SMD) and impregnation (IM) have been prepared and characterized using XRD, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and intelligent gravimetric analyzer (IGA). The relative number of hydroxy on the adsorbents was investigated by in situ FTIR. Surface acidities of the adsorbents were studied by infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine and correlated with reactivity for adsorptive desulfurization. The IGA technique was employed to investigate adsorption behavior of thiophene and benzene on the adsorbents at 303 K. It is shown that MoO3 can be highly dispersed up to 0.2 g g-1 in the MCM-41 channels by the SMD strategy with the ordered mesoporous structure of the MoMM samples remaining intact. The ordered mesostructure of MCM-41 is, however, destroyed at higher MoO3 contents of 0.26 and 0.32 g g-1 with particle sizes of 1.2 nm and 3.6 nm, respectively, observed. For the MoMI(0.2) sample prepared by the IM method, the aggregation of the MoO3 particles takes place with a particle size of 6.5 nm obtained. The results are also revealed that the dispersion extent of the MoO3 species is related to the abundant surface hydroxy of MCM-41. The host species and guest species undergo solid-state reaction to form Sisbnd Osbnd Mo bonds in the mixtures which enhance both the Lewis acid and Brönsted acid of the samples. It has been concluded that the surface acidities of the sorbents contributes to the desulfurization performance which has also been investigated in this study. The octahedral coordinated species (Mo7O246-) are the adsorptive active species for desulfurization compared with the tetrahedral coordinated ones (MoO42-).

  18. Adsorption and substitution effects of Mg on the growth of calcium sulfate hemihydrate: An ab initio DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yan; Hou, S. C.; Xiang, Lan; Yu, Yang-Xin

    2015-12-01

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO4·0.5H2O, CSH) whiskers with high aspect ratio are promising reinforce materials which have drawn much attention. In order to obtain high quality CSH materials, effect of Mg2+ ions on properties of the (0 0 2), (2 0 0)1 and (2 0 0)2 planes of CSH is investigated using an ab initio density functional theory (DFT) with a van der Waals (vdW) dispersion-correction. The computed results show that strong adsorption and substitution effects take place between Mg2+ ion and (2 0 0)1 plane. The adsorption energies of an Mg2+ ion on the (0 0 2), (2 0 0)1 and (2 0 0)2 planes are -0.066, -0.571 and -0.047 eV, respectively. An insight into the electrostatic potential of pristine CSH planes has demonstrated that the (2 0 0)1 plane is much more negatively charged than the (0 0 2) and (2 0 0)2 planes. The energies of the substitution of a Ca atom with an Mg atom on the CSH (0 0 2), (2 0 0)1 and (2 0 0)2 planes are 1.572, 0.063 and 1.349 eV, respectively. It is found that Ca atoms on the (2 0 0)1 plane are relatively easy to be substituted by Mg atoms. The calculation results of a Ca2+ ion adsorption on the Mg-doped (2 0 0)1 plane indicate that the adsorption energies increase apparently as the doping ratio varies from 0 to 1.0. Compared with K+, Na+ and Al3+ ions, Mg2+ ion is the most promising additive to promote the growth of CSH along c axis.

  19. Teachable Moment: Google Earth Takes Us There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ann; Davinroy, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the current educational climate, where clearly articulated learning objectives are required, it is clear that the spontaneous teachable moment still has its place. Authors Ann Williams and Thomas Davinroy think that instructors from almost any discipline can employ Google Earth as a tool to take advantage of teachable moments through the…

  20. Orion Spacecraft Takes Shape

    NASA Video Gallery

    Technicians move the two halves of the Orion crew exploration vehicle's crew module into place to fuse them together at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, La. The Lockheed Martin Orio...

  1. Thin layer joining by gas adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taga, Yasunori; Fukumura, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    Attempt has been made to join borosilicate glass and cycloolefin (COP) polymer film by using gas adsorption method. After corona plasma treat, COP was exposed to (3-glycidoxypropyl) trimethoxysilane (GPS) and glass to (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APS) both in air atmosphere, resulting in co-adsorption of water vapor in the atmosphere and organosilane gases. Surface characterization of plasma treated and gas adsorbed surfaces was carried out by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using Mg Kα X-ray source. Joining was carried out by a roll laminator after contact of both surfaces at room temperature, followed by annealing at 130 °C for 10 min. Adhesion strength was evaluated by 180 degree peel test based on ASTM D-903 and durability was examined under the conditions of 60 °C and 95% RH. It was found that after plasma treatment, complex functional groups such as Csbnd H, Csbnd O, Cdbnd O, Osbnd Cdbnd O and CO3 were found on COP and Osbnd H on glass. Thickness of GPS gas adsorption layer on COP was evaluated by the XPS to be at least 1.1 nm by taking inelastic mean free path of Si2p photoelectron into consideration. Joining force was found to be more than 5 N/25 mm corresponding to almost equal to COP bulk tensile strength. In addition, durability of this adhesion strength remained unchanged over 2000 h even after exposure to the durability test conditions of 60 °C and 95% RH. The results can be explained in terms of formation of Hsbnd H hydrogen bonding and Sisbnd O covalent bonding via silanols will be made at the interface as a result of lamination and annealing processes. In conclusion, ultrathin joining method by gas adsorption was established by the formation of hydrogen and covalent bonds at the interface by low temperature reaction process.

  2. Thiol-functionalized polysilsesquioxane as efficient adsorbent for adsorption of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Yuzhong Qu, Rongjun; Liu, Xiguang; Mu, Lei; Bu, Baihui; Sun, Yuting; Chen, Hou; Meng, Yangfeng; Meng, Lina; Cheng, Lin

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • PMPSQ was promising adsorbent for the removal of Hg(II) and Mn(II). • The adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. • The adsorption isotherms can be described by the monolayer Langmuir model. • The adsorption was controlled by film diffusion and chemical ion-exchange mechanism. - Abstract: Thiol-functionalized polysilsesquioxane was synthesized and used for the adsorption of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution. Results showed that the optimal pH was about 6 and 5 for Hg(II) and Mn(II), respectively. Adsorption kinetics showed that the adsorption equilibriums were established within 100 min and followed pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption isotherms revealed that the adsorption capacities increased with the increasing of temperature. The adsorption was found to be well described by the monolayer Langmuir isotherm model and took place by chemical ion-exchange mechanism. The thermodynamic properties indicated the adsorption processes were spontaneous and endothermic nature. Selectively adsorption showed that PMPSQ can selectively adsorb Hg(II) from binary ion systems in the presence of the coexistent ions Mn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). Based on the results, it is concluded that PMPSQ had comparable high adsorption efficiency and could be potentially used for the removal of Hg(II) and Mn(II) from aqueous solution.

  3. A Critical Pedagogy of Place and the Critical Place(s) of Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    The notion of place-based education as grounding student learning in the local raises important questions about what constitutes the "local" in a now closely interconnected world and what constitutes an educational "place" when places of learning are shifting, as both new virtual sites emerge and old physical ones, including schools, lose some of…

  4. Take the IBS Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Committed to Quality in Patient Care TAKE THE IBS TEST Do you have recurrent abdominal pain or ... have a real and treatable medical condition called irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Your doctor now has new information and ...

  5. Take Meds Faithfully

    MedlinePlus

    ... was a good idea.) I Wider use of electronic prescription pills boxes and reminder devices that can ... to help you take your medicines are proliferating. Electronic pill reminder devices are available at most large ...

  6. Reservoir capacity estimates in shale plays based on experimental adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Tan

    Fine-grained sedimentary rocks are characterized by a complex porous framework containing pores in the nanometer range that can store a significant amount of natural gas (or any other fluids) through adsorption processes. Although the adsorbed gas can take up to a major fraction of the total gas-in-place in these reservoirs, the ability to produce it is limited, and the current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures. A better understanding and quantification of adsorption/desorption mechanisms in these rocks is therefore required, in order to allow for a more efficient and sustainable use of these resources. Additionally, while water is still predominantly used to fracture the rock, other fluids, such as supercritical CO2 are being considered; here, the idea is to reproduce a similar strategy as for the enhanced recovery of methane in deep coal seams (ECBM). Also in this case, the feasibility of CO2 injection and storage in hydrocarbon shale reservoirs requires a thorough understanding of the rock behavior when exposed to CO2, thus including its adsorption characteristics. The main objectives of this Master's Thesis are as follows: (1) to identify the main controls on gas adsorption in mudrocks (TOC, thermal maturity, clay content, etc.); (2) to create a library of adsorption data measured on shale samples at relevant conditions and to use them for estimating GIP and gas storage in shale reservoirs; (3) to build an experimental apparatus to measure adsorption properties of supercritical fluids (such as CO2 or CH 4) in microporous materials; (4) to measure adsorption isotherms on microporous samples at various temperatures and pressures. The main outcomes of this Master's Thesis are summarized as follows. A review of the literature has been carried out to create a library of methane and CO2 adsorption isotherms on shale samples from various formations worldwide. Large discrepancies have been found between estimates of the adsorbed gas density

  7. Enacting a Place-Responsive Research Methodology: Walking Interviews with Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Jonathan; Mannion, Greg

    2016-01-01

    Place-based and place-responsive approaches to outdoor learning and education are developing in many countries but there is dearth of theoretically-supported methodologies to take a more explicit account of place in research in these areas. In response, this article outlines one theoretical framing for place-responsive methodologies for…

  8. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  9. Conformational changes of bovine serum albumin upon its adsorption in dodecane-in-water emulsions as revealed by front-face steady-state fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Castelain, C; Genot, C

    1994-01-05

    Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterise dodecane-in-buffer (0.1 M phosphate buffer; pH = 7.6) emulsions stabilised by bovine serum albumin (BSA). A 15-nm blue-shift of the emission maximum of the adsorbed protein and a significant increase of its fluorescence quantum yield were observed. The contribution of tyrosyl residues to total fluorescence was tentatively evaluated from different spectra and an R ratio taking into account the stray-light interference; R increased upon BSA absorption but the Tyrosine contribution remained weak in all cases. Thus, conformational changes of the protein take place upon BSA adsorption onto the dodecane-water interface. They involve modifications in the environment of the protein aromatic amino acids especially of the tryptophanyl residues which are displaced to a more hydrophobic location. Moreover, the proportions of absorbed and non-adsorbed BSA in emulsions can be estimated from the position of the emission maximum.

  10. A Place for Everything, and Everything in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, John

    2008-01-01

    Sixteen papers on the general theme of the "place" of psychology, particularly in higher education, arose from the author's paper "Psychology in its place." Several themes emerge from the disparate contributions. The author discusses two papers which directly comment on his original one, the papers of John Newland and Tom…

  11. Cooperative Ecology & Place: Development of a Pedagogy of Place Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewicki, James

    The major tenets of a pedagogy of place are that nature teaches; understanding place is indispensable to community; where and how a student learns is as vital as what a student learns; and respect is integral to learning. Environmental literacy is the capacity to perceive and interpret the relative health of environmental systems and to take…

  12. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  13. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  14. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  15. Taking a Broader View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2005-01-01

    A study on stem cells is presented by understanding the environment in which they are found, the support cells and blood vessels as well as the protein scaffolds and other molecules. Researchers found that stem cells in reproductive tissue are surrounded by a pocket of support cells that hold them in place and align them to divide properly, so…

  16. SR-71 Taking Off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    One of three U.S. Air Force SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft originally retired from operational service and loaned to NASA for a high-speed research program retracts its landing gear after taking off from NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (later Dryden Flight Research Center), Edwards, California, on a 1990 research flight. One of the SR-71As was later returned to the Air Force for active duty in 1995. Data from the SR-71 high-speed research program will be used to aid designers of future supersonic/hypersonic aircraft and propulsion systems. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of

  17. A Safe and Welcoming Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingher, Gary

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the theme of safe and comforting places for children, and how libraries can help provide safe havens for children. Presents a survey of safe places in selected works of children's literature. Includes a sampler of creative activities focusing on the theme, and a list of resources (books and videotapes). (AEF)

  18. Teachers Taking Professional Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Normore, Anthony H.; Floyd, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Preservice teachers get their first teaching position hoping to take the first step toward becoming professional educators and expecting support from experienced colleagues and administrators, who often serve as their mentors. In this article, the authors present the story of Kristine (a pseudonym), who works at a middle school in a large U.S.…

  19. Taking the long view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Patrick; Smith, Emma

    2016-10-01

    A new study of the long-term employment prospects of UK science and engineering students suggests that talk of a skills shortage is overblown, with most graduates in these disciplines taking jobs outside science. Researchers Patrick White and Emma Smith discuss their findings and what they mean for current physics students

  20. Simulating Price-Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Lucas M.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a price-takers' market simulation geared toward principles-level students. This simulation demonstrates that price-taking behavior is a natural result of the conditions that create perfect competition. In trials, there is a significant degree of price convergence in just three or four rounds. Students find this…

  1. Take a Bow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Greg; Ogurek, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Performing-arts centers can provide benefits at the high school and collegiate levels, and administrators can take steps now to get the show started. When a new performing-arts center comes to town, local businesses profit. Events and performances draw visitors to the community. Ideally, a performing-arts center will play many roles: entertainment…

  2. It Takes a Township

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNiff, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I argue for higher education practitioners to take focused action to contribute to transforming their societies into open and democratically negotiated forms of living, and why they should do so. The need is especially urgent in South Africa, whose earlier revolutionary spirit led to massive social change. The kind of social…

  3. Taking Library Leadership Personally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Heather; Macauley, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines the emerging trends for leadership in the knowledge era. It discusses these within the context of leading, creating and sustaining the performance development cultures that libraries require. The first step is to recognise that we all need to take leadership personally no matter whether we see ourselves as leaders or followers.…

  4. Theoretical predictions of properties and volatility of chlorides and oxychlorides of group-4 elements. II. Adsorption of tetrachlorides and oxydichlorides of Zr, Hf, and Rf on neutral and modified surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Borschevsky, A.; Iliaš, M.; Türler, A.

    2014-08-14

    With the aim to interpret results of gas-phase chromatography experiments on volatility of group-4 tetrachlorides and oxychlorides including those of Rf, adsorption enthalpies of these species on neutral, and modified quartz surfaces were estimated on the basis of relativistic, two-component Density Functional Theory calculations of MCl{sub 4}, MOCl{sub 2}, MCl{sub 6}{sup −}, and MOCl{sub 4}{sup 2} with the use of adsorption models. Several mechanisms of adsorption were considered. In the case of physisorption of MCl{sub 4}, the trend in the adsorption energy in the group should be Zr > Hf > Rf, so that the volatility should change in the opposite direction. The latter trend complies with the one in the sublimation enthalpies, ΔH{sub sub}, of the Zr and Hf tetrachlorides, i.e., Zr < Hf. On the basis of a correlation between these quantities, ΔH{sub sub}(RfCl{sub 4}) was predicted as 104.2 kJ/mol. The energy of physisorption of MOCl{sub 2} on quartz should increase in the group, Zr < Hf < Rf, as defined by increasing dipole moments of these molecules along the series. In the case of adsorption of MCl{sub 4} on quartz by chemical forces, formation of the MOCl{sub 2} or MOCl{sub 4}{sup 2−} complexes on the surface can take place, so that the sequence in the adsorption energy should be Zr > Hf > Rf, as defined by the complex formation energies. In the case of adsorption of MCl{sub 4} on a chlorinated quartz surface, formation of the MCl{sub 6}{sup 2−} surface complexes can occur, so that the trend in the adsorption strength should be Zr ≤ Hf < Rf. All the predicted sequences, showing a smooth change of the adsorption energy in the group, are in disagreement with the reversed trend Zr ≈ Rf < Hf, observed in the “one-atom-at-a-time” gas-phase chromatography experiments. Thus, currently no theoretical explanation can be found for the experimental observations.

  5. Enhanced adsorption of CO2 at steps of ultrathin ZnO: the importance of Zn-O geometry and coordination.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xingyi; Sorescu, Dan C; Lee, Junseok

    2017-02-15

    The interaction between CO2 and ultrathin ZnO supported on Au(111) has been studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that CO2 binds weakly on the planar ZnO bilayer and trilayer surfaces, desorbing at T = 130 K. CO2 binds more strongly at the steps formed between ZnO bilayers and trilayers, desorbing at T = 285-320 K depending upon the CO2 exposure. The adsorption energies determined from DFT calculations for CO2 on the ZnO planar surfaces and at the steps are ∼5.8 and 19.0 kcal mol(-1), respectively, agreeing with the apparent activation energies of desorption (Ed) estimated based on the TPD peaks at the limit of low CO2 exposures (7.7 and 19.5 kcal mol(-1), respectively). The DFT calculations further identify that the most stable adsorption configuration of CO2 at the steps of ultrathin ZnO is facilitated by the geometry and coordination of the Zn cations and O anions near the step region. Specifically, the enhanced adsorption takes place via bonding of both the C and O atoms of the CO2 molecule to the tri-fold coordinated O anions at the trilayer edge and to the neighboring Zn cations on the bilayer terrace, respectively, leading to CO2 bending and formation of a carbonate-like species.

  6. Molecular modeling of the adsorption and initial photocatalytic oxidation step for para-nitrophenol on nano-sized TiO2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Hilal S.

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, the non-constrained optimization for three proposed models of PNP molecule onto TiO2 (100) surface has resulted in three molecular adsorption conformations; a vertical alignment via bridged NO2, a parallel alignment bridges via NO2 and OH groups, and a monodentate vertical alignment bridged via OH. The first configuration is the dominant adsorption structure. The adsorption energy for the bridging geometries is found to be much more stable than that of the monodentate conformer. The predicted VDOS spectra indicate that the main interaction between PNP molecule and the surface of TiO2 takes place through a linkage between the Lewis acid sites, fivefold Ti (V) and fourfold Ti (IV) coordinated titanium surface atoms, and the nitro or phenolic oxygen atoms. Frontier electron theory (FET) and Wheland localization approach (WLA) have been applied for the prediction of the primary •OH initiated oxidation intermediates. These approaches highlight similar expectations for the variation in the reactivity of the ring positions, towards the hydroxyl radical attack. By comparison with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations, it is shown that MSINDO can reproduce literature data with acceptable accuracy.

  7. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  8. Galactose adsorption on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Matti; Puisto, Mikko

    2014-03-01

    In order to understand the valorisation of biomass, it is essential to study the behavior of sugar molecules on catalytic surfaces. We have studied the adsorption of galactose molecules on the Ru(0001) surface using first principles calculations. We present results for the fully relaxed configurations of the molecule at different adsorption sites. We also compare the effect of the inclusion of the van der Waals interactions on both the energetics of the free galactose molecule and the adsorption energy of galactose on Ru(0001). We compare our results, obtained using periodically repeated supercells, to those obtained with cluster calculations.

  9. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  10. Adsorption of Polyoxyethylenic Nonionic and Anionic Surfactants from Aqueous Solution: Effects Induced by the Addition of NaCl and CaCl2.

    PubMed

    Nevskaia; Guerrero-Ruíz; de D López-González J

    1998-09-01

    The adsorption processes of two different types of surfactant from aqueous solutions have been studied on several solids. The adsorbates used were a nonionic (TX-100) and a series of anionic (NP4S, NP10S, and NP25S) oxyethylenic surfactants. As adsorbent, five nonporous solids, including three quartz (QA, QB, and QC), a kaolin, and a dolomite, were chosen for this study, since these types of materials are frequently found in oil reservoirs. Great differences have been found in the adsorption plateaus, depending on the nature of the surfactant (anionic or nonionic). The influence of the presence of NaCl and CaCl2 in the solutions has been also studied. NaCl affects the adsorption of anionic surfactants on quartz and kaolin samples in a similar way. When this salt is added, the amount of anionic surfactants adsorbed on the solid surfaces increases. Some differences in the adsorption of the TX-100 surfactant, depending on the nature of the surface and the type of salt added, have been detected. Basically, three different adsorption behaviors have been found when NaCl is added. The amounts of TX-100 adsorbed decrease when NaCl is added to the solution on the QA sample; the amounts increase on the QB and kaolin samples; no alteration is observed on QC and dolomite samples. Changes in adsorption isotherms, depending on whether NaCl or CaCl2 is added, have also been observed. For the same five adsorbents, zeta potential measurements also have been carried out. When the nonionic TX-100 surfactant is adsorbed, a decrease in the negative values of the zeta potential takes place. However, for the adsorption of anionic surfactants, an increase in the negative values of the zeta potential is detected. The surface charge has been also determined by potentiometric titration (in presence and in absence of TX-100), and a decrease in surface charge when TX-100 is adsorbed on the sample surfaces has been detected. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  11. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and column operations for the removal of hazardous dye, Tartrazine from aqueous solutions using waste materials--Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, as adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Alok; Mittal, Jyoti; Kurup, Lisha

    2006-08-25

    Adsorbents, Bottom Ash (a power plant waste) and De-Oiled Soya (an agricultural waste) exhibit good efficacy to adsorb a highly toxic dye, Tartrazine. Through the batch technique equilibrium uptake of the dye is observed at different concentrations, pH of the solution, dosage of adsorbents and sieve size of adsorbents. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms are successfully employed on both the adsorbents and on the basis of these models the thermodynamic parameters are evaluated. Kinetic investigations reveal that more than 50% adsorption of dye is achieved in about 1h in both the cases, whereas, equilibrium establishment takes about 3-4h. The linear plots obtained in rate constant and mass transfer studies further confirm the applicability of first order rate expression and mass transfer model, respectively. The kinetic data treated to identify rate controlling step of the ongoing adsorption processes indicate that for both the systems, particle diffusion process is predominant at higher concentrations, while film diffusion takes place at lower concentrations. The column studies reveal that about 96% saturation of both the columns is attained during their exhaustion, while about 88 and 84% of the dye material is recovered by eluting dilute NaOH solution through exhausted Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns, respectively.

  12. Bromide Adsorption by Reference Minerals and Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bromide, Br-, adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous Al and Fe oxide, montmorillonite, kaolinite, and temperate and tropical soils. Bromide adsorption decreased with increasing solution pH with minimal adsorption occurring above pH 7. Bromide adsorption was higher for amorphous oxides t...

  13. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  14. Auditory perspective taking.

    PubMed

    Martinson, Eric; Brock, Derek

    2013-06-01

    Effective communication with a mobile robot using speech is a difficult problem even when you can control the auditory scene. Robot self-noise or ego noise, echoes and reverberation, and human interference are all common sources of decreased intelligibility. Moreover, in real-world settings, these problems are routinely aggravated by a variety of sources of background noise. Military scenarios can be punctuated by high decibel noise from materiel and weaponry that would easily overwhelm a robot's normal speaking volume. Moreover, in nonmilitary settings, fans, computers, alarms, and transportation noise can cause enough interference to make a traditional speech interface unusable. This work presents and evaluates a prototype robotic interface that uses perspective taking to estimate the effectiveness of its own speech presentation and takes steps to improve intelligibility for human listeners.

  15. Multilayer adsorption on fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Péter; Felinger, Attila

    2014-01-10

    Multilayer adsorption is often observed in liquid chromatography. The most frequently employed model for multilayer adsorption is the BET isotherm equation. In this study we introduce an interpretation of multilayer adsorption measured on liquid chromatographic stationary phases based on the fractal theory. The fractal BET isotherm model was successfully used to determine the apparent fractal dimension of the adsorbent surface. The nonlinear fitting of the fractal BET equation gives us the estimation of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the monolayer saturation capacity of the adsorbent as well. In our experiments, aniline and proline were used as test molecules on reversed phase and normal phase columns, respectively. Our results suggest an apparent fractal dimension 2.88-2.99 in the case of reversed phase adsorbents, in the contrast with a bare silica column with a fractal dimension of 2.54.

  16. Take the "C" Train

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawton, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, the author recalls several of her experiences in which she successfully pulled her boats out of river holes by throwing herself to the water as a sea-anchor. She learned this trick from her senior guides at a spring training. Her guides told her, "When you're stuck in a hole, take the "C" train."" "Meaning?" The author asked her…

  17. It Takes an Ecosystem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-25

    Business Review (April 2006). [7] Marco Iansiti and Roy Levien. “Strategy as Ecology,” Harvard Business Review , March 2004. 27 It Takes an... Harvard Business Review (March 2004). [8] Viljainen, Martti & Kauppinen, Marjo. "Software Ecosystems: A Set of Management Practices for Platform...E. “How Competitive Forces Shape Strategy.” Harvard Business Review (March 1979). [11] ASA(ALT) Common Operating Environment Implementation Plan

  18. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  19. Place recognition using batlike sonar.

