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Sample records for adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements

  1. Measurements of VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics of typical interior building materials

    SciTech Connect

    An, Y.; Zhang, J.S.; Shaw, C.Y.

    2000-07-01

    The adsorption/desorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on interior building material surfaces (i.e., the sink effect) can affect the VOC concentrations in a building, and thus need to be accounted for an indoor air quality (IAQ) prediction model. In this study, the VOC adsorption/desorption characteristics (sink effect) were measured for four typical interior building materials including carpet, vinyl floor tile, painted drywall, and ceiling tile. The VOCs tested were ethylbenzene, cyclohexanone, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, benzaldehyde, and dodecane. These five VOCs were selected because they are representative of hydrocarbons, aromatics, ketones, aldehydes, and chlorine substituted compounds. The first order reversible adsorption/desorption model was based on the Langmuir isotherm was used to analyze the data and to determine the equilibrium constant of each VOC-material combination. It was found that the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, which is a measure of the sink capacity, increased linearly with the inverse of the VOC vapor pressure. For each compound, the adsorption/desorption equilibrium constant, and the adsorption rate constant differed significantly among the four materials tested. A detailed characterization of the material structure in the micro-scale would improve the understanding and modeling of the sink effect in the future. The results of this study can be used to estimate the impact of sink effect on the VOC concentrations in buildings.

  2. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  3. Effect of 300 and 500 MPa pressure treatments on starch-water adsorption/desorption isotherms and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Mauro D.; Cunha, Pedro; Queirós, Rui P.; Fidalgo, Liliana G.; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Saraiva, Jorge A.

    2014-10-01

    Pressure treatments of 300 and 500 MPa during 15 min were found to change starch-water sorption (adsorption and desorption) isotherms and the hysteresis effect, particularly the 500 MPa. This last treatment shifted the adsorption/desorption isotherms downward, compared with non-treated starch and starch treated at 300 MPa. The observed hysteresis effect decreased with the increase in pressure level in the whole aw range, indicating that adsorption and desorption isotherms became closer. Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller model parameters Cb, Cg, K and Mm also showed changes caused by pressure, the latter being lower in the pressure-processed samples, thus indicating possible changes on microbial and (bio)chemical stabilities of pressure-processed food products containing starch.

  4. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters. PMID:26657085

  5. Effect of humic acid on the adsorption/desorption behavior of glyphosate on goethite. Isotherms and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Arroyave, Jeison Manuel; Waiman, Carolina C; Zanini, Graciela P; Avena, Marcelo J

    2016-02-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) on the adsorption/desorption of glyphosate (Gly) on goethite were investigated under pseudo equilibrium conditions by adsorption isotherms and under kinetic conditions by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Isotherms reveal that the attachment of Gly is almost completely inhibited by HA molecules. The opposite effect is not observed: HA adsorption is not affected by the presence of Gly. ATR-FTIR allowed the simultaneous detection of adsorbed HA and Gly during kinetic runs, revealing that HA at the surface decreases markedly the adsorption rate of Gly likely as a result of a decreased availability of sites for Gly adsorption and because of electrostatic repulsion. In addition, HA in solution increases the desorption rate of Gly. The rate law for Gly desorption could be determined giving important insights on the desorption mechanism. The herbicide is desorbed by two parallel processes: i) a direct detachment from the surface, which is first order in adsorbed Gly; and ii) a ligand exchange with HA molecules, which is first order in adsorbed Gly and first order in dissolved HA. Rate constants for both processes were quantified, leading to half-lives of 3.7 h for the first process, and 1.4 h for the second process in a 400 mg L(-1) HA solution. These data are important for modeling the dynamics of glyphosate in environmentally relevant systems, such as soils and surface waters.

  6. Visualization and Measurement of Adsorption/Desorption Process of Ethanol in Activated Carbon Adsorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Murata, Kenta; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Yasushi

    Adsorption refrigerator is one of the efficient tools for waste heat recovery, because the system is driven by heat at relative low temperature. However, the coefficient of performance is low due to its batch operation and the heat capacity of the adsorber. In order to improve the performance, it is important to optimize the configuration to minimize the amount of driving heat, and to clarify adsorption/desorption phenomena in transient conditions. Neutron radiography was applied to visualize and measure the adsorption amount distribution in an adsorber. The visualization experiments had been performed at the neutron radiography facility of E-2 port of Kyoto University Research Reactor. Activated carbon and ethanol were used as the adsorbent and refrigerant. From the acquired radiographs, adsorption amount was quantitatively measured by applying the umbra method using a checkered neutron absorber with boron powder. Then, transient adsorption and desorption processes of a rectangular adsorber with 84 mm in width, 50 mm in height and 20 mm in depth were visualized. As the result, the effect of fins in the adsorbent layer on the adsorption amount distribution was clearly visualized.

  7. Isothermal and Adiabatic Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNairy, William W.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the working of the Adiabatic Gas Law Apparatus, a useful tool for measuring the pressure, temperature, and volume of a variety of gases undergoing compressions and expansions. Describes the adaptation of this apparatus to perform isothermal measurements and discusses the theory behind the adiabatic and isothermal processes. (JRH)

  8. Isothermal Adsorption Measurement for the Development of High Performance Solid Sorption Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidyut Baran; Koyama, Shigeru; Alam, K. C. Amanul; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao; Ng, Kim Choon; Chua, Hui Tong

    Interest in low-grade thermal heat powered solid sorption system using natural refrigerants has been increased. However, the drawbacks of these adsorption systems are their poor performance. The objective of this paper is to improve the performance of thermally powered adsorption cooling system by selecting new adsorbent-refrigerant pairs. Adsorption capacity of adsorbent-refrigerant pair depends on the thermophysical properties (pore size, pore volume and pore diameter) of adsorbent and isothermal characteristics of the adsorbent-refrigerant pair. In this paper, the thermophysical properties of three types of silica gels and three types of pitch based activated carbon fibers are determined from the nitrogen adsorption isotherms. The standard nitrogen gas adsorption/desorption measurements on various adsorbents at liquid nitrogen of temperature 77.4 K were performed. Surface area of each adsorbent was determined by the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) plot of nitrogen adsorption data. Pore size distribution was measured by the Horvath and Kawazoe (HK) method. Adsorption/desorption isotherm results showed that all three carbon fibers have no hysteresis and had better adsorption capacity in comparison with those of silica gels.

  9. Adsorption / Desorption Behavior of Water Vapor in an Adsorbent Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor onto desiccant rotor has been investigated to improve the desiccant cooling system by means of computer simulation. In this paper, we paid attention to the relationship between the equilibrium amount of water adsorbed onto the desiccant material and the relative humidity, that is adsorption isotherm as a principal characteristic feature of adsorbent. Considering actual adsorbents, five types of adsorption isotherms were assumed to clarify the influence of adsorption isotherm on the dehumidifying performance. After the investigation on the influences of some operating conditions on the dehumidifying performance at each selected adsorption isotherm, it was found that higher dehumidifying performance and reduction of length of desiccant rotor could be achieved by selecting appropriate adsorption isotherm. It was also predicted that S-shaped adsorption isotherm which is raised sharply at relative humidity around 15 % could produce the lowest air humidity at regeneration air temperature 80 °C. Moreover influence of the intraparticle diffusion coefficient which significantly influence on the adsorption / desorption rate was discussed choosing two adsorption isotherm from the above five isotherms. It seems that effective range of the intraparticle diffusion coefficient for the significant improvement of the dehumidifying performance was strongly influenced by the shape of adsorption isotherm.

  10. Wide-range and accurate modeling of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, rigorous data and adequate models about linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil are presented, contributing with a substantial improvement over available adsorption works. The kinetics of the adsorption/desorption phenomenon and the adsorption/desorption equilibrium isotherms were determined through batch studies for total LAS amount and also for each homologue series: C10, C11, C12 and C13. The proposed multiple pseudo-first order kinetic model provides the best fit to the kinetic data, indicating the presence of two adsorption/desorption processes in the general phenomenon. Equilibrium adsorption and desorption data have been properly fitted by a model consisting of a Langmuir plus quadratic term, which provides a good integrated description of the experimental data over a wide range of concentrations. At low concentrations, the Langmuir term explains the adsorption of LAS on soil sites which are highly selective of the n-alkyl groups and cover a very small fraction of the soil surface area, whereas the quadratic term describes adsorption on the much larger part of the soil surface and on LAS retained at moderate to high concentrations. Since adsorption/desorption phenomenon plays a major role in the LAS behavior in soils, relevant conclusions can be drawn from the obtained results. PMID:26070080

  11. Wide-range and accurate modeling of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Oliver-Rodríguez, B; Zafra-Gómez, A; Reis, M S; Duarte, B P M; Verge, C; de Ferrer, J A; Pérez-Pascual, M; Vílchez, J L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, rigorous data and adequate models about linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) adsorption/desorption on agricultural soil are presented, contributing with a substantial improvement over available adsorption works. The kinetics of the adsorption/desorption phenomenon and the adsorption/desorption equilibrium isotherms were determined through batch studies for total LAS amount and also for each homologue series: C10, C11, C12 and C13. The proposed multiple pseudo-first order kinetic model provides the best fit to the kinetic data, indicating the presence of two adsorption/desorption processes in the general phenomenon. Equilibrium adsorption and desorption data have been properly fitted by a model consisting of a Langmuir plus quadratic term, which provides a good integrated description of the experimental data over a wide range of concentrations. At low concentrations, the Langmuir term explains the adsorption of LAS on soil sites which are highly selective of the n-alkyl groups and cover a very small fraction of the soil surface area, whereas the quadratic term describes adsorption on the much larger part of the soil surface and on LAS retained at moderate to high concentrations. Since adsorption/desorption phenomenon plays a major role in the LAS behavior in soils, relevant conclusions can be drawn from the obtained results.

  12. Adsorption-desorption behavior of thiram onto humic acid.

    PubMed

    Filipe, O M S; Vidal, M M; Duarte, A C; Santos, E B H

    2009-06-10

    The adsorption/desorption behavior of pure thiram (Thi-P) and formulated thiram (Thi-F) onto commercial humic acids (HA) was studied using a batch equilibration procedure. Results of adsorption kinetic experiments showed that thiram adsorption is a fast process since 85% of the equilibrium concentration is reached within two hours. Experimental K(D) values between 0.110 to 0.210 L g(-1) were obtained for the adsorption of both Thi-P and Thi-F onto HA, suggesting that thiram is strongly sorbed by humic acids. In general, for both Thi-P and Thi-F, the lower the initial thiram concentration, the stronger is its adsorption (higher K(D) and percentage adsorption values). The adsorption isotherms were found to match the BET model. The results show that thiram adsorption onto condensed humic acids cannot be explained only in terms of specific interactions, such as those identified in studies of adsorption of thiram with humic acids in solution. The comparison of sorption and desorption results allowed the observation of hysteresis phenomena. Desorption K(D) values were consistently higher than those for adsorption at the same equilibrium concentration. Hysteresis was lower for the formulated thiram suggesting that adsorption is more reversible in the presence of the formulation components turning the pesticide more susceptible to be leached.

  13. Adsorption-desorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, S.K.; Selim, H.M.; Iskandar, I.K.

    1995-11-01

    This study studied the adsorption-desorption behavior of TNT (2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene) and RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine) in a bentonite/sand reference material (Swy-1 montmorillonite clay mixed with acid-washed sand) and two selected soils (Norwood and Kolin). Release of TNT,RDX, and other compounds from a contaminated soil obtained from the Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant (AAP) site was also investigated. The kinetics of TNT and RDX retention were measured using batch methods for a range of input concentrations. For RDX, the adsorption isotherms were distinctly linear. The TNT adsorption isotherm for bentonite/sand mixture appeared linear and was described equally well using linear, Freundlich, Langmuir, and a modified Langmuir model. For the Norwood and Kolin soils, TNT adsorption isotherms exhibited distinct nonlinearity and the Freundlich model provided the best fit. As indicated by the K{sub d} values, TNT exhibited stronger retention or affinity to all soils and the bentonite/sand mixture than for RDX. The RDX retention data indicated little time-dependent behavior. The TNT retention data indicated a continued decrease in TNT concentration with time in the Norwood and Kolin soils. This was possibly caused by the formation and subsequent adsorption of transformation products because transformation products, such as amino nitro toluene compounds, were identified during batch experiments. For the bentonite/sand mixture, TNT retention was rapid initially and reached apparent equilibrium within 1 day. Unlike Kolin and Norwood soils, there was no hysteretic behavior of TNT adsorption-desorption by the bentonite/sand mixture and a mass balance suggested fully reversible retention mechanisms. 15 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Adsorption-desorption of tricyclazole: effect of soil types and organic matter.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Mukherjee, Irani; Varghese, Eldho

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption-desorption of tricyclazole was studied by batch equilibrium method in two soil types, varying in their physical and chemical properties. The adsorption of tricyclazole on the soil matrix exhibited low rate of accumulation with 18.24 ± 0.14 % in Ultisol and moderately high rate with 43.62 ± 0.14 % in Vertisol after 6 h of equilibrium time. For soils amended with farmyard manure (FYM), the adsorption percentage increased to 32.52 ± 0.14 % in Ultisol and 55.14 ± 0.14 % in Vertisol. The Freundlich model was used to describe the adsorption-desorption of the tricyclazole in two soils. The adsorption isotherm suggested a relatively higher affinity of tricyclazole to the adsorption sites at low equilibrium concentrations. Variation in sorption affinities of the soils as indicated by the distribution coefficient (K d) for sorption in the range of 0.78 ± 0.01-1.38 ± 0.03, 1.71 ± 0.03-2.99 ± 0.09, 2.75 ± 0.05-4.69 ± 0.01, and 4.65 ± 0.08-7.64 ± 0.01 mL/g for Ultisol, FYM-amended Ultisol, Vertisol, and FYM-amended Vertisol, respectively. Desorption was slower than adsorption, indicating a hysteresis effect. The hysteresis coefficient varied from 0.023 ± 0.15 to 0.160 ± 0.12 in two test soils. A good fit to the linear and Freundlich isotherms was observed with correlation coefficients >0.96. The results revealed that adsorption-desorption was influenced by soil properties and showed that the maximum sorption and minimum desorption of pesticide were observed in soils with higher organic carbon and clay content. Thus, groundwater contamination may be minimized, on application of tricyclazole in high-sorption soils of rice-growing regions. PMID:25647794

  15. Adsorption-desorption of tricyclazole: effect of soil types and organic matter.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Mukherjee, Irani; Varghese, Eldho

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption-desorption of tricyclazole was studied by batch equilibrium method in two soil types, varying in their physical and chemical properties. The adsorption of tricyclazole on the soil matrix exhibited low rate of accumulation with 18.24 ± 0.14 % in Ultisol and moderately high rate with 43.62 ± 0.14 % in Vertisol after 6 h of equilibrium time. For soils amended with farmyard manure (FYM), the adsorption percentage increased to 32.52 ± 0.14 % in Ultisol and 55.14 ± 0.14 % in Vertisol. The Freundlich model was used to describe the adsorption-desorption of the tricyclazole in two soils. The adsorption isotherm suggested a relatively higher affinity of tricyclazole to the adsorption sites at low equilibrium concentrations. Variation in sorption affinities of the soils as indicated by the distribution coefficient (K d) for sorption in the range of 0.78 ± 0.01-1.38 ± 0.03, 1.71 ± 0.03-2.99 ± 0.09, 2.75 ± 0.05-4.69 ± 0.01, and 4.65 ± 0.08-7.64 ± 0.01 mL/g for Ultisol, FYM-amended Ultisol, Vertisol, and FYM-amended Vertisol, respectively. Desorption was slower than adsorption, indicating a hysteresis effect. The hysteresis coefficient varied from 0.023 ± 0.15 to 0.160 ± 0.12 in two test soils. A good fit to the linear and Freundlich isotherms was observed with correlation coefficients >0.96. The results revealed that adsorption-desorption was influenced by soil properties and showed that the maximum sorption and minimum desorption of pesticide were observed in soils with higher organic carbon and clay content. Thus, groundwater contamination may be minimized, on application of tricyclazole in high-sorption soils of rice-growing regions.

  16. Laboratory measurement of sorption in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Harr, M.S.; Pettit, P.; Ramey, J.J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A new apparatus for measuring steam adsorption-desorption isothermally on rock samples has been installed and initial runs made for rock samples from geothermal reservoirs. The amounts adsorbed measured in these experiments are the same order of magnitude as previous experiments.

  17. Enhanced saturation coverages in adsorption-desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tassel, Paul R.; Viot, Pascal; Tarjus, Gilles; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Talbot, Julian

    2000-01-01

    Many experimental studies of protein deposition on solid surfaces involve alternating adsorption/desorption steps. In this paper, we investigate the effect of a desorption step (separating two adsorption steps) on the kinetics, the adsorbed-layer structure, and the saturation density. Our theoretical approach involves a density expansion of the pair distribution function and an application of an interpolation formula to estimate the saturation density as a function of the density at which the desorption process commences, ρ1, and the density of the depleted configuration, ρ2. The theory predicts an enhancement of the saturation density compared with that of a simple, uninterrupted random sequential adsorption (RSA) process and a maximum in the saturation density when ρ2=(2/3)ρ1. The theoretical results are in qualitative and semiquantitative agreement with the results of numerical simulations.

  18. Adsorption-desorption characteristics of lead in variable charge soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, J Y; Yang, X E; He, Z L; Chen, G C; Shentu, J L; Li, T Q

    2004-01-01

    Adsorption desorption processes of Pb at contaminated levels in two variable charge soils were investigated. The red soil (RAR) developed on the Arenaceous rock (clayey, mixed siliceous thermic typic Dystrochrept) adsorbed more Pb2+ than the red soil (REQ) derived from the Quaternary red earths (clayey, kaolinitic thermic plinthite Aquult). The maximum adsorption values (Xm) that were obtained from the simple Langmuir model were 52.6 mmol Pb2+ kg(-1) soil and 29.9 mmol Pb2+ kg(-1) soil, respectively, for the RAR and REQ. Adsorption of Pb2+ decreased soil pH by 1.10 unit for the RAR soil and 1.21 unit for the REQ soil at the highest loading. The adsorption equilibrium pH of RAR was higher than that of REQ at the same Pb2+ concentration. The distribution coefficient (Kd) of Pb in the soils decreased exponentially with increasing Pb2+ loading. Most of the adsorbed Pb2+ in the soils was not desorbed in the 0.01 mol L(-1) NaNO3 solution. After five successive extractions with NaNO3, only 0-11% of the total adsorbed Pb2+ in the RAR soil was desorbed and the corresponding value of the REQ soil was 0-19%, indicating that the RAR soil had a greater affinity for Pb2+ than the REQ soil at the same Pb2+ loading. Different mechanisms might be involved in Pb2+ adsorption/desorption at different levels of Pb2+ loading and between the two soils.

  19. Adsorption-desorption of metolachlor and atrazine in Indian soils: effect of fly ash amendment.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rakesh K; Singh, Neera

    2013-02-01

    The effect of two fly ashes as soil amendment on the adsorption-desorption of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylphenyl)] and atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) was studied in alluvial and laterite soils. The adsorption data for both the herbicides fitted well the Freundlich equation, and Freundlich adsorption coefficient (K (f)) increased with an increase of fly ash amount. Both the fly ashes differed in their extent to increase herbicide sorption, and the effect was different in different soils. Atrazine was sorbed more in the soils/soils + fly ash mixtures than the metolachlor. The K (f) values showed significant correlation with the amount of fly ash amendment (correlation coefficient, R > 0.982). The desorption isotherms also fitted the Freundlich equation, and desorption showed hysteresis which increased with an increase in the content of fly ash amendment. The free energy change (ΔG) indicated that the sorption process is exothermic, spontaneous, and physical in nature. The study has shown that fly ash as soil amendment significantly increased the sorption of metolachlor and atrazine, but the effect is soil- and fly ash-specific. PMID:22572800

  20. Adsorption-desorption of metolachlor and atrazine in Indian soils: effect of fly ash amendment.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rakesh K; Singh, Neera

    2013-02-01

    The effect of two fly ashes as soil amendment on the adsorption-desorption of metolachlor [2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylphenyl)] and atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) was studied in alluvial and laterite soils. The adsorption data for both the herbicides fitted well the Freundlich equation, and Freundlich adsorption coefficient (K (f)) increased with an increase of fly ash amount. Both the fly ashes differed in their extent to increase herbicide sorption, and the effect was different in different soils. Atrazine was sorbed more in the soils/soils + fly ash mixtures than the metolachlor. The K (f) values showed significant correlation with the amount of fly ash amendment (correlation coefficient, R > 0.982). The desorption isotherms also fitted the Freundlich equation, and desorption showed hysteresis which increased with an increase in the content of fly ash amendment. The free energy change (ΔG) indicated that the sorption process is exothermic, spontaneous, and physical in nature. The study has shown that fly ash as soil amendment significantly increased the sorption of metolachlor and atrazine, but the effect is soil- and fly ash-specific.

  1. Biodegradation of persistent organics can overcome adsorption-desorption hysteresis in biological activated carbon systems.

    PubMed

    Abromaitis, V; Racys, V; van der Marel, P; Meulepas, R J W

    2016-04-01

    In Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) systems, persistent organic pollutants can be removed through a combination of adsorption, desorption and biodegradation. These processes might be affected by the presence of other organics, especially by the more abundant easily-biodegradable organics, like acetate. In this research these relations are quantified for the removal of the persistent pharmaceutical metoprolol. Acetate did not affect the adsorption and desorption of metoprolol, but it did greatly enhance the metoprolol biodegradation. At least part of the BAC biomass growing on acetate was also able to metabolise metoprolol, although metoprolol was only converted after the acetate was depleted. The presence of easily-degradable organics like acetate in the feeding water is therefore beneficial for the removal of metoprolol in BAC systems. The isotherms obtained from metoprolol adsorption and desorption experiments showed that BAC systems are subject to hysteresis; for AC bioregeneration to take place the microbial biomass has to reduce the concentration at the AC-biomass interface 2.7 times compared to the concentration at which the carbon was being loaded. However, given the threshold concentration of the MET degrading microorganisms (<0.08 μg/L) versus the average influent concentration (1.3 μg/L), bioregeneration is feasible.

  2. Adsorption, Desorption, and Clustering H20 on Pt (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Daschbach, John L.; Peden, Brandon M.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2004-01-15

    The adsorption, desorption, and clustering behavior of H20 on Pt(111) has been investigated by specular He scattering. The data show that water adsorbed on a clean Pt(111) surface undergoes a transition from a random to a clustered structure near 60 K. The initial helium scattering cross sections as a function of temperature are found to be insensitive to H20 flux over a range of 0.005 ML/s to 0.55 ML/s indicating the clustering process is more complex than simple surface diffusion. The coarsening process of an initially random distribution of water deposited at 25 K is found to occur over a broad temperature range, 60 K< T <140 K, during thermal annealing. The desorption kinetics for submonolayer water are determined to be zero-order for surface coverages greater than 0.05 ML and temperatures between 150 K and 174 K. The zero-order desorption kinetics are consistent with a two-dimensional two-phase coexistence between H2O condensed phase and a 2-gas phase on the Pt surface

  3. Sub-Grid Reactive Diffusion and Apparent Uranyl Adsorption/Desorption Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Kerisit, S.; Ma, R.; Zheng, C.; Zachara, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adsorption/desorption is an important process affecting contaminant fate and transport in subsurface sediments. This presentation will discuss the importance of sub-grid reactive diffusion in both intragranular and inter-grain domains that affect the apparent rates of uranyl adsorption/desorption at the macroscopic scale. Uranyl[U(VI)]-contaminated site at Hanford 300A where U(VI) resides in intragranular domains as surface-complexed species is used as an example in this presentation. Molecular dynamics calculations revealed that uranyl surface complexation reactions are a fast process with a first-order rate constant of 100 per second. Consequently U(VI) adsorption/desorption is treated as an equilibrium process. An equilibrium, Kd-based model, however, significantly over-predicted the historical migration of the uranyl plume at the site. Sub-grain pore-scale simulations and stirred-flow cell experiments indicated that the coupling of intragranular diffusion with surface complexation reactions decreased the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption over 4 order of magnitude. The apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption decreased further over 1 order of magnitude due to the sub-grid pore-scale coupling of diffusive mass transfer and grain-scale U(VI) adsorption/desorption as revealed by column experiments and pore-scale simulations. Field-scale reactive transport models that incorporate the complexity of sub-grid reactive diffusion in the apparent rate of U(VI) adsorption/desorption were consistent with the slow migration of the U(VI) plume at the site.

  4. Laboratory Measurements of Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNairy, W. W.

    1997-04-01

    Adiabatic and isothermal measurements on various of gases are made possible by using the Adiabatic Gas Law apparatus made by PASCO Scientific(Much of this work was published by the author in "The Physics Teacher", vol. 34, March 1996, p. 178-80.). By using a computer interface, undergraduates are able to data for monatomic, diatomic and polyatomic gases for both compression and expansion processes. Designed principally to obtain adiabatic data, the apparatus may be easily modified for use in isothermal processes. The various sets of data are imported into a spreadsheet program where fits may be made to the ideal gas law and the adiabatic gas law. Excellent results are obtained for the natural logarithm of pressure versus the natural logarithm of volume for both the isothermal data (expected slope equal to -1 in all cases) and the adiabatic data (slope equal to -1 times the ratio of specific heats for the particular gas). An overview of the lab procedure used at VMI will be presented along with data obtained for several adiabatic and isothermal processes.

  5. Adsorption-desorption characteristics of cadmium in variable charge soils.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen-Li; Xu, Hai-Ping; Zhu, Ying-Mei; Yang, Xiao-E; Chen, Guo-Chao

    2005-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has received considerable attention because of its association with various human health problems. The behavior of adsorption-desorption of Cd at contaminated levels in two variable charge soils were investigated. The red soil (RAR) developed on the Arenaceous rock (clayey, mixed siliceous thermic typic Dystrochrept) adsorbed more Cd2+ than the red soil (REQ) derived from the Quaternary red earths (clayey, kaolinitic thermic plinthite Aquult). The characteristics of Cd adsorption could be described by the Freundlich equation (r2 = 0.997 and 0.989, respectively, for the RAR and REQ) and the simple Langmuir adsorption equation (r2 = 0.985 and 0.977, respectively, for the RAR and REQ). The maximum adsorption values (Xm) that were obtained from the simple Langmuir model were 36.23 mmol Cd2+ kg(-1) soil and 31.15 mmol Cd2+ kg(-1) soil, respectively for the RAR and REQ. Adsorption of Cd2+ decreased soil pH by 1.28 unit for the RAR soil and 1.23 unit for the REQ soil at the highest loading. The distribution coefficient (kd) of Cd in the soil decreased exponentially with increasing Cd2+ loading. The adsorption of cadmium in the two variable charge soils was characterized by a rapid process that lasted approximately 15 min, followed by a slower but longer period. 85.5% and 79.4% of the added Cd were adsorbed within two hours by the RAR and REQ soil, respectively. More Cd2+ was adsorbed at 10 degrees C than at 25 degrees C or 40 degrees C. After five successive desorptions with 0.01 mol L(-1) NaNO3 solution, 53.3% of the total adsorbed Cd2+ in the RAR soil was desorbed and the corresponding value of the REQ soil was 46.5%, indicating that the RAR soil had a lower affinity for Cd2+ than the REQ soil at the same Cd2+ loading. PMID:15792301

  6. Evaluation of iodide and iodate for adsorption-desorption characteristics and bioavailability in three types of soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chunlai; Weng, Huanxin; Jilani, Ghulam; Yan, Ailan; Liu, Huiping; Xue, Zhiyong

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption-desorption of iodine in two forms, viz., iodide (I(-)) and iodate (IO (3) (-) ), in three types of soil were investigated. The soils were: red soil developed on Quaternary red earths (REQ)- clayey, kaolintic thermic plinthite Aquult, Inceptisol soil (IS) and alluvial soil (AS)-Fluvio-marine yellow loamy soil. The isothermal curves of iodine adsorption on soils were described by Langmuir and Freundlich equation, and the maximum adsorption values (y (m)) were obtained from the simple Langmuir model. As compared with the iodide, the iodate was adsorbed in higher amounts by the soils tested. Among three soils, the REQ soil adsorbed more iodine (I(-) and IO (3) (-) ) than the IS and AS. The distribution coefficient (K (d)) of iodine in the soils decreased exponentially with increasing iodine loading concentration. Desorption of iodine in soil was increased correspondingly with increasing adsorption values. The REQ soil had a greater affinity for iodine than the IS and AS at the same iodine loadings. In the pot experiment cultivated with pakchoi (Brassica chinensis L.) and added with two exogenous iodine sources, the iodide form was quickly taken up by pakchoi and caused more toxicity to the vegetable. The rate of iodine loss from soil was higher for iodide form as compared with the iodate. The iodine bioavailability was the highest but the persistence was the weakest in AS among the three soils tested, and the REQ soil showed just the opposite trend to that of the AS soil. This study is of theoretical importance to understand the relationship between iodine adsorption-desorption characteristics and their bioavailability in different soils and it also has practical implications for seeking effective alternatives of iodine biofortification to prevent iodine deficiency disorders.

  7. The adsorption/desorption of phosphorus in freshwater sediments from buffer zones: the effects of sediment concentration and pH.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Du, Yun; Du, Chao; Xu, Meng; Loáiciga, Hugo A

    2016-01-01

    Riparian buffer zones adjacent to reservoirs and lakes protect aquatic ecosystems from polluted surface runoff. Sediments, collected from the buffer zones of Danjiangkou Reservoir (SR) and Honghu Lake (SL) in an ecologically fragile region in central China, were evaluated to reveal their phosphorus-adsorbing/desorbing properties and storage capacities. A nonlinear regression method was used to fit the pseudo-second-order kinetic and the modified crossover-type Langmuir isotherm models to the experimental data. It is shown that the adsorption of phosphorus onto the studied sediments followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic expression. The modified crossover-type Langmuir isotherm model was found to be a suitable method for describing adsorption/desorption processes in the experimental sediments. The maximum adsorption capacities (Q m), partitioning coefficients (K p), native adsorbed exchangeable phosphorus (NAP), and equilibrium phosphorus concentration (EPC0) were subsequently obtained for the experimental sediments. The effects of sediment concentration and pH were also investigated by batch experiments and Fourier transformation infrared and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The adsorption/desorption characteristics of different phosphate species on the sediments from reservoir and lake buffer zones were identified.

  8. ADSORPTION, DESORPTION AND OXIDATION OF ARSENIC AFFECTED BY CLAY MINERALS AND AGING PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption/desorption and oxidation/reduction of arsenic at clay surfaces are very important to the natural attenuation of arsenic in the subsurface environment. Although numerous studies have concluded that iron oxides have high affinities for the adsorption of As(V), very litt...

  9. Role of organic matter on boron adsorption-desorption hysteresis of soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we evaluated the boron (B) adsorption/desorption reaction in six soils and examined the extent to which organic matter content, as well as incubation time affected B release. Six soils varying in initial pH, clay content, and were selected for the study. Adsorption experiments were c...

  10. Adsorption/desorption characteristics and separation of anthocyanins from muscadine (Vitis rotundifolia) juice pomace by use of macroporous adsorbent resins.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Amandeep K; Gu, Liwei

    2013-02-20

    In this study, the adsorption/desorption characteristics of anthocyanins on five Amberlite resins (FPX-66, XAD-7HP, XAD-16N, XAD-1180, and XAD-761) were evaluated. FPX-66 and XAD-16N showed the highest adsorption and desorption capacities and ratios for anthocyanins from muscadine pomace extract, while XAD-7HP had the lowest adsorption and desorption capacities and ratios. On the basis of static adsorption and desorption tests, three resins (FPX-66, XAD-16N, and XAD-1180) were selected for adsorption kinetics and isotherms. The adsorption mechanism was better explained by the pseudo-first-order kinetics for FPX-66 and XAD-16N; however, for XAD-1180, pseudo-second-order kinetics was the most suitable model. The experimental data fitted best to Langmuir isotherm model for all three resins. Dynamic testing was done on a column packed with FPX-66 resin and breakthrough volume was reached at 17 bed volumes of muscadine pomace water extract during adsorption. Three bed volumes of aqueous ethanol (70%) resulted in complete desorption. Resin adsorption resulted in a concentrated pomace extract that contained 13% (w/w) anthocyanins with no detectable sugars. PMID:23368425

  11. Influence of soil components on adsorption-desorption of hazardous organics-development of low cost technology for reclamation of hazardous waste dumpsites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zareen; Anjaneyulu, Y

    2005-02-14

    The waste disposal practices on land frequently lead to the deposition of hazardous waste at geologically/hydrogeologically unsuitable locations, resulting in surface and groundwater contamination. The movement of chemicals through soil is not only dependent on the physical, chemical and biological properties of the waste but also on the characteristics of the soil of the disposal site. In this paper the authors report their results on the influence of soil components on adsorption-desorption of certain industrially widely used hazardous organics like phenol, p-nitrophenol, 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol on typical soils of Patancheru industrial area (Hyderabad, AP, India). The data on nature of organics, soil organic matters, clay, free iron and aluminum oxides of soils are known to influence the adsorption-desorption process are presented. There was reduction up to 67.5% (organic matter removed), 53.8% (clay removed) and 24.2% (iron and aluminum oxides removed) in the adsorption capacity of the soils when compared to untreated soils indicating the role played by these soil components in adsorption process. Desorption isotherms of soil adsorbed hazardous organics exhibited hysteresis at higher initial concentration indicating the degree of irreversibility of adsorption-desorption process. Mixed microbial cultures were developed which can degrade the hazardous organics to complete mineralisation by utilizing them as sole source of carbon and their corresponding biokinetic constants were evaluated. Preparation of dumpsites with suitable soil surface having high holding capacity for organics and their in situ biodegradation by mixing with specific microbial cultures can be exploited as a cost effective technology for reclamation of hazardous waste dumpsites.

  12. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Li, Zhenjun; Chen, Long; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-07-17

    The adsorption, desorption, and displacement kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110) are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam techniques. The TPD spectra for both H2O and CO2 have well-resolved peaks corresponding to desorption from bridge-bonded oxygen (BBO), Ti, and oxygen vacancies (VO) sites in order of increasing peak temperature. Analysis of the saturated monolayer peak for both species reveals that the corresponding adsorption energies on all sites are greater for H2O and for CO2. Sequential dosing of H2O and CO2 reveals that, independent of the dose order, H2O molecules will displace CO2 in order to occupy the highest energy binding sites available. Isothermal experiments show that the displacement of CO2 by H2O occurs between 75 and 80 K. Further analysis shows that a ratio of 4 H2O to 3 CO2 molecules is needed to displace CO2 from the TiO2(110) surface.

  13. Characterization of polysulfone and polysulfone/vanillin microcapsules by 1H NMR spectroscopy, solid-state 13C CP/MAS-NMR spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption analyses.

    PubMed

    Peña, Brisa; de Ménorval, Louis-Charles; Garcia-Valls, Ricard; Gumí, Tània

    2011-11-01

    Textile detergent and softener industries have incorporated perfume microencapsulation technology to improve their products. Perfume encapsulation allows perfume protection until use and provides a long-lasting fragrance release. But, certain industrial microcapsules show low encapsulation capacity and low material stability. Polysulfone capsules have been already proposed to solve these drawbacks. Among them, PSf/Vanillin capsules were considered as a desirable system. They present both good material stability and high encapsulation capacity. However, several factors such as the final location of the perfume in the polymeric matrix, the aggregation state that it has in the capsule and its interaction with the capsule components have not been studied yet. These factors can provide vast information about the capsule performance and its improvement. With the aim to characterize these parameters, the physical and chemical properties of PSf/Vanillin capsules have been investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and N(2) adsorption-desorption measurements. AFM micrograph and N(2) isotherms confirm that the presence of vanillin modify the physical structure of PSf/Vanillin microcapsules as it is trapped in the capsule porosity. NMR results show that vanillin is present in solid state in PSf/Vanillin microcapsules.

  14. Apparatus to Measure Adiabatic and Isothermal Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, D. W.; White, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a simple manual apparatus designed to serve as an effective demonstration of the differences between isothermal and adiabatic processes for the general or elementary physics student. Enables students to verify Boyle's law for slow processes and identify the departure from this law for rapid processes and can also be used to give a clear…

  15. Single-crystal and humidity-controlled powder diffraction study of the breathing effect in a metal-organic framework upon water adsorption/desorption.

    PubMed

    Aríñez-Soriano, Javier; Albalad, Jorge; Vila-Parrondo, Christian; Pérez-Carvajal, Javier; Rodríguez-Hermida, Sabina; Cabeza, Aurelio; Juanhuix, Jordi; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2016-05-26

    Herein we report a study on water adsorption/desorption-triggered single-crystal to single-crystal transformations in a MOF, by single-crystal and humidity-controlled powder X-ray diffraction and water-sorption measurements. We identified a gate-opening effect at a relative humidity of 85% upon water adsorption, and a gate-closure effect at a relative humidity of 55 to 77% upon water desorption. This reversible breathing effect between the "open" and the "closed" structures of the MOF involves the cleavage and formation of several coordination bonds.

  16. Arsenic(V) adsorption-desorption in agricultural and mine soils: Effects of organic matter addition and phosphate competition.

    PubMed

    Arco-Lázaro, Elena; Agudo, Inés; Clemente, Rafael; Bernal, M Pilar

    2016-09-01

    High total and bioavailable concentrations of As in soils represent a potential risk for groundwater contamination and entry in the food chain. The use of organic amendments in the remediation of As-contaminated soils has been found to produce distinct effects on the solubility of As in the soil. Therefore, knowledge about As adsorption-desorption processes that govern its solubility in soil is of relevance in order to predict the behaviour of this element during these processes. In this paper, the objective was to determine As adsorption and desorption in four different soils, with and without compost addition, and also in competition with phosphate, through the determination of sorption isotherms. Batch experiments were carried out using three soils affected differently by previous mining activity of the Sierra Minera of La Unión-Cartagena (SE Spain) and an agricultural soil from Segovia province (central Spain). Adsorption was higher in the mining soils (and highest in the acidic one) than in the agricultural soils, although the latter were not affected negatively by organic matter or phosphate competition for sorption sites. The results show that As adsorption in most soils, both with and without compost, fitted better a multimolecular layer model (Freundlich), whereas As adsorption in competition with P fitted a monolayer model (Langmuir). Moreover, the use of compost and phosphate reduced the adsorption of As in the mining soils, while in the agricultural soils compost increased their low adsorption capacity. Therefore, the use of compost can be a good option to favour As immobilisation in soils of low adsorption, but knowledge of the soil composition will be crucial to predict the effects of organic amendments on As solubility in soils and its associated environmental risk.

  17. Arsenic(V) adsorption-desorption in agricultural and mine soils: Effects of organic matter addition and phosphate competition.

    PubMed

    Arco-Lázaro, Elena; Agudo, Inés; Clemente, Rafael; Bernal, M Pilar

    2016-09-01

    High total and bioavailable concentrations of As in soils represent a potential risk for groundwater contamination and entry in the food chain. The use of organic amendments in the remediation of As-contaminated soils has been found to produce distinct effects on the solubility of As in the soil. Therefore, knowledge about As adsorption-desorption processes that govern its solubility in soil is of relevance in order to predict the behaviour of this element during these processes. In this paper, the objective was to determine As adsorption and desorption in four different soils, with and without compost addition, and also in competition with phosphate, through the determination of sorption isotherms. Batch experiments were carried out using three soils affected differently by previous mining activity of the Sierra Minera of La Unión-Cartagena (SE Spain) and an agricultural soil from Segovia province (central Spain). Adsorption was higher in the mining soils (and highest in the acidic one) than in the agricultural soils, although the latter were not affected negatively by organic matter or phosphate competition for sorption sites. The results show that As adsorption in most soils, both with and without compost, fitted better a multimolecular layer model (Freundlich), whereas As adsorption in competition with P fitted a monolayer model (Langmuir). Moreover, the use of compost and phosphate reduced the adsorption of As in the mining soils, while in the agricultural soils compost increased their low adsorption capacity. Therefore, the use of compost can be a good option to favour As immobilisation in soils of low adsorption, but knowledge of the soil composition will be crucial to predict the effects of organic amendments on As solubility in soils and its associated environmental risk. PMID:27239690

  18. Effect of organic matter and calcium carbonate on behaviors of cadmium adsorption-desorption on/from purple paddy soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiulan; Jiang, Tao; Du, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Batch experiments and sequential extraction analysis were employed to investigate the effects of soil organic matter and CaCO3 on the adsorption and desorption of cadmium (Cd(2+)) onto and from two purple paddy soils, an acidic purple paddy soil (APPS) and a calcareous purple paddy soil (CPPS). The Cd(2+) adsorption isotherms on both soils could be well-described by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. CPPS had a higher capacity and a stronger affinity for Cd(2+) adsorption compared with APPS. The adsorption process of Cd(2+) on APPS was dominated by electrostatic attractions, whereas the adsorption mechanism varied depending on the Cd(2+) concentrations in equilibrium solutions on CPPS. At low equilibrium concentrations, the adsorption process was primarily specific adsorption, but nonspecific adsorption dominated at high equilibrium concentrations. Removal of organic matter decreased the amount of Cd(2+) adsorption on both of the soils, slightly affected the Cd(2+) desorption rate and exchangeable Cd (EXC-Cd) in APPS and increased the desorption rate and EXC-Cd in CPPS, suggesting that the effect of organic matter on Cd(2+) adsorption-desorption depends on the soils. CPPS and APPS containing CaCO3 exhibited higher adsorption amounts but lower desorption rates and lower proportions of EXC-Cd than those of their corresponding soils without CaCO3, demonstrating that CaCO3 played an important role in Cd(2+) specific adsorption on soil. The changes in the thermodynamic parameters, including free energy (ΔG(0)), enthalpy (ΔH(0)) and entropy (ΔS(0)), as evaluated by the Van't Hoff equations, indicated that the adsorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process with the primary interaction forces of dipole interactions and hydrogen bonds on APPS, whereas both physical and chemical interactions dominated the adsorption on CPPS.

  19. Measurements of BET Surface Area on Silica Nanosprings

    SciTech Connect

    Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.

    2008-09-01

    Nitrogen adsorption desorption isotherm for Silica nanosprings (GoNano2) samples deposited on substrate. The isotherm was obtained at 77 K using liquid N2 bath. The area of the substrate is 16 cm2. The amount of the sample is 0.44 mg/cm2. Amount of silica nanosprings= 7.04 mg. There is no indication of substantial micro or mesoporosity in the sample based on the nature of the isotherm. Eleven point BET surface area was measured. Nine points plotted. Goodness if fit R= 0.9992. BET surface area for silica nanosprings= 262 cm2/g

  20. Kinetic modeling of antimony(V) adsorption-desorption and transport in soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Li, Lulu; Zhou, Shiwei

    2014-09-01

    Antimonate [Sb(V)] adsorption-desorption and transport in an acidic red soil (Yingtan) and a calcareous soil (Huanjiang) was investigated using kinetic batch and miscible displacement experiments. Different formulations of a multi-reaction model (MRM) were evaluated for their capabilities of describing the retention and transport mechanisms of Sb(V) in soils. The experimental results showed that adsorption of Sb(V) by two soils was kinetically controlled and largely irreversible. The Sb(V) adsorption capacity and kinetic rate of the acidic red soil was much higher than that of the calcareous soil. The asymmetrical breakthrough curves indicated the strong dominance of non-equilibrium retention of Sb(V). A four step sequential extraction procedure provided evidence that majority of applied Sb(V) was irreversibly retained. A formulation of MRM with two kinetic sorption sites (reversible and irreversible) successfully described Sb(V) adsorption-desorption data. The use of kinetic batch rate coefficients for predictions of breakthrough curves (BTCs) underestimated Sb(V) retention and overestimated its mobility. In an inverse mode with optimized rate coefficients, the MRM formulation was capable of simulating Sb(V) transport in soil columns.

  1. Non-Debye relaxation in the dielectric response of nematic liquid crystals: Surface and memory effects in the adsorption-desorption process of ionic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, J. L.; Santoro, P. A.; Zola, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Evangelista, L. R.; Ciuchi, F.; Mazzulla, A.; Scaramuzza, N.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the presence of ions in insulating materials such as nematic liquid crystals may be responsible for the dielectric spectroscopy behavior observed experimentally. It is shown that, at low frequencies, an essentially non-Debye relaxation process takes place due to surface effects. This is accomplished by investigating the effects of the adsorption-desorption process on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell when the generation and recombination of ions is present. The adsorption-desorption is governed by a non-usual kinetic equation in order to incorporate memory effects related to a non-Debye relaxation and the roughness of the surface. The analysis is carried out by searching for solutions to the drift-diffusion equation that satisfy the Poisson equation relating the effective electric field to the net charge density. We also discuss the effect of the mobility of the ions, i.e., situations with equal and different diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions, on the impedance and obtain an exact expression for the admittance. The model is compared with experimental results measured for the impedance of a nematic liquid crystal sample and a very good agreement is obtained.

  2. Effect of soil type and organic manure on adsorption-desorption of flubendiamide.

    PubMed

    Das, Shaon Kumar; Mukherjee, Irani; Kumar, Aman

    2015-07-01

    Laboratory study on adsorption-desorption of flubendiamide was conducted in two soil types, varying in their physical and chemical properties, by batch equilibrium method. After 4 h of equilibrium time, adsorption of flubendiamide on soil matrix exhibited moderately low rate of accumulation with 4.52 ± 0.21% in red soil and low rate with 3.55 ± 0.21% in black soil. After amending soils with organic manure, adsorption percentage increased to 6.42 ± 0.21% in red soil and (4.18 ± 0.21%) in black soil indicating that amendment significantly increased sorption. Variation in sorption affinities of the soils as indicated by distribution coefficient (K d) for sorption was in the range of 2.98-4.32, 4.91-6.64, 1.04-1.45 and 1.92-2.81 ml/g for red soil, organic manure-treated red soil, black soil and organic manure-treated black soil, respectively. Desorption was slightly slower than adsorption indicating a hysteresis effect having hysteresis coefficient ranges between 0.023 and 0.149 in two test soils. The adsorption data for the insecticide fitted well the Freundlich equation. Results revealed that adsorption-desorption was influenced by soil types and showed that the maximum sorption and minimum desorption of the insecticide was observed in soils with higher organic carbon and clay content. It can be inferred that crystal lattice of the clay soil plays a significant role in flubendiamide adsorption and desorption. Adsorption was lower at acidic pH and gradually increased towards alkaline pH. As this insecticide is poorly sorbed in the two Indian soil types, there may be a possibility of their leaching to lower soil profiles.

  3. Effect of long term organic amendments on adsorption-desorption of thiram onto a luvisol soil derived from loess.

    PubMed

    Filipe, O M S; Vidal, M M; Scherer, H W; Schneider, R J; Duarte, A C; Esteves, V I; Santos, E B H

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the influence of soil organic amendments on the sorption properties of the fungicide thiram. The organic amendments studied were organic household compost (COM), sewage sludge from municipal water treatment facilities (SLU) and farmyard manure (FYM), which were compared to mineral fertilizer application (MIN). Sorption-desorption experiments were performed using the batch method and the results indicated that the adsorption isotherms were non-linear and were found to conform to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) model, suggesting multilayer adsorption and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions after the saturation of the surface layer. In general, distribution coefficient values, K(D), are dependent on, but not proportional to, the initial concentration of thiram. For a fixed thiram initial concentration, a significant correlation (r(2)>0.851; p<0.001) between K(D) values and the soil organic carbon content (OC) was observed. The highest value of K(D) was observed for the soil amended with compost, which is the one with the highest organic carbon content. K(D) values were divided by the soil organic carbon contents in order to obtain organic carbon partition coefficients K(OC). Comparing K(OC) means from 3 (initial concentrations) x 4 (soil organic matter compositions) x 3 (replicates) factorial ANOVA allow us to conclude that there is a significant but not proportional influence of the initial concentration of thiram on those values, but changes in the soil organic matter composition, associated to different soil amendments, have no significant influence on adsorption of thiram. To evaluate the reversibility of thiram adsorption, two consecutive desorption cycles were performed with CaCl(2) 0.01 mol L(-1). The desorption K(D) values were consistently higher (approximately twice) than those for adsorption at the same equilibrium concentrations for all soil samples supporting the existence of hysteresis in the adsorption-desorption

  4. Evaluation of theoretical and empirical water vapor sorption isotherm models for soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per; de Jonge, Lis W.

    2016-01-01

    The mathematical characterization of water vapor sorption isotherms of soils is crucial for modeling processes such as volatilization of pesticides and diffusive and convective water vapor transport. Although numerous physically based and empirical models were previously proposed to describe sorption isotherms of building materials, food, and other industrial products, knowledge about the applicability of these functions for soils is noticeably lacking. We present an evaluation of nine models for characterizing adsorption/desorption isotherms for a water activity range from 0.03 to 0.93 based on measured data of 207 soils with widely varying textures, organic carbon contents, and clay mineralogy. In addition, the potential applicability of the models for prediction of sorption isotherms from known clay content was investigated. While in general, all investigated models described measured adsorption and desorption isotherms reasonably well, distinct differences were observed between physical and empirical models and due to the different degrees of freedom of the model equations. There were also considerable differences in model performance for adsorption and desorption data. While regression analysis relating model parameters and clay content and subsequent model application for prediction of measured isotherms showed promise for the majority of investigated soils, for soils with distinct kaolinitic and smectitic clay mineralogy predicted isotherms did not closely match the measurements.

  5. Analytic theory of the adsorption-desorption transition of Gaussian polymers interacting with a periodic lattice of adsorbing centers.

    PubMed

    Chervanyov, A I; Heinrich, G

    2008-08-21

    Based on the obtained exact analytic solution, we calculate the adsorption-desorption diagram that describes the adsorption of Gaussian polymers onto a rigid surface that bears a periodic array of the adsorbing centers. It is shown that the polymer adsorption onto this substrate is fully governed by a delicate balance between the entropic depletion repulsion of polymers from the rigid surface and their attraction to the adsorbing centers. Magnitudes of these competitive effects are calculated in terms of the reduced overall affinity of the substrate eta(-1) and the reduced separation between the adsorbing centers d. The calculated exact adsorption-desorption diagram eta(d) that describes the equilibrium between the above depletion and adsorption interactions, is shown to obey the scaling law eta approximately d(-1.17).

  6. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10−11 ~ 10−9 molL−1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima. PMID:26868138

  7. Extension lifetime for dye-sensitized solar cells through multiple dye adsorption/desorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Ruei-Tang; Shen, Po-Shen; Chen, Peter; Guo, Tzung-Fang

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we propose a novel concept of extending the lifetime of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) and reducing the costs of re-conditioning DSCs by recycling the FTO/TiO2 substrates. The photovoltaic performances of DSCs using substrates with various cycles of dye uptake and rinse off history are tested. The results show that dye adsorption and Voc are significantly increased under multiple dye adsorption/desorption process and resulted in the improvement of power conversion efficiency. Moreover, the dyeing kinetics is faster after multiple recycling processes, which is favorable for the industrial application. With surface analysis and charge transport characteristics, we also demonstrate the optimal functionality of TiO2/dye interface for the improved Voc and efficiency. The results confirm that the improved performances are due to increased dye loading and dense packing of dye molecules. Our results are beneficial for the understanding on the extension of DSCs lifetime after long-term operation in the application of DSC modules. This approach may also be applied in the replacement of newly synthesized photosensitizes to the active cells.

  8. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10‑11 ~ 10‑9 molL‑1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  9. Adsorption-desorption noise in plasmonic chemical/biological sensors in multiple analyte environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Olga; Jakšić, Zoran; Matović, Jovan

    2009-05-01

    We analyzed the intrinsic noise of plasmonic sensors caused by the adsorption-desorption of gaseous analytes on the sensor surface. We analyzed a general situation when there is a larger number of different species in the environment. We developed our model and applied it to calculate various analyte mixtures, including some environmental pollutants, toxic and dangerous substances. The spectral density of mean square refractive index fluctuations follows a dependence similar to that of generation-recombination noise in photodetectors, flat at lower frequencies and sharply decreasing at higher. Some of the calculated noise levels are well within the detection range of conventional surface plasmon resonance sensors. One of the obvious conclusions is that AD noise may be an important limiting factor in monitoring process kinetics by nanoplasmonic sensors. An AD noise peak is observed in temperature dependence of mean square refractive index fluctuations, thus sensor operating temperature may be optimized to obtain larger signal to noise ratio. A significant property of AD noise is its increase with the plasmon sensor area decrease, which means that it will be even more pronounced in modern nanoplasmonic devices. Our consideration is valid both for conventional surface plasmon resonance devices and for general nanoplasmonic devices. This research could be of importance in diverse areas such as environmental sensing, homeland security, forensic applications, life sciences, etc.

  10. Purification of olive mill wastewater phenols through membrane filtration and resin adsorption/desorption.

    PubMed

    Zagklis, Dimitris P; Vavouraki, Aikaterini I; Kornaros, Michael E; Paraskeva, Christakis A

    2015-03-21

    Olive tree cultivation has a long history in the Mediterranean countries, and even today consists an important cultural, economic, and environmental aspect of the area. The production of olive oil through 3-phase extraction systems, leads to the co-production of large quantities of olive mill wastewater (OMW), with toxic compounds that inhibit its biodegradation. Membrane filtration has been used for the exploitation of this byproduct, through the isolation of valuable phenolic compounds. In the current work, a fraction of the waste occurring from a membrane process was used. More specifically the reverse osmosis concentrate, after a nanofiltration, containing the low-molecular-weight compounds, was further treated with resin adsorption/desorption. The non ionic XAD4, XAD16, and XAD7HP resins were implemented, for the recovery of phenols and their separation from carbohydrates. The recovered phenolic compounds were concentrated through vacuum evaporation reaching a final concentration of 378 g/L in gallic acid equivalents containing 84.8 g/L hydroxytyrosol.

  11. Restricted access: on the nature of adsorption/desorption hysteresis in amorphous, microporous polymeric materials.

    PubMed

    Jeromenok, Jekaterina; Weber, Jens

    2013-10-22

    The phenomenon of low-pressure adsorption/desorption hysteresis, which is commonly observed in microporous polymers, is investigated by detailed gas adsorption studies. Diffusional limitations by pore blocking effects, which arise as a consequence of the micropore morphology and connectivity, are discussed as the origin of the hysteresis rather than swelling effects, which have been suggested previously. Micropores with narrow openings, which cannot be filled easily, are expected to be present next to open pores. Those pores are termed restricted-access pores and are only filled in the course of the adsorption process as a consequence of the increasing solvation pressure exhibited from already filled micropores. As a consequence of the results presented here, it is suggested to use the desorption branch in addition to the adsorption branch for the extraction of the porosity characteristics, such as specific surface area, pore volume, and pore size distribution. The magnitude of the low-pressure hysteresis might hence give an idea of the micropore connectivity, which is important information for potential applications.