    PubMed

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-08-02

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map.

  20. People and Places. Teacher's Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Priscilla H., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews teachers' resources related to people and places. Most of these focus on the identification of geographic locations and historical biographies of famous individuals or groups of people. Includes discussions of reference works, audio cassettes, activity kits, and fiction. (MJP)

  1. The Place of Creative Nonfiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesse, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the topic of creative nonfiction and how it is addressed throughout this special issue. Suggests that how creative nonfiction is placed does have implications for literature and writing, both creative and non. (SG)

  2. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  3. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  4. Why It Takes Prevention, Not Detection, to Fight Bioterrorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janata, Jiri (Art)

    2005-01-01

    Following the events which took place on September 11, 2001, and the anthrax attacks which occurred after that date, US authorities became concerned with the idea that an assault with chemical or biological weapons could take place on American territory or in American ships or planes. A worrisome model for such an assault was the 1995 terrorist…

  5. John Dewey and a Pedagogy of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayanandhan, Stephanie Raill

    2009-01-01

    If asked to define the idea of "place" one might struggle. Yet people across time and cultures readily share examples of important places or safe places or "foreign" places with one another and offer heartfelt descriptions in literature and art of childhood places, favorite places, strange places. Akinbola Akinwumi, paraphrasing Yi-Fu Tuan,…

  6. Hydrogen Surface Reactions and Adsorption Studied on Y2O3, YSZ, and ZrO2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The surface reactivity of Y2O3, YSZ, and ZrO2 polycrystalline powder samples toward H2 has been comparatively studied by a pool of complementary experimental techniques, comprising volumetric methods (temperature-programmed volumetric adsorption/oxidation and thermal desorption spectrometry), spectroscopic techniques (in situ electric impedance and in situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy), and eventually structural characterization methods (X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy). Reduction has been observed on all three oxides to most likely follow a surface or near-surface-limited mechanism involving removal of surface OH-groups and associated formation of water without formation of a significant number of anionic oxygen vacancies. Partly reversible adsorption of H2 was proven on the basis of molecular H2 desorption. Dictated by the specific hydrophilicity of the oxide, readsorption of water eventually takes place. The inference of this surface-restricted mechanism is further corroborated by the fact that no bulk structural and/or morphological changes were observed upon reduction even at the highest reduction temperatures (1173 K). We anticipate relevant implications for the use of especially YSZ in fuel cell research, since in particular the chemical state and structure of the surface under typical reducing high-temperature conditions affects the operation of the entire cell. PMID:24791182

  7. Negligible effects of tryptophan on the aflatoxin adsorption of sodium bentonite.

    PubMed

    Magnoli, A P; Copia, P; Monge, M P; Magnoli, C E; Dalcero, A M; Chiacchiera, S M

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine if the competitive adsorption of tryptophan (Trp) and aflatoxin B₁ (AFB₁) could potentially affect the ability of a sodium bentonite (NaB) to prevent aflatoxicosis in monogastric animals. The adsorption of Trp and AFB₁ on this adsorbent is fast and could be operating on the same time-scale making competition feasible. In vitro competitive adsorption experiments under simulated gastrointestinal conditions were performed. A high affinity of the clay for Trp and NaB was observed. The effect of an excess of KCl to mimic the ionic strength of the physiological conditions were also investigated. A six-times decrease in the Trp surface excess at saturation was observed. A similar behaviour was previously found for AFB₁ adsorption. Taking into account the amount of Trp adsorbed by the clay and the usual adsorbent supplementation level in diets, a decrease in Trp bioavailability is not expected to occur. Tryptophan adsorption isotherms on NaB were 'S'-shaped and were adjusted by the Frumkin-Fowler-Guggenheim model. The reversibility of the adsorption processes was investigated in order to check a potential decrease in the ability of NaB to protect birds against chronic aflatoxicoses. Adsorption processes were completely reversible for Trp, while almost irreversible for AFB₁. In spite of the high affinity of the NaB for Trp, probably due to the reversible character of Trp adsorption, no changes in the AFB₁ adsorption isotherm were observed when an excess of the amino acid was added to the adsorption medium. As a consequence of the preferential and irreversible AFB₁ adsorption and the reversible weak binding of Trp to the NaB, no changes in the aflatoxin sorption ability of the clay are expected to occur in the gastrointestinal tract of birds.

  8. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  9. Functionalization of delaminated zeolite ITQ-6 for the adsorption of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Zukal, A.; Dominguez, I.; Mayerova, J.; Cejka, J.

    2009-09-15

    Novel functionalized adsorbents for CO{sub 2} separation were synthesized by grafting 3-aminopropyl, 3-(methylamino) propyl, or 3-(phenylamino)propyl ligands in the delaminated zeolite ITQ-6. On the basis of the texture parameters determined from nitrogen adsorption isotherms recorded at 77 K and the results of chemical analysis, physicochemical properties of functionalized ITQ-6 were evaluated and compared with those of mesoporous SBA-15 silica functionalized with the same ligands. To examine carbon dioxide adsorption on functionalized materials, adsorption isotherms at 293 K were measured. To obtain information on the surface energetics of CO{sub 2} adsorption on selected samples, isotherms were taken in the temperature range front 273 to 333 K and adsorption isosteres were calculated. Isosteric adsorption heats determined from the slope of adsorption isosteres proved that all of the 3-aminopropyl ligands in ITQ-6 take part in CO{sub 2} adsorption. It was found that in the whole region of CO{sub 2} pressures the efficiency of the amine ligand, defined as the number of adsorbed CO{sub 2} molecules per one airline ligand, is higher for functionalized ITQ-6 than for functionalized SBA-15 silica.

  10. The Path Is Place: Skateboarding, Graffiti and Performances of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on two performances of place involving graffiti and skateboarding: the first looks at a graffiti intervention by SKL0, an urban artist in Singapore, and the second examines the "Long Live Southbank" ("LLSB") campaign to resist the relocation of Southbank's Undercroft, an appropriated skate space in London.…

  11. Microgravity Smoldering Combustion Takes Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Microgravity Smoldering Combustion (MSC) experiment lifted off aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in September 1995 on the STS-69 mission. This experiment is part of series of studies focused on the smolder characteristics of porous, combustible materials in a microgravity environment. Smoldering is a nonflaming form of combustion that takes place in the interior of combustible materials. Common examples of smoldering are nonflaming embers, charcoal briquettes, and cigarettes. The objective of the study is to provide a better understanding of the controlling mechanisms of smoldering, both in microgravity and Earth gravity. As with other forms of combustion, gravity affects the availability of air and the transport of heat, and therefore, the rate of combustion. Results of the microgravity experiments will be compared with identical experiments carried out in Earth's gravity. They also will be used to verify present theories of smoldering combustion and will provide new insights into the process of smoldering combustion, enhancing our fundamental understanding of this frequently encountered combustion process and guiding improvement in fire safety practices.

  12. Adsorption of oxygen on W/100/ - Adsorption kinetics and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, E.; Poppa, H.; Viswanath, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on W(100) single-crystal surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), flash desorption, low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and retarding-field work-function measurements. The AES results reveal stepwise changes in the sticking coefficients in the coverage range 0 to 1 and activated adsorption at higher coverages. Upon room-temperature adsorption, a series of complex LEED patterns is observed. In layers adsorbed at 1050 K and cooled to room temperature, the p(2 x 1) structure is the first ordered structure observed. This structure shows a reversible order-disorder transition between 700 and 1000 K and is characterized by a work function which is lower than that of the clean surface. Heating room-temperature adsorbates changes their structure irreversibly. At temperatures below 750 K, some new structures are observed.

  13. Adsorption of N/S heterocycles in the flexible metal-organic framework MIL-53(Fe(III)) studied by in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Van de Voorde, Ben; Munn, Alexis S; Guillou, Nathalie; Millange, Franck; De Vos, Dirk E; Walton, Richard I

    2013-06-14

    The adsorption of N/S-containing heterocyclic organic molecules in the flexible iron(III) terephthalate MIL-53, Fe(III)(OH)(0.6)F(0.4)(O2C-C6H4-CO2)·(H2O), from the liquid phase was studied with in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD), in order to follow the adsorption-induced expansion of the structure. For comparison with the diffraction data, liquid phase adsorption isotherms were recorded for uptake of benzothiophene, benzothiazole and indole in isopropanol and in heptane. The solvent not only influences pore opening but is also a competing guest. The in situ EDXRD experiments allow the kinetics of guest uptake and the competition with solvent to be monitored directly. Indole uptake is limited; this adsorbate is barely capable of opening the closed, either hydrated or dehydrated, MIL-53(Fe) structure, or of penetrating the isopropanol-containing material in the concentration range under study. When isopropanol is used as a solvent, the guest molecules benzothiophene and benzothiazole must be present at a certain threshold concentration before substantial adsorption into the metal-organic framework takes place, eventually resulting in full opening of the structure. The fully expanded structures of benzothiophene or benzothiazole loaded MIL-53(Fe) materials have Imcm symmetry and a unit cell volume of ca. 1600 Å(3), and upon uptake of the guest molecules by the closed form (unit cell volume ~1000 Å(3)) no intermediate crystalline phases are seen. Successful uptake by MIL-53(Fe) requires that the adsorbate is primarily a good hydrogen bond acceptor; additionally, based on UV-visible spectroscopy, a charge-transfer interaction between the S atoms of benzothiophene and the aromatic rings in the MOF pore wall is proposed.

  14. Adsorptive desulfurization by activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Ankur; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra

    2009-10-30

    This study reports usage of commercial grade activated alumina (aluminum oxide) as adsorbent for the removal of sulfur from model oil (dibenthiophene (DBT) dissolved in n-hexane). Bulk density of alumina was found to be 1177.77 kg/m(3). The BET surface area of alumina was found to decrease from 143.6 to 66.4 m(2)/g after the loading of DBT at optimum conditions. The carbon-oxygen functional groups present on the surface of alumina were found to be effective in the adsorption of DBT onto alumina. Optimum adsorbent dose was found to be 20 g/l. The adsorption of DBT on alumina was found to be gradual process, and quasi-equilibrium reached in 24 h. Langmuir isotherm best represented the equilibrium adsorption data. The heat of adsorption and change in entropy for DBT adsorption onto alumina was found to be 19.5 kJ/mol and 139.2 kJ/mol K, respectively.

  15. Reduced protein adsorption by osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Steitz, Roland; Tolan, Metin; Czeslik, Claus

    2011-06-07

    Osmolytes are substances that affect osmosis and are used by cells to adapt to environmental stress. Here, we report a neutron reflectivity study on the influence of some osmolytes on protein adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces. Bovine ribonuclease A (RNase) and bovine insulin were used as model proteins adsorbing at a hydrophilic silica and at a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. From the neutron reflectivity data, the adsorbed protein layers were characterized in terms of layer thickness, protein packing density, and adsorbed protein mass in the absence and presence of urea, trehalose, sucrose, and glycerol. All data point to the clear effect of these nonionic cosolvents on the degree of protein adsorption. For example, 1 M sucrose leads to a reduction of the adsorbed amount of RNase by 39% on a silica surface and by 71% on a polystyrene surface. Trehalose was found to exhibit activity similar to that of sucrose. The changes in adsorbed protein mass can be attributed to a decreased packing density of the proteins in the adsorbed layers. Moreover, we investigated insulin adsorption at a hydrophobic surface in the absence and presence of glycerol. The degree of insulin adsorption is decreased by even 80% in the presence of 4 M of glycerol. The results of this study demonstrate that nonionic cosolvents can be used to tune and control nonspecific protein adsorption at aqueous-solid interfaces, which might be relevant for biomedical applications.

  16. A biological oil adsorption filter.

    PubMed

    Pasila, Antti

    2004-12-01

    A new oil adsorption method called adsorption filtration (AF) has been developed. It is a technology where by oil residues can be cleaned from water by running it through a simple filter made from freeze treated, dried, milled and then fragmented plant material. By choosing suitable plants and fragmentation sizes it is possible to produce filters, which pass water but adsorb oil. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of manufacturing oil adsorbing filter materials from reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) or hemp fibre (Cannabis sativa L.). The oil (80 ml) was mixed with de-ionised water (200 ml) and this mixture was filtered through 10 or 20 g adsorption filters. Fine spring harvested hemp fibre (diameter less than 1 mm) and reed canary grass fragments adsorb 2-4 g of oil per gram of adsorption material compared to 1-3 g of water. Adsorption filtration is thus a novel way of gathering spilled oil in shallow coastal waters before the oil reaches the shore.

  17. Taking action against violence.

    PubMed

    Kunz, K

    1996-05-01

    Significant increase in violent crimes in recent years forced Icelandic men to take action against violence. Television was seen as a major contributory factor in increasing violence. Surveys indicate that 10-15 years after television broadcasting commences in a particular society, the incidence of crime can be expected to double. While the majority of the individuals arrested for violent crimes are men, being male does not necessarily mean being violent. The Men's Committee of the Icelandic Equal Rights Council initiated a week-long information and education campaign under the theme "Men Against Violence". This campaign involved several events including an art exhibit, speeches on violence in families, treatment sought by those who are likely to resort to violence, booklet distribution among students in secondary schools, and a mass media campaign to raise public awareness on this pressing problem.

  18. Metal adsorption on mosses: Toward a universal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Pokrovsky, O S

    2014-02-01

    This study quantifies the adsorption of heavy metals on 4 typical moss species used for environmental monitoring in the moss bag technique. The adsorption of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto Hypnum sp., Sphagnum sp., Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachytecium rutabulum has been investigated using a batch reactor in a wide range of pH (1.3-11.0) and metal concentrations in solution (1.6μM-3.8mM). A Linear Programming Model (LPM) was applied for the experimental data to derive equilibrium constants and the number of surface binding sites. The surface acid-base titration performed for 4 mosses at a pH range of 3-10 in 0.1M NaNO3 demonstrated that Sphagnum sp. is the most efficient adsorbent as it has the maximal number of proton-binding sites on the surface (0.65mmol g(-1)). The pKa computed for all the moss species suggested the presence of 5 major functional groups: phosphodiester, carboxyl, phosphoryl, amine and polyphenols. The results of pH-edge experiments demonstrated that B. rutabulum exhibits the highest percentage of metal adsorption and has the highest number of available sites for most of the metals studied. However, according to the results of the constant pH "Langmuirian" isotherm, Sphagnum sp. can be considered as the strongest adsorbent, although the relative difference from other mosses is within 20%. The LPM was found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data in the full range of the studied solution parameters. The results of this study demonstrate a rather similar pattern of five metal adsorptions on mosses, both as a function of pH and as a metal concentration, which is further corroborated by similar values of adsorption constants. Therefore, despite the species and geographic differences between the mosses, a universal adsorption edge and constant pH adsorption isotherm can be recommended for 4 studied mosses. The quantitative comparison of metal adsorption with other common natural organic and inorganic materials demonstrates

  19. IgG adsorption on a new protein A adsorbent based on macroporous hydrophilic polymers. I. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Perez-Almodovar, Ernie X; Carta, Giorgio

    2009-11-20

    Experimental determination and modeling of IgG binding on a new protein A adsorbent based on a macroporous resin were performed. The new adsorbent consists of polymeric beads based on hydrophilic acrylamido and vinyl monomers with a pore structure optimized to allow favorable interactions of IgG with recombinant protein A coupled to the resin. The particles have average diameter of 57 microm and a narrow particle size distribution. The IgG adsorption equilibrium capacity is 46 mg/cm(3) and the effective pore diffusivity determined from pulse response experiments for non-binding conditions is 8.0 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s. The IgG adsorption kinetics can be described with the same effective diffusivity by taking into account a heterogeneous binding mechanism with fast binding sites, for which adsorption is completely diffusion controlled, and slow binding sites for which adsorption is controlled by the binding kinetics. As a result of this mechanism, the breakthrough curve exhibits a tailing behavior, which appears to be associated with the slow binding sites. A detailed rate model taking into account intraparticle diffusion and binding kinetics is developed and is found capable of predicting both batch adsorption and breakthrough behavior over an ample range of experimental conditions. The corresponding effective diffusivity is independent of protein concentration in solution over the range 0.2-2 mg/cm(3) and of protein binding as a result of the large pore size of the support matrix. Overall, the small particle size and low diffusional hindrance allow capture of IgG with short residence times while attaining substantial dynamic binding capacities.

  20. Places to Go: Google's Search Results for "Net Generation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In his Places to Go column for a special issue on the Net Generation, Stephen Downes takes an unexpected trip--to Google. According to Downes, Google epitomizes the essence of the Net Generation. Infinitely searchable and adaptable, Google represents the spirit of a generation raised in the world of the Internet, a generation that adapts…

  1. After Dark in the Antipodes: Pedagogy, Place and Queer Phenomenology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Vicki; Rasmussen, Mary Lou

    2010-01-01

    This paper pursues issues of pedagogy, place and queer phenomenology in the context of what might be meant by the term "after-queer" or "what falls outside queer" as we currently theorise, practice and locate queer. Inspired by Sara Ahmed's account of how bodies become oriented by the ways in which they take up time and space,…

  2. Play Memories and Place Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study examined play memories from childhood to adulthood of 478 university students between ages 20 and 62 as exhibited in drawings of play memories and questionnaire responses. The study focused on the role of the physical environment and place identity in play memories and individual identity development. Findings showed that…

  3. The Social Attachment to Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Michael S.; Sorenson, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Many theories either implicitly or explicitly assume that individuals readily move to places that improve their financial well-being. Other forces, however, offset these tendencies; for example, people often wish to remain close to family and friends. We introduce a methodology for determining how individuals weigh these countervailing forces, and…

  4. Sense of Place in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This journal issue contains interviews, essays, short stories, and poetry focusing on sense of place in Appalachia. In interviews, author Wilma Dykeman discussed past and recent novels set in Appalachia with interviewer Sandra L. Ballard; and novelist Lee Smith spoke with interviewer Pat Arnow about how Appalachia has shaped her writing. Essays…

  5. Sense of Place Curriculum Framework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Central Regional Educational Lab., Oak Brook, IL.

    This document describes a curriculum model that aims to help students gain a sense of stewardship toward their community and an appreciation for their heritage. At the Sense of Place Symposium, Iowa teachers and administrators worked together to develop an interdisciplinary curriculum framework that would connect students to their communities. The…

  6. The Mushroom Place. Part III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlichter, Carol

    1978-01-01

    The final installment of a series of articles on the "Mushroom Place" learning center program, which involves creative thinking activities for young, gifted students, describes "Doing It the Hard Way," a performance task which involves the actual construction of objects from a selected set of materials in the absence of the usual project tools.…

  7. A Place on the Shelf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Devon

    2007-01-01

    If we read to discover new worlds, we also read to find ourselves. For gays and lesbians, this act of discovery can be problematic: literature has so often excluded them. In the last decades, as gays and lesbians have grown increasingly vocal in the effort to secure their rightful place in society, a broad range of fiction has emerged that…

  8. Place recognition using batlike sonar

    PubMed Central

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14188.001 PMID:27481189

  9. Creative Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Ronald M., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This journal contains articles and materials to help teachers instruct students about U.S. historical and cultural heritage. Articles and teaching materials are: "History in the Hands of Tomorrow's Citizens" (C. D. Shull; B. M. Boland); "On-Site Learning--The Power of Historic Places" (J. O. Horton); "Visualizing…

  10. "Changing Places" in Changed Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showalter, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    Thirty years ago, every American academic going on a research trip or a sabbatical to England carried a copy of David Lodge's comic classic, "Changing Places" (1975), which told a tale of two 40-year-old professors of English literature and two embattled campuses in the eventful spring of 1969. An ineffectual British academic, Philip…

  11. The place of care in ethical theory.

    PubMed

    Veatch, R M

    1998-04-01

    The concept of care and a related ethical theory of care have emerged as increasingly important in biomedical ethics. This essay outlines a series of questions about the conceptualization of care and its place in ethical theory. First, it considers the possibility that care should be conceptualized as an alternative principle of right action; then as a virtue, a cluster of virtues, or as a synonym for virtue theory. The implications for various interpretations of the debate of the relation of care and justice are then explored, suggesting three possible meanings for that contrast. Next, the possibility that care theorists are taking up the debate over the relation between principles and cases is considered. Finally, it is suggested that care theorists may be pressing for consideration of an entirely new question in moral theory: the assessment of the normative appropriateness of relationships. Issues needing to be addressed in an ethic of relationships are suggested.

  12. Partition and water/oil adsorption of some surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tadmouri, Rawad; Zedde, Chantal; Routaboul, Corinne; Micheau, Jean-Claude; Pimienta, Véronique

    2008-10-02

    Adsorption isotherms have been determined at the water/oil interface for five biphasic systems involving surfactants (non-ionic and ionic) present in both phases at partition equilibrium. The systems studied were polyoxyethylene(23)lauryl ether (Brij35) in water/hexane and four ionic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and a series of three tetraalkylammonium dodecylsulfate (TEADS, TPADS, and TBADS) in water/CH 2Cl 2. Interfacial tension measurements performed at the water/air and water/oil interfaces provided all the necessary information for the determination of the adsorption parameters by taking partition into account. These measurements also allowed the comparison of the adsorption properties at both interfaces which showed an increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant and a decrease of the maximum surface concentration at the water/oil interface compared to water/air. The values of the critical aggregation concentration showed, in all cases, that only the surfactant dissolved in the aqueous phase contribute to the decrease of the water/oil interfacial tension. In the case of the four ionic surfactants, the critical aggregation concentration obtained in biphasic conditions were lowered because of the formation of mixed surfactant-CH 2Cl 2 aggregates.

  13. Adsorption isotherms of charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Bakhshandeh, Amin; Diehl, Alexandre; Levin, Yan

    2016-10-19

    We present theory and simulations which allow us to quantitatively calculate the amount of surface adsorption excess of charged nanoparticles onto a charged surface. The theory is very accurate for weakly charged nanoparticles and can be used at physiological concentrations of salt. We have also developed an efficient simulation algorithm which can be used for dilute suspensions of nanoparticles of any charge, even at very large salt concentrations. With the help of the new simulation method, we are able to efficiently calculate the adsorption isotherms of highly charged nanoparticles in suspensions containing multivalent ions, for which there are no accurate theoretical methods available.

  14. Thermodynamic features of dioxins' adsorption.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Marina; Piemonte, Vincenzo; di Celso, Giuseppe Mazziotti; Ronconi, Silvia; Capocelli, Mauro

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, the six more poisonous species among all congeners of dioxin group are taken into account, and the P-T diagram for each of them is developed. Starting from the knowledge of vapour tensions and thermodynamic parameters, the theoretical adsorption isotherms are calculated according to the Langmuir's model. In particular, the Langmuir isotherm parameters (K and wmax) have been validated through the estimation of the adsorption heat (ΔHads), which varies in the range 20-24kJ/mol, in agreement with literature values. This result will allow to put the thermodynamical basis for a rational design of different process units devoted to dioxins removal.

  15. Counterion release and electrostatic adsorption

    PubMed

    Sens; Joanny

    2000-05-22

    The effective charge of a rigid polyelectrolyte (PE) approaching an oppositely charged surface is studied. The cases of a weak (annealed) and strongly charged PE with condensed counterions (such as DNA) are discussed. In the most interesting case of the adsorption onto a substrate of low dielectric constant (such as a lipid membrane or a mica sheet) the condensed counterions are not always released as the PE approaches the substrate, because of the major importance of the image-charge effect. For the adsorption onto a surface with freely moving charges, the image-charge effect becomes less important and full release is often expected.

  16. Pairing K-12 Teachers with Geographic Researchers: Why It Should Take Place and How It Can.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orvis, Kenneth H.; Horn, Sally P.; Jumper, Sidney R.

    1999-01-01

    Contends that excitement can be infused into the K-12 geography curriculum by involving teachers in real research projects led by professional geographers. Describes a project where K-12 teachers and geographers participated in geography field research in the mountain highlands of the Valle Nuevo Scientific Reserve of the Dominican Republic. (CMK)

  17. Mismatch negativity to acoustical illusion of beat: how and where the change detection takes place?

    PubMed

    Chakalov, Ivan; Paraskevopoulos, Evangelos; Wollbrink, Andreas; Pantev, Christo

    2014-10-15

    In case of binaural presentation of two tones with slightly different frequencies the structures of brainstem can no longer follow the interaural time differences (ITD) resulting in an illusionary perception of beat corresponding to frequency difference between the two prime tones. Hence, the beat-frequency does not exist in the prime tones presented to either ear. This study used binaural beats to explore the nature of acoustic deviance detection in humans by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG). Recent research suggests that the auditory change detection is a multistage process. To test this, we employed 26 Hz-binaural beats in a classical oddball paradigm. However, the prime tones (250 Hz and 276 Hz) were switched between the ears in the case of the deviant-beat. Consequently, when the deviant is presented, the cochleae and auditory nerves receive a "new afferent", although the standards and the deviants are heard identical (26 Hz-beats). This allowed us to explore the contribution of auditory periphery to change detection process, and furthermore, to evaluate its influence on beats-related auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs). LORETA-source current density estimates of the evoked fields in a typical mismatch negativity time-window (MMN) and the subsequent difference-ASSRs were determined and compared. The results revealed an MMN generated by a complex neural network including the right parietal lobe and the left middle frontal gyrus. Furthermore, difference-ASSR was generated in the paracentral gyrus. Additionally, psychophysical measures showed no perceptual difference between the standard- and deviant-beats when isolated by noise. These results suggest that the auditory periphery has an important contribution to novelty detection already at sub-cortical level. Overall, the present findings support the notion of hierarchically organized acoustic novelty detection system.

  18. Does Reflective Learning Take Place in Online MBA Introductory Quantitative Courses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Blake A.; Walsh, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Online education has grown dramatically over the past 15 years. At the university level, researchers have shown that online education has both its advantages--greater flexibility and access to student--and disadvantages--like disconnection with other students and faculty. Another possible drawback for the students enrolled in an online course is…

  19. Improving the Performance of High School Students: Focusing on Connections and Transitions Taking Place in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crist, Cynthia; Jacquart, Mary; Shupe, David A.

    Too many students entering colleges or universities find that they lack the essential skills and knowledge required for college. One reason for high school graduates' lack of preparedness for college is a serious lack of communication between the preschool-12 and postsecondary education systems. Like other states, Minnesota has focused…

  20. When Private Schools Take Public Dollars: What's the Place of Accountability in School Voucher Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Hentges, Christina M.; Petrilli, Michael J.; Winkler, Amber M.

    2009-01-01

    Of all the arguments that critics of school voucher programs advance, the one that may resonate loudest with the public concerns school accountability. Opponents say it's not fair to hold public schools accountable for their results (under No Child Left Behind and similar systems) and then let private schools receive taxpayer dollars--however…

  1. In what time scale proton transfer takes place in a live CHO cell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2013-06-01

    Excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate, HPTS) in a live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is studied by time resolved confocal microscopy. The cytoplasm region of the cell is stained by a photoacid, HPTS (HA). The time constant of initial proton transfer (τPT) in the cell is found to be ˜10 times longer than that in bulk water, while the time constants of recombination (τrec) and dissociation (τdiss) in the cell are ˜3 times and ˜2 times longer, respectively. The slower rate of proton transfer (˜10 times) inside the CHO cell compared to that in bulk water is ascribed to slower solvation dynamics, lower availability of free water molecules, and disruption of hydrogen-bond network inside the cell. Translational and rotational diffusion of HPTS inside a single CHO cell have been investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and picosecond anisotropy measurement, respectively. Both the translational and rotational diffusion slow down inside the live cell. FCS studies indicate that HPTS remains tightly bound to a macromolecule inside the cell.

  2. A Reaction that Takes Place in Beakers but not in Conical Flasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin; Ophardt, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Inductors are substances that undergo a reaction and in so doing markedly accelerate or induce a simultaneous reaction. An experiment showing a reaction involving the oxidation of iodide to iodine by chromium (VI) found to be slow in the absence of acid, but which proceeded rapidly when iron (II) was induced is demonstrated.

  3. Orthodontics in 3 millennia. Chapter 8: The cephalometer takes its place in the orthodontic armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Norman

    2006-04-01

    After World War II, cephalometric radiography came into widespread use, enabling orthodontists to measure changes in tooth and jaw positions produced by growth and treatment. Cephalometrics revealed that many malocclusions resulted from faulty jaw relationships, not just malposed teeth, and made it possible to see that jaw growth could be altered by orthodontic treatment. Since 1931, a multitude of analyses have been developed, whereby the face is inscribed in triangles, rectangles, and polygons, permitting the orthodontist to dissect the profile into an array of angular and distance measurements. Those who embraced too quickly these measurements as a panacea soon learned that they are best taken with a grain of good judgment.

  4. Where Does the Transformation of Precipitated Ceria Nanoparticles in Hydroponic Plants Take Place?

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhui; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Xiao; Zhang, Junzhe; Ding, Yayun; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Guo, Zhi; Zhang, Lijuan; Chai, Zhifang; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have been found to be partly biotransformed from Ce(IV) to Ce(III) in plants, yet the transformation process and mechanism are not fully understood. Here, we try to clarify the specific site and necessary conditions for the transformation of precipitated CeO2 NPs in hydroponic cucumber plants. Three different treatment modes were adopted according to whether the NPs were incubated with roots all the time or not. Results showed that exposure modes significantly affect the translocation and transformation of CeO2 NPs. In the normal exposure mode, Ce was present as a Ce(IV) and Ce(III) mixture in the roots and shoots, and the proportion of Ce(III) in the shoots was enhanced obviously with the increase of exposure time. The results of short-time incubation and petiole exposure modes suggested that CeO2 NPs could not be reduced within a short incubation time (3 h) or be further reduced inside the plant tissues. It was deduced that root surfaces are the sites, and the physicochemical interaction between the NPs and root exudates at the nanobio interface is the necessary condition for the transformation of CeO2 NPs in plant systems. These results will contribute to understanding the transformation mechanism of CeO2 and other metal-based NPs and properly evaluate their ecological effects.

  5. To impose enhanced penalties for certain drug offense that take place on Federal property.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Nunes, Devin [R-CA-22

    2013-06-05

    07/15/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Systemic analysis of desertification processes taking place in the Limpopo river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messina, Mario; Attorre, Fabio; Vitale, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Desertification and land degradation are phenomena that ranks among the greatest environmental challenges of our time. Desertification is a global issue, with serious implications worldwide for biodiversity, socio-economic stability and sustainable development. Biophysical indicators of land degradation and desertification, like Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and Total Ecosystem Respiration (Reco) were provided by remote sensing technology (MODIS). The study aims to evaluate the dynamical changes of NPP and Reco in the Limpopo river basin, a Southern African region that includes, Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe, during the time period 2001-2010. In particular, the relations between NPP, Reco, environmental, physiological and land use parameters have been widely investigated through the application of a new and powerful statistical classifier, the Random Forest Analysis (RFA), and a general non-linear model, the Response Surface Regression Model (GRM). RFA highlighted that Temperature is one of the most important predictors affecting NPP and Reco in the Limpopo river basin. Conversely, other environmental parameters like, Precipitation, Evapotranspiration and Vegetation cover rarely influence NPP and Reco. Our results provide information on desertification and land degradation phenomena and a first step for identifying practices to mitigate their negative impacts. However, it must be taken into account that NPP and Reco depend by a multitude of factors (e.g. human activities, socio-economic policies) and can vary in relation to spatial and temporal scale. In order to achieve a better understanding of land degradation and desertification processes, land use and socio-economic variables should be considered.

  7. The Eclipsing Binary Di Herculis: One Mystery Solved, But Another Takes Its Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Nicole; Guinan, E.; Maloney, F.

    2010-01-01

    The 8th-mag eclipsing binary DI Herculis has perplexed scientists for the past few decades due to its anomalously slow apsidal motion rate. DI Her consists of two main-sequence stars (B5V, B6V), with P(orb) = 10.55 days, and eccentricity(e= 0.489). Since the apsidal motion is dominated by General Relativity, the system is one of the few tests available for verifying the theory. Combining the expected classical (1.93°/100 yr) and relativistic (2.34°/100 yr) effects, the predicted apsidal motion rate is 4.27°/100 yr. Our recent determination of the apsidal motion yields 1.33°+/-0.25 /100 yr, based on eclipse timings from 1936-2008. Recently, Albrecht et al (2009, Nature 461) have apparently solved the apsidal motion anomaly of DI Her, finding that the axes of both stars are significantly inclined from the normal to the orbital plane. This was determined from the radial velocity curves and observing the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during primary and secondary eclipses. Having significantly misaligned axes of rotation produces a perturbation that greatly reduces the classical apsidal motion effect, thus explaining the observed small apsidal motion rate. Even though this discovery apparently solves the problem, it raises new questions as to how the axes are so tilted. Additionally, tilted axes are expected to contribute to other orbital effects, such as changes in orbital inclination, which have not yet observed from the apparent constancy in eclipse depths over time. We have also searched for evidence of small periodic oscillations in the eclipse timings and found no evidence of a light travel time effect arising from a possible tertiary component. Further, we find evidence that the projected rotation axes of the stars may be precessing, since it appears that the value of V(rot)sini has increased over the past 30 years. This research was supported by NSF/RUI Grants AST05-07536/42.

  8. Interdisciplinary Discussions of Hydrology and River Linking Take Place in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Vijay P.

    2004-05-01

    Considerable investment has been made in the development, construction, and management of water resources projects in the past 150 years. Many of these projects have caused deleterious environmental consequences, such as erosion and sedimentation of reservoirs, water logging, and alkalinization and salinization of irrigated lands. With the rising demand worldwide for quality water, the increasing call for preservation of environmental quality and sustenance of biodiversity, and the simultaneous and growing acceptance that the water use and management strategies of the past have often been unsustainable, there is an urgent need for wide-ranging discussions of past water resources policies and practices. Scientists, engineers, planners, managers, administrators, and policy makers recently met in Bhopal, India, to discuss problems and exchange ideas pertaining to water, water use, and the environment in arid, semi-arid, sub-humid, humid, and tropical regions. More than 400 participants representing 30 countries, including Australia, Canada, India, Germany, France, Italy, the United States, and the United Kingdom, among others attended Water and Environment (WE)-2003.

  9. When Private Schools Take Public Dollars: What's the Place of Accountability in School Voucher Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Chester E., Jr.; Hentges, Christina M.; Petrilli, Michael J.; Winkler, Amber M.

    2009-01-01

    Critics of school voucher programs argue that private schools that receive taxpayer dollars should be held accountable to the same standards as public schools. School choice supporters counter that private schools should be left alone to answer to the parents of their students. The authors advocate for a re-visit to the discussion of…

  10. 49 CFR 40.221 - Where does an alcohol test take place?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... alcohol testing site, you must ensure that it provides visual and aural privacy to the employee being... privacy requirements of paragraph (c) is not readily available, this part allows a reasonable suspicion or... site must afford visual and aural privacy to the employee to the greatest extent practicable. (f)...

  11. Writing from the Broken Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Recounts the author's own experience writing about deeply painful experiences in her own life, and the gift of healing this journey offered. Argues that such writing takes a special kind of courage, and that these books (a volume of poetry about sexual abuse, and the other a novel about a troubled family) hold out a promise of hope and healing.…

  12. There's No Place Like School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, the principal of a rural Oregon elementary school used a 21st Century Community Learning Centers grant and Title I funds to design a program to address homeless children's personal and social well-being. Kids eat a nutritious breakfast, take showers, get clothes washed, receive positive feedback, and participate in after-school…

  13. The Magical Place Called Opera.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raplenovich, Kay

    1996-01-01

    "Create Your Own," month-long "Artist in Education" residencies sponsored by the Ohio Arts Council, are used to guide students and teachers through the process of taking the vision of an original opera conceived by students and turning it into a reality. A local opera company is actually created. "Create Your Own"…

  14. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  15. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  16. [The place of the child].

    PubMed

    Molenat, F

    2008-08-01

    A child's self-construction and access to his identity depend on the conditions of affective security in which he is raised and his genealogical references, the founders of his own place in society. The quality of the professional care at the different stages of the birth process is confirmed as a major variable in the parents' sense of security, followed by the child's. The drift toward the illusion of a right to a child is tempered by the attention that can be contributed by all healthcare providers who come into contact with couples when they request artificial procreation: recognition of their request, but also of their suffering, so as to separate the child's place from parental projections that may be poorly adjusted to the child's needs.

  17. Acid natural clinoptilolite: structural properties against adsorption/separation of n-paraffins.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Aramis; Farías, Tania; de Ménorval, Louis Charles; Autié-Castro, Giselle; Yee-Madeira, Hernany; Contreras, José Luis; Autié-Pérez, Miguel

    2011-08-01

    The employment of an acid natural clinoptilolite (AZH-1) in the adsorption and separation of n-paraffins has been evaluated. Natural clinoptilolite, NZ, was the raw material used to prepare the sodium-exchanged clinoptilolite (AZ) starting from which the AZH-1 sample was obtained by acid treatment. The structural stability of the samples after the applied treatments was demonstrated. The nitrogen adsorption experiments indicated that the acid sample has a homogeneous porous distribution and a considerable increase in the micropore volume with respect to NZ and AZ. The employment of the inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution (IGCID) allowed studying the adsorption and separation of n-paraffin mixtures on AZH-1. It was also confirmed that the diffusion on AZH-1 took place in an unblocked structure through the A channel of ten members with minimal interactions. The IGCID results demonstrated the capacities of the acid Cuban natural zeolite in the adsorption and separation of n-paraffin mixtures.

  18. X-ray Spectromicroscopy Study of Protein Adsorption to a Polystyrene-Polylactide Blend

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Bonnie; Hitchcock, Adam; Cornelius, Rena; Brash, John; Scholl, Andreas; Doran, Andrew

    2010-06-09

    Synchrotron-based X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) was used to study the adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) to polystyrene-polylactide (40:60 PS-PLA, 0.7 wt percent) thin films, annealed under various conditions. The rugosity of the substrate varied from 35 to 90 nm, depending on the annealing conditions. However, the characteristics of the protein adsorption (amounts and phase preference) were not affected by the changes in topography. The adsorption was also not changed by the phase inversion which occured when the PS-PLA substrate was annealed above Tg of the PLA. The amount of protein adsorbed depended on whether adsorption took place from distilled water or phosphate buffered saline solution. These differences are interpreted as a result of ionic strength induced changes in the protein conformation in solution.

  19. Role of pH in metal adsorption from aqueous solutions containing chelating agents on chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, F.C.; Tseng, R.L.; Juang, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The role of pH in adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions containing chelating agents on chitosan was emphasized. Four chelating agents including ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, tartaric acid, and sodium gluconate were used. It was shown that the adsorption ability of Cu(II) on chitosan from its chelated solutions varied significantly with pH variations. The competition between coordination of Cu(II) with unprotonated chitosan and electrostatic interaction of the Cu(II) chelates with protonated chitosan took place because of the change in solution pH during adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity was obtained within each optimal pH range determined from titration curves of the chelated solutions. Coordination of Cu(II) with the unprotonated chitosan was found to dominate at pH below such an optimal pH value.

  20. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  1. Adsorption of pesticides on resins.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulos, Grigorios; Hourdakis, Adamadia; Doulia, Danae

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the capability of organic hydrophobic polymeric resins Amberlite XAD-4 and XAD-7 to remove the pesticides alachlor and amitrole from water. The pesticides adsorption on the two different adsorbents was measured by batch equilibrium technique and isotherm types and parameters were estimated. Two theoretical models were applied based on a Freundlich and a Langmuir isotherms. The effect of pesticides chemical composition and structure as well as the nature of solid surface on the efficiency of adsorption was evaluated. The influence of pH also was studied. In low pH solutions adsorption of amitrole was higher upon the nonionic aliphatic acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 in comparison to the nonionic, crosslinked macroreticular copolymer of styrene divinylbenzene XAD-4. In neutral and intermediate pH solutions the polar acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 was more effective to the retention of alachlor. The acrylic ester copolymer showed at pH 3 the lower effectiveness in alachlor removal from water. The data of the adsorption isotherms of pesticides upon the examined polymeric resins seemed to conform to both the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherm models.

  2. Engineering and Design: Adsorption Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    adsorptive media addressed in- clude granular activated carbon (GAC) and other alternative adsorption carbon media, such as powdered activated carbon (PAC... Adsorption Media. a. Activated Carbon . Activated carbon can be manufactured from carbonaceous material, in- cluding coal (bituminous, subbituminous...information contained in Corps of Engineers Guide Specification 11225: Downflow Liquid Granular Activated Carbon

  3. There's no place like home.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T

    1996-02-05

    When the school system in tiny Colby, Kans., signed onto a health plan that excluded the only hospital in the entire county, its citizens learned an important lesson. ¿If we're not working together,¿ says the hospital's administrator, ¿health plans and medical centers are going to come in here and take business away from us.¿ Here's what they learned about keeping rural health care rural.

  4. A Place Pedagogy for "Global Contemporaneity"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Margaret J.

    2010-01-01

    Around the globe people are confronted daily with intransigent problems of space and place. Educators have historically called for place-based or place-conscious education to introduce pedagogies that will address such questions as how to develop sustainable communities and places. These calls for place-conscious education have included liberal…

  5. Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium study for removal of mercuric chloride by CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon sorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Liu, Zhouyang; Lee, Joo-Youp

    2013-05-15

    The intrinsic adsorption kinetics of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) was studied for raw, 4% and 10% CuCl2-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl2-AC) sorbents in a fixed-bed system. An HgCl2 adsorption kinetic model was developed for the AC sorbents by taking into account the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium, and internal and external mass transfer. The adsorption kinetic constants determined from the comparisons between the simulation and experimental results were 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5m(3)/(gs) for DARCO-HG, 4%(wt), and 10%(wt) CuCl2-AC sorbents, respectively, at 140 °C. CuCl2 loading was found to slightly increase the adsorption kinetic constant or at least not to decrease it. The HgCl2 equilibrium adsorption data based on the Langmuir isotherm show that high CuCl2 loading can result in high binding energy of the HgCl2 adsorption onto the carbon surface. The adsorption equilibrium constant was found to increase by ~10 times when CuCl2 loading varied from 0 to 10%(wt), which led to a decrease in the desorption kinetic constant (k2) by ~10 times and subsequently the desorption rate by ~50 times. Intraparticle pore diffusion considered in the model showed good accuracy, allowing for the determination of intrinsic HgCl2 adsorption kinetics.

  6. Self-healable and reversible liposome leakage by citrate-capped gold nanoparticles: probing the initial adsorption/desorption induced lipid phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Juewen

    2015-09-01

    We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer.We herein report that the adsorption/desorption of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) transiently causes leakage in fluid phase DOPC liposomes, while the liposomes do not leak with AuNPs capped with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Leakage also fails to occur for gel phase DPPC liposomes. Citrate-capped (but not MPA-capped) AuNPs raise the phase transition temperature of DPPC. We conclude that citrate-capped AuNPs interact with the PC liposomes very strongly, inducing a local fluid-to-gel lipid phase transition for DOPC. Leakage takes place during this transition, and the membrane integrity is resumed after the transition. Citrate-capped AuNPs allow stronger van der Waals forces than MPA-capped AuNPs with PC liposomes, since the latter are separated from the liposome surface by the ~0.3 nm MPA layer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04805b

  7. An anthropologist in unexpected places

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Johan Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Much contemporary anthropology has turned away from exclusive focus on so-called “primitive” tribes in far-away places. The study of urban people has become more prominent, and some researchers have also turned their gaze towards marginalized minorities in their communities. Philippe Bourgois is an example of this. He is well known for studying crack dealers in East Harlem, New York ( In Search of Respect) and homeless heroin addicts in San Francisco (Righteous Dopefiend). Kula Kula was lucky enough to catch him in his office, and had a chat via skype. PMID:25436019

  8. Adsorption of small inorganic molecules on a defective MoS2 monolayer.

    PubMed

    González, César; Biel, Blanca; Dappe, Yannick J

    2017-04-05

    We present a theoretical study of molecular adsorption on defects on a MoS2 monolayer. Based on Density Functional Theory, our calculations confirm that small inorganic molecules, such as CO2, CO, H2O, NO, NO2, H2 and N2, remain bonded to the pristine monolayer through weak van der Waals interactions, suggesting that the molecules may easily diffuse over the clean monolayer. On the other hand, the introduction of defects can lead to three different situations, depending on the defect and the molecule considered: physisorption, chemical (strong) bonding to the metallic defects, namely the Mo substitutional atoms on the S vacancies, and dissociation, that can take place spontaneously at 0 K in some specific cases or by the effect of thermal agitation in molecules such as CO2 or NO2 on the S vacancy. Our energetic and electronic analyses provide an explanation to such bonding possibilities, showing that in the low interacting situations, the molecules tend to adopt a planar configuration parallel to the monolayer, while a molecular rotation is favored in order to facilitate the bond formation on the reactive sites. Finally, the ab initio based Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) simulations show the fingerprint of each molecule adsorbed on the most reactive site. This work opens the way to the possibility of tuning the catalytic properties of MoS2 by controlling the creation of specific defects in the MoS2 monolayer.

  9. Imaging molecular adsorption and desorption dynamics on graphene using terahertz emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Y.; Kawayama, I.; Tabata, M.; Salek, K. A.; Murakami, H.; Wang, M.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.; Kono, J.; Tonouchi, M.

    2014-08-01

    Being an atomically thin material, graphene is known to be extremely susceptible to its environment, including defects and phonons in the substrate on which it is placed as well as gas molecules that surround it. Thus, any device design using graphene has to take into consideration all surrounding components, and device performance needs to be evaluated in terms of environmental influence. However, no methods have been established to date to readily measure the density and distribution of external perturbations in a quantitative and non-destructive manner. Here, we present a rapid and non-contact method for visualizing the distribution of molecular adsorbates on graphene semi-quantitatively using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging. We found that the waveform of terahertz bursts emitted from graphene-coated InP sensitively changes with the type of atmospheric gas, laser irradiation time, and ultraviolet light illumination. The terahertz waveform change is explained through band structure modifications in the InP surface depletion layer due to the presence of localized electric dipoles induced by adsorbed oxygen. These results demonstrate that terahertz emission serves as a local probe for monitoring adsorption and desorption processes on graphene films and devices, suggesting a novel two-dimensional sensor for detecting local chemical reactions.

  10. The Internal Dynamics of Fibrinogen and Its Implications for Coagulation and Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Stephan; Schmid, Friederike; Settanni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a serum multi-chain protein which, when activated, aggregates to form fibrin, one of the main components of a blood clot. Fibrinolysis controls blood clot dissolution through the action of the enzyme plasmin, which cleaves fibrin at specific locations. Although the main biochemical factors involved in fibrin formation and lysis have been identified, a clear mechanistic picture of how these processes take place is not available yet. This picture would be instrumental, for example, for the design of improved thrombolytic or anti-haemorrhagic strategies, as well as, materials with improved biocompatibility. Here, we present extensive molecular dynamics simulations of fibrinogen which reveal large bending motions centered at a hinge point in the coiled-coil regions of the molecule. This feature, likely conserved across vertebrates according to our analysis, suggests an explanation for the mechanism of exposure to lysis of the plasmin cleavage sites on fibrinogen coiled-coil region. It also explains the conformational variability of fibrinogen observed during its adsorption on inorganic surfaces and it is supposed to play a major role in the determination of the hydrodynamic properties of fibrinogen. In addition the simulations suggest how the dynamics of the D region of fibrinogen may contribute to the allosteric regulation of the blood coagulation cascade through a dynamic coupling between the a- and b-holes, important for fibrin polymerization, and the integrin binding site P1. PMID:26366880

  11. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC.

  12. Adsorption modeling for macroscopic contaminant dispersal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Axley, J.W.

    1990-05-01

    Two families of macroscopic adsorption models are formulated, based on fundamental principles of adsorption science and technology, that may be used for macroscopic (such as whole-building) contaminant dispersal analysis. The first family of adsorption models - the Equilibrium Adsorption (EA) Models - are based upon the simple requirement of equilibrium between adsorbent and room air. The second family - the Boundary Layer Diffusion Controlled Adsorption (BLDC) Models - add to the equilibrium requirement a boundary layer model for diffusion of the adsorbate from the room air to the adsorbent surface. Two members of each of these families are explicitly discussed, one based on the linear adsorption isotherm model and the other on the Langmuir model. The linear variants of each family are applied to model the adsorption dynamics of formaldehyde in gypsum wall board and compared to measured data.