  12. Adsorption/Desorption Behavior of Water Vapor in an Adsorbent Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Kodama, Akio

    To clarify the operating and design concept of desiccant rotor, which is a most important component of an adsorptive desiccant cooling process, adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor has been investigated by means of computer simulation. Mass transfer coefficient in the mathematical model could be related to cycle time by applying the penetration theory. Considering this relationship, influences of the rotation speed of the desiccant rotor, process / regeneration air velocity and their velocity ratio were investigated. It was found that the optimum rotation speed tended to disappear when the regeneration air temperature was low and its humidity was considerably small compared to the process inlet air, since the product air condition approached to regeneration air condition as the rotation speed increased. Decrease of the dehumidifying performance was observed at higher air velocity and the corresponding higher rotation speed since the adsorbent rotor was not fully regenerated due to shorter regeneration time and shorter residence time of process / regeneration air in the adsorbent rotor prevented the mass transfer between air and adsorbent. It was also found that the dehumidifying performance was not improved even though the adsorbent was fully regenerated by higher regeneration air velocity as the sensible heat transferred from the regeneration zone via adsorbent itself increased and disturbed adsorption.

  13. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the 137Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of 137Cs (10-11 ~ 10-9 molL-1 of 137Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed “weathered biotite” (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed 137Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of 137Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed 137Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  14. Purification of olive mill wastewater phenols through membrane filtration and resin adsorption/desorption.

    PubMed

    Zagklis, Dimitris P; Vavouraki, Aikaterini I; Kornaros, Michael E; Paraskeva, Christakis A

    2015-03-21

    Olive tree cultivation has a long history in the Mediterranean countries, and even today consists an important cultural, economic, and environmental aspect of the area. The production of olive oil through 3-phase extraction systems, leads to the co-production of large quantities of olive mill wastewater (OMW), with toxic compounds that inhibit its biodegradation. Membrane filtration has been used for the exploitation of this byproduct, through the isolation of valuable phenolic compounds. In the current work, a fraction of the waste occurring from a membrane process was used. More specifically the reverse osmosis concentrate, after a nanofiltration, containing the low-molecular-weight compounds, was further treated with resin adsorption/desorption. The non ionic XAD4, XAD16, and XAD7HP resins were implemented, for the recovery of phenols and their separation from carbohydrates. The recovered phenolic compounds were concentrated through vacuum evaporation reaching a final concentration of 378 g/L in gallic acid equivalents containing 84.8 g/L hydroxytyrosol. PMID:25497019

  15. Kinetics of protein adsorption/desorption mediated by pH-responsive polymer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiao-Hang; Lei, Qun-Li; Ren, Chun-Lai

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new way of regulating protein adsorption by using a pH-responsive polymer. According to the theoretical results obtained from the molecular theory and kinetic approaches, both thermodynamics and kinetics of protein adsorption are verified to be well controlled by the solution pH. The kinetics and the amount of adsorbed proteins at equilibrium are greatly increased when the solution environment changes from acid to neutral. The reason is that the increased pH promotes the dissociation of the weak polyelectrolyte, resulting in more charged monomers and more stretched chains. Thus the steric repulsion within the polymer layer is weakened, which effectively lowers the barrier felt by the protein during the process of adsorption. Interestingly, we also find that the kinetics of protein desorption is almost unchanged with the variation of pH. It is because although the barrier formed by the polymer layer changes along with the change of pH, the potential at contact with the surface varies equally. Our results may provide useful insights into controllable protein adsorption/desorption in practical applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21274062, 11474155, and 91027040).

  16. Cesium adsorption/desorption behavior of clay minerals considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Hiroki; Hirose, Atsushi; Motai, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Cesium adsorption/desorption experiments for various clay minerals, considering actual contamination conditions in Fukushima, were conducted using the (137)Cs radioisotope and an autoradiography using imaging plates (IPs). A 50 μl solution containing 0.185 ~ 1.85 Bq of (137)Cs (10(-11) ~ 10(-9 )molL(-1) of (137)Cs) was dropped onto a substrate where various mineral particles were arranged. It was found that partially-vermiculitized biotite, which is termed "weathered biotite" (WB) in this study, from Fukushima sorbed (137)Cs far more than the other clay minerals (fresh biotite, illite, smectite, kaolinite, halloysite, allophane, imogolite) on the same substrate. When WB was absent on the substrate, the amount of (137)Cs sorbed to the other clay minerals was considerably increased, implying that selective sorption to WB caused depletion of radiocesium in the solution and less sorption to the coexisting minerals. Cs-sorption to WB continued for about one day, whereas that to ferruginous smectite was completed within one hour. The sorbed (137)Cs in WB was hardly leached with hydrochloric acid at pH 1, particularly in samples with a longer sorption time. The presence/absence of WB sorbing radiocesium is a key factor affecting the dynamics and fate of radiocesium in Fukushima.

  17. Competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline, oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline on two acid soils: Stirred flow chamber experiments.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Fernández-Sanjurjo, Maria J; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this work was to study the competitive adsorption/desorption of tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) on two acid soils. We used the stirred flow chamber technique to obtain experimental data on rapid kinetic processes affecting the retention/release of the antibiotics. Both adsorption and desorption were higher on soil 1 (which showed the highest carbon, clay and Al and Fe oxides content) than on soil 2. Moreover, hysteresis affected the adsorption/desorption processes. Experimental data were fitted to a pseudo-first order equation, resulting qamax (adsorption maximum) values that were higher for soil 1 than for soil 2, and indicating that CTC competed with TC more intensely than OTC in soil 1. Regarding soil 2, the values corresponding to the adsorption kinetics constants (ka) and desorption kinetics constants for fast sites (kd1), followed a trend inverse to qamax and qdmax respectively. In conclusion, competition affected adsorption/desorption kinetics for the three antibiotics assayed, and thus retention/release and subsequent transport processes in soil and water environments.

  18. Expanded bed adsorption/desorption of proteins with Streamline Direct CST I adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Xiu, Guohua; Mata, Vera G; Grande, Carlos A; Rodrigues, Alirio E

    2006-08-20

    Streamline Direct CST I is a new type of ion exchanger with multi-modal functional groups, specially designed for an expanded bed adsorption (EBA) process, which can capture directly the proteins from the high ionic strength feedstocks with a high binding capacity. In this study, an experimental study is carried out for two-component proteins (BSA and myoglobin) competitive adsorption and desorption in an expanded bed packed with Streamline Direct CST I. Based on the measurements of the single- and two-component bovine serum albumin (BSA)/myoglobin adsorption isotherm on Streamline Direct CST I, the binding and elution conditions for the whole EBA process are selected; and then frontal analysis for a longer timescale and column displacement experiments in a fixed bed (XK16/20 column) are carried out to evaluate the two-component proteins (BSA and myoglobin) competitive adsorption and displacement on Streamline Direct CST I. Finally, the feasibility of capturing both BSA and myoglobin by an expanded bed packed with Streamline Direct CST I is addressed in a Streamline 50 column packed with 300 mL Streamline Direct CST I. PMID:16572450

  19. Simulated Water Adsorption Isotherms in Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Cylinderical Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    StrioloDr., A; Naicker, P. K.; Chialvo, Ariel A; Cummings, Peter T; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.

    2005-01-01

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations are performed to study the adsorption of water in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). At room temperature the resulting adsorption isotherms in (10:10) and wider SWCNs are characterized by negligible amount of water uptake at low pressures, sudden and complete pore filling once a threshold pressure is reached, and wide adsorption/desorption hysteresis loops. The width of these loops decreases as pore diameter narrows. Adsorption/desorption hysteresis loops are not observed for water adsorption in (6:6) SWCNs. When the nanotubes are doped with small amounts of oxygenated sites it is possible to obtain adsorption isotherms in which the water uptake increases gradually as the pressure increases. Simulated X-ray diffraction patterns for confined water are also reported.

  20. Measuring the Kinetics of Molecular Association by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Vander Meulen, Kirk A; Horowitz, Scott; Trievel, Raymond C; Butcher, Samuel E

    2016-01-01

    The real-time power response inherent in an isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiment provides an opportunity to directly analyze association kinetics, which, together with the conventional measurement of thermodynamic quantities, can provide an incredibly rich description of molecular binding in a single experiment. Here, we detail our application of this method, in which interactions occurring with relaxation times ranging from slightly below the instrument response time constant (12.5 s in this case) to as large as 600 s can be fully detailed in terms of both the thermodynamics and kinetics. In a binding titration scenario, in the most general case an injection can reveal an association rate constant (kon). Under more restrictive conditions, the instrument time constant-corrected power decay following each injection is simply an exponential decay described by a composite rate constant (kobs), from which both kon and the dissociation rate constant (koff) can be extracted. The data also support the viability of this exponential approach, for kon only, for a slightly larger set of conditions. Using a bimolecular RNA folding model and a protein-ligand interaction, we demonstrate and have internally validated this approach to experiment design, data processing, and error analysis. An updated guide to thermodynamic and kinetic regimes accessible by ITC is provided.

  1. Control of Uniform and Interconnected Macroporous Structure in PolyHIPE for Enhanced CO2 Adsorption/Desorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanyong; Liu, Yao; Chen, Jian; Du, Zhongjie; Mi, Jianguo

    2016-07-19

    The highly uniform and interconnected macroporous polymer materials were prepared within the high internal phase hydrosol-in-oil emulsions (HIPEs). Impregnated with polyethylenimine (PEI), the polyHIPEs were then employed as solid adsorbents for CO2 capture. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests were performed with pure CO2, 10% CO2/N2, and moist CO2, respectively. It has shown that the polyHIPE with suitable surface area and PEI impregnation exhibits high CO2 adsorption capacity, remarkable CO2/N2 selectivity, excellent adsorption/desorption kinetics, enhanced efficiency in the presence of water, and admirable stability in capture and release cycles. The results demonstrate the superior comprehensive performance of the present PEI-impregnated polyHIPE for CO2 capture from the postcombustion flue gas. PMID:27322734

  2. Comparison of batch, stirred flow chamber, and column experiments to study adsorption, desorption and transport of carbofuran within two acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Fernández-Calviño, David; Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Different methods (batch, column and stirred flow chamber experiments) used for adsorption and desorption of carbofuran studies were compared. All tested methods showed that the carbofuran adsorption was higher in the soil with the higher organic matter content, whereas the opposite behaviour was observed for the percentage of carbofuran desorbed. However, different methods have revealed some discrepancies in carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetics. Although batch method showed interesting data on equilibrium experiments, such as a low heterogeneity for the carbofuran adsorption sites independent of soil organic matter content, it had some disadvantages for carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetic studies. The disadvantages were related with the excessive limitations of this method on kinetics, i.e., no difference could be detected between different soils. However, with column and stirred flow chamber methods the carbofuran adsorption/desorption kinetics of different soils could be compared. Moreover, the absolute values of carbofuran adsorption/desorption and its rate were higher in the stirred flow chamber than in the batch and column experiments. Using stirred flow chamber experiments the carbofuran desorption was significantly faster than its adsorption, whereas carbofuran using column experiments they were similar. These discrepancies should be considered when the results obtained only with one method is discussed.

  3. The effect of chars and their water extractable organic carbon (WEOC) fractions on atrazine adsorption-desorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoski, I.; Jablonowski, N.; Burauel, P.; Miano, T.

    2012-04-01

    Chars are carbonaceous material produced from different type of biomass by pyrolysis. They are known as highly effective adsorbents for atrazine therefore limiting its degradation and its diffusion into the aqueous phase. The aim of the present work is to study the effects of different chars and char's derived WEOC on atrazine sorption-desorption processes. The five chars been used in this study derived from: 1) fast pyrolysis from hard wood (FP1); 2) flash pyrolysis from soft wood (FP2); 3) slow pyrolysis from deciduous wood (CC); 4) gasification from deciduous wood (GC) and 5) the market, purchased as activated charcoal standard (AC). Short-term batch equilibration tests were conducted to assess the sorption-desorption behavior of 14C-labeled atrazine on the chars, with a special focus on the desorption behavior using successive dilution method with six consecutive desorption step. Chars and their WEOC were physically and chemically characterized. Results demonstrate that biomass and pyrolysis process used to produce chars affect their physical and chemical properties, and atrazine adsorption-desorption behavior. Atrazine desorption resulted from the positive and competitive interactions between WEOC and chars surfaces. WEOC pool play important role in atrazine adsorption-desorption behavior. FP1 and FP2 with higher concentration of WEOC showed higher desorption rates, whereas GC, CC and AC with insignificant WEOC concentration strongly adsorb atrazine with low desorption rates. According to our results, when high WEOC pools chars are concerned, an increase in atrazine desorption can be observed but further studies would help in confirming the present results.

  4. Treatment of dynamic mixture of hexane and benzene vapors in a Trickle Bed Air Biofilter integrated with cyclic adsorption/desorption beds.

    PubMed

    Aly Hassan, Ashraf; Sorial, George A

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges that face successful biofiltration is the erratic loading pattern and long starvation periods. However, such patterns are common in practical applications. In order to provide long-term stable operation of a biofilter under these conditions, a cyclic adsorption/desorption beds system with flow switching was installed prior to a biofilter. Different square waves of a mixture containing n-hexane and benzene at a 2:1 ratio were applied to the cyclic adsorption/desorption beds and then fed to a biofilter. The performance of this integrated system was compared to a biofilter unit receiving the same feed of both VOCs. The cyclic adsorption/desorption beds unit successfully achieved its goal of stabilizing erratic loading even with very sharp peaks at the influent concentration equalizing influent concentrations ranging from 10-470 ppmv for n-hexane to 30-1410 ppmv for benzene. The study included different peak concentrations with durations ranging from 6 to 20 min. The cyclic beds buffered the fluctuating influent load and the followed biofilter had all the time a continuous stable flow. Another advantage achieved by the cyclic adsorption/desorption beds was the uninterrupted feed to the biofilter even during the starvation where there was no influent in the feed. The results of the integrated system with regard to removal efficiency and kinetics are comparable to published results with continuous feed studies at the same loading rates. The removal efficiency for benzene had a minimum of 85% while for n-hexane ranged from 50% to 77% according to the loading rate. The control unit showed very erratic performance highlighting the benefit of the utilization of the cyclic adsorption/desorption beds. The biofilter was more adaptable to concentration changes in benzene than n-hexane.

  5. Isothermal heat measurements of TBP-nitric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Cavin, W.S.

    1994-12-16

    Net heats of reaction were measured in an isothermal calorimeter for both single phase (organic) and two phase (organic and aqueous) TBP/HNO{sub 3} reacting solutions at temperatures above 100 C. The oxidation rate constant was determined to be 5.4E-4 min{sup {minus}1} at 110 C for an open ``vented`` system as compared to 1.33 E-3 min{sup {minus}1} in the closed system. The heat released per unit material oxidized was also reduced. The oxidation in both phases was found to be first order in nitric acid and pseudo-zero order in butylnitrate and water. The hydrolysis (esterification) rate constant determined by Nichols` (1.33E-3 min{sup {minus}1}) fit the experimental data from this work well. Forced evaporation of the volatile components by the product gases from oxidation resulted in a cooling mechanism which more than balanced the heat from the oxidation reaction in the two-phased systems. Rate expressions were derived and rate constants determined for both the single and two phase systems. An approximating mathematical model was developed to fit the experimental data and to extrapolate beyond the experimental conditions. This model shows that one foot of ``reacting`` 14.3M HNO{sub 3} aqueous phase solution at 121 C will transport sufficient water to the organic phase to replace evaporative losses, maintaining endothermicity, for organic layers up to 12.2 + 6.0 feet deep. If the pressure in a reacting system is allowed to increase due to insufficient venting the temperature of the organic phase would increase in temperature to reach a new equilibrium. The rate of oxidation would increase not only due to the increase in temperature but also from the increased concentration of dissolved HNO{sub 3} reduction products. Another important factor is that the cooling system described in this work becomes less effective as the total pressure increases. These factors probably contributed to the explosion at Tomsk.

  6. Diffusion barriers in the kinetics of water vapor adsorption/desorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.W.; Foley, N.J.; Thomas, K.M.; Norman, P.R.; Francis, D.C.

    1998-07-07

    The adsorption of water vapor on a highly microporous coconut-shell-derived carbon and a mesoporous wood-derived carbon was studied. These carbons were chosen as they had markedly different porous structures. The adsorption and desorption characteristics of water vapor on the activated carbons were investigated over the relative pressure range p/p{degree} = 0--0.9 for temperatures in the range 285--313 K in a static water vapor system. The adsorption isotherms were analyzed using the Dubinin-Serpinski equation, and this provided an assessment of the polarity of the carbons. The kinetics of water vapor adsorption and desorption were studied with different amounts of preadsorbed water for set changes in pressure relative to the saturated vapor pressure (p/p{degree}). The adsorption kinetics for each relative pressure step were compared and used to calculate the activation energies for the vapor pressure increments. The kinetic results are discussed in relation to their relative position on the equilibrium isotherm and the adsorption mechanism of water vapor on activated carbons.

  7. A GCMC simulation and experimental study of krypton adsorption/desorption hysteresis on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Luisa; Horikawa, Toshihide; Phadungbut, Poomiwat; Johnathan Tan, Shiliang; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2016-09-15

    Adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats of krypton on a highly graphitized carbon black, Carbopack F, have been studied with a combination of Monte Carlo simulation and high-resolution experiments at 77K and 87K. Our investigation sheds light on the microscopic origin of the experimentally observed, horizontal hysteresis loop in the first layer, and the vertical hysteresis-loop in the second layer, and is found to be in agreement with our recent Monte Carlo simulation study (Diao et al., 2015). From detailed analysis of the adsorption isotherm, the latter is attributed to the compression of an imperfect solid-like state in the first layer, to form a hexagonally packed, solid-like state, immediately following the first order condensation of the second layer. To ensure that capillary condensation in the confined spaces between microcrystallites of Carbopack F does not interfere with these hysteresis loops, we carried out simulations of krypton adsorption in the confined space of a wedge-shaped pore that mimics the interstices between particles. These simulations show that, up to the third layer, any such interference is negligible.

  8. A GCMC simulation and experimental study of krypton adsorption/desorption hysteresis on a graphite surface.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Luisa; Horikawa, Toshihide; Phadungbut, Poomiwat; Johnathan Tan, Shiliang; Do, D D; Nicholson, D

    2016-09-15

    Adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats of krypton on a highly graphitized carbon black, Carbopack F, have been studied with a combination of Monte Carlo simulation and high-resolution experiments at 77K and 87K. Our investigation sheds light on the microscopic origin of the experimentally observed, horizontal hysteresis loop in the first layer, and the vertical hysteresis-loop in the second layer, and is found to be in agreement with our recent Monte Carlo simulation study (Diao et al., 2015). From detailed analysis of the adsorption isotherm, the latter is attributed to the compression of an imperfect solid-like state in the first layer, to form a hexagonally packed, solid-like state, immediately following the first order condensation of the second layer. To ensure that capillary condensation in the confined spaces between microcrystallites of Carbopack F does not interfere with these hysteresis loops, we carried out simulations of krypton adsorption in the confined space of a wedge-shaped pore that mimics the interstices between particles. These simulations show that, up to the third layer, any such interference is negligible. PMID:27343464

  9. Experimental adsorption isotherms based on inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kalogirou, E; Bassiotis, I; Artemiadi, Th; Margariti, S; Siokos, V; Roubani-Kalantzopoulou, F

    2002-09-01

    A new chromatographic perturbation method is used for studying the adsorption-desorption equilibrium in various gas-solid heterogeneous systems. It is the reversed-flow method giving accurate and precise values of many physicochemical constants including the basic and necessary adsorption isotherm values. For four inorganic oxides, namely, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and PbO, and two aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene) these adsorption isotherms have been determined through a non-linear model. PMID:12385379

  10. [Adsorption-desorption Characteristics of Fermented Rice Husk for Ferrous and Sulfur Ions].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-mei; Liao, Min; Hua, Jia-yuan; Chen, Na; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Pei-zhi; Xie Kai-zhi; XU, Chang-xu; Liu, Guang-rong

    2015-10-01

    To understand the potential of rice husk to fix Fe2+ and S2- ions, the sorption of Fe2+ and S2- by fermented rice husk was studied by using batch incubation experiments in the present study. The effects of adsorption time, Fe2+ and S2- concentration, pH, the temperature and ionic strength in adsorption reaction solution on the sorption were investigated. Therefore, the stability of Fe2+ and S2- adsorbed by fermented rice husk was further validated by desorption experiments performed under similar conditions as adsorption. The results showed that, the adsorption kinetics of Fe2+ (r = 0.912 1) and S2- (r = 0.901 1) by fermented rice husk fits the Elovich kinetics equation, and Freundlich isotherm model could simulate the isotherm adsorption processes of Fe2+ (R2 = 0.965 1) and S2- (R2 = 0.936 6) on fermented rice husk was better than other models. The adsorption processes on fermented rice husk were non- preferential adsorption for Fe2+ and S2, while the adsorption process of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was spontaneous reaction and the adsorption process of S2- was non-spontaneous reaction. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk were endothermic process since high temperature could benefit to the adsorption. The adsorption mechanism of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by coordination adsorption, the adsorption mechanism of S2- on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by ligand exchange adsorption. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk showed greater pH adaptability which ranged from 1.50 to 11.50. With the increasing of ionic strength, the amount of adsorbed Fe2+ on fermented rice husk wasincreased in some extent, the amount of adsorbed S2- on fermented rice husk was slightly decreased, which further proved the adsorption of Fe2+ was major in inner sphere complexation and the adsorption of S2- was major in outer complexation. The desorption rates of Fe2+ and S2- which was adsorbed by fermented

  11. [Adsorption-desorption Characteristics of Fermented Rice Husk for Ferrous and Sulfur Ions].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-mei; Liao, Min; Hua, Jia-yuan; Chen, Na; Zhang, Nan; Xu, Pei-zhi; Xie Kai-zhi; XU, Chang-xu; Liu, Guang-rong

    2015-10-01

    To understand the potential of rice husk to fix Fe2+ and S2- ions, the sorption of Fe2+ and S2- by fermented rice husk was studied by using batch incubation experiments in the present study. The effects of adsorption time, Fe2+ and S2- concentration, pH, the temperature and ionic strength in adsorption reaction solution on the sorption were investigated. Therefore, the stability of Fe2+ and S2- adsorbed by fermented rice husk was further validated by desorption experiments performed under similar conditions as adsorption. The results showed that, the adsorption kinetics of Fe2+ (r = 0.912 1) and S2- (r = 0.901 1) by fermented rice husk fits the Elovich kinetics equation, and Freundlich isotherm model could simulate the isotherm adsorption processes of Fe2+ (R2 = 0.965 1) and S2- (R2 = 0.936 6) on fermented rice husk was better than other models. The adsorption processes on fermented rice husk were non- preferential adsorption for Fe2+ and S2, while the adsorption process of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was spontaneous reaction and the adsorption process of S2- was non-spontaneous reaction. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk were endothermic process since high temperature could benefit to the adsorption. The adsorption mechanism of Fe2+ on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by coordination adsorption, the adsorption mechanism of S2- on fermented rice husk was mainly controlled by ligand exchange adsorption. The adsorption processes of Fe2+ and S2- on fermented rice husk showed greater pH adaptability which ranged from 1.50 to 11.50. With the increasing of ionic strength, the amount of adsorbed Fe2+ on fermented rice husk wasincreased in some extent, the amount of adsorbed S2- on fermented rice husk was slightly decreased, which further proved the adsorption of Fe2+ was major in inner sphere complexation and the adsorption of S2- was major in outer complexation. The desorption rates of Fe2+ and S2- which was adsorbed by fermented

  12. Role of the solvent in the adsorption-desorption equilibrium of cinchona alkaloids between solution and a platinum surface: correlations among solvent polarity, cinchona solubility, and catalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhen; Zaera, Francisco

    2005-01-13

    The role that the nature of the solvent plays in defining the extent of cinchona alkaloid adsorption-desorption equilibrium on platinum surfaces has been studied both by testing their solubility in 54 different solvents and by probing the stability of adsorbed cinchona in the presence of those solvents. The solubilities vary by as much as 5-6 orders of magnitude, display volcano-type correlations with solvent polarity and dielectric constant, and follow a cinchonine < cinchonidine < quinine, quinidine sequence. The adsorption-desorption equilibrium shifts toward the solution with increasing dissolving power of the solvent. The relevance of these results to the behavior of cinchona as chiral modifiers in hydrogenation catalysis is discussed.

  13. Recycling cellulases by pH-triggered adsorption-desorption during the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yaping; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Yang, Yang; Qi, Wei; Li, Qiujin; He, Zhimin

    2014-06-01

    Recycling of cellulases is an effective way to reduce the cost of enzymatic hydrolysis for the production of cellulosic ethanol. In this study, we examined the adsorption and desorption behaviors of cellulase at different pH values and temperatures. Furthermore, we developed a promising way to recover both free and bound cellulases by pH-triggered adsorption-desorption. The results show that acidic pH (e.g., pH 4.8) was found to favor adsorption, whereas alkaline pH (e.g., pH 10) and low temperature (4-37 °C) favored desorption. The adsorption of cellulases reached an equilibrium within 60 min at pH 4.8 and 25 °C, leading to approximately 50 % of the added cellulases bound to the substrate. By controlling the pH of eluent (citrate buffer, 25 °C), we were able to increase the desorption efficiency of bound cellulases from 15 % at pH 4.8 to 85 % at pH 10. To recover cellulases after enzymatic hydrolysis, we employed adsorption by fresh substrate and desorption at pH 10 to recover the free cellulases in supernatant and the bound cellulases in residue, respectively. The recycling performance (based on the glucose yield) of this simple strategy could reach near 80 %. Our results provided a simple, low-cost, and effective approach for cellulase recycling during the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

  14. Impact of sewage sludge spreading on nickel mobility in a calcareous soil: adsorption-desorption through column experiments.

    PubMed

    Mamindy-Pajany, Yannick; Sayen, Stéphanie; Guillon, Emmanuel

    2013-07-01

    A soil column adsorption-desorption study was performed on an agricultural calcareous soil to determine the impact of sewage sludge spreading on nickel mobility. Ni adsorption experiments were followed by desorption tests involving the following liquid extractants: water, calcium (100 mg/L), oxalic acid (525 mg/L equivalent to 100 mg carbon/L), and sludge extracts (0.5 and 2.5 g/L). Desorption tests were also conducted after sewage sludge spreading at three application rates (30, 75, and 150 t/ha). According to the breakthrough curve, Ni adsorption was irreversible and occurred mainly through interactions with calcite surface sites. Nickel desorption from the soil column was promoted in presence of significant dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration as observed with oxalic acid elution and sludge extract at 2.5 g/L. In sludge-amended soil columns, the maximum Ni levels occurred in first pore volumes, and they were positively correlated to the sludge application rate. The presence of DOC in leaching waters was the main factor controlling Ni desorption from the sludge-amended soil columns. This finding implies that DOC generated by sludge applied on calcareous soils might facilitate the leaching of Ni due to the formation of soluble Ni-organic complexes. Thus, sludge application can have potential environmental impacts in calcareous soils, since it promotes nickel transport by decreasing Ni retention by soil components.

  15. Adsorption/desorption and bioavailability of methamphetamine in simulated gastrointestinal fluids under the presence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Xiong, Zhenhu; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Adsorption/desorption and desorption hysteresis of methamphetamine (MMA) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as well as bioavailability of MMA were studied in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and background fluids. Adsorption of MMA in near-neutral (weak alkaline) intestinal fluid was enhanced, while adsorption of MMA on CNTs in acid gastric fluid was suppressed. Desorption of MMA is divided into fast and slow stages, and fast desorption conducting in the gastric fluid lasted shortly and slow desorption occurred in intestinal fluid; pepsin can enhance the release of MMA in gastrointestinal system. While, the acidic condition in gastric fluid is the main factor which causes the release of MMA. The amount of MMA released from CNTs in different fluids follows the order gastric > background (pH = 2.0) > intestinal (fed) > intestinal (fasted) > background (pH = 7.5). These findings in the simulated gastrointestinal system suggest that the release of MMA from CNTs could be promoted by biomacromolecules (such as pepsin and bile salts in digestive tract); thus, the bioavailability of MMA is enhanced.

  16. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  17. Adsorption/desorption of arsenic by tropical peat: influence of organic matter, iron and aluminium.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lílian Karla; Melo, Camila Almeida; Goveia, Danielle; Lobo, Fabiana Aparecida; Armienta Hernández, Maria Aurora; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Rosa, André Henrique

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the interaction of arsenic species (As(III) and As(V)) with tropical peat. Peat samples collected in Brazil were characterized using elemental analysis and 13C NMR. Adsorption experiments were performed using different concentrations of As with peat in natura and enriched with Fe or Al, at three different pH levels. Peat samples, in natura or enriched with metals, were analysed before and after adsorption processes using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics was evaluated, and the data were fitted using the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The results showed that interaction between As and peat was dependent on the levels of organic matter (OM) and the metals (Fe and Al). As(III) was not adsorbed by in natura peat or Al-enriched peat, although small amounts of As(III) were adsorbed by Fe-enriched peat. Adsorption of As(V) by the different peat samples ranged from 21.3 to 52.7 μg g(-1). The best fit to the results was obtained using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the adsorption of As(V) could be described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The results showed that Fe-enriched peat was most effective in immobilizing As(V). FTIR analysis revealed the formation of ternary complexes involving As(V) and peat enriched with metals, suggesting that As(V) was associated with Al or Fe-OM complexes by metal bridging. PMID:25413109

  18. Adsorption/desorption of arsenic by tropical peat: influence of organic matter, iron and aluminium.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lílian Karla; Melo, Camila Almeida; Goveia, Danielle; Lobo, Fabiana Aparecida; Armienta Hernández, Maria Aurora; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Rosa, André Henrique

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the interaction of arsenic species (As(III) and As(V)) with tropical peat. Peat samples collected in Brazil were characterized using elemental analysis and 13C NMR. Adsorption experiments were performed using different concentrations of As with peat in natura and enriched with Fe or Al, at three different pH levels. Peat samples, in natura or enriched with metals, were analysed before and after adsorption processes using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. The adsorption kinetics was evaluated, and the data were fitted using the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The results showed that interaction between As and peat was dependent on the levels of organic matter (OM) and the metals (Fe and Al). As(III) was not adsorbed by in natura peat or Al-enriched peat, although small amounts of As(III) were adsorbed by Fe-enriched peat. Adsorption of As(V) by the different peat samples ranged from 21.3 to 52.7 μg g(-1). The best fit to the results was obtained using the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the adsorption of As(V) could be described by the Freundlich isotherm model. The results showed that Fe-enriched peat was most effective in immobilizing As(V). FTIR analysis revealed the formation of ternary complexes involving As(V) and peat enriched with metals, suggesting that As(V) was associated with Al or Fe-OM complexes by metal bridging.

  19. Measuring Multivalent Binding Interactions by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dam, Tarun K; Talaga, Melanie L; Fan, Ni; Brewer, Curtis F

    2016-01-01

    Multivalent glycoconjugate-protein interactions are central to many important biological processes. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can potentially reveal the molecular and thermodynamic basis of such interactions. However, calorimetric investigation of multivalency is challenging. Binding of multivalent glycoconjugates to proteins (lectins) often leads to a stoichiometry-dependent precipitation process due to noncovalent cross-linking between the reactants. Precipitation during ITC titration severely affects the quality of the baseline as well as the signals. Hence, the resulting thermodynamic data are not dependable. We have made some modifications to address this problem and successfully studied multivalent glycoconjugate binding to lectins. We have also modified the Hill plot equation to analyze high quality ITC raw data obtained from multivalent binding. As described in this chapter, ITC-driven thermodynamic parameters and Hill plot analysis of ITC raw data can provide valuable information about the molecular mechanism of multivalent lectin-glycoconjugate interactions. The methods described herein revealed (i) the importance of functional valence of multivalent glycoconjugates, (ii) that favorable entropic effects contribute to the enhanced affinities associated with multivalent binding, (iii) that with the progression of lectin binding, the microscopic affinities of the glycan epitopes of a multivalent glycoconjugate decrease (negative cooperativity), (iv) that lectin binding to multivalent glycoconjugates, especially to mucins, involves internal diffusion jumps, (bind and jump) and (v) that scaffolds of glycoconjugates influence their entropy of binding.

  20. Uptake of gaseous formaldehyde by soil surfaces: a combination of adsorption/desorption equilibrium and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo; Su, Hang; Li, Xin; Kuhn, Uwe; Meusel, Hannah; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Ammann, Markus; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shao, Min; Cheng, Yafang

    2016-08-01

    Gaseous formaldehyde (HCHO) is an important precursor of OH radicals and a key intermediate molecule in the oxidation of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Budget analyses reveal large discrepancies between modeled and observed HCHO concentrations in the atmosphere. Here, we investigate the interactions of gaseous HCHO with soil surfaces through coated-wall flow tube experiments applying atmospherically relevant HCHO concentrations of ˜ 10 to 40 ppbv. For the determination of uptake coefficients (γ), we provide a Matlab code to account for the diffusion correction under laminar flow conditions. Under dry conditions (relative humidity = 0 %), an initial γ of (1.1 ± 0.05) × 10-4 is determined, which gradually drops to (5.5 ± 0.4) × 10-5 after 8 h experiments. Experiments under wet conditions show a smaller γ that drops faster over time until reaching a plateau. The drop of γ with increasing relative humidity as well as the drop over time can be explained by the adsorption theory in which high surface coverage leads to a reduced uptake rate. The fact that γ stabilizes at a non-zero plateau suggests the involvement of irreversible chemical reactions. Further back-flushing experiments show that two-thirds of the adsorbed HCHO can be re-emitted into the gas phase while the residual is retained by the soil. This partial reversibility confirms that HCHO uptake by soil is a complex process involving both adsorption/desorption and chemical reactions which must be considered in trace gas exchange (emission or deposition) at the atmosphere-soil interface. Our results suggest that soil and soil-derived airborne particles can either act as a source or a sink for HCHO, depending on ambient conditions and HCHO concentrations.

  1. Probing Adsorption / Desorption Processes at the Liquid / Solid Interface: Thiols and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles; Jung, Linda S.; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer; Nelsen, K. E.; Stayton, P. S.; Gelb, M. H.; Aebersold, R.

    2001-03-01

    The adsorption of molecules from liquid solutions onto solid surfaces can be monitored with high sensitivity and fast time response by following changes in the angle or wavelength at which the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a thin metal film is optically excited. Simple methods convert these measured changes into adsorbate concentrations. We report here the adsorption and desorption kinetics and equilibrium coverages of a variety of species on well-characterized surfaces as determined by SPR techniques. When the diffusion constant of the adsorbing species is known in the liquid phase, the intrinsic rate constants can be determined from the kinetic results. The sticking probability, defined as the rate of adsorption per molecular collision with the surface, directly expresses the difficulty encountered by a molecule in scaling the barrier to adsorption. Its prior use has been restricted to adsorption of gases. A method extending this concept to adsorption from liquid solutions is applied to transient measurements of alkylthiol adsorption onto gold from ethanol solutions. The initial sticking probability increases from 10-8 to 10-6 with alkyl chain length, implying a stabilization of the transition state by 0.65 kJ/mol per CH_2. Since their sticking probabilities in gas phase are 1.0, the solvent increases the activation free energy by 40 kJ/mol. Applications of gold-thin-film SPR sensors in quantifying biological interactions will be described also. A gold surface containing a few biotin headgroups in a self assembled alkylthiolate monolayer of mainly oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) headgroups selectively adsorbs the protein streptavidin with a structure that depends on the biotin / OEG ratio. The free biotin sites in the resulting streptavidin monolayer have been used as strong linker sites for further attachment of intact, biotinylated lipid vesicles and biotinylated, double-stranded oligonucleotides to the surface. These complex biological films then provide a

  2. Effect of UV irradiation on adsorption/desorption of oxygen and water on carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muckley, Eric S.; Nelson, Anthony J.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Ivanov, Ilia N.

    2016-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films composed of semiconducting single wall nanotubes (s-SWNTs), metallic single wall nanotubes (m-SWNTs), and multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) were exposed to O2 and H2O vapor in the dark and under UV irradiation. Changes in the film conductivity and mass were measured in situ. We find that UV irradiation increases the resistive response of CNT films to O2 and H2O by more than an order of magnitude. In m-SWNT and MWNT films, UV irradiation changes the sign of the resistive response to O2 and H2O by generating free charge carriers. S-SWNTs show the largest UV-induced resistive response and exhibit weakening of van der Waals interactions with the QCM crystal when exposed to gas/vapor.

  3. Isothermal Calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Pressure-feedback signal indicates rate of heating. Improved isothermal calorimeter measures rate of heating in object under test. Called "isothermal" because chamber holding object and its environment maintained at or near constant temperature to minimize spurious tranfers of heat introducing errors into measurements. When item under test generates heat, rate of boiling and pressure in inner chamber increase. Servo-valve opens wider to maintain preset differential pressure. Valve-control voltage used as measure of rate of heating.

  4. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Adsorption/Desorption in Packed Sorption Beds Under Ideal and Non-Ideal Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, H.; Knox, J. C.; Smith, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The importance of the wall effect on packed beds in the adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water on molecular sieve 5A of 0.127 cm in radius is examined experimentally and with one-dimensional computer simulations. Experimental results are presented for a 22.5-cm long by 4.5-cm diameter cylindrical column with concentration measurements taken at various radial locations. The set of partial differential equations are solved using finite differences and Newman's method. Comparison of test data with the axial-dispersed, non-isothermal, linear driving force model suggests that a two-dimensional model (submitted to Separation Science and Technology) is required for accurate simulation of the average column breakthrough concentration. Additional comparisons of test data with the model provided information on the interactive effects of carrier gas coadsorption with CO2, as well as CO2-H2O interactions.

  5. Advanced structural analysis of nanoporous materials by thermal response measurements.

    PubMed

    Oschatz, Martin; Leistner, Matthias; Nickel, Winfried; Kaskel, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Thermal response measurements based on optical adsorption calorimetry are presented as a versatile tool for the time-saving and profound characterization of the pore structure of porous carbon-based materials. This technique measures the time-resolved temperature change of an adsorbent during adsorption of a test gas. Six carbide and carbon materials with well-defined nanopore architecture including micro- and/or mesopores are characterized by thermal response measurements based on n-butane and carbon dioxide as the test gases. With this tool, the pore systems of the model materials can be clearly distinguished and accurately analyzed. The obtained calorimetric data are correlated with the adsorption/desorption isotherms of the materials. The pore structures can be estimated from a single experiment due to different adsorption enthalpies/temperature increases in micro- and mesopores. Adsorption/desorption cycling of n-butane at 298 K/1 bar with increasing desorption time allows to determine the pore structure of the materials in more detail due to different equilibration times. Adsorption of the organic test gas at selected relative pressures reveals specific contributions of particular pore systems to the increase of the temperature of the samples and different adsorption mechanisms. The use of carbon dioxide as the test gas at 298 K/1 bar provides detailed insights into the ultramicropore structure of the materials because under these conditions the adsorption of this test gas is very sensitive to the presence of pores smaller than 0.7 nm. PMID:25773383

  6. Development of a HEX-Z Partially Homogenized Benchmark Model for the FFTF Isothermal Physics Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2012-05-01

    A series of isothermal physics measurements were performed as part of an acceptance testing program for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). A HEX-Z partially-homogenized benchmark model of the FFTF fully-loaded core configuration was developed for evaluation of these measurements. Evaluated measurements include the critical eigenvalue of the fully-loaded core, two neutron spectra, 32 reactivity effects measurements, an isothermal temperature coefficient, and low-energy gamma and electron spectra. Dominant uncertainties in the critical configuration include the placement of radial shielding around the core, reactor core assembly pitch, composition of the stainless steel components, plutonium content in the fuel pellets, and boron content in the absorber pellets. Calculations of criticality, reactivity effects measurements, and the isothermal temperature coefficient using MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections with the benchmark model are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment measurements. There is only some correlation between calculated and measured spectral measurements; homogenization of many of the core components may have impacted computational assessment of these measurements. This benchmark evaluation has been added to the IRPhEP Handbook.

  7. BENCHMARK EVALUATION OF THE INITIAL ISOTHERMAL PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS AT THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    John Darrell Bess

    2010-05-01

    The benchmark evaluation of the initial isothermal physics tests performed at the Fast Flux Test Facility, in support of Fuel Cycle Research and Development and Generation-IV activities at the Idaho National Laboratory, has been completed. The evaluation was performed using MCNP5 with ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries and according to guidelines provided for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project Handbook. Results provided include evaluation of the initial fully-loaded core critical, two neutron spectra measurements near the axial core center, 32 reactivity effects measurements (21 control rod worths, two control rod bank worths, six differential control rod worths, two shutdown margins, and one excess reactivity), isothermal temperature coefficient, and low-energy electron and gamma spectra measurements at the core center. All measurements were performed at 400 ºF. There was good agreement between the calculated and benchmark values for the fully-loaded core critical eigenvalue, reactivity effects measurements, and isothermal temperature coefficient. General agreement between benchmark experiment measurements and calculated spectra for neutrons and low-energy gammas at the core midplane exists, but calculations of the neutron spectra below the core and the low-energy gamma spectra at core midplane did not agree well. Homogenization of core components may have had a significant impact upon computational assessment of these effects. Future work includes development of a fully-heterogeneous model for comprehensive evaluation. The reactor physics measurement data can be used in nuclear data adjustment and validation of computational methods for advanced fuel cycle and nuclear reactor systems using Liquid Metal Fast Reactor technology.

  8. Analysis of wax esters in edible oils by automated on-line coupling liquid chromatography-gas chromatography using the through oven transfer adsorption desorption (TOTAD) interface.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Alvaro; Cortés, José M; Toledano, Rosa M; Villén, Jesús; Vázquez, Ana

    2011-07-29

    An automated method for the direct analysis of wax esters in edible oils is presented. The proposed method uses the TOTAD (through oven transfer adsorption desorption) interface for the on-line coupling of normal phase liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. In this fully automated system, the oil with C32 wax ester as internal standard and diluted with heptane is injected directly with no sample pre-treatment step other than filtration. The proposed method allows analysis of different wax esters, and is simpler and faster than the European Union Official Method, which is tedious and time-consuming. The obtained results closely match the certified values obtained from the median of the analytical results of the inter-labs certification study. Relative standard deviations of the concentrations are less than 5%. The method is appropriate for routine analysis as it is totally automated.

  9. Chemical noise produced by equilibrium adsorption/desorption of surface pyridine at Au-Ag-Au bimetallic atom-scale junctions studied by fluctuation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tai-Wei; Branagan, Sean P; Bohn, Paul W

    2013-03-20

    The chemical noise contained in conductance fluctuations resulting from adsorption and desorption of pyridine at Au-Ag-Au bimetallic atom-scale junctions (ASJs) exhibiting ballistic electron transport is studied using fluctuation spectroscopy. ASJs are fabricated by electrochemical Ag deposition in a Au nanogap to produce a high-conductance Ag quantum wire, followed by electromigration-induced thinning in pyridine solution to create stable ASJs. The conductance behavior of the resulting ASJs is analyzed by sequential autocorrelation and Fourier transform of the current-time data to yield the power spectral density (PSD). In these experiments the PSDs from Ag ASJs in pyridine exhibit two main frequency regions: 1/f noise originating from resistance fluctuations of the junction itself at low frequencies, and a Lorentzian noise component arising from molecular adsorption/desorption fluctuations at higher frequencies. The characteristic cutoff frequency of the Lorentzian noise component determines the relaxation time of molecular fluctuations, which, in turn, is sensitive to the kinetics of the adsorption/desorption process. The kinetics are found to depend on concentration and on the adsorption binding energy. The junction size (<5G0), on the other hand, does not affect the kinetics, as the cutoff frequency remains unchanged. Concentration-dependent adsorption free energies are interpreted as arising from a distribution of binding energies, N(E(b)), on the Ag ASJ. Other observations, such as long lifetime ASJs and two-level fluctuations in conductance, provide additional evidence for the integral role of the adsorbate in determining ASJ reorganization dynamics.

  10. Effect of spent mushroom substrate amendment of vineyard soils on the behavior of fungicides: 1. Adsorption-desorption of penconazole and metalaxyl by soils and subsoils.

    PubMed

    Marín-Benito, Jesús M; Sánchez-Martín, María J; Andrades, M Soledad; Pérez-Clavijo, Margarita; Rodríguez-Cruz, M Sonia

    2009-10-28

    The effect of the addition of fresh and composted spent mushroom substrates (F-SMS and C-SMS) to vineyard soils on the adsorption-desorption of penconazole and metalaxyl was studied under laboratory conditions. SMS is a promising agricultural residue as an amendment to increase the soil organic matter (OM) content. It may also modify the behavior of fungicides applied to vineyards. Freundlich Kf adsorption constants of both fungicides by soils and subsoils from three experimental plots unamended and amended in the field ranged between 2.78 and 13.4 (penconazole) and 0.14 and 0.67 (metalaxyl) with scant differences for unamended soil and subsoil. However, Kf values of amended soils were higher than those corresponding to subsoils and generally higher than those of unamended soils (up to 2.3 times for penconazole and 1.3 times for metalaxyl). The influence of SMS treatment (fresh or composted) was observed in the adsorption of the most hydrophobic fungicide penconazole. Simple and multiple correlations between soil and subsoil properties and adsorption constants indicated the influence of the OM on the adsorption of both fungicides, together with the clay, silt, and CaCO(3) content for metalaxyl and the pH for penconazole. The results revealed changes in the adsorption-desorption processes of these fungicides, which could give rise to a decrease in the mobility of metalaxyl (highly water-soluble) and an increase in the retention of penconazole (more hydrophobic). These effects could have an impact on surface and/or groundwater contamination.

  11. On the Physical Meaning of the Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements in Calorimeters with Full Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grolier, Jean-Pierre E.; del Río, Jose Manuel

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a detailed study of the thermodynamics of the titration process in an isothermal titration calorimeter with full cells. We show that the relationship between the enthalpy and the heat measured is better described in terms of the equation Δ H = Winj + Q (where Winj is the work necessary to carry out the titration) than in terms of ΔH = Q. Moreover, we show that the heat of interaction between two components is related to the partial enthalpy of interaction at infinite dilution of the titrant component, as well as to its partial volume of interaction at infinite dilution. PMID:20054472

  12. CO2 Isotherms Measured on Moisture-Equilbrated Argonne Premium Coals at 550C and 15 Mpa

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, A.L.

    2007-05-01

    Sorption isotherms, which describe the coal’s gas storage capacity, are important for estimating the carbon sequestration potential of coal seams. The DOE-NETL initiated a second inter-laboratory isotherm comparison of coals where CO2 sorption isotherms were collected on moisture-equilibrated coals at temperatures and pressures relevant to CO2 sequestration. Each laboratory used the same coal samples and followed the same general procedure; however, each laboratory used their own apparatus and isotherm measurement technique. This study investigated the inter-laboratory reproducibility of carbon dioxide isotherm measurements on moisture-equilibrated Argonne premium coal samples (Pocahontas #3, Illinois #6, and Beulah Zap). Six independent laboratories provided isotherm data on the three moisture-equilibrated coal samples at 55oC and pressures up to 15 MPa. Agreement among the laboratories was good up to 8 MPa. At the higher pressures, the data among the laboratories diverged significantly for two of the laboratories and coincided reasonably well for four of the laboratories. This work provides guidance for estimating the reproducibility that might be expected when comparing published sorption isotherms on moisture-equilibrated coals from different laboratories.

  13. Effect of cation type, alkyl chain length, adsorbate size on adsorption kinetics and isotherms of bromide ionic liquids from aqueous solutions onto microporous fabric and granulated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Safia; Duclaux, Laurent; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; Reinert, Laurence; Farooq, Amjad; Yasin, Tariq

    2014-11-01

    The adsorption from aqueous solution of imidazolium, pyrrolidinium and pyridinium based bromide ionic liquids (ILs) having different alkyl chain lengths was investigated on two types of microporous activated carbons: a fabric and a granulated one, well characterized in terms of surface chemistry by "Boehm" titrations and pH of point of zero charge measurements and of porosity by N2 adsorption at 77 K and CO2 adsorption at 273 K. The influence of cation type, alkyl chain length and adsorbate size on the adsorption properties was analyzed by studying kinetics and isotherms of eight different ILs using conductivity measurements. Equilibrium studies were carried out at different temperatures in the range [25-55 °C]. The incorporation of ILs on the AC porosity was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption measurements at 77 K. The experimental adsorption isotherms data showed a good correlation with the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of ILs onto activated carbons was an exothermic process, and that the removal efficiency increased with increase in alkyl chain length, due to the increase in hydrophobicity of long chain ILs cations determined with the evolution of the calculated octanol-water constant (Kow). The negative values of free energies indicated that adsorption of ILs with long chain lengths having hydrophobic cations was more spontaneous at the investigated temperatures.

  14. Idealized Shale Sorption Isotherm Measurements to Determine Pore Volume, Pore Size Distribution, and Surface Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, R.; Wang, B.; Aljama, H.; Rupp, E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One method for mitigating the impacts of anthropogenic CO2-related climate change is the sequestration of CO2 in depleted gas and oil reservoirs, including shale. The accurate characterization of the heterogeneous material properties of shale, including pore volume, surface area, pore size distributions (PSDs) and composition is needed to understand the interaction of CO2 with shale. Idealized powdered shale sorption isotherms were created by varying incremental amounts of four essential components by weight. The first two components, organic carbon and clay, have been shown to be the most important components for CO2 uptake in shales. Organic carbon was represented by kerogen isolated from a Silurian shale, and clay groups were represented by illite from the Green River shale formation. The rest of the idealized shale was composed of equal parts by weight of SiO2 to represent quartz and CaCO3 to represent carbonate components. Baltic, Eagle Ford, and Barnett shale sorption measurements were used to validate the idealized samples. The idealized and validation shale sorption isotherms were measured volumetrically using low pressure N2 (77K) and CO2 (273K) adsorbates on a Quantachrome Autosorb IQ2. Gravimetric isotherms were also produced for a subset of these samples using CO2 and CH4adsorbates under subsurface temperature and pressure conditions using a Rubotherm magnetic suspension balance. Preliminary analyses were inconclusive in validating the idealized samples. This could be a result of conflicting reports of total organic carbon (TOC) content in each sample, a problem stemming from the heterogeneity of the samples and different techniques used for measuring TOC content. The TOC content of the validation samples (Eagle Ford and Barnett) was measured by Rock-Eval pyrolysis at Weatherford Laboratories, while the TOC content in the Baltic validation samples was determined by LECO TOC. Development of a uniform process for measuring TOC in the validation samples is

  15. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-15

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic “poly-tropic law” is more appropriate than the isothermal “barometric law” to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the “poly-tropic law” are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  16. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (˜2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3.

  17. Electron temperature measurement in Maxwellian non-isothermal beam plasma of an ion thruster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zun; Tang, Haibin; Kong, Mengdi; Zhang, Zhe; Ren, Junxue

    2015-02-01

    Published electron temperature profiles of the beam plasma from ion thrusters reveal many divergences both in magnitude and radial variation. In order to know exactly the radial distributions of electron temperature and understand the beam plasma characteristics, we applied five different experimental approaches to measure the spatial profiles of electron temperature and compared the agreement and disagreement of the electron temperature profiles obtained from these techniques. Experimental results show that the triple Langmuir probe and adiabatic poly-tropic law methods could provide more accurate space-resolved electron temperature of the beam plasma than other techniques. Radial electron temperature profiles indicate that the electrons in the beam plasma are non-isothermal, which is supported by a radial decrease (∼2 eV) of electron temperature as the plume plasma expands outward. Therefore, the adiabatic "poly-tropic law" is more appropriate than the isothermal "barometric law" to be used in electron temperature calculations. Moreover, the calculation results show that the electron temperature profiles derived from the "poly-tropic law" are in better agreement with the experimental data when the specific heat ratio (γ) lies in the range of 1.2-1.4 instead of 5/3. PMID:25725841

  18. HEAT OF HYDRATION OF SALTSTONE MIXES-MEASUREMENT BY ISOTHERMAL CALORIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V; Tommy Edwards, T

    2007-07-02

    This report provides initial results on the measurement of heat of hydration of Saltstone mixes using isothermal calorimetry. The results were obtained using a recently purchased TAM Air Model 3116 Isothermal Conduction Calorimeter. Heat of hydration is an important property of Saltstone mixes. Greater amounts of heat will increase the temperature of the curing mix in the vaults and limit the processing rate. The heat of hydration also reflects the extent of the hydraulic reactions that turn the fluid mixture into a ''stone like'' solid and consequently impacts performance properties such as permeability. Determining which factors control these reactions, as monitored by the heat of hydration, is an important goal of the variability study. Experiments with mixes of portland cement in water demonstrated that the heats measured by this technique over a seven day period match very well with the literature values of (1) seven day heats of hydration using the standard test method for heat of hydration of hydraulic cement, ASTM C 186-05 and (2) heats of hydration measured using isothermal calorimetry. The heats of hydration of portland cement or blast furnace slag in a Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) simulant revealed that if the cure temperature is maintained at 25 C, the amount of heat released over a seven day period is roughly 62% less than the heat released by portland cement in water. Furthermore, both the blast furnace slag and the portland cement were found to be equivalent in heat production over the seven day period in MCU. This equivalency is due to the activation of the slag by the greater than 1 Molar free hydroxide ion concentration in the simulant. Results using premix (a blend of 10% cement, 45% blast furnace slag, and 45% fly ash) in MCU, Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA) and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) simulants reveal that the fly ash had not significantly reacted (undergone hydration reactions) after seven

  19. The Ca(2+)-EDTA chelation as standard reaction to validate Isothermal Titration Calorimeter measurements (ITC).

    PubMed

    Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth; Barbas, Rafael; Prohens, Rafel

    2016-07-01

    A study about the suitability of the chelation reaction of Ca(2+)with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a validation standard for Isothermal Titration Calorimeter measurements has been performed exploring the common experimental variables (buffer, pH, ionic strength and temperature). Results obtained in a variety of experimental conditions have been amended according to the side reactions involved in the main process and to the experimental ionic strength and, finally, validated by contrast with the potentiometric reference values. It is demonstrated that the chelation reaction performed in acetate buffer 0.1M and 25°C shows accurate and precise results and it is robust enough to be adopted as a standard calibration process. PMID:27154686

  20. Isothermal flow measurements in a gas turbine combustor using a fast flame ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, R. W.; Hochgreb, S.

    2010-05-01

    A fast-response flame ionization detector (FFID) has been used to study isothermal gas transport and mixing inside a gas turbine combustion chamber. The large, highly linear dynamic range of the FFID coupled with a frequency response that extends up to approximately 200 Hz can reveal large-scale features of interest in turbulent flows. Experiments were performed in a ground-based test facility simulating high-altitude restart conditions. Pulses of propane were discharged into the core swirler of a fuel injector through a high-speed valve. The mole fraction of this tracer was monitored at various locations inside the combustion chamber. These measurements allowed the identification of recirculation timescales and flow instabilities at different points inside the combustion chamber, providing important insights into the altitude restart process.