  13. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  14. Removal of dorzolamide from biomedical wastewaters with adsorption onto graphite oxide/poly(acrylic acid) grafted chitosan nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Kyzas, George Z; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J; Deliyanni, Eleni A

    2014-01-01

    A novel graphite oxide/poly(acrylic acid) grafted chitosan nanocomposite (GO/CSA) was prepared and used as biosorbent for the removal of pharmaceutical compound (dorzolamide) from biomedical synthetic wastewaters. The performance was evaluated taking into account pH, kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption. GO/CSA presented higher adsorption capacity in comparison with the parent materials (graphite oxide and poly(acrylic acid) grafted chitosan). All adsorbents prepared were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and potentiometric titration. The surface features were also evaluated after the dorzolamide adsorption in order to derive the adsorption mechanism. It was suggested that the reactive groups of GO and CSA can interact with the amino groups of dorzolamide and mainly the abundance of carboxyl groups of GO/CSA composite was the main reason for its enhanced adsorption capacity.

  15. Binary adsorption equilibrium of carbon dioxide and water vapor on activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Xiao, Penny; Webley, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Adsorption equilibria of a CO2/H2O binary mixture on activated alumina F-200 were measured at several temperatures and over a wide range of concentrations from 4% to around 90% of the saturated water vapor pressure. In comparison with the single-component data, the loading of CO2 was not reduced in the presence of H2O, whereas at low relative humidity the adsorption of H2O was depressed. The binary system was described by a competitive/cooperative adsorption model where the readily adsorbed water layers acted as secondary sites for further CO2 adsorption via hydrogen bonding or hydration reaction. The combination of kinetic models, namely, a Langmuir isotherm for characterizing pure CO2 adsorption and a BET isotherm for H2O, was extended to derive a binary adsorption equilibrium model for the CO2/H2O mixture. Models based on the ideal adsorbed solution theory of Myers and Prausnitz failed to characterize the data over the whole composition range, and a large deviation of binary CO2/H2O equilibrium from ideal solution behavior was observed. The extended Langmuir-BET (LBET) isotherm, analogous to the extended Langmuir equation, drastically underestimated the CO2 loading. By incorporating the interactions between CO2 and H2O molecules on the adsorbent surface and taking into account the effect of nonideality, the realistic interactive LBET (R-LBET) model was found to be in very good agreement with the experimental data. The derived binary isosteric heat of adsorption showed that the heat was reduced by competitive adsorption but promoted by cooperative adsorption.

  16. PLACES Aircraft Experiment Test Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    7 7 -7 II’ DNA-TR-81-223 ~ PLACES AIRCRAFT EXPERIMENT TEST RESULTS ESL, Incorporated 495 Java Drive...Incorporated AREA , WORK UNIT NUMBERS 495 Java Drive Task S99QAXHB-00007 Sunnyvale, California 94086 II. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12...a, . C . . . ’. . ’’ " ’ ’ " ’ " ." "" " " "S """" " ", " " "" :""’" " ’ ,.U I p.00 I’. (v cu C. 2Sso7 012 22S 7571 linq ~ STR IE 0i aA 0 Fiue1-16 A

  17. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  18. Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, A. L.; Rojas, S.; Dias-Droguett, D. E.; Bhuyan, H.; Aomoa, N.; Kakati, M.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanoparticles using a quartz crystal microbalance. The carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from a thermal plasma jet at different pressure (15 - 263 torr) of the reactants and different current (50 - 250 A) to generate the plasma. The as-prepared carbon nanoparticles were directly deposited on top of the gold electrode of a quartz crystal and we monitored in-situ the changes in resonance frequency while the chamber was pressurized at different hydrogen pressures. These changes enabled determination of absorbed hydrogen mass in order to get H/C mass ratio curves as a function of H2 pressure. Adsorption curves obtained in some carbon nanoparticles indicated the formation of hydrogen monolayer inside the pores of the carbon nanoparticles. Using the value of the jump due to the formation of a H2\\ monolayer, a surface area was estimated between 40-60 m2/g for hydrogen adsorption. In other carbon samples, hydrogen uptake curves indicated that H2 was filling the sample's pores when pore volume was large. These observations will be discussed in detail for several carbon nanoparticles samples. Funds provided by VRI Puente 9/2012 and 10/2012

  19. Adsorption of Gemini surfactants onto clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Salako, O; Lo, C; Couzis, A; Somasundaran, P; Lee, J W

    2013-12-15

    This work addresses the adsorption of two Gemini surfactants at the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate-water interface. The Gemini surfactants investigated here are Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 that have two anionic head groups and one hydrophobic tail group. The adsorption of these surfactants was quantified using adsorption isotherms and the adsorption isotherms were determined using liquid-liquid titrations. Even if the Gemini surfactant adsorption isotherms show multi-layer adsorption, they possess the first Langmuir layer with the second adsorption layer only evident in the 2A1 adsorption isotherm. Zeta potentials of CP hydrate particles in the surfactant solution of various concentrations of Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were measured to further explain their adsorption behavior at the CP hydrate-water interface. Zeta potentials of alumina particles as a model particle system in different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were also measured to confirm the configuration of all the surfactants at the interface. The determination of the isotherms and zeta-potentials provides an understanding framework for the adsorption behavior of the two Gemini surfactants at the hydrate-water interface.

  20. Taking Sides on "Takings": Rhetorical Resurgence of the Sagebrush Rebellion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaviello, Tony

    The "Takings Clause" of the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution seems clear enough: when the government takes an individual's property, it must pay him or her for it. The "Sagebrush Rebellion" refers to the numerous incarnations of a movement to privatize public lands and contain environmental regulation. This…

  1. Catechol and HCl Adsorption on TiO2(110) in Vacuum and at the Water-TiO2 Interface.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, Henrik H; Shea, Joan-Emma; Metiu, Horia

    2015-06-18

    Coadsorbed water is often unavoidable in electrochemistry and low-temperature catalysis. In addition, water influences the adsorption of biomolecules on surfaces. We use ab initio DFT molecular dynamics and ground-state calculations to study the adsorption of HCl and catechol on the rutile TiO2(110) surface and at a water-rutile interface. We find that a coadsorbed water film reduces the adsorption energy of both catechol and HCl significantly because water molecules must be displaced from the surface before catechol or HCl can adsorb. The adsorption energy of catechol (or HCl) at the water-rutile interface can be estimated as the adsorption energy in vacuum minus the energy to remove two water molecules (respectively, one water molecule) from the rutile surface in vacuum and place them in liquid water. This estimate predicts the effect of a surface water film on adsorption without the need of molecular dynamics.

  2. Tritium Specific Adsorption Simulation Utilizing the OSPREY Model

    SciTech Connect

    Veronica Rutledge; Lawrence Tavlarides; Ronghong Lin; Austin Ladshaw

    2013-09-01

    During the processing of used nuclear fuel, volatile radionuclides will be discharged to the atmosphere if no recovery processes are in place to limit their release. The volatile radionuclides of concern are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. Methods are being developed, via adsorption and absorption unit operations, to capture these radionuclides. It is necessary to model these unit operations to aid in the evaluation of technologies and in the future development of an advanced used nuclear fuel processing plant. A collaboration between Fuel Cycle Research and Development Offgas Sigma Team member INL and a NEUP grant including ORNL, Syracuse University, and Georgia Institute of Technology has been formed to develop off gas models and support off gas research. This report is discusses the development of a tritium specific adsorption model. Using the OSPREY model and integrating it with a fundamental level isotherm model developed under and experimental data provided by the NEUP grant, the tritium specific adsorption model was developed.

  3. Non-Debye relaxation in the dielectric response of nematic liquid crystals: surface and memory effects in the adsorption-desorption process of ionic impurities.

    PubMed

    de Paula, J L; Santoro, P A; Zola, R S; Lenzi, E K; Evangelista, L R; Ciuchi, F; Mazzulla, A; Scaramuzza, N

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the presence of ions in insulating materials such as nematic liquid crystals may be responsible for the dielectric spectroscopy behavior observed experimentally. It is shown that, at low frequencies, an essentially non-Debye relaxation process takes place due to surface effects. This is accomplished by investigating the effects of the adsorption-desorption process on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell when the generation and recombination of ions is present. The adsorption-desorption is governed by a non-usual kinetic equation in order to incorporate memory effects related to a non-Debye relaxation and the roughness of the surface. The analysis is carried out by searching for solutions to the drift-diffusion equation that satisfy the Poisson equation relating the effective electric field to the net charge density. We also discuss the effect of the mobility of the ions, i.e., situations with equal and different diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions, on the impedance and obtain an exact expression for the admittance. The model is compared with experimental results measured for the impedance of a nematic liquid crystal sample and a very good agreement is obtained.

  4. The first contribution of capillary electrophoresis to the study of abiotic origins of homochirality: investigation of the enantioselective adsorption of 3-carboxy adipic acid on minerals.

    PubMed

    Castro-Puyana, María; Salgado, Antonio; Hazen, Robert M; Crego, Antonio L; Alegre, María Luisa Marina

    2008-04-01

    CE with UV detection was used for the first time to determine the enantioselective adsorption of the short-chain tricarboxylic acid, 3-carboxy adipic acid, on minerals as a mean of investigating plausible mechanisms for the origin of biochemical homochirality on Earth. The use of vancomycine as chiral selector in the separation buffer using the partial filling technique enabled the separation of the two enantiomers of this organic acid in about 12 min. Taking into account that this compound has a low absorption of the UV light, and in order to achieve the sensitivity needed to determine the enantiomeric excess of samples of 3-carboxy adipic acid adsorbed on minerals, we applied a strategy consisting of a field-amplified sample stacking together with the use of a bubble capillary and detection at low wavelength (192 nm). This combination enabled an LOD of about 10(-7) M and the determination of the enantiomeric excess of 3-carboxy adipic acid adsorbed on calcite and feldspar mineral samples at subnanomol levels of this acid. Results showed that an enantioselective adsorption of the enantiomers of 3-carboxy adipic acid on minerals took place.

  5. Non-Debye relaxation in the dielectric response of nematic liquid crystals: Surface and memory effects in the adsorption-desorption process of ionic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, J. L.; Santoro, P. A.; Zola, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Evangelista, L. R.; Ciuchi, F.; Mazzulla, A.; Scaramuzza, N.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the presence of ions in insulating materials such as nematic liquid crystals may be responsible for the dielectric spectroscopy behavior observed experimentally. It is shown that, at low frequencies, an essentially non-Debye relaxation process takes place due to surface effects. This is accomplished by investigating the effects of the adsorption-desorption process on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell when the generation and recombination of ions is present. The adsorption-desorption is governed by a non-usual kinetic equation in order to incorporate memory effects related to a non-Debye relaxation and the roughness of the surface. The analysis is carried out by searching for solutions to the drift-diffusion equation that satisfy the Poisson equation relating the effective electric field to the net charge density. We also discuss the effect of the mobility of the ions, i.e., situations with equal and different diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions, on the impedance and obtain an exact expression for the admittance. The model is compared with experimental results measured for the impedance of a nematic liquid crystal sample and a very good agreement is obtained.

  6. Place-Identity in a School Setting: Effects of the Place Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcouyeux, Aurore; Fleury-Bahi, Ghozlane

    2011-01-01

    Studies on place identity show positive relationships between the evaluation of a place and mechanisms involved in place identification. However, individuals also identify with places of low social prestige (places that bear a negative social image). Few authors investigate the nature of place identity processes in this case. The goal of this…

  7. Oh, the Places They Went: SBOs Share Their Career Paths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    "Oh the Places You'll Go!" That Dr. Seuss book is a standard gift for graduates as they are sent out into the world-whether it's off to college or into the world of work. "You can steer yourself any direction you choose." What direction did school business officials take to get where they are today? The most recent…

  8. Adsorption of cadmium on husk of Lathyrus sativus: physico-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Panda, G C; Das, S K; Chatterjee, S; Maity, P B; Bandopadhyay, T S; Guha, A K

    2006-06-01

    Adsorption of cadmium (II) from aqueous solution by low-cost biosorbents was investigated. Husk of Lathyrus sativus (HLS) was found to be the most efficient in this respect and removed approximately 95% of the metal. The influence of pH, temperature, contact time and metal ion concentration on the adsorption process by HLS was studied. Hydrogen ion concentration of the solution greatly influenced the process with an optimum at pH 5.0-6.0, whereas temperature had no significant effect. The process was very fast and more than 90% of the total adsorption took place within the first 5 min and was found to follow pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The adsorption data can better be explained by Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum adsorption capacity was 35 mg/g of HLS at pH 5.0 and 30 degrees C. Scanning electron micrographs showed that cadmium was present as micro precipitate on the surface of the adsorbent. Cadmium replaced calcium of the biomass as revealed from the EDX analysis indicating that the adsorption proceeds through ion exchange mechanism. Cadmium could be desorbed from the loaded biomass by lowering pH approximately 1.0 with mineral acid.

  9. The astrophysics of crowded places.

    PubMed

    Davies, Melvyn

    2002-12-15

    Today the Sun is in a relatively uncrowded place. The distance between it and the nearest other star is relatively large (about 200,000 times the Earth-Sun distance!). This is beneficial to life on Earth; a close encounter with another star is extremely unlikely. Such encounters would either remove the Earth from its orbit around the Sun or leave it on an eccentric orbit similar to a comet's. But the Sun was not formed in isolation. It was born within a more-crowded cluster of perhaps a few hundred stars. As the surrounding gas evaporated away, the cluster itself evaporated too, dispersing its stars into the Galaxy. Virtually all stars in the Galaxy share this history, and here I will describe the role of 'clusterness' in a star's life. Stars are often formed in larger stellar clusters (known as open and globular clusters), some of which are still around today. I will focus on stars in globular clusters and describe how the interactions between stars in these clusters may explain the zoo of stellar exotica which have recently been observed with instruments such as the Hubble Space Telescope and the X-ray telescopes XMM-Newton and Chandra. In recent years, myriad planets orbiting stars other than the Sun--the so-called 'extrasolar' planets--have been discovered. I will describe how a crowded environment will affect such planetary systems and may in fact explain some of their mysterious properties.

  10. DNA stickers promote polymer adsorption onto cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sato, Teruaki; Ali, Md Monsur; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2012-10-08

    Adsorption of oligonucleotides onto model cellulose surfaces was investigated by comparing the Boese and Breaker's cellulose binding oligonucleotide (CBO) with a nonspecific oligonucleotide control (NSO). Measurements using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique confirmed that CBO adsorbed onto cellulose more than NSO, particularly at high ionic strengths (100 mM CaCl(2)). CBO showed a higher maximum adsorption on nanofibrillated and nanocrystalline cellulose than on regenerated cellulose, indicating a preference for the native cellulose I crystal structure under conditions that favored specific adsorption over calcium-mediated electrostatically driven adsorption. In addition, an anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM) with grafted CBO also adsorbed onto the surface of cellulose in CaCl(2), whereas the unmodified A-PAM did not. This work shows that CBO performs as a "sticker", facilitating the adsorption of polyacrylamide onto cellulose, even under high ionic strength conditions where the adsorption of conventional polyelectrolytes is inhibited.

  11. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  12. Multistage adsorption of diffusing macromolecules and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Tom; D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2007-09-01

    We derive the equations that describe adsorption of diffusing particles onto a surface followed by additional surface kinetic steps before being transported across the interface. Multistage surface kinetics occurs during membrane protein insertion, cell signaling, and the infection of cells by virus particles. For example, viral entry into healthy cells is possible only after a series of receptor and coreceptor binding events occurs at the cellular surface. We couple the diffusion of particles in the bulk phase with the multistage surface kinetics and derive an effective, integrodifferential boundary condition that contains a memory kernel embodying the delay induced by the surface reactions. This boundary condition takes the form of a singular perturbation problem in the limit where particle-surface interactions are short ranged. Moreover, depending on the surface kinetics, the delay kernel induces a nonmonotonic, transient replenishment of the bulk particle concentration near the interface. The approach generalizes that of Ward and Tordai [J. Chem. Phys. 14, 453 (1946)] and Diamant and Andelman [Colloids Surf. A 183-185, 259 (2001)] to include surface kinetics, giving rise to qualitatively new behaviors. Our analysis also suggests a simple scheme by which stochastic surface reactions may be coupled to deterministic bulk diffusion.

  13. Taking Over a Broken Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Taking over a broken program can be one of the hardest tasks to take on. However, working towards a vision and a common goal--and eventually getting there--makes it all worth it in the end. In this article, the author shares the lessons she learned as the new director for the Bright Horizons Center in Ashburn, Virginia. She suggests that new…

  14. Taking Chances in Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Lindsey; Knox, David

    2016-01-01

    A 64 item Internet questionnaire was completed by 381 undergraduates at a large southeastern university to assess taking chances in romantic relationships. Almost three fourths (72%) self-identified as being a "person willing to take chances in my love relationship." Engaging in unprotected sex, involvement in a "friends with…

  15. Adsorption kinetics of azinphosmethyl from aqueous solution onto pyrolyzed Horseshoe sea crab shell from the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gulen, J; Aroguz, A Z; Dalgin, D

    2005-07-01

    The adsorption behavior of azinphosmethyl on pyrolyzed Horseshoe Crab (Limulus polyphemus) outer shell, as a residue, from the Atlantic Ocean, collected along the Maine coast, USA, has been studied with regards to its kinetic and equilibrium conditions, taking into account adsorbate concentrations of 2 x 10(-3), 4 x 10(-3), 6 x 10(-3), and 8 x 10(-3), as well as temperatures of 30 degrees C, 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C, and 60 degrees C. The yield of adsorption of azinphosmethyl from aqueous solution ranged from 56.1% to 61% with temperature increasing. Kinetic studies showed that adsorption rate decreased as the initial azinphosmethyl concentration increased. It was found, that the adsorption reaction obeyed first-order kinetics. The overall rate constants were estimated for different temperatures. The activation energy for adsorption was about 1.52 kJmol(-1), which implies that azinphosmethyl mainly adsorbed physically onto Horseshoe Crab outer shell. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied to the experimental data and isotherm constants were calculated. The thermodynamic parameters DeltaG0, DeltaH0 and DeltaS0 for the adsorption reaction were evaluated based on equilibrium data and in connection with this result the thermodynamic aspects of adsorption reaction were discussed. The adsorption was found to be endothermic in nature. The adsorbent used in this study proved highly efficient for the removal of azinphosmethyl.

  16. Survey cover pages: to take or not to take.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Randy A; Lam, Charlene; Wiederman, Michael W

    2010-01-01

    In survey research, the elements of informed conset, including contact information for the researchers and the Institutional Review Board, may be located on a cover page, which participants are advised that they may take. To date, we are not aware of any studies examining the percentage of research participants that actually take these cover pages, which was the purpose of this study. Among a consecutive sample of 419 patients in an internal medicine setting, 16% removed the cover page. There were no demographic predictors regarding who took versus did not take the cover page.

  17. Theoretical Study of Trimethylacetic Acid Adsorption on CeO 2 (111) Surface

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Weina; Thevuthasan, S.; Wang, Wenliang; ...

    2016-01-11

    We investigated trimethylacetic acid (TMAA) adsorption on stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient CeO2(111) surfaces using density functional theory that accounts for the on-site Coulomb interaction via a Hubbard term (DFT+U) and long-range dispersion correction. Both the molecular state and dissociative state (TMAA → TMA– + H+) were identified on stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient CeO2(111) surfaces. For the stoichiometric surface, two thermodynamically favorable configurations with adsorption energies of the order of -30 kcal/mol are identified; one is a molecule adsorption state, and the other one is a dissociative state. For the oxygen-deficient surface, dissociative states are more favorable than molecular states. Moreover, the mostmore » favorable configuration is the dissociative adsorption of TMAA with the adsorption energy of the order of -77 kcal/mol. The dissociated TMA moiety takes the position of oxygen vacancy, forming three Ce–O bonds. The signature vibrational frequencies for these thermodynamically stable structures are reported as well as their electronic structures. The effects of long-range dispersion interactions are found to be negligible for geometries but important for adsorption energies.« less

  18. Theoretical Study of Trimethylacetic Acid Adsorption on CeO 2 (111) Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weina; Thevuthasan, S.; Wang, Wenliang; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-11

    We investigated trimethylacetic acid (TMAA) adsorption on stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient CeO2(111) surfaces using density functional theory that accounts for the on-site Coulomb interaction via a Hubbard term (DFT+U) and long-range dispersion correction. Both the molecular state and dissociative state (TMAA → TMA– + H+) were identified on stoichiometric and oxygen-deficient CeO2(111) surfaces. For the stoichiometric surface, two thermodynamically favorable configurations with adsorption energies of the order of -30 kcal/mol are identified; one is a molecule adsorption state, and the other one is a dissociative state. For the oxygen-deficient surface, dissociative states are more favorable than molecular states. Moreover, the most favorable configuration is the dissociative adsorption of TMAA with the adsorption energy of the order of -77 kcal/mol. The dissociated TMA moiety takes the position of oxygen vacancy, forming three Ce–O bonds. The signature vibrational frequencies for these thermodynamically stable structures are reported as well as their electronic structures. The effects of long-range dispersion interactions are found to be negligible for geometries but important for adsorption energies.

  19. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  20. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  1. Adsorption of acid dye onto organobentonite.

    PubMed

    Baskaralingam, P; Pulikesi, M; Elango, D; Ramamurthi, V; Sivanesan, S

    2006-02-06

    Removal of Acid Red 151 from aqueous solution at different dye concentrations, adsorbent doses and pH has been studied. The bentonite clay has been modified using cationic surfactants, which has been confirmed using XRD and FT-IR analyses. Experimental result has shown that the acidic pH favours the adsorption. The adsorption isotherms are described by means of Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption capacity has been found to be 357.14 and 416.66 mg g(-1) for the cetyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride-bentonite (CDBA-bent) and cetylpyridinium chloride-bentonite (CP-bent), respectively. Kinetic studies show that the adsorption followed second-order kinetics.

  2. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  3. Sensor technology to support Aging in Place.

    PubMed

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie; Miller, Steven J; Galambos, Colleen; Alexander, Greg; Keller, James; Popescu, Mihail

    2013-06-01

    Older adults want to age in place at home. Sensor technology has the potential to help by monitoring individuals' health status, detecting emergency situations, and notifying health care providers. Researchers at the University of Missouri are investigating the impact of registered nurse care coordination and technology on the ability of older adults to age in place. Technology coupled with care coordination has improved clinical outcomes. This article presents an overview of the Aging in Place research, TigerPlace as a Missouri-sponsored Aging in Place facility, and the sensor technology developed to support Aging in Place.

  4. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  5. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  6. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  7. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  8. 47 CFR 0.481 - Place of filing applications for radio authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. 0.481 Section 0.481 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION... Taking Examinations § 0.481 Place of filing applications for radio authorizations. For locations...

  9. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  10. 29 CFR 1471.520 - Who places the information into the EPLS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who places the information into the EPLS? 1471.520 Section... GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 1471.520 Who places the information into the EPLS? Federal officials who take actions to exclude persons under this part or...

  11. 5 CFR 919.520 - Who places the information into the EPLS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Who places the information into the EPLS... List System § 919.520 Who places the information into the EPLS? Federal officials who take actions to... enter the following information about those persons into the EPLS: (a) Information required by §...

  12. 5 CFR 919.520 - Who places the information into the EPLS?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Who places the information into the EPLS... List System § 919.520 Who places the information into the EPLS? Federal officials who take actions to... enter the following information about those persons into the EPLS: (a) Information required by §...

  13. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  14. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  15. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  16. 29 CFR 780.140 - Place of performing the practice as a factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... STANDARDS ACT General Scope of Agriculture âsuch Farming Operationâ-of the Farmer § 780.140 Place of performing the practice as a factor. So long as the farming operations to which a farmer's practice pertains... altered by the fact that the farming operations take place on more than one farm or by the fact that...

  17. The adsorption of phloretin to lipid monolayers and bilayers cannot be explained by langmuir adsorption isotherms alone.

    PubMed Central

    Cseh, R; Benz, R

    1998-01-01

    Phloretin and its analogs adsorb to the surfaces of lipid monolayers and bilayers and decrease the dipole potential. This reduces the conductance for anions and increases that for cations on artificial and biological membranes. The relationship between the change in the dipole potential and the aqueous concentration of phloretin has been explained previously by a Langmuir adsorption isotherm and a weak and therefore negligible contribution of the dipole-dipole interactions in the lipid surface. We demonstrate here that the Langmuir adsorption isotherm alone is not able to properly describe the effects of dipole molecule binding to lipid surfaces--we found significant deviations between experimental data and the fit with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. We present here an alternative theoretical treatment that takes into account the strong interaction between membrane (monolayer) dipole field and the dipole moment of the adsorbed molecule. This treatment provides a much better fit of the experimental results derived from the measurements of surface potentials of lipid monolayers in the presence of phloretin. Similarly, the theory provides a much better fit of the phloretin-induced changes in the dipole potential of lipid bilayers, as assessed by the transport kinetics of the lipophilic ion dipicrylamine. PMID:9512036

  18. Taking Research into Schools: The West Lothian Action Enquiry Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binnie, Lynne M.; Allen, Kristen; Beck, Elaine

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines the efforts of an Educational Psychology Service (EPS) to develop its practice in the area of research. It will argue that the Action Enquiry model of service delivery can empower teaching staff and may allow an effective means of change and improvement to take place in schools. This model steers research towards providing…

  19. Teaching Kids with Learning Disabilities to Take Public Transit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Taking public transit can make anyone nervous, especially in a large or medium-sized city where there are many different bus lines going many different places. The author's daughter, Anna, has multiple learning disabilities and may never learn to drive, but she wants to be as independent as possible so the author taught her to ride the bus. This…

  20. Anion adsorption induced surface reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    2005-11-01

    Surface stress plays an important role in the behavior of solid surfaces. Potential-controlled anion adsorption in electrolytes alters the surface stress of the electrode and results in morphology changes to the surfaces. With a combination of potential-induced surface stress measurement and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), it is demonstrated that anion adsorption induces changes in structure of thin films and modifies the growth morphology and stress evolution in epitaxially grown films. Surface structural transitions in the heteroepitaxial system consisting of one to two gold monolayers on platinum substrates were observed. By increasing the potential, structural transitions, from (1 x 1), to a striped phase, to a hexagonal structure, occurred in the gold bilayer. This hexagonal structure was related to the formation of an ordered sulfate adlayer with a ( 3x7 ) structure. Such transitions were repeatable by cycling the potential. Furthermore, the transitions between various dislocation structures were affected by anion adsorption. The surface composition of the gold bilayer on Pt was measured by underpotential deposition of copper. By subtracting the contribution of a pure Pt surface from the gold bi-layer on Pt, a stress change of -2.4 N/m was observed, which agrees with the stress change of -2.46 N/m predicted to accompany formation of 1.5 MLs of coherent Au on Pt(111) from epitaxy theory. The Cu monolayer deposited on Au(111) from an acid sulfate electrolyte was found to be pseudomorphic while the Cu monolayer formed on Au(111) in vacuum was incoherent. The stress-thickness change associated with the coherent monolayer of copper on Au(111) in electrolyte was -0.6 N/m, while conventional epitaxy theories predict a value of +7.76 N/m. STM results elucidated the sulfate adsorption on the copper monolayer caused an expansion of the layer as evidenced by a Moire Structure. For the Cu monolayer on Au(111), the sulfate-induced expansion

  1. Charcoal/Nitrogen Adsorption Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Refrigerator with no wear-related moving parts produces 0.5 W of cooling at 118 K. When fully developed, refrigerator needs no electrical power, and life expectancy of more than 10 yr, operates unattended to cool sensitive infrared detectors for long periods. Only moving parts in adsorption cryocooler are check valves. As charcoal is cooled in canister, gas pressure drops, allowing inlet check valve to open and admit more nitrogen. When canister is heated, pressure rises, closing inlet valve and eventually opening outlet valve.

  2. Moisture adsorption in optical coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, H. Angus

    1988-01-01

    The thin film filter is a very large aperture component which is exceedingly useful because of its small size, flexibility and ease of mounting. Thin film components, however, do have defects of performance and especially of stability which can cause problems in systems, particularly where long-term measurements are being made. Of all of the problems, those associated with moisture absorption are the most serious. Moisture absorption occurs in the pore-shaped voids inherent in the columnar structure of the layers. Ion-assisted deposition is a promising technique for substantially reducing moisture adsorption effects in thin film structures.

  3. Fixed-bed adsorption study of methylene blue onto pyrolytic tire char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrigianni, Vassiliki; Giannakas, Aris; Papadaki, Maria; Albanis, Triantafyllos; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the adsorption efficiency of acid treated pyrolytic tire char to cationic methylene blue (MB) dye adsorption from aqueous solutions was investigated by fixed-bed adsorption column experiments. The effects of the initial dye concentration (10 - 40 mg L-1) and feed flow rate (50 - 150 mL min -1) with a fixed bed height (15 cm) were studied in order to determine the breakthrough characteristics of the adsorption system. The Adams-Bohart, Yoon-Nelson and Thomas model were applied to the adsorption of MB onto char at different operational conditions to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic parameters of the column. The results showed that the maximum adsorbed quantities decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing initial MB concentration. Breakthrough time and exhaustion time increased with decreasing inlet dye concentration and flow rate. In contrast with Adams-Bohart model, Yoon-Nelson model followed by Thomas model were found more suitable to describe the fixed-bed adsorption of methylene blue by char. The correlation coefficient values R2 for both models at different operating conditions are higher than 0.9 and the low average relative error values provided very good fittings of experimental data at different operating conditions. Higher adsorption capacity of 3.85 mg g -1 was obtained at 15 cm of adsorbent bed height, flow rate of 100 mL min -1and initial MB concentration of 40 mg L-1. Although that activated carbons exhibited higher adsorption capacities in the literature, acid-treated pyrolytic tire char was found to be considerably efficient adsorbent for the removal of MB dye column taking into account the advantages of the simpler production process compared to activated carbons, as well as, the availability of waste tire feedstock and concurrent waste tire management.

  4. Electric-Assisted Capillary Rise Adsorption of Polar and Nonpolar Solvents by Cellulose and Chitosan.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi; Wang, Min-Yan; Wu, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Lin-Hai; Shen, Qing

    2016-02-18

    Electric-assisted capillary rise adsorption of polar and nonpolar solvents by cellulose and chitosan was studied by employing an electrostatic generator to assist a common capillary rise wetting by taking the anode and cathode electrodes respectively linked to a metal tube charged with samples and the probe solvent. To vary the voltage at 0, 100, 200, and 300 V, respectively, the recorded dynamic adsorption results showed that the cellulose and chitosan both kept a stable adsorption of the nonpolar hexane and diiodomethane, obviously ignoring the voltage increase. Moreover, the hexane amount adsorbed by cellulose and chitosan is similar, while the diiodomethane amount was adsorbed to a greater amount by cellulose as compared with the chitosan corresponding to these two biomaterials-based nonpolar components, for example, greater for cellulose and smaller for chitosan. Results also showed that the adsorption of polar water and formamide was gradually increased with the voltage increase, especially for chitosan, to correspond to the polar component of these materials, for example, greater for chitosan and smaller for cellulose. These adsorption behaviors suggested that the application of an extra electric field can only enhance the adsorption of polar solvent, and the molecular structure, for exmaple, the β-(1-4)-linked d-glucosamine units of chitosan, has sensitive electric field responses in polar solvent adsorption as compared with those of the β(1-4)-linked d-glucose units of cellulose. The reason for the electric adsorption behaviors was known due to the presence of an extra electric-field-induced reduction of the total surface tension of solvent and mainly the polar component.

  5. Adsorption studies of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on lead sulphide, copper sulphide and zinc sulphide - determination Cr(III) in the presence of Cr(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Sarwar, M.; Masood, M.K.; Farooq, S. )

    1990-01-01

    The adsorption studies of Cr(VI) in presence of Cr(III) on the sulphide of Lead, Zinc and Copper has been studied. It has been found that in case of lead sulphide 100% adsorption of Cr(VI) took place at pH 4.0 and of Cr(III) at pH 7.0. While in case of zinc sulphide and 100% adsorption of Cr(VI) took place at pH 4.5 and of Cr(III) at pH 6.5. In case of copper sulphide 100% adsorption of Cr(VI) took place at pH 5.0 and of Cr(III) at pH 7.0. This difference in adsorption at different pH values forms the basis for the determination of these ions. The method is accurate.

  6. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

  7. 76 FR 79409 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... environmental reasons (such as presence of marine mammals). Pile driving would typically take place 6 days per... underwater acoustic environment consists of ambient sound, defined as environmental background sound levels... reduction in sound levels. Both environmental conditions and the characteristics of the sound...

  8. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Monomer Adsorption-Desorption Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jian-Hong; Lin, Zhen-Quan; Chen, Xiao-Shuang

    2009-05-01

    We propose an adsorption-desorption model for a deposit growth system, in which the adsorption and desorption of particles coexist. By means of the generalized rate equation we investigate the cluster (island) size distribution in the dynamic equilibrium state. The results show that the evolution behaviour of the system depends crucially on the details of the rate kernels. The cluster size distribution can take the scale-free power-law form in some cases, while it grows exponentially with size in other cases.

  9. The Space Place: Adventures in Informal Education - and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, D.; Leon, N.

    2001-12-01

    products both economical and comprehensive. While the Space Place effort started as a New Millennium Program effort, it was quickly expanded to all NASA missions who wish to participate. The team soon realized that the informal education community wanted a variety of content - not just more and more information about a few missions, but rather a continuous infusion of new content from new missions. This expansion of the Space Place program allows any mission to take advantage of the existing Space Place infrastructure and alliances - and provides the much-needed variety of materials that the informal education community desires. This poster session will provide an overview of the Space Place effort within the informal education community, and will illustrate some of the valuable lessons learned by the team in working with this rich and varied community.

  10. Hawaii Play Fairway Analysis: Hawaiian Place Names

    SciTech Connect

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-11-15

    Compilation of Hawaiian place names indicative of heat. Place names are from the following references: Pukui, M.K., and S.H. Elbert, 1976, Place Names of Hawaii, University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, HI 96822, 289 pp. ; Bier, J. A., 2009, Map of Hawaii, The Big Island, Eighth Edition, University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, HI  96822, 1 sheet.; and Reeve, R., 1993, Kahoolawe Place Names, Consultant Report No. 16, Kahoolawe Island Conveyance Commission, 259 pp.

  11. Nurse! What's Taking So Long?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164577.html Nurse! What's Taking So Long? Study at a children's ... in a child's hospital room, anxious parents expect nurses to respond pronto. That rarely happens, however, and ...

  12. LRO Takes the Moon's Temperature

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the June 2011 lunar eclipse, scientists will be able to get a unique view of the moon. While the sun is blocked by the Earth, LRO's Diviner instrument will take the temperature on the lunar ...

  13. Take Care with Pet Reptiles

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Features Take Care with Pet Reptiles and Amphibians Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... helpful resources. Safe Handling Tips for Reptiles and Amphibians Always wash your hands thoroughly after handling reptiles ...

  14. Taking Care of Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack or stroke. Lifestyle changes, like making smart food choices and being physically active, and taking medicine can ... your risk by managing your “ABCs” with smart food choices, physical activity, and medicine. Losing weight and quitting ...

  15. LRO Takes the Moon's Temperature

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the December 2011 lunar eclipse, LRO's Diviner instrument will take the temperature on the lunar surface. Since different rock sizes cool at different rates, scientists will be able to infer...

  16. Taking America To New Heights

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP) is taking America to new heights with its Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) partners. In 2011, NASA entered into funded Space Act Agreements (SAAs) w...

  17. Anthropological Studies of Native American Place Names.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Thomas F.

    1997-01-01

    Traces development of Native American place name studies from Boas (1880s) to the present. Argues that place names convey information about physical environments but also reveal how people perceive, conceptualize, and utilize their environment. Suggests the utility of place names as a framework for cultural analysis and describes recent…

  18. Sense of Place in Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudryavtsev, Alex; Stedman, Richard C.; Krasny, Marianne E.

    2012-01-01

    Although environmental education research has embraced the idea of sense of place, it has rarely taken into account environmental psychology-based sense of place literature whose theory and empirical studies can enhance related studies in the education context. This article contributes to research on sense of place in environmental education from…

  19. Adsorption of beta blockers to environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kibbey, Tohren C G; Paruchuri, Rajiv; Sabatini, David A; Chen, Lixia

    2007-08-01

    Beta-adrenergic blocking agents (beta blockers) are widely used pharmaceuticals which have been detected in the environment. Predicting the transport and ultimate fate of beta blockers in the environment requires understanding their adsorption to soils and sediments, something for which little information is currently available. The objective of this work was to examine the adsorption of three beta blockers, propranolol, metoprolol and nadolol, to a natural alluvial material, as well as to six minerals present as components of the alluvial material. Batch adsorption experiments indicate that, for most of the minerals studied, compound hydrophobicity is an important predictor of adsorption, with propranolol,the most hydrophobic compound studied, adsorbing to the greatest extent. Results further suggest that, for the minerals studied, electrostatic effects are not a good predictor of adsorption; adsorption extent was not well-predicted by either surface zeta potential or by the difference between experiment pH and point of zero charge, despite the cationic nature af the three beta blockers at experiment pH values. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), on adsorption. Results indicate that SDBS significantly increases the adsorption of propranolol to two different sorbents. This result is potentially important because surfactants such as SDBS are likely to be present in wastewater effluents with beta blockers and could influence their mobility in the environment.

  20. Polychelated cryogels: hemoglobin adsorption from human blood.

    PubMed

    Erol, Kadir

    2017-02-01

    The separation and purification methods are extremely important for the hemoglobin (Hb) which is a crucial biomolecule. The adsorption technique is popular among these methods and the cryogels have been used quite much due to their macropores and interconnected flow channels. In this study, the Hb adsorption onto the Cu(II) immobilized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-glycidyl methacrylate), poly(HEMA-GMA)-Cu(II), cryogels was investigated under different conditions (pH, interaction time, initial Hb concentration, temperature and ionic strength) to optimize adsorption conditions. The swelling test, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface area (BET), elemental and ICP-OES analysis were performed for the characterization of cryogels. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) molecule was used as a Cu(II)-chelating ligand. The Hb adsorption capacity of cryogels was determined as 193.8 mg Hb/g cryogel. The isolation of Hb from human blood was also studied under optimum adsorption conditions determined and the Hb (124.5 mg/g cryogel) was isolated. The adsorption model was investigated in the light of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models and it was determined to be more appropriate to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  1. Arsenate adsorption by unsaturated alluvial sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenate adsorption as a function of solution arsenic concentration and solution pH was investigated on five alluvial sediments from the Antelope Valley, Western Mojave Desert, California. Arsenate adsorption increased with increasing solution pH, exhibited a maximum around pH 4 to 5, and then decr...

  2. BSA adsorption on bimodal PEO brushes.

    PubMed

    Bosker, W T E; Iakovlev, P A; Norde, W; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2005-06-15

    BSA adsorption onto bimodal PEO brushes at a solid surface was measured using optical reflectometry. Bimodal brushes consist of long (N=770) and short (N=48) PEO chains and were prepared on PS surfaces, applying mixtures of PS(29)-PEO(48) and PS(37)-PEO(770) block copolymers and using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Pi-A isotherms of (mixtures of) the block copolymers were measured to establish the brush regime. The isotherms of PS(29)-PEO(48) show hysteresis between compression and expansion cycles, indicating aggregation of the PS(29)-PEO(48) upon compression. Mixtures of PS(29)-PEO(48) and PS(37)-PEO(770) demonstrate a similar hysteresis effect, which eventually vanishes when the ratio of PS(37)-PEO(770) to PS(29)-PEO(48) is increased. The adsorption of BSA was determined at brushes for which the grafting density of the long PEO chains was varied, while the total grafting density was kept constant. BSA adsorption onto monomodal PEO(48) and PEO(770) brushes was determined for comparison. The BSA adsorption behavior of the bimodal brushes is similar to the adsorption of BSA at PEO(770) monomodal brushes. The maximum of BSA adsorption at low grafting density of PEO(770) can be explained by ternary adsorption, implying an attraction between BSA and PEO. The contribution of primary adsorption to the total adsorbed amount is negligible.

  3. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  4. Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica for uranium adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guo; Yurun, Feng; Li, Ma; Dezhi, Gao; Jie, Jing; Jincheng, Yu; Haibin, Sun; Hongyu, Gong; Yujun, Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica (TBP-SBA-15) was synthesized by modified mesoporous silica with γ-amino propyl triethoxy silane and tributyl phosphate. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), thermo-gravimetric/differential thermalanalyzer (TG/DTA), N2 adsorption-desorption (BET) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Results showed that TBP-SBA-15 had large surface areas with ordered channel structure. Moreover, the effects of adsorption time, sorbent dose, solution pH, initial uranium concentration and temperature on the uranium adsorption behaviors were investigated. TBP-SBA-15 showed a high uranium adsorption capacity in a broad range of pH values. The U(VI) adsorption rate of TBP-SBA-15 was fast and nearly achieved completion in 10 min with the sorbent dose of 1 g/L. The U(VI) adsorption of TBP-SBA-15 followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, indicating that the process was belonged to chemical adsorption. Furthermore, the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0) confirmed that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous.

  5. Spirit Takes a Turn for Adirondack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This rear hazard-identification camera image looks back at the circular tracks made in the martian soil when the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit drove about 3 meters (10 feet) toward the mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack, Spirit's first rock target. Spirit made a series of arcing turns totaling approximately 1 meter (3 feet). It then turned in place and made a series of short, straightforward movements totaling approximately 2 meters (6.5 feet). The drive took about 30 minutes to complete, including time stopped to take images. The two rocks in the upper left corner of the image are called 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi.' In the upper right corner is a portion of the lander, now known as the Columbia Memorial Station.

  6. Application of cellulose acetate to the selective adsorption and recovery of Au(III).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Kubota, Fukiko; Baba, Yuzo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro

    2014-10-13

    Cellulose acetyl derivatives were examined for the selective recovery of Au(III) from acidic chloride solutions as an adsorbent, and cellulose acetate fibers (CAF) were found to be effective for the separation of Au(III) from other metal ions, including the precious metal ions Pt(IV) and Pd(II). The amount of Au(III) adsorbed by the fibers increased with an increase in the hydrochloric acid concentration, but decreased with an increase in the ionic strength of the solution. The adsorption of Au(III) onto CAF took place quickly and an adsorption equilibrium was reached within 1h. The maximum adsorption capacity of Au(III) was determined to be 110 mg/g at 2M hydrochloric acid. The loaded Au(III) was readily recovered by incineration.

  7. Effect of purity on adsorption capacities of a Mars-like clay mineral at different pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Traci; Mcdoniel, Bridgett; Bustin, Roberta; Allton, Judith H.

    1992-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in adsorption of carbon dioxide on Marslike clay minerals. Some estimates of the carbon dioxide reservoir capacity of the martian regolith were calculated from the amount of carbon dioxide adsorbed on the ironrich smectite nontronite under martian conditions. The adsorption capacity of pure nontronite could place upper limits on the regolith carbon dioxide reservoir, both at present martian atmospheric pressure and at the postulated higher pressures required to permit liquid water on the surface. Adsorption of carbon dioxide on a Clay Mineral Society standard containing nontronite was studied over a wide range of pressures in the absence of water. Similar experiments were conducted on the pure nontronite extracted from the natural sample. Heating curves were obtained to help characterize and determine the purity of the clay sample.

  8. How Surface Heterogeneity Affects Protein Adsorption: Annealing of OTS Patterns and Albumin Adsorption Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Gerald N.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy and intensity histogram analysis techniques were used to monitor spatially-resolved albumin adsorption kinetics to model heterogeneous surfaces on sub-μm scales. Several distinct protein subpopulations were resolved, each represented by a normal distribution of adsorption densities on the adsorbent surface. Histogram analyses provided dynamic information of mean adsorption density, spread in adsorption density, and surface area coverage for each distinct protein subpopulation. A simple adsorption model is proposed in which individual protein binding events are predicted by the summation of multiple protein's surface sub-site interactions with different binding energy sub-sites on adsorbent surfaces. This model is predictive of the albumin adsorption on the patterns produced by one step μ-contact printing (μCP) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on glass but fails to describe adsorption once the same patterns are altered by a thermal annealing step. PMID:19746205

  9. Historical consideration of place: inviting multiple histories and narratives in place-based education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Miyoun

    2010-12-01

    Drawing upon van Eijck and Roth's notion of "place as chronotope," this review paper discusses historical consideration of place as it assists us to conceptualize place in its collective, political, and dialogical nature. In a place, we are positioned amidst of the multiplicity of histories and narratives within ever shifting various contexts of place. Historical consideration acknowledges multiplicity and marginalization in a place, thus, legitimizes multiple place histories and invites multiple narratives to engage in dialogical process of place. With historical consideration, place identity can be approached and framed in its collective, dialogical nature within larger social, political contexts of place. The paper further suggests that place based education should be able to acknowledge and invite multiple histories and marginalized voices of students into creating a place to dwell together.

  10. Factors affecting drug adsorption on beta zeolites.

    PubMed

    Pasti, Luisa; Sarti, Elena; Cavazzini, Alberto; Marchetti, Nicola; Dondi, Francesco; Martucci, Annalisa

    2013-05-01

    The adsorption behaviour of three commonly used drugs, namely ketoprofen, hydrochlorothiazide and atenolol, from diluted aqueous solutions on beta zeolites with different SiO2/Al2O3 ratio (i.e. 25, 38 and 360) was investigated by changing the ionic strength and the pH, before and after thermal treatment of the adsorbents. The selective adsorption of drugs was confirmed by thermogravimetry and X-ray diffraction. The adsorption capacity of beta zeolites was strongly dependent on both the solution pH and the alumina content of the adsorbent. Such a remarkable difference was interpreted as a function of the interactions between drug molecules and zeolite surface functional groups. Atenolol was readily adsorbed on the less hydrophobic zeolite, under pH conditions in which electrostatic interactions were predominant. On the other hand, ketoprofen adsorption was mainly driven by hydrophobic interactions. For undissociated molecules the adsorption capability increased with the increase of hydrophobicity.

  11. Adsorption and desorption of reversible supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweistra, Henk J. A.; Besseling, N. A. M.

    2006-08-01

    We report numerical mean-field results on the quasichemical level of approximation that describe adsorption of reversible supramolecular polymers at a flat interface. Emphasis is laid on the regime of strong adsorption from a dilute solution. There are two differences with respect to macromolecular polymer adsorption: (i) adsorption sets in at relatively high monomer concentrations of the surrounding solution, and (ii) the surface is filled within a much narrower concentration range. Contrary to macromolecular polymers, supramolecular polymers can therefore be desorbed by dilution of the equilibrium solution by solvent within an experimentally accessible concentration window. Based on simple thermodynamic arguments, we provide a quantitative explanation why supramolecular polymers adsorb at relatively high concentrations. Moreover, we discuss the (by comparison) narrow concentration window wherein filling of the surface occurs. This is attributed to the cooperative nature of supramolecular polymer adsorption. The degree of cooperativity is quantified by means of the Hill parameter n .

  12. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  13. Finite-Temperature Hydrogen Adsorption/Desorption Thermodynamics Driven by Soft Vibration Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sung-Jae; Lee, Eui-Sup; Yoon, Mina; Yong-Hyun, Kim

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that room-temperature hydrogen storage on nanostructured or porous materials requires enhanced dihydrogen adsorption. In this work we reveal that room-temperature hydrogen storage is possible not only by the enhanced adsorption, but also by making use of the vibrational free energy from soft vibration modes. These modes exist for example in the case of metallo-porphyrin-incorporated graphenes (M-PIGs) with out-of-plane ( buckled ) metal centers. There, the in-plane potential surfaces are flat because of multiple-orbital-coupling between hydrogen molecules and the buckled-metal centers. This study investigates the finite-temperature adsorption/desorption thermodynamics of hydrogen molecules adsorbed on M-PIGs by employing first-principles total energy and vibrational spectrum calculations. Our results suggest that the current design strategy for room-temperature hydrogen storage materials should be modified by explicitly taking finite-temperature vibration thermodynamics into account.

  14. Corrected thermodynamic description of adsorption via formalism of the theory of volume filling of micropores.

    PubMed

    Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Rychlicki, Gerhard

    2006-06-01

    Based on the series of benzene adsorption and related enthalpy of adsorption data measured on porous carbons that possess various porous structures, we show that the creation of a solidlike structure in pores depends on the average pore diameter of an adsorbent. Taking into account the solidlike adsorbed phase in the thermodynamic description of the adsorption process via the formalism of the theory of volume filling of micropores (TVFM) leads to very good agreement between the data measured experimentally and those calculated from TVFM. Finally we show that the boundary between solidlike and liquidlike structures of benzene molecules in carbon pores is located around the average pore diameter, close to ca. 2.1-2.4 nm.