  1. The Ca(2+)-EDTA chelation as standard reaction to validate Isothermal Titration Calorimeter measurements (ITC).

    PubMed

    Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth; Barbas, Rafael; Prohens, Rafel

    2016-07-01

    A study about the suitability of the chelation reaction of Ca(2+)with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as a validation standard for Isothermal Titration Calorimeter measurements has been performed exploring the common experimental variables (buffer, pH, ionic strength and temperature). Results obtained in a variety of experimental conditions have been amended according to the side reactions involved in the main process and to the experimental ionic strength and, finally, validated by contrast with the potentiometric reference values. It is demonstrated that the chelation reaction performed in acetate buffer 0.1M and 25°C shows accurate and precise results and it is robust enough to be adopted as a standard calibration process.

  2. Comparison of Adsorption/Desorption of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) on Electrospun Nanofibers with Tenax TA for Potential Application in Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Lanling; Deng, Siwei; Zhao, Renshan; Deng, Jianjun; Kang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the adsorption/desorption of target compounds on homemade electrospun nanofibers, polystyrene (PS) nanofibers, acrylic resin (AR) nanofibers and PS-AR composite nanofibers with Tenax TA. Ten volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed by preconcentration onto different sorbents followed by desorption (thermal and solvent orderly) and analysis by capillary gas chromatography. In comparison to Tenax TA, the electrospun nanofibers displayed a significant advantage in desorption efficiency and adsorption selectivity. Stability studies were conducted as a comparative experiment between PS-AR nanofibers and Tenax TA using toluene as the model compound. No stability problems were observed upon storage of toluene on both PS-AR nanofibers and Tenax TA over 60 hours period when maintained in an ultra-freezer (−80°C). The nanofibers provided slightly better stability for the adsorbed analytes than Tenax TA under other storage conditions. In addition, the nanofibers also provided slightly better precision than Tenax TA. The quantitative adsorption of PS-AR nanofibers exhibited a good linearity, as evidenced by the 0.988–0.999 range of regression coefficients (R). These results suggest that for VOCs sampling the electrospun nanofibers can be a potential ideal adsorbent. PMID:27776140

  3. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on Forsterite, Mg2SiO4(011)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. Scott; Li, Zhenjun; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-12-18

    We have examined the adsorbate-substrate interaction kinetics of CO2 and H2O on a natural forsterite crystal surface, Mg2SiO4(011), with 10-15% of substitutional Fe2+. We use temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and molecular beam techniques to determine the adsorption, desorption, and displacement kinetics for H2O and CO2. Neither CO2 nor H2O has distinct sub-monolayer desorption peaks but instead both have a broad continuous desorption feature that evolve smoothly into multilayer desorption. Inversion of the monolayer coverage spectra for both molecules reveals that the corresponding binding energies for H2O are greater than that for CO2 on all sites. The relative strength of these interactions is the dominant factor in the competitive adsorption/displacement kinetics. In experiments where the two adsorbates are co-dosed, H2O always binds to the highest energy binding sites available and displaces CO2. The onset of CO2 displacement by H2O occurs between 65 and 75 K.

  4. A Non-linear Temperature-Time Program for Non-isothermal Kinetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Hong Yong

    2016-04-01

    A new temperature-time program for non-isothermal measurements of chemical reaction rates has been developed. The major advantages of the proposed temperature-time function are twofold: Firstly, the analysis of kinetic information in the high temperature range of the measurement is improved over the conventional linear temperature program by slowing the rate of temperature increase in the high temperature range and secondly, the new temperature program greatly facilitates the data analysis by providing a closed-form solution of the temperature integral and allows a convenient way to obtain the kinetic parameters by eliminating the need for the approximate evaluation of the temperature integral. The procedures for applying the new temperature-time program to the analysis of experimental data are demonstrated in terms of the determination of the kinetic parameters based on the selection of a suitable conversion function in the rate equation as well as the direct determination of activation energy at different conversion extents without the need for a conversion function. The rate analysis based on the new temperature program is robust and does not appear to be sensitive to errors in experimental measurements.

  5. 15-ton press for measurement of isothermal compression of condensed gases at 4. 2/sup 0/K

    SciTech Connect

    Utyuzh, A.N.

    1987-02-01

    A press for measurement of isothermal compression of solid hydrogen and other condensed gases at 4.2/sup 0/K is described. The maximum force of the press is 15 tons, the stroke is 80 mm, and the consumption of liquid helium under stationary conditions is 0.6 liters/h.

  6. The Effect of Pore Connectivity on Water Adsorption Isotherms in Non-activated Graphitic Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    StrioloDr., A; Gubbins, Dr. K. E.; Chialvo, Ariel A; Cummings, Peter T

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption of water in graphitic carbons is usually simulated via a weighted average of the adsorption isotherms simulated in carbon-slit pore of different widths. By following this procedure, details about pore morphology and pore connectivity may be overlooked. Towards a better match between virtual and real experiments, we present simulated adsorption isotherms for SPC/E model water in porous carbons composed by interconnected carbon-slit pores. The pores are separated from each other by one graphene layer. Imperfections (lack of carbon atoms) in the graphene layers result in interconnections between pores. The grand canonical Monte Carlo algorithm is used here to simulate water adsorption. Our results show that while the qualitative features obtained in the simulation of independent slit-shaped pores are reproduced when interconnected pores are considered, the adsorption isotherms rise more gradually and the adsorption/desorption hysteresis loops are narrower in the latter case.

  7. The effect of molecular weight on the adsorption/desorption characteristics of polymeric scale inhibitors on silica sand and in sandstone cores

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G.M.; Sorbie, K.S.

    1994-12-31

    A number of polymeric scale inhibitors are currently used for downhole application in oilfield ``squeeze`` treatments. These materials must perform the dual role of inhibiting scale formation at low concentration levels whilst giving acceptably long return curves at the wellbore. Both of these design aspects of polymeric scale inhibitors relate to their adsorption characteristics (either on the growing scale crystal or onto the rock substrate) which, in turn, are functions of the molecular weight of the species. In this paper, the authors examine the effects of inhibitor molecular weight on its adsorption characteristics onto highly quartzitic substrates and they discuss the importance of this factor in governing the dynamics of the inhibitor return curve. The effects of molecular weight on the inhibition efficiency, during both early nucleation and later crystal growth, are also examined. The adsorption/desorption characteristics of three polymeric scale inhibitors, each having a range of molecular weights, are studied in this work: viz. polyacrylate (PAA) and phosphinopolycarboxylate (PPCA) scale inhibitors of weight average molecular weight, M{sub w} < 10,000 g/mol, and polyvinyl sulphonic acid (PVS) inhibitors of M{sub w} < 20,000 g/mol. Using these polymers, the authors show that the preferential adsorption of the higher molecular weight components occurs. Results on the scale inhibition efficiency of barium sulphate, obtained for the same range of polymeric inhibitors, are also presented as functions of molecular weight. The factors required to ensure a long return curve are not necessarily the same as those for efficient inhibition under certain solution conditions (e.g. solution pH). This illustrates the importance of reaching a compromise in terms of molecular weight between inhibition efficiency and squeeze lifetime. The significance of these findings for field squeeze treatments using polymeric inhibitors is discussed. 43 refs.

  8. Cr(VI) adsorption/desorption on untreated and mussel shell-treated soil materials: fractionation and effects of pH and chromium concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, M.; Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J. C.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Núñez-Delgado, A.

    2014-12-01

    We used batch-type experiments to study Cr(VI) adsorption/desorption on granitic material, forest soil, pyritic material, mussel shell, and on forest soil and granitic material amended with 12 t ha-1 shell, considering the effects of varying Cr(VI) concentration and pH. Sequential extractions were carried out to fractionate adsorbed Cr(VI) and to determine the stability of Cr(VI) retention. The pyritic material had the highest Cr(VI) retention capacity, whereas the granitic material showed the lowest retention potential. When high Cr concentrations were added, some saturation of the adsorbent surfaces became apparent, but Cr release remained low. The highest Cr retention was achieved at very acid pH value, with release progressively increasing as a function of increasing pH. The amendment with 12 t ha-1 mussel shell did not cause marked changes in Cr(VI) retention. Adsorption data were satisfactory adjusted to the Freundlich model. Regarding Cr(VI) fractionation, the soluble fraction (weakly bound) was the dominant in mussel shell and in the un-amended and amended granitic material, whereas more stable fractions dominated in the pyritic material (residual fraction) and in the forest soil (oxidizable fraction). In conclusion, the pyritic material presented the highest Cr(VI) retention capacity, while the retention was low and weak on the granitic material; mussel shell was characterized by not marked Cr(VI) retention potential, and it did not cause remarkable increase in Cr(VI) retention when used to amend the granitic material or the forest soil.

  9. Adhesion of Streptococcus sanguinis to glass surfaces measured by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC).

    PubMed

    Hauser-Gerspach, Irmgard; de Freitas, Patricia Scandiucci; Dan Daniels, A U; Meyer, Jürg

    2008-04-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first step in the development of the oral biofilm, called dental plaque. Plaque is the cause of caries, periodontal diseases, and periimplantitis. Investigations of dental plaque, including bacterial adhesion, employ various in vivo and in vitro models using microscopic methods. Microcalorimetry offers another direct approach. The model organism Streptococcus sanguinis is one of the first colonizers adhering to the saliva-coated human tooth surfaces or dental materials within minutes after tooth cleaning. TAM III thermostats, equipped with microcalorimeters, were used for isothermal microcalorimetric (IMC) measurements of heat production as a function of time, expressed by power-time (p-t) curves. Continuous measurements of heat production of growing S. sanguinis cells showed their overall metabolic activity and were highly reproducible. For the adhesion experiments the bacteria were allowed to adhere to different amounts of glass beads. Growing S. sanguinis cells produced a characteristic p-t curve with a maximum of 500 microW at 4.5 h when reaching 10(9) cells ml(-1). The same number of stationary S. sanguinis cells, suspended in PBS produced only approximately 30 microW at 0.5 h due to adhesion. But the amount of heat increased with available glass surface area, indicating that a portion of the heat of adhesion was measured. Similar results were obtained with stationary S. sanguinis cells suspended in human saliva. This study shows that microcalorimetric evaluation of initial bacterial adhesion is indeed possible and may become a rapid, reproducible screening method to study adhesion of different bacteria to different dental materials or to modified surfaces.

  10. Study of the isothermal transformation of ductile iron with 0.5% Cu by electrical resistance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, B.Y.; Chen, E.T.; Lei, T.S.

    1995-10-01

    A computer-controlled system for measuring electrical resistance has been developed and used to study the isothermal transformation of austenite in a ductile iron (3.31% C, 3.12% Si, 0.22% mn, 0.55% Cu). The ability of the technique to follow the isothermal decomposition of austenite was established by measurements on an AISI 4340 steel. The times at which the austenite decomposed to primary ferrite, pearlite, and bainite were accurately detected. In the ductile iron, the formation of pearlite and of bainite was easily detected, and an isothermal transformation diagram was constructed from the results. The temperature range for the formation of bainite is especially important in producing austempered ductile iron (ADI) and was mapped. An initial stage of decomposition of austenite to ferrite and high-carbon austenite is followed by a time delay; then the high-carbon austenite decomposes to bainite. The formation of ADI requires austempering to a structure of ferrite and high-carbon austenite, then quenching to retain this structure, thus avoiding the formation of bainite. This is achieved by isothermal transformation into the time-delay region. For the ductile iron studied here, this time region was about 2.6 h at 400 C and increased to 277 h at 300 C.

  11. Study of the isothermal transformation of ductile iron with 0.5% Cu by electrical resistance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B. Y.; Chen, E. T.; Lei, T. S.

    1995-10-01

    A computer-controlled system for measuring electrical resistance has been developed and used to study the isothermal transformation of austenite in a ductile iron (3.31 % C, 3.12 % Si, 0.22 % Mn, 0.55 % Cu). The ability of the technique to follow the isothermal decomposition of austenite was established by measurements on an AISI4340 steel. The times at which the austenite decomposed to primary ferrite, pearlite, and bainite were accurately detected. In the ductile iron, the formation of pearlite and of bainite was easily detected, and an isothermal transformation diagram was constructed from the results. The temperature range for the formation of bainite is especially important in producing austempered ductile iron (ADI) and was mapped. An initial stage of decomposition of austenite to ferrite and high-carbon austenite is followed by a time delay; then the high-carbon austenite decomposes to bainite. The formation of ADI requires austempering to a structure of ferrite and high-carbon austenite, then quenching to retain this structure, thus avoiding the formation of bainite. This is achieved by isothermal transformation into the time-delay region. For the ductile iron studied here, this time region was about 2.6 h at 400 °C and increased to 277 h at 300 °C.

  12. Isothermal mass flow measurements in microfabricated rectangular channels over a very wide Knudsen range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John M.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Brown, Jason R.; Hochrein, James M.; Thornberg, Steven M.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Gallis, Michael A.; Torczynski, John R.; Khraishi, Tariq; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2014-05-01

    Measurement and modeling of gas flows in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scale channels are relevant to the fundamentals of rarefied gas dynamics (RGD) and the practical design of MEMS-based flow systems and micropumps. We describe techniques for building robust, leak-free, rectangular microchannels which are relevant to micro- and nanofluidic devices, while the channels themselves are useful for fundamental RGD studies. For the first time, we report the isothermal steady flow of helium (He) gas through these channels from the continuum to the free-molecular regime in the unprecedented Knudsen range of 0.03-1000. On the high end, our value is 20-fold larger than values previously reported by Ewart et al (2007 J. Fluid Mech. 584 337-56). We accomplished this through a dual-tank accumulation technique which enabled the monitoring of very low flow rates, below 10-14 kg s-1. The devices were prebaked under vacuum for 24 h at 100 °C in order to reduce outgassing and attain high Kn. We devised fabrication methods for controlled-depth micro-gap channels using silicon for both channel ceiling and floor, thereby allowing direct comparisons to models which utilize this simplifying assumption. We evaluated the results against a closed-form expression that accurately reproduces the continuum, slip, transition, and free-molecular regimes developed partly by using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The observed data were in good agreement with the expression. For Kn > ˜100, we observed minor deviations between modeled and experimental flow values. Our fabrication processes and experimental data are useful to fundamental RGD studies and future MEMS microflow devices with respect to extremely low-flow measurements, model validation, and predicting optimal designs.

  13. ON THE ACCURACY OF THE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE DIAGNOSTICS OF SOLAR PLASMAS. APPLICATION TO SDO/AIA. I. ISOTHERMAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guennou, C.; Auchere, F.; Soubrie, E.; Bocchialini, K.; Barbey, N.

    2012-12-15

    Differential emission measure (DEM) analysis is a major diagnostic tool for stellar atmospheres. However, both its derivation and its interpretation are notably difficult because of random and systematic errors, and the inverse nature of the problem. We use simulations with simple thermal distributions to investigate the inversion properties of SDO/AIA observations of the solar corona. This allows a systematic exploration of the parameter space, and using a statistical approach the respective probabilities of all the DEMs compatible with the uncertainties can be computed. Following this methodology, several important properties of the DEM inversion, including new limitations, can be derived and presented in a very synthetic fashion. In this first paper, we describe the formalism and we focus on isothermal plasmas as building blocks to understand the more complex DEMs studied in the second paper. The behavior of the inversion of AIA data being thus quantified, and we provide new tools to properly interpret the DEM. We quantify the improvement of the isothermal inversion with six AIA bands compared to previous EUV imagers. The maximum temperature resolution of AIA is found to be 0.03 log T{sub e} , and we derive a rigorous test to quantify the compatibility of observations with the isothermal hypothesis. However, we demonstrate limitations in the ability of AIA alone to distinguish different physical conditions.

  14. Kinetics of isothermal structural relaxation in metallic glasses measured by real-time diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajlaoui, K.; Yousfi, M. A.; Ouelhazi, I.; Georgarakis, K.; Tourki, Z.; Vaughan, G.; Yavari, A. R.

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative measurements of the excess free volume in Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 and Cu55Zr30Ti10Pd5 metallic glasses during in situ isothermal annealing at various temperatures are used to identify physical parameters of structural relaxation in metallic glasses and to discuss proposed models describing this process. The free-volume model is found to provide a simple and predictive description for structural relaxation phenomena. We show that structural relaxation kinetics follows a second-order law in a satisfactory manner. The activation energy for relaxation is found to depend on annealing temperature and the extent of structural relaxation.

  15. Thermooxidative stability of poppy seeds studied by non-isothermal DSC measurements.

    PubMed

    Cibulková, Zuzana; Čertík, Milan; Dubaj, Tibor

    2014-05-01

    Papaver somniferum L. is an important crop cultivated mostly for seed production. Poppy seeds have a high nutritive value and are used as a food and as a source of edible oil. This oil is a rich source of polyunsaturated fatty acids. It is well known that the unsaturated fatty acids easily undergo oxidation reactions, which lead to the reduction of shelf life, nutritional quality, development of unpleasant tastes and odors. The goal of this study was to develop the methodology for testing the stability of poppy seeds using non-isothermal DSC. For the treatment of the experimental data a method based on non-Arrhenian temperature function has been applied and the values the kinetic parameters have been obtained. In order to assess the durability of the commercial poppy seeds, the lengths of induction periods have been calculated.

  16. Isothermal-desorption-rate measurements in the vicinity of the Curie temperature for H2 chemisorbed on nickel films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanabarger, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the isothermal desorption rate of H2 chemisorbed onto polycrystalline nickel films made for temperatures spanning the Curie temperature of the nickel film are presented. Desorption kinetics were followed by measuring the decay of the change in resistance of the nickel film brought about by hydrogen chemisorption after gas-phase H2 had been rapidly evacuated. The desorption rate is found to undergo an anomalous decrease in the vicinity of the Curie temperature, accompanied by an increase in the desorption activation energy and the equilibrium constant for the chemisorbed hydrogen. The results are interpreted in terms of anomalous variations in rate constants for the formation of the precursor molecular adsorbed state and the chemisorbed atomic state due to the phase transition in the nickel. The changes in rate constants are also considered to be in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on a spin coupling between the adatom and the magnetic substrate.

  17. A universally applicable and rapid method for measuring the growth of streptomyces and other filamentous microorganisms by methylene blue adsorption-desorption.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marco; Sawers, R Gary

    2013-07-01

    Quantitative assessment of growth of filamentous microorganisms, such as streptomycetes, is generally restricted to determination of dry weight. Here, we describe a straightforward methylene blue-based sorption assay to monitor microbial growth quantitatively, simply, and rapidly. The assay is equally applicable to unicellular and filamentous bacterial and eukaryotic microorganisms.

  18. The unfolding enthalpy of the pH 4 molten globule of apomyoglobin measured by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed Central

    Jamin, M.; Antalik, M.; Loh, S. N.; Bolen, D. W.; Baldwin, R. L.

    2000-01-01

    The unfolding enthalpy of the pH 4 molten globule from sperm whale apomyoglobin has been measured by isothermal titration calorimetry, using titration to acid pH. The unfolding enthalpy is close to zero at 20 degrees C, in contrast both to the positive values expected for peptide helices and the negative values reported for holomyoglobin and native apomyoglobin. At 20 degrees C, the hydrophobic interaction should make only a small contribution to the unfolding enthalpy according to the liquid hydrocarbon model. Our result indicates that some factor present in the unfolding enthalpies of native proteins makes the unfolding enthalpy of the pH 4 molten globule less positive than expected from data for peptide helices. PMID:10933499

  19. Searching for Measures of Reversibility in Continuous Adsorption through Packed Bed Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiras, Dimitris K.

    2009-08-01

    This work deals with searching for measures of after-process reversibility in continuous adsorption through packed bed columns. A methodology has been designed/developed under the form of an algorithmic procedure including 17 activity stages and 5 decision nodes. An implementation is presented concerning adsorption/desorption of methylene blue on pine sawdust. An Ideal Reversibility Index (IRI) and two Real Rreversibility Indices (RRIs) have been estimated after fitting kinetic adsorption/desorption models to experimental data. Last, the implications of applying an innovation are discussed in terms of techno-economic analysis.

  20. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these

  1. Measuring remanence anisotropy of hematite in red beds: anisotropy of high-field isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, Dario; Kodama, Kenneth P.

    2009-09-01

    The potential of using high-field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) measurements for determining the origin of natural remanent magnetization in red beds and for identifying and correcting possible red-bed inclination shallowing was investigated for specimens of the Carboniferous Shepody Formation of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada. The technique makes it possible for a typical paleomagnetic laboratory to measure the remanence anisotropy of high-coercivity hematite. High-field (hf) AIR was used in conjunction with 100 mT alternating field (af) and 120°C thermal demagnetization to separate the contribution of hematite to the remanence anisotropy from that of magnetite/maghemite and goethite, respectively. A 5-T impulse DC magnetic field was used for the hf-AIR to reset the magnetic moment of high-coercivity hematite so that demagnetization between AIR orientations was not necessary. The ability of a 5-T field to reset the magnetization was tested by generating an isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curve for hematite by using impulse DC magnetic fields up to 5 T in one orientation and followed by applying a field in the opposite direction at each step. Each field application was treated by 120°C heating and 100 mT af demagnetization before measurement. At 5 T, the difference between the magnetizations applied in opposite directions disappeared indicating that no magnetic memory persisted at this field strength. We performed a validity and reproducibility test of our hf-AIR measurement technique by measuring three specimens multiple times along two orthogonal coordinate systems. The method yielded highly reproducible results and, on rotating the specimen's coordinates, the fabric rotated by 90° as expected, showing that it is not an artifact of the technique. We also measured hf-AIR on samples that had previously been chemically demagnetized in 3N HCl to remove the secondary, chemically grown pigmentary hematite. The hf

  2. Adsorption-desorption behavior of 2,4-D on NCP-modified bentonite and zeolite: implications for slow-release herbicide formulations.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiary, Somayeh; Shirvani, Mehran; Shariatmadari, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Clay minerals have obtained considerable attention for slow-release formulation of herbicides to increase weed control efficacy and reduce leaching potential and environmental pollution. This study deals with preparing, characterizing and examining the potentials of modified bentonite and zeoilite in adsorption and release of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) herbicide. 2,4-D sorption of the N-cetylpyridinium (NCP)-modified bentonites and zeolites were much higher than those of unmodified substrates. The 2,4-D adsorption capacity of the organo-minerals increased with increasing surfactant loading. Desorption isotherms of 2,4-D did not coincide their corresponding sorption isotherms showing hysteresis. The proportion of 2,4-D released from the organo-minerals after seven desorption cycles varied between 29% and 50% of the total retained herbicide. The sorbed 2,4-D on the adsorbents showed gradual release pattern with time. The release pattern of 2,4-D from NCP-modified bentonite and zeolite, make these synthetic organo-minerals suitable candidate for slow release formulation of 2,4-D.

  3. Predictions and measurements of isothermal flowfields in axisymmetric combustor geometries. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, D. L.; Lilley, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical predictions, flow visualization experiments and time-mean velocity measurements were obtained for six basic nonreacting flowfields (with inlet swirl vane angles of 0 (swirler removed), 45 and 70 degrees and sidewall expansion angles of 90 and 45 degrees) in an idealized axisymmetric combustor geometry. A flowfield prediction computer program was developed which solves appropriate finite difference equations including a conventional two equation k-epsilon eddy viscosity turbulence model. The wall functions employed were derived from previous swirling flow measurements, and the stairstep approximation was employed to represent the sloping wall at the inlet to the test chamber. Recirculation region boundaries have been sketched from the entire flow visualization photograph collection. Tufts, smoke, and neutrally buoyant helium filled soap bubbles were employed as flow tracers. A five hole pitot probe was utilized to measure the axial, radial, and swirl time mean velocity components.

  4. Revealing the surface and bulk regimes of isothermal graphene growth on Ni with in situ kinetic measurements and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Merkulov, Igor A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Eres, Gyula; Geohegan, David B

    2014-01-01

    In situ optical diagnostics are used to reveal the isothermal nucleation and growth mechanisms of graphene on Ni across a wide temperature range (560 C < T < 840 C) by chemical vapor deposition from single, sub-second pulses of acetylene. An abrupt, two-orders of magnitude change in growth times (~ 100s to 1s) is revealed at T = 680 C. Below and above this temperature, similar sigmoidal kinetics are measured and attributed to autocatalytic growth reactions but by two different mechanisms, surface assembly and dissolution/precipitation, respectively. These data are used to develop a simple and general kinetic model for graphene growth that includes the nucleation phase and includes the effects of carbon solubility in metals, describes delayed nucleation, and allows the interpretation of the competition between surface and bulk growth modes. The sharp transition in growth kinetics at T = 680 C is explained by a change in defect site density required for nucleation due to a transition in the carbon-induced mobility of the Ni surface. The easily-implemented optical reflectivity diagnostics and the simple kinetic model described here allow a pathway to optimize the growth of graphene on metals with arbitrary carbon solubility.

  5. Constraining the volatility distribution and gas-particle partitioning of combustion aerosols using isothermal dilution and thermodenuder measurements.

    PubMed

    Grieshop, Andrew P; Miracolo, Marissa A; Donahue, Niel M; Robinson, Allen L

    2009-07-01

    The gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions from a diesel engine and the combustion of hard- and soft-woods in a stove was investigated by isothermally diluting them in a smog chamber or by passing them through a thermodenuder and measuring the extent of evaporation. The experiments were conducted at atmospherically relevant conditions: low concentrations and small temperature perturbations. The partitioning of the POA emissions from both sources varied continuously with changing concentration and temperature. Although the POA emissions are semivolatile, they do not completely evaporate at typical atmospheric conditions. The overall partitioning characteristics of diesel and wood smoke POA are similar, with wood smoke being somewhat less volatile than the diesel exhaust. The gas-particle partitioning of aerosols formed from flash-vaporized engine lubricating oil was also studied; diesel POA is somewhat more volatile than the oil aerosol. The experimental data from the dilution- and thermodenuder-based techniques were fit using absorptive partitioning theory to derive a volatility distribution of the POA emissions from each source. These distributions are suitable for use in chemical transport models that simulate POA concentrations.

  6. Adsorption in gas mass spectrometry. I. Effects on the measurement of individual isotopic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonfiantini, Roberto; Valkiers, Staf; Taylor, Philip D. P.; de Bièvre, Paul

    1997-05-01

    The adsorption-desorption process of gas molecules on the walls of the mass spectrometer inlet system was studied in order to assess quantitatively its influence on measurement results. The effects on individual isotopic species in SiF4 measurements required for the re-determination of the Avogadro constant are discussed in this paper, while the effects on isotope amount ratio determinations will be discussed in a companion paper. A model based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm is developed, which fits well the experimental observations and provides the means to investigate adsorption and desorption kinetics in the inlet system. A parameter called the [`]apparent leak-rate coefficient' is introduced; this represents the relative variation with time of any isotopic species in the inlet system. All the adsorption parameters appearing in the balance equations are derived from the apparent leak-rate coefficient. Application of the model to long mass-spectrometric measurements of SiF4 yields a rate constant of 6.5 × 10-5 s-1 for SiF4 effusion through the molecular leak of the inlet system. Adsorption and desorption rate-constants are equal to 20-25% of the leak rate-constant, and the adsorption sites are about two orders of magnitude lower than the number of Ni and Cu atoms present on the inlet system walls.

  7. Radium, Thorium and Radioactive Lead Isotopes in Groundwaters: Application to the in Situ Determination of Adsorption-Desorption Rate Constants and Retardation Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswami, S.; Graustein, William C.; Turekian, Karl K.; Dowd, John F.

    1982-12-01

    Five groundwater samples taken from different Hydrogeologie settings in Connecticut were analyzed for major cation chemistry and the concentration of U and Th decay series nuclides 238U, 234Th, 226Ra, 222Rn, 210Pb, 210Po, 232Th, 228Ra, 228Th, and 224Ra. The concentration of 222Rn in the waters ranged between 103 and 104 dpm l-1 and was three to four orders of magnitude greater than that of the short-lived alpha daughters 224Ra, 228Ra, and 234Th, even though the rates of supply of these four nuclides to solution are expected to be similar. We infer that sorption removes radium and thorium from these groundwaters on a time scale of 3 minutes or less. The (224Ra/228Ra) and (234Th/228Th) activity ratios in these waters indicate that desorption of these nuclides occurs on a time scale of a week or less and that equilibrium between solution and surface phases is established. In situ retardation factors for radium, thorium, and lead may therefore be calculated directly from the isotopic data; values range from 4,500 to 200,000. Neither sorption time scales nor retardation factors are strongly dependent on the nuclide or on hydrogeology of the aquifer. Since our study includes nuclides with diverse chemical properties, we suggest that other uncomplexed heavy metals and transuranic elements will also behave in a manner similar to those measured here. The approach presented here should therefore find application in developing site-specific models of the transport of radioactive or stable elemental waste through water-saturated media.

  8. Reservoir engineering and treatment design technology: Comparison of Antrim Shale isotherm measurements performed on the Nomeco Bagley East B3-11 well, Otsego County, MI. Topical report, February 1992-February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, D.E.

    1993-02-01

    The primary objective of this project was to generate a set of isotherm data measured on comparable Antrim Shale samples to determine what, if any, differences might exist between different laboratories` methods and results.

  9. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of anionic dyes onto organo-bentonite from single and multisolute systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dazhong; Fan, Jianxin; Zhou, Weizhi; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Kang, Qi

    2009-12-15

    The performances of polydiallydimethylammonium modified bentonite (PDADMA-bentonite) as an adsorbent to remove anionic dyes, namely Acid Scarlet GR (AS-GR), Acid Turquoise Blue 2G (ATB-2G) and Indigo Carmine (IC), were investigated in single, binary and ternary dye systems. In adsorption from single dye solutions with initial concentration of 100 micromol/L, the dosage of PDADMA-bentonite needed to remove 95% dye was 0.42, 0.68 and 0.75 g/L for AS-GR, ATB-2G and IC, respectively. The adsorption isotherms of the three dyes obeyed the Langmuir isotherm model with the equilibrium constants of 0.372, 0.629 and 4.31 L/micromol, the saturation adsorption amount of 176.3, 149.2 and 228.7 micromol/g for ATB-2G, IC and AS-GR, respectively. In adsorption from mixed dye solutions, the isotherm of each individual dye followed an expanded Langmuir isotherm model and the relationship between the total amount of dyes adsorbed and the total equilibrium dye concentration was interpreted well by Langmuir isotherm model. In the region of insufficient dosage of PDADMA-bentonite, the dye with a larger affinity was preferentially removed by adsorption. Desorption was observed in the kinetic curve of the dye with lower affinity on PDADMA-bentonite surface by the competitive adsorption. The kinetics in single dye solution and the total adsorption of dyes in binary and ternary dye systems nicely followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  10. Adsorption of methylene blue onto poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol) nanotubes: kinetics, isotherm and thermodynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhonghui; Zhang, Jianan; Fu, Jianwei; Wang, Minghuan; Wang, Xuzhe; Han, Runping; Xu, Qun

    2014-05-30

    Poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol) (PZS) nanotubes, an excellent adsorbent, were successfully synthesized by an in situ template method and used for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution. The morphology and structures of as-synthesized PZS nanotubes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms. The effects of temperature, concentration, pH and contact time on MB adsorption were studied. It was favorable for adsorption under the condition of basic and high temperature. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were used to fit adsorption data in the kinetic studies. And results showed that the adsorption kinetics were more accurately described by the pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium isotherms were conducted using Freundlich and Langmuir models. It has been demonstrated that the better agreement was Langmuir isotherm with correlation coefficient of 0.9933, equilibrium absorption capacity of 69.16mg/g and the corresponding contact time of 15min. Thermodynamic analyses showed that MB adsorption onto the PZS nanotubes was endothermic and spontaneous and it was also a physisorption process.

  11. Magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles for Cr(VI) adsorption: kinetic, isotherm and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ali; Demirbel, Emel; Tekin, Nalan; Osman, Bilgen; Beşirli, Necati

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic vinylphenyl boronic acid microparticles, poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate(EG)-vinylphenyl boronic acid(VPBA)) [m-poly(EG-VPBA)], produced by suspension polymerization and characterized, was found to be an efficient solid polymer for Cr(VI) adsorption. The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were prepared by copolymerizing of ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EG) with 4-vinyl phenyl boronic acid (VPBA). The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, electron spin resonance (ESR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and swelling studies. The m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were used at adsorbent/Cr(VI) ion ratios. The influence of pH, Cr(VI) initial concentration, temperature of the removal process was investigated. The maximum removal of Cr(VI) was observed at pH 2. Langmuir isotherm and Dubinin-Radushkvich isotherm were found to better fit the experiment data rather than Fruendlich isotherm. The kinetics of the adsorption process of Cr(VI) on the m-poly(EG-VPBA) microparticles were investigated using the pseudo first-order, pseudo-second-order, Ritch-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models, results showed that the pseudo-second order equation model provided the best correlation with the experimental results. The thermodynamic parameters (free energy change, ΔG(0) enthalpy change, ΔH(0); and entropy change, ΔS(0)) for the adsorption have been evaluated. PMID:25666882

  12. Surface area and pore size characteristics of nanoporous gold subjected to thermal, mechanical, or surface modification studied using gas adsorption isotherms, cyclic voltammetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yih Horng; Davis, Jason A.; Fujikawa, Kohki; Ganesh, N. Vijaya; Demchenko, Alexei V.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms are used to investigate the Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) pore size distribution of physically modified, thermally annealed, and octadecanethiol functionalized np-Au monoliths. We present the full adsorption-desorption isotherms for N2 gas on np-Au, and observe type IV isotherms and type H1 hysteresis loops. The evolution of the np-Au under various thermal annealing treatments was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The images of both the exterior and interior of the thermally annealed np-Au show that the porosity of all free standing np-Au structures decreases as the heat treatment temperature increases. The modification of the np-Au surface with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of C18-SH (coverage of 2.94 × 1014 molecules cm−2 based from the decomposition of the C18-SH using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)), was found to reduce the strength of the interaction of nitrogen gas with the np-Au surface, as reflected by a decrease in the ‘C’ parameter of the BET equation. From cyclic voltammetry studies, we found that the surface area of the np-Au monoliths annealed at elevated temperatures followed the same trend with annealing temperature as found in the BET surface area study and SEM morphology characterization. The study highlights the ability to control free-standing nanoporous gold monoliths with high surface area, and well-defined, tunable pore morphology. PMID:22822294

  13. Application of electron stimulated desorption techniques to measure the isotherm and the mean residence time of hydrogen physisorbed on a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Ichiro Shimizu, Hideyuki; Kawarabuki, Taku; Yamakawa, Koichiro; Miura, Takashi

    2015-03-15

    Electron stimulated desorption techniques were applied to probe the density of H{sub 2} physisorbed on a cold surface. The adsorption isotherm of H{sub 2} on a copper surface was measured in the equilibrium pressure range between 10{sup −9} and 10{sup −4} Pa at surface temperatures of 6.5 and 4.2 K. The mean residence times of H{sub 2} on copper were obtained from the observation of the time development of the surface density in a transitional state approaching equilibrium, and are 50–500 s for the coverage between 1 and 0.18 at 4.2 K of the substrate temperature. The adsorption energies of 1.18–1.27 kJ/mol, and the condensation coefficient of 0.074–0.018 were also deduced.

  14. Adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic solution onto porous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, A.; Ramlan, N. A.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Chu, C. M.; Farm, Y. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Adsorption isotherm is essential component in the understanding of the adsorption process. Several methods of the measurements, analysis and interpretation of adsorption from solution have been reported in the literature. Most of the measurements of adsorption isotherm from solution were involved the measurement of excess isotherm conducted at low region of sorbates concentration. Direct interpretation of excess adsorption isotherm as adsorption isotherm is always been practice. Therefore, in this work a study on the measurement of the adsorption isotherm from solution of non-azeotropic organic solvent mixture onto porous adsorbents for whole range of liquid concentration was conducted. The study included the measurement of excess adsorption isotherm using conventional technique. Theoretical analysis and interpretation of adsorption isotherm from the excess isotherm were conducted using Pseudo Ideal Adsorption, Gibbs Dividing Plane Model and Langmuir-Fruendlich binary isotherm model. For organic solvents, acetone and propanol were chosen as the adsorbates due to the non-azeotropic properties in the mixture. Activated carbon and silicalite were chosen as adsorbents due to the different in their porosity such as macro porous and micro porous structure. The result of the study has revealed that the adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic mixture onto activated carbon and silicalite can be interpreted as monolayer type of adsorption.

  15. The impact of xylem cavitation on water potential isotherms measured by the pressure chamber technique in Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu & W.C. Cheng.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongmei; Pan, Shaoan; Tyree, Melvin T

    2016-08-01

    Pressure-volume (PV) curve analysis is the most common and accurate way of estimating all components of the water relationships in leaves (water potential isotherms) as summarized in the Höfler diagram. PV curve analysis yields values of osmotic pressure, turgor pressure, and elastic modulus of cell walls as a function of relative water content. It allows the computation of symplasmic/apoplastic water content partitioning. For about 20 years, cavitation in xylem has been postulated as a possible source of error when estimating the above parameters, but, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no one has ever previously quantified its influence. Results in this paper provide independent estimates of osmotic pressure by PV curve analysis and by thermocouple psychrometer measurement. An anatomical evaluation was also used for the first time to compare apoplastic water fraction estimates from PV analysis with anatomical values. Conclusions include: (i) PV curve values of osmotic pressure are underestimated prior to correcting osmotic pressure for water loss by cavitation in Metasequoia glyptostroboides; (ii) psychrometer estimates of osmotic pressure obtained in tissues killed by freezing or heating agreed with PV values before correction for apoplastic water dilution; (iii) after correction for dilution effects, a solute concentration enhancement (0.27MPa or 0.11 osmolal) was revealed. The possible sources of solute enhancement were starch hydrolysis and release of ions from the Donnan free space of needle cell walls. PMID:27312671

  16. The impact of xylem cavitation on water potential isotherms measured by the pressure chamber technique in Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu & W.C. Cheng.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongmei; Pan, Shaoan; Tyree, Melvin T

    2016-08-01

    Pressure-volume (PV) curve analysis is the most common and accurate way of estimating all components of the water relationships in leaves (water potential isotherms) as summarized in the Höfler diagram. PV curve analysis yields values of osmotic pressure, turgor pressure, and elastic modulus of cell walls as a function of relative water content. It allows the computation of symplasmic/apoplastic water content partitioning. For about 20 years, cavitation in xylem has been postulated as a possible source of error when estimating the above parameters, but, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no one has ever previously quantified its influence. Results in this paper provide independent estimates of osmotic pressure by PV curve analysis and by thermocouple psychrometer measurement. An anatomical evaluation was also used for the first time to compare apoplastic water fraction estimates from PV analysis with anatomical values. Conclusions include: (i) PV curve values of osmotic pressure are underestimated prior to correcting osmotic pressure for water loss by cavitation in Metasequoia glyptostroboides; (ii) psychrometer estimates of osmotic pressure obtained in tissues killed by freezing or heating agreed with PV values before correction for apoplastic water dilution; (iii) after correction for dilution effects, a solute concentration enhancement (0.27MPa or 0.11 osmolal) was revealed. The possible sources of solute enhancement were starch hydrolysis and release of ions from the Donnan free space of needle cell walls.

  17. ON THE ISOTHERMALITY OF SOLAR PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2010-11-01

    Recent measurements have shown that the quiet unstructured solar corona observed at the solar limb is close to isothermal, at a temperature that does not appear to change over wide areas or with time. Some individual active region loop structures have also been found to be nearly isothermal both along their axis and across their cross section. Even a complex active region observed at the solar limb has been found to be composed of three distinct isothermal plasmas. If confirmed, these results would pose formidable challenges to the current theoretical understanding of the thermal structure and heating of the solar corona. For example, no current theoretical model can explain the excess densities and lifetimes of many observed loops if the loops are in fact isothermal. All of these measurements are based on the so-called emission measure (EM) diagnostic technique that is applied to a set of optically thin lines under the assumption of isothermal plasma. It provides simultaneous measurement of both the temperature and EM. In this work, we develop a new method to quantify the uncertainties in the technique and to rigorously assess its ability to discriminate between isothermal and multithermal plasmas. We define a formal measure of the uncertainty in the EM diagnostic technique that can easily be applied to real data. We here apply it to synthetic data based on a variety of assumed plasma thermal distributions and develop a method to quantitatively assess the degree of multithermality of a plasma.

  18. Alchemical Free Energy Calculations and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Measurements of Aminoadamantanes Bound to the Closed State of Influenza A/M2TM.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Harris; Drakopoulos, Antonios; Tzitzoglaki, Christina; Homeyer, Nadine; Kolarov, Felix; Gkeka, Paraskevi; Freudenberger, Kathrin; Liolios, Christos; Gauglitz, Günter; Cournia, Zoe; Gohlke, Holger; Kolocouris, Antonios

    2016-05-23

    Adamantane derivatives, such as amantadine and rimantadine, have been reported to block the transmembrane domain (TM) of the M2 protein of influenza A virus (A/M2) but their clinical use has been discontinued due to evolved resistance in humans. Although experiments and simulations have provided adequate information about the binding interaction of amantadine or rimantadine to the M2 protein, methods for predicting binding affinities of whole series of M2 inhibitors have so far been scarcely applied. Such methods could assist in the development of novel potent inhibitors that overcome A/M2 resistance. Here we show that alchemical free energy calculations of ligand binding using the Bennett acceptance ratio (BAR) method are valuable for determining the relative binding potency of A/M2 inhibitors of the aminoadamantane type covering a binding affinity range of only ∼2 kcal mol(-1). Their binding affinities measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) against the A/M2TM tetramer from the Udorn strain in its closed form at pH 8 were used as experimental probes. The binding constants of rimantadine enantiomers against M2TMUdorn were measured for the first time and found to be equal. Two series of alchemical free energy calculations were performed using 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipids to mimic the membrane environment. A fair correlation was found for DPPC that was significantly improved using DMPC, which resembles more closely the DPC lipids used in the ITC experiments. This demonstrates that binding free energy calculations by the BAR approach can be used to predict relative binding affinities of aminoadamantane derivatives toward M2TM with good accuracy. PMID:27105206

  19. Measurements of water vapor adsorption on The Geysers rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously between 90 and 30{degrees}C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang, some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated processes were not present, and no increase in water adsorption with temperature was observed.

  20. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite. PMID:26731309

  1. Adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid on activated bleaching earth-chitosan-SDS composites: Optimization, kinetics, isotherms.

    PubMed

    Naowanat, Nitiya; Thouchprasitchai, Nutthavich; Pongstabodee, Sangobtip

    2016-03-15

    The adsorption of emulsified oil from metalworking fluid (MWF) on activated bleaching earth (BE)-chitosan-sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composites (BE/MCS) was investigated under a statistical design of experiments at a 95% confidence interval to identify the critical factors and to optimize the adsorption capacity. The BE/MCS adsorbents were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller adsorption/desorption isotherms, contact angle analysis (sessile drop technique) and their zeta potential. From the results of a full 2(5) factorial design with three center points, the adsorbent weight and initial pH of the MWF had a significant antagonistic effect on the adsorption capacity while the initial MWF concentration and BE:chitosan:SDS weight ratio had a synergistic influence. Temperature factor has no discernible effect on the capacity. From the FCCC-RSM design, the optimal capacity range of 2840-2922.5 mg g(-1) was achieved at sorbent weight of 1.6-1.9 g, pH of 5.5-6.5, initial MWF concentration of 52-55 g l(-1) and BE:chitosan:SDS (w/w/w) ratio of 4.7:1:1-6.2:1:1. To test the validation and sensitivity of RSM model, the results showed that the estimated adsorption capacity was close to the experimental capacity within an error range of ±3%, suggesting that the RSM model was acceptable and satisfied. From three kinetics models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order model and Avrami's equation) and two adsorption isotherms (Langmuir model and Freundlich model), assessed using an error function (Err) and the coefficient of determination (R(2)), Avrami's equation and Freundlich isotherm model provided a good fitting for the data, suggesting the presence of more than one reaction pathway in the MWF adsorption process and the heterogeneous surface adsorption of the BC/ABE-5.5 composite.

  2. Rapid Adsorption of Copper(II) and Lead(II) by Rice Straw/Fe3O4 Nanocomposite: Optimization, Equilibrium Isotherms, and Adsorption Kinetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B.; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:25815470

  3. Rapid adsorption of copper(II) and lead(II) by rice straw/Fe₃O₄ nanocomposite: optimization, equilibrium isotherms, and adsorption kinetics study.

    PubMed

    Khandanlou, Roshanak; Ahmad, Mansor B; Fard Masoumi, Hamid Reza; Shameli, Kamyar; Basri, Mahiran; Kalantari, Katayoon

    2015-01-01

    Rice straw/magnetic nanocomposites (RS/Fe3O4-NCs) were prepared via co-precipitation method for removal of Pb(II) and Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to find the optimum conditions for removal of ions. The effects of three independent variables including initial ion concentration, removal time, and adsorbent dosage were investigated on the maximum adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II). The optimum conditions for the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained (100 and 60 mg/L) of initial ion concentration, (41.96 and 59.35 s) of removal time and 0.13 g of adsorbent for both ions, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of Pb(II) and Cu(II) were obtained 96.25% and 75.54%, respectively. In the equilibrium isotherm study, the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption kinetics was best depicted by the pseudo-second order model. Desorption experiments showed adsorbent can be reused successfully for three adsorption-desorption cycles.

  4. Measurements of water vapor adsorption on the Geysers rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Horita, Juske; Simonson, John M.; Mesmer, Robert E.

    1996-01-24

    The ORNL high temperature isopiestic apparatus was adapted for adsorption measurements. The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three different wells of The Geysers was measured at 150 °C and at 200 °C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 ≤ p/p0 ≤ 0.98, where p0 is the saturated water vapor pressure. The rocks were crushed and sieved into three fractions of different grain sizes (with different specific surface areas). Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, BET surface area analyses were performed by Porous Materials Inc. on the same rock samples using nitrogen or krypton adsorption measurements at 77 K. Specific surface areas and pore volumes were determined. These parameters are important in estimating water retention capability of a porous material. The same laboratory also determined the densities of the samples by helium pycnometry. Their results were then compared with our own density values obtained by measuring the effect of buoyancy in compressed argon. One of the goals of this project is to determine the dependence of the water retention capacity of the rocks as a function of temperature. The results show a significant dependence of the adsorption and desorption isotherms on the grain size of the sample. The increase in the amount of water retained with temperature observed previously (Shang et al., 1994a, 1994b, 1995) between 90 and 130°C for various reservoir rocks from The Geysers may be due to the contribution of slow chemical adsorption and may be dependent on the time allowed for equilibration. In contrast with the results of Shang et al. (1994a, 1994b, 1995), some closed and nearly closed hysteresis loops on the water adsorption/desorption isotherms (with closing points at p/p0 ≈ 0.6) were obtained in this study. In these cases the effects of activated

  5. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Yujing; Li, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the measurement of the heat produced by the stepwise addition of one substance to another. It is a common experimental technique, for example, in pharmaceutical science, to measure equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies. We describe a stirring device and an injection pump that can be used with a…

  6. Isothermic hemodialysis and ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Rosales, L M; Schneditz, D; Morris, A T; Rahmati, S; Levin, N W

    2000-08-01

    The increase in patient temperature during hemodialysis is explained by hemodynamic compensation during ultrafiltration and hypovolemia that leads to peripheral vasoconstriction and reduced heat losses. We analyzed 51 stable high-efficiency hemodialysis treatments in 27 patients during isothermic dialysis in which body temperature was maintained at a constant level (+/-0.1 degrees C) using the temperature-control option of the Blood Temperature Monitor (BTM; Fresenius Medical Care, Bad Homburg, Germany). Hemodialysis was delivered using ultrapure water (limulus amebocyte lysate test < 0. 06 endotoxin units/mL) at mean blood flows of 410 +/- 40 mL/min. During treatments lasting 178 +/- 23 minutes, 4.8% +/- 1.4% of postdialysis body weight (W%) and 9.5% +/- 2.5% of postdialysis body water were removed using mean ultrafiltration rates of 1.1 +/- 0.3 L/h. Dialysate temperatures significantly decreased from 35.9 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C to 35.6 degrees C +/- 0.6 degrees C during hemodialysis. During these treatments, 187 +/- 69 kJ of thermal energy were removed from the patients through the extracorporeal circulation using cool dialysate. Extracorporeal heat flow was 17 +/- 6 W. Energy expenditure (H) estimated from anthropometric data was 65 +/- 12 W. Thus, 28% +/- 10% of estimated energy expenditure (H%) was removed during isothermic dialysis. A highly significant correlation was observed between H% and W% (H% = -5.6 * W%; r(2) = 0.91; P < 0.0001). This result is in support of the volume hypothesis of intradialytic heat accumulation and provides a rule of thumb to estimate extracorporeal cooling requirements for isothermic dialysis. Approximately 6% of H must be removed through the extracorporeal circulation for each percent of ultrafiltration-induced body-weight change. The importance of body temperature control during hemodialysis increases with increased ultrafiltration requirements.

  7. Conductive heat transfer from an isothermal magma chamber and its application to the measured heat flow distribution from mount hood, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Menuel; Tilling, Robert I.; ,

    1993-01-01

    A steady-state solution for heat transfer from an isothermal, spherical magma chamber, with an imposed regional geothermal gradient far from the chamber, is developed. The extensive published heat-flow data set for Mount Hood, Oregon, is dominated by conductive heat transfer in the deeper parts of most drill holes and provides an ideal application of such a model. Magma-chamber volumes or depths needed to match the distribution of heat-flow data are larger or shallower than those inferred from geologic evidence.

  8. Adsorption of methyl orange from aqueous solution by aminated pumpkin seed powder: Kinetics, isotherms, and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Subbaiah, Munagapati Venkata; Kim, Dong-Su

    2016-06-01

    Present research discussed the utilization of aminated pumpkin seed powder (APSP) as an adsorbent for methyl orange (MO) removal from aqueous solution. Batch sorption experiments were carried to evaluate the influence of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time, and temperature. The APSP was characterized by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The experimental equilibrium adsorption data were fitted using two two-parameter models (Langmuir and Freundlich) and two three-parameter models (Sips and Toth). Langmuir and Sips isotherms provided the best model for MO adsorption data. The maximum monolayer sorption capacity was found to be 200.3mg/g based on the Langmuir isotherm model. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model equations were used to analyze the kinetic data of the adsorption process and the data was fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model (R(2)>0.97). The calculated thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) from experimental data showed that the sorption of MO onto APSP was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range 298-318 K. The FTIR results revealed that amine and carboxyl functional groups present on the surface of APSP. The SEM results show that APSP has an irregular and porous surface which is adequate morphology for dye adsorption. Desorption experiments were carried to explore the feasibility of adsorbent regeneration and the adsorbed MO from APSP was desorbed using 0.1M NaOH with an efficiency of 93.5%. Findings of the present study indicated that APSP can be successfully used for removal of MO from aqueous solution. PMID:26921544

  9. In Situ Measurement of the γ/ γ' Lattice Mismatch Evolution of a Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Superalloy During Non-isothermal Very High-Temperature Creep Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Graverend, Jean-Briac; Dirand, Laura; Jacques, Alain; Cormier, Jonathan; Ferry, Olivier; Schenk, Thomas; Gallerneau, Franck; Kruch, Serge; Mendez, José

    2012-11-01

    The evolution of the γ/ γ' lattice mismatch of the AM1 single-crystal superalloy was measured during in situ non-isothermal very high-temperature creep tests under X-ray synchrotron radiation. The magnitude of the effective lattice mismatch in the 1273 K to 1323 K (1000 °C to 1050 °C) temperature range always increased after overheatings performed at temperatures lower than 1403 K (1130 °C). In contrast, a decrease of its magnitude was observed after overheatings at temperatures greater than 1453 K (1180 °C) due to massive dislocation recovery processes occurring at very high temperature.

  10. Isothermal separation processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.

    1982-01-01

    The isothermal processes of membrane separation, supercritical extraction and chromatography were examined using availability analysis. The general approach was to derive equations that identified where energy is consumed in these processes and how they compare with conventional separation methods. These separation methods are characterized by pure work inputs, chiefly in the form of a pressure drop which supplies the required energy. Equations were derived for the energy requirement in terms of regular solution theory. This approach is believed to accurately predict the work of separation in terms of the heat of solution and the entropy of mixing. It can form the basis of a convenient calculation method for optimizing membrane and solvent properties for particular applications. Calculations were made on the energy requirements for a membrane process separating air into its components.

  11. Water adsorption isotherms on CH3-, OH-, and COOH-terminated organic surfaces at ambient conditions measured with PM-RAIRS.

    PubMed

    Tu, Aimee; Kwag, Hye Rin; Barnette, Anna L; Kim, Seong H

    2012-10-30

    The water adsorption isotherms on methyl (CH(3))-, hydroxyl (OH)-, and carboxylic acid (COOH)-terminated alkylthiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au were studied at room temperature and ambient pressure with polarization modulation reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (PM-RAIRS). PM-RAIRS analysis showed that water does not adsorb at all on the CH(3)-SAM/Au at subsaturation humidity conditions. In a dry Ar environment, the OH-SAM/Au holds at least 2 layer thick strongly bound water molecules which exhibit a broad O-H stretch vibration peak centered at ∼3360 cm(-1). The peak position implies that the strongly bound water layer on the OH SAM is more like a liquid than an ice. The additional uptake of water in humid environments is relatively weak, and the peak position changes very little. Unlike the OH-SAM/Au, the COOH-SAM/Au does not have strongly bound water layer. This seems to be due to the strong hydrogen bonding between terminal COOH groups in dry conditions. The weak interactions between water and carboxyl groups at low relative humidity (RH) and the solvation of dissociated carboxylic groups in high RH lead to a type III isotherm behavior, based on the BET categories, for water adsorption on the COOH-SAM/Au. The water spectra on the COOH-SAM at RH > 45% are centered at ∼3430 cm(-1) and very broad, indicating that the hydrogen-bonding network of water on the COOH-SAM is much different from that on the OH-SAM.

  12. Isothermal Amplification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Li, Qian; Wang, Lihua; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-11-25

    Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids is a simple process that rapidly and efficiently accumulates nucleic acid sequences at constant temperature. Since the early 1990s, various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isothermal amplification methods have been used for biosensing targets such as DNA, RNA, cells, proteins, small molecules, and ions. The applications of these techniques for in situ or intracellular bioimaging and sequencing have been amply demonstrated. Amplicons produced by isothermal amplification methods have also been utilized to construct versatile nucleic acid nanomaterials for promising applications in biomedicine, bioimaging, and biosensing. The integration of isothermal amplification into microsystems or portable devices improves nucleic acid-based on-site assays and confers high sensitivity. Single-cell and single-molecule analyses have also been implemented based on integrated microfluidic systems. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the isothermal amplification of nucleic acids encompassing work published in the past two decades. First, different isothermal amplification techniques are classified into three types based on reaction kinetics. Then, we summarize the applications of isothermal amplification in bioanalysis, diagnostics, nanotechnology, materials science, and device integration. Finally, several challenges and perspectives in the field are discussed. PMID:26551336

  13. Isothermal Amplification of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongxi; Chen, Feng; Li, Qian; Wang, Lihua; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-11-25

    Isothermal amplification of nucleic acids is a simple process that rapidly and efficiently accumulates nucleic acid sequences at constant temperature. Since the early 1990s, various isothermal amplification techniques have been developed as alternatives to polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These isothermal amplification methods have been used for biosensing targets such as DNA, RNA, cells, proteins, small molecules, and ions. The applications of these techniques for in situ or intracellular bioimaging and sequencing have been amply demonstrated. Amplicons produced by isothermal amplification methods have also been utilized to construct versatile nucleic acid nanomaterials for promising applications in biomedicine, bioimaging, and biosensing. The integration of isothermal amplification into microsystems or portable devices improves nucleic acid-based on-site assays and confers high sensitivity. Single-cell and single-molecule analyses have also been implemented based on integrated microfluidic systems. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the isothermal amplification of nucleic acids encompassing work published in the past two decades. First, different isothermal amplification techniques are classified into three types based on reaction kinetics. Then, we summarize the applications of isothermal amplification in bioanalysis, diagnostics, nanotechnology, materials science, and device integration. Finally, several challenges and perspectives in the field are discussed.

  14. On the Isothermality of Solar Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent measurements have shown that the quiet unstructured solar corona observed at the solar limb is close to isothermal, at a temperature that does not appear to change over wide areas or with time. Some in dividual active loop structures have also been found to be nearly iso thermal both along their axis and across their cross-section. Even a complex active region observed at the solar limb has been found to be composed of three distinct isothermal plasmas. If confirmed, these r esults would pose formidable challenges to the current theoretical understanding of the thermal structure and heating of the solar corona. For example, no current theoretical model can explain the excess dens ities and lifetimes of many observed loops if the loops are in fact i sothermal. All of these measurements are based on the so-called emiss ion measure (EM) diagnostic technique that is applied to a set of opt ically thin lines under the assumption of isothermal plasma. It provi des simultaneous measurement of both the temperature and EM. However, no study has ever been carried out to quantify the uncertainties in the technique and to rigorously assess its ability to discriminate bet ween isothermal and multithermal plasmas. Such a study is the topic o f the present work. We define a formal measure of the uncertainty in the EM diagnostic technique that can easily be applied to real data. We here apply it to synthetic data based on a variety of assumed plas ma thermal distributions, and develop a method to quantitatively asse ss the degree of multithermality of a plasma.

  15. Biomedical Use of Isothermal Microcalorimeters

    PubMed Central

    Braissant, Olivier; Wirz, Dieter; Göpfert, Beat; Daniels, A.U.

    2010-01-01

    Isothermal microcalorimetry is becoming widely used for monitoring biological activities in vitro. Microcalorimeters are now able to measure heat production rates of less than a microwatt. As a result, metabolism and growth of relatively small numbers of cultured bacteria, protozoans, human cells and even small animals can be monitored continuously and extremely accurately at any chosen temperature. Dynamic effects on these organisms of changes in the culture environment—or of additions to it—are easily assessed over periods from hours to days. In addition microcalorimetry is a non-destructive method that does not require much sample preparation. It is also completely passive and thus allows subsequent evaluations of any kind on the undisturbed sample. In this review, we present a basic description of current microcalorimetry instruments and an overview of their use for various biomedical applications. These include detecting infections, evaluating effects of pharmaceutical or antimicrobial agents on cells, monitoring growth of cells harvested for tissue eingineering, and assessing medical and surgical device material physico-chemical stability and cellular biocompatibility. PMID:22163413

  16. Isothermal blast wave model of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solinger, A.; Buff, J.; Rappaport, S.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of the 'adiabatic' assumption in supernova-remnant calculations is examined, and the alternative extreme of an isothermal blast wave is explored. It is concluded that, because of thermal conductivity, the large temperature gradients predicted by the adiabatic model probably are not maintained in nature. Self-similar solutions to the hydrodynamic equations for an isothermal blast wave have been found and studied. These solutions are then used to determine the relationship between X-ray observations and inferred parameters of supernova remnants. A comparison of the present results with those for the adiabatic model indicates differences which are less than present observational uncertainties. It is concluded that most parameters of supernova remnants inferred from X-ray measurements are relatively insensitive to the specifics of the blast-wave model.

  17. Non isothermal effects on phase transformation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sista, Vivekanand

    Cyclic thermal processing has been shown to accelerate the kinetics of several phase transformations, with a significant beneficial impact on productivity and energy consumption of the energy intensive operations like cyclic grain growth kinetics, recrystallization kinetics and austempering. Austempering is an important thermal processing operation, where strong and tough bainitic steel is produced in a single heat treatment. A new process called cyclic austempering was developed where the steel is first austenized and then cooled rapidly to just above the martensite start temperature where the bainitic transformation is carried out in a controlled fluctuating temperature profile, by continuous heating and cooling segments between two temperature limits. Both isothermal and cyclic austempering experiments were performed on 1080 steel. The powerful dilatometry technique was used to measure the diametrical change as a function of transformation time and temperature. The time taken for the complete bainitic transformation in both isothermal and cyclic austempering processes were calculated to see whether the bainitic kinetics are accelerated or not. Asymmetric cyclic austempering was also performed to determine the heating and cooling rate effects on the transformation. Cyclic austempering resulted in accelerating kinetics to about an 80% reduction in time compared to that of conventional isothermal austempering. Incubation times were calculated to propose a possible mechanism for the accelerated kinetics. Microstructure analysis and hardness analysis was used to establish the cyclic transformation kinetics.

  18. Column Chromatography To Obtain Organic Cation Sorption Isotherms.

    PubMed

    Jolin, William C; Sullivan, James; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2016-08-01

    Column chromatography was evaluated as a method to obtain organic cation sorption isotherms for environmental solids while using the peak skewness to identify the linear range of the sorption isotherm. Custom packed HPLC columns and standard batch sorption techniques were used to intercompare sorption isotherms and solid-water sorption coefficients (Kd) for four organic cations (benzylamine, 2,4-dichlorobenzylamine, phenyltrimethylammonium, oxytetracycline) with two aluminosilicate clay minerals and one soil. A comparison of Freundlich isotherm parameters revealed isotherm linearity or nonlinearity was not significantly different between column chromatography and traditional batch experiments. Importantly, skewness (a metric of eluting peak symmetry) analysis of eluting peaks can establish isotherm linearity, thereby enabling a less labor intensive means to generate the extensive data sets of linear Kd values required for the development of predictive sorption models. Our findings clearly show that column chromatography can reproduce sorption measures from conventional batch experiments with the benefit of lower labor-intensity, faster analysis times, and allow for consistent sorption measures across laboratories with distinct chromatography instrumentation. PMID:27379799

  19. Comparing Experimental and Simulated Pressure-Area Isotherms for DPPC

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Susan L.; Larson, Ronald G.

    2008-01-01

    Although pressure-area isotherms are commonly measured for lipid monolayers, it is not always appreciated how much they can vary depending on experimental factors. Here, we compare experimental and simulated pressure-area isotherms for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) at temperatures ranging between 293.15 K and 323.15 K, and explore possible factors influencing the shape and position of the isotherms. Molecular dynamics simulations of DPPC monolayers using both coarse-grained (CG) and atomistic models yield results that are in rough agreement with some of the experimental isotherms, but with a steeper slope in the liquid-condensed region than seen experimentally and shifted to larger areas. The CG lipid model gives predictions that are very close to those of atomistic simulations, while greatly improving computational efficiency. There is much more variation among experimental isotherms than between isotherms obtained from CG simulations and from the most refined simulation available. Both atomistic and CG simulations yield liquid-condensed and liquid-expanded phase area compressibility moduli that are significantly larger than those typically measured experimentally, but compare well with some experimental values obtained under rapid compression. PMID:18199666

  20. Column Chromatography To Obtain Organic Cation Sorption Isotherms.

    PubMed

    Jolin, William C; Sullivan, James; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2016-08-01

    Column chromatography was evaluated as a method to obtain organic cation sorption isotherms for environmental solids while using the peak skewness to identify the linear range of the sorption isotherm. Custom packed HPLC columns and standard batch sorption techniques were used to intercompare sorption isotherms and solid-water sorption coefficients (Kd) for four organic cations (benzylamine, 2,4-dichlorobenzylamine, phenyltrimethylammonium, oxytetracycline) with two aluminosilicate clay minerals and one soil. A comparison of Freundlich isotherm parameters revealed isotherm linearity or nonlinearity was not significantly different between column chromatography and traditional batch experiments. Importantly, skewness (a metric of eluting peak symmetry) analysis of eluting peaks can establish isotherm linearity, thereby enabling a less labor intensive means to generate the extensive data sets of linear Kd values required for the development of predictive sorption models. Our findings clearly show that column chromatography can reproduce sorption measures from conventional batch experiments with the benefit of lower labor-intensity, faster analysis times, and allow for consistent sorption measures across laboratories with distinct chromatography instrumentation.

  1. Scaling in Supersonic Isothermal Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritsuk, A. G.; Wagner, R.; Norman, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    An exact relation for third-order structure functions in isothermal compressible turbulence (Galtier & Banerjee 2011) is verified using numerical data from a simulation at Mach 6. The analysis supports a Kolmogorov-like cascade phenomenology and yields a reduced version of the relation for high Mach number turbulence.

  2. Isothermal-Gas-Transfer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Don I.

    1989-01-01

    Isothermal Gas Transfer program (GASXFER) solves variety of problems in which gas or gas mixture transferred between two containers. Special features of program include ease of entering data and ease of obtaining output. Program displays, prints, or graphs complete pressure history of each gas as function of time. Written in Lotus Symphony macrolanguage.

  3. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  4. Development of isothermal rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminskas, R. A.; Malone, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The results of the Resonant Infrasonic Gauging System (RIGS) development program are reported. The RIGS is a gauging system that is capable of measuring propellant quantity under zero-G as well as under accelerated (one-G) conditions. With the exception of liquid hydrogen, it can be used to gauge virtually any propellant in liquid form including cryogenics. The gauge consists of a sensor unit which is attached to the propellant tank and electronic control unit which may be positioned separately from the sensor. The control unit receives the signals from the sensor as well as the ullage gas pressure and propellant temperature measurements, and computes the propellant quantity remaining in the tank. During the course of this program two prototype RIGS sensors were designed and constructed. The sensors were tested first in the laboratory using water as the simulated propellant and, later, using LN2 in a 100-gallon tank. The system tests proved that the gauge operates virtually as predicted by theory and yielded an accuracy better than 1%.

  5. Understand rotating isothermal collapses yet

    SciTech Connect

    Tohline, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    A scalar virial equation is used to describe the dynamic properties of equilibrium gas clouds, taking into account the relative effects of surface pressure, rotation, self gravity and internal isothermal pressure. Details concerning the internal structure of the clouds are ignored in order to obtain a globalized analytical expression. The obtained solution to the equation is found to agree with the surface-pressure-dominated model of Stahler (1983), and the rotation-dominated model of Hayashi, Narita, and Miyama (1982). On the basis of the analytical expression of virial equilibrium in the clouds, some of the limiting properties of isothermal clouds are described, and a realistic starting model for cloud collapse is proposed. 18 references.

  6. Venus: an isothermal lower atmosphere?

    PubMed

    Gale, W; Liwshitz, M; Sinclair, A C

    1969-05-30

    Use of Earth-based microwave data in extrapolating the atmospheric profile of Venus below the region probed by Mariner V and Venera 4 reveals an isothermal layer at 670 degrees +/- 20 degrees K that extends to an altitude of 7 +/- 2 kilometers. This model gives a value of 6054.8 kilometers for the radius of Venus, and agreement with brightness spectrum, radar cross sections, and results of microwave interferometry.

  7. IDGE: Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flew on STS-62 to study the microscopic, tree-like structures (dendrites) that form within metals as they solidify from molten materials. The size, shape, and orientation of these dendrites affect the strength and usefulness of metals. Data from this experiment will be used to test and improve the mathematical models that support the industrial production of metals.

  8. Isothermal combustion for improved efficiencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramohalli, Kumar N. R.

    1987-06-01

    This theoretical effort proposes, and explains in detail, the concept of isothermal combustion for vastly improved efficiencies. The concept involves combustion at constant total temperatures in order to realize isothermal heat addition to the working fluid in typical power plants; it is rendered practical by extracting a precise amount of work from the flowing/expanding gases; the heat addition due to combustion will be balanced out to keep the total temperature constant. (In an oversimplified description, it might be said that this involves burning in the turbine stages, or burning during the expansion stroke.) Isothermal heat addition enables the thermodynamic cycle to approach the Carnot cycle more closely than the state-of-the-art Brayton, Otto, or Diesel cycles. A closed-form analytical expression is derived to explicitly show the cycle efficiency in terms of the pressure ratio and the overall temperature ratio. Thirty- to forty-percent efficiency increases are seen over the Brayton efficiency for the same overall temperature ratio. Some practical issues such as limits to pressure ratios, blade cooling, and service life are qualitatively discussed.

  9. A model free method for estimation of complicated adsorption isotherms in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Forssén, Patrik; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2015-08-28

    Here we show that even extremely small variations in the adsorption isotherm can have a tremendous effect on the shape of the overloaded elution profiles and that the earlier in the adsorption isotherms the variation take place, the larger its impact on the shape of the elution profile. These variations are so small that they can be "hidden" by the discretization and in the general experimental noise when using traditional experimental methods, such as frontal analysis, to measure adsorption isotherms. But as the effects of these variations are more clearly visible in the elution profiles, the Inverse Method (IM) of adsorption isotherm estimation is an option. However, IM usually requires that one selects an adsorption isotherm model prior to the estimation process. Here we show that even complicated models might not be able to estimate the adsorption isotherms with multiple inflection points that small variations might give rise to. We therefore developed a modified IM that, instead of fixed adsorption isotherm models, uses monotone piecewise interpolation. We first validated the method with synthetic data and showed that it can be used to estimate an adsorption isotherm, which accurately predicts an extremely "strange" elution profile. For this case it was impossible to estimate the adsorption isotherm using IM with a fixed adsorption model. Finally, we will give an example of a real chromatographic system where adsorption isotherm with inflection points is estimated by the modified IM.

  10. Pressure-composition-isotherms of palladium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, T.B.

    1996-11-01

    About one year ago a summary report was submitted covering the previous three years of the contract. This earlier report should be consulted as a useful survey and evaluation of the research carried out by the authors. Because of difficulties during the current contract period arising from the anomalous nature of the melt-spun alloys received from LANL, it is not possible to contribute much beyond that given in last year's summary with regard to the overall picture of the behavior of Pd-rich alloys towards hydrogen and its isotopes. In this contract year deuterium was employed instead of hydrogen and instead of using cycled alloys, the alloys employed for each isotherm measurement were in their virgin condition. Because of the anomalous behavior of the melt-spun alloys, it was not feasible or worthwhile in some cases, e.g., when the alloy behaved anomalously, to carry out all of the originally proposed work. Nonetheless considering these obstacles, some useful data were obtained. For example, the obtaining of deuterium isotherms for the Pd-Rh alloys down to {minus}40 C using internally oxidized melt-spun alloys may prove to be useful.

  11. Computer Modeling of Non-Isothermal Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Narayan, K. Lakshmi; Levine, L. E.; Cull, T. C.; Ray, C. S.

    1996-01-01

    A realistic computer model for simulating isothermal and non-isothermal phase transformations proceeding by homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation and interface-limited growth is presented. A new treatment for particle size effects on the crystallization kinetics is developed and is incorporated into the numerical model. Time-dependent nucleation rates, size-dependent growth rates, and surface crystallization are also included. Model predictions are compared with experimental measurements of DSC/DTA peak parameters for the crystallization of lithium disilicate glass as a function of particle size, Pt doping levels, and water content. The quantitative agreement that is demonstrated indicates that the numerical model can be used to extract key kinetic data from easily obtained calorimetric data. The model can also be used to probe nucleation and growth behavior in regimes that are otherwise inaccessible. Based on a fit to data, an earlier prediction that the time-dependent nucleation rate in a DSC/DTA scan can rise above the steady-state value at a temperature higher than the peak in the steady-state rate is demonstrated.

  12. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials.

  13. Characterization of binding interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Doyle

    1997-02-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry is a high-accuracy method for measuring binding affinities. Titration calorimetry is a universal method that has broad impact throughout biotechnology. In recent years, microcalorimeters that are capable of characterizing binding interactions of biological macromolecules have become commercially available. Results from these studies are providing new insight into the molecular nature of macromolecular interactions.

  14. Friction factor for isothermal and nonisothermal flow through porous media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, J. C.; Dutton, J. L.; Benson, B. A.; Fortini, A.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements were performed to determine the pressure drops for gaseous flow through porous materials of different microstructures, porosities, and thickness under isothermal and nonisothermal conditions at various temperature levels. Results were satisfactorily correlated by a simple equation relating the friction factor to the Reynolds number and porosities.

  15. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE ON TRICHLOROETHYLENE DESORPTION FROM SILICA GEL AND NATURAL SEDIMENTS. 1. ISOTHERMS. (R822626)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aqueous phase isotherms were calculated from vapor phase desorption isotherms
    measured at 15, 30, and 60 C for
    trichloroethylene on a silica gel, an aquifer sediment, a soil, a sand fraction,
    and a clay and silt fraction, all at...

  16. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Characterize Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction as an intrinsic probe to characterize any chemical process that involves heat changes spontaneously occurring during the reaction. The general features of this method to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of enzymatic reactions (kcat, KM, ΔH) are described and discussed here together with some detailed applications to specific cases. ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis, can be performed in solution, and needs only small amounts of enzyme. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful, and unique tool to extend the knowledge of enzyme kinetics to drug discovery.

  17. Lunar ash flows - Isothermal approximation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.; O'Keefe, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Suggestion of the ash flow mechanism as one of the major processes required to account for some features of lunar soil. First the observational background and the gardening hypothesis are reviewed, and the shortcomings of the gardening hypothesis are shown. Then a general description of the lunar ash flow is given, and a simple mathematical model of the isothermal lunar ash flow is worked out with numerical examples to show the differences between the lunar and the terrestrial ash flow. The important parameters of the ash flow process are isolated and analyzed. It appears that the lunar surface layer in the maria is not a residual mantle rock (regolith) but a series of ash flows due, at least in part, to great meteorite impacts. The possibility of a volcanic contribution is not excluded. Some further analytic research on lunar ash flows is recommended.

  18. Isothermal titration calorimetry of RNA.

    PubMed

    Salim, Nilshad N; Feig, Andrew L

    2009-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a fast and robust method to study the physical basis of molecular interactions. A single well-designed experiment can provide complete thermodynamic characterization of a binding reaction, including K(a), DeltaG, DeltaH, DeltaS and reaction stoichiometry (n). Repeating the experiment at different temperatures allows determination of the heat capacity change (DeltaC(P)) of the interaction. Modern calorimeters are sensitive enough to probe even weak biological interactions making ITC a very popular method among biochemists. Although ITC has been applied to protein studies for many years, it is becoming widely applicable in RNA biochemistry as well, especially in studies which involve RNA folding and RNA interactions with small molecules, proteins and with other RNAs. This review focuses on best practices for planning, designing and executing effective ITC experiments when one or more of the reactants is an RNA. PMID:18835447

  19. Isothermal Circumstellar Dust Shell Model for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, G.; Towers, I. N.; Jovanoski, Z.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a model of radiative transfer in circumstellar dust shells. By assuming that the shell is both isothermal and its thickness is small compared to its radius, the model is simple enough for students to grasp and yet still provides a quantitative description of the relevant physical features. The isothermal model can be used in a…

  20. Ancient Parchment Examination by Surface Investigation Methods.

    PubMed

    Facchini; Malara; Bazzani; Cavallotti

    2000-11-15

    A restoring process was set up to restore flexibility, size, and shape in naturally aged or fire-damaged parchments of old manuscripts. Validation of such a process requires the measurement of intrinsic parchment properties and comparison of them before and after the treatment. To this aim, we investigated morphological, mechanical, and surface physico-chemical properties of parchment by taking SEM pictures and characterizing small samples by microindentation, mercury porosimetry, and water vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. ISOTHERMAL AIR INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H Oh; Eung S Kim

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory carried out air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. An isothermal test loop was designed and set to understand the stratified-flow phenomenon, which is important as the initial air flow into the lower plenum of the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) when a large break loss-of-coolant accident occurs. The unique flow characteristics were focused on the VHTR air-ingress accident, in particular, the flow visualization of the stratified flow in the inlet pipe to the vessel lower plenum of the General Atomic’s Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR). Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids, and water was used to represent a light fluid, which mimics a counter current flow due to the density difference between the stimulant fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between simulant fluids was established even for very small density differences. The CFD calculations were compared with experimental data. A grid sensitivity study on CFD models was also performed using the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for the numerical accuracy of CFD calculations . As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident.

  2. Isothermal densification and metamorphism of new snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleef, S.; Loewe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-12-01

    The interplay between overburden stress and surface energy induced growth and coarsening is relevant for the densification of snow and porous ice at all densities. The densification of new snow is amenable to high precision experiments on short time scales. To this end we investigate the coupling of densification and metamorphism of new snow via time-lapse tomography experiments in the laboratory. We compare the evolution of density, strain, and specific surface area to previous long-time metamorphism experiments of snow and creep of polycrystalline ice. Experimental conditions are tailored to the requirements of time-lapse tomography and the measurements are conducted under nearly isothermal conditions at -20°C with a duration of two days. Images were taken with temporal resolution of a few hours which reveal precise details of the microstructure evolution due to sintering and compaction. We used different crystal shapes of natural new snow and snow samples obtained by sieving crystals grown in a snowmaker in the laboratory. To simulate the effect of overburden stress due to an overlying snowpack additional weights were applied to the sample. As expected we find an influence of the densification rate on initial density and overburden stress. We calculated strain rates and identified a transient creep behavior with a similar power law for all crystal types which substantially differs from the Andrade creep of polycrystalline ice. As a main result we found that the evolution of the specific surface area is independent of the density and follows a unique decay form for all measurements of each crystal type. The accuracy of the measurements allows to obtain a decay exponent for the SSA which is the same as previously obtained from the long-time regime during isothermal metamorphism after several months. Our preliminary results for all available types of new snow suggest a correlation between the initial density and SSA. We also find snow samples which coincide in

  3. Characterizing Nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms in soils using multifractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz Ferreiro, Jorge; Miranda, José G. V.; Vidal Vázquez, Eva

    2010-05-01

    The specific surface area is an attribute known to characterize the soil ability to retain and transport nutrients and water. A number of studies have shown that specific surface area correlates cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, water retention, aggregate stability and clay swelling. In the past fractal theory has been widely used to study different gas adsorption isotherms like water vapour and nitrogen adsorption isotherms. More recently we have shown that nitrogen adsorption isotherms showed multifractal nature. In this work, both N2 adsorption and desorption isotherms measured in a Mollisol were examined as a probability measure using the multifractal formalism in order to determinate its possible multifractal behaviour. Soil samples were collected in two different series of an Argiudoll located in the north of Buenos Aires and in the south of Santa Fe provinces, Argentina. Two treatments of each soil series were sampled at three depths, without replication, resulting in six samples per soil series and a total of twelve samples analyzed. Multifractal analysis was performed using the box counting method. Both, the N2 adsorption and desorption isotherms exhibited a well defined scaling behaviour indicating a fully developed multifractal structure of each isotherm branch. The singularity spectra and Rényi dimension spectra obtained for adsorption and also for desorption isotherms had shapes similar to the spectra of multifractal measures and several parameters were extracted from these spectra. The capacity dimension, D0, for both N2 adsorption and desorption data sets were not significantly different from 1.00. However, nitrogen adsorption and desorption data showed significantly different values of entropy dimension, D1, and correlation dimension, D2. For instance, entropy dimension values extracted from multifractal spectra of adsorption isotherms were on average 0.578 and varied from 0.501 to 0.666. In contrast, the corresponding figures for

  4. Synthesis of a ruthenium(II) bipyridyl complex coordinated by a functionalized Schiff base ligand: Characterization, spectroscopic and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements of M 2+ binding and sensing (M 2+ = Ca 2+, Mg 2+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Namrata; Mishra, Lallan; Mustafi, Sourajit M.; Chary, Kandala V. R.; Houjou, Hirohiko

    2009-07-01

    Bis-[methylsalicylidine-4'benzoic acid]-ethylene (LH 2) complexed with cis-Ru(bpy) 2Cl 2·2H 2O provides a complex of composition [Ru(bpy) 2L]·2NH 4PF 6 ( 1), which has been characterized spectroscopically. Its binding behaviour towards Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ions is monitored using 1H NMR titration, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and luminescence microscopy. The luminescent ruthenium complex binds Ca 2+ in a more selective manner as compared to Mg 2+.

  5. Synthesis of a ruthenium(II) bipyridyl complex coordinated by a functionalized Schiff base ligand: characterization, spectroscopic and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements of M2+ binding and sensing (M2+=Ca2+, Mg2+).

    PubMed

    Dixit, Namrata; Mishra, Lallan; Mustafi, Sourajit M; Chary, Kandala V R; Houjou, Hirohiko

    2009-07-01

    Bis-[methylsalicylidine-4'benzoic acid]-ethylene (LH2) complexed with cis-Ru(bpy)2Cl(2).2H2O provides a complex of composition [Ru(bpy)2L].2NH4PF6 (1), which has been characterized spectroscopically. Its binding behaviour towards Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions is monitored using 1H NMR titration, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and luminescence microscopy. The luminescent ruthenium complex binds Ca2+ in a more selective manner as compared to Mg2+.

  6. ISOFIT - A PROGRAM FOR FITTING SORPTION ISOTHERMS TO EXPERIMENTAL DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isotherm expressions are important for describing the partitioning of contaminants in environmental systems. ISOFIT (ISOtherm FItting Tool) is a software program that fits isotherm parameters to experimental data via the minimization of a weighted sum of squared error (WSSE) obje...

  7. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  8. RuO2 Non-isothermal Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Guglielmo; Giomi, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    The use of a RuO2 resistor in non-isothermal measuring setup is proposed. A calculation is presented to explain the principle for a resistor obeying variable-range-hopping theory and the results are compared to measurements in the range of 11.2-30 mK for a commercial resistor. The thermometer, which measures the electron temperature, does not show overheating effects at 11.2 mK with a measuring power of 10^{-12} W.

  9. Multifractal characteristics of Nitrogen adsorption isotherms from tropical soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    One of the primary methods used to characterize a wide range of porous materials, including soils, are gas adsorption isotherms. An adsorption isotherm is a function relating the amount of adsorbed gas or vapour to the respective equilibrium pressure, during pressure increase at constant temperature. Adsorption data allow easily estimates of specific surface area and also can provide a characterization of pore surface heterogeneity. Most of the properties and the reactivity of soil colloids are influenced by their specific surface area and by parameters describing the surface heterogeneity. For a restricted scale range, linearity between applied pressure and volume of adsorbate holds, which is the basis for current estimations of specific surface area. However, adsorption isotherms contain also non-linear segments of pressure versus volume so that evidence of multifractal scale has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze the multifractal behaviour of nitrogen adsorption isotherms from a set of tropical soils. Samples were collected form 54 horizons belonging to 19 soil profiles in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The most frequent soil type was Oxisol, according to the Soil Survey Staff, equivalent to Latossolo in the Brazilian soil classification system. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms at standard 77 K were measured using a Thermo Finnigan Sorptomatic 1990 gas sorption analyzer (Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA). From the raw data a distributions of mass along a support was obtained to perform multifractal analysis. The probability distribution was constructed by dividing the values of the measure in a given segment by the sum of the measure in the whole scale range. The box-counting method was employed to perform multifractal analysis. All the analyzed N2 adsorption isotherms behave like a multifractal system. The singularity spectra, f(α), showed asymmetric concave down parabolic shapes, with a greater tendency toward the left side, where moments

  10. Unified water isotherms for clayey porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Lu, N.

    2013-09-01

    We provide a unified model for the soil-water retention function, including the effect of bound and capillary waters for all types of soils, including clayey media. The model combines a CEC-normalized isotherm describing the sorption of the bound water (and the filling of the trapped porosity) and the van Genuchten model to describe the capillary water sorption retention but ignore capillary condensation. For the CEC-normalized isotherm, we tested both the BET and Freundlich isotherms, and we found that the Freundlich is more suitable than the BET isotherm in fitting the data. It is also easier to combine the Freundlich isotherm with the van Genuchten model. The new model accounts for (1) the different types of clay minerals, (2) the different types of ions sorbed in the Stern layer and on the basal planes of 2:1 clays, and (3) the pore size distribution. The model is validated with different data sets, including mixtures of kaolinite and bentonite. The model parameters include two exponents (the pore size exponent of the van Genuchten model and the exponent of the Freundlich isotherm), the capillary entry pressure, and two critical water contents. The first critical water content is the water content at saturation (porosity), and the second is the maximum water content associated with adsorption forces, including the trapped nonbound water.

  11. Isothermal thermogravimetric data acquisition analysis system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Kenneth, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The description of an Isothermal Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) Data Acquisition System is presented. The system consists of software and hardware to perform a wide variety of TGA experiments. The software is written in ANSI C using Borland's Turbo C++. The hardware consists of a 486/25 MHz machine with a Capital Equipment Corp. IEEE488 interface card. The interface is to a Hewlett Packard 3497A data acquisition system using two analog input cards and a digital actuator card. The system provides for 16 TGA rigs with weight and temperature measurements from each rig. Data collection is conducted in three phases. Acquisition is done at a rapid rate during initial startup, at a slower rate during extended data collection periods, and finally at a fast rate during shutdown. Parameters controlling the rate and duration of each phase are user programmable. Furnace control (raising and lowering) is also programmable. Provision is made for automatic restart in the event of power failure or other abnormal terminations. Initial trial runs were conducted to show system stability.

  12. ISOTHERMAL AIR-INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2013-01-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has conducted airingress experiments as part of a campaign to validate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations for very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) analysis. An isothermal test loop was designed to recreate exchange or stratified flow that occurs in the lower plenum of VHTR after a break in the primary loop allows helium to leak out and reactor building air to enter the reactor core. The experiment was designed to measure stratified flow in the inlet pipe connecting to the lower plenum of the General Atomics gas turbine–modular helium reactor (GT-MHR). Instead of helium and air, brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids, and water was used as the lighter fluid to create, using scaling laws, the appropriate flow characteristics of the lower plenum immediately after depressurization. These results clearly indicate that stratified flow is established even for very small density differences. Corresponding CFD results were validated with the experimental data. A grid sensitivity study on CFD models was also performed using the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for the numerical accuracy of CFD calculations. The calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that current CFD methods are suitable for simulating density gradient stratified flow phenomena in an air-ingress accident.

  13. Modeling isothermal and non-isothermal flows in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohseni Languri, Ehsan

    2011-12-01

    solutions obtained after applying the stress-continuity and stress-jump boundary conditions are found to work well at low porosities, which is in contradiction with the results achieved earlier by other researchers. The traditional approach of using averaged equations in the regions of sharp gradients in porous media to describe flow and transport is theoretically untenable and perhaps inaccurate. A novel ensemble averaging method is being proposed to test the accuracy of the volume averaged or smoothed description of flows in porous media in the regions of sharp gradients. In the new method, the flow in a certain arrangement of particles (called a realization) is averaged using a small unit cell, much smaller than the REV. Then such an averaged flow variable is further averaged over a whole gamut of randomly-generated particle realizations. First the accuracy of the ensemble averaging method was tested by comparing the permeability of an artificially generated porous medium obtained by the proposed method against the permeability predicted by some established theoretical models of permeability. The proposed method was found to be quite accurate. Later the ensemble average method was applied to the open-channel porous-medium interface region characterized by a sharp gradient in the flow velocities. It was discovered that the volume averaged description of such flows, characterized by the use of the Brinkman equation along with the stress-continuity and stress-jump conditions, is quite accurate for a range of Reynolds numbers. The non-isothermal transport during flow in porous media is examined next. The main focus in this area of research is the thermal dispersion term found in the heat transfer equation for single- and dual-scale porous media. Most of the previous efforts on modeling the heat transfer phenomena in porous media were devoted to isotropic porous media. However, for the anisotropic porous media widely in many industrial applications, not much research on the

  14. Water vapor sorption hysteresis of ceramic bricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koronthalyova, Olga

    2016-07-01

    A quantification of the hysteretic effects and their thorough analysis was carried out for three types of ceramic bricks. Water vapor adsorption/desorption isotherms were measured by the standard desiccator method. The desorption measurements were carried out from capillary moisture content as well as from equilibrium moisture content corresponding to the relative humidity of 98 %. For all three tested types of bricks the hysteretic effects were present but their significance differed depending on the particular type of brick. Significant differences were noticed also in desorption curves determined from capillary moisture content and from equilibrium moisture content corresponding to the relative humidity of 98 %. Based on the measured data a possible correlation between pore structure parameters and noticed hysteretic effects as well as relevance of the open pore model are discussed. The obtained adsorption/desorption curves were approximated by an analytical relation.

  15. Isotherm ranking and selection using thirteen literature datasets involving hydrophobic organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matott, L. Shawn; Jiang, Zhengzheng; Rabideau, Alan J.; Allen-King, Richelle M.

    2015-06-01

    Numerous isotherm expressions have been developed for describing sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), including "dual-mode" approaches that combine nonlinear behavior with a linear partitioning component. Choosing among these alternative expressions for describing a given dataset is an important task that can significantly influence subsequent transport modeling and/or mechanistic interpretation. In this study, a series of numerical experiments were undertaken to identify "best-in-class" isotherms by refitting 10 alternative models to a suite of 13 previously published literature datasets. The corrected Akaike Information Criterion (AICc) was used for ranking these alternative fits and distinguishing between plausible and implausible isotherms for each dataset. The occurrence of multiple plausible isotherms was inversely correlated with dataset "richness", such that datasets with fewer observations and/or a narrow range of aqueous concentrations resulted in a greater number of plausible isotherms. Overall, only the Polanyi-partition dual-mode isotherm was classified as "plausible" across all 13 of the considered datasets, indicating substantial statistical support consistent with current advances in sorption theory. However, these findings are predicated on the use of the AICc measure as an unbiased ranking metric and the adoption of a subjective, but defensible, threshold for separating plausible and implausible isotherms.

  16. Isothermal and non-isothermal torrefaction characteristics and kinetics of microalga Scenedesmus obliquus CNW-N.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Wu, Zih-Ying; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2014-03-01

    Isothermal and non-isothermal torrefaction characteristics and kinetics of microalga Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) CNW-N are studied using thermogravimetric analysis. The pyrolysis of S. obliquus CNW-N with increasing temperature is characterized by four-stage decomposition. Depending on the torrefaction temperature, light, mild, and severe torrefaction from the weight loss and the maximum decomposition rate of the microalga can be classified. Under the same average temperature and torrefaction duration, non-isothermal torrefaction gives more severe pretreatment than the isothermal one. Increasing the heating rate of non-isothermal torrefaction also intensifies the pretreatment severity. Therefore, microalgae can be torrefied via non-isothermal torrefaction in a shorter time under the same pretreatment extent. The atomic H/C ratio in the microalga decreases with increasing torrefaction severity, whereas the atomic O/C ratio rises. The analysis suggests that the activation energy of isothermal torrefaction is 57.52×10(3)Jmol(-1), while it is between 40.14×10(3) and 88.41×10(3)Jmol(-1) for non-isothermal torrefaction.

  17. Isothermal solidification in a binary alloy melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laxmanan, V.

    1988-01-01

    A space shuttle experiment employing the General Purpose (Rocket) Furnace (GPF) in its isothermal mode of operation is manifested on MSL-3, circa 1989. The central aim of this experiment is to investigate the effect of reduced gravity levels on the segregation behavior in a slowly, and isothermally, cooled sample of a binary Pb-15 wt percent Sn alloy. This experiment would thus be able to simulate, in a small laboratory sample, about 20 mm dia 60 mm high and weighing about 150 grams, some aspects of the segregation phenomena occurring in large industrial ingots. Ground-based experiments conducted in the single-cavity simulator of the GPF, located at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), in support of the microgravity experiment are described in detail. The results of the MSFC experiments are compared with other related experiments conducted at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), wherein the isothermal constraints were relaxed.

  18. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  19. Characterization of nitrogen adsorption isotherms of thermally-treated organoclays using multifractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lado, Marcos; Borisover, Mikhail; Paz-Gonzalez, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Nitrogen adsorption isotherms of soils have been reported to exhibit multifractal behavior. In the present work, multifractal analysis is used to characterize changes in N2 adsorption isotherms of organoclays prepared with different cations and exposed to various thermal treatments. Wyoming bentonite was exchanged with benzyltrimethylammonium (BTMA-clay), tetraethylammonium (TEA-clay), and hexadecyltrimethylammonium exchanged at 41 and 90% of the cation exchange capacity of the clay (HDTMA41- and HDTMA90-clay). The resulting organoclays were exposed to temperatures ranging from 25 to 420°C during two hours, freeze-dried, and N2 adsorption isotherms were measured at 77°K. The obtained isotherms showed multifractal behavior, and parameters derived from Rényi and singularity spectra varied with changes in the organic cation and the treatment temperature. The type of cation was the dominant factor responsible for changes in spectra, and significant interactions were observed between type of cation and temperature for several parameters. Significant correlations were found between organic carbon content and multifractal parameters, indicating a relation between changes in N2 sorption sites and thermal transformations of the organic cations. Significant correlations were also found between some multifractal parameters and the heterogeneity exponent of a Freundlich model fitted to nitrobenzene isotherms measured in the organoclays, suggesting that multifractal analysis of N2 adsorption isotherms could be useful to analyze the heterogeneity of sorption sites when sorption determinations yield a limited amount of data.

  20. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications. PMID:26655185

  1. A microfabrication-based approach to quantitative isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Jia, Yuan; Lin, Qiao

    2016-04-15

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) directly measures heat evolved in a chemical reaction to determine equilibrium binding properties of biomolecular systems. Conventional ITC instruments are expensive, use complicated design and construction, and require long analysis times. Microfabricated calorimetric devices are promising, although they have yet to allow accurate, quantitative ITC measurements of biochemical reactions. This paper presents a microfabrication-based approach to integrated, quantitative ITC characterization of biomolecular interactions. The approach integrates microfabricated differential calorimetric sensors with microfluidic titration. Biomolecules and reagents are introduced at each of a series of molar ratios, mixed, and allowed to react. The reaction thermal power is differentially measured, and used to determine the thermodynamic profile of the biomolecular interactions. Implemented in a microdevice featuring thermally isolated, well-defined reaction volumes with minimized fluid evaporation as well as highly sensitive thermoelectric sensing, the approach enables accurate and quantitative ITC measurements of protein-ligand interactions under different isothermal conditions. Using the approach, we demonstrate ITC characterization of the binding of 18-Crown-6 with barium chloride, and the binding of ribonuclease A with cytidine 2'-monophosphate within reaction volumes of approximately 0.7 µL and at concentrations down to 2mM. For each binding system, the ITC measurements were completed with considerably reduced analysis times and material consumption, and yielded a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction in agreement with published data. This demonstrates the potential usefulness of our approach for biomolecular characterization in biomedical applications.

  2. Performance Characteristics of an Isothermal Freeze Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Hailey, A.E.

    2001-08-22

    This document discusses performance characteristics of an isothermal freeze valve. A freeze valve has been specified for draining the DWPF melter at the end of its lifetime. Two freeze valve designs have been evaluated on the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 (SCM-2). In order to size the DWPF freeze valve, the basic principles governing freeze valve behavior need to be identified and understood.

  3. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  4. Cosolvent effects on sorption isotherm linearity.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Dermont C

    2002-06-01

    Sorption-desorption hysteresis, slow desorption kinetics, and other nonideal phenomena have been attributed to the differing sorptive characteristics of the natural organic polymers associated with soils and sediments. In this study, aqueous and mixed solvent systems were used to investigate the effects of a cosolvent, methanol, on sorption isotherm linearity with natural organic matter (NOM), and to evaluate whether these results support, or weaken, the rubbery/glassy polymer conceptualization of NOM. All of the sorption isotherms displayed some nonlinear character. Our data indicates that all of the phenanthrene and atrazine isotherms were nonlinear up to the highest equilibrium solution concentration to solute solubility in water or cosolvent ratios (Ce/Sw,c) used, approximately 0.018 and 0.070, respectively. Isotherm linearity was also observed to increase with volumetric methanol content (fc). This observation is consistent with the NOM rubbery/glassy polymer conceptualization: the presence of methanol in NOM increased isotherm linearity as do solvents in synthetic polymers, and suggests that methanol is interacting with the NOM, enhancing its homogeneity as a sorptive phase so that sorption is less bimodal as fc increases. When the equilibrium solution concentration was normalized for solute solubility in water or methanol-water solutions, greater relative sorption magnitude was observed for the methanol-water treatments. This observation, in conjunction with the faster sorption kinetics observed in the methanol-water sediment column systems, indicates that the increase in relative sorption magnitude with fc may be attributed to the faster sorption kinetics in the methanol-water systems, and hence, greater relative sorptive uptake for the rubbery polymer fraction of NOM at similar time scales.

  5. Determination of low levels of amorphous content in inhalation grade lactose by moisture sorption isotherms.

    PubMed

    Vollenbroek, Jasper; Hebbink, Gerald A; Ziffels, Susanne; Steckel, Hartwig

    2010-08-16

    Alpha-lactose monohydrate is widely used as an excipient in dry powder inhalers, and plays a very important role in the efficiency of the drug delivery. Due to the processing, low levels of amorphous lactose could be present in the blends. Varying amounts could have a strong effect on the efficiency of drug delivery of the powder blends. Therefore, the accurate measurement of low levels of amorphous lactose content is very important. A new method was developed to measure the amorphous content, based on dynamic vapour sorption (DVS). In contrast to the traditional re-crystallization approach of amorphous lactose, the new method is based on moisture sorption isotherms. Moisture sorption isotherms of blends of crystalline alpha-lactose and freeze-dried or spray-dried amorphous lactose were measured. By fitting the data with a Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) isotherm, a linear correlation was found between measured and actual amorphous content for the whole range of 0.1-100%. Differences between freeze-dried and spray-dried lactose, due to different molecular arrangements, could be removed by a preconditioning the samples at 35% RH prior to the isotherm measurement. It was shown that accurate determination of very low concentrations of amorphous lactose content is possible using moisture sorption isotherm analyses. PMID:20493937

  6. Pyrolysis kinetics of coking coal mixed with biomass under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ha Myung; Seo, Myung Won; Jeong, Sang Mun; Na, Byung Ki; Yoon, Sang Jun; Lee, Jae Goo; Lee, Woon Jae

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the kinetic characteristics of coking coal mixed with biomass during pyrolysis, thermogravimetric (TG) and thermo-balance reactor (TBR) analyses were conducted under non-isothermal and isothermal condition. Yellow poplar as a biomass (B) was mixed with weak coking coal (WC) and hard coking coal (HC), respectively. The calculated activation energies of WC/B blends were higher than those of HC/B blends under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions. The coal/biomass blends show increased reactivity and decreased activation energy with increasing biomass blend ratio, regardless of the coking properties of the coal. The different char structures of the WC/B and HC/B blends were analyzed by BET and SEM.

  7. Isotherms for adsorption of cellobiohydrolase I and II from Trichoderma reesei on microcrystalline cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Medve, J.; Tjerneld, F.; Stahlberg, J.

    1997-04-01

    Adsorption to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) of pure cellobiohydrolase I and II (CBH I and CBH II) from Trichoderma reesei has been studied. Adsorption isotherms of the enzymes were measured at 4{degree}C using CBH I and CBH II alone and in reconstituted equimolar mixtures. Several models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Jovanovic) were tested to describe the experimental adsorption isotherms. The isotherms did not follow the basic (one site) Langmuir equation that has often been used to describe adsorption isotherms of cellulases; correlation coefficients (R{sup 2}) were only 0.926 and 0.947, for CBH I and II, respectively. The experimental isotherms were best described by a model of Langmuir type with two adsorption sites and by a combined Langmuir-Freundlich model (analogous to the Hill equation); using these models the correlation coefficients were in most cases higher than 0.995. Apparent binding parameters derived from the two sites Langmuir model indicated stronger binding of CBH II compared to CBH I; the distribution coefficients were 20.7 and 3.7 L/g for the two enzymes, respectively. The binding capacity was higher for CBH I than for CBH II. The isotherms when analyzed with the combined model indicated presence of unequal binding sites on cellulose and/or negative cooperativity in the binding of the enzyme molecules. 39 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. USING ISOTHERMS TO PREDICT GAC'S CAPACITY FOR SYNTHETIC ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This investigation involved operating a pilot granular activated carbon (GAC) plant to obtain capacity data under typical field conditions, determining isotherms for selected synthetic organic chemicals, and comparing the capacity predicted by the isotherm data with the pilot-pla...

  9. Thermistor based, low velocity isothermal, air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrita, Admésio A. C. M.; Mendes, Ricardo; Quintela, Divo A.

    2016-03-01

    The semiconductor thermistor technology is applied as a flow sensor to measure low isothermal air velocities (<2 ms-1). The sensor is subjected to heating and cooling cycles controlled by a multifunctional timer. In the heating stage, the alternating current of a main AC power supply source guarantees a uniform thermistor temperature distribution. The conditioning circuit assures an adequate increase of the sensors temperature and avoids the thermal disturbance of the flow. The power supply interruption reduces the consumption from the source and extends the sensors life time. In the cooling stage, the resistance variation of the flow sensor is recorded by the measuring chain. The resistive sensor parameters proposed vary significantly and feature a high sensitivity to the flow velocity. With the aid of a computer, the data transfer, storage and analysis provides a great advantage over the traditional local anemometer readings. The data acquisition chain has a good repeatability and low standard uncertainties. The proposed method measures isothermal air mean velocities from 0.1 ms-1 to 2 ms-1 with a standard uncertainty error less than 4%.

  10. A Graphite Absorbed-Dose Calorimeter in the Quasi-Isothermal Mode of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzani, J.; Duftschmid, K. E.; Strachotinsky, Ch; Leitner, A.

    1984-01-01

    A quasi-isothermal method of operating an absorbed-dose graphite calorimeter is described in theory and practice. In contrast with the well-known quasi-adiabatic operation, which entails temperature increases during measurements, in the quasi-isothermal mode the temperatures of the different graphite bodies remain constant except for small temperature drifts throughout the measurement. This implies that the temperature dependence of the specific heat of the absorber and of the sensitivity of the temperature sensor influence the absorbed-dose determination significantly less. The method is characterized by a power-compensating measuring principle which is illustrated with a 3-body graphite calorimeter. Comparisons of the quasi-isothermal with the quasi-adiabatic method of operation showed good agreement.

  11. Measuring surface dynamics of biomolecules by total internal reflection fluorescence with photobleaching recovery or correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, N L; Burghardt, T P; Axelrod, D

    1981-03-01

    The theoretical basis of a new technique for measuring equilibrium adsorption/desorption kinetics and surface diffusion of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules at solid surfaces has been developed. The technique combines total internal reflection fluorescence (TIR) with either fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A laser beam totally internally reflects at a solid/liquid interface; the shallow evanescent field in the liquid excites the fluorescence of surface adsorbed molecules. In TIR/FPR, adsorbed molecules are bleaching by a flash of the focused laser beam; subsequent fluorescence recovery is monitored as bleached molecules exchange with unbleached ones from the solution or surrounding nonilluminated regions of the surface. In TIR/FCS, spontaneous fluorescence fluctuations due to individual molecules entering and leaving a well-defined portion of the evanescent field are autocorrelated. Under appropriate experimental conditions, the rate constants and surface diffusion coefficient can be readily obtained from the TIR/FPR and TIR/FCS curves. In general, the shape of the theoretical TIR/FPR and TIR/FCS curves depends in a complex manner upon the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the size of the iluminated or observed region, and the adsorption/desorption/kinetic rate constants. The theory can be applied both to specific binding between immobilized receptors and soluble ligands, and to nonspecific adsorption processes. A discussion of experimental considerations and the application of this technique to the adsorption of serum proteins on quartz may be found in the accompanying paper (Burghardt and Axelrod. 1981. Biophys. J. 33:455). PMID:7225515

  12. A phaseguided passive batch microfluidic mixing chamber for isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Hakenberg, Sydney; Hügle, Matthias; Weidmann, Manfred; Hufert, Frank; Dame, Gregory; Urban, Gerald A

    2012-11-01

    With a view to developing a rapid pathogen detection system utilizing isothermal nucleic acid amplification, the necessary micro-mixing step is innovatively implemented on a chip. Passive laminar flow mixing of two 6.5 μl batches differing in viscosity is performed within a microfluidic chamber. This is achieved with a novel chip space-saving phaseguide design which allows, for the first time, the complete integration of a passive mixing structure into a target chamber. Sequential filling of batches prior to mixing is demonstrated. Simulation predicts a reduction of diffusive mixing time from hours down to one minute. A simple and low-cost fabrication method is used which combines dry film resist technology and direct wafer bonding. Finally, an isothermal nucleic acid detection assay is successfully implemented where fluorescence results are measured directly from the chip after a one minute mixing sequence. In combination with our previous work, this opens up the way towards a fully integrated pathogen detection system in a lab-on-a-chip format. PMID:22952055

  13. Characterization of protein-protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Leavitt, Stephanie A; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of protein-protein interactions has attracted the attention of many researchers from both a fundamental point of view and a practical point of view. From a fundamental point of view, the development of an understanding of the signaling events triggered by the interaction of two or more proteins provides key information to elucidate the functioning of many cell processes. From a practical point of view, understanding protein-protein interactions at a quantitative level provides the foundation for the development of antagonists or agonists of those interactions. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique with the capability of measuring not only binding affinity but the enthalpic and entropic components that define affinity. Over the years, isothermal titration calorimeters have evolved in sensitivity and accuracy. Today, TA Instruments and MicroCal market instruments with the performance required to evaluate protein-protein interactions. In this methods paper, we describe general procedures to analyze heterodimeric (porcine pancreatic trypsin binding to soybean trypsin inhibitor) and homodimeric (bovine pancreatic α-chymotrypsin) protein associations by ITC.

  14. Equilibrium Sequences and Gravitational Instability of Rotating Isothermal Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woong-Tae; Moon, Sanghyuk

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear rings at the centers of barred galaxies exhibit strong star formation activities. They are thought to undergo gravitational instability when they are sufficiently massive. We approximate them as rigidly rotating isothermal objects and investigate their gravitational instability. Using a self-consistent field method, we first construct their equilibrium sequences specified by two parameters: α corresponding to the thermal energy relative to gravitational potential energy, and {\\widehat{R}}{{B}} measuring the ellipticity or ring thickness. Unlike in the incompressible case, not all values of {\\widehat{R}}{{B}} yield an isothermal equilibrium, and the range of {\\widehat{R}}{{B}} for such equilibria shrinks with decreasing α. The density distributions in the meridional plane are steeper for smaller α, and well approximated by those of infinite cylinders for slender rings. We also calculate the dispersion relations of non-axisymmetric modes in rigidly rotating slender rings with angular frequency Ω0 and central density {ρ }c. Rings with smaller α are found more unstable with a larger unstable range of the azimuthal mode number. The instability is completely suppressed by rotation when Ω0 exceeds the critical value. The critical angular frequency is found to be almost constant at ∼ 0.7{(G{ρ }c)}1/2 for α ≳ 0.01 and increases rapidly for smaller α. We apply our results to a sample of observed star-forming rings and confirm that rings without a noticeable azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters are indeed gravitationally unstable.

  15. ISOTHERMAL AND MULTITHERMAL ANALYSIS OF CORONAL LOOPS OBSERVED WITH AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Worley, B. T.; Anderson, D. J.; Pathak, S.; Kimble, J. A.

    2011-04-10

    The coronal filters in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory peak at different temperatures; the series covers the entire active region temperature range, making AIA ideal for multithermal analysis. Here, we analyze coronal loops from several active regions that have been observed by AIA. We have specifically targeted cool loops (or at least loops with a cool component) that were chosen in the 171 A channel of AIA, which has a peak response temperature of log T = 5.8. We wanted to determine if the loops could be described as isothermal or multithermal. We find that several of our 12 loops have narrow temperature distributions, which may be consistent with isothermal plasma; these can be modeled with a single flux tube. Other loops have intermediate-width temperature distributions, appear well-constrained, and should be multi-stranded. The remaining loops, however, have unrealistically broad differential emission measures. We find that this problem is the result of missing low-temperature lines in the AIA 131 A channel. If we repeat the analysis without the 131 A data, these loops also appear to be well-constrained and multi-stranded.

  16. Isothermal compressibility of amino alcohols in the pressure range from 0.1 to 300 MPa at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodnikova, M. N.; Troitskii, V. M.; Solonina, I. A.; Shirokova, E. V.; Kraevskii, S. V.

    2015-01-01

    The isothermal compressibilities of three amino alcohols are measured on a unique setup for direct compression in the pressure range of 0.1 to 300 MPa at 298 K. The lowest baric dependence of isothermal compressibility is found for 3-amino-1-propanol, while 2-amino-1-butanol is characterized by the highest isothermal compressibility. The crystallization of 4-amino-1-butanol is observed at pressures of 200-250 MPa. The resulting data are discussed from the viewpoint of the stability of spatial hydrogen bond networks in amino alcohols and are compared to the similar dependences of liquid diols.

  17. Isothermal and non-isothermal viscoelastic flow of PTT fluid in lid-driven polar cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercan, Hatice; Atalık, Kunt

    2012-12-01

    The isothermal and non-isothermal viscoelastic flow of Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) fluids is considered in liddriven polar cavity geometry, using a numerical solution method with parameter continuation technique. Thermoelastic effects, in terms of elastic/elongational effects and viscous dissipation, are demonstrated by the changes in vortical structure, temperature/stress distributions and heat transfer characteristics in the curved cavity. Central vortex/maximum temperature location shifts are observed under elastic and elongational (strain hardening and strain softening/shear thinning) effects for isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The growth in size and strength of a secondary vortex is denoted in the downstream stationary corner of the cavity for the viscoelastic fluid under strain hardening, which also introduces an increase in stress gradients. Viscous heating is observed with elongational effects near the central vortex in the cavity. Stress components and their gradients decrease under viscous dissipation. The changes in temperature field and heat transfer properties in the cavity are revealed.

  18. Numerical Model for Isothermal and Non-Isothermal Crystallization of Liquids and Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.