  15. The influence of complex biological feedstock on the fluidization and bed stability in expanded bed adsorption

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lahore; Kleef; Kula; Thommes

    1999-08-20

    The stability of expanded bed adsorption systems (EBA) was studied in biomass containing culture broth by residence time distribution (RTD) experiments, using pulse inputs of fluorescent molecules as tracers. Different commercial adsorbents (Streamline DEAE, SP, Phenyl, Chelating, and AC) were tested at various biomass concentrations (2.5-12 %, wet weight) of whole (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) yeast, yeast cell homogenate, and Escherichia coli homogenate. Analyzing the RTD according to the PDE model (PDE: axially dispersed plug-flow exchanging mass with stagnant zones) allowed the calculation of three parameters: the number of transfer units for mass exchange between mobile and stagnant fraction (N), the Peclet number for overall axial dispersion (P), and the mobile fraction of the liquid in axially dispersed plug flow (varphi). When fluidization was performed in particle-free buffer the normalized response signal (after perfect input pulse) was symmetric (N:0; P: 50-100; varphi: 1), thus, demonstrating the formation of a homogeneous fluidized (expanded) bed. Upon application of suspended biomass the RTD was skewed, depending on the adsorbent used and the type and level of biomass present in the sample. This situation leads to three different characteristic pictures: the well-fluidized system (N: >/= 7-10; P: >/= 40; varphi: 0.80-0.90), the system exhibiting bottom channeling (N: < 1-2; P: >/= 40; varphi: 0.5-0.7) and, the system where extensive agglomeration develops (N: 4-7; P: 20-40; varphi: < 0.5). These results demonstrate that changes in the hydrodynamics of EBA already take place in the presence of moderate concentrations of biomass. Furthermore, those changes can be quantitatively described mainly in terms of the fraction of stagnant zones in the system, which are formed due to the interaction of biomass and adsorbent. The technique described here can be used to evaluate a certain combination of adsorbent and biomass with regard to its suitability for

  16. Adsorption of chromate and cupric ions onto chitosan-coated cotton gauze.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Franco; Tonetti, Cinzia; Periolatto, Monica

    2014-09-22

    A chitosan-coated cotton gauze was prepared by UV-curing and tested as adsorbent to remove copper (II) and chromium (VI) ions from water solutions. The adsorbent characterization was carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR). Adsorption of copper and chromium ions onto the gauze was tested in batch process at different experimental conditions. The effects of pH, temperature, contact time and metal ion concentration were investigated. The optimum adsorption took place at pH 3 for Cr(VI) and pH 5 for Cu(II) ions respectively, while the temperature did not affect the adsorption process. Pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models were used to investigate the adsorption kinetics which was found very fast and better described by the pseudo-second order model for both metal ions. The adsorption of Cr(VI) ions was satisfactory described by the Langmuir isotherm, while that of Cu(II) ions showed a better agreement with the Freundlich model.

  17. Dye adsorption of cotton fabric grafted with PPI dendrimers: Isotherm and kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Salimpour Abkenar, Samera; Malek, Reza Mohammad Ali; Mazaheri, Firouzmehr

    2015-11-01

    In this research, the cotton fabrics grafted with two generations of the poly(propylene imine) dendrimers were applied to adsorb textile dyes from aqueous solutions. Direct Red 80 (anionic dye), Disperse Yellow 42 (nonionic dye) and Basic Blue 9 (cationic dye) were selected as model dyes. The effect of various experimental parameters such as initial concentration of dyes, charge of dyes molecule, salt and pH was investigated on the adsorption process. Furthermore, kinetics and equilibrium of the adsorption process on the grafted samples were studied. It was found that maximum adsorption of anionic and disperse dyes took place at around pH 3, while cationic dye could be adsorbed at around pH 11. The Langmuir equation was able to describe the mechanism of dyes adsorption. In addition, the second-order equation was found to be fit with the kinetics data. Interestingly, it seems that the dye adsorption of the grafted fabrics is strongly pH dependent.

  18. Computational study of hydrocarbon adsorption in metal-organic framework Ni2(dhtp).

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuquan; Wick, Collin D; Thallapally, Praveen K; McGrail, B Peter; Dang, Liem X

    2011-03-31

    Enhancing the efficiency of the Rankine cycle, which is utilized for multiple renewable energy sources, requires the use of a working fluid with a high latent heat of vaporization. To further enhance its latent heat, a working fluid can be placed in a metal organic heat carrier (MOHC) with a high heat of adsorption. One such material is Ni\\DOBDC, in which linear alkanes have a higher heat of adsorption than cyclic alkanes. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the structural, diffusive, and adsorption properties of n-hexane and cyclohexane in Ni\\DOBDC. The strong binding for both n-hexane and cyclohexane with Ni\\DOBDC is attributed to the increase of the heat of adsorption observed in experiments. Our structural results indicate the organic linkers in Ni\\DOBDC are the primary binding sites for both n-hexane and cyclohexane molecules. However, at all temperatures and loadings examined in present work, n-hexane clearly showed stronger binding with Ni\\DOBDC than cyclohexane. This was found to be the result of the ability of n-hexane to reconfigure its structure to a greater degree than cyclohexane to gain more contacts between adsorbates and adsorbents. The geometry and flexibility of guest molecules were also related to their diffusivity in Ni\\DOBDC, with higher diffusion for flexible molecules. Because of the large pore sizes in Ni\\DOBDC, energetic effects were the dominant force for alkane adsorption and selectivity.

  19. Adsorption characteristics of sol gel-derived zirconia for cesium ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yakout, Sobhy M; Hassan, Hisham S

    2014-07-01

    Zirconia powder was synthesized via a sol gel method and placed in a batch reactor for cesium removal investigation. X-ray analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized for the evaluation of the developed adsorbent. The adsorption process has been investigated as a function of pH, contact time and temperature. The adsorption is strongly dependent on the pH of the medium whereby the removal efficiency increases as the pH turns to the alkaline range. The process was initially very fast and the maximum adsorption was attained within 60 min of contact. A pseudo-second-order model and homogeneous particle diffusion model (HPDM) were found to be the best to correlate the diffusion of cesium into the zirconia particles. Furthermore, adsorption thermodynamic parameters, namely the standard enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy, were calculated. The results indicate that cesium adsorption by zirconia is an endothermic (ΔH>0) process and good affinity of cesium ions towards the sorbent (ΔS>0) was observed.

  20. Adsorption, desorption and bioregeneration in the treatment of 2-chlorophenol with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Aktaş, Ozgür; Ceçen, Ferhan

    2007-03-22

    This study aims to clarify the effect of activated carbon type on the extent of adsorbability, desorbability, and bioregenerability in the treatment of 2-chlorophenol. Four different activated carbon types; thermally activated and chemically activated powdered carbons (PAC), and their granular countertypes (GAC) with similar physical characteristics were used. Thermally activated carbons adsorbed 2-chlorophenol much better than chemically activated ones. However, adsorption was more reversible in the case of chemically activated ones. The use of powdered and granular activated carbon countertypes resulted in comparable adsorption and desorption characteristics. For each activated carbon type, 2-chlorophenol exhibited higher adsorbability and lower desorbability than phenol. Biodegradation of 2-chlorophenol took place very slowly when it was used as the sole carbon source in acclimated and non-acclimated activated sludges. Bioregeneration occurred only via desorption due to an initial concentration gradient and no further desorption took place due to low biodegradability. Bioregeneration of activated carbon loaded with 2-chlorophenol was not a suitable option when 2-chlorophenol was the only carbon source. It is suggested to remove 2-chlorophenol via adsorption onto activated carbon rather than applying biological treatment. Also in such cases, the use of thermally activated carbons with higher adsorption and lower desorption capacities is recommended rather than chemically activated carbons.

  1. Adsorption of water vapor by poly(styrenesulfonic acid), sodium salt: isothermal and isobaric adsorption equilibria.

    PubMed

    Toribio, F; Bellat, J P; Nguyen, P H; Dupont, M

    2004-12-15

    Air conditioning and dehumidifying systems based on sorption on solids are of great interest, especially in humid climates, because they allow reduction of thermal loads and use of chlorofluorocarbons. Previous studies have shown that hydrophilic polymers such as sulfonic polymers can have very high performance in water adsorption from air. The aim of this study was to characterize the water vapor adsorption properties of fully sulfonated and monosulfonated poly(styrenesulfonic acid), sodium salt, and to elucidate the mechanism of adsorption on these materials. Adsorption isotherms have been determined by TGA between 298 and 317 K for pressures ranging from 0.1 to 45 hPa. They have type II of the IUPAC classification and a small hysteresis loop between adsorption and desorption processes was observed only for the monosulfonated sample. Water content is up to 80% weight at 80% relative humidity. Adsorption isotherms have been well fitted with the FHH model. Adsorption-desorption isobars have been determined by TGA under 37 hPa in the temperature range 298-373 K. They show that these polymers can be completely regenerated by heating at 313 K under humidified air. No degradation of the adsorption properties has been observed after several regenerations. Adsorption enthalpies and entropies have been deduced from the Clapeyron equation and from DSC measurements. A good agreement was found. A mechanism of adsorption is proposed considering two kinds of adsorbate: bounded water in electrostatic interaction with functional groups and free water resulting from condensation.

  2. Modeling the adsorption of mixed gases based on pure gas adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption-based Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers usually operate with pure gases. A sorption-based compressor has many benefits; however, it is limited by the pressure ratios it can provide. Using a mixed-refrigerant (MR) instead of a pure refrigerant in JT cryocoolers allows working at much lower pressure ratios. Therefore, it is attractive using MRs in sorption- based cryocoolers in order to reduce one of its main limitations. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady-state conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the process in a sorption compressor goes through various temperatures, pressures and adsorption concentrations; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In order to simulate the sorption process in a compressor a numerical analysis for mixed gases is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics. The pure gas adsorption properties have been measured for four gases (nitrogen, methane, ethane, and propane) with Norit-RB2 activated carbon. A single adsorption model is desired to describe the adsorption of all four gases. This model is further developed to a mixed-gas adsorption model. In future work more adsorbents will be tested using these four gases and the adsorption model will be verified against experimental results of mixed-gas adsorption measurements.

  3. Quantification of the effects of organic and carbonate buffers on arsenate and phosphate adsorption on a goethite-based granular porous adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M; Fukushi, Keisuke; Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Green, Peter G; Darby, Jeannie L

    2011-01-15

    Interest in the development of oxide-based materials for arsenate removal has led to a variety of experimental methods and conditions for determining arsenate adsorption isotherms, which hinders comparative evaluation of their adsorptive capacities. Here, we systematically investigate the effects of buffer (HEPES or carbonate), adsorbent dose, and solution pH on arsenate and phosphate adsorption isotherms for a previously well characterized goethite-based adsorbent (Bayoxide E33 (E33)). All adsorption isotherms obtained at different adsorbate/adsorbent concentrations were identical when 1 mM of HEPES (96 mg C/L) was used as a buffer. At low aqueous arsenate and phosphate concentration (∼1.3 μM), however, adsorption isotherms obtained using 10 mM of NaHCO(3) buffer, which is a reasonable carbonate concentration in groundwater, are significantly different from those obtained without buffer or with HEPES. The carbonate competitive effects were analyzed using the extended triple layer model (ETLM) with the adsorption equilibrium constant of carbonate calibrated using independent published carbonate adsorption data for pure goethite taking into consideration the different surface properties. The successful ETLM calculations of arsenate adsorption isotherms for E33 under various conditions allowed quantitative comparison of the arsenate adsorption capacity between E33 and other major adsorbents initially tested under varied experimental conditions in the literature.

  4. CO-induced Pd segregation and the effect of subsurface Pd on CO adsorption on CuPd surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padama, A. A. B.; Villaos, R. A. B.; Albia, J. R.; Diño, W. A.; Nakanishi, H.; Kasai, H.

    2017-01-01

    We report results of our study on the adsorption of CO on CuPd surfaces with bulk stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric layers using density functional theory (DFT). We found that the presence of Pd atoms in the subsurface layer promotes the adsorption of CO. We also observed CO-induced Pd segregation on the CuPd surface and we attribute this to the strong CO-Pd interaction. Lastly, we showed that the adsorption of CO promotes Pd-Pd interaction as compared to the pristine surface which promotes strong Cu-Pd interaction. These results indicate that CO adsorption on CuPd surfaces can be tuned by taking advantage of the CO-induced segregation and by considering the role of subsurface Pd atoms.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of Protein Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.; Belfort, Georges

    2008-03-01

    Amyloidogenic diseases, such as, Alzheimer's are caused by adsorption and aggregation of partially unfolded proteins. Adsorption of proteins is a concern in design of biomedical devices, such as dialysis membranes. Protein adsorption is often accompanied by conformational rearrangements in protein molecules. Such conformational rearrangements are thought to affect many properties of adsorbed protein molecules such as their adhesion strength to the surface, biological activity, and aggregation tendency. It has been experimentally shown that many naturally occurring proteins, upon adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces, undergo a helix to sheet or random coil secondary structural rearrangement. However, to better understand the equilibrium structural complexities of this phenomenon, we have performed Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of adsorption of a four helix bundle, modeled as a lattice protein, and studied the adsorption behavior and equilibrium protein conformations at different temperatures and degrees of surface hydrophobicity. To study the free energy and entropic effects on adsorption, Canonical ensemble MC simulations have been combined with Weighted Histogram Analysis Method(WHAM). Conformational transitions of proteins on surfaces will be discussed as a function of surface hydrophobicity and compared to analogous bulk transitions.

  6. Functionalized SBA-15 materials for bilirubin adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tao; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jun; Deng, Feng

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the driving force for bilirubin adsorption on mesoporous materials, a comparative study was carried out between pure siliceous SBA-15 and three functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous materials: CH 3-SBA-15 (MS), NH 2-SBA-15 (AS), and CH 3/NH 2-SBA-15 (AMS) that were synthesized by one-pot method. The obtained materials exhibited large surface areas (553-810 m 2/g) and pore size (6.6-7.1 nm) demonstrated by XRD and N 2-ad/desorption analysis. The SEM images showed that the materials had similar fiberlike morphology. The functionalization extent was calculated according to 29Si MAS NMR spectra and it was close to the designed value (10%). The synthesized mesoporous materials were used as bilirubin adsorbents and showed higher bilirubin adsorption capacities than the commercial active carbon. The adsorption capacities of amine functionalized samples AMS and AS were larger than those of pure siliceous SBA-15 and MS, indicating that electrostatic interaction was the dominant driving force for bilirubin adsorption on mesoporous materials. Increasing the ionic strength of bilirubin solution by adding NaCl would decrease the bilirubin adsorption capacity of mesoporous material, which further demonstrated that the electrostatic interaction was the dominant driving force for bilirubin adsorption. In addition, the hydrophobic interaction provided by methyl groups could promote the bilirubin adsorption.

  7. Determination of oleuropein using multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode by adsorptive stripping square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Cittan, Mustafa; Koçak, Süleyman; Çelik, Ali; Dost, Kenan

    2016-10-01

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode was used to prepare an electrochemical sensing platform for the determination of oleuropein. Results showed that, the accumulation of oleuropein on the prepared electrode takes place with the adsorption process. Electrochemical behavior of oleuropein was studied by using cyclic voltammetry. Compared to the bare GCE, the oxidation peak current of oleuropein increased about 340 times at MWCNT/GCE. Voltammetric determination of oleuropein on the surface of prepared electrode was studied using square wave voltammetry where the oxidation peak current of oleuropein was measured as an analytical signal. A calibration curve of oleuropein was performed between 0.01 and 0.70µM and a good linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient of 0.9984. Detection and quantification limits of the method were obtained as 2.73 and 9.09nM, respectively. In addition, intra-day and inter-day precision studies indicated that the voltammetric method was sufficiently repeatable. Finally, the proposed electrochemical sensor was successfully applied to the determination of oleuropein in an olive leaf extract. Microwave-assisted extraction of oleuropein had good recovery values between 92% and 98%. The results obtained with the proposed electrochemical sensor were compared with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis.

  8. Professionalism: Teachers Taking the Reins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helterbran, Valeri R.

    2008-01-01

    It is essential that teachers take a proactive look at their profession and themselves to strengthen areas of professionalism over which they have control. In this article, the author suggests strategies that include collaborative planning, reflectivity, growth in the profession, and the examination of certain personal characteristics.

  9. Taking Stands for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lorinda; Rios, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe efforts to help students take a stand for social justice in the College of Education at one predominantly White institution in the western Rocky Mountain region. The authors outline the theoretical frameworks that inform this work and the context of our work. The focus is on specific pedagogical strategies used…

  10. Four Takes on Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebell, Michael A.; Odden, Allan; Rolle, Anthony; Guthrie, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Educational Leadership talks with four experts in the fields of education policy and finance about how schools can weather the current financial crisis. Michael A. Rebell focuses on the recession and students' rights; Allan Odden suggests five steps schools can take to improve in tough times; Anthony Rolle describes the tension between equity and…

  11. Experiencing discrimination increases risk taking.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Jeremy P; Koslov, Katrina; Nock, Matthew K; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2013-02-01

    Prior research has revealed racial disparities in health outcomes and health-compromising behaviors, such as smoking and drug abuse. It has been suggested that discrimination contributes to such disparities, but the mechanisms through which this might occur are not well understood. In the research reported here, we examined whether the experience of discrimination affects acute physiological stress responses and increases risk-taking behavior. Black and White participants each received rejecting feedback from partners who were either of their own race (in-group rejection) or of a different race (out-group rejection, which could be interpreted as discrimination). Physiological (cardiovascular and neuroendocrine) changes, cognition (memory and attentional bias), affect, and risk-taking behavior were assessed. Significant participant race × partner race interactions were observed. Cross-race rejection, compared with same-race rejection, was associated with lower levels of cortisol, increased cardiac output, decreased vascular resistance, greater anger, increased attentional bias, and more risk-taking behavior. These data suggest that perceived discrimination is associated with distinct profiles of physiological reactivity, affect, cognitive processing, and risk taking, implicating direct and indirect pathways to health disparities.

  12. College Presidents Take on 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul

    2008-01-01

    College presidents have long gotten flak for refusing to take controversial stands on national issues. A large group of presidents opened an emotionally charged national debate on the drinking age. In doing so, they triggered an avalanche of news-media coverage and a fierce backlash. While the criticism may sting, the prime-time fracas may help…

  13. Take Charge of Your Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marshall A.

    2013-01-01

    Today's work world is full of uncertainty. Every day, people hear about another organization going out of business, downsizing, or rightsizing. To prepare for these uncertain times, one must take charge of their own career. This article presents some tips for surviving in today's world of work: (1) Be self-managing; (2) Know what you…

  14. Taking control of anorexia together.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elaine

    2015-02-27

    Many people with anorexia receive inadequate treatment for what is a debilitating, relentless and life-threatening illness. In Lincolnshire an innovative nurse-led day programme is helping people stay out of hospital and take back control from the illness. Peer support is crucial to the programme's success.

  15. Historical Consideration of Place: Inviting Multiple Histories and Narratives in Place-Based Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Miyoun

    2010-01-01

    Drawing upon van Eijck and Roth's notion of "place as chronotope," this review paper discusses historical consideration of place as it assists us to conceptualize place in its collective, political, and dialogical nature. In a place, we are positioned amidst of the multiplicity of histories and narratives within ever shifting various contexts of…

  16. Sense of Place in the Practice and Assessment of Place-Based Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semken, Steven; Freeman, Carol Butler

    2008-01-01

    We teach earth, ecological, and environmental sciences in and about "places" imbued with meaning by human experience. Scientific understanding is but one of the many types of meanings that can accrue to a given place. People develop emotional attachments to meaningful places. The "sense of place," encompassing the meanings and…

  17. The WorkPlace distributed processing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Troy; Henderson, Scott

    1993-01-01

    Real time control problems require robust, high performance solutions. Distributed computing can offer high performance through parallelism and robustness through redundancy. Unfortunately, implementing distributed systems with these characteristics places a significant burden on the applications programmers. Goddard Code 522 has developed WorkPlace to alleviate this burden. WorkPlace is a small, portable, embeddable network interface which automates message routing, failure detection, and re-configuration in response to failures in distributed systems. This paper describes the design and use of WorkPlace, and its application in the construction of a distributed blackboard system.

  18. Adsorption of amylase enzyme on ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Beier, Søren Prip; Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M; Hansen, Ernst B; Jonsson, Gunnar

    2007-08-28

    A method to measure the static adsorption on membrane surfaces has been developed and described. The static adsorption of amylase-F has been measured on two different ultrafiltration membranes, both with a cutoff value of 10 kDa (a PES membrane and the ETNA10PP membrane, which is a surface-modified PVDF membrane). The adsorption follows the Langmuir adsorption theory. Thus, the static adsorption consists of monolayer coverage and is expressed both as a permeability drop and an adsorption resistance. From the adsorption isotherms, the maximum static permeability drops and the maximum static adsorption resistances are determined. The maximum static permeability drop for the hydrophobic PES membrane is 75%, and the maximum static adsorption resistance is 0.014 m2.h.bar/L. The maximum static permeability drop for the hydrophilic surface-modified PVDF membrane (ETNA10PP) is 23%, and the maximum static adsorption resistance is 0.0046 m2.h.bar/L. The difference in maximum static adsorption, by a factor of around 3, affects the performance during the filtration of a 5 g/L amylase-F solution at 2 bar. The two membranes behave very similarly during filtration with almost equal fluxes and retentions even though the initial water permeability of the PES membrane is around 3 times larger than the initial water permeability of the ETNA10PP membrane. This is mainly attributed to the larger maximum static adsorption of the PES membrane. The permeability drop during filtration exceeds the maximum static permeability drop, indicating that the buildup layer on the membranes during filtration exceeds monolayer coverage, which is also seen by the increase in fouling resistance during filtration. The accumulated layer on the membrane surface can be described as a continually increasing cake-layer thickness, which is independent of the membrane type. At higher concentrations of enzyme, concentration polarization effects cannot be neglected. Therefore, stagnant film theory and the osmotic

  19. Apparatus for the study of macromolecular adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, C. S.; Hallock, R. B.

    1989-04-01

    A surface plasmon adsorbate monitor (SPAM) is described which allows the adsorption of macromolecules or other adsorbates to a metal surface to be monitored. Surface plasmons are employed and the apparatus has no moving parts. The kinetics of adsorption may be studied on a time scale of seconds rather than the more common time scale of minutes; a simple improvement in computer memory access should allow temporal studies in the millisecond range. As an illustration, the adsorption of carboxyl-terminated polystyrene from a solution with acetone onto a silver surface is measured.

  20. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water.

  1. Nanoscopic characterization of the water vapor-salt interfacial layer reveals a unique biphasic adsorption process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; He, Jianfeng; Shen, Yi; Li, Xiaowei; Sun, Jielin; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Shao, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Our quantitative understanding of water adsorption onto salt surfaces under ambient conditions is presently quite poor owing to the difficulties in directly characterizing this interfacial layer under these conditions. Here we determine the thickness of the interfacial layer on NaCl at different relative humidities (RH) based on a novel application of atomic force spectroscopy and capillary condensation theory. In particular, we take advantage of the microsecond-timescale of the capillary condensation process to directly resolve the magnitude of its contribution in the tip-sample interaction, from which the interfacial water thickness is determined. Further, to correlate this thickness with salt dissolution, we also measure surface conductance under similar conditions. We find that below 30% RH, there is essentially only the deposition of water molecules onto this surface, typical of conventional adsorption onto solid surfaces. However, above 30% RH, adsorption is simultaneous with the dissolution of ions, unlike conventional adsorption, leading to a rapid increase of surface conductance. Thus, water adsorption on NaCl is an unconventional biphasic process in which the interfacial layer not only exhibits quantitative differences in thickness but also qualitative differences in composition. PMID:27527905

  2. Adsorption and reactivity of nitrogen atoms on silica surface under plasma exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, D.; Guaitella, O.; de los Arcos, T.; von Keudell, A.; Rousseau, A.

    2014-11-01

    The kinetics of adsorption, desorption and recombination of nitrogen atoms on a silica surface is investigated. Stable nitrogen atoms are grafted to the inner surface of a fused silica discharge tube by a discharge in N2 at 0.53 mbar. After the pre-treatment, the surface is analysed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and an isotopic exchange technique. The latter consists of the exposure of the pre-treated surface with a discharge in the heavy nitrogen isotope 30N2. Nitrogen isotopologues 29N2 and 28N2 produced on the surface are detected using a mass spectrometer and provide information about the coverage and reactivity of adsorbed 14N atoms. It is found that during the pre-treatment, a silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) layer is formed on the initially clean SiO2 surface. The coverage of N on the surface increases from 5  ×  1013 to 5  ×  1015 cm-2 for a pre-treatment duration in the range of 10-2 - 104 s. Atoms on the surface demonstrate a distribution of reactivity, which is attributed to a distribution of their binding energies and configurations on the surface. We demonstrate that stable chemisorbed Nads are not the main recombination sites for N atoms on the surface contrary to previous studies. We conclude that recombination takes place mainly on weakly bonding active sites with the binding energy smaller than 1 eV.