    1993-01-01

    A new numerical model of isothermal and non-isothermal first order phase transformations, such as the crystallization of liquids and glasses, is presented. This model computes directly the volume fraction transformed, taking into account time-dependent nucleation rates and cluster-size-dependent growth velocities. The model is applied to the crystallization of lithium disilicate glass, using the appropriate kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. The model is used (1) to determine the validity of common methods for computing the volume fraction transformed as a function of time in isothermal experiments when a time-dependent nucleation rate is expected, (2) to simulate non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies of glass devitrification as a function of scan rate, and (3) to compute the effect of preannealing on the DSC peak parameters. A novel behavior of the nucleation rate with scan rate is predicted, arising because the relaxation of the cluster distribution cannot be described by a single relaxation time. Comparisons of the calculations with experimental data on this glass demonstrate the validity of the model.

  19. XRMON-SOL: Isothermal equiaxed solidification of a grain refined Al-20 wt%Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Houltz, Y.; Li, J.; Lockowandt, C.; Henriksson, K.; Zimmermann, G.; Melville, N.; Browne, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A novel isothermal solidification furnace (XRMON-SOL) has been developed for operation under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, using aluminium-based alloys, in conjunction with real-time in situ X-radiography. The furnace is scheduled to fly on board the MASER 13 Sounding Rocket with a view to investigating isothermal equiaxed solidification under microgravity conditions. The present work provides details of the furnace design as well as detailed analysis of pre-flight terrestrial solidification experiments investigating nucleation and growth characteristics of a thin sample of grain refined Al-20 wt%Cu alloy isothermally solidified at a constant cooling rate of -0.05 K/s. Measurements of nucleation density, nucleation undercooling, grain orientation, grain envelope evolution, primary tip growth velocities, and equiaxed grain interactions are provided. Although the effects of gravity were minimised by choice of sample orientation, we show that such effects can only be eliminated in a microgravity environment.

  20. A Simple Rate Law Experiment Using a Custom-Built Isothermal Heat Conduction Calorimeter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Xi.

    2008-01-01

    Most processes (whether physical, chemical, or biological) produce or consume heat: measuring thermal power (the heat production rate) is therefore a typical method of studying processes. Here we describe the design of a simple isothermal heat conduction calorimeter built for use in teaching; we also provide an example of its use in simultaneously…

  1. Isothermal Analysis of the Crystallization Kinetics in Lithium Disilicate Glass using Trans Temp Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuss, T.; Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics for lithium disilicate, Li2O2SiO2, (LS2) glass has been studied extensively by nonisothermal methods, but only a few studies on the isothermal crystallization kinetics of LS2 are available. In the present research, isothermal crystallization experiments or the LS2 glass were conducted in a Trans Temp furnace between 600 and 635 C, and selected properties such as the activation energy for crystallization (E), crystal growth index or Avrami parameter (n), the concentration of quenched-in nuclei in the starting glass (Ni) and the crystal nucleation rate (I) were measured. The crystal nucleation rate (I) was measured at only one selected temperature of 452 C, at this time. This commercial furnace has a 13 cm long isothermal heating zone (+/- 1 C) that allows precise heat treatment of relatively large samples. By placing a thermocouple within approx. 2 mm of the sample, it was possible to detect the heat of crystallization in the form of an isothermal crystallization exotherm during isothermal heat treatment of the sample. The values of E (318 plus or minus 10 kJ/mol), n (3.6 plus or minus 0.l), and N(sub i) (1.6 x 10(exp l2) m(sup -3)) calculated by analyzing these isotherms using the standard Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation were reproducible and in agreement with the literature values. The value of I, 1.9 x 10(exp 10) m(sup -3) s(sup -1) at 452 C, is an order of magnitude higher than the reported value for LS2.

  2. Statistical Design in Isothermal Aging of Polyimide Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, James K.; Jobe, Marcus; Crane, Elizabeth A.

    1995-01-01

    Recent developments in research on polyimides for high temperature applications have led to the synthesis of many new polymers. Among the criteria that determines their thermal oxidative stability, isothermal aging is one of the most important. Isothermal aging studies require that many experimental factors are controlled to provide accurate results. In this article we describe a statistical plan that compares the isothermal stability of several polyimide resins, while minimizing the variations inherent in high-temperature aging studies.

  3. Hydrogen isotherms for LaNi(sub 4.6)M(sub .04)alloys where M=Group 4A elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, S.; Flanagan, T. B.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen isotherms have been measured for activated LaNi(sub 4.6)M(sub 0.4) alloys from 300 K to 473 K or 493 K, where M= Si, Ge, Sn. Thermodynamic parameters have been obtained from the isotherms using van't Hoff plots for hydride decomposition.

  4. Capillarity in isothermal infiltration of alumina fiber preforms with aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A. . Dept. of Materials Science); Compton, L.M. )

    1994-10-01

    Models derived in petroleum engineering and soil science for flow of two immiscible fluids in a porous medium are extended to the infiltration of ceramic preforms by a liquid metal. SAFFIL alumina fiber preforms are infiltrated with an aluminum matrix in a series of interrupted unidirectional and isothermal experiments at various low applied pressures, to measure profiles of the volume fraction of metal along the length of the preforms. Comparison of experimental data with theory reveals the existence of a pressure-dependent incubation time for wetting of the alumina preforms by molten aluminum at 973 K. If this incubation time is taken into account, experimental curves of metal distribution are well predicted by theory, confirming the validity of the models after initiation of flow.

  5. Isothermal titration calorimetry of ion-coupled membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Boudker, Olga; Oh, SeCheol

    2015-04-01

    Binding of ligands, ranging from proteins to ions, to membrane proteins is associated with absorption or release of heat that can be detected by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Such measurements not only provide binding affinities but also afford direct access to thermodynamic parameters of binding--enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity. These parameters can be interpreted in a structural context, allow discrimination between different binding mechanisms and guide drug design. In this review, we introduce advantages and limitations of ITC as a methodology to study molecular interactions of membrane proteins. We further describe case studies where ITC was used to analyze thermodynamic linkage between ions and substrates in ion-coupled transporters. Similar type of linkage analysis will likely be applicable to a wide range of transporters, channels, and receptors.

  6. Adsorption, desorption and mobility of cyfluthrin in three Malaysian tropical soils of different textures.

    PubMed

    Lsmail, B S; Choo, Lee Yin; Salmijah, S; Halimah, M; Tayeb, M A

    2015-09-01

    The sorption and desorption of cyfluthrin mixture isomers were determined using batch equilibration method and mobility was studied under laboratory conditions, using packed soil column. The soil types used in the study were clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam obtained from three tomato farms in Cameron Highlands. A low Freundlich adsorption distribution coefficient K(ads(f)) for cyfluthrin was observed for clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam soils (95.69, 21.64 and 8.99 l/kg, respectively). Results showed that cyfluthrin had high Freundlich organic matter (OM) distribution coefficient K(oc) values of 5799, 2278 and 1635 lkg(-1) for clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam soils, respectively. These values indicate that cyfluthrin is considered immobile in Malaysian soils with different textures, based on the value of K(oc) by McCall. Adsorption of cyfluthrin was significantly (P < 0.05) affected with soil pH, fertilizer NPK, organic matter content and temperature. It was observed that approximately 95.8%, 93.8% and 91.8% of the adsorbed cyfluthrin remained sorbed after four successive rinses for clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam soils. Soil column test showed that cyfluthrin was not detected in leachate. Cyfluthrin was detected in topsoil and its concentration decreased with depth. The downward movement of cyfluthrin in sandy clay loam soil was more than that in clay loam and clayey soils. Approximately, 80.9%, 77.8% and 67.3% cyfluthrin was observed at the depth of 0-5 cm (rainfall 350 mm) for clayey, clay loam and sandy clay loam soils respectively. Mobility of cyfluthrin showed that the percentage of cyfluthrin leached into soil was not affected by the amount of rainfall. The result clearly showed that cyfluthrin molecules were bound strongly to all the three Malaysian soil types. PMID:26521552

  7. Analysis of the ion adsorption-desorption characteristics of biofilm matrices.

    PubMed

    Kurniawan, Andi; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Tsuchiya, Yuki; Morisaki, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of biofilm polymers formed on stone surfaces in Lake Biwa and ion adsorption and desorption to and from these biofilms were investigated. The results indicated that both positively and negatively charged sites exist in the biofilm polymer. A physicochemical interaction between these sites and ions in the surrounding water seems to promote the adsorption of ions to the biofilm through an attractive electrostatic interaction and an ion-exchange mechanism. The results also indicated that, in comparison with ion-exchange resins, ions were more loosely bound to and desorbed more easily from the biofilm polymer. This suggests that microbes in the biofilm can readily use these ions as nutrient ions. Our present findings indicate that the biofilm may play an important role in supplying nutrient ions to microbes in the biofilm and in the development of a nutrient-rich environment within the biofilm through both ion adsorption and desorption. This study shows for the first time that the inside of a biofilm can be a sustainable environment for microbes. PMID:22673305

  8. Response properties in the adsorption-desorption model on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šćepanović, J. R.; Stojiljković, D.; Jakšić, Z. M.; Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Vrhovac, S. B.

    2016-06-01

    The out-of-equilibrium dynamical processes during the reversible random sequential adsorption (RSA) of objects of various shapes on a two-dimensional triangular lattice are studied numerically by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We focused on the influence of the order of symmetry axis of the shape on the response of the reversible RSA model to sudden perturbations of the desorption probability Pd. We provide a detailed discussion of the significance of collective events for governing the time coverage behavior of shapes with different rotational symmetries. We calculate the two-time density-density correlation function C(t ,tw) for various waiting times tw and show that longer memory of the initial state persists for the more symmetrical shapes. Our model displays nonequilibrium dynamical effects such as aging. We find that the correlation function C(t ,tw) for all objects scales as a function of single variable ln(tw) / ln(t) . We also study the short-term memory effects in two-component mixtures of extended objects and give a detailed analysis of the contribution to the densification kinetics coming from each mixture component. We observe the weakening of correlation features for the deposition processes in multicomponent systems.

  9. Adsorption/desorption of phosphorus on limestone from the Biscayne Aquifer under freshwater and seawater conditions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Areas of seawater intrusion are known geochemically active regions particularly in limestone aquifers, where carbonate mineral dissolution and ion exchange reactions are important. Both of these processes can lead to a release of phosphorus from the aquifer matrix to the groundwater as seawater int...

  10. Role of cell wall deconstructing enzymes in the proanthocyanidin-cell wall adsorption-desorption phenomena.

    PubMed

    Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; Ortega-Regules, Ana; Lozada, Daniel; Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén

    2016-04-01

    The transference of proanthocyanidins from grapes to wine is quite low. This could be due, among other causes, to proanthocyanidins being bound to grape cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations in the must. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from grapes will depend on the ability to disrupt these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the behavior of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions when commercial maceration enzymes are present in the solution. The results showed that cell wall polysaccharides adsorbed a high amount of proanthocyanidins and only a limited quantity of proanthocyanidins could be desorbed from the cell walls after washing with a model solution. The presence of enzymes in the solution reduced the proanthocyanidin-cell wall interaction, probably through the elimination of pectins from the cell wall network.

  11. ADSORPTION/DESORPTION HYSTERESIS IN ORGANIC POLLUTANT AND SOIL/SEDIMENT INTERACTION. (R825513C015)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Thermoreversible crystallization of charged colloids due to adsorption/desorption of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Murakado, Ai; Toyotama, Akiko; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Nagano, Ryota; Okuzono, Tohru; Yamanaka, Junpei

    2016-03-01

    We report that charged colloids exhibit thermoreversible crystallization via the adsorption of ionic surfactants onto particle surfaces. Due to the temperature dependence of the adsorption quantity, the colloids crystallized upon cooling and melted upon heating. To clarify the influences of surfactant adsorption on the crystallization, polystyrene (PS) particles dispersed in ethylene glycol (EG)/water mixtures were employed, enabling continuous tuning of the adsorption quantity by changing the EG concentration. The thermoreversible crystallization/melting behavior was found to be mainly attributable to changes in the ionic strength of the medium resulting from variation in the concentration of the non-adsorbed ionic surfactant molecules with temperature. We expect that the present findings will be useful for fine control of colloidal crystallization and the further study of colloidal crystallization in low permittivity media.

  13. Analysis and optimization of carbon nanotubes and graphene sensors based on adsorption-desorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sang-Zi; Chen, Gugang; Harutyunyan, Avetik R.; Cole, Milton W.; Sofo, Jorge O.

    2013-12-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes mats and graphene have shown great potential as gas sensors. We analyze NO adsorption/sensing experiments with the kinetic Langmuir model adapted to include adsorption sites from which the molecule does not desorb. The model reproduces the available experimental data. Its fitting parameters provide information on the microscopic phenomena governing adsorption, and variation of these parameters allows the optimization of the sensitivity, detection limit, and time response of the sensors. The result reveals an optimal operating temperature before thermal desorption becomes dominant at high temperature, the potential improvement of selectivity by tuning the gate voltage in a field effect transistor configuration, and quantifies the benefits of reducing the density of defects in the sensing materials.

  14. Protein adsorption, desorption, and aggregation mediated by solid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Perevozchikova, Tatiana; Nanda, Hirsh; Nesta, Douglas P; Roberts, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    Adsorption of proteins to solid-fluid interfaces is often empirically found to promote formation of soluble aggregates and larger, subvisible, and visible particles, but key stages in this process are often difficult to probe directly. Aggregation mediated by adsorption to water-silicon oxide (SiOx) interfaces, akin to hydrated glass surfaces, was characterized as a function of pH and ionic strength for alpha-chymotrypsinogen (aCgn) and for a monoclonal antibody (IgG1). A flow cell permitted neutron reflectivity for protein layers adsorbed to clean SiOx surfaces, as well as after successive "rinse" steps. Aggregates recovered in solution after gently "rinsing" the surface were characterized by neutron scattering, microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. IgG1 molecules oriented primarily "flat" against the SiOx surface, with the primary protein layer desorbed to a minimal extent, whereas a diffuse overlayer was easily rinsed off. aCgn molecules were resistant to desorption when they appeared to be unfolded at the interface, but were otherwise easily removed. For cases where strong binding occurred, protein that did desorb was a mixture of monomer and small amounts of HMW aggregates (for aCgn) or subvisible particles (for IgG1). Changes in adsorption and/or unfolding with pH indicated that electrostatic interactions were important in all cases.

  15. Flexible manipulation of microfluids using optically regulated adsorption/desorption of hydrophobic materials.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hidenori; Irie, Takashi; Takahashi, Junko; Wakida, Shin-ichi

    2007-04-15

    To realize highly integrated micro total analysis systems (microTAS), a simply controlled miniaturized valve should be utilized on microfluidic device. In this paper, we describe the application of photo-induced super-hydrophilicity of titanium dioxide (TiO2) to microfluidic manipulation. In addition, we found a new phenomenon for reversibly converting the surface wettability using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix and the photocatalytic properties of TiO2. While PDMS polymer was irradiated with UV, it was confirmed that hydrophobic material was released from the polymer to air. Several prepolymers were identified as the hydrophobic material with a gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer (GC/MS). Here, we successfully demonstrated the flexible manipulation of microfluid in a branched microchannel using the reversible wettability as micro opto-switching valve (MOS/V). The simultaneous control of MOS/Vs was also demonstrated on a 256-MOS/V integrated disk. The MOS/V promises to be one of the most effective flow switching valves for advanced applications in highly integrated micro/nano fluidics. PMID:17027249

  16. Isothermal aging of three polyurethane elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.

    1996-05-01

    Two polyurethane systems, EN-7 and L-100, have a long history as encapsulants and coatings in Sandia programs. These materials contain significant amounts of toluene diisocyanate (TDI), a suspect human carcinogen. As part of efforts to reduce the use of hazardous materials in the workplace, PET-90A, a polyurethane with less than 0.1% free TDI, was identified as a candidate for new applications and as a replacement for the more hazardous polyurethanes in selected programs. This report documents the results of a two-year accelerated aging study of PET-90A, EN-7, and L-100 polyurethane elastomers to characterize the effect of 135{degrees}F isothermal aging on selected physical, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. In general, there was very little change in properties over the two year period for the three elastomers. The largest changes occurred in EN-7, which is the polyurethane with the longest service history in Sandia applications.

  17. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - SCN Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to the crystals that form inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dentrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provid a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. These shadowgraphic images show succinonitrile (SCN) dentrites growing in a melt (liquid). The space-grown crystals also have cleaner, better defined sidebranches. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institude (RPI) and NASA/ Glenn Research Center(GRC). Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo gredit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  18. A family of lowered isothermal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieles, Mark; Zocchi, Alice

    2015-11-01

    We present a family of self-consistent, spherical, lowered isothermal models, consisting of one or more mass components, with parametrized prescriptions for the energy truncation and for the amount of radially biased pressure anisotropy. The models are particularly suited to describe the phase-space density of stars in tidally limited, mass-segregated star clusters in all stages of their life-cycle. The models extend a family of isotropic, single-mass models by Gomez-Leyton and Velazquez, of which the well-known Woolley, King and Wilson (in the non-rotating and isotropic limit) models are members. We derive analytic expressions for the density and velocity dispersion components in terms of potential and radius, and introduce a fast model solver in PYTHON (LIMEPY), that can be used for data fitting or for generating discrete samples.

  19. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  20. ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS OF SINGULAR ISOTHERMAL QUADRUPOLE LENS

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Zhe; Lin, W. P.; Yang Xiaofeng E-mail: linwp@shao.ac.cn

    2013-06-20

    Using an analytical method, we study the singular isothermal quadrupole (SIQ) lens system, which is the simplest lens model that can produce four images. In this case, the radial mass distribution is in accord with the profile of the singular isothermal sphere lens, and the tangential distribution is given by adding a quadrupole on the monopole component. The basic properties of the SIQ lens have been studied in this Letter, including the deflection potential, deflection angle, magnification, critical curve, caustic, pseudo-caustic, and transition locus. Analytical solutions of the image positions and magnifications for the source on axes are derived. We find that naked cusps will appear when the relative intensity k of quadrupole to monopole is larger than 0.6. According to the magnification invariant theory of the SIQ lens, the sum of the signed magnifications of the four images should be equal to unity, as found by Dalal. However, if a source lies in the naked cusp, the summed magnification of the left three images is smaller than the invariant 1. With this simple lens system, we study the situations where a point source infinitely approaches a cusp or a fold. The sum of the magnifications of the cusp image triplet is usually not equal to 0, and it is usually positive for major cusps while negative for minor cusps. Similarly, the sum of magnifications of the fold image pair is usually not equal to 0 either. Nevertheless, the cusp and fold relations are still equal to 0 in that the sum values are divided by infinite absolute magnifications by definition.

  1. Isothermal vapour flow in extremely dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, L. C.; Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.; Templeton, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    In dry soils hydraulic connectivity within the liquid water phase decreases and vapour flow becomes a significant transport mechanism for water. The temperature or solute concentration of the liquid phase affects the vapour pressure of the surrounding air, thus temperature or solute gradients can drive vapour flows. However, in extremely dry soils where water is retained by adsorptive forces rather than capillarity, vapour flows can also occur. In such soils tiny changes in water content significantly affect the equilibrium vapour pressure in the soil, and hence small differences in water content can initiate vapour pressure gradients. In many field conditions this effect may be negligible compared to vapour flows driven by other factors. However, flows of this type are particularly significant in a new type of subsurface irrigation system which uses pervaporation, via a polymer tubing, as the mechanism for water supply. In this system, water enters the soil in vapour phase. Experiments were performed in laboratory conditions using marine sand that had previously been oven dried and cooled. This dry sand was used to represent the desert conditions in which this irrigation system is intended for use. Experimental results show that isothermal vapour flows can significantly affect the performance of such irrigation systems due to the rapid transport of water through the soil via the vapour phase. When the irrigation pipe was buried at a depth of 10cm a vapour flow from the soil surface was observed in less than 2 hours. These flows therefore affect the loss of mass into the atmosphere and thus must be considered when evaluating the availability of water for the irrigated crop. The experiments also provide a rare opportunity to observe isothermal vapour flows initiating from a subsurface source. Such experiments allow the significance of these flows to be quantified and potentially applied to other areas of arid zone hydrology.

  2. Effects of temperature on trichloroethylene desorption from silica gel and natural sediments. 1. Isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Werth, C.J.; Reinhard, M.

    1997-03-01

    Aqueous phase isotherms were calculated from vapor phase desorption isotherms measured at 15, 30, and 60{degree}C for trichloroethylene on a silica gel, an aquifer sediment, a soil, a sand fraction, and a clay and silt fraction, all at 100% relative humidity. Isosteric heats of adsorption (Q{sub st}(q)) were calculated as a function of the sorbed concentration, q, and examined with respect to the following mechanisms: adsorption on water wet mineral surfaces, sorption in amorphous organic matter (AOM), and adsorption in hydrophobic micropores. Silica gel, sand fraction, and clay and silt fraction 60{degree}C isotherms are characterized by a Freundlich region and a region at very low concentrations where isotherm points deviate from log-log linear behavior. The latter is designated the non-Freundlich region. For the silica gel, values of Q{sub st}(q) (9.5-45 kJ/mol) in both regions are consistent with adsorption in hydrophobic micropores. For the natural solids, values of Q{sub st}(q) in the Freundlich regions are less than or equal to zero and are consistent with sorption on water wet mineral surfaces and in AOM. In the non-Freundlich regions, diverging different temperature isotherms with decreasing q and Q{sub st}(q) value of 34 kJ/mol for the clay and silt fraction suggest that adsorption is occurring in hydrophobic micropores. The General Adsorption Isotherm is used to capture this adsorption heterogeneity. 57 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Multiscale analysis of nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms in soils developed over sandstone and basic parent materials with contrasting texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Marinho, Mara de A.; de Abreu, Cleide A.

    2014-05-01

    Mono- and multifractal analysis of soil nitrogen adsorption isotherms (NAI) have been proven to be useful, allowing a better characterization of soil surface properties and soil porous system. Multiscale analysis of nitrogen desorption isotherms (NDI), which was less frequently performed, can also provide very valuable information. The multifractal theory was used to analyse both soil adsorption and desorption isotherms from soils developed over contrasting parent material and with different texture. We sampled 32 soil horizons from 6 soil profiles in neighbouring sites from São Paulo State, Brazil. Three of the profiles, developed over sandstone, were sandy loam or loamy, whereas the other three profiles, developed over weathered sediments or basic parent material, were clayey textured. Soil specific surface area (SSA) varied, from about 3.0 to 46 m2 g-1. Surface parameters showed a strong correlation with clay content, but they were not correlated with cation exchange capacity (CEC). The scaling properties of both nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms from all the studied soil horizons could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. Multifractal parameters from NAIs and NDIs showed great differences. The singularity spectra, f(α) of the desorption isotherms had an asymmetrically long left part and its asymmetry was in general higher compared with adsorption isotherms. Moreover, adsorption isotherms behaved like more clustered measures, showing lower entropy dimension, D1, smaller correlation dimension, D2, and higher heterogeneity than desorption isotherms. Differences in multifractal behaviour of NAIs and NDIs had been proven to be mainly related to the characteristics of the hysteretic loop measured at high relative pressures. Several multifractal parameters extracted from NAIs and NDIs also distinguished between sandy-loam and loam soils and clayey soils. Multifractal parameters calculated from NAIs and NDIs provide new insight to assess

  4. Financial Statement Audit Report of Isothermal Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Ralph

    This report presents the results of the Isothermal Community College financial statement audit for the fiscal year ending on June 30, 1998. Isothermal Community College is a component of the State of North Carolina, thus the authority to audit is granted by Article 5A of G.S. 147. The accounts and operations of the institution were subject to…

  5. Densities, isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X.; Zhang, Q. M.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Ding, Y. Y.; Zhou, L.; Cao, J.

    2015-05-01

    We report the measurements of the densities of linear alkylbenzene at three temperatures over 4 to 23 °C with pressures up to 10 MPa. The measurements have been analysed to yield the isobaric thermal expansion coefficients and, so far for the first time, isothermal compressibilities of linear alkylbenzene. Relevance of results for current generation (i.e., Daya Bay) and next generation (i.e. JUNO) large liquid scintillator neutrino detectors are discussed.

  6. Non-isothermal decomposition kinetics of diosgenin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fei-xiong; Fu, Li; Feng, Lu; Liu, Chuo-chuo; Ren, Bao-zeng

    2013-10-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of isothermal decomposition of diosgenin were studied by thermogravimetry (TG) and Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). The activation energy of the thermal decomposition process was determined from the analysis of TG curves by the methods of Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger, respectively. The mechanism of thermal decomposition was determined to be Avrami-Erofeev equation ( n = 1/3, n is the reaction order) with integral form G(α) = [-ln(1 - α)]1/3 (α = 0.10-0.80). E a and log A [s-1] were determined to be 44.10 kJ mol-1 and 3.12, respectively. Moreover, the thermodynamics properties of Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, and Δ G ≠ of this reaction were 38.18 kJ mol-1, -199.76 J mol-1 K-1, and 164.36 kJ mol-1 in the stage of thermal decomposition.

  7. Adsorption isotherm special study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-05-01

    The study was designed to identify methods to determine adsorption applicable to Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, and to determine how changes in aquifer conditions affect metal adsorption, resulting retardation factors, and estimated contaminant migration rates. EPA and ASTM procedures were used to estimate sediment sorption of U, As, and Mo under varying groundwater geochemical conditions. Aquifer matrix materials from three distinct locations at the DOE UMTRA Project site in Rifle, CO, were used as the adsorbents under different pH conditions; these conditions stimulated geochemical environments under the tailings, near the tailings, and downgradient from the tailings. Grain size, total surface area, bulk and clay mineralogy, and petrography of the sediments were characterized. U and Mo yielded linear isotherms, while As had nonlinear ones. U and Mo were adsorbed strongly on sediments acidified to levels similar to tailings leachate. Changes in pH had much less effect on As adsorption. Mo was adsorbed very little at pH 7-7.3, U was weakly sorbed, and As was moderately sorbed. Velocities were estimated for metal transport at different pHs. Results show that the aquifer materials must be characterized to estimate metal transport velocities in aquifers and to develop groundwater restoration strategies for the UMTRA project.

  8. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  9. Material Compatibility with Isothermal Pb-Li

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Walker, Larry R; Unocic, Kinga A

    2012-01-01

    Eutectic Pb-Li is a leading candidate for current fusion blanket concepts as a coolant. However, there is very little data about the compatibility of most materials with Pb-Li above 500 C where the dissolution rate of many conventional alloys increases rapidly. Current work is beginning to assess Pb-Li compatibility from 500 to 800 C using isothermal capsule experiments. Aluminide coatings hold some promise in protecting conventional Fe-base alloys at 600-700 C. However, there is a significant initial Al loss that has not been clearly explained. Furthermore, the reaction product with coated materials is LiAlO{sub 2} rather than Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 600 and 700 C. Even when pre-oxidized to form {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, an alumina layer on FeCrAl transformed to LiAlO{sub 2} at 700 and 800 C. At 500 C, the preformed oxide partially transformed from alumina and some Li was detected in the oxide layer.

  10. Analysis of the variation of the 0°C isothermal altitude during rainfall events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeimetz, Fränz; Garcìa, Javier; Schaefli, Bettina; Schleiss, Anton J.

    2016-04-01

    In numerous countries of the world (USA, Canada, Sweden, Switzerland,…), the dam safety verifications for extreme floods are realized by referring to the so called Probable Maximum Flood (PMF). According to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), this PMF is determined based on the PMP (Probable Maximum Precipitation). The PMF estimation is performed with a hydrological simulation model by routing the PMP. The PMP-PMF simulation is normally event based; therefore, if no further information is known, the simulation needs assumptions concerning the initial soil conditions such as saturation or snow cover. In addition, temperature series are also of interest for the PMP-PMF simulations. Temperature values can not only be deduced from temperature measurement but also using the temperature gradient method, the 0°C isothermal altitude can lead to temperature estimations on the ground. For practitioners, the usage of the isothermal altitude for referring to temperature is convenient and simpler because one value can give information over a large region under the assumption of a certain temperature gradient. The analysis of the evolution of the 0°C isothermal altitude during rainfall events is aimed here and based on meteorological soundings from the two sounding stations Payerne (CH) and Milan (I). Furthermore, hourly rainfall and temperature data are available from 110 pluviometers spread over the Swiss territory. The analysis of the evolution of the 0°C isothermal altitude is undertaken for different precipitation durations based on the meteorological measurements mentioned above. The results show that on average, the isothermal altitude tends to decrease during the rainfall events and that a correlation between the duration of the altitude loss and the duration of the rainfall exists. A significant difference in altitude loss is appearing when the soundings from Payerne and Milan are compared.

  11. 0°C isotherm height distribution for Earth-space communication satellite links in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, J. S.; Falodun, S. E.; Odiba, O.

    2014-06-01

    For an optimum performance of Earth-space satellite communication links, a number of meteorological parameters are needed to be considered along the Earth-space path for specific locations and the height of the 0°C isotherm (freezing level height) is among such parameters. Information regarding this parameter is always based on the recommendation of ITU-RP-839 in the form of contour maps. Since the meteorological parameters are location dependent, there is a need for the establishment of these parameters for specific locations. In addition, ITU-R model uses an yearly averaged constant rain height for the attenuation estimation, which may not be appropriate for tropical regions. In the present paper, the 0°C isotherm (ZDI) height has been established using two years of data collected on-board the precipitation radar of the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The result shows the seasonal dependence of the 0°C isotherm height. It is observed, among other things, that the height is higher during the wet season as compared to the dry season. Rain induced attenuation at frequencies above 10 GHz is also estimated using the 0°C isotherm height derived for each of the locations over the elevation angle of the NIGCOMSAT-1R in Nigeria.

  12. Large scale synthesis of nanoporous BN flake with high surface areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hui-Ling; Han, Qiu-Xia; Wu, Jie; Meng, Xiang-Lin; Cui, Hong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Nanoporous boron nitride (BN) flake was synthesized in large scale at temperatures between 550 and 600 °C for 10 h via the simple reaction between NaBH4 and CH5N3S. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectra confirm the formation of hexagonal BN. Examination by high-resolution transmission electron microscope reveals that the product is comprised of nanoporous flake, which exhibits a high surface area of 214 m2 g-1 characterized by nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The nanoporous BN flake has good thermal stability and oxidation resistance up to 800 °C measured by thermogravimetric analysis.

  13. Determining Kinetic Parameters for Isothermal Crystallization of Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Zhang, T.; Reis, S. T.; Brow, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    Non-isothermal crystallization techniques are frequently used to determine the kinetic parameters for crystallization in glasses. These techniques are experimentally simple and quick compared to the isothermal techniques. However, the analytical models used for non-isothermal data analysis, originally developed for describing isothermal transformation kinetics, are fundamentally flawed. The present paper describes a technique for determining the kinetic parameters for isothermal crystallization in glasses, which eliminates most of the common problems that generally make the studies of isothermal crystallization laborious and time consuming. In this technique, the volume fraction of glass that is crystallized as a function of time during an isothermal hold was determined using differential thermal analysis (DTA). The crystallization parameters for the lithium-disilicate (Li2O.2SiO2) model glass were first determined and compared to the same parameters determined by other techniques to establish the accuracy and usefulness of the present technique. This technique was then used to describe the crystallization kinetics of a complex Ca-Sr-Zn-silicate glass developed for sealing solid oxide fuel cells.

  14. Non isothermal drying process optimisation - Drying of clay tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasić, M.; Radojević, Z.

    2015-11-01

    In our previous studies we have developed a model for determination of the variable effective diffusivity and identification of the exact transition points between possible drying mechanisms. The next goal was to develop a drying regime which could in advance characterize the real non isothermal process of drying clay tiles. In order to do this four isothermal experiments were recorded. Temperature and humidity were maintained at 350C / 75%; 450C / 70%; 450C / 60% and 500C / 60%; respectively in each experiment. All experimentally collected data were analyzed and the exact transition points between possible drying mechanisms were detected. Characteristic drying period (time) for each isothermal drying mechanism was also detected. The real, non-isothermal drying process was approximated by 5 segments. In each of these segments approximately isothermal drying condition were maintained. Temperature and humidity of the drying air, in the first four segments, was maintained on the same level as in recorded isothermal experiments while in the fifth segment, it were maintained at 700C / 40%. The duration of the first four segments were calculated from the diagrams Deff - t respectively for each experiment. The clay tile in experiment five was dried without cracking using the proposed non isothermal drying regime.

  15. Isothermal test as a WLR monitor for Cu interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, Amit P.; Pham, Van; Chan, Jay; Weidner, Jorg-Oliver; Heinig, Volker; Thierbach, Steffi

    2000-08-01

    The need for higher interconnect current densities has been increasing rapidly for advanced integrated circuits. Cu interconnects have emerged as viable candidates to replace Aluminium due to the lower sheet resistivity and increased electro migration lifetime of Cu. Previously, we had reported the use of the isothermal test as a WLR monitor for detecting process defects such as voids in the Aluminium interconnects. This paper further extends the application of the isothermal test methodology for detecting and characterizing process defects in Cu interconnect technology. Package electro migration test are time consuming and may be impractical in detecting process defects in a timely manner. Isothermal test, on the other hand, can be effectively used as a fast WLR process monitor. This paper reports the influence of direction of test current as well as different types of test structures, such as a single level NIST structure and a via chain structure and a via chain structure, on the isothermal test results for Cu interconnects. The isothermal test data has been shown to be helpful in evaluating the location and severity of the process defects through a proper choice of test structures. Joule heating due to high current density is found to be the major driving force for the sensitivity of isothermal test failures. A good correlation is also seen with the package electro migration data. A simple wafer level isothermal test has thus been successfully demonstrated as a reliability tool for process monitoring in Cu VLSI interconnects.

  16. Isothermal anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic metallic IrMn

    PubMed Central

    Galceran, R.; Fina, I.; Cisneros-Fernández, J.; Bozzo, B.; Frontera, C.; López-Mir, L.; Deniz, H.; Park, K.-W.; Park, B.-G.; Balcells, Ll.; Martí, X.; Jungwirth, T.; Martínez, B.

    2016-01-01

    Antiferromagnetic spintronics is an emerging field; antiferromagnets can improve the functionalities of ferromagnets with higher response times, and having the information shielded against external magnetic field. Moreover, a large list of aniferromagnetic semiconductors and metals with Néel temperatures above room temperature exists. In the present manuscript, we persevere in the quest for the limits of how large can anisotropic magnetoresistance be in antiferromagnetic materials with very large spin-orbit coupling. We selected IrMn as a prime example of first-class moment (Mn) and spin-orbit (Ir) combination. Isothermal magnetotransport measurements in an antiferromagnetic-metal(IrMn)/ferromagnetic-insulator thin film bilayer have been performed. The metal/insulator structure with magnetic coupling between both layers allows the measurement of the modulation of the transport properties exclusively in the antiferromagnetic layer. Anisotropic magnetoresistance as large as 0.15% has been found, which is much larger than that for a bare IrMn layer. Interestingly, it has been observed that anisotropic magnetoresistance is strongly influenced by the field cooling conditions, signaling the dependence of the found response on the formation of domains at the magnetic ordering temperature. PMID:27762278

  17. Characterization of membrane protein interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Situ, Alan J; Schmidt, Thomas; Mazumder, Parichita; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2014-10-23

    Understanding the structure, folding, and interaction of membrane proteins requires experimental tools to quantify the association of transmembrane (TM) helices. Here, we introduce isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure integrin αIIbβ3 TM complex affinity, to study the consequences of helix-helix preorientation in lipid bilayers, and to examine protein-induced lipid reorganization. Phospholipid bicelles served as membrane mimics. The association of αIIbβ3 proceeded with a free energy change of -4.61±0.04kcal/mol at bicelle conditions where the sampling of random helix-helix orientations leads to complex formation. At bicelle conditions that approach a true bilayer structure in effect, an entropy saving of >1kcal/mol was obtained from helix-helix preorientation. The magnitudes of enthalpy and entropy changes increased distinctly with bicelle dimensions, indicating long-range changes in bicelle lipid properties upon αIIbβ3 TM association. NMR spectroscopy confirmed ITC affinity measurements and revealed αIIbβ3 association and dissociation rates of 4500±100s(-1) and 2.1±0.1s(-1), respectively. Thus, ITC is able to provide comprehensive insight into the interaction of membrane proteins.

  18. Mapping glycoside hydrolase substrate subsites by isothermal titration calorimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Cogan, Uri; Adir, Noam; Solomon, Vered; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2004-01-01

    Relating thermodynamic parameters to structural and biochemical data allows a better understanding of substrate binding and its contribution to catalysis. The analysis of the binding of carbohydrates to proteins or enzymes is a special challenge because of the multiple interactions and forces involved. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a direct measure of binding enthalpy (ΔHa) and allows the determination of the binding constant (free energy), entropy, and stoichiometry. In this study, we used ITC to elucidate the binding thermodynamics of xylosaccharides for two xylanases of family 10 isolated from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6. The change in the heat capacity of binding (ΔCp = ΔH/ΔT) for xylosaccharides differing in one sugar unit was determined by using ITC measurements at different temperatures. Because hydrophobic stacking interactions are associated with negative ΔCp, the data allow us to predict the substrate binding preference in the binding subsites based on the crystal structure of the enzyme. The proposed positional binding preference was consistent with mutants lacking aromatic binding residues at different subsites and was also supported by tryptophan fluorescence analysis. PMID:15277671

  19. Comparison of multifractal parameters form adsorption isotherms, desorption isotherms and mercury intrusion curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Mon, Rodolfo; Vidal Vázquez, Eva

    2013-04-01

    The soil pore space is composed of a continuum of pores extremely variable in size, which range from equivalent diameter sizes smaller than nanometers to an upper limit of the order of centimeters. So, it is quite typical for soil pore space to display a size range of more than a factor of 106 in scale. Nitrogen sorption and mercury injection provide pores size distributions in the range from about 0.1 to 0.001 μm and 150 to 0.005 μm, respectively. The aims of this study were to evaluate the scaling properties of nitrogen adsorption isotherms (NAI), nitrogen desorption isotherms (NDI) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) curves of agricultural soils from "La Pampa húmeda", in the north of Buenos Aires and south of Santa Fé provinces, Argentina. Both NAIs, NDIs and MIPs exhibited multifractal behavior but its scaling properties were different so that the multifractality index, assessed by the width of the generalized dimension and the singularity spectra ranked as follows: NAI > NDI > MIP. Also, parameterization by the Hurst exponent indicates NAIs were less persistent than NDIs and in turn, these were less persistent than MIPs. The multfractal approach was useful to characterize the heterogeneity of various domains of the soil nano- micro- and mesopore system at the scale of small aggregates.

  20. Experimental studies of hydrogen on boron nitride: I. Adsorption isotherms of HD

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.D.; Sullivan, N.S.

    1995-09-01

    The authors report the results of measurements of adsorption isotherms of deuterium hydride (HD) adsorbed onto boron nitride. From this data they derive both the two-dimensional critical point temperatures (using Larher`s method) and the heat of adsorption for the first few layers of this system. These results are compared with similar measurements of HD adsorbed onto graphite and MgO. While substantial substeps within some adlayer steps are evident in the adsorption isotherms of HD on graphite and MgO and have been shown to indicate a two-dimensional liquid-solid transition within the layer, no substep is evident at the level of one percent of a step level for HD adsorbed onto BN.

  1. Hierarchical flower-like Co3-xFexO4 ferrite hollow spheres: facile synthesis and catalysis in the degradation of methylene blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jinhui; Yang, Wenshu; Zhang, Zhe; Pan, Shunhao; Lu, Baoping; Ke, Xi; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2013-03-01

    A facile method is proposed for the synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) flower-like Co3-xFexO4 ferrite (CF) hollow spheres, using SiO2@FeOOH as precursor. The CF hollow spheres are efficient for the catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) in the presence of H2O2 at 80 °C. The obtained CF hollow spheres were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements. The formation of 3D hierarchical flower-like superstructure was influenced by the relative amount of urea used. As the mole ratio of CoCl2 and urea decreased, the structure of the products was tailored from yolk-like spheres to hollow spheres with different sized void interiors. Moreover, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm analysis showed that the CF hollow spheres have a large specific surface area (163 m2 g-1) which provided more activity sites. The CF hollow spheres can catalyze the oxidation of MB efficiently. These results indicate that the designed CF hollow spheres exhibit promising capability for the degradation of dyes.A facile method is proposed for the synthesis of three-dimensional (3D) flower-like Co3-xFexO4 ferrite (CF) hollow spheres, using SiO2@FeOOH as precursor. The CF hollow spheres are efficient for the catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) in the presence of H2O2 at 80 °C. The obtained CF hollow spheres were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements. The formation of 3D hierarchical flower-like superstructure was influenced by the relative amount of urea used. As the mole ratio of CoCl2 and urea decreased, the structure of the products was tailored from yolk-like spheres to hollow spheres with different sized void interiors. Moreover, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm

  2. Two-step adsorption on jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers: dependence on hydrogen-bonding capability of adsorbates, ligand-substituent effect, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Yukari; Onishi, Fumiaki; Kita, Hidetoshi; Ebihara, Masahiro

    2010-11-01

    A preliminary study of isopropanol (IPA) adsorption/desorption isotherms on a jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymer, [Zn(2)(bdc)(2)(dabco)](n) (1, H(2)bdc = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane), showed unambiguous two-step profiles via a highly shrunk intermediate framework. The results of adsorption measurements on 1, using probing gas molecules of alcohol (MeOH and EtOH) for the size effect and Me(2)CO for the influence of hydrogen bonding, show that alcohol adsorption isotherms are gradual two-step profiles, whereas the Me(2)CO isotherm is a typical type-I isotherm, indicating that a two-step adsorption/desorption is involved with hydrogen bonds. To further clarify these characteristic adsorption/desorption behaviors, selecting nitroterephthalate (bdc-NO(2)), bromoterephthalate (bdc-Br), and 2,5-dichloroterephthalate (bdc-Cl(2)) as substituted dicarboxylate ligands, isomorphous jungle-gym-type porous coordination polymers, {[Zn(2)(bdc-NO(2))(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (2 ⊃ solvents), {[Zn(2)(bdc-Br)(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (3 ⊃ solvents), and {[Zn(2)(bdc-Cl(2))(2)(dabco)]·solvents}(n) (4 ⊃ solvents), were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray analyses. Thermal gravimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and N(2) adsorption at 77 K measurements reveal that [Zn(2)(bdc-NO(2))(2)(dabco)](n) (2), [Zn(2)(bdc-Br)(2)(dabco)](n) (3), and [Zn(2)(bdc-Cl(2))(2)(dabco)](n) (4) maintain their frameworks without guest molecules with Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of 1568 (2), 1292 (3), and 1216 (4) m(2) g(-1). As found in results of MeOH, EtOH, IPA, and Me(2)CO adsorption/desorption on 2-4, only MeOH adsorption on 2 shows an obvious two-step profile. Considering the substituent effects and adsorbate sizes, the hydrogen bonds, which are triggers for two-step adsorption, are formed between adsorbates and carboxylate groups at the corners in the pores, inducing wide pores to become narrow pores. Interestingly, such

  3. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Signature Identification Software

    2009-03-17

    This is an extendable open-source Loop-mediated isothermal AMPlification (LAMP) signature design program called LAVA (LAMP Assay Versatile Analysis). LAVA was created in response to limitations of existing LAMP signature programs.

  4. The Calculation of Adsorption Isotherms from Chromatographic Peak Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between adsorption isotherms and elution peak shapes in gas chromatography, and describes a laboratory experiment which involves the adsorption of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene on alumina at different temperatures. (MLH)

  5. Revisiting the streptavidin-biotin binding by using an aptamer and displacement isothermal calorimetry titration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tai-Chih; Tsai, Ching-Wei; Lee, Peng-Chen; Chen, Wen-Yih

    2015-03-01

    The association constant of a well-known streptavidin-biotin binding has only been inferred from separately measured kinetic parameters. In a single experiment, we obtained Ka 1 × 10(12)  M(-1) by using a streptavidin-binding aptamer and ligand-displacement isothermal titration calorimetry. This study explores the challenges of determining thermodynamic parameters and the derived equilibrium binding affinity of tight ligand-receptor binding.

  6. Methods for determining the CO2 sorption capacity of coal: Experimental and theoretical high pressure isotherms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weishauptová, Zuzana; Přibyl, Oldřich

    2016-04-01

    One way to reduce CO2 emissions discharged into the atmosphere is by trapping it and storing it in suitable repositories, including coal-bearing strata. The history of coal mining in the Czech Republic is very rich but most of the mines have been closed down in recent years. However, the unmined coal seams are interesting for the purposes of CO2 storage, especially due the opportunities they offer for recovering coal-bed methane. Mine structures of this kind can be found in large parts of the Upper Silesian Basin, where the total storage capacity has been estimated at about 380 Mt CO2. This is an interesting storage potential. In order to identify a suitable high-capacity locality for CO2 storage within a coal seam, it is necessary to study not only the geological conditions within the seam, but also the textural properties of the coal, which control the mechanism and the extent of the storage. The major storage mechanism is by sorption processes that take place in the coal porous system (adsorption in micropores and on the surface of meso/macropores, and absorption in the macromolecular structure). The CO2 sorption capacity is generally indirectly determined in a laboratory by measuring the amount of carbon dioxide captured in a coal sample at a pressure and temperature corresponding to the in situ conditions, using high pressure sorption techniques. The low pressure sorption technique can be used, by setting the partial volumes of CO2 according to its binding and storage mode. The sorption capacity is determined by extrapolation to the saturation pressure as the sum of the individual partially sorbed volumes. The aim of the study was to determine the partial volumes of CO2 bound by different mechanisms in the individual parts of the porous system of the coal, and to compare the sum with the results obtained by the high pressure isotherm. The study was carried out with 3 samples from a borehole survey in the Czech part of the Upper Silesian Basin. A high pressure

  7. Algorithmic comparisons of decaying, isothermal, supersonic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsionas, S.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R. S.; Schmidt, W.; Price, D. J.; Dursi, L. J.; Gritschneder, M.; Walch, S.; Piontek, R.; Kim, J.; Jappsen, A.-K.; Ciecielag, P.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2009-12-01

    Context: Simulations of astrophysical turbulence have reached such a level of sophistication that quantitative results are now starting to emerge. However, contradicting results have been reported in the literature with respect to the performance of the numerical techniques employed for its study and their relevance to the physical systems modelled. Aims: We aim at characterising the performance of a variety of hydrodynamics codes including different particle-based and grid-based techniques on the modelling of decaying supersonic turbulence. This is the first such large-scale comparison ever conducted. Methods: We modelled driven, compressible, supersonic, isothermal turbulence with an rms Mach number of M_rms ˜ 4, and then let it decay in the absence of gravity, using runs performed with four different grid codes (ENZO, FLASH, TVD, ZEUS) and three different SPH codes (GADGET, PHANTOM, VINE). We additionally analysed two calculations denoted as PHANTOM A and PHANTOM B using two different implementations of artificial viscosity in PHANTOM. We analysed the results of our numerical experiments using volume-averaged quantities like the rms Mach number, volume- and density-weighted velocity Fourier spectrum functions, and probability distribution functions of density, velocity, and velocity derivatives. Results: Our analysis indicates that grid codes tend to be less dissipative than SPH codes, though details of the techniques used can make large differences in both cases. For example, the Morris & Monaghan viscosity implementation for SPH results in less dissipation (PHANTOM B and VINE versus GADGET and PHANTOM A). For grid codes, using a smaller diffusion parameter leads to less dissipation, but results in a larger bottleneck effect (our ENZO versus FLASH runs). As a general result, we find that by using a similar number of resolution elements N for each spatial direction means that all codes (both grid-based and particle-based) show encouraging similarity of all

  8. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, Martin E.; Koss, M. B.; Lupulescu, A. O.; LaCombe, J. C.; Frei, J. E.; Malarik, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) constituted a series of three NASA-supported microgravity experiments, all of which flew aboard the space shuttle, Columbia. This experimental space flight series was designed and operated to grow and record dendrite solidification in the absence of gravity-induced convective heat transfer, and thereby produce a wealth of benchmark-quality data for testing solidification scaling laws. The data and analysis performed on the dendritic growth speed and tip size in Succinontrie (SCN) demonstrates that although the theory yields predictions that are reasonably in agreement with experiment, there are significant discrepancies. However, some of these discrepancies can be explained by accurately describing the diffusion of heat. The key finding involves recognition that the actual three-dimensional shape of dendrites includes time-dependent side-branching and a tip region that is not a paraboloid of revolution. Thus, the role of heat transfer in dendritic growth is validated, with the caveat that a more realistic model of the dendrite then a paraboloid is needed to account for heat flow in an experimentally observed dendrite. We are currently conducting additional analysis to further confirm and demonstrate these conclusions. The data and analyses for the growth selection physics remain much less definitive. From the first flight, the data indicated that the selection parameter, sigma*, is not exactly a constant, but exhibits a slight dependence on the supercooling. Additional data from the second flight are being examined to investigate the selection of a unique dendrite speed, tip size and shape. The IDGE flight series is now complete. We are currently completing analyses and moving towards final data archiving. It is gratifying to see that the IDGE published results and archived data sets are being used actively by other scientists and engineers. In addition, we are also pleased to report that the techniques and IDGE

  9. Bioanalytical applications of isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huimin; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The most popular in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques like polymerase chain reaction (PCR) including real-time PCR are costly and require thermocycling, rendering them unsuitable for uses at point-of-care. Highly efficient in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques using simple, portable and low-cost instruments are crucial in disease diagnosis, mutation detection and biodefense. Toward this goal, isothermal amplification techniques that represent a group of attractive in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques for bioanalysis have been developed. Unlike PCR where polymerases are easily deactivated by thermally labile constituents in a sample, some of the isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques, such as helicase-dependent amplification and nucleic acid sequence-based amplification, enable the detection of bioanalytes with much simplified protocols and with minimal sample preparations since the entire amplification processes are performed isothermally. This review focuses on the isothermal nucleic acid amplification techniques and their applications in bioanalytical chemistry. Starting off from their amplification mechanisms and significant properties, the adoption of isothermal amplification techniques in bioanalytical chemistry and their future perspectives are discussed. Representative examples illustrating the performance and advantages of each isothermal amplification technique are discussed along with some discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of each technique.

  10. The signal in total-body plethysmography: errors due to adiabatic-isothermic difference.

    PubMed

    Chaui-Berlinck, J G; Bicudo, J E

    1998-09-01

    Total-body plethysmography is a technique often employed in comparative physiology studies because it avoids excessive handling of the animals. The pressure signal obtained is generated by an increase in internal energy of the gas phase of the system. Currently, this increase in internal energy is ascribed to heating (and water vapour saturation) of the inspired gas. The standard equation for computing tidal-volume implies that only temperature and saturation differences can be responsible for generating the ventilation signal. In this study, we were able to demonstrate that the difference between the external process of the thoracic expansion, which is adiabatic, and the internal process of it, which is isothermic, is an important factor of internal energy change in the total-body plethysmography method. In other words, organic tissues transfer heat to the entering gas but also to the present gas, in a way that keeps internal expansion an isothermic process. This extra amount of energy was never taken into account before. Therefore, experiments using such a technique to measure tidal-volume should be done using isothermic chambers. Moreover, due to uncertainties of the complementary measurements (ambient and lung temperatures, ambient water vapour saturation) needed to compute tidal-volume using total-body plethysmography, a minimal temperature difference about 15 degrees C between body and ambient should exist to keep uncertainties in tidal-volume values below 5%. However, this limit is not absolute, because it varies as a function of humidity and degree of uncertainty of the complementary measurements.

  11. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  12. Isothermal and non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of PVA + ionic liquid [BDMIM][BF4]-based polymeric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroj, A. L.; Chaurasia, S. K.; Kataria, Shalu; Singh, R. K.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of ionic liquid (IL), 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate [BDMIM][BF4], on crystallization behavior of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) has been studied by isothermal and non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry techniques. The PVA + IL based polymer electrolyte films have been prepared using solution casting technique. To describe the isothermal and non-isothermal crystallization kinetics, several kinetic equations have been employed on PVA + IL based films. There is strong dependence of the peak crystallization temperature (Tc), relative degree of crystallity (Xt), half-time of crystallization (t1/2), crystallization rate constants (Avrami Kt and Tobin AT), and Avrami (n) and Tobin (nT) exponents on the cooling rate and IL loading.

  13. Differential Binding Models for Direct and Reverse Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Isaac; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2016-03-10

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique to measure the stoichiometry and thermodynamics from binding experiments. Identifying an appropriate mathematical model to evaluate titration curves of receptors with multiple sites is challenging, particularly when the stoichiometry or binding mechanism is not available. In a recent theoretical study, we presented a differential binding model (DBM) to study calorimetry titrations independently of the interaction among the binding sites (Herrera, I.; Winnik, M. A. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 8659-8672). Here, we build upon our DBM and show its practical application to evaluate calorimetry titrations of receptors with multiple sites independently of the titration direction. Specifically, we present a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with the general form d[S]/dV that can be integrated numerically to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of free and bound species S at every injection step and, subsequently, to evaluate the volume-normalized heat signal (δQ(V) = δq/dV) of direct and reverse calorimetry titrations. Additionally, we identify factors that influence the shape of the titration curve and can be used to optimize the initial concentrations of titrant and analyte. We demonstrate the flexibility of our updated DBM by applying these differentials and a global regression analysis to direct and reverse calorimetric titrations of gadolinium ions with multidentate ligands of increasing denticity, namely, diglycolic acid (DGA), citric acid (CIT), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and use statistical tests to validate the stoichiometries for the metal-ligand pairs studied.

  14. A Constitutive Model for Isothermal Pseudoelasticity Coupled with Plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dongjie; Landis, Chad M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a new constitutive model for isothermal pseudoelastic shape memory alloys is presented. The model is based upon a kinematic hardening framework that was previously developed for ferroelastic and ferroelectric switching behavior. The basis of the model includes a transformation surface, an associated flow rule for transformation strain, and kinematic hardening with the back stresses represented by a transformation potential that is dependent upon the transformation strain. In contrast to many models that introduce tension/compression asymmetry by devising transformation surfaces in terms of invariants of the stress tensor, this model achieves this capability by means of expressing the transformation potential from which the back stresses are derived as a weighted mix of two potentials that are, respectively, calibrated to measured tensile and compressive responses. Additionally, in this model, plastic deformation is allowed to occur at high stresses by employing a standard J2 -based yield surface with isotropic hardening. Finally, to demonstrate the ability of the constitutive model to perform in highly non-proportional loading states, some finite element simulations on crack tip fields are presented.

  15. Isothermal and non-isothermal kinetic models of chemical processes in foods governed by competing mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Micha; Corradini, Maria G; Normand, Mark D

    2009-08-26

    A process or reaction that peaks at high temperatures but not at low ones indicates competition between synthesis and degradation. A proposed phenomenological model composed of a decay factor superimposed on a growth term can describe both. Temperature elevation shortens the two subprocesses' characteristic times and increases their rates. The degradation's characteristic time relative to the experiment's determines whether a peak is observed. All of the parameters determine the peak's height and shape as can be seen in two interactive Wolfram demonstrations on the Web. Detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanisms is unnecessary for the model's construction, and uniqueness is not a prerequisite either. However, different expressions might be needed for ongoing processes and ones initially undetectable. The model's applicability is demonstrated with published results on very different reactions in foods. In principle, it can be converted into a dynamic rate equation for simulating a process's evolution under non-isothermal conditions.

  16. The temperature dependence of ponded infiltration under isothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, J.; Murphy, F.

    1991-01-01

    A simple temperature-sensitive modification to the Green and Ampt infiltration equation is described; this assumes that the temperature dependence of the hydraulic conductivity is reciprocally equal to the temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid water, and that both the transmission zone saturation and the wetting front matric potential gradient are independent of temperature. This modified Green and Ampt equation is compared with ponded, isothermal infiltration experiments run on repacked columns of Olympic Sand and Aiken Loam at 5, 25, and 60??C. Experimental results showed increases in infiltration rates of at least 300% between 5 and 60??C for both soil materials, with subsequent increases in cumulative infiltration of even greater magnitudes for the loam. There is good agreement between measured and predicted initial infiltration rates at 25??C for both soil materials, yet at 60??C, the predicted results overestimate initial infiltration rates for the sand and underestimate initial rates for the loam. Measurements of the wetting depth vs. cumulative infiltration indicate that the transmission zone saturation increased with increasing temperature for both soil materials. In spite of this increased saturation with temperature, the final infiltration rates at both 25 and 60??C were predicted accurately using the modified Green and Ampt equation. This suggests that increased saturation occurred primarily in dead-end pore spaces, so that transmission zone hydraulic conductivities were unaffected by these temperature-induced changes in saturation. In conclusion, except for initial infiltration rates at 60??C, the measured influence of temperature on infiltration rates was fully accounted for by the temperature dependence of the viscosity of liquid water. ?? 1991.

  17. Revisiting the terrestrial carbon cycle: New insights from isothermal microcalorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Anke M.; Boye, Kristin; Bölscher, Tobias; Nunan, Naoise; Coucheney, Elsa; Schaefer, Michael; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Energy is continuously transformed in environmental systems through the metabolic activities of living organisms. In terrestrial ecosystems, there is a general consensus that the diversity of microbial metabolic processes is poorly related to overall ecosystem function because of the inherent functional redundancy that exists within many microbial communities. Here, we propose a conceptual ecological model of microbial energetics in various terrestrial ecosystems (e.g. Scandinavian arable systems or temporarily flooded systems in South East Asia). Using isothermal microcalorimetry, we show that direct measures of energetics provide a functional link between energy flow and the composition of belowground microbial communities at a high taxonomic level. In contrast, this link is not apparent when carbon dioxide (CO2) was used as an aggregate measure of microbial metabolism. Our results support the notion that systems with higher relative abundances of fungi have more efficient microbial metabolism. Furthermore, we suggest that the microbial energetics approach combined with spectroscopic and aqueous chemical measurements is a viable approach to determine the effect of energy release from organic matter on metal(loid) mobility in soils and sediments under anaerobic conditions. We advocate that the microbial energetics approach provides complementary information to soil respiration for investigating the involvement of microbial communities in belowground carbon dynamics. Our results indicate that microbial metabolic processes are an essential constituent in governing the terrestrial carbon balance and that microbial diversity should not be neglected in ecosystem modeling. Quantification of microbial energetics incorporates thermodynamic principles and our conceptual model provides empirical data that can feed into carbon-climate based ecosystem feedback modeling. Together they disentangle the intrinsically complex yet essential carbon dynamics of soils to address

  18. Isothermal aging of IM7/8320 and IM7/5260

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Gates, Thomas S.

    1992-01-01

    Isothermal aging was conducted on two composite systems being considered as possible candidates for the next generation supersonic transport. The composite systems were IM7/5260, a carbon/thermoset, and IM7/8320, a carbon/amorphous thermoplastic. The materials were isothermally aged for a total of 5000 hours at 125 C and 175 C. These temperatures are approximately equivalent to the upper skin temperatures of an aircraft flying at Mach 2.0 and Mach 2.4, respectively. The variations of the following properties were determined as a function of aging time: weight loss, moduli, glass transition temperature, microcracking, and modulus and strength of a +/- 45 laminate. The difficulties and accuracy of strain measurements are also discussed.

  19. Relation between Water Vapor Adsorption Isotherms and Dynamic Dehumidification Performances of Desiccant Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Koji; Matsuguma, Shingo; Jin, Wei-Li; Okano, Hiroshi; Teraoka, Yasutake; Hirose, Tsutomu

    Desiccant rotors with different water vapor adsorption properties were fabricated by the synthesis of silica gels inside the honeycomb matrices. Dynamic dehumidification performances of the rotors were measured under different conditions and they were discussed in relation to water vapor adsorption isotherms. At the reactivation air temperatures of 80 and 140 oC, the best dynamic performance was observed with the rotor on which the adsorbed amount of water vapor at lower relative humidity was highest. When the reactivation air temperature was 50 oC, on the other hand, the rotor of which the isotherm exhibited monotonic and nearly linear increase up to higher relative humidity was the most suitable. The normalized changes of absolute humidity and adsorbed amount were defined, and these phenomena were analyzed. When the dependences of both parameters against the relative humidity were similar, the rotor showed the best dehumidification performance.

  20. Integration and global analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for studying macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Brautigam, Chad A; Zhao, Huaying; Vargas, Carolyn; Keller, Sandro; Schuck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful and widely used method to measure the energetics of macromolecular interactions by recording a thermogram of differential heating power during a titration. However, traditional ITC analysis is limited by stochastic thermogram noise and by the limited information content of a single titration experiment. Here we present a protocol for bias-free thermogram integration based on automated shape analysis of the injection peaks, followed by combination of isotherms from different calorimetric titration experiments into a global analysis, statistical analysis of binding parameters and graphical presentation of the results. This is performed using the integrated public-domain software packages NITPIC, SEDPHAT and GUSSI. The recently developed low-noise thermogram integration approach and global analysis allow for more precise parameter estimates and more reliable quantification of multisite and multicomponent cooperative and competitive interactions. Titration experiments typically take 1-2.5 h each, and global analysis usually takes 10-20 min.

  1. Non-Isothermal Calorimetric Studies of the Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. S.; Day, D. E.; Huang, W.; Narayan, K. Lakshmi; Cull, T. S.; Kelton, K. F.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of preannealing treatments on the polymorphic crystallization of lithium disilicate glasses is examined. As expected, glasses heated at different rates through the temperature range where there is significant nucleation develop widely different numbers of nuclei. This can dramatically influence the stability and transformation characteristics of the annealed glass. Non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements are demonstrated to be useful to probe the nucleation behavior. The first systematic investigations of particle size effects on the non-isothermal transformation behavior are presented and discussed. Based on DTA and microscopy experiments, we show that small particles of lithium disilicate glasses crystallize primarily by surface crystallization. The relative importance of surface versus volume crystallization is examined by varying particle size, by introducing nucleating agents and by exposing glasses to atmospheres of different water content. These data are analyzed quantitatively using a numerical model developed in a second paper following in this volume.

  2. Characteristics of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface of a non-isothermal jet.

    PubMed

    Westerweel, Jerry; Petracci, Alberto; Delfos, René; Hunt, Julian C R

    2011-02-28

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface of a jet is characterized by sharp jumps ('discontinuities') in the conditional flow statistics relative to the interface. Experiments were carried out to measure the conditional flow statistics for a non-isothermal jet, i.e. a cooled jet. These experiments are complementary to previous experiments on an isothermal Re=2000 jet, where, in the present experiments on a non-isothermal jet, the thermal diffusivity is intermediate to the diffusivity of momentum and the diffusivity of mass. The experimental method is a combined laser-induced fluorescence/particle image velocimetry method, where a temperature-sensitive fluorescent dye (rhodamine 6G) is used to measure the instantaneous temperature fluctuations. The results show that the cooled jet can be considered to behave like a self-similar jet without any significant buoyancy effects. The detection of the interface is based on the instantaneous temperature, and provides a reliable means to detect the interface. Conditional flow statistics reveal the superlayer jump in the conditional vorticity and in the temperature.

  3. Isothermal oxidation study on NiMnGa ferromagnetic shape memory alloy at 600-1000 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kök, Mediha; Pirge, Gürsev; Aydoğdu, Yıldırım

    2013-03-01

    Oxidation behavior of NiMnGa alloy has been investigated under isothermal temperature by thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) spectroscope systems. The Ni-28.5Mn-20.5Ga alloy (composition in atomic percent) was exposed to oxygen atmosphere isothermally, i.e., between 600 °C and 1000 °C, for 1 h. A gravimetric method was used to determine the oxidation kinetics; weight gain per unit area as a function of time. It was determined that the oxidation constant increases significantly with isothermal temperature. Activation energy of the oxidation was found to be 152 kJ/mol. X-ray diffraction patterns of the heat-treated samples contain oxide peaks, mainly belonging to Mn3O4. X-ray analyses demonstrate that the amount of the oxide increases with isothermal temperature while that of martensite phase decreases. The scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) spectroscope analysis also gives the same result. According to magnetic measurements, the saturation of NiMnGa alloys decreases with rising isothermal oxidation temperature.

  4. Comparison of high-pressure CO2 sorption isotherms on Eastern and Western US coals

    SciTech Connect

    Romanov, V; Hur, T -B; Fazio, J; Howard, B

    2013-10-01

    Accurate estimation of carbon dioxide (CO2) sorption capacity of coal is important for planning the CO2 sequestration efforts. In this work, we investigated sorption and swelling behavior of several Eastern and Western US coal samples from the Central Appalachian Basin and from San Juan Basin. The CO2 sorption isotherms have been completed at 55°C for as received and dried samples. The role of mineral components in coal, the coal swelling, the effects of temperature and moisture, and the error propagation have been analyzed. Changes in void volume due to dewatering and other factors such as temporary caging of carbon dioxide molecules in coal matrix were identified among the main factors affecting accuracy of the carbon dioxide sorption isotherms. The (helium) void volume in the sample cells was measured before and after the sorption isotherm experiments and was used to build the volume-corrected data plots.

  5. The Effect of Isothermal Heat Treatment Time on the Microstructure and Properties of 2.11% Al Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanian-Naziftoosi, H. R.; Haghdadi, N.; Kiani-Rashid, A. R.

    2012-08-01

    In this article, the bainitic transformation during austempering was studied for a 2.11% Al containing ductile iron under different isothermal holding times. The austenitizing time and temperature were selected to be 60 min and 920 °C, respectively, referring to previous studies. The isothermal austempering heat treatments were performed at 350 °C for different durations. Microstructures have been examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural investigations revealed that austempering treatment at 350 °C for durations up to 100 min results in microstructures consisting of carbide-free bainitic ferrite with considerable amounts of retained austenite while the extension of isothermal transformation time leads to precipitation of carbides. Hardness measurements were also carried out the results of which were shown to be consistent with microstructural evolutions.

  6. Analysis of Titan's neutral upper atmosphere from Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Waite, J. H.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Gell, D. A.; Niemann, H. B.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Borggren, N.; Fletcher, G. G.; Patrick, E. L.; Raaen, E.; Magee, B. A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present an in-depth study of the distributions of various neutral species in Titan's upper atmosphere, between 950 and 1500 km for abundant species (N 2, CH 4, H 2) and between 950 and 1200 km for other minor species. Our analysis is based on a large sample of Cassini/INMS (Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer) measurements in the CSN (Closed Source Neutral) mode, obtained during 15 close flybys of Titan. To untangle the overlapping cracking patterns, we adopt Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to determine simultaneously the densities of different species. Except for N 2, CH 4, H 2 and 40Ar (as well as their isotopes), all species present density enhancements measured during the outbound legs. This can be interpreted as a result of wall effects, which could be either adsorption/desorption of these molecules or heterogeneous surface chemistry of the associated radicals on the chamber walls. In this paper, we provide both direct inbound measurements assuming ram pressure enhancement only and abundances corrected for wall adsorption/desorption based on a simple model to reproduce the observed time behavior. Among all minor species of photochemical interest, we have firm detections of C 2H 2, C 2H 4, C 2H 6, CH 3C 2H, C 4H 2, C 6H 6, CH 3CN, HC 3N, C 2N 2 and NH 3 in Titan's upper atmosphere. Upper limits are given for other minor species. The globally averaged distributions of N 2, CH 4 and H 2 are each modeled with the diffusion approximation. The N 2 profile suggests an average thermospheric temperature of 151 K. The CH 4 and H 2 profiles constrain their fluxes to be 2.6×10 cms and 1.1×10 cms, referred to Titan's surface. Both fluxes are significantly higher than the Jeans escape values. The INMS data also suggest horizontal/diurnal variations of temperature and neutral gas distribution in Titan's thermosphere. The equatorial region, the ramside, as well as the nightside hemisphere of Titan appear to be warmer and present some evidence for the depletion

  7. Binding Isotherms and Time Courses Readily from Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is presented that binding isotherms, simple or biphasic, can be extracted directly from noninterpreted, complex 2D NMR spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) to reveal the largest trend(s) across the series. This approach renders peak picking unnecessary for tracking population changes. In 1:1 binding, the first principal component captures the binding isotherm from NMR-detected titrations in fast, slow, and even intermediate and mixed exchange regimes, as illustrated for phospholigand associations with proteins. Although the sigmoidal shifts and line broadening of intermediate exchange distorts binding isotherms constructed conventionally, applying PCA directly to these spectra along with Pareto scaling overcomes the distortion. Applying PCA to time-domain NMR data also yields binding isotherms from titrations in fast or slow exchange. The algorithm readily extracts from magnetic resonance imaging movie time courses such as breathing and heart rate in chest imaging. Similarly, two-step binding processes detected by NMR are easily captured by principal components 1 and 2. PCA obviates the customary focus on specific peaks or regions of images. Applying it directly to a series of complex data will easily delineate binding isotherms, equilibrium shifts, and time courses of reactions or fluctuations. PMID:27458657

  8. Binding Isotherms and Time Courses Readily from Magnetic Resonance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Van Doren, Steven R

    2016-08-16

    Evidence is presented that binding isotherms, simple or biphasic, can be extracted directly from noninterpreted, complex 2D NMR spectra using principal component analysis (PCA) to reveal the largest trend(s) across the series. This approach renders peak picking unnecessary for tracking population changes. In 1:1 binding, the first principal component captures the binding isotherm from NMR-detected titrations in fast, slow, and even intermediate and mixed exchange regimes, as illustrated for phospholigand associations with proteins. Although the sigmoidal shifts and line broadening of intermediate exchange distorts binding isotherms constructed conventionally, applying PCA directly to these spectra along with Pareto scaling overcomes the distortion. Applying PCA to time-domain NMR data also yields binding isotherms from titrations in fast or slow exchange. The algorithm readily extracts from magnetic resonance imaging movie time courses such as breathing and heart rate in chest imaging. Similarly, two-step binding processes detected by NMR are easily captured by principal components 1 and 2. PCA obviates the customary focus on specific peaks or regions of images. Applying it directly to a series of complex data will easily delineate binding isotherms, equilibrium shifts, and time courses of reactions or fluctuations. PMID:27458657

  9. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies on the binding of DNA bases and PNA base monomers to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gourishankar, A; Shukla, Sourabh; Ganesh, Krishna N; Sastry, Murali

    2004-10-20

    An isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) investigation of the interaction of DNA bases and PNA base monomers with gold nanoparticles is described revealing a binding sequence in the order C > G > A > T. Direct measurement of the strength of interaction of ligands with nanogold by ITC has important implications in surface modification strategies for biomedical, catalysis, and nanoarchitecture applications.

  10. Moisture adsorption isotherms and glass transition temperature of pectin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Santanu; Shivhare, U S; Muley, S

    2013-06-01

    The moisture adsorption isotherms of low methoxyl pectin were determined at 30-70°C and water activity ranging from 0.11 to 0.94. The moisture adsorption isotherms revealed that the equilibrium moisture content increased with water activity. Increase in temperature, in general, resulted in decreased equilibrium moisture content. However in some cases, equilibrium moisture content values increased with temperature at higher water activities. Selected sorption models (GAB, Halsey, Henderson, Oswin, modified Oswin) were tested for describing the adsorption isotherms. Parameters of each sorption models were determined by nonlinear regression analysis. Oswin model gave the best fit for pectin sorption behaviour. Isosteric heat of sorption decreased with increase in moisture content and varied between 14.607 and 0.552 kJ/mol. Glass transition temperature decreased with increase in moisture content of pectin. PMID:24425957

  11. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that the GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.

  12. The sorption of sulfamethazine on soil samples: isotherms and error analysis.

    PubMed

    Mutavdžić Pavlović, Dragana; Ćurković, Lidija; Blažek, Dijana; Župan, Josip

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, batch sorption of sulfamethazine on eight soil samples (six from Croatia and two from Bosnia and Hercegovina) with different organic matter contents ranging from 1.52 to 12.8% was investigated. The effects of various parameters such as agitation time, initial concentration, and ionic strength on the sulfamethazine sorption were studied. The experimental data were analysed using a one-parameter model, Linear isotherm, and two two-parameter models, the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The goodness of fit was measured using the linear regression and the determination coefficient (R(2)) value. Also, the equilibrium data of the two-parameter models were analysed using the residual root mean square error (RMSE), the sum of squares of errors (ERRSQ), and a composite fractional error function (HYBRID). Non-linear regression has better characteristics for analysing experimental data. The obtained sorption coefficients Kd (from 0.25 to 8.10 mL/g) and the Freundlich sorption coefficients KF (from 1.16 to 7.99 (μg/g)(mL/μg)(1/n)) exhibited quite low values, which indicated that sulfamethazine is weakly adsorbed on the evaluated soils, is highly mobile, and has a great potential to penetrate and pollute the ground water. The Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm was used to estimate the apparent free energy of sorption. PMID:25163651

  13. The sorption of sulfamethazine on soil samples: isotherms and error analysis.

    PubMed

    Mutavdžić Pavlović, Dragana; Ćurković, Lidija; Blažek, Dijana; Župan, Josip

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, batch sorption of sulfamethazine on eight soil samples (six from Croatia and two from Bosnia and Hercegovina) with different organic matter contents ranging from 1.52 to 12.8% was investigated. The effects of various parameters such as agitation time, initial concentration, and ionic strength on the sulfamethazine sorption were studied. The experimental data were analysed using a one-parameter model, Linear isotherm, and two two-parameter models, the Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The goodness of fit was measured using the linear regression and the determination coefficient (R(2)) value. Also, the equilibrium data of the two-parameter models were analysed using the residual root mean square error (RMSE), the sum of squares of errors (ERRSQ), and a composite fractional error function (HYBRID). Non-linear regression has better characteristics for analysing experimental data. The obtained sorption coefficients Kd (from 0.25 to 8.10 mL/g) and the Freundlich sorption coefficients KF (from 1.16 to 7.99 (μg/g)(mL/μg)(1/n)) exhibited quite low values, which indicated that sulfamethazine is weakly adsorbed on the evaluated soils, is highly mobile, and has a great potential to penetrate and pollute the ground water. The Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm was used to estimate the apparent free energy of sorption.

  14. Isotherms for Water Adsorption on Molecular Sieve 3A: Influence of Cation Composition

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Ronghong; Ladshaw, Austin; Nan, Yue; Liu, Jiuxu; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas; DePaoli, David W.; Tavlarides, Lawrence L.

    2015-06-16

    This study is part of our continuing efforts to address engineering issues related to the removal of tritiated water from off-gases produced in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. In the current study, adsorption equilibrium of water on molecular sieve 3A beads was investigated. Adsorption isotherms for water on the UOP molecular sieve 3A were measured by a continuous-flow adsorption system at 298, 313, 333, and 353 K. Experimental data collected were analyzed by the Generalized Statistical Thermodynamic Adsorption (GSTA) isotherm model. The K+/Na+ molar ratio of this particular type of molecular sieve 3A was ~4:6. Our results showed that themore » GSTA isotherm model worked very well to describe the equilibrium behavior of water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A. The optimum number of parameters for the current experimental data was determined to be a set of four equilibrium parameters. This result suggests that the adsorbent crystals contain four energetically distinct adsorption sites. In addition, it was found that water adsorption on molecular sieve 3A follows a three-stage adsorption process. This three-stage adsorption process confirmed different water adsorption sites in molecular sieve crystals. In addition, the second adsorption stage is significantly affected by the K+/Na+ molar ratio. In this stage, the equilibrium adsorption capacity at a given water vapor pressure increases as the K+/Na+ molar ratio increases.« less

  15. Isothermal annealing of a 620 nm optical absorption band in Brazilian topaz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotani, Sadao; Matsuoka, Masao; Albuquerque, Antonio Roberto Pereira Leite

    2013-04-01

    Isothermal decay behaviors, observed at 515, 523, 562, and 693 K, for an optical absorption band at 620 nm in gamma-irradiated Brazilian blue topaz were analyzed using a kinetic model consisting of O- bound small polarons adjacent to recombination centers (electron traps). The kinetic equations obtained on the basis of this model were solved using the method of Runge-Kutta and the fit parameters describing these defects were determined with a grid optimization method. Two activation energies of 0.52±0.08 and 0.88±0.13 eV, corresponding to two different structural configurations of the O- polarons, explained well the isothermal decay curves using first-order kinetics expected from the kinetic model. On the other hand, thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra measured at various temperatures showed a single band at 400 nm in the temperature range of 373-553 K in which the 620 nm optical absorption band decreased in intensity. Monochromatic TL glow curve data at 400 nm extracted from the TL emission spectra observed were found to be explained reasonably by using the knowledge obtained from the isothermal decay analysis. This suggests that two different structural configurations of O- polarons are responsible for the 620 nm optical absorption band and that the thermal annealing of the polarons causes the 400 nm TL emission band.

  16. Curie temperature isotherm analysis and tectonic implications of aeromagnetic data from Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Estimates of the depth to the Curie temperature isotherm in Nevada are in accordance with other regional geologic and geophysical information and together can be explained in the context of presentday tectonism. A method to estimate the depth extent of magnetic sources from the statistical properties of magnetic anomalies was applied to a statewide compilation of aeromagnetic data from Nevada. Basal depths of magnetic sources show no apparent correlation with the so-called magnetic quiet zone, which trends northerly through the eastern part of the state, or with basin-and-range topography. However, certain correlations with published heat flow measurements are apparent and suggest that undulations in basal depth of magnetic sources are related in part to undulations in the Curie temperature isotherm. For example, an area of shallow basal depth (<10 km) near Battle Mountain corresponds to an area of exceptionally high conductive heat flow and indicates a shallow depth to the Curie temperature isotherm in this region. A narrow zone of shallow basal depth extends south from the Battle Mountain area along the 118??W meridian to at least latitude 38??N, which also is a zone of historic surface offsets and high-magnitude earthquakes. The correspondence along the 118?? meridian of shallow basal depth, high heat flow, high lower crustal seismic velocities, attenuated P and S wave arrivals, historic faulting and, large earthquakes suggests that they each are related to an active north trending spreading zone in this part of the Basin and Range province. -Author

  17. Monitoring the progression of loop-mediated isothermal amplification using conductivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuzhi; Liu, Wenwen; Lu, Xun; Justin Gooding, J; Li, Qiufen; Qu, Keming

    2014-12-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) yields a large amount of DNA, as well as magnesium pyrophosphate precipitate, causing a decrease in ionic strength that can be measured with a conductivity meter. There is a clear relationship between the conductivity of the LAMP mixture solution and the duration of biochemical reaction. Moreover, there is also a clear relationship between the change in conductivity and the amount of initial template DNA over the range of 0.08 to 3.2 ng. These results demonstrate the feasibility not only for detecting the LAMP product qualitatively but also for real-time monitoring the biochemical reaction progression quantitatively using conductivity measurements.

  18. Effect of temperature on sorption isotherms of Brussels sprout.

    PubMed

    Irzyniec, Zbigniew; Klimczak, Jolanta

    2003-02-01

    The effect of temperature (0, 20 and 40 degrees C) on the sorptivity of freeze-dried Brussels sprout was studied. It was checked which of the sorption isotherm equations that included temperature was the best to estimate experimental data. The surface area of a monolayer and isosteric heat of sorption was calculated. From the tested equations the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) and Oswin equations appeared to be the best for describing sorption isotherms of freeze-dried Brussels sprout. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation was found suitable for the calculation of pure isosteric heat of sorption.

  19. Modeling and CFD prediction for diffusion and adsorption within room with various adsorption isotherms.

    PubMed

    Murakami, S; Kato, S; Ito, K; Zhu, Q

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents physical models that are used for analyzing numerically the transportation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials in a room. The models are based on fundamental physicochemical principles of their diffusion and adsorption/desorption (hereafter simply sorption) both in building materials and in room air. The performance of the proposed physical models is examined numerically in a test room with a technique supported by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Two building materials are used in this study. One is a VOC emitting material for which the emission rate is mainly controlled by the internal diffusion of the material. The other is an adsorptive material that has no VOC source. It affects the room air concentration of VOCs with its sorption process. The floor is covered with an emission material made of polypropylene styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). An adsorbent material made of coal-based activated carbon is spread over the sidewalls. The results of numerical prediction show that the physical models and their numerical simulations explain well the mechanism of the transportation of VOCs in a room.

  20. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Can Provide Critical Thinking Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale E.; Goode, David R.; Seney, Caryn S.; Boatwright, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    College chemistry faculties might not have considered including isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in their majors' curriculum because experimental data from this instrumental method are often analyzed via automation (software). However, the software-based data analysis can be replaced with a spreadsheet-based analysis that is readily…

  1. Derivation of the Freundlich Adsorption Isotherm from Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skopp, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Freundlich adsorption isotherm is a useful description of adsorption phenomena. It is frequently presented as an empirical equation with little theoretical basis. In fact, a variety of derivations exist. Here a new derivation is presented using the concepts of fractal reaction kinetics. This derivation provides an alternative basis for…

  2. Kink Wave Propagation in Thin Isothermal Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopin, I. P.; Nagorny, I. G.; Nippolainen, E.

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the propagation of kink waves in thin and isothermal expanding flux tubes in cylindrical geometry. By using the method of radial expansion for fluctuating variables we obtained a new kink wave equation. We show that including the radial component of the tube magnetic field leads to cutoff-free propagation of kink waves along thin flux tubes.

  3. Calculation of thermomechanical fatigue life based on isothermal behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Saltsman, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    The isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) crack initiation response of a hypothetical material was analyzed. Expected thermomechanical behavior was evaluated numerically based on simple, isothermal, cyclic stress-strain-time characteristics and on strainrange versus cyclic life relations that have been assigned to the material. The attempt was made to establish basic minimum requirements for the development of a physically accurate TMF life-prediction model. A worthy method must be able to deal with the simplest of conditions: that is, those for which thermal cycling, per se, introduces no damage mechanisms other than those found in isothermal behavior. Under these assumed conditions, the TMF life should be obtained uniquely from known isothermal behavior. The ramifications of making more complex assumptions will be dealt with in future studies. Although analyses are only in their early stages, considerable insight has been gained in understanding the characteristics of several existing high-temperature life-prediction methods. The present work indicates that the most viable damage parameter is based on the inelastic strainrange.

  4. Calculation of thermomechanical fatigue life based on isothermal behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Saltsman, James F.

    1987-01-01

    The isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) crack initiation response of a hypothetical material was analyzed. Expected thermomechanical behavior was evaluated numerically based on simple, isothermal, cyclic stress-strain - time characteristics and on strainrange versus cyclic life relations that have been assigned to the material. The attempt was made to establish basic minimum requirements for the development of a physically accurate TMF life-prediction model. A worthy method must be able to deal with the simplest of conditions: that is, those for which thermal cycling, per se, introduces no damage mechanisms other than those found in isothermal behavior. Under these assumed conditions, the TMF life should be obtained uniquely from known isothermal behavior. The ramifications of making more complex assumptions will be dealt with in future studies. Although analyses are only in their early stages, considerable insight has been gained in understanding the characteristics of several existing high-temperature life-prediction methods. The present work indicates that the most viable damage parameter is based on the inelastic strainrange.

  5. Monte Carlo Markov chain DEM reconstruction of isothermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Reale, F.; Testa, P.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Recent studies carried out with SOHO and Hinode high-resolution spectrometers have shown that the plasma in the off-disk solar corona is close to isothermal. If confirmed, these findings may have significant consequences for theoretical models of coronal heating. However, these studies have been carried out with diagnostic techniques whose ability to reconstruct the plasma distribution with temperature has not been thoroughly tested. Aims: In this paper, we carry out tests on the Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) technique with the aim of determining: 1) its ability to retrieve isothermal plasmas from a set of spectral line intensities, with and without random noise; 2) to what extent can it discriminate between an isothermal solution and a narrow multithermal distribution; and 3) how well it can detect multiple isothermal components along the line of sight. We also test the effects of 4) atomic data uncertainties on the results, and 5) the number of ions whose lines are available for the DEM reconstruction. Methods: We first use the CHIANTI database to calculate synthetic spectra from different thermal distributions: single isothermal plasmas, multithermal plasmas made of multiple isothermal components, and multithermal plasmas with a Gaussian DEM distribution with variable width. We then apply the MCMC technique on each of these synthetic spectra, so that the ability of the MCMC technique at reconstructing the original thermal distribution can be evaluated. Next, we add a random noise to the synthetic spectra, and repeat the exercise, in order to determine the effects of random errors on the results. We also we repeat the exercise using a different set of atomic data from those used to calculate synthetic line intensities, to understand the robustness of the results against atomic physics uncertainties. The size of the temperature bin of the MCMC reconstruction is varied in all cases, in order to determine the optimal width. Results: We find that the MCMC

  6. Nanocalorimetry-coupled time-of-flight mass spectrometry: identifying evolved species during high-rate thermal measurements.

    PubMed

    Yi, Feng; DeLisio, Jeffery B; Zachariah, Michael R; LaVan, David A

    2015-10-01

    We report on measurements integrating a nanocalorimeter sensor into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) for simultaneous thermal and speciation measurements at high heating rates. The nanocalorimeter sensor was incorporated into the extraction region of the TOFMS system to provide sample heating and thermal information essentially simultaneously with the evolved species identification. This approach can be used to measure chemical reactions and evolved species for a variety of materials. Furthermore, since the calorimetry is conducted within the same proximal volume as ionization and ion extraction, evolved species detected are in a collision-free environment, and thus, the possibility exists to interrogate intermediate and radical species. We present measurements showing the decomposition of ammonium perchlorate, copper oxide nanoparticles, and sodium azotetrazolate. The rapid, controlled, and quantifiable heating rate capabilities of the nanocalorimeter coupled with the 0.1 ms temporal resolution of the TOFMS provides a new measurement capability and insight into high-rate reactions, such as those seen with reactive and energetic materials, and adsorption\\desorption measurements, critical for understanding surface chemistry and accelerating catalyst selection. PMID:26372315

  7. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Isothermal and Non-isothermal Deep Drawing of IS 513 CR3 Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayavan, T.; Karthikeyan, L.; Senthilkumar, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    The present work aims to investigate the effects of the temperature gradient developed within the tool profiles on the formability of IS 513 CR3-grade steel sheets using the cup drawing test. The deformation characteristics of steel sheets were analyzed by comparing the thicknesses in various regions of the formed cup and also the limiting drawing ratios (LDR). Finite element simulations were carried out to predict the behavior of the steel sheets in isothermal and non-isothermal forming using Abaqus/Standard 6.12-1. An analytical model created by Kim was used to validate the experimental and finite element analysis (FEA) results on identical process parameters. Both the FEA and analytical modeling results showed that formability improvement is possible in warm forming; the findings are in good agreement with the experimental results in determining the locations and values of excessive thinning. The results also indicated that formability improvement cannot be achieved by keeping the tooling temperature at the same level. The LDR increased by around 9.5% in isothermal forming and by 19% in non-isothermal forming (with the punch maintained at a lower temperature compared with the die and blank holder). In addition, the fractured surfaces of unsuccessfully formed samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Metallographic investigations confirmed that the fracture mechanism during the forming of IS 513 CR3-grade steel sheets depends on the brittleness, strain hardening value, forming temperature, and magnitude of stresses developed.

  8. Crystallisation kinetics of some archetypal ionic liquids: isothermal and non-isothermal determination of the Avrami exponent.

    PubMed

    Pas, Steven J; Dargusch, Matthew S; MacFarlane, Douglas R

    2011-07-01

    The properties of ionic liquids give rise to applications in diverse technology areas including mechanical engineering, mining, aerospace and defence. The arbitrary physical property that defines an ionic liquid is a melting point below 100 °C, and as such, an understanding of crystallisation phenomena is extremely important. This is the first report dealing with the mechanism of crystallisation in ionic liquids. Assuming crystallisation of the ionic liquids is a thermal or mass diffusion-controlled process, the values of the isothermal Avrami exponent obtained from three different ionic liquids with three different anions and cations all indicate that growth occurs with a decreasing nucleation rate (n=1.8-2.2). For one of the ionic liquids it was possible to avoid crystallisation by fast cooling and then observe a devitrification upon heating through the glass transition. The isothermal Avrami exponent of devitrification suggested growth with an increasing nucleating rate (n=4.1), compared to a decreasing nucleation rate when crystallisation occurs on cooling from the melt (n=2.0). Two non-isothermal methods were employed to determine the Avrami exponent of devitrification. Both non-isothermal Avrami exponents were in agreement with the isothermal case (n=4.0-4.15). The applicability of JMAK theory suggests that the nucleation event in the ionic liquids selected is a random stochastic process in the volume of the material. Agreement between the isothermal and non-isothermal techniques for determining the Avrami exponent of devitrification suggests that the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy are independent of thermal history. The heating rate dependence of the glass transition enabled the calculation of the fragility index, which suggests that the ionic liquid is a "strong" glass former. This suggests that the temperature dependence of the rate constant could be close to Arrhenius, as assumed by JMAK theory. More generally, therefore, it can be

  9. The electrochemical performance of ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composite material for supercapacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jicheng; Zhao, Jiachang; Tang, Bohejin; Liu, Ping; Xu, Jingli

    2010-12-15

    A series of high performance ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composites have been synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the composites derived at the hydrothermal temperature of 125, 150, 175, 200, 250, 275 and 300 {sup o}C. The formation of nanosized nickel compounds, fully inside the mesopore system, was confirmed with XRD and TEM. An N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms measurements still revealed mesoporosity for the host/guest compounds. It is noteworthy that an OMC/nickel nitrate hydroxide hydrate composite (OMCN-150) exhibits more excellent performance. Based on the various hydrothermal temperatures of the composite, the capacitance of an OMCN-150 delivering the best electrochemical performance is about 2.4 (5 mV s{sup -1}) and 1.5 (50 mV s{sup -1}) times of the pristine OMC. The capacitance retention of an OMCN-150 is 96.1%, which indicates that the electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor is improved greatly, and represents novel research and significant advances in the field of electrode composite materials for supercapacitor. -- Graphical abstract: A series of high performance nickel compound/ordered mesoporous carbon composites were synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. Display Omitted

  10. The electrochemical performance of ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composite material for supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jicheng; Zhao, Jiachang; Tang, Bohejin; Liu, Ping; Xu, Jingli

    2010-12-01

    A series of high performance ordered mesoporous carbon/nickel compounds composites have been synthesized by a combination of incipient wetness impregnation and hydrothermal method for the first time. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N 2 adsorption/desorption isotherms and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the composites derived at the hydrothermal temperature of 125, 150, 175, 200, 250, 275 and 300 °C. The formation of nanosized nickel compounds, fully inside the mesopore system, was confirmed with XRD and TEM. An N 2 adsorption/desorption isotherms measurements still revealed mesoporosity for the host/guest compounds. It is noteworthy that an OMC/nickel nitrate hydroxide hydrate composite (OMCN-150) exhibits more excellent performance. Based on the various hydrothermal temperatures of the composite, the capacitance of an OMCN-150 delivering the best electrochemical performance is about 2.4 (5 mV s -1) and 1.5 (50 mV s -1) times of the pristine OMC. The capacitance retention of an OMCN-150 is 96.1%, which indicates that the electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor is improved greatly, and represents novel research and significant advances in the field of electrode composite materials for supercapacitor.

  11. Rapid methyl orange degradation using porous ZnO spheres photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Nirmalya; Ahmad, Rafiq; Kuk, Hyeon; Lee, Dae Hoon; Hahn, Yoon-Bong; Khang, Gilson

    2016-08-01

    Porous zinc oxide (ZnO) spheres were synthesized by facile low temperature solution route. The as-synthesized porous ZnO spheres were characterized in detail in terms of their morphological, structural, optical and photocatalytic properties using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy and Raman-scattering measurements. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis was performed to determine pore size distribution from the adsorption isotherm curves using the Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) method. Morphological and structural characterizations showed porous nature of ZnO spheres with high surface area, good crystallinity, wurtzite hexagonal phase and good optical features. Next, ZnO spheres were studied as photocatalyst for photodegradation of harmful dye, methyl orange (MO). Under ultraviolet light irradiation, the decrease in MO dye concentration was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy at different time intervals until the dye was completely degraded to colorless end product. Rapid MO dye decomposition was observed with a degradation rate of ~96.3% within the initial 120min, which is attributed to the porous nature, large specific surface area (114.6m(2)g(-1)), narrow pore size distribution (~2.5 to 25nm) evaluated from N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms analysis and excellent electron accepting features of the engineered porous ZnO spheres.

  12. Rapid methyl orange degradation using porous ZnO spheres photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Nirmalya; Ahmad, Rafiq; Kuk, Hyeon; Lee, Dae Hoon; Hahn, Yoon-Bong; Khang, Gilson

    2016-08-01

    Porous zinc oxide (ZnO) spheres were synthesized by facile low temperature solution route. The as-synthesized porous ZnO spheres were characterized in detail in terms of their morphological, structural, optical and photocatalytic properties using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy and Raman-scattering measurements. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis was performed to determine pore size distribution from the adsorption isotherm curves using the Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) method. Morphological and structural characterizations showed porous nature of ZnO spheres with high surface area, good crystallinity, wurtzite hexagonal phase and good optical features. Next, ZnO spheres were studied as photocatalyst for photodegradation of harmful dye, methyl orange (MO). Under ultraviolet light irradiation, the decrease in MO dye concentration was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy at different time intervals until the dye was completely degraded to colorless end product. Rapid MO dye decomposition was observed with a degradation rate of ~96.3% within the initial 120min, which is attributed to the porous nature, large specific surface area (114.6m(2)g(-1)), narrow pore size distribution (~2.5 to 25nm) evaluated from N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms analysis and excellent electron accepting features of the engineered porous ZnO spheres. PMID:27295413

  13. Equilibration of a Graphite Absorbed-Dose Calorimeter and the Quasi-Isothermal Mode of Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, A.; Cottens, E.; Paulsen, A.; Poffijn, A.

    1986-01-01

    From a mathematical model of a three-body absorbed-dose calorimeter a procedure for achieving thermal equilibrium is developed which uses calculational methods to determine the exact amount and timing of electrical energy to be dissipated in the calorimetric bodies. This procedure is applied to the quasi-isothermal mode of operation in which a radiation beam and equivalent electrical heating are alternately used to keep the calorimetric bodies at temperatures as constant as possible. Measurements of the dose rate of a 60Co beam in graphite using this technique are reported.

  14. Investigation of Strength Recovery in Welds of NUCu-140 Steel Through Multipass Welding and Isothermal Post-Weld Heat Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Jason T.; DuPont, John N.; Jain, Divya; Baik, Sung-Il; Seidman, David N.

    2015-11-01

    NUCu-140 is a ferritic copper precipitation-strengthened steel that is a candidate material for use in many naval and structural applications. Previous work has shown that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of NUCu-140 exhibit softening that is due to dissolution of the copper-rich precipitates. This study aims to recover the FZ and HAZ strength by re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates through either multiple weld passes or an isothermal post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). The potential use of multiple thermal cycles was investigated with HAZ simulations using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulator. The HAZ simulations represented two weld thermal cycles with different combinations of peak temperatures during the initial and secondary weld passes. To investigate the potential for a PWHT for strength recovery, gas tungsten arc weld samples were isothermally heated for various times and temperatures. Microhardness measurements revealed no strength recovery in the multipass HAZ samples. The time-dependent precipitate characteristics were modeled under the HAZ thermal cycle conditions, and the results showed that the lack of strength recovery could be attributed to insufficient time for re-precipitation during the secondary weld pass. Conversely, full strength recovery in the HAZ was observed in the isothermally heat treated samples. Atom probe tomography analysis correlated this strength recovery to re-precipitation of the copper-rich precipitates during the isothermal PWHT.

  15. Correlation of adsorption isotherms of hydrogen isotopes on mordenite adsorbents using reactive vacancy solution theory

    SciTech Connect

    Munakata, K.; Nakamura, A.; Kawamura, Y.

    2015-03-15

    The authors have applied the isotherm equations derived from the reactive vacancy solution theory (RVST) to correlation of experimental and highly non-ideal adsorption isotherms of hydrogen and deuterium on a mordenite adsorbent, and have examined the ability of the isotherm equations to match this correlation. Several isotherm equations such as Langmuir, Freundlich, Toth, Vacancy Solution Theory and so forth were also tested, but they did not work. For the Langmuir-Freundlich equation tests have indicated that its 'ability to correlate' of the adsorption isotherms is not satisfactory. For the multi-site Langmuir-Freundlich (MSLF) equation the correlation of the isotherms appears to be somewhat improved but remains unsatisfactory. The results show that the isotherm equations derived from RVST can better correlate the experimental isotherms.

  16. Experimental study of highly turbulent isothermal opposed-jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Gianfilippo; Gomez, Alessandro

    2010-10-01

    Opposed-jet flows have been shown to provide a valuable means to study a variety of combustion problems, but have been limited to either laminar or modestly turbulent conditions. With the ultimate goal of developing a burner for laboratory flames reaching turbulence regimes of relevance to practical systems, we characterized highly turbulent, strained, isothermal, opposed-jet flows using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The bulk strain rate was kept at 1250 s-1 and specially designed and properly positioned turbulence generation plates in the incoming streams boosted the turbulence intensity to well above 20%, under conditions that are amenable to flame stabilization. The data were analyzed with proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) and a novel statistical analysis conditioned to the instantaneous position of the stagnation surface. Both POD and the conditional analysis were found to be valuable tools allowing for the separation of the truly turbulent fluctuations from potential artifacts introduced by relatively low-frequency, large-scale instabilities that would otherwise partly mask the turbulence. These instabilities cause the stagnation surface to wobble with both an axial oscillation and a precession motion about the system axis of symmetry. Once these artifacts are removed, the longitudinal integral length scales are found to decrease as one approaches the stagnation line, as a consequence of the strained flow field, with the corresponding outer scale turbulent Reynolds number following a similar trend. The Taylor scale Reynolds number is found to be roughly constant throughout the flow field at about 200, with a value virtually independent of the data analysis technique. The novel conditional statistics allowed for the identification of highly convoluted stagnation lines and, in some cases, of strong three-dimensional effects, that can be screened, as they typically yield more than one stagnation line in the flow field. The ability to lock on the

  17. Isothermal dehydration of thin films of water and sugar solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Heyd, R.; Rampino, A.; Bellich, B.; Elisei, E.; Cesàro, A.; Saboungi, M.-L.

    2014-03-28

    The process of quasi-isothermal dehydration of thin films of pure water and aqueous sugar solutions is investigated with a dual experimental and theoretical approach. A nanoporous paper disk with a homogeneous internal structure was used as a substrate. This experimental set-up makes it possible to gather thermodynamic data under well-defined conditions, develop a numerical model, and extract needed information about the dehydration process, in particular the water activity. It is found that the temperature evolution of the pure water film is not strictly isothermal during the drying process, possibly due to the influence of water diffusion through the cellulose web of the substrate. The role of sugar is clearly detectable and its influence on the dehydration process can be identified. At the end of the drying process, trehalose molecules slow down the diffusion of water molecules through the substrate in a more pronounced way than do the glucose molecules.

  18. Chip Scale Package Integrity Assessment by Isothermal Aging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    1998-01-01

    Many aspects of chip scale package (CSP) technology, with focus on assembly reliability characteristics, are being investigated by the JPL-led consortia. Three types of test vehicles were considered for evaluation and currently two configurations have been built to optimize attachment processes. These test vehicles use numerous package types. To understand potential failure mechanisms of the packages, particularly solder ball attachment, the grid CSPs were subjected to environmental exposure. Package I/Os ranged from 40 to nearly 300. This paper presents both as assembled, up to 1, 000 hours of isothermal aging shear test results and photo micrographs, and tensile test results before and after 1,500 cycles in the range of -30/100 C for CSPs. Results will be compared to BGAs with the same the same isothermal aging environmental exposures.

  19. Sampling the isothermal-isobaric ensemble by Langevin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xingyu; Fang, Jun; Wang, Han

    2016-03-28

    We present a new method of conducting fully flexible-cell molecular dynamics simulation in isothermal-isobaric ensemble based on Langevin equations of motion. The stochastic coupling to all particle and cell degrees of freedoms is introduced in a correct way, in the sense that the stationary configurational distribution is proved to be consistent with that of the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. In order to apply the proposed method in computer simulations, a second order symmetric numerical integration scheme is developed by Trotter's splitting of the single-step propagator. Moreover, a practical guide of choosing working parameters is suggested for user specified thermo- and baro-coupling time scales. The method and software implementation are carefully validated by a numerical example. PMID:27036433

  20. Isothermal dehydration of thin films of water and sugar solutions.

    PubMed

    Heyd, R; Rampino, A; Bellich, B; Elisei, E; Cesàro, A; Saboungi, M-L

    2014-03-28

    The process of quasi-isothermal dehydration of thin films of pure water and aqueous sugar solutions is investigated with a dual experimental and theoretical approach. A nanoporous paper disk with a homogeneous internal structure was used as a substrate. This experimental set-up makes it possible to gather thermodynamic data under well-defined conditions, develop a numerical model, and extract needed information about the dehydration process, in particular the water activity. It is found that the temperature evolution of the pure water film is not strictly isothermal during the drying process, possibly due to the influence of water diffusion through the cellulose web of the substrate. The role of sugar is clearly detectable and its influence on the dehydration process can be identified. At the end of the drying process, trehalose molecules slow down the diffusion of water molecules through the substrate in a more pronounced way than do the glucose molecules.

  1. Application of isothermal current deep level transient spectroscopy to solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancour, D. P.; Pierret, R. F.; Lundstrom, M. S.; Melloch, M. R.

    1989-03-01

    The utility of isothermal current deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) techniques in directly probing solar cells is described and illustrated. A modified approach to processing the isothermal DLTS data is also presented. Specifically, it is pointed out that properly normalized isothermal data, whether derived from a current or capacitance transient, should conform to a single, temperature-independent curve.

  2. Isothermal and nonisothermal decomposition of famotidine in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Junnarkar, G H; Stavchansky, S

    1995-04-01

    The kinetics of hydrolysis of famotidine in aqueous solution was studied by isothermal and nonisothermal method over the pH range of 1.71 to 10.0. Nonisothermal kinetics was studied with the purpose of determining its use in the establishment of the expiration date of pharmaceutical preparations, particularly drugs in solutions and for assessment of stability characteristics of pharmaceutical formulations during the development stage. A comparison of isothermal (55, 70 and 85 degrees C) and nonisothermal kinetics was performed. Aqueous solutions of famotidine were buffered at pH 1.71, 2.24, 2.66, 4.0, 8.5, 9.0 and 10.0 were used. In the nonisothermal studies, the temperature rate of the reaction was continuously varied throughout the experiment. The energies of activation were found to be in close agreement for isothermal and nonisothermal studies, indicating that nonisothermal studies may save considerable amount of time in the early stages of drug development and stability testing. Logk-pH profiles were constructed for 55, 70 and 85 degrees C from the first-order rate constants obtained from isothermal studies at pH values ranging from 1.71 to 10.00. The pH-rate profile indicated that famotidine undergoes specific acid catalysis in the acidic region and general base catalysis in the alkaline region. Hydrolysis in the acidic and alkaline media resulted in the formation of four and five degradation products, respectively. A possible degradation pathway for the acidic and alkaline hydrolysis was discussed. PMID:7596998

  3. Multi-stage, isothermal CO preferential oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Skala, Glenn William; Brundage, Mark A.; Borup, Rodney Lynn; Pettit, William Henry; Stukey, Kevin; Hart-Predmore, David James; Fairchok, Joel

    2000-01-01

    A multi-stage, isothermal, carbon monoxide preferential oxidation (PrOx) reactor comprising a plurality of serially arranged, catalyzed heat exchangers, each separated from the next by a mixing chamber for homogenizing the gases exiting one heat exchanger and entering the next. In a preferred embodiment, at least some of the air used in the PrOx reaction is injected directly into the mixing chamber between the catalyzed heat exchangers.

  4. The special features of protein adsorption isotherms on silica adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukhrai, E. S.; Atyaksheva, L. F.; Pilipenko, O. S.

    2011-05-01

    The adsorption isotherms of hemoglobin, peroxidase, and β-galactosidase on silochrome and mesoporous and biporous silicas were comparatively studied. Adsorption developed in two stages, including fast "reversible" protein adsorption (equilibrium was reached in t ≤ 1-2 h) and a "slow stage" of irreversible binding in t ≫ 24 h (multipoint adsorption). The corresponding equilibrium constants were determined. The mechanism of unlimited linear association of peroxidase in the adsorption layer on the surface of silochrome was established.

  5. Non-isothermal buckling behavior of viscoplastic shell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riff, Richard; Simitses, G. J.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing the structural response of thin, metallic elasto-viscoplastic shell structures under large thermomechanical loads and their non-isothermal buckling behavior. Among the system responses associated with these loads and conditions are snap-through, buckling, thermal buckling, and creep buckling. This geometric and material nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and are considered in the model and the numerical treatment.

  6. Simplified models for estimating isothermal operating characteristics of food extruders.

    PubMed

    Levine, L; Rockwood, J

    1985-09-01

    A model of isothermal food extruder performance is described. Inferences about alternative extruder screw designs and their performance are drawn from the model. The model suggests that thread depth or diameter compression screws are superior in performance to a pitch compression screw. The advantage gained from using diameter compression screws is paid for with significantly higher rates of energy dissipation. The use of the model to characterize screws having both a compression zone and metering zone is described.

  7. Micromechanisms of thermomechanical fatigue: A comparison with isothermal fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Thermomechanical Fatigue (TMF) experiments were conducted on Mar-M 200, B-1900, and PWA-1480 (single crystals) over temperature ranges representative of gas turbine airfoil environments. The results were examined from both a phenomenological basis and a micromechanical basis. Depending on constituents present in the superalloy system, certain micromechanisms dominated the crack initiation process and significantly influenced the TMF lives as well as sensitivity of the material to the type TMF cycle imposed. For instance, high temperature cracking around grain boundary carbides in Mar-M 200 resulted in short in-phase TMF lives compared to either out-of-phase or isothermal lives. In single crystal PWA-1480, the type of coating applied was seen to be the controlling factor in determining sensitivity to the type of TMF cycle imposed. Micromechanisms of deformation were observed over the temperature range of interest to the TMF cycles, and provided some insight as to the differences between TMF damage mechanisms and isothermal damage mechanisms. Finally, the applicability of various life prediction models to TMF results was reviewed. Current life prediction models based on isothermal data must be modified before being generally applied to TMF.

  8. Optimization of turn-back primers in isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasumasa; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Aoki, Shintaro; Ishizu, Yuri; Kawai, Yuki; Kogo, Yasushi; Daub, Carsten O; Lezhava, Alexander; Arner, Erik; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2011-05-01

    The application of isothermal amplification technologies is rapidly expanding and currently covers different areas such as infectious disease, genetic disorder and drug dosage adjustment. Meanwhile, many of such technologies have complex reaction processes and often require a fine-tuned primer set where existing primer design tools are not sufficient. We have developed a primer selection system for one important primer, the turn-back primer (TP), which is commonly used in loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) and smart amplification process (SmartAmp). We chose 78 parameters related to the primer and target sequence, and explored their relationship to amplification speed using experimental data for 1344 primer combinations. We employed the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) method for parameter selection and estimation of their numerical coefficients. We subsequently evaluated our prediction model using additional independent experiments and compared to the LAMP primer design tool, Primer Explorer version4 (PE4). The evaluation showed that our approach yields a superior primer design in isothermal amplification and is robust against variations in the experimental setup. Our LASSO regression analysis revealed that availability of the 3'- and 5'-end of the primer are particularly important factors for efficient isothermal amplification. Our computer script is freely available at: http://gerg.gsc.riken.jp/TP_optimization/.

  9. Plant Canopy Temperature and Heat Flux Profiles: What Difference Does an Isothermal Skin Make?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, R. D.; Qualls, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature Ts plays a vital role in the determination of sensible (H) and latent heat flux, upwelling long-wave radiation, and ground heat flux. While it is widely recognized that there is a range of skin temperatures represented in even a homogeneous canopy, it is often necessary or convenient to treat the surface as isothermal. This study investigates, at the sub-canopy scale, the implications of assuming that a canopy is isothermal. The focus is on profiles within the canopy of air, foliage, and soil surface temperature, and of sensible and latent heat flux source strength. Data from a dense grassland at the Southern Great Plains experiment in 1997 (SGP97) were used to assess the ability of a multi-layer canopy model to match measured sensible and latent heat fluxes along with radiometric surface temperatures. In its standard mode, the model solves the energy balance for each canopy layer and uses Localized Near Field (LNF) theory to model the turbulent transport. The results suggest the model captures the most important features of canopy flux generation and transport, and support its use to investigate scalar profiles within canopies. For 112 data points at SGP97, the model produced realistic temperature and sensible heat flux source profiles. In addition, it was run in a mode that seeks the isothermal (soil and foliage) skin temperature (Ti) that provides the same Hproduced by the model in its standard mode. This produces profiles of air and foliage temperature and of sensible heat source strength that differ significantly from profiles from the standard mode. Based on these simulations, realistic canopies may have a mixture of positive and negative sensible heat flux sources at various heights, typically with large contributions from the soil surface. There is frequently a discontinuity between foliage temperatures near the soil and the actual soil surface temperature. For isothermal canopies, heat sources at all levels had the same sign and

  10. Direct Measurement of Adsorbed Gas Redistribution in Metal–Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying-Pin; Liu, Yangyang; Liu, Dahuan; Bosch, Mathieu; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-03-04

    Knowledge about the interactions between gas molecules and adsorption sites is essential to customize metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as adsorbents. The dynamic interactions occurring during adsorption/desorption working cycles with several states are especially complicated. Even so, the gas dynamics based upon experimental observations and the distribution of guest molecules under various conditions in MOFs have not been extensively studied yet. In this work, a direct time-resolved diffraction structure envelope (TRDSE) method using sequential measurements by in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has been developed to monitor several gas dynamic processes taking place in MOFs: infusion, desorption, and gas redistribution upon temperature change. The electron density maps indicate that gas molecules prefer to redistribute over heterogeneous types of sites rather than to exclusively occupy the primary binding sites. We found that the gas molecules are entropically driven from open metal sites to larger neighboring spaces during the gas infusion period, matching the localized-to-mobile mechanism. In addition, the partitioning ratio of molecules adsorbed at each site varies with different temperatures, as opposed to an invariant distribution mode. Equally important, the gas adsorption in MOFs is intensely influenced by the gas–gas interactions, which might induce more molecules to be accommodated in an orderly compact arrangement. This sequential TRDSE method is generally applicable to most crystalline adsorbents, yielding information on distribution ratios of adsorbates at each type of site.