  3. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  4. Aging in Place: Knowing where You Are

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosel, Natalie

    2003-01-01

    Research on aging in place appropriately emphasizes the value of familiar surroundings. The current study contributes an exploration of elders' personal knowledge of where and with whom they are aging in place, knowledge actively accumulated from a lifetime spent in the same area. Structured conversations over a four-month period with 10 elders…

  5. Section 2--Psychology in Its Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, John

    2008-01-01

    In 1996, Graham Richards published "Putting Psychology in its Place: An introduction from a critical historical perspective." Here, I seek to consider what is or should be the "place" of Psychology in education, more particularly Higher Education, and not just from a historical perspective. This raises issues about several…

  6. Coloring in the Emotional Language of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Making educational places more inviting to learners is a key aspect of Invitational Theory. This paper introduces a simple technique for sensitizing learners and instructors to how their environment affects their feelings and ability to learn. It describes a learning exercise that may be used to assess, evaluate and transform places, to promote…

  7. A Quiet Place for Student Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    As electronic gadgets predominate a student's life, there comes a need for silence. A quiet place free of electromagnetic spectrum waves, dirty and stray electricity, and the endless chirps, whistles, beeps, and customized signaling. A quiet place can offer solitude for meditation, inspiration, and spiritual awareness. Student involvement in the…

  8. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  9. Urban Environmental Education and Sense of Place

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudryavtsev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Urban environmental educators are trying to connect students to the urban environment and nature, and thus develop a certain sense of place. To do so, educators involve students in environmental stewardship, monitoring, activism, and outdoor recreation in cities. At the same time, sense of place has been linked to pro-environmental behaviors and…

  10. 45 CFR 1703.301 - Meeting place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meeting place. 1703.301 Section 1703.301 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE GOVERNMENT IN THE SUNSHINE ACT Conduct of Meetings § 1703.301 Meeting place. Meetings...

  11. [The mortuary: a place of life].

    PubMed

    Gelot, Antoinette Bernabe

    2011-12-01

    The mortuary is a place where past, present and future converge. It is a place where families can prepare and find peace. Every day, mortuary staff offer humanity and care to the families and loved ones of the deceased, to help them continue to build their own lives.

  12. Adult Learning by "the Biography of Place."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurantowicz, Ewa

    The "biography of place" can be available in the objective (currently valid and predominant) history of a given region of residence or it can be created by individuals in the process of reflections on their own social identity, which is defined by their place of living. Each perspective is conditioned by an epistemological and…

  13. 45 CFR 99.13 - Place.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Place. 99.13 Section 99.13 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR HEARINGS FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Preliminary Matters-Notice and Parties § 99.13 Place. The hearing shall be held in the...

  14. Education and Place: A Review Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nespor, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In this review essay, Jan Nespor uses three recent contributions to place-based education, Paul Theobald's "Teaching the Commons," C.A. Bowers's "Revitalizing the Commons," and David Gruenewald and Gregory Smith's edited volume "Place-Based Education in the Global Age," to examine some fundamental conceptual and practical issues in the area. One…

  15. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  16. Capillary condensation and adsorption of binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, B; Darkrim-Lamari, F; Levesque, D

    2006-06-21

    The adsorption of equimolar binary mixtures of hydrogen-carbon dioxide, hydrogen-methane, and methane-carbon dioxide in porous material models is determined by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The material models have an adsorbent surface similar to that of nanofibers with a herringbone structure. Our main result, which is relevant for hydrogen purification and carbon dioxide capture, is that the adsorption selectivities calculated for the mixtures can differ significantly from those deduced from simulations of the adsorption of pure gases, in particular, when one of the adsorbed gases presents a capillary condensation induced by confinement within the pore network. A comparison of our data is also made with theoretical models used in the literature for predicting the properties of the mixture adsorption.

  17. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  18. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption.

  19. H2O Adsorption Kinetics on Smectites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Howard, J.; Quinn, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The adsorptive equilibration of H2O with montomorillonite has been measured. At low temperatures and pressures equilibration can require many hours, effectively preventing smectites at the martian surface from responding to diurnal pressure and temperature variations.

  20. Argon adsorption and the lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of Ar adsorption experiments on a terrestrial labradorite and lunar rock 15415 crushed in vacuo are reported. The experiments were designed to test lunar atmosphere simulation models for the behavior of Ar on the lunar surface, as determined from the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer results. These models (Hodges, 1980, 1982) used a single adsorption potential to characterize the surfaces of lunar soil grains, with the result that high (6-7 kcal/mol) heats of adsorption were inferred. The present experimental results show that very high adsorption potentials are indeed associated with fresh mineral surfaces, but that these energetic surfaces occupy only small fractions of the total surface area. Nonetheless, these small fractions of surface, if they can be maintained in the lunar regolith in steady-state condition, could be sufficient to account for the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer observations.

  1. Krypton based adsorption type cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Schember, Helene R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Krypton and a monolithic porous carbon such as Saran carbon are used respectively as the sorbate and sorbent of an adsorption type refrigerator to improve refrigeration efficiency and operational longevity.

  2. Methane Adsorption on Aggregates of Fullerenes: Site-Selective Storage Capacities and Adsorption Energies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Alexander; Zöttl, Samuel; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Scheier, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Methane adsorption on positively charged aggregates of C60 is investigated by both mass spectrometry and computer simulations. Calculated adsorption energies of 118–281 meV are in the optimal range for high-density storage of natural gas. Groove sites, dimple sites, and the first complete adsorption shells are identified experimentally and confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, using a newly developed force field for methane–methane and fullerene–methane interaction. The effects of corrugation and curvature are discussed and compared with data for adsorption on graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. PMID:23744834

  3. Methane adsorption on aggregates of fullerenes: site-selective storage capacities and adsorption energies.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Zöttl, Samuel; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Scheier, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Methane adsorption on positively charged aggregates of C60 is investigated by both mass spectrometry and computer simulations. Calculated adsorption energies of 118-281 meV are in the optimal range for high-density storage of natural gas. Groove sites, dimple sites, and the first complete adsorption shells are identified experimentally and confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, using a newly developed force field for methane-methane and fullerene-methane interaction. The effects of corrugation and curvature are discussed and compared with data for adsorption on graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes.

  4. Sleep Deprivation and Advice Taking

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Jan Alexander; Leder, Johannes; Ketturat, Charlene; Dresler, Martin; Faber, Nadira Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Judgements and decisions in many political, economic or medical contexts are often made while sleep deprived. Furthermore, in such contexts individuals are required to integrate information provided by – more or less qualified – advisors. We asked if sleep deprivation affects advice taking. We conducted a 2 (sleep deprivation: yes vs. no) ×2 (competency of advisor: medium vs. high) experimental study to examine the effects of sleep deprivation on advice taking in an estimation task. We compared participants with one night of total sleep deprivation to participants with a night of regular sleep. Competency of advisor was manipulated within subjects. We found that sleep deprived participants show increased advice taking. An interaction of condition and competency of advisor and further post-hoc analyses revealed that this effect was more pronounced for the medium competency advisor compared to the high competency advisor. Furthermore, sleep deprived participants benefited more from an advisor of high competency in terms of stronger improvement in judgmental accuracy than well-rested participants. PMID:27109507

  5. Improving the medical 'take sheet'.

    PubMed

    Reed, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The GMC states that "Trainees in hospital posts must have well organised handover arrangements, ensuring continuity of patient care[1]". In the Belfast City Hospital throughout the day there can be multiple new medical admissions. These can be via the GP Unit, transfers for tertiary care, and transfers due to bed shortages in other hospitals. Over the course of 24 hours there can be up to four medical SHOs and three registrars that fill in the take sheet. Due to the variety of admission routes and number of doctors looking after the medical take information can be lost during handover between SHOs. In the current format there is little room to write and key and relevant information on the medical take sheet about new and transferring patients. I felt that this handover sheet could be improved. An initial questionnaire demonstrated that 47% found the old proforma easy to use and 28.2% felt that it allowed them to identify sick patients. 100% of SHOs and Registrars surveyed felt that it could be improved from its current form. From feedback from my colleagues I created a new template and trialled it in the hospital. A repeat questionnaire demonstrated that 92.3% of responders felt the new format had improved medical handover and that 92.6% felt that it allowed safe handover most of the time/always. The success of this new proforma resulted in it being implemented on a permanent basis for new medical admissions and transfers to the hospital.

  6. Finding similar places using the observation-to-generalization place model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    In this article, a novel observation-to-generalization place model is proposed. It is shown how this model can be used to formally define the problem of finding geographically similar places. The observation-to-generalization model differentiates between observations of phenomena in the environment at a specific location and time, and generalizations about places that are inferred from these observations. A suite of operations is defined to find similar places based on the invariance of generalized place properties, and it is demonstrated how these functions can be applied to the problem of finding similar places based on the topics that people write about in place descriptions. One use for similar-place search is for exploratory research that will enable investigators to perform case-control studies on place data.

  7. Defluoridation of drinking water using adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Kandasamy, Jaya; Naidu, Ravi

    2013-03-15

    Excessive intake of fluoride (F), mainly through drinking water, is a serious health hazard affecting humans worldwide. There are several methods used for the defluoridation of drinking water, of which adsorption processes are generally considered attractive because of their effectiveness, convenience, ease of operation, simplicity of design, and for economic and environmental reasons. In this paper, we present a comprehensive and a critical literature review on various adsorbents used for defluoridation, their relative effectiveness, mechanisms and thermodynamics of adsorption, and suggestions are made on choice of adsorbents for various circumstances. Effects of pH, temperature, kinetics and co-existing anions on F adsorption are also reviewed. Because the adsorption is very weak in extremely low or high pHs, depending on the adsorbent, acids or alkalis are used to desorb F and regenerate the adsorbents. However, adsorption capacity generally decreases with repeated use of the regenerated adsorbent. Future research needs to explore highly efficient, low cost adsorbents that can be easily regenerated for reuse over several cycles of operations without significant loss of adsorptive capacity and which have good hydraulic conductivity to prevent filter clogging during the fixed-bed treatment process.

  8. Gibbs adsorption and the compressibility equation

    SciTech Connect

    Aranovich, G.L.; Donohue, M.D.

    1995-08-08

    A new approach for deriving the equation of state is developed. It is shown that the integral in the compressibility equation is identical to the isotherm for Gibbs adsorption in radial coordinates. The Henry, Langmuir, and Frumkin adsorption isotherms are converted into equations of state. It is shown that using Henry`s law gives an expression for the second virial coefficient that is identical to the result from statistical mechanics. Using the Langmuir isotherm leads to a new analytic expression for the hard-sphere equation of state which can be explicit in either pressure or density. The Frumkin isotherm results in a new equation of state for the square-well potential fluid. Conversely, new adsorption isotherms can be derived from equations of state using the compressibility equation. It is shown that the van der Waals equation gives an adsorption isotherm equation that describes both polymolecular adsorption and the unusual adsorption behavior observed for supercritical fluids. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Differential Heat of Adsorption and Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yun; Wu, Jianzhong

    2017-01-31

    Heat of adsorption is a basic thermodynamic property extensively used not only for understanding thermal effects and heat management in industrial gas storage and separation processes but also for development and validation of adsorption models and materials force fields. Despite a long history of theoretical studies and a vast experimental literature, controversies often arise in the thermodynamic analysis of heat effects due to various assumptions used to describe gas adsorption and inconsistencies between direct calorimetric measurements and isosteric heat obtained from various adsorption isotherms. Here we present a rigorous theoretical procedure for predicting isosteric heat without any assumption about the geometry of porous adsorbents or operating conditions. Quantitative relations between the differential heat and various isosteres have been established with the grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation for gas adsorption in amorphous as well as crystalline porous materials. The inconsistencies and practical issues with conventional methods for the analysis of the heat effect have been clarified in the context of the exact results for model systems. Via the resolution of a number of controversies about heat analysis, we hope that the new theoretical procedure will be adopted for both fundamental research and industrial applications of gas adsorption processes.

  10. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; ...

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  11. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challenging due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.

  12. Carbon dioxide adsorption in graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2011-09-01

    Control over the CO2 emission via automobiles and industrial exhaust in atmosphere, is one of the major concerns to render environmental friendly milieu. Adsorption can be considered to be one of the more promising methods, offering potential energy savings compared to absorbent systems. Different carbon nanostructures (activated carbon and carbon nanotubes) have attracted attention as CO2 adsorbents due to their unique surface morphology. In the present work, we have demonstrated the CO2 adsorption capacity of graphene, prepared via hydrogen induced exfoliation of graphitic oxide at moderate temperatures. The CO2 adsorption study was performed using high pressure Sieverts apparatus and capacity was calculated by gas equation using van der Waals corrections. Physical adsorption of CO2 molecules in graphene was confirmed by FTIR study. Synthesis of graphene sheets via hydrogen exfoliation is possible at large scale and lower cost and higher adsorption capacity of as prepared graphene compared to other carbon nanostructures suggests its possible use as CO2 adsorbent for industrial application. Maximum adsorption capacity of 21.6 mmole/g was observed at 11 bar pressure and room temperature (25 °C).

  13. Accounting for adsorption and desorption in lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Maximilien; Duvail, Magali; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Frenkel, Daan; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    We report a Lattice-Boltzmann scheme that accounts for adsorption and desorption in the calculation of mesoscale dynamical properties of tracers in media of arbitrary complexity. Lattice Boltzmann simulations made it possible to solve numerically the coupled Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics and Nernst-Planck equations of electrokinetics in complex, heterogeneous media. With the moment propagation scheme, it became possible to extract the effective diffusion and dispersion coefficients of tracers, or solutes, of any charge, e.g., in porous media. Nevertheless, the dynamical properties of tracers depend on the tracer-surface affinity, which is not purely electrostatic and also includes a species-specific contribution. In order to capture this important feature, we introduce specific adsorption and desorption processes in a lattice Boltzmann scheme through a modified moment propagation algorithm, in which tracers may adsorb and desorb from surfaces through kinetic reaction rates. The method is validated on exact results for pure diffusion and diffusion-advection in Poiseuille flows in a simple geometry. We finally illustrate the importance of taking such processes into account in the time-dependent diffusion coefficient in a more complex porous medium.

  14. [Exfoliative esophagitis while taking dabigatran].

    PubMed

    Scheppach, Wolfgang; Meesmann, Malte

    2015-04-01

    History | A 77-year-old woman was admitted with severe chest pain, heartburn, dysphagia and odynophagia. She had been on dabigatran for 13 months due to atrial fibrillation and arterial hypertension. Investigations and findings | Endoscopy of the esophagus revealed sloughing of mucosal casts, predominantly in the upper half of the organ. Treatment and course | The patient was placed on pantoprazol, local anaesthetic antacid and i. v. fluids. Dabigatran was discontinued. The symptoms disappeared within 3 days. Control endoscopy after 12 days showed complete healing of the esophageal mucosa. Conclusion | The intake of dabigatran was associated with exfoliative esophagitis, possibly due to caustic tissue damage by prolonged drug contact.

  15. Crowdsourcing a Collective Sense of Place

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Andrew; Croitoru, Arie; Crooks, Andrew T.; Stefanidis, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Place can be generally defined as a location that has been assigned meaning through human experience, and as such it is of multidisciplinary scientific interest. Up to this point place has been studied primarily within the context of social sciences as a theoretical construct. The availability of large amounts of user-generated content, e.g. in the form of social media feeds or Wikipedia contributions, allows us for the first time to computationally analyze and quantify the shared meaning of place. By aggregating references to human activities within urban spaces we can observe the emergence of unique themes that characterize different locations, thus identifying places through their discernible sociocultural signatures. In this paper we present results from a novel quantitative approach to derive such sociocultural signatures from Twitter contributions and also from corresponding Wikipedia entries. By contrasting the two we show how particular thematic characteristics of places (referred to herein as platial themes) are emerging from such crowd-contributed content, allowing us to observe the meaning that the general public, either individually or collectively, is assigning to specific locations. Our approach leverages probabilistic topic modelling, semantic association, and spatial clustering to find locations are conveying a collective sense of place. Deriving and quantifying such meaning allows us to observe how people transform a location to a place and shape its characteristics. PMID:27050432

  16. Exploring Space and Place with Walking Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phil; Bunce, Griff; Evans, James; Gibbs, Hannah; Hein, Jane Ricketts

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the use of walking interviews as a research method. In spite of a wave of interest in methods which take interviewing out of the "safe," stationary environment, there has been limited work critically examining the techniques for undertaking such work. Curiously for a method which takes an explicitly spatial approach, few…

  17. Place in Pacific Islands Climate Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, C.; Koh, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding place, including both the environment and its people, is essential to understanding our climate, climate change, and its impacts. For us to develop a sense of our place, we need to engage in multiple ways of learning: observation, experimentation, and opportunities to apply new knowledge (Orr, 1992). This approach allows us to access different sources of knowledge and then create local solutions for local issues. It is especially powerful when we rely on experts and elders in our own community along with information from the global community.The Pacific islands Climate Education Partnership (PCEP) is a collaboration of partners—school systems, nongovernmental organizations, and government agencies—working to support learning and teaching about climate in the Pacific. Since 2009, PCEP partners have been working together to develop and implement classroom resources, curriculum standards, and teacher professional learning opportunities in which learners approach climate change and its impacts first through the lens of their own place. Such an approach to putting place central to teaching and learning about climate requires partnership and opportunities for learners to explore solutions for and with their communities. In this presentation, we will share the work unfolding in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) as one example of PCEP's approach to place-based climate education. Three weeklong K-12 teacher professional learning workshops took place during June-July 2015 in Majuro, RMI on learning gardens, climate science, and project-based learning. Each workshop was co-taught with local partners and supports educators in teaching climate-related curriculum standards through tasks that can foster sense of place through observation, experimentation, and application of new knowledge. Additionally, we will also share PCEP's next steps in place-based climate education, specifically around emerging conversations about the importance of highlighting

  18. Place and the experience of air quality.

    PubMed

    Day, Rosemary

    2007-03-01

    This article examines how concepts of place effects are relevant in understanding the public's experience of air pollution. Using qualitative and quantitative data from a case study of four neighbourhoods in north London, the analysis shows how this experience is mediated by multiple aspects of place, which may be seen as overlain. These multiple aspects also provide routes to inequalities in the experience of air pollution. Working with these understandings of the relevance of place could provide ways to mitigate the experience of pollution, and to address environmental health inequalities.

  19. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  20. Assessing the Adsorption Properties of Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fine-grained rocks, such as shales, contain a significant amount of nanopores that can significantly contribute to their storage capacity through the mechanism of adsorption. The current ability to extract natural gas that is adsorbed in the rock's matrix is limited and current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures, thus leading to very low recovery efficiencies. Shales constitute also a great portion of so-called caprocks above potential CO2 sequestration sites; hereby, the adsorption process may limit the CO2 mobility within the cap-rock, thus minimizing leakage phenomena. Whether it is a reservoir or a caprock, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of adsorption in these natural materials is key to improve the engineering design of subsurface operations. Results will be presented from a laboratory study that combines conventional techniques for the measurement of adsorption isotherms with novel methods that allows for the imaging of adsorption using x-rays. Various nanoporous materials are considered, thus including rocks, such as shales and coals, pure clay minerals and engineered adsorbents with well-defined nanopore structures, such as zeolites. Supercritical CO2 adsorption isotherms have been measured with a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension balance by covering the pressure range 0.1-20~MPa. A medical x-ray CT scanner has been used to identify three-dimensional patterns of the adsorption properties of a packed-bed of adsorbent, thus enabling to assess the spatial variability of the adsorption isotherm. The data are analyzed by using thermodynamically rigorous measures of adsorption and a graphical method is applied for their interpretation. The density of the adsorbed phase is estimated and compared to data reported in the literature; the latter is key to disclose gas-reserves and/or potential storage capacity estimates. When evaluated against classic adsorbent materials, the adsorption mechanism in shales is further complicated by

  1. 32 CFR 1653.2 - Procedures for taking an appeal to the President.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for taking an appeal to the President... SYSTEM APPEAL TO THE PRESIDENT § 1653.2 Procedures for taking an appeal to the President. (a) When the Director of Selective Service appeals to the President he shall place in the registrant's file a...

  2. "Don't take diabetes for granted."

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "Don't take diabetes for granted." Past Issues / Fall 2009 ... regularly, and take your medicines on time. Don't take diabetes for granted! Fall 2009 Issue: Volume ...

  3. Ciprofloxacin adsorption on graphene and granular activated carbon: kinetics, isotherms, and effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuan; Tsang, Daniel C W; Chen, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Yang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly used antibiotic and widely detected in wastewaters and farmlands nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of next-generation adsorbent (graphene) and conventional adsorbent (granular activated carbon, GAC) for CIP removal. Batch experiments and characterization tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, thermodynamic properties, and the influences of solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter (NOM), and water sources). Compared to GAC, graphene showed significantly faster adsorption and reached equilibrium within 3 min, confirming the rapid access of CIP into the macroporous network of high surface area of graphene as revealed by the Brunner-Emmet-Teller measurements analysis. The kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second-order model, suggesting the importance of the initial CIP concentration related to surface site availability of graphene. The adsorption isotherm on graphene followed Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 323 mg/g, which was higher than other reported carbonaceous adsorbents. The CIP adsorption was thermodynamically favourable on graphene and primarily occurred through π - π interaction, according to the FTIR spectroscopy. While the adsorption capacity of graphene decreased with increasing solution pH due to the speciation change of CIP, the adverse effects of ionic strength (0.01-0.5 mol L(-1)), presence of NOM (5 mg L⁻¹), and different water sources (river water or drinking water) were less significant on graphene than GAC. These results indicated that graphene can serve as an alternative adsorbent for CIP removal in commonly encountered field conditions, if proper separation and recovery is available in place.

  4. Chromate adsorption on acid-treated and amines-modified clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajjaji, M.; Beraa, A.

    2015-03-01

    Acid-treated montmorillonite-rich clay and amines (methylamine, morpholine, and aniline)-modified clay adsorbents were investigated and their abilities to remove chromate from aqueous solution were studied. For the later purpose, kinetic studies were carried out under different operating conditions (chromate concentration, adsorbent content, and temperature), and adsorption isotherm measurements were performed. It was found that the kinetic of adsorption was fast and the data followed the pseudo-second rate equation. The rate of adsorption was controlled by the intra-particle diffusion and mass transfer through the liquid film, and the relative importance of these limiting steps depended on the operating conditions. Chromate adsorption was an endothermic process and took place spontaneously by physisorption. The free energy at 25 ≤ T ≤ 40 °C varied from -1.5 to -46 kJ/mol. Adsorption isotherms of Na+-saturated clay (AN), acid-treated clay (AA), and methylamine-clay and morpholine-clay (A-Me, A-Mo) were type V, whereas those of aniline-clay (A-An) were type III. The estimated maximum uptakes were 105, 29, 15, 11, and 10 mmol/kg for A-An, AN, A-Mo, AA, and A-Me, respectively. The mechanism of chromate adsorption was discussed based on the shape of the isotherms. Considering for instance the most efficient absorbent (A-An), the isotherm followed the Freundlich equation and hydrogen chromate (the main stable form at working pH) adsorbed to solid particles once aniline species were entirely desorbed.

  5. Heavy metal adsorption changes of EAF steel slag after phosphorus adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanling; Cao, Lijing; Chen, Xiao; Hou, Wenhua; Wang, Qunhui

    2012-01-01

    A kind of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag was phosphated, and its isothermal and dynamic adsorptions of copper, cadmium, and lead ions were measured to determine if heavy metal adsorption changes after phosphorus adsorption. The surface area increased greatly after the slag was phosphated. Isothermal adsorption experiments showed that the theoretical Q(max) of the EAF steel slag on Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) improved 59, 50, and 89% respectively after it was phosphated. Dynamic adsorption results showed that the greatest adsorption capacities of unit volume of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) were 2.2, 1.8, and 1.8 times that of the column packed with original EAF steel slag when the column was packed with phosphate EAF steel slag at the same heavy metal ion concentration. The breakthrough time, the exhaustion time and elution efficiency of the column also increased when the column was packed with phosphated EAF steel slag compared with that packed with original EAF steel slag. Phosphorus adsorption could further improve the heavy metal ion adsorption of the EAF steel slag.