  11. Fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms at the gold substrate revealed by QCM-D measurements and RSA modeling.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Katarzyna; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption kinetics of fibrinogen at a gold substrate at various pHs was thoroughly studied using the QCM-D method. The experimental were interpreted in terms of theoretical calculations performed according to the random sequential adsorption model (RSA). In this way, the hydration functions and water factors of fibrinogen monolayers were quantitatively evaluated at various pHs. It was revealed that for the lower range of fibrinogen coverage the hydration function were considerably lower than previously obtained for the silica sensor [33]. The lower hydration of fibrinogen monolayers on the gold sensor was attributed to its higher roughness. However, for higher fibrinogen coverage the hydration functions for both sensors became identical exhibiting an universal behavior. By using the hydration functions, the fibrinogen adsorption/desorption runs derived from QCM-D measurements were converted to the Γd vs. the time relationships. This allowed to precisely determine the maximum coverage that varied between 1.6mgm(-2) at pH 3.5 and 4.5mgm(-2) at pH 7.4 (for ionic strength of 0.15M). These results agree with theoretical eRSA modeling and previous experimental data derived by using ellipsometry, OWLS and TIRF. Various fibrinogen adsorption mechanisms were revealed by exploiting the maximum coverage data. These results allow one to develop a method for preparing fibrinogen monolayers of well-controlled coverage and molecule orientation.

  12. Mathematical techniques to characterize nitrogen isotherms from eroded sediments under conventional tillage and no tillage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinho, M. D.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.

    2011-12-01

    Soil specific surface area (SSA) is one of the most important soil properties as it affects chemical reactivity, cation exchange capacity and, in general, nutrient holding capacity. The SSA of a soil mainly depends on texture, clay type and organic matter content, which in turn are factors affecting the erosion potential. An important consideration in the link between soil erosion and nutrient transfer to waters is the well-documented relation between SSA (or particle size distribution) and nutrient losses. Because, sediment erosion and transport processes are particle size dependent, they influence also SSA. Characterization of both, soil nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms by monofractal and multifractal analysis has been demonstrated to be an useful tool, which allows a better understanding of the organization of the soil colloidal complex. Here, we report measures of nitrogen isotherm in sediments produced under three different management histories and we characterize them by various mathematical techniques including fractal and multifractal analysis. Soil and water losses from an Oxisol were evaluated under natural rain, at the experimental station of UNICAMP/ FEAGRI, Campinas, SP, Brazil. Experimental plots were 20 m x 30 m (i.e. 600 m2) and the management systems compared were no-tillage and two different conventional tillage techniques. Specific surface area determined by the classical BET method was significantly lower in sediments eroded from the no-tilled than from the tilled plots. The scaling properties of both nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms from all the studied sediment samples could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. Various fractal and multifractal parameters obtained from the adsorption and desorption characteristics also were useful to differentiate the impact of tillage treatment on the adsorption and desorption characteristics of the eroded sediments. Reasons for such differences have been already explored.

  13. Freundlich and dual Langmuir isotherm models for predicting 137Cs binding on Savannah River Site soils.

    PubMed

    Goto, Momoko; Rosson, Robert; Wampler, J Marion; Elliott, W Crawford; Serkiz, Steven; Kahn, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Distribution of 137Cs and stable cesium between aqueous solution and near-surface soil samples from five locations at the Savannah River Site was measured in order to develop a predictive model for 137Cs uptake by the soils. Sorption of 137Cs in these soils appears to be mostly by hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite. Batch sorption studies with 4 d for equilibration were conducted at three cesium concentrations and at two backing electrolyte (NaNO3) concentrations. The soil-solution mixtures were pH-adjusted to evaluate the effects of pH on cesium sorption. Sorbed cesium was related to the equilibrium aqueous cesium concentrations by a Freundlich isotherm model. Model fits on logarithmic scales have a common slope of 0.60 +/- 0.03 for acidic mixtures and 0.69 +/- 0.04 for neutralized mixtures but have unique intercepts that are influenced by backing electrolyte concentration and pH. An ion-exchange model is proposed that pertains to all five soils and relates the Freundlich isotherms to the cation exchange capacity of soil and the aqueous concentrations of cesium, sodium, and a third ionic species that was hydrogen in the acidic mixtures and potassium in the neutralized mixtures. Model fits are consistent with Kd values in the entire range of 5-2,300 L kg(-1) determined for the five soil types. As an alternate model, dual Langmuir isotherms were fitted to the data. The results suggest cesium sorption by (1) relatively few interlayer-wedge sites, highly selective for cesium, and (2) much more abundant but less selective sites on internal and external planar surfaces.

  14. Curie temperature isotherm analysis and tectonic implications of aeromagnetic data from Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, R.J.

    1988-10-10

    Estimates of the depth to the Curie temperature isotherm in Nevada are in accordance with other regional geologic and geophysical information and together can be explained in the context of present-day tectonism. A method to estimate the depth extent of magnetic sources from the statistical properties of magnetic anomalies was applied to a statewide compilation of aeromagnetic data from Nevada. Basal depths of magnetic sources show no apparent correlation with the so-called magnetic quiet zone, which trends northerly through the eastern part of the state, or with basin-and-range topography. However, certain correlations with published heat flow measurements are apparent and suggest that undulations in basal depth of magnetic sources are related in part to undulations in the Curie temperature isotherm. For example, an area of shallow basal depth (< 10 km) near Battle Mountain corresponds to an area of exceptionally high conductive heat flow and indicates a shallow depth to the Curie temperature isotherm in this region. A narrow zone of shallow basal depth extends south from the Battle Mountain area along the 118/degrees/W meridian to at least latitude 38/degrees/N, which also is a zone of historic surface offsets and high-magnitude earthquakes. The correspondence along the 118/degrees/ meridian of shallow basal depth, high heat flow, high lower crustal seismic velocities, attenuated P and S wave arrivals, historic faulting, and large earthquakes suggests that they each are related to an active north trending spreading zone in this part of the Basin and Range province. 83 references.

  15. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the binary systems of chlorine with difluoromethane, chlorodifluoromethane, and dichlorodifluoromethane at 10 C

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Cho, S.Y.; Nah, I.W.

    1998-07-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for difluoromethane + chlorine, chlorodifluoromethane + chlorine, and dichlorodifluoromethane + chlorine have been measured. The experimental data are correlated with the Peng-Robinson equation of state, and the relevant parameters are presented. All of the binary systems form minimum boiling homogeneous azeotropes at the experimental conditions. The correlation of the vapor-liquid equilibria was found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  16. Label-Free Determination of the Dissociation Constant of Small Molecule-Aptamer Interaction by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Marc; Suess, Beatrix

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful label-free technique to determine the binding constant as well as thermodynamic parameters of a binding reaction and is therefore well suited for the analysis of small molecule-RNA aptamer interaction. We will introduce you to the method and present a protocol for sample preparation and the calorimetric measurement. A detailed note section will point out useful tips and pitfalls.

  17. The Effect of the Moisture Regime on the Interaction of Fluorene with Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Giat, Vered; Mingelgrin, Uri

    2015-07-01

    Movement and persistence of organic molecules in porous media is strongly influenced by their interactions with the solid phase. Understanding these interactions is important for the execution of reliable risk assessments and for proper handling and disposal of toxic organic chemicals. Transport and attenuation models often assume rapid adsorption-desorption equilibration and neglect the role of the ever-changing moisture regime at the top of the vadose zone. Adsorption of the polyaromatic hydrocarbon fluorene (CH), both from hexane and from water, on a cattle manure compost and on two soils-Dor (montmorillonitic, 1.9% organic matter [OM]) and Maagan-Michael (kaolinitic, 5.2% OM)-was studied. Adsorption from hexane mimics interactions with surfaces exposed to a gas phase or to an apolar liquid. Desorption was measured after loading the sorbents with fluorene dissolved in hexane, evaporating the solvent, and incubation in the wet state (above saturation of the porous medium), air-dried, or while undergoing wetting-drying cycles. Although good correlation was observed between the adsorption coefficient of fluorene from water and OM content, adsorption from hexane highly correlated with the surface charge density of the sorbent (its cation exchange capacity or its polarity). When added to the sorbents from hexane and then desorbed into water, less fluorene desorbed than predicted by its aqueous adsorption isotherms. Desorption from all sorbents decreased as the duration of incubation at air dryness increased. Thus, fluorene exhibited adsorption-desorption hysteresis, and a particularly strong adsorption-desorption hysteresis was exhibited by fluorene-loaded Maagan-Michael soil after undergoing wetting-drying cycles. PMID:26437097

  18. Non-isothermal infiltration and tracer transport experiments on large soil columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotkova, Martina; Snehota, Michal; Cejkova, Eva; Tesar, Miroslav

    2016-04-01

    Isothermal and non-isothermal infiltration experiments were carried out in the laboratory on large undisturbed soil columns (19 cm in diameter, 25 cm high) taken at the experimental catchments Roklan (Sumava Mountains, Czech Republic) and Uhlirska (Jizera Mountains, Czech republic). The aim of the study was twofold. The first goal was to obtain water flow and heat transport data for indirect parameter estimation of thermal and hydraulic properties of soils from two sites by inverse modelling. The second aim was to investigate the extent of impact of the temperature on saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) and dispersity of solute transport. The temperature of infiltrating water in isothermal experiment (20 °C) was equal to the initial temperature of the sample. For non-isothermal experiment water temperature was 5°C, while the initial temperature of the sample was 20°C as in previous case. The experiment was started by flooding the sample surface. Then water level was maintained at constant level throughout the infiltration run using the optical sensor and peristaltic pump. Concentration pulse of deuterium was applied at the top of the soil sample, during the steady state flow. Initial pressure head in the sample was close to field capacity. Two tensiometers and two temperature sensors were inserted in the soil sample in two depths (9 and 15 cm below the top of the sample). Two additional temperature sensors monitored the temperature entering and leaving the samples. Water drained freely through the perforated plate at the bottom of sample by gravity. Inflow and outflow water flux densities, water pressure heads and soil temperatures were monitored continuously during experiments. Effluent was sampled in regular time intervals and samples were analysed for deuterium concentrations by laser spectroscopy to develop breakthrough curves. The outcome of experiments are the series of measured water fluxes, pressure heads and temperatures ready for inverse modelling

  19. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program. Task 4. Third Contractor Information Meeting. [Adsorption-desorption on geological media

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The study subject of this meeting was the adsorption and desorption of radionuclides on geologic media under repository conditions. This volume contans eight papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for all eight papers. (DLC)

  20. Cellulase stability, adsorption/desorption profiles and recycling during successive cycles of hydrolysis and fermentation of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Cristina; Felby, Claus; Gama, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    The potential of enzymes recycling after hydrolysis and fermentation of wheat straw under a variety of conditions was investigated, monitoring the activity of the enzymes in the solid and liquid fractions, using low molecular weight substrates. A significant amount of active enzymes could be recovered by recycling the liquid phase. In the early stage of the process, enzyme adsorb to the substrate, then gradually returning to the solution as the saccharification proceeds. At 50°C, normally regarded as an acceptable operational temperature for saccharification, the enzymes (Celluclast) significantly undergo thermal deactivation. The hydrolysis yield and enzyme recycling efficiency in consecutive recycling rounds can be increased by using high enzyme loadings and moderate temperatures. Indeed, the amount of enzymes in the liquid phase increased with its thermostability and hydrolytic efficiency. This study contributes towards developing effective enzymes recycling strategies and helping to reduce the enzyme costs on bioethanol production.

  1. A DIFFUSE-INTERFACE APPROACH FOR MODELING TRANSPORT, DIFFUSION AND ADSORPTION/DESORPTION OF MATERIAL QUANTITIES ON A DEFORMABLE INTERFACE*

    PubMed Central

    Teigen, Knut Erik; Li, Xiangrong; Lowengrub, John; Wang, Fan; Voigt, Axel

    2010-01-01

    A method is presented to solve two-phase problems involving a material quantity on an interface. The interface can be advected, stretched, and change topology, and material can be adsorbed to or desorbed from it. The method is based on the use of a diffuse interface framework, which allows a simple implementation using standard finite-difference or finite-element techniques. Here, finite-difference methods on a block-structured adaptive grid are used, and the resulting equations are solved using a non-linear multigrid method. Interfacial flow with soluble surfactants is used as an example of the application of the method, and several test cases are presented demonstrating its accuracy and convergence. PMID:21373370

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A SURROGATE SEDIMENT TO STUDY THE MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR ADSORPTION/DESORPTION HYSTERESIS. (R825513C016)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Valorization of biosorbent obtained from a forestry waste: Competitive adsorption, desorption and transport of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn.

    PubMed

    Cutillas-Barreiro, Laura; Paradelo, Remigio; Igrexas-Soto, Alba; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María José; Álvarez-Rodriguez, Esperanza; Garrote, Gil; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Bark from Pinus pinaster is one of the most abundant forestry wastes in Europe, and among the proposed technologies for its reutilization, the removal of heavy metals from wastewater has been gaining increasing attention. In this work, we have studied the performance of pine bark for heavy metal biosorption on competitive systems. Pb, Cu, Ni, Zn and Cd sorption and desorption at equilibrium were studied in batch experiments, whereas transport was studied in column experiments. Batch experiments were performed adding simultaneously different concentrations (0.08-3.15mM) of two or more metals in solution to pine bark samples. Column experiments were performed with 10mM solutions of two metals or a 5mM solution of the five metals. In general, the results under competitive conditions were different to those obtained in monoelemental experiments. The multi-metal batch experiments showed the adsorption sequence Pb≈Cu>Cd>Zn>Ni for lower metal doses, Pb>Cu>Cd>Zn>Ni for intermediate doses, and Pb>Cu>Cd≈Zn≈Ni for high metal doses. Desorption followed the sequence PbCu>Zn>Cd>Ni. The presence of a second metal affected the transport of all the elements studied except Pb, and confirmed the strong influence of Pb and Cu on the retention of the other metals. These results can help to appropriately design decontamination systems using this forestry waste.

  4. Adsorption-desorption mechanism of phosphate by immobilized nano-sized magnetite layer: interface and bulk interactions.

    PubMed

    Zach-Maor, Adva; Semiat, Raphael; Shemer, Hilla

    2011-11-15

    Phosphate adsorption mechanism by a homogenous porous layer of nano-sized magnetite particles immobilized onto granular activated carbon (nFe-GAC) was studied for both interface and bulk structures. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed phosphate bonding to the nFe-GAC predominantly through bidentate surface complexes. It was established that phosphate was adsorbed to the magnetite surface mainly via ligand exchange mechanism. Initially, phosphate was adsorbed by the active sites on the magnetite surface, after which it diffused into the interior of the nano-magnetite layer, as indicated by intraparticle diffusion model. This diffusion process continues regardless of interface interactions, revealing some of the outer magnetite binding sites for further phosphate uptake. Desorption, using NaOH solution, was found to be predominantly a surface reaction, at which hydroxyl ions replace the adsorbed phosphate ions only at the surface outer biding sites. Five successive fix-bed adsorption/regeneration cycles were successfully applied, without significant reduction in the nFe-GAC adsorption capacity and at high regeneration efficiency.

  5. Adsorption, desorption and fractionation of As(V) on untreated and mussel shell-treated granitic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco-Reigosa, N.; Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J. C.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Núñez-Delgado, A.

    2014-12-01

    As(V) adsorption and desorption were studied on granitic material, coarse and fine mussel shell, and granitic material amended with 12 and 24 t ha-1 fine shell, investigating the effect of different As(V) concentrations and different pH, as well as the fractions where the adsorbed As(V) was retained. As(V) adsorption was higher on fine than on coarse shell. Mussel shell amendment increased As(V) adsorption on granitic material. Adsorption data corresponding to the un-amended and shell-amended granitic material were satisfactory fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Desorption was always < 19% when the highest As(V) concentration (100 mg L-1) was added. Regarding the effect of pH, the granitic material showed its highest adsorption (66%) at pH < 6, and it was lower as pH increased. Fine shell presented notable adsorption in the whole pH range between 6 and 12, with a maximum of 83%. The shell-amended granitic material showed high As(V) adsorption, with a maximum (99%) at pH near 8, but decreasing as pH increased. Desorption varying pH was always < 26%. In the granitic material, desorption increased progressively when pH increased from 4 to 6, contrary to what happened to mussel shell. Regarding the fractionation of the adsorbed As(V), most of it was in the soluble fraction (weakly bound). Globally, the granitic material did not show high As(V) retention capacity, which implies risks of water pollution and transfer to the food chain; however, the mussel shell amendment increased As(V) retention, making this practice recommendable.

  6. Adsorption, desorption and fractionation of As(V) on untreated and mussel shell-treated granitic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco-Reigosa, N.; Cutillas-Barreiro, L.; Nóvoa-Muñoz, J. C.; Arias-Estévez, M.; Álvarez-Rodríguez, E.; Fernández-Sanjurjo, M. J.; Núñez-Delgado, A.

    2015-03-01

    As(V) adsorption and desorption were studied on granitic material, coarse and fine mussel shell and granitic material amended with 12 and 24 t ha-1 fine shell, investigating the effect of different As(V) concentrations and different pH as well as the fractions where the adsorbed As(V) was retained. As(V) adsorption was higher on fine than on coarse shell. Mussel shell amendment increased As(V) adsorption on granitic material. Adsorption data corresponding to the unamended and shell-amended granitic material were satisfactory fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich models. Desorption was always <19% when the highest As(V) concentration (100 mg L-1) was added. Regarding the effect of pH, the granitic material showed its highest adsorption (66%) at pH <6, and it was lower as pH increased. Fine shell presented notable adsorption in the whole pH range between 6 and 12, with a maximum of 83%. The shell-amended granitic material showed high As(V) adsorption, with a maximum (99%) at pH near 8, but decreased as pH increased. Desorption varying pH was always <26%. In the granitic material, desorption increased progressively when pH increased from 4 to 6, contrary to what happened to mussel shell. Regarding the fractionation of the adsorbed As(V), most of it was in the soluble fraction (weakly bound). The granitic material did not show high As(V) retention capacity, which could facilitate As(V) transfer to water courses and to the food chain in case of As(V) compounds being applied on this material; however, the mussel shell amendment increased As(V) retention, making this practice recommendable.

  7. Valorization of biosorbent obtained from a forestry waste: Competitive adsorption, desorption and transport of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn.

    PubMed

    Cutillas-Barreiro, Laura; Paradelo, Remigio; Igrexas-Soto, Alba; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María José; Álvarez-Rodriguez, Esperanza; Garrote, Gil; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Bark from Pinus pinaster is one of the most abundant forestry wastes in Europe, and among the proposed technologies for its reutilization, the removal of heavy metals from wastewater has been gaining increasing attention. In this work, we have studied the performance of pine bark for heavy metal biosorption on competitive systems. Pb, Cu, Ni, Zn and Cd sorption and desorption at equilibrium were studied in batch experiments, whereas transport was studied in column experiments. Batch experiments were performed adding simultaneously different concentrations (0.08-3.15mM) of two or more metals in solution to pine bark samples. Column experiments were performed with 10mM solutions of two metals or a 5mM solution of the five metals. In general, the results under competitive conditions were different to those obtained in monoelemental experiments. The multi-metal batch experiments showed the adsorption sequence Pb≈Cu>Cd>Zn>Ni for lower metal doses, Pb>Cu>Cd>Zn>Ni for intermediate doses, and Pb>Cu>Cd≈Zn≈Ni for high metal doses. Desorption followed the sequence PbCu>Zn>Cd>Ni. The presence of a second metal affected the transport of all the elements studied except Pb, and confirmed the strong influence of Pb and Cu on the retention of the other metals. These results can help to appropriately design decontamination systems using this forestry waste. PMID:27232204

  8. Adsorption, Desorption, and Diffusion of Nitrogen in a Model Nanoporous Material: I. Surface Limited Desorption Kinetics in Amorphous Solid Water

    SciTech Connect

    Zubkov, Tykhon; Smith, R. Scott; Engstrom, Todd R.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2007-11-14

    The adsorption and desorption kinetics of N2 on porous amorphous solid water (ASW) films were studied using molecular beam techniques, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The ASW films were grown on Pt(111) at 23 K by ballistic deposition from a collimated H2O beam at various incident angles to control the film porosity. The experimental results show that the N2 condensation coefficient is essentially unity until near saturation, independent of the ASW film thickness. This means that N2 transport within the porous films is rapid. The TPD results show that the desorption of a fixed dose of N2 shifts to higher temperature with ASW film thickness. Kinetic analysis of the TPD spectra shows that a film thickness rescaling of the coverage dependent activation energy curve results in a single master curve. Simulation of the TPD spectra using this master curve results in a quantitative fit to the experiments over a wide range of ASW thicknesses (up to 1000 layers, ~0.5 mm). The success of the rescaling model indicates that N2 transport within the porous film is rapid enough to maintain a uniform distribution throughout the film on a time scale faster than desorption.

  9. Adsorption/desorption properties of copper ions on the surface of iron-coated sand using BET and EDAX analyses.

    PubMed

    Lai, C H; Lo, S L; Chiang, H L

    2000-10-01

    This study was conducted to develop a heating process for coating hydrated iron oxide on the sand surface to utilise the adsorbent properties of the coating and the filtration properties of the sand. BET and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses were used to investigate the surface properties of the coated layer. An energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) technique of analysis was used for characterising metal adsorption sites on the iron-coated sand surface. The results indicated that the iron-coated sand had more micropores and higher specific surface area because of the attachment of iron oxide. Copper ions could penetrate into the micropores and mesopores of iron oxide on sand surface, and the regeneration of the iron-coated sand could be achieved by soaking with pH = 3.0 acid solution. Besides, the results of EDAX analysis showed that copper ions were chemisorbed on the surface of iron-coated sand. Results of the study developed an innovative technology for coating iron oxide on sand surface for the treatment of heavy metal in water.

  10. High-precision, automated integration of multiple isothermal titration calorimetric thermograms: new features of NITPIC

    PubMed Central

    Scheuermann, Thomas H.; Brautigam, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has become a standard and widely available tool to measure the thermodynamic parameters of macromolecular associations. Modern applications of the method, including global analysis and drug screening, require the acquisition of multiple sets of data; sometimes these data sets number in the hundreds. Therefore, there is a need for quick, precise, and automated means to process the data, particularly at the first step of data analysis, which is commonly the integration of the raw data to yield an interpretable isotherm. Herein, we describe enhancements to an algorithm that previously has been shown to provide an automated, unbiased, and high-precision means to integrate ITC data. These improvements allow for the speedy and precise serial integration of an unlimited number of ITC data sets, and they have been implemented in the freeware program NITPIC, version 1.1.0. We present a comprehensive comparison of the performance of this software against an older version of NITPIC and a current version of Origin, which is commonly used for integration. The new methods recapitulate the excellent performance of the previous versions of NITPIC while speeding it up substantially, and their precision is significantly better than that of Origin. This new version of NITPIC is therefore well suited to the serial integration of many ITC data sets. PMID:25524420

  11. The high-temperature phase equilibria of the Ni–Sn–Zn system: Isothermal sections

    PubMed Central

    Schmetterer, Clemens; Rajamohan, Divakar; Ipser, Herbert; Flandorfer, Hans

    2011-01-01

    In this work three complete isothermal sections of the Ni–Sn–Zn system at 700, 800 and 900 °C are presented. They were constructed based on experimental investigation of more than 60 alloy samples. Powder XRD, single crystal XRD, EPMA, and DTA measurements on selected samples were carried out. Two new ternary compounds, designated as τ2 (Ni5Sn4Zn) and τ3 (Ni7Sn9Zn5), were identified and their homogeneity ranges and crystal structures could be described. Whereas τ3 is only present at 700 °C, the τ2-phase was found at both 700 and 800 °C. No truly ternary compound could be found in the isothermal section at 900 °C. A seemingly ternary compound at 20 at% Sn in the Ni-rich part of Ni–Sn–Zn was found at 800 and 900 °C. Our XRD results, however, indicate that this phase is a ternary solid solution of Ni3Sn-HT from constituent binary Ni–Sn. It is stabilized to lower temperatures by additions of Zn. These new experimental results will provide valuable information to the thermodynamic description of alloy systems relevant for high-temperature lead-free soldering. PMID:27087750

  12. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments.

    PubMed

    Becker, M; Dreißigacker, C; Klein, S; Kargl, F

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min(-1) up to 10 K min(-1) can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K-1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  13. Near-isothermal furnace for in situ and real time X-ray radiography solidification experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, M. Dreißigacker, C.; Klein, S.; Kargl, F.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we present a newly developed near-isothermal X-ray transparent furnace for in situ imaging of solidification processes in thin metallic samples. We show that the furnace is ideally suited to study equiaxed microstructure evolution and grain interaction. To observe the growth dynamics of equiaxed dendritic structures, a minimal temperature gradient across the sample is required. A uniform thermal profile inside a circular sample is achieved by positioning the sample in the center of a cylindrical furnace body surrounded by a circular heater arrangement. Performance tests with the hypo-eutectic Al-15wt.%Cu and the near-eutectic Al-33wt.%Cu alloys validate the near-isothermal character of the sample environment. Controlled cooling rates of less than 0.5 K min{sup −1} up to 10 K min{sup −1} can be achieved in a temperature range of 720 K–1220 K. Integrated in our rotatable laboratory X-ray facility, X-RISE, the furnace provides a large field of view of 10.5 mm in diameter and a high spatial resolution of ∼4 μm. With the here presented furnace, equiaxed dendrite growth models can be rigorously tested against experiments on metal alloys by, e.g., enabling dendrite growth velocities to be determined as a function of undercooling or solutal fields in front of the growing dendrite to be measured.

  14. Phytoremediation and absorption isotherms of heavy metal ions by Convolvulus tricolor (CTC).

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Rezvan; Mahdavian, Leila

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, use of plants for remediation of contaminated soils, especially removal of heavy metals, is considered. The current study tends to investigate the removal of lead and nickel ions by the Convolvulus tricolor (CTC), was grown for 30 days in different concentrations of lead and nickel ions. Then concentration of them in soil and different organs of the plant was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. The highest absorbed of them occurred in concentration 0.001N, which highest Pb(2+) accumulation is in the aerial parts of the plant: leaf > stem > root and for Ni(2)+: root > stem > leaf. No ion was observed into the flowers and nickel ion absorption is more of lead ion in different plant organs of CTC. The experimental isotherm data were investigated using isotherms of Langmuir, Freundlich, BET, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (DRK). The correlation coefficient for all of them is calculated that show the best correlation coefficient for Ni(2+) adsorption is obtained BET model, whereas for Pb(2+) adsorption in root is Freundlich model but for its leaf and stem is BET model. The results show, CTC is suitable for Pb(2+) and Ni(2+) and this technique is in-situ method, simple, and low cost. PMID:26458024

  15. The Apparent Critical Isotherm for Cryoinsult-Induced Osteonecrotic Lesions in Emu Femoral Heads

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Jessica E.; Pedersen, Douglas R.; Robinson, Duane A.; Conzemius, Michael G.; Baer, Thomas E.; Brown, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Cryoinsult-induced osteonecrosis (ON) in the emu femoral head provides a unique opportunity to systematically explore the pathogenesis of ON in an animal model that progresses to human-like femoral head collapse. Among the various characteristics of cryoinsult, the maximally cold temperature attained is one plausible determinant of tissue necrosis. To identify the critical isotherm required to induce development of osteonecrosis in the cancellous bone of the emu femoral head, a thermal finite element (FE) model of intraoperative cryoinsults was developed. Thermal material property values of emu cancellous bone were estimated from FE simulations of cryoinsult to emu cadaver femora, by varying model properties until the FE-generated temperatures matched corresponding thermocouple measurements. The resulting FE model, with emu-bone-specific thermal properties augmented to include blood flow effects, was then used to study intraoperatively performed in vivo cryoinsults. Comparisons of minimum temperatures attained at FE nodes corresponding to the three-dimensional histologically apparent boundary of the region of osteonecrosis were made for six experimental cryoinsults. Series-wide, a critical isotherm of 3.5°C best corresponded to the boundary of the osteonecrotic lesions. PMID:18561937

  16. Statistical physics studies of multilayer adsorption isotherm in food materials and pore size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouaini, F.; Knani, S.; Ben Yahia, M.; Ben Lamine, A.

    2015-08-01

    Water sorption isotherms of foodstuffs are very important in different areas of food science engineering such as for design, modeling and optimization of many processes. The equilibrium moisture content is an important parameter in models used to predict changes in the moisture content of a product during storage. A formulation of multilayer model with two energy levels was based on statistical physics and theoretical considerations. Thanks to the grand canonical ensemble in statistical physics. Some physicochemical parameters related to the adsorption process were introduced in the analytical model expression. The data tabulated in literature of water adsorption at different temperatures on: chickpea seeds, lentil seeds, potato and on green peppers were described applying the most popular models applied in food science. We also extend the study to the newest proposed model. It is concluded that among studied models the proposed model seems to be the best for description of data in the whole range of relative humidity. By using our model, we were able to determine the thermodynamic functions. The measurement of desorption isotherms, in particular a gas over a solid porous, allows access to the distribution of pore size PSD.

  17. High-precision, automated integration of multiple isothermal titration calorimetric thermograms: new features of NITPIC.

    PubMed

    Scheuermann, Thomas H; Brautigam, Chad A

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has become a standard and widely available tool to measure the thermodynamic parameters of macromolecular associations. Modern applications of the method, including global analysis and drug screening, require the acquisition of multiple sets of data; sometimes these data sets number in the hundreds. Therefore, there is a need for quick, precise, and automated means to process the data, particularly at the first step of data analysis, which is commonly the integration of the raw data to yield an interpretable isotherm. Herein, we describe enhancements to an algorithm that previously has been shown to provide an automated, unbiased, and high-precision means to integrate ITC data. These improvements allow for the speedy and precise serial integration of an unlimited number of ITC data sets, and they have been implemented in the freeware program NITPIC, version 1.1.0. We present a comprehensive comparison of the performance of this software against an older version of NITPIC and a current version of Origin, which is commonly used for integration. The new methods recapitulate the excellent performance of the previous versions of NITPIC while speeding it up substantially, and their precision is significantly better than that of Origin. This new version of NITPIC is therefore well suited to the serial integration of many ITC data sets. PMID:25524420

  18. Indoor pollutant mixing time in an isothermal closed room: An investigation using CFD

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.; Lobscheid, C.; Abadie, M.O.; Finlayson, E.U.

    2003-07-01

    We report on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of mixing time of a pollutant in an unventilated, mechanically mixed, isothermal room. The study aims to determine: (1) the adequacy of the standard Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes two-equation ({kappa}-{var_epsilon}) turbulence model for predicting the mixing time under these conditions and (2) the extent to which the mixing time depends on the room airflow, rather than the source location within the room. The CFD simulations modeled the 12 mixing time experiments performed by Drescher et al. (Indoor Air 5 (1995) 204) using a point pulse release in an isothermal, sealed room mechanically mixed with variable power blowers. Predictions of mixing time were found in good agreement with experimental measurements, over an order of magnitude variation in blower power. Additional CFD simulations were performed to investigate the relation between pollutant mixing time and source location. Seventeen source locations and five blower configurations were investigated. Results clearly show large dependence of the mixing time on the room airflow, with some dependence on source location. We further explore dependence of mixing time on the velocity and turbulence intensity at the source location. Implications for positioning air-toxic sensors in rooms are briefly discussed.

  19. A NON-ISOTHERMAL THEORY FOR INTERPRETING SODIUM LINES IN TRANSMISSION SPECTRA OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Heng, Kevin; Lavie, Baptiste; Wyttenbach, Aurélien; Ehrenreich, David; Lovis, Christophe; Sing, David K.

    2015-04-10

    We present a theory for interpreting the sodium lines detected in transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres. Previous analyses employed the isothermal approximation and dealt only with the transit radius. By recognizing the absorption depth and the transit radius as being independent observables, we develop a theory for jointly interpreting both quantities, which allows us to infer the temperatures and number densities associated with the sodium lines. We are able to treat a non-isothermal situation with a constant temperature gradient. Our novel diagnostics take the form of simple-to-use algebraic formulae and require measurements of the transit radii (and their corresponding absorption depths) at line center and in the line wing for both sodium lines. We apply our diagnostics to the HARPS data of HD 189733b, confirm the upper atmospheric heating reported by Huitson et al., derive a temperature gradient of 0.4376 ± 0.0154 K km{sup −1}, and find densities ∼1–10{sup 4} cm{sup −3}.

  20. Failure Mechanisms During Isothermal Fatigue of SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, P. K.; Bartolotta, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Failure mechanisms during isothermal fatigue of unidirectional SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb (at.%) composites have been determined by microstructural analysis of samples from tests interrupted prior to the end of life and from tests conducted to failure. Specimens from three regions of life were examined based on the maximum strain from a fatigue life diagram: Region 1 (high strain), Region 2 (mid-strain) and Region 3 (low strain). Crack lengths were also measured from interrupted samples and compared based on temperature (23-815 C), region of life and numbers of cycles. Region 1 was controlled by fiber-dominated failure. A transition zone was observed between Regions 1 and 2 due to competition between failure mechanisms. Failure in Region 2 was generally described as surface-initiated cracking with varying amounts of fiber bridging. However, the specific descriptions of crack propagation through the fibers and matrix varied with strain and temperature over this broad region. Region 3 exhibited endurance behaviour at 23 C with no cracking after lO(exp 6) cycles. However at 425 C, surface-initiated cracking was observed after 10(exp 6) cycles with fractured fibers in the crack wake. If endurance behaviour exists for conditions of isothermal fatigue in air at temperatures of greater than or equal to 425 C, it may only be found at very low strains and at greater than 10(exp 6) cycles.

  1. Bithermal fatigue - A link between isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bill, Robert C.; Fanti, Paolo D.

    1988-01-01

    A technique for bithermal fatigue testing is presented in which the tensile and compressive halves of the cycle are conducted isothermally at two significantly different temperatures. With reference to experimental results obtained for a nickel-base superalloy, B1900 + Hf, it is shown that bithermal fatigue testing is a simple alternative to thermomechanical fatigue and can provide a conservative determination of thermomechanical fatigue life for creep damage dominated failure modes. Bithermal fatigue results can be directly related to thermomechanical fatigue results through the use of an appropriate damage rule.

  2. Adsorption Isotherm studies of Methyl Bromide adsorbed on Magnesium Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Teresa; Sprung, Michael

    2005-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of polar molecules with ionic surfaces is technologically very important. Using high precision, volumetric adsorption isotherms the layering properties of methyl bromide on the MgO(100) surface were examined between 164 K and 179 K. Methyl bromide (Triple point = 179.49K) is found to exhibit two layering transitions within this temperature interval. Thermodynamic quantities derived from this study including the layering transition temperatures, the 2D compressibility, layer enthalpy and entropy of adsorption, and the isosteric enthalpy of adsorption will be presented. Comparisons with the adsorption properties of methyl chloride and methyl iodide will also be included.

  3. Studying the allosteric energy cycle by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Julvez, Marta; Abian, Olga; Vega, Sonia; Medina, Milagros; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful biophysical technique which allows a complete thermodynamic characterization of protein interactions with other molecules. The possibility of dissecting the Gibbs energy of interaction into its enthalpic and entropic contributions, as well as the detailed additional information experimentally accessible on the intermolecular interactions (stoichiometry, cooperativity, heat capacity changes, and coupled equilibria), make ITC a suitable technique for studying allosteric interactions in proteins. Two experimental methodologies for the characterization of allosteric heterotropic ligand interactions by ITC are described in this chapter, illustrated with two proteins with markedly different structural and functional features: a photosynthetic electron transfer protein and a drug target viral protease.

  4. Isothermal compressibility determination across Bose-Einstein condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda-Cuevas, F. J.; Castilho, P. C. M.; Mercado-Gutierrez, E. D.; Fritsch, A. R.; Muniz, S. R.; Lucioni, E.; Roati, G.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2015-07-01

    We apply the global thermodynamic variables approach to experimentally determine the isothermal compressibility parameter κT of a trapped Bose gas across the phase transition. We demonstrate the behavior of κT around the critical pressure, revealing the second-order nature of the phase transition. Compressibility is the most important susceptibility to characterize the system. The use of global variables shows advantages with respect to the usual local density approximation method and can be applied to a broad range of situations.

  5. Isothermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication of point contacts. 1: Theoretical formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The isothermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) of a point contact was analyzed numerically by simultaneously solving the elasticity and Reynolds equations. In the elasticity analysis the contact zone was divided into equal rectangular areas, and it was assumed that a uniform pressure was applied over each area. In the numerical analysis of the Reynolds equation, a phi analysis (where phi is equal to the pressure times the film thickness of the 3/2 power) was used to help the relaxation process. The EHL point contact analysis is applicable for the entire range of elliptical parameters and is valid for any combination of rolling and sliding within the contact.

  6. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry: Assisted Crystallization of RNA-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Da Veiga, Cyrielle; Mezher, Joelle; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The success rate of nucleic acids/ligands co-crystallization can be significantly improved by performing preliminary biophysical analyses. Among suitable biophysical approaches, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is certainly a method of choice. ITC can be used in a wide range of experimental conditions to monitor in real time the formation of the RNA- or DNA-ligand complex, with the advantage of providing in addition the complete binding profile of the interaction. Following the ITC experiment, the complex is ready to be concentrated for crystallization trials. This chapter describes a detailed experimental protocol for using ITC as a tool for monitoring RNA/small molecule binding, followed by co-crystallization.

  7. DNA heats up: energetics of genome ejection from phage revealed by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Jeembaeva, Meerim; Jönsson, Bengt; Castelnovo, Martin; Evilevitch, Alex

    2010-02-01

    Most bacteriophages are known to inject their double-stranded DNA into bacteria upon receptor binding in an essentially spontaneous way. This downhill thermodynamic process from the intact virion to the empty viral capsid plus released DNA is made possible by the energy stored during active packaging of the genome into the capsid. Only indirect measurements of this energy have been available until now, using either single-molecule or osmotic suppression techniques. In this work, we describe for the first time the use of isothermal titration calorimetry to directly measure the heat released (or, equivalently, the enthalpy) during DNA ejection from phage lambda, triggered in solution by a solubilized receptor. Quantitative analyses of the results lead to the identification of thermodynamic determinants associated with DNA ejection. The values obtained were found to be consistent with those previously predicted by analytical models and numerical simulations. Moreover, the results confirm the role of DNA hydration in the energetics of genome confinement in viral capsids.

  8. Kinetics of trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Maximova, Ksenia; Trylska, Joanna

    2015-10-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was applied to determine enzymatic activity and inhibition. We measured the Michaelis-Menten kinetics for trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of two substrates, casein (an insoluble macromolecule substrate) and Nα-benzoyl-dl-arginine β-naphthylamide (a small substrate), and estimated the thermodynamic parameters in the temperature range from 20 to 37°C. The inhibitory activities of reversible (small molecule benzamidine) and irreversible (small molecule phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride and macromolecule α1-antitrypsin) inhibitors of trypsin were also determined. We showed the usefulness of ITC for fast and direct measurement of inhibition constants and half-maximal inhibitory concentrations and for predictions of the mechanism of inhibition. ITC kinetic assays could be an easy and straightforward way to estimate Michaelis-Menten constants and the effectiveness of inhibitors as well as to predict the inhibition mechanism. ITC efficiency was found to be similar to that of classical spectrophotometric enzymatic assays.

  9. Non-Isothermal Experimental Study of the Constrained Vapor Bubble Thermosyphon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karthikeyan, Muthu; Huang, Jianming; Plawsky, Joel; Wayner, Peter, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical techniques to study non-isothermal transport processes in the constrained vapor bubble thermosyphon (CVBT) were developed using a pentane/quartz system. The transport processes can be evaluated by measuring the liquid film profile, which gives the pressure field, and the temperature field. The axial variation in the capillary pressure was measured using an image-analyzing interferometer that is based on computer-enhanced video microscopy of the naturally occurring interference fringes. Thermoelectric coolers were used to control the temperature level in the condensation region and, therefore, the length of the approximately 'adiabatic' surface region which is a function of the temperature difference between the CVBT surface and the surroundings. High values for the axial thermal conductance in the 'adiabatic' surface region were demonstrated under certain conditions.

  10. Isothermal physical aging characterization of Polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) and Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) films by creep and stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yunlong; Bradshaw, Roger D.

    2007-03-01

    This paper considers the experimental characterization of isothermal physical aging of PEEK and PPS films using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Using the short-term test method established by Struik, momentary creep and stress relaxation curves were measured at several temperatures within 15-35°C below the glass transition temperature ( T g ) at various aging times. Stress and strain levels were such that the materials remained in the linear viscoelastic regime. These curves were then shifted together to determine momentary master curves and shift rates using the PHYAGE program. In order to validate the obtained isothermal physical aging behavior, the results of creep and stress relaxation testing were compared and shown to be consistent with one another using appropriate interconversion of the viscoelastic material functions. Time-temperature superposition of the master curves was also performed. The temperature shift factors and aging shift rates for both PEEK and PPS were consistent for both creep and stress relaxation test results.

  11. 3D Finite Element Analysis of Spider Non-isothermal Forging Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ling; Wei, Wei; Wei, Kun Xia; Alexandrov, Igor V.; Hu, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The differences of effective stress, effective strain, velocity field, and the load-time curves between the spider isothermal and non-isothermal forging processes are investigated by making full use of 3D FEA, and verified by the production experiment of spider forging. Effective stress is mainly concentrated on the pin, and becomes lower closer to the front of the pin. The maximum effective strain in the non-isothermal forging is lower than that in the isothermal. The great majority of strain in the non-isothermal forging process is 1.76, which is larger than the strain of 1.31 in the isothermal forging. The maximum load required in the isothermal forging is higher than that in the non-isothermal. The maximum experimental load and deformation temperature in the spider production are in good agreement with those in the non-isothermal FEA. The results indicate that the non-isothermal 3D FEA results can guide the design of the spider forging process.

  12. Ab initio prediction of adsorption isotherms for small molecules in metal-organic frameworks: the effect of lateral interactions for methane/CPO-27-Mg.

    PubMed

    Sillar, Kaido; Sauer, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    A hybrid method that combines density functional theory for periodic structures with wave function-based electron correlation methods for finite-size models of adsorption sites is employed to calculate energies for adsorption of CH(4) onto different sites in the metal-organic framework (MOF) CPO-27-Mg (Mg-MOF-74) with chemical accuracy. The adsorption energies for the Mg(2+), linker, second layer sites are -27.8, -18.3, and -15.1 kJ/mol. Adsorbate-adsorbate interactions increase the average CH(4) adsorption energy by about 10% (2.4 kJ/mol). The free rotor-harmonic oscillator-ideal gas model is applied to calculate free energies/equilibrium constants for adsorption on the individual sites. This information is used in a multisite Langmuir model, augmented with a Bragg-Williams model for lateral interactions, to calculate adsorption isotherms. This ab initio approach yields the contributions of the individual sites to the final isotherms and also of the lateral interactions that contribute about 15% to the maximum excess adsorption capacity. Isotherms are calculated for both absolute amounts, for calculation of isosteric heats of adsorption as function of coverage, and excess amounts, for comparison with measured isotherms. Agreement with observed excess isotherms is reached if the experimentally determined limited accessibility of adsorption sites (78%) is taken into account.

  13. Crystallographic orientation variation of isothermal pearlite under high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Lan Zhou, Xiaoling Chen, Jianhao

    2015-07-15

    Crystallographic orientation (CO) variation of magnetic-induced pearlite (MIP) during its microstructure evolution in 19.8 T was investigated by electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD). It is closely related to the isothermal temperatures (ITs) and the applied magnetic time (MT) during the process of MIP formation. The <100> easy magnetization direction in MIP colonies is strengthened with the MT within the certain transformed fraction of MIP (f{sub MIP}) at the relatively lower IT (983 K) above the eutectoid temperature but below the magnetically shifted upward eutectoid temperature, while this special CO tends to be weakened at a relatively higher IT (995 K). For the same MT, the higher the IT, the relatively larger is the proportion in <100> orientation for MIP colonies at the early growth stage. These results have demonstrated that the change of <100> orientation of MIP is closely related to the growth rate of pearlite ferrite (PF), and strengthened mainly at early transformation stage. When f{sub MIP} reaches some value, the growth rate of MIP at other COs, such as <110>, even at the hard magnetization direction, turns to present speed-up. - Highlights: • HMF can induce pearlite with different fractions above the eutectoid temperature. • CO is closely related to isothermal temperatures and applied magnetic time. • <100> direction is related to the growth rate of PF, and strengthened at early stage. • When f{sub MIP} reaches some value, the growth rate at other COs turns to present speed-up.

  14. Sequence dependence of isothermal DNA amplification via EXPAR

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jifeng; Ferguson, Tanya M.; Shinde, Deepali N.; Ramírez-Borrero, Alissa J.; Hintze, Arend; Adami, Christoph; Niemz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal nucleic acid amplification is becoming increasingly important for molecular diagnostics. Therefore, new computational tools are needed to facilitate assay design. In the isothermal EXPonential Amplification Reaction (EXPAR), template sequences with similar thermodynamic characteristics perform very differently. To understand what causes this variability, we characterized the performance of 384 template sequences, and used this data to develop two computational methods to predict EXPAR template performance based on sequence: a position weight matrix approach with support vector machine classifier, and RELIEF attribute evaluation with Naïve Bayes classification. The methods identified well and poorly performing EXPAR templates with 67–70% sensitivity and 77–80% specificity. We combined these methods into a computational tool that can accelerate new assay design by ruling out likely poor performers. Furthermore, our data suggest that variability in template performance is linked to specific sequence motifs. Cytidine, a pyrimidine base, is over-represented in certain positions of well-performing templates. Guanosine and adenosine, both purine bases, are over-represented in similar regions of poorly performing templates, frequently as GA or AG dimers. Since polymerases have a higher affinity for purine oligonucleotides, polymerase binding to GA-rich regions of a single-stranded DNA template may promote non-specific amplification in EXPAR and other nucleic acid amplification reactions. PMID:22416064

  15. Bondi-like Accretion in Magnetized Supersonic Isothermal Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burleigh, Kaylan J.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    The Bondi and Bondi-Hoyle-Lytlleton formulas give the order of magnitude steady-accretion rate onto a point mass at rest or moving, respectively, in a uniform density gas in the limit of negligible gas self-gravity. This applies in star-forming clouds where self-gravity is negligible near protostars and new-born stars, but instead of being uniform the gas is supersonically turbulent and threaded by dynamically important (Alven Mach number ˜ 1) large-scale magnetic fields. To determine the Bondi-like accretion rate in these environments, we used the ORION2 code to carry out grid-based 3D adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of accretion onto sink particles embedded in an environment of fully developed, magnetized supersonic isothermal turbulence. We evolved the models until the median and mean accretion rates, over particles, became steady. We present a simple semi-analytic model that predicts the median and mean accretion rate from the turbulent properties of the background medium, such as the 3D Mach number and RMS plasma-β, and show that it is highly consistent with our simulations. Numerical codes can use our semi-analytic model as an accurate sub-grid model for accretion in magnetized supersonic isothermal turbulence.

  16. CEC-normalized clay-water sorption isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, W. F.; Revil, A.

    2011-11-01

    A normalized clay-water isotherm model based on BET theory and describing the sorption and desorption of the bound water in clays, sand-clay mixtures, and shales is presented. Clay-water sorption isotherms (sorption and desorption) of clayey materials are normalized by their cation exchange capacity (CEC) accounting for a correction factor depending on the type of counterion sorbed on the mineral surface in the so-called Stern layer. With such normalizations, all the data collapse into two master curves, one for sorption and one for desorption, independent of the clay mineralogy, crystallographic considerations, and bound cation type; therefore, neglecting the true heterogeneity of water sorption/desorption in smectite. The two master curves show the general hysteretic behavior of the capillary pressure curve at low relative humidity (below 70%). The model is validated against several data sets obtained from the literature comprising a broad range of clay types and clay mineralogies. The CEC values, derived by inverting the sorption/adsorption curves using a Markov chain Monte Carlo approach, are consistent with the CEC associated with the clay mineralogy.

  17. Analysis of moisture desorption isotherms of eggplant (Solanum melongena).

    PubMed

    Moreira, R; Chenlo, F; Torres, M D; Vallejo, N

    2010-10-01

    Sorption isotherms of eggplant were determined employing, as experimental technique, a static gravimetric method, using saturated salt solutions to achieve the equilibrium. The experiments were carried out at different temperatures (20, 35, 50 and 65 °C). The sorption isotherms can be classified, according to Brunauer's classification, as type II or III depending on temperature. Equilibrium moisture content data were correlated by two models usually applied to foodstuffs (Brunauer--Emmet--Teller (BET) and Halsey). BET model was employed to determine monolayer moisture content (0.121 kg/kg d.b.). Halsey model was selected by the goodness of fitting. Experimental data were analyzed by a thermodynamic approach to obtain some properties as net isosteric heat, equilibrium heat and differential and net integral entropy. The differential enthalpy and entropy decreased with increasing moisture content and satisfied the compensation theory. The net integral enthalpy and entropy showed maximum values (≈31 kJ/mol and ≈88 J/mol.K) at 0.093 (kg/kg d.b.) of moisture content.

  18. Non isothermal model free kinetics for pyrolysis of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Garima; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2014-10-01

    The kinetics of thermal decomposition of rice straw was studied by thermogravimetry. Non-isothermal thermogravimetric data of rice straw decomposition in nitrogen atmosphere at six different heating rates of 5-40 °C/min was used for evaluating kinetics using several model free kinetic methods. The results showed that the decomposition process exhibited two zones of constant apparent activation energies. The values ranged from 142 to 170 kJ/mol (E(avg) = 155.787 kJ/mol), and 170 to 270 kJ/mol (E(avg) = 236.743 kJ/mol) in the conversion range of 5-60% and 61-90% respectively. These values were used to determine the reaction mechanism of process using master plots and compensation parameters. The results show that the reaction mechanism of whole process can be kinetically characterized by two successive reactions, a diffusion reaction followed by a third order rate equation. The kinetic results were validated using isothermal predictions. The results derived are useful for development and optimization of biomass thermochemical conversion systems. PMID:25105267

  19. Sorption isotherms and isosteric heats of sorption of Malaysian paddy.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Wael; Ghazali, Farinazleen Mohamad; Jinap, S; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd; Radu, Son

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the water sorption characteristics of cereal is extremely essential for optimizing the drying process and ensuring storage stability. Water relation of rough rice was studied at 20, 30, 40 and 50 °C over relative humidity (RH.) between 0.113 and 0.976 using the gravimetric technique. The isotherms displayed the general sigmoid, Type II pattern and exhibited the phenomenon of hysteresis where it was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The sorption characteristics were temperature dependence where the sorption capacity of the paddy increased as the temperature was decreased at fixed (RH). Among the models assessed for their ability to fit the sorption data, Oswin equation was the best followed by the third order polynomial, GAB, Smith, Chung-Pfost, and Henderson models. The monolayer moisture content was higher for desorption than adsorption and tend to decrease with the increase in temperature. Given the temperature dependence of the sorption isotherms the isosteric heats of sorption were calculated using Claussius-Clapeyron equation. The net isosteric heats decreased as the moisture content was increased and heats of desorption were greater than that of adsorption. PMID:25328208

  20. Thermodynamic properties of water sorption isotherms of grape seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majd, Kamran Maleki; Karparvarfard, Seyed H.; Farahnaky, Asgar; Ansari, Sara

    2014-03-01

    In this study the moisture sorption isotherm of grape seed was determined by using a static gravimetric method at 35-65°C and 0.108-0.821 water activity range. The sorption isotherms were found to be typical sigmoid shape of most food materials. Five models including the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (2-parameter), Guggenheim, Anderson and De Boer (3-parameter), Oswin (2-parameter), Ferro-Fontan (3-parameter) and Peleg (4-parameter) models were considered to fit the experimental data. The Ferro- Fontan and Peleg equations (at three temperatures 35, 45, 65°C) having R2 greater than 0.97 and lower values of standard error of estimate and deviation modulus gave the best fit of the experimental data throughout the entire range of water activity. The net isosteric heat of sorption, calculated by Calusius-Clapeyron equation on experimental data, was found to be a polynomial and exponential function of equilibrium moisture content within the temperature range investigated.

  1. Morphology and non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of CuInS{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by solvo-thermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Majeed Khan, M.A.; Kumar, Sushil; Alsalhi, M.S.; Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhoshan, Mansour; Alrokayan, Salman A.; Ahamad, Tansir

    2012-03-15

    Nanocrystals of copper indium disulphide (CuInS{sub 2}) were synthesized by a solvo-thermal method. The structure, morphology and non-isothermal crystallization kinetic behavior of samples were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, field emission transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis techniques. Non-isothermal measurements at different heating rates were carried out and the crystallization kinetics of samples were analyzed using the most reliable non-isothermal kinetic methods. The kinetic parameters such as glass transition temperature, thermal stability, activation energy, Avrami exponent etc. were evaluated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CuInS{sub 2} nanocrystals have scientific and technological importance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples have been prepared by solvo-thermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesized samples exhibit excellent morphology and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of solar cell devices.

  2. Extracting local surface charges and charge regulation behavior from atomic force microscopy measurements at heterogeneous solid-electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cunlu; Ebeling, Daniel; Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-10-01

    We present a method to determine the local surface charge of solid-liquid interfaces from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements that takes into account shifts of the adsorption/desorption equilibria of protons and ions as the cantilever tip approaches the sample. We recorded AFM force distance curves in dynamic mode with sharp tips on heterogeneous silica surfaces partially covered by gibbsite nano-particles immersed in an aqueous electrolyte with variable concentrations of dissolved NaCl and KCl at pH 5.8. Forces are analyzed in the framework of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in combination with a charge regulation boundary that describes adsorption and desorption reactions of protons and ions. A systematic method to extract the equilibrium constants of these reactions by simultaneous least-squared fitting to experimental data for various salt concentrations is developed and is shown to yield highly consistent results for silica-electrolyte interfaces. For gibbsite-electrolyte interfaces, the surface charge can be determined, yet, an unambiguous identification of the relevant surface speciation reactions is not possible, presumably due to a combination of intrinsic chemical complexity and heterogeneity of the nano-particle surfaces.