  6. Considering place in community health nursing.

    PubMed

    Bender, Amy; Clune, Laurie; Guruge, Sepali

    2007-09-01

    When a geographic location is assigned meaning, it becomes a place. The authors argue that place matters as both geographical location and lived experience. They extend the current conceptualization of nursing geography to encompass community health nursing and address intricacies of community nursing practice and research that often go unnoticed. They do so by exploring the notion of place in home and community, including the structural/spatial dimensions of the nurse-client relationship. The authors review the health geography literatures, then discuss the implications for practice and research in community health. They invite community health nurses to critically examine their practice and research with reference to such issues as the power of the nurse, marginalized places as determinants of health, and how best to care for clients living in diverse community settings.

  7. Local Foods, Local Places Summary Reports

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These summary reports describe Local Foods, Local Places projects in communities across the country, including farmers markets, cooperatives, community gardens, and other food-related enterprises that can boost local economies and drive revitalization.

  8. Healthy Places for Healthy People 2016 Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Application form for the 2016 round of Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance to help communities work with health care partners to revitalize downtowns and neighborhoods while helping residents live healthier lives.

  9. Time and Place for Teaching Black Pride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, George B.

    1972-01-01

    Argues that the traditional black church appears latently able and well-placed to complement the effort of the black family to prepare its young children to be black and proud in a white-dominated society. (Author/JM)

  10. Senior Living: There's No Place Like Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Senior Living There's No Place Like Home Past Issues / ... state offices on aging; social services organizations; nearby senior centers; and civic, tribal, and religious organizations. They ...

  11. Children and Place: A Natural Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vickers, Valerie G.; Matthews, Catherine E.

    2002-01-01

    Presents seven outdoor activities on the environment and ecology to be used at the K-12 grade level. Connects students with the environment they live in and develops the critical sense of place. (Contains 26 references.) (YDS)

  12. Learning as Existential Engagement with/in Place: Departing from Vandenberg and the Reams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Ruyu

    2014-01-01

    This article takes Vandenberg's critique of Ream and Ream's view on the Deweyan learning environment as a departing point to explore the educational meaning of place. The divergence between Vandenberg and the Reams reminds us that the place is not merely a physical site for learners to be located in but also a horizon to be engaged with.…

  13. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  14. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  15. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields a very broad range of adsorption energies, and it is unclear a priori which evaluation is better. QMC reveals that in the systems considered here it is essential to account for van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces since this alters both the absolute and relative adsorption energies of water and methanol. We show, via FF simulations, that incorrect relative energies can lead to significant changes in the interfacial densities of water and methanol solutions at the kaolinite interface. Despite the clear improvements offered by the vdW-corrected and the vdW-inclusive functionals, absolute adsorption energies are often overestimated, suggesting that the treatment of vdW forces in DFT is not yet a solved problem. PMID:27917256

  16. Foundations of Place: A Multidisciplinary Framework for Place-Conscious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenewald, David A.

    2003-01-01

    This article provides educators at all levels with a theoretical rationale for place-conscious education; it also discusses pedagogical pathways, and institutional challenges, to place-consciousness. Drawing on insights from phenomenology, critical geography, bioregionalism, ecofeminism, and other place-conscious traditions, the author gathers…

  17. A Tie for Third Place: Teens Need Physical Spaces as well as Virtual Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heeger, Paula Brehm

    2006-01-01

    "Third places" or public and informal gathering places have declined over the years. Third places, which are "neutral ground" where people gather to discuss, interact, and enjoy the company of those they know, are important for the health of communities. It's a known fact that teens have a strong need to socialize, and their third-space options…

  18. Operationalizing Place: Discovering, Reasoning about, and Exploring Place Knowledge from Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Benjamin Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Places and place types, such as "small town", play a fundamental role in how people organize knowledge about the world. Although places are commonly referenced in human communication, often they are not canonically defined and many of the properties people associate with them have proved difficult to operationalize. In information…

  19. Remembering the Roots of Place Meanings for Place-Based Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutson, Garrett

    2011-01-01

    Place-based education seeks to connect learners to local environments through a variety of strategies that increase environmental awareness and connectedness to particular parts of the world. The concept of place meanings encompasses the subjective ways people construct meaning through their experiences with an array of settings. Place meanings…

  20. The Vote and Vax program: public health at polling places.

    PubMed

    Shenson, Douglas; Adams, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Although influenza-associated illness is a major cause of hospitalizations and death among older Americans, only half of adults aged 50 or older-for whom influenza vaccinations are recommended-receive an annual influenza vaccination. National elections, which draw a large number of older voters, take place during influenza vaccination season and represent an untapped opportunity for large-scale delivery of vaccinations. In 2006, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation launched a program to evaluate the feasibility of delivering influenza vaccinations near polling places. Twenty-five public health agencies were each provided grants of $8000 and asked to implement at least two Vote and Vax clinics. Immunizers were required to obtain prior permission from local election authorities and to charge fees as they would at their other community-based clinics. Influenza vaccination had to be made available both to voters and to nonvoters. On election day, the initiative delivered 13790 influenza vaccinations at 127 polling places in 14 states. More than 80 percent of adult vaccine recipients were in the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control-defined priority groups and 28 percent were "new" influenza vaccination recipients. Vote and Vax is a potentially national strategy that could significantly expand the delivery of influenza vaccinations.

  1. Modeling place field activity with hierarchical slow feature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schönfeld, Fabian; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2015-01-01

    What are the computational laws of hippocampal activity? In this paper we argue for the slowness principle as a fundamental processing paradigm behind hippocampal place cell firing. We present six different studies from the experimental literature, performed with real-life rats, that we replicated in computer simulations. Each of the chosen studies allows rodents to develop stable place fields and then examines a distinct property of the established spatial encoding: adaptation to cue relocation and removal; directional dependent firing in the linear track and open field; and morphing and scaling the environment itself. Simulations are based on a hierarchical Slow Feature Analysis (SFA) network topped by a principal component analysis (ICA) output layer. The slowness principle is shown to account for the main findings of the presented experimental studies. The SFA network generates its responses using raw visual input only, which adds to its biological plausibility but requires experiments performed in light conditions. Future iterations of the model will thus have to incorporate additional information, such as path integration and grid cell activity, in order to be able to also replicate studies that take place during darkness. PMID:26052279

  2. Apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  3. Method for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  4. Method and apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Drost, Kevin; Vishwanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2004-06-08

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. In another aspect, the apparatus or methods utilize heat exchange channels of varying lengths that have volumes controlled to provide equal heat fluxes. Methods of fuel cell startup are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  5. Simultaneous reduction and adsorption for immobilization of uranium from aqueous solution by nano-flake Fe-SC.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjun; Zhu, Yuting; Wang, Min; Li, Zhixuan; Tan, Zhicong; Xu, Ruibin; Tang, Hongmei; Chang, Xiangyang; Xiong, Ya; Chen, Diyun

    2016-12-15

    Uranium containing radioactive wastewater is seriously hazardous to the natural environment if it is being discharged directly. Herein, nano-flake like Fe loaded sludge carbon (Fe-SC) is synthesized by carbothermal process from Fe-rich sludge waste and applied in the immobilization of uranium in aqueous. Batch isotherm and kinetic adsorption experiments are adopted to investigate the adsorption behavior of Fe-SC to uranium in aqueous. XPS analyses were conducted to evaluate the immobilized mechanism. It was found that the carbonized temperature played significant role in the characteristics and immobilization ability of the resulted Fe-SC. The Fe-SC-800 carbonized at 800°C takes more advantageous ability in immobilization of uranium from aqueous than the commercial available AC and powder zero valent iron. The adsorption behavior could be fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm adsorption model and pseudo-second order model. The equilibrium adsorption amount and rate for Fe-SC-800 is high to 148.99mgg(-1) and 0.015gmg(-1)min(-1), respectively. Both reductive precipitation and physical adsorption are the main mechanisms of immobilization of uranium from aqueous by Fe-SC-800.

  6. Conceptual adsorption models and open issues pertaining to performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    Recently several articles have been published that question the appropriateness of the distribution coefficient, Rd, concept to quantify radionuclide migration. Several distinct issues are raised by various critics. In this paper I provide some perspective on issues surrounding the modeling of nuclide retardation. The first section defines adsorption terminology and discusses various adsorption processes. The next section describes five commonly used adsorption conceptual models, specifically emphasizing what attributes that affect adsorption are explicitly accommodated in each model. I also review efforts to incorporate each adsorption model into performance assessment transport computer codes. The five adsorption conceptual models are (1) the constant Rd model, (2) the parametric Rd model, (3) isotherm adsorption models, (4) mass-action adsorption models, and (5) surface-complexation with electrostatics models. The final section discusses the adequacy of the distribution ratio concept, the adequacy of transport calculations that rely on constant retardation factors and the status of incorporating sophisticated adsorption models into transport codes.

  7. Adsorption of phenolic compound by aged-refuse.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Youcai, Zhao

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by aged-refuse has been studied. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol and the data fits well to the Freundlich equation. The chlorinated phenols are absorbed more strongly than the phenol and the adsorption capacity has an oblivious relationship with the numbers and the position of chlorine subsistent. The experiment data suggests that both the partition function and the chemical adsorption involve in the adsorption process. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model were applied to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption and the results show that it fit the pseudo-second-order model. More than one step involves in the adsorption process and the overall rate of the adsorption process appears to be controlled by the chemical reaction. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and endothermic.

  8. Effect of Adsorption on the Contact Angle: Water-Glass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz, Ali; Ward, Charles A.

    2002-03-01

    The contact angle at the line formed by the intersection of solid, liquid and vapor phases is usually assumed to be only a function of temperature. This amounts to neglecting the effects of vapor adsorption. However recent experimental observations made during a Space Shuttle flight raised questions about this view. To explain the observations, it was hypothesized that in the limit of the pressure approaching the saturation vapour pressure, adsorption effects can gave rise to an approximately 20° increase in the contact angle. In a ground-based laboratory, this hypothesis examined. Nine cylinders, each with a different diameters has been partially filled with water, sealed and the miniscule height measured under isothermal conditions. By determining the interface shape from the Laplace equation that has the measured meniscus height, the value of the contact angle and pressure at the three-phase line can be inferred. An equilibrium adsorption isotherm relation is derived using a model of the adsorbate that was previously introduced by Hill. The adsorption isotherm relation this obtained contains three temperature-dependent parameters, and when used with the Gibbs adsorption equation, an expression for the contact angle in terms of these parameters is obtained. Their values at each of 5 different temperatures were determined by fitting theoretical relation to the measured contact angles. This permits the amount adsorbed in the limit of the pressure approaching the saturation vapour pressure to be calculated—a parameter range not previously explored. It also permits one to show that the contact angles measured on the Space Shuttle are completely consistent with those measured in a ground-based larboratory provided one takes adsorption into account. The results suggest the contact angle depends strongly on the pressure and that its pressure-dependence can not be neglected when the pressure at the three phase line is near the saturation vapor pressure.

  9. Improving Written Communication Through Perspective-taking

    PubMed Central

    Traxler, Matthew J.; Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2014-01-01

    To convey their ideas successfully, writers must envision how readers will interpret their texts. In our previous research (Traxler & Gernsbacher, 1992), we discovered that writers who received feedback from their readers successfully revised descriptions of geometric figures, whereas writers who did not receive feedback did not. We also discovered that writers who received feedback from their readers on one set of descriptions wrote better descriptions of a new set of geometric figures. We concluded that feedback—even a minimal form of feedback—helps writers learn to envision how readers will interpret their texts. In the present research, we investigated another way that writers can learn to envision how readers will interpret their texts. Our treatment placed writers “in their readers’ shoes”. In three experiments, half the writers performed a task that their readers would subsequently perform, and the other half of the writers performed a control task. In our first and second experiments, the writers who gained their readers’ perspective by performing their readers’ task successfully revised their descriptions of geometric figures, whereas writers who performed the control task did not. In our third experiment, we discovered that writers who performed their readers’ task did not improve their descriptions merely because they were exposed to examples of other writers’ descriptions. We concluded that gaining their readers’ perspective helps writers communicate more clearly because perspective-taking helps writers form a mental representation of how readers interpret their texts. PMID:25404785

  10. Diffusion-controlled evaporation of sodium dodecyl sulfate solution drops placed on a hydrophobic substrate.

    PubMed

    Doganci, Merve Dandan; Sesli, Belma Uyar; Erbil, H Yildirim

    2011-10-15

    In this work, the effect of SDS anionic surfactant on the diffusion-controlled evaporation rate of aqueous solution drops placed on TEFLON-FEP substrate was investigated with 11 different SDS concentrations. Drop evaporation was monitored in a closed chamber having a constant RH of 54-57% by a video camera. The initial contact angle, θ(i) decreased from 104±2° down to 68±1° due to the adsorption of SDS both at the water-air and the solid-water interfaces. The adsorption of SDS on the solid surface was found to be 76% of that of its adsorption at the water-air interface by applying Lucassen-Reynders approach. An equation was developed for the comparison of the evaporation rates of drops having different θ(i) on the same substrate. It was found that the addition of SDS did not alter the drop evaporation rate considerably for the first 1200 s for all the SDS concentrations. The main difference was found to be the change of the mode of drop evaporation by varying the SDS concentration. The constant θ mode was operative up to 80 mM SDS concentration, whereas constant contact area mode was operative after 200 mM SDS concentrations due to rapid drop pining on the substrate.

  11. Infrared astronomy takes center stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, Frederick C.; Gatley, Ian; Hollenbach, David

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of infrared astronomy, including the ability to detect cool matter, explore the hidden universe, reveal a wealth of spectral lines, and reach back to the beginning of time are outlined. Ground-based infrared observations such as observations in the thermal infrared region are discussed as well as observations utilizing infrared telescopes aboard NASA aircraft and orbiting telescopes. The Space Infrared Telescope Facility and the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy are described, and it is pointed out that infrared astronomers can penetrate obscuring dust to study stars and interstellar matter throughout the Milky Way galaxy. Application of various infrared instruments to the investigation of stars and planets is emphasized, and focus is placed on the discovery of clouds or disks of particles around mature stars and acquisition of high-resolution spectra of the gaseous and solid materials orbiting on the fringes of the solar system.

  12. Preparation and characterization of surfactant-modified hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite and its adsorption behavior toward humic acid and copper(II).

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yanhui; Lin, Jianwei; Li, Jia

    2013-04-01

    A novel composite material, i.e., surfactant-modified hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite, was used as an adsorbent to remove humic acid (HA) and copper(II) from aqueous solution. Hydroxyapatite/zeolite composite (HZC) and surfactant-modified HZC (SMHZC) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscope. The adsorption of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC was investigated. For comparison purposes, HA adsorption onto HZC was also investigated. SMHZC exhibited much higher HA adsorption capacity than HZC. The HA adsorption capacity for SMHZC decreased slightly with increasing pH from 3 to 8 but decreased significantly with increasing pH from 8 to 12. The copper(II) adsorption capacity for SMHZC increased with increasing pH from 3 to 6.5. The adsorption kinetic data of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC obeyed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption of HA and copper(II) on SMHZC took place in three different stages: fast external surface adsorption, gradual adsorption controlled by both film and intra-particle diffusions, and final equilibrium stage. The equilibrium adsorption data of HA on SMHZC better fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model than the Freundlich isotherm model. The equilibrium adsorption data of copper(II) on SMHZC could be described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The presence of copper(II) in solution enhanced HA adsorption onto SMHZC. The presence of HA in solution enhanced copper(II) adsorption onto SMHZC. The mechanisms for the adsorption of HA on SMHZC at pH 7 may include electrostatic attraction, organic partitioning, hydrogen bonding, and Lewis acid-base interaction. The mechanisms for the adsorption of copper(II) on SMHZC at pH 6 may include surface complexation, ion exchange, and dissolution-precipitation. The obtained results indicate that SMHZC can be used as an effective adsorbent to simultaneously remove HA and

  13. Neptunium(V) adsorption to calcite.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Frank; Brendebach, Boris; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-12

    The migration behavior of the actinyl ions U(VI)O2(2+), Np(V)O2+ and Pu(V,VI)O2(+,2+) in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption reactions (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, coprecipitation/structural incorporation) with minerals. Here NpO2+ adsorption onto calcite is studied in batch type experiments over a wide range of pH (6.0-9.4) and concentration (0.4 microM-40 microM) conditions. pH is adjusted by variation of CO2 partial pressure. Adsorption is found to be pH dependent with maximal adsorption at pH 8.3 decreasing with increasing and decreasing pH. pH dependence of adsorption decreases with increasing Np(V) concentration. EXAFS data of neptunyl adsorbed to calcite and neptunyl in the supernatant shows differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance, 1.85+/-0.01 angstroms for the adsorbed and 1.82+/-0.01 angstroms for the solution species. The equatorial environment of the neptunyl in solution shows about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.45+/-0.02 angstroms. For adsorbed neptunyl there are also about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.46+/-0.01 angstroms. An additional feature in the adsorbed species' R-space spectrum can be related to carbonate neighbours, 3 to 6 carbon backscatterers (C-eq) at 3.05+/-0.03 angstroms and 3 to 6 oxygen backscatterers (O-eq2) at 3.31+/-0.02 angstroms. The differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance and the C-eq and O-eq2 backscatterers which are only present for the adsorbed species indicate inner-sphere bonding of the adsorbed neptunyl species to the calcite surface. Experiments on adsorption kinetics indicate that after a fast surface adsorption process a continuous slow uptake occurs which may be explained by incorporation via surface dissolution and reprecipitation processes. This is also indicated by the part irreversibility of the adsorption as shown by increased KD values after desorption compared to adsorption.

  14. Phosphorus recovery using pelletized adsorptive materials ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Phosphorous (P) is one of the essential nutrients for growth and is generally the most limiting nutrient since, it cannot be fixed from the atmosphere. Methods for recovering phosphorous from water systems already exist, but advances are being made to find a more economic, efficient, effective and easy to use method that can allow for reuse of the recovered P. One area of study is in adsorption, which involves finding the best material for adsorption of phosphorous from water and for releasing it back into the environment through desorption or leaching. The goal of this research was to first optimize the capacity for a pelletized adsorptive material that was synthesized with varying amounts of a binder material from 0-20 % and then to study recovering the phosphate for reuse. The pelletized materials were studied through kinetics experiments as well as isotherm experiments to gain insight into the adsorption capacity and mechanism. Following successful adsorption, a simple leaching study was conducted to see how much phosphate would be released back into water without any added desorption aid. Desorption was then studied by changing the pH of solution. Presenting my thesis work with a poster at ACS.

  15. Adsorption behavior of heavy metals on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Minamisawa, Mayumi; Minamisawa, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shoichiro; Takai, Nobuharu

    2004-09-08

    We have investigated adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) at pH 2-6.7 onto the biomaterials chitosan, coffee, green tea, tea, yuzu, aloe, and Japanese coarse tea, and onto the inorganic adsorbents, activated carbon and zeolite. High adsorptive capabilities were observed for all of the biomaterials at pH 4 and 6.7. In the adsorption of Cd(II), blend coffee, tea, green tea, and coarse tea have comparable loading capacities to activated carbon and zeolite. Although activated carbon, zeolite, and chitosan are utilized in a variety of fields such as wastewater treatment, chemical and metallurgical engineering, and analytical chemistry, these adsorbents are costly. On the other hand, processing of the test biomaterials was inexpensive, and all the biomaterials except for chitosan were able to adsorb large amounts of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions after a convenient pretreatment of washing with water followed by drying. The high adsorption capability of the biomaterials prepared from plant materials is promising in the development of a novel, low-cost adsorbent. From these results, it is concluded that heavy metal removal using biomaterials would be an effective method for the economic treatment of wastewater. The proposed adsorption method was applied to the determination of amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water samples.

  16. Sulfate adsorption in Michigan forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    The occurrence of acidic atmospheric deposition raised concerns over adverse cation leaching effects on Michigan forest soils with low cation exchange capacities. Leaching effects of acid deposition depend on mobility of sulfate in the soil. Little was known, however, concerning the ability of these soils to adsorb sulfate. The objectives of this study were to determine the ability of representative Michigan forest soils to adsorb sulfate, to relate sulfate adsorption to soil properties, and to develop equations to predict sulfate adsorption in similar forest soils. Frigid zone soil series studied were Grayling (Typic Udipsamments), Rubicon (Entic Haplorthods), Kalkaska (Typic Haplorthods), and Montcalm (Eutric Glossoboralfs). Mesic zone series studied were Spinks (Psammentic Hapludals) and Oshtemo (Typic Hapludalfs). Six randomly located pedons of each series were sampled. Sulfate adsorption was determined by shaking 10 gram soil samples for 24 hours in 50 mL 0.01 M CaCl/sub 2/ solution containing 10 mg SO/sub 4/-S L/sup -1/. Solution filtrates were turbidimetrically analyzed for SO/sub 4/-S and adsorption was calculated from reduction in SO/sub 4/-S concentration. Bw, Bs, and Bh horizons of frigid zone soils and E and Bt horizons of mesic zone soils had the highest sulfate adsorbing abilities. No significant differences were found between series in total sulfate adsorptive capacity.

  17. DNA adsorption by indium tin oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-01-01

    The high conductivity and optical transparency of indium tin oxide (ITO) has made it a popular material in the electronic industry. Recently, its application in biosensors is also explored. To understand its biointerface chemistry, we herein investigate its interaction with fluorescently labeled single-stranded oligonucleotides using ITO nanoparticles (NPs). The fluorescence of DNA is efficiently quenched after adsorption, and the interaction between DNA and ITO NPs is strongly dependent on the surface charge of ITO. At low pH, the ITO surface is positively charged to afford a high DNA adsorption capacity. Adsorption is also influenced by the sequence and length of DNA. For its components, In2O3 adsorbs DNA more strongly while SnO2 repels DNA at neutral pH. The DNA adsorption property of ITO is an averaging result from both components. DNA adsorption is confirmed to be mainly by the phosphate backbone via displacement experiments using free phosphate or DNA bases. Last, DNA-induced DNA desorption by forming duplex DNA is demonstrated on ITO, while the same reaction is more difficult to achieve on other metal oxides including CeO2, TiO2, and Fe3O4 because these particles adsorb DNA more tightly.

  18. Adsorption of Wine Constituents on Functionalized Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A

    2016-10-18

    The adsorption of macromolecules on solid surfaces is of great importance in the field of nanotechnology, biomaterials, biotechnological, and food processes. In the field of oenology adsorption of wine macromolecules such as polyphenols, polysaccharides, and proteins is much less desirable on membrane materials because of fouling and reduced filtering performance. On the other hand, adsorption of these molecules on processing aids is very beneficial for achieving wine clarity and stability. In this article, the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of white, rosé, and red wine constituents was evaluated. Allylamine, acrylic acid, and ethanol were selected as precursors for plasma polymerization in order to generate coatings rich in amine, carboxyl, and hydroxyl chemical groups, respectively. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ability of different surface chemical functionalities to adsorb wine constituents were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results demonstrated that the amine and carboxyl modified surfaces encourage adsorption of constituents from white wine. The hydroxyl modified surfaces have the ability to preferentially adsorb rosé wine constituents, whereas red wine adsorbed to the highest extent on acrylic acid surface.

  19. Adsorption of phenanthrene on natural snow.

    PubMed

    Domine, Florent; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Bonnaud, Elodie; Martellini, Tania; Picaud, Sylvain

    2007-09-01

    The snowpack is a reservoir for semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and, in particular, for persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which are sequestered in winter and released to the atmosphere or hydrosphere in the spring. Modeling these processes usually assumes that SVOCs are incorporated into the snowpack by adsorption to snow surfaces, but this has never been proven because the specific surface area (SSA) of snow has never been measured together with snow composition. Here we expose natural snow to phenanthrene vapors (one of the more volatile POPs) and measure for the first time both the SSA and the chemical composition of the snow. The results are consistent with an adsorption equilibrium. The measured Henry's law constant is H(Phen)(T) = 2.88 x 10(22) exp(-10660/7) Pa m2 mol(-1), with Tin Kelvin. The adsorption enthalpy is delta H(ads) = -89 +/- 18 kJ mol(-1). We also perform molecular dynamics calculations of phenanthrene adsorption to ice and obtain AHads = -85 +/- 8 kJ mol(-1), close to the experimental value. Results are applied to the adsorption of phenanthrene to the Arctic and subarctic snowpacks. The subarctic snowpack, with a low snow area index (SAI = 1000), is a negligible reservoir of phenanthrene, butthe colder Arctic snowpack, with SAI = 2500, sequesters most of the phenanthrene present in the (snow + boundary layer) system.

  20. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].