  3. Using the ubiquitous pH meter combined with a loop mediated isothermal amplification method for facile and sensitive detection of Nosema bombycis genomic DNA PTP1.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shunbi; Yuan, Yali; Song, Yue; Zhuo, Ying; Li, Tian; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2014-12-28

    Here we show an amplification-coupled detection method for directly measuring released hydrogen ions during the loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) procedure by using a pH meter. The genomic DNA of Nosema bombycis (N. bombycis) was amplified and detected by employing this LAMP-pH meter platform for the first time.

  4. The non-isothermal rheology of low viscosity magmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolzenburg, Stephan; Giordano, Daniele; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate prediction of the run-out distance of lava flows, as well as the understanding of magma migration in shallow dyke systems is hampered by an incomplete understanding of the transient, sub-liquidus rheology of crystallizing melts. This sets significant limits to physical property based modelling of lava flow (especially flow width, length and advancement rate) and magma migration behaviour and the resulting accuracy of volcanic hazard assessment The importance of the dynamic rheology of a lava / magma on its emplacement style becomes especially apparent in towards later stages of flow and dyke emplacement, where the melt builds increasing resistance to flow, entering rheologic regimes that determine the halting of lava flows and sealing of dykes. Thermal gradients between the interior of a melt body and the contact with air or the substratum govern these rheologic transitions that give origin to flow directing or impeding features like levees, tubes and chilled margins. Besides the critical importance of non-isothermal and sub-liquidus processes for the understanding of natural systems, accurate rheologic data at these conditions are scarce and studies capturing the transient rheological evolution of lavas at conditions encountered during emplacement virtually absent. We describe the rheologic evolution of a series of natural, re-melted lava samples during transient and non-equilibrium crystallization conditions characteristic of lava flows and shallow magmatic systems in nature. The sample suite spans from foidites to basalts; the dominant compositions producing low viscosity lava flows. Our data show that all melts undergo one or more change zones in effective viscosity when subjected to sub liquidus temperatures. The apparent viscosity of the liquid-crystal suspension increases drastically from the theoretical temperature-viscosity relationship of a pure liquid once cooled below the liquidus temperature. We find that: 1) Both cooling rate and shear rate

  5. A modified Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model for simulating pH-dependent adsorption effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeppu, Gautham P.; Clement, T. Prabhakar

    2012-03-01

    Analytical isotherm equations such as Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms are widely used for modeling adsorption data. However, these isotherms are primarily useful for simulating data collected at a fixed pH value and cannot be easily adapted to simulate pH-dependent adsorption effects. Therefore, most adsorption studies currently use numerical surface-complexation models (SCMs), which are more complex and time consuming than traditional analytical isotherm models. In this work, we propose a new analytical isotherm model, identified as the modified Langmuir-Freundlich (MLF) isotherm, which can be used to simulate pH-dependent adsorption. The MLF isotherm uses a linear correlation between pH and affinity coefficient values. We validated the proposed MLF isotherm by predicting arsenic adsorption onto two different types of sorbents: pure goethite and goethite-coated sand. The MLF model gave good predictions for both experimental and surface complexation-model predicted datasets for these two sorbents. The proposed analytical isotherm framework can help reduce modeling complexity, model development time, and computational efforts. One of the limitations of the proposed method is that it is currently valid only for single-component systems. Furthermore, the model requires a system-specific pH. vs. affinity coefficient relation. Despite these limitations, the approach provides a promising analytical framework for simulating pH-dependent adsorption effects.

  6. Tomography-based monitoring of isothermal snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, P. P.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2015-02-01

    Time-lapse X-ray micro-tomography was used to investigate the structural dynamics of isothermal snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow. Diffusion and advection across the snow pores were analysed in controlled laboratory experiments. The 3-D digital geometry obtained by tomographic scans was used in direct pore-level numerical simulations to determine the effective transport properties. The results showed that isothermal advection with saturated air have no influence on the coarsening rate that is typical for isothermal snow metamorphism. Diffusion originating in the Kelvin effect between snow structures dominates and is the main transport process in isothermal snow packs.

  7. A physically based model for the isothermal martensitic transformation in a maraging steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijver, S. O.; Blaauw, H. S.; Beyer, J.; Post, J.

    2003-10-01

    Isothermal transformation from austenite to martensite in steel products during or after the production process often show residual stresses which can create unacceptable dimensional changes in the final product. Tn order to gain more insight in the effects infiuencing the isothermai transformation, the overall kinetics in a low Carbon-Nickel maraging steel is investigated. The influence of the austenitizing température, time and quenching rate on the transformation is measured magnetically and yields information about the transformation rate and final amount of transformation. A physically based model describing the nucleation and growth of martensite is used to explain the observed effects. The results show a very good fit of the experimental values and the model description of the transformation, within the limitations of the inhomogeneities (carbides and intermetallics, size and distribution in the material and stress state) and experimental conditions.

  8. Effect of solvent state and isothermal conditions on gelation of methylcellulose hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sunil C; Liang, C M; Lam, Y C

    2008-01-01

    In this study, thermal behavior of aqueous solutions of methyl cellulose (MC) at a constant temperature of 50 degrees C was analyzed. Various samples were studied for two consecutive heating-cooling cycles. The experiments with the solutions prepared using cold de-ionized (DI) water showed that the rate of gelation was higher for higher MC concentrations. However, the rate was slower during the first heating-cooling cycle than during the second cycle. The possible reasons behind such observations are discussed. Various MC solutions prepared using hot DI water were studied for understanding the role of the solvent state in the isothermal gelation process. The gelation of these MC solutions started at a lower MC concentration and resulted in a higher gelation rate. The gelation mechanism responsible for such effects is explored and presented. Finally, a gel-indexing method is proposed to provide a quantitative measure of the gelation state of all the MC gels.

  9. Isobaric Heat Capacity, Isothermal Compressibility and Fluctuational Properties of 1-Bromoalkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkovskii, V. I.; Ryshkova, O. S.; Neruchev, Yu. A.; Goncharov, A. L.; Postnikov, E. B.

    2016-06-01

    We present results of the experimental measurements of the isobaric heat capacity for 1-bromohexane, 1-bromoheptane, 1-bromooctane, 1-bromononane, 1-bromodecane, 1-bromoundecane, 1-bromododecane and 1-bromotetradecane at normal pressure and the speed of sound and the density for 1-bromotetradecane within the temperature range 298.15-423.15 K. These data on the isobaric heat capacity and the literature-based reference data for the density and the speed of sound were used to calculate the isothermal compressibility and the inverse reduced fluctuations. Based on the comparison of the results for pure n-alkanes and α ,ω -dibromoalkanes, we discuss the influence of bromine atom on the volume fluctuations.

  10. Thermodynamic signature of secondary nano-emulsion formation by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Fotticchia, Teresa; Mattia, Carlo Andrea; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta

    2014-12-01

    The stabilization of oil in water nano-emulsions by means of a polymer coating is extremely important; it prolongs the shelf life of the product and makes it suitable for a variety of applications ranging from nutraceutics to cosmetics and pharmaceutics. To date, an effective methodology to assess the best formulations in terms of thermodynamic stability has yet to be designed. Here, we perform a complete physicochemical characterization based on isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) compared to conventional dynamic light scattering (DLS) to identify polymer concentration domains that are thermodynamically stable and to define the degree of stability through thermodynamic functions depending upon any relevant parameter affecting the stability itself, such as type of polymer coating, droplet distance, etc. For instance, the method was proven by measuring the energetics in the case of two different biopolymers, chitosan and poly-L-lysine, and for different concentrations of the emulsion coated with poly-L-lysine.

  11. Isothermal transient ionic current as a characterization technique for ion transport in Ta2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattsson, M. Strømme; Niklasson, G. A.

    1999-06-01

    The Isothermal Transient Ionic Current (ITIC) technique was applied to β-Ta2O5 samples made by chemical vapor deposition. The mobility, conductivity, and number of protons in the material could be extracted from the measurements. Li ions were intercalated electrochemically into the β-Ta2O5 and it was found that the ITIC method could separate the contribution from proton and Li ion conduction in such a way that the mobilities of both species could be extracted. Furthermore, the lattice-gas model [A. J. Berlinsky, W. G. Unruh, W. R. McKinnon, and R. R. Haering, Solid State Commun. 31, 135 (1979)] was employed to describe the Li interaction process. This model showed that the Li ions tended to distribute uniformly, rather then to attract each other and form clusters in the material.

  12. A simple identification method of saliva by detecting Streptococcus salivarius using loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki; Ohmori, Takeshi; Hara, Masaaki; Takada, Aya; Shojo, Hideki; Adachi, Noboru; Saito, Kazuyuki

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that detection of Streptococcus salivarius is feasible for proving the presence of saliva in a forensic sample. Here, a simple and rapid method for the detection of S. salivarius in forensic samples was developed that uses loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The LAMP primer set was designed using S. salivarius-specific sequences of glucosyltransferase K. To simplify the procedure, the sample was prepared by boiling and mutanolysin treatment only, and the entire analytical process was completed within 2.5 h. The cut-off value was set at 0.1 absorbance units, measured at 660 nm, upon termination of the reaction. S. salivarius was identified in all saliva samples, but was not detected in other body fluids or on the skin surface. Using this method, S. salivarius was successfully detected in various mock forensic samples. We therefore suggest that this approach is useful for the identification of saliva in forensic practice. PMID:21198609

  13. Conditions for calibration of an isothermal titration calorimeter using chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Sgarlata, Carmelo; Zito, Valeria; Arena, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of protonation of 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (TRIS) is a suitable one for the calibration of isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC), providing that experimental conditions are appropriately chosen. The conditions and methods for handling experimental data from a nanowatt-ITC are discussed. Also, the binding of Ba(2+) to 18-Crown-6 is successfully used to check the accuracy and precision of the chemical calibration performed with TRIS. This latter reaction has the additional advantage that the data can also be used for a check on the determination of the value of a binding constant. The anomaly of the first injection in ITC is analyzed and, by combining calorimetric and spectroscopic measurements, it is shown that it mainly results from a backlash effect of the syringe plunger rather than from a diffusion effect. PMID:23196751

  14. Characterization by thermoelectric power of a commercial aluminum-iron-silicon alloy (8011) during isothermal precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Luiggi A., N.J.

    1998-11-01

    The author has characterized a commercial 8011 (Al-Fe-Si) alloy by studying samples under different initial states of strain hardening and iron and silicon supersaturation using thermoelectric power as a measurement technique. Isothermal kinetics of precipitation are obtained in the temperature range between 225 C and 600 C. He has determined the atom fraction precipitated for each microstructural condition, identifying the dominant alloying additions and evaluating the typical parameters of the precipitated phases, such as, for example, the apparent activation energy. Finally, he determined the time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams. These results prove that iron is the alloying addition that controls the precipitation kinetics of the 8011 alloy in the temperature range studied.

  15. Moisture sorption isotherms and thermodynamic properties of Oak wood (Quercus robur and Quercus canariensis): optimization of the processing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Rim; Azzouz, Soufien; Remond, Romain; Ouertani, Sahbi; Elaieb, Mohamed Taher; El Cafci, Mohamed Afif

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine the moisture desorption isotherms and essentials thermodynamic properties of two Oak wood varieties. Desorption isotherms were measured using a static gravimetric method at 50, 60, 70 and 80 °C within the range of 5-90 % relative humidity. The equilibrium moisture content decreased with increasing temperature and decreased with decreasing relative humidity at a constant temperature. The `Thermodynamic' sorption equation was found to be the best for describing the experimental moisture sorption isotherms of woods within the range of temperature and water activity investigated. The Fiber saturation point, deduced from the `Thermodynamic' model parameters, depends on the temperature and varying from 22.6 to 54.4 (% kg water/kg dry matter). Isosteric heat of desorption and differential entropy were calculated by applying Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the desorption data fitted by the `Thermodynamic' model. The isosteric heat of desorption and the differential entropy decreased with increasing moisture content according to an exponential law equation and varying from 2.03 to 31.14 kJ/mol and from 73.98 to 4.34 J/(mol K), respectively. The linear relationship between differential enthalpy and entropy satisfied the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. The sign of Gibbs free energy was found to be positive (+283 J/mol) and (+97 J/mol) for Quercus robur and Quercus canariensis, respectively. The isokinetic temperature was found to be greater than the harmonic temperature. Based on the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory, it could be concluded that the moisture desorption isotherm of Oak wood is a non-spontaneous and enthalpy-controlled process.

  16. Synthesis of magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Fe-OMC) adsorbent and its evaluation for fuel desulfurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzin Nejad, N.; Shams, E.; Amini, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon adsorbent was synthesized using soft templating method to adsorb sulfur from model oil (dibenzothiophene in n-hexane). Through this research, pluronic F-127, resorcinol-formaldehyde and hydrated iron nitrate were respectively used as soft template, carbon source and iron source. The adsorbent was characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm and transmission electron microscopy. Nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement revealed the high surface area (810 m2 g-1), maxima pore size of 3.3 nm and large pore volume (1.01 cm3 g-1) of the synthesized sample. The adsorbent showed a maximum adsorption capacity of 111 mg dibenzothiophene g-1 of adsorbent. Sorption process was described by the pseudo-second-order rate equation and could be better fitted by the Freundlich model, showing the heterogeneous feature of the adsorption process. In addition, the adsorption capacity of regenerated adsorbent was 78.6% of the initial level, after five regeneration cycles.

  17. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of 137Cs in Fracture-Fill Material. Experiments and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Reimus, Paul William

    2015-10-29

    In this study, we demonstrate how a combination of batch sorption/desorption experiments and column transport experiments were used to effectively parameterize a model describing the colloid-facilitated transport of Cs in the Grimsel granodiorite/FFM system. Cs partition coefficient estimates onto both the colloids and the stationary media obtained from the batch experiments were used as initial estimates of partition coefficients in the column experiments, and then the column experiment results were used to obtain refined estimates of the number of different sorption sites and the adsorption and desorption rate constants of the sites. The desorption portion of the column breakthrough curves highlighted the importance of accounting for adsorption-desorption hysteresis (or a very nonlinear adsorption isotherm) of the Cs on the FFM in the model, and this portion of the breakthrough curves also dictated that there be at least two different types of sorption sites on the FFM. In the end, the two-site model parameters estimated from the column experiments provided excellent matches to the batch adsorption/desorption data, which provided a measure of assurance in the validity of the model.

  18. Efficient Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Technique Identifies Direct Interaction of Small Molecule Inhibitors with the Target Protein.

    PubMed

    Gal, Maayan; Bloch, Itai; Shechter, Nelia; Romanenko, Olga; Shir, Ofer M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) play a critical role in regulating many cellular processes. Finding novel PPI inhibitors that interfere with specific binding of two proteins is considered a great challenge, mainly due to the complexity involved in characterizing multi-molecular systems and limited understanding of the physical principles governing PPIs. Here we show that the combination of virtual screening techniques, which are capable of filtering a large library of potential small molecule inhibitors, and a unique secondary screening by isothermal titration calorimetry, a label-free method capable of observing direct interactions, is an efficient tool for finding such an inhibitor. In this study we applied this strategy in a search for a small molecule capable of interfering with the interaction of the tumor-suppressor p53 and the E3-ligase MDM2. We virtually screened a library of 15 million small molecules that were filtered to a final set of 80 virtual hits. Our in vitro experimental assay, designed to validate the activity of mixtures of compounds by isothermal titration calorimetry, was used to identify an active molecule against MDM2. At the end of the process the small molecule (4S,7R)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-hydroxy-2,7-dimethyl-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)-4,6,7,8 tetrahydrIoquinoline-3-carboxamide was found to bind MDM2 with a dissociation constant of ~2 µM. Following the identification of this single bioactive compound, spectroscopic measurements were used to further characterize the interaction of the small molecule with the target protein. 2D NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding region of the small molecule, and fluorescence polarization measurement confirmed that it indeed competes with p53.

  19. Applications of isothermal titration calorimetry in protein science.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yi

    2008-07-01

    During the past decade, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has developed from a specialist method for understanding molecular interactions and other biological processes within cells to a more robust, widely used method. Nowadays, ITC is used to investigate all types of protein interactions, including protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA/RNA interactions, protein-small molecule interactions and enzyme kinetics; it provides a direct route to the complete thermodynamic characterization of protein interactions. This review concentrates on the new applications of ITC in protein folding and misfolding, its traditional application in protein interactions, and an overview of what can be achieved in the field of protein science using this method and what developments are likely to occur in the near future. Also, this review discusses some new developments of ITC method in protein science, such as the reverse titration of ITC and the displacement method of ITC.

  20. Moisture ingress into electronics enclosures under isothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staliulionis, Ž.; Jabbari, M.; Hattel, J. H.

    2016-06-01

    The number of electronics used in outdoor environment is constantly growing. The humidity causes about 19 % of all electronics failures and, especially, moisture increases these problems due to the ongoing process of miniaturization and lower power consumption of electronic components. Moisture loads are still not understood well by design engineers, therefore this field has become one of the bottlenecks in the electronics system design. The objective of this paper is to model moisture ingress into an electronics enclosure under isothermal conditions. The moisture diffusion model is based on a 1D quasi-steady state (QSS) approximation for Fick's second law. This QSS approach is also described with an electrical analogy which gives a fast tool in modelling of the moisture response. The same QSS method is applied to ambient water vapour variations. The obtained results are compared to an analytical solution and very good agreement is found.

  1. Isothermal titration calorimetry of membrane proteins - progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rajarathnam, Krishna; Rösgen, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and ion channels, mediate diverse biological functions that are crucial to all aspects of life. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms, and in particular, the thermodynamic basis of the binding interactions of the extracellular ligands and intracellular effector proteins is essential to understand the workings of these remarkable nanomachines. In this review, we describe how isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) can be effectively used to gain valuable insights into the thermodynamic signatures (enthalpy, entropy, affinity, and stoichiometry), which would be most useful for drug discovery studies, considering that more than 30% of the current drugs target membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Structural and biophysical characterisation of membrane protein-ligand binding.

  2. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry: Assisted Crystallization of RNA-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Da Veiga, Cyrielle; Mezher, Joelle; Dumas, Philippe; Ennifar, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The success rate of nucleic acids/ligands co-crystallization can be significantly improved by performing preliminary biophysical analyses. Among suitable biophysical approaches, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is certainly a method of choice. ITC can be used in a wide range of experimental conditions to monitor in real time the formation of the RNA- or DNA-ligand complex, with the advantage of providing in addition the complete binding profile of the interaction. Following the ITC experiment, the complex is ready to be concentrated for crystallization trials. This chapter describes a detailed experimental protocol for using ITC as a tool for monitoring RNA/small molecule binding, followed by co-crystallization. PMID:26227041

  3. Ground Control Setup of the (LIF) Large Isothermal Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Large Isothermal Furnace (LIF) was flown on a mission in cooperation with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. LIF is a vacuum-heating furnace designed to heat large samples uniformly. The furnace consists of a sample container and heating element surrounded by a vacuum chamber. A crewmemeber will insert a sample cartridge into the furnace. The furnace will be activated and operations will be controlled automatically by a computer in response to an experiment number entered on the control panel. At the end of operations, helium will be discharged into the furnace, allowing cooling to start. Cooling will occur through the use of a water jacket while rapid cooling of samples can be accomplished through a controlled flow of helium. Data from experiments will help scientists better understand this important process which is vital to the production of high-quality semiconductor crystals.

  4. Isothermal DNA amplification strategies for duplex microorganism detection.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Felipe, Sara; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis Antonio; Morais, Sergi; Puchades, Rosa; Maquieira, Ángel

    2015-05-01

    A valid solution for micro-analytical systems is the selection of a compatible amplification reaction with a simple, highly-integrated efficient design that allows the detection of multiple genomic targets. Two approaches under isothermal conditions are presented: recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Both methods were applied to a duplex assay specific for Salmonella spp. and Cronobacter spp., with excellent amplification yields (0.2-8.6 · 10(8) fold). The proposed approaches were successfully compared to conventional PCR and tested for the milk sample analysis as a microarray format on a compact disc (support and driver). Satisfactory results were obtained in terms of resistance to inhibition, selectivity, sensitivity (10(1)-10(2)CFU/mL) and reproducibility (below 12.5%). The methods studied are efficient and cost-effective, with a high potential to automate microorganisms detection by integrated analytical systems working at a constant low temperature.

  5. Singular Isothermal Disks and the Formation of Multiple Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galli, Daniele; Shu, Frank H.; Laughlin, Gregory; Lizano, Susana; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A crucial missing ingredient in previous theoretical studies of fragmentation is the inclusion of dynamically important levels of magnetic fields. As a minimal model for a candidate presursor to the formation of binary and multiple stars, we therefore consider the equilibrium configuration of isopedically magnetized, scale-free, singular isothermal disks, without the assumption of axial symmetry. We find that lopsided (M = 1) configurations exist at any dimensionless rotation rate, including zero. Multiple-lobed (M = 2, 3, 4, ...) configurations bifurcate from an underlying axisymmetric sequence at progressively higher dimensionless rates of rotation, but such nonaxisymmetric sequences always terminate in shockwaves before they have a chance to fission into separate bodies. We advance the hypothesis that binary and multiple star-formation from smooth (i.e., not highly turbulent) starting states that are supercritical but in unstable mechanical balance requires the rapid (i.e., dynamical) loss of magnetic flux at some stage of the ensuing gravitational collapse.

  6. Liouvillian integrability of gravitating static isothermal fluid spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacono, Roberto; Llibre, Jaume

    2014-10-01

    We examine the integrability properties of the Einstein field equations for static, spherically symmetric fluid spheres, complemented with an isothermal equation of state, ρ = np. In this case, Einstein's equations can be reduced to a nonlinear, autonomous second order ordinary differential equation (ODE) for m/R (m is the mass inside the radius R) that has been solved analytically only for n = -1 and n = -3, yielding the cosmological solutions by De Sitter and Einstein, respectively, and for n = -5, case for which the solution can be derived from the De Sitter's one using a symmetry of Einstein's equations. The solutions for these three cases are of Liouvillian type, since they can be expressed in terms of elementary functions. Here, we address the question of whether Liouvillian solutions can be obtained for other values of n. To do so, we transform the second order equation into an equivalent autonomous Lotka-Volterra quadratic polynomial differential system in {R}^2, and characterize the Liouvillian integrability of this system using Darboux theory. We find that the Lotka-Volterra system possesses Liouvillian first integrals for n = -1, -3, -5, which descend from the existence of invariant algebraic curves of degree one, and for n = -6, a new solvable case, associated to an invariant algebraic curve of higher degree (second). For any other value of n, eventual first integrals of the Lotka-Volterra system, and consequently of the second order ODE for the mass function must be non-Liouvillian. This makes the existence of other solutions of the isothermal fluid sphere problem with a Liouvillian metric quite unlikely.

  7. Determination of the adsorptive capacity and adsorption isotherm of vapor-phase mercury chloride on powdered activated carbon using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsun-Yu Lin; Chung-Shin Yuan; Wei-Ching Chen; Chung-Hsuang Hung

    2006-11-15

    This study investigated the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the adsorptive capacity and adsorption isotherm of vapor-phase mercury chloride on powdered activated carbon (PAC). The technique is commonly applied to remove mercury-containing air pollutants from gas streams emitted from municipal solid waste incinerators. An alternative form of powdered activated carbon derived from a pyrolyzed tire char was prepared for use herein. The capacity of waste tire-derived PAC to adsorb vapor-phase HgCl{sub 2} was successfully measured using a self-designed TGA adsorption system. Experimental results showed that the maximum adsorptive capacities of HgCl{sub 2} were 1.75, 0.688, and 0.230 mg of HgCl{sub 2} per gram of powdered activated carbon derived from carbon black at 30, 70, and 150{sup o} for 500 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of HgCl{sub 2}, respectively. Four adsorption isotherms obtained using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Brunauer-Emmett-eller (BET) models were used to simulate the adsorption of HgCl{sub 2}. The comparison of experimental data associated with the four adsorption isotherms indicated that BET fit the experimental results better than did the other isotherms at 30{sup o}, whereas the Freundlich isotherm fit the experimental results better at 70 and 150{sup o}. Furthermore, the calculations of the parameters associated with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms revealed that the adsorption of HgCl{sub 2} by PAC-derived carbon black favored adsorption at various HgCl{sub 2} concentrations and temperatures. 35 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Comparison of recovery methods for the enumeration of injured Listeria innocua cells under isothermal and non-isothermal treatments.

    PubMed

    Miller, Fátima A; Ramos, Bárbara; Brandão, Teresa R S; Teixeira, Paula; Silva, Cristina L M

    2010-12-01

    This study compares the feature of different media with the combination of selective with non-selective media in a TAL method for recovery of Listeria innocua cells exposed to thermal treatments. Experiments were conducted in broth at constant temperature (52.5 and 65.0 °C) and pH (4.5 and 7.5) conditions, using NaCl or glycerol to adjust water activity to 0.95. Four different media were used in bacterial cell enumeration: (i) a non-selective medium - TSAYE, (ii) two selective media - TSAYE + 5%NaCl and Palcam Agar and (iii) TAL medium (consisting of a layer of Palcam Agar overlaid with one of TSAYE). Two food products were used as case studies aiming at comparison of results obtained on selective and TAL media enumeration. Parsley samples were inoculated with L. innocua and subjected to posterior thermal treatments both under isothermal (52.5, 60.0 and 65.0 °C) and non-isothermal (heating rate of 1.8 °C/min from 20.0 to 65.0 °C) conditions. The recovery capability of TAL method was also studied when a pre-cooked frozen food (i.e. meat pockets) was fried (oil temperature of ∼180 °C). TAL method proved to be better than Palcam Agar in terms of capability to recover injured cells and was effective in L. innocua enumeration when non-sterile samples were analysed.

  9. A Sixth-Form Teaching Unit on the Langmuir Adsorption Isotherm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkley, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Presents a teaching unit on the Langmuir absorption isotherm suitable for advanced secondary school chemistry classes. Describes the experimental investigation of the isothermal adsorption of sulfur dioxide on charcoal, and discusses the derivation of the Langmuir equation and some applications. (JR)

  10. Bainitic microstructures formed by split isothermal transformation in an Fe-C-Si-Mn-Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.

    1996-05-01

    Effect of split isothermal transformations (SITs) on bainitic microstructure has been studied in an Fe-C-Si-Mn-Mo steel by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Split isothermal transformations caused the spheroidization and coalescence of bainitic ferrite subunits, suggesting that bainite probably formed by a displacive transformation mechanism.

  11. Revisiting Isotherm Analyses Using R: Comparison of Linear, Non-linear, and Bayesian Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive adsorption isotherm data exist for an array of chemicals of concern on a variety of engineered and natural sorbents. Several isotherm models exist that can accurately describe these data from which the resultant fitting parameters may subsequently be used in numerical ...

  12. The Langmuir isotherm: a commonly applied but misleading approach for the analysis of protein adsorption behavior.

    PubMed

    Latour, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    The Langmuir adsorption isotherm provides one of the simplest and most direct methods to quantify an adsorption process. Because isotherm data from protein adsorption studies often appear to be fit well by the Langmuir isotherm model, estimates of protein binding affinity have often been made from its use despite that fact that none of the conditions required for a Langmuir adsorption process may be satisfied for this type of application. The physical events that cause protein adsorption isotherms to often provide a Langmuir-shaped isotherm can be explained as being due to changes in adsorption-induced spreading, reorientation, clustering, and aggregation of the protein on a surface as a function of solution concentration in contrast to being due to a dynamic equilibrium adsorption process, which is required for Langmuir adsorption. Unless the requirements of the Langmuir adsorption process can be confirmed, fitting of the Langmuir model to protein adsorption isotherm data to obtain thermodynamic properties, such as the equilibrium constant for adsorption and adsorption free energy, may provide erroneous values that have little to do with the actual protein adsorption process, and should be avoided. In this article, a detailed analysis of the Langmuir isotherm model is presented along with a quantitative analysis of the level of error that can arise in derived parameters when the Langmuir isotherm is inappropriately applied to characterize a protein adsorption process.

  13. Using Compression Isotherms of Phospholipid Monolayers to Explore Critical Phenomena: A Biophysical Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gragson, Derek E.; Beaman, Dan; Porter, Rhiannon

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments are described in which students explore phase transitions and critical phenomena by obtaining compression isotherms of phospholipid monolayers using a Langmuir trough. Through relatively simple analysis of their data students gain a better understanding of compression isotherms, the application of the Clapeyron equation, the…

  14. Measurements of nitrogen atom density in N2/Ar sputtering plasma for fabrication of high-mobility amorphous In2O3:Sn films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takasaki, Toshiyuki; Ide, Tomoaki; Matsushima, Koichi; Takeda, Keigo; Hori, Masaru; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyumwoon; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Itagaki, Naho

    2015-09-01

    Amorphous In2O3:Sn (a-ITO) has attracted attention because of the advantages such as smooth surface and high etching rate. We have recently succeeded in sputtering deposition of a-ITO films with high mobility 61 cm2/Vs by introducing N2 into the deposition atmosphere. Here, aiming to clarify effects of N of a-ITO film growth, we measure absolute density of N atom in N2/Ar sputtering plasma by using vacuum UV absorption spectroscopy. ITO films were fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering on glass substrates at 150C with Ar-N2 mixed gas. We observed that the morphology is changed from polycrystalline to amorphous by introducing N2 into the deposition atmosphere. Furthermore the mobility of a-ITO films was found to be greatly dependent on N2 flow rate. The electron Hall mobility increases from 48 to 55 cm2/Vs with increasing N2 flow rate ratio from 3 to 5%, where the absolute density of N atom in the plasma increases from 3.78 to 7.44 (1010 cm-3) . Since the N composition ratio in ITO films is almost constant for N2 flow rate ratio of 3-5%, the difference in the adsorption/desorption behavior of N atoms on the growth surface brings about the change in the film properties.

  15. Ciprofloxacin adsorption on graphene and granular activated carbon: kinetics, isotherms, and effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuan; Tsang, Daniel C W; Chen, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Yang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin (CIP) is a commonly used antibiotic and widely detected in wastewaters and farmlands nowadays. This study evaluated the efficacy of next-generation adsorbent (graphene) and conventional adsorbent (granular activated carbon, GAC) for CIP removal. Batch experiments and characterization tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption kinetics, equilibrium isotherms, thermodynamic properties, and the influences of solution chemistry (pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter (NOM), and water sources). Compared to GAC, graphene showed significantly faster adsorption and reached equilibrium within 3 min, confirming the rapid access of CIP into the macroporous network of high surface area of graphene as revealed by the Brunner-Emmet-Teller measurements analysis. The kinetics was better described by a pseudo-second-order model, suggesting the importance of the initial CIP concentration related to surface site availability of graphene. The adsorption isotherm on graphene followed Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 323 mg/g, which was higher than other reported carbonaceous adsorbents. The CIP adsorption was thermodynamically favourable on graphene and primarily occurred through π - π interaction, according to the FTIR spectroscopy. While the adsorption capacity of graphene decreased with increasing solution pH due to the speciation change of CIP, the adverse effects of ionic strength (0.01-0.5 mol L(-1)), presence of NOM (5 mg L⁻¹), and different water sources (river water or drinking water) were less significant on graphene than GAC. These results indicated that graphene can serve as an alternative adsorbent for CIP removal in commonly encountered field conditions, if proper separation and recovery is available in place. PMID:26050736

  16. A thermodynamically consistent explicit competitive adsorption isotherm model based on second-order single component behaviour.

    PubMed

    Ilić, Milica; Flockerzi, Dietrich; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    A competitive adsorption isotherm model is derived for binary mixtures of components characterized by single component isotherms which are second-order truncations of higher order equilibrium models suggested by multi-layer theory and statistical thermodynamics. The competitive isotherms are determined using the ideal adsorbed solution (IAS) theory which, in case of complex single component isotherms, does not generate explicit expressions to calculated equilibrium loadings and causes time consuming iterations in simulations of adsorption processes. The explicit model derived in this work is based on an analysis of the roots of a cubic polynomial resulting from the set of IAS equations. The suggested thermodynamically consistent and widely applicable competitive isotherm model can be recommended as a flexible tool for efficient simulations of fixed-bed adsorber dynamics.

  17. Numerical simulations of compressively driven interstellar turbulence. I. Isothermal gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Federrath, C.; Hupp, M.; Kern, S.; Niemeyer, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Supersonic turbulence is ubiquitous in the interstellar medium and plays an important role in contemporary star formation. Aims: We performed high-resolution numerical simulations of supersonic isothermal turbulence driven by compressive large-scale forcing and analyse various statistical properties. Methods: The compressible Euler equations with an external stochastic force field dominated by rotation-free modes are solved with the piecewise parabolic method. Both a static grid and adaptive mesh refinement is used with an effective resolution N=7683. Results: After a transient phase dominated by shocks, turbulence evolves into a steady state with root mean square Mach number ≈2.5, in which cloud-like structures of over-dense gas are surrounded by highly rarefied gas. The index of the turbulence energy spectrum function is β≈ 2.0 in the shock-dominated phase. As the flow approaches statistical equilibrium, the spectrum flattens, with β≈ 1.9. For the scaling exponent of the root mean square velocity fluctuation, we obtain γ≈ 0.43 from the velocity structure functions of second order. These results are well within the range of observed scaling properties for the velocity dispersion in molecular clouds. Calculating structure functions of order p=1,ldots,5, we find significant deviations from the Kolmogorov-Burgers model proposed by Boldyrev for all scaling exponents. Our results are very well described by a general log-Poisson model with a higher degree of intermittency, which implies an influence by the forcing on the scaling properties. The spectral index of the quadratic logarithmic density fluctuation is βδ≈ 1.8. In contrast to previous numerical results for isothermal turbulence, we obtain a skewed probability density function of the mass density fluctuations that is not consistent with log-normal statistics and entails a substantially higher fraction of mass in the density peaks than implied by the Padoan-Nordlund relation between the

  18. Interaction of hydrogen chloride with alumina. [atmospheric effluent concentrations and interaction of solid rocket propellants used in space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, R. R.; Wightman, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of temperature, pressure, and outgas conditions on the absorption of hydrogen chloride and water vapor on both alpha and gamma alumina was studied. Characterization of the adsorbents was performed using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low temperature nitrogen adsorption desorption measurements, BET nitrogen surface area measurements and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). Water vapor adsorption isotherms at 30, 40, and 50 C were measured on alpha and gamma alumina after outgassing at 80, 200, and 400 C. Both outgas temperature and adsorption temperature influenced the adsorption of water vapor on the aluminas. The water vapor adsorption was completely reversible. Alpha alumina absorbed more water per unit area than gamma alumina. Differences in the adsorption capacity for water vapor of the two aluminas were explained on the basis of ideal surface models of alpha and gamma alumina. Isosteric heats of adsorption for water vapor on the aluminas were determined over a limited range of surface coverage.

  19. Study of Height Reduction of Sn99Cu1/Cu Solder Joints as a Result of Isothermal Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwen; Liu, Changqing; Wu, Yiping; An, Bing; Zhou, Longzao

    2015-11-01

    Sn99Cu1/Cu solder joints were investigated after isothermal aging at 175°C for different lengths of time under vacuum conditions. The results revealed height reduction of the solder of approximately 1.2 μm after aging for 1132.5 h. This was primarily attributed to growth of a layer of interfacial intermetallic compounds. The reduction was measured by use of a copper block containing a recess filled with solder, which was reflowed then polished flat. Height reduction of the solder joint during aging was found to obey the parabolic law Δ h = -0.031√ t, and was in excellent agreement with theoretical calculation.

  20. Comparison of isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of twenty-five commercial sheet alloys at 1150 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The cyclic and isothermal oxidation resistance of 25 high-temperature Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base sheet alloys after 100 hours in air at 1150 C was compared. The alloys were evaluated in terms of their oxidation, scaling, and vaporization rates and their tendency for scale spallation. These values were used to develop an oxidation rating parameter based on effective thickness change, as calculated from a mass balance. The calculated thicknesses generally agreed with the measured values, including grain boundary oxidation, to within a factor of 3. Oxidation behavior was related to composition, particularly Cr and Al content.

  1. Diagnosis of brugian filariasis by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Tanner, Nathan A; Zhang, Yinhua; Evans, Thomas C; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed and evaluated a Brugia Hha I repeat loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the rapid detection of Brugia genomic DNA. Amplification was detected using turbidity or fluorescence as readouts. Reactions generated a turbidity threshold value or a clear visual positive within 30 minutes using purified genomic DNA equivalent to one microfilaria. Similar results were obtained using DNA isolated from blood samples containing B. malayi microfilariae. Amplification was specific to B. malayi and B. timori, as no turbidity was observed using DNA from the related filarial parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus or Dirofilaria immitis, or from human or mosquito. Furthermore, the assay was most robust using a new strand-displacing DNA polymerase termed Bst 2.0 compared to wild-type Bst DNA polymerase, large fragment. The results indicate that the Brugia Hha I repeat LAMP assay is rapid, sensitive and Brugia-specific with the potential to be developed further as a field tool for diagnosis and mapping of brugian filariasis. PMID:23272258

  2. Isothermal separation processes update. Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect

    England, C.

    1984-08-01

    The isothermal processes of membrane separation, supercritical extraction and condensed-phase chromatography were examined using availability analysis, a method which addresses the thermodynamic value of energy as well as its amount. The general approach was to derive equations that identified where energy, expressed in terms of thermodynamic work, is consumed in these processes and how they compare with conventional separation methods. These separation methods are characterized by pure work inputs, chiefly in the form of a pressure drop which supplies the required energy. Equations were derived for the energy requirement in terms of the theories of ideal and regular solutions. This approach is believed to accurately predict the work of separation in terms of the heat of solution and the entropy of mixing. It can form the basis of a convenient calculation method for optimizing membrane and solvent properties for particular applications. Close examination of supercritical extraction found a relatively simple thermodynamic relationship among the thermodynamic properties of the solvent, the entropy of mixing, and the heat of solution. This allows a direct estimate of the work requirements. The actual work, however, is largely due to the requirement to cycle pressure at high levels in this method. Still, the energy requirements are very low, making up for usually high capital costs for equipment. 12 references, 9 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kirsty A; Hunt, Hugh E M

    2015-06-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal analysis is used to determine the variation of pressures and velocities along the pipe length. Results show that transport of small quantities of hydrogen to power fuel cells and maintain balloon buoyancy can be achieved at pressures and temperatures that are tolerable in terms of both the pipe strength and the current state of pumping technologies. To avoid solidification, transport of SO2 would require elevated temperatures that cannot be tolerated by the strength fibres in the pipe. While the use of particle-based slurries rather than SO2 for climate engineering can reduce the pipe size significantly, the pumping pressures are close to the maximum bursting pressure of the pipe. PMID:26543573

  4. On Paleointensity Estimates From Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization Normalization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, M.

    2002-12-01

    The ratio of Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM) to saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (IRMs) of a rock is dependent upon the magnetic material in it, the mechanism of magnetization, and the field in which the rock is magnetized. In calibration experiments, a variety of rocks given Thermal Remanent Magnetization (TRM) in a field of order 0.01 mT gave ratios of NRM:IRMs of order 0.01, when the NRM and IRMs were demagnetized to 20mT to eliminate the effect of very soft multidomain material. The method was initially used with lunar samples because standard methods that involved heating the samples proved impossible, whereas many analyses had presented the critical values of NRM and IRMs after 20mT. In this case, to know the field to an order of magnitude was important and led to the notion that there was a strong field on the moon, comparable with the geomagnetic field, from about 3.9 to 3.6 Gyr (Cisowski and Fuller 1986). Similarly, it is useful to know the martian field in which NRM was acquired by ALH84001 at 4.0 Gyr was one order less than the geomagnetic field, as has been suggested by studies of that meteorite. Clearly, the method is a simple normalization and should not be relied upon as anything more.

  5. Immobilization of Acetobacter aceti on cellulose ion exchangers: adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, R.; Gainer, J.L.; Kirwan, D.J.

    1986-08-01

    The adsorptive behavior of cells of Acetobacter aceti, ATCC 23746, on DEAE-, TEAE-, and DEHPAE-cellulose ion exchangers in a modified Hoyer's medium at 30 degrees Centigrade was investigated. The maximum observed adsorption capacities varied from 46 to 64 mg dry wt/g resin. The Langmuir isotherm form was used to fit the data, since the cells formed a monolayer on the resin and exhibited saturation. The equilibrium constant in the Langmuir expression was qualitatively correlated with the surface charge density of the resin. The adsorption was also ''normalized'' by considering the ionic capacities of the resins. The exceptionally high normalized adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-cellulose, 261 mg dry/meq, may be explained by an interaction between the cell wall and the polyglyceryl chains of the exchanging groups in addition to the electrostatic effects. The effect of pH on the bacterial adsorption capacity of ECTEOLA-, TEAE-, and phosphate-cellulose resins was studied and the pH of the bacteria was estimated to be 3.0. 17 references.

  6. Isothermal Microcalorimetry To Study Drugs against Schistosoma mansoni▿

    PubMed Central

    Manneck, Theresia; Braissant, Olivier; Haggenmüller, Yolanda; Keiser, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Alternative antischistosomal drugs are required since praziquantel is virtually the only drug available for treatment and morbidity control of schistosomiasis. Manual microscopic reading is the current “gold standard” to assess the in vitro antischistosomal properties of test drugs; however, it is labor-intensive, subjective, and difficult to standardize. Hence, there is a need to develop novel tools for antischistosomal drug discovery. The in vitro effects of praziquantel, oxamniquine, artesunate, and mefloquine on metabolic activity and parasite motility of Schistosoma mansoni (newly transformed schistosomula [NTS] and 49-day-old adult worms) were studied using isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). Results were compared to morphological readouts of viability. Results obtained for the four drugs tested with phenotypic evaluation by microscopy and IMC showed a good correlation, but IMC also identified drug effects that were not visible by microscopic evaluation, and IMC precisely determined the onset of action of the test drugs. Similar sensitivities on NTS and adult schistosomes were observed for praziquantel and mefloquine, while slight differences in the drug susceptibilities of the two developmental stages were noted with oxamniquine and artesunate. IMC is a useful tool for antischistosomal drug discovery that should be further validated. In addition, our data support the use of NTS in in vitro antischistosomal drug assays. PMID:21270220

  7. Horseshoe Drag in Three-dimensional Globally Isothermal Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masset, F. S.; Benítez-Llambay, P.

    2016-01-01

    We study the horseshoe dynamics of a low-mass planet in a three-dimensional, globally isothermal, inviscid disk. We find, as reported in previous work, that the boundaries of the horseshoe region (separatrix sheets) have cylindrical symmetry about the disk’s rotation axis. We interpret this feature as arising from the fact that the whole separatrix sheets have a unique value of Bernoulli’s constant, and that this constant does not depend on altitude, but only on the cylindrical radius, in barotropic disks. We next derive an expression for the torque exerted by the horseshoe region on the planet, or horseshoe drag. Potential vorticity is not materially conserved as in two-dimensional flows, but it obeys a slightly more general conservation law (Ertel’s theorem) that allows an expression for the horseshoe drag identical to the expression in a two-dimensional disk to be obtained. Our results are illustrated and validated by three-dimensional numerical simulations. The horseshoe region is found to be slightly narrower than previously extrapolated from two-dimensional analyses with a suitable softening length of the potential. We discuss the implications of our results for the saturation of the corotation torque, and the possible connection to the flow at the Bondi scale, which the present analysis does not resolve.

  8. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Vescovo, E.; Wang, Y.; Caruso, A.N.; Belashchenko, K.D.; Dowben, P.A.; Binek, C.

    2010-06-20

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Neel temperature.

  9. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Xi; Wang, Yi; Wu, Ning; Caruso, Anthony N; Vescovo, Elio; Belashchenko, Kirill D; Dowben, Peter A; Binek, Christian

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-controlled spin electronics is crucial for continued progress in information technology. It aims at reduced power consumption, increased integration density and enhanced functionality where non-volatile memory is combined with high-speed logical processing. Promising spintronic device concepts use the electric control of interface and surface magnetization. From the combination of magnetometry, spin-polarized photoemission spectroscopy, symmetry arguments and first-principles calculations, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr(2)O(3) has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr(2)O(3) single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias field between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This effect reflects the switching of the bulk antiferromagnetic domain state and the interface magnetization coupled to it. The switchable exchange bias sets in exactly at the bulk Néel temperature.

  10. Singular Isothermal Disks. Paper 2; Nonaxiymmetric Bifurcations and Equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galli, Danielle; Shu, Frank H.; Laughlin, Gregory; Lizano, Susana

    2000-01-01

    We review the difficulties of the classical fission and fragmentation hypotheses for the formation of binary and multiple stars. A crucial missing ingredient in previous theoretical studies is the inclusion of dynamically important levels of magnetic fields. As a minimal model for a candidate presursor to the formation of binary and multiple stars, we therefore formulate and solve the problem of the equilibria of isopedically magnetized, singular isothermal disks, without the assumption of axial symmetry. Considerable analytical progress can be made if we restrict our attention to models that are scale-free, i.e., that have surface densities that vary inversely with distance omega from the rotation axis of the system. In agreement with earlier analysis by Syer and Tremaine, we find that lopsided (M = 1) configurations exist at any dimensionless rotation rate, including zero. Multiple-lobed (M = 2, 3, 4, ...) configurations bifurcate from an underlying axisymmetric sequence at progressively higher dimensionless rates of rotation, but such nonaxisymmetric sequences always terminate in shockwaves before they have a chance to fission into M = 2, 3, 4, ... separate bodies. On the basis of our experience in this paper, we advance the hypothesis that binary and multiple star-formation from smooth (i.e., not highly turbulent) starting states that are supercritical but in unstable mechanical balance requires the rapid (i.e., dynamical) loss of magnetic flux at some stage of the ensuing gravitational collapse.

  11. The Evolution of Dendrite Morphology during Isothermal Coarsening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkemper, Jens; Mendoza, Roberto; Kammer, Dimitris; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2003-01-01

    Dendrite coarsening is a common phenomenon in casting processes. From the time dendrites are formed until the inter-dendritic liquid is completely solidified dendrites are changing shape driven by variations in interfacial curvature along the dendrite and resulting in a reduction of total interfacial area. During this process the typical length-scale of the dendrite can change by orders of magnitude and the final microstructure is in large part determined by the coarsening parameters. Dendrite coarsening is thus crucial in setting the materials parameters of ingots and of great commercial interest. This coarsening process is being studied in the Pb-Sn system with Sn-dendrites undergoing isothermal coarsening in a Pb-Sn liquid. Results are presented for samples of approximately 60% dendritic phase, which have been coarsened for different lengths of times. Presented are three-dimensional microstructures obtained by serial-sectioning and an analysis of these microstructures with regard to interface orientation and interfacial curvatures. These graphs reflect the evolution of not only the microstructure itself, but also of the underlying driving forces of the coarsening process. As a visualization of the link between the microstructure and the driving forces a three-dimensional microstructure with the interfaces colored according to the local interfacial mean curvature is shown.

  12. Hendra virus detection using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Foord, Adam J; Middleton, Deborah; Heine, Hans G

    2012-04-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic paramyxovirus endemic in Australian Pteropus bats (fruit bats or flying foxes). Although bats appear to be unaffected by the virus, HeV can spread from fruit bats to horses, causing severe disease. Human infection results from close contact with the blood, body fluids and tissues of infected horses. HeV is a biosecurity level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen, with a high case-fatality rate in humans and horses. Current assays for HeV detection require complex instrumentation and are generally time consuming. The aim of this study was to develop a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay to detect nucleic acid from all known HeV strains in horses without the requirement for complex laboratory equipment. A LAMP assay targeting a conserved region of the HeV P-gene was combined with a Lateral Flow Device (LFD) for detection of amplified product. All HeV isolates, the original HeV isolated in 1994 as well as the most recent isolates from 2011 were detected. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of the HeV-LAMP assay was equal to a TaqMan assay developed previously. Significantly, these assays detected HeV in horses before clinical signs were observed. The combined LAMP-LFD procedure is a sensitive method suitable for HeV diagnosis in a resource-limited situation or where rapid test results are critical.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of sorption isotherms of cassava (Manihot esculenta).

    PubMed

    Koua, Blaise Kamenan; Koffi, Paul Magloire Ekoun; Gbaha, Prosper; Toure, Siaka

    2014-09-01

    Sorption isotherms of cassava were determined experimentally using a static gravimetric method at 30, 45 and 60 °C and within the range of 0.10-0.90 water activity. At a constant water activity, equilibrium moisture content decreased with increasing temperature. The equilibrium moisture content increased with increasing water activity at a given temperature. The experimental results were modelled using seven sorption models using non-linear regression technique. Results demonstrated that the GAB model adequately predicted equilibrium moisture content of cassava for the range of temperatures and water activities studied. The thermodynamic functions such as net isosteric heat of sorption, differential entropy of sorption, net integral enthalpy and entropy were evaluated to provide an understanding of the properties of water and energy requirements associated with the sorption behaviour. Net isosteric heat and differential entropy decreased with increasing equilibrium moisture content. The net integral enthalpy decreased while net integral entropy increased with increasing equilibrium moisture content. Net integral entropy was negative in value. All thermodynamic functions were adequately characterised by a power law model. The point of maximum stability was found between 0.053 and 0.154 kg water/kg db for cassava. PMID:25190827

  14. Diagnosis of brugian filariasis by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Tanner, Nathan A; Zhang, Yinhua; Evans, Thomas C; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed and evaluated a Brugia Hha I repeat loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the rapid detection of Brugia genomic DNA. Amplification was detected using turbidity or fluorescence as readouts. Reactions generated a turbidity threshold value or a clear visual positive within 30 minutes using purified genomic DNA equivalent to one microfilaria. Similar results were obtained using DNA isolated from blood samples containing B. malayi microfilariae. Amplification was specific to B. malayi and B. timori, as no turbidity was observed using DNA from the related filarial parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus or Dirofilaria immitis, or from human or mosquito. Furthermore, the assay was most robust using a new strand-displacing DNA polymerase termed Bst 2.0 compared to wild-type Bst DNA polymerase, large fragment. The results indicate that the Brugia Hha I repeat LAMP assay is rapid, sensitive and Brugia-specific with the potential to be developed further as a field tool for diagnosis and mapping of brugian filariasis.

  15. Diagnosis of Brugian Filariasis by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Catherine B.; Tanner, Nathan A.; Zhang, Yinhua; Evans, Thomas C.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed and evaluated a Brugia Hha I repeat loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for the rapid detection of Brugia genomic DNA. Amplification was detected using turbidity or fluorescence as readouts. Reactions generated a turbidity threshold value or a clear visual positive within 30 minutes using purified genomic DNA equivalent to one microfilaria. Similar results were obtained using DNA isolated from blood samples containing B. malayi microfilariae. Amplification was specific to B. malayi and B. timori, as no turbidity was observed using DNA from the related filarial parasites Wuchereria bancrofti, Onchocerca volvulus or Dirofilaria immitis, or from human or mosquito. Furthermore, the assay was most robust using a new strand-displacing DNA polymerase termed Bst 2.0 compared to wild-type Bst DNA polymerase, large fragment. The results indicate that the Brugia Hha I repeat LAMP assay is rapid, sensitive and Brugia-specific with the potential to be developed further as a field tool for diagnosis and mapping of brugian filariasis. PMID:23272258

  16. Isothermal pumping analysis for high-altitude tethered balloons

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kirsty A.; Hunt, Hugh E. M.

    2015-01-01

    High-altitude tethered balloons have potential applications in communications, surveillance, meteorological observations and climate engineering. To maintain balloon buoyancy, power fuel cells and perturb atmospheric conditions, fluids could be pumped from ground level to altitude using the tether as a hose. This paper examines the pumping requirements of such a delivery system. Cases considered include delivery of hydrogen, sulfur dioxide (SO2) and powders as fluid-based slurries. Isothermal analysis is used to determine the variation of pressures and velocities along the pipe length. Results show that transport of small quantities of hydrogen to power fuel cells and maintain balloon buoyancy can be achieved at pressures and temperatures that are tolerable in terms of both the pipe strength and the current state of pumping technologies. To avoid solidification, transport of SO2 would require elevated temperatures that cannot be tolerated by the strength fibres in the pipe. While the use of particle-based slurries rather than SO2 for climate engineering can reduce the pipe size significantly, the pumping pressures are close to the maximum bursting pressure of the pipe. PMID:26543573

  17. Hendra virus detection using Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Foord, Adam J; Middleton, Deborah; Heine, Hans G

    2012-04-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic paramyxovirus endemic in Australian Pteropus bats (fruit bats or flying foxes). Although bats appear to be unaffected by the virus, HeV can spread from fruit bats to horses, causing severe disease. Human infection results from close contact with the blood, body fluids and tissues of infected horses. HeV is a biosecurity level 4 (BSL-4) pathogen, with a high case-fatality rate in humans and horses. Current assays for HeV detection require complex instrumentation and are generally time consuming. The aim of this study was to develop a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay to detect nucleic acid from all known HeV strains in horses without the requirement for complex laboratory equipment. A LAMP assay targeting a conserved region of the HeV P-gene was combined with a Lateral Flow Device (LFD) for detection of amplified product. All HeV isolates, the original HeV isolated in 1994 as well as the most recent isolates from 2011 were detected. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of the HeV-LAMP assay was equal to a TaqMan assay developed previously. Significantly, these assays detected HeV in horses before clinical signs were observed. The combined LAMP-LFD procedure is a sensitive method suitable for HeV diagnosis in a resource-limited situation or where rapid test results are critical. PMID:22327143

  18. In-situ isothermal phase transitions in photochromic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Samantha J.; Gleeson, Helen F.; D'Emanuele, Antony; Serak, Svetlana V.; Grozhik, Vladimir A.

    1998-06-01

    This study examines the optical response and physical properties of the homologous series 4-n-butyl-4'-n-alkoxyazobenzene. The members of this series all exhibit liquid crystalline phase behavior, and have also been used as dopants in 4-cyano-4'- n'pentylbiphenyl (5CB), a room temperature nematic liquid crystal. The guest-host system and the azobenzene series have been characterized using optical microscopy and UV-vis spectrophotometry. Illumination of these systems with light of a suitable wavelength induces a trans-cis isomerization of the azo- dye molecules which results in a reorientation of the liquid crystal director, often to such an extent that the liquid crystal phase is disrupted, causing an in situ isothermal phase transition. The response of the liquid crystal system to a linearly polarized beam of exciting radiation is examined with the use of a probe He:Ne laser. Changes in light transmission are then detected with a photodiode. Responses are discussed in terms of homologue, cell thickness and temperature.

  19. Isothermal Crystallization Kinetics of Mango (Mangifera indica) Almond Seed Fat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Fuentes, J. A.; Hernandez-Medel, M. R.; Duran-de-Bazua, M. C.

    In this study, the kinetics of isothermal crystallization of mango (Mangifera indica) almond seed fat var. Manila (MAF) was analyzed, within the theoretical context of the Sestak-Berggren model, the Avrami Equation and its modification by Khanna and Taylor. The results showed that the induction times for the formation of crystalline nuclei increased with the crystallization temperature (3.3 min at 8°C and 10.9 min at 12°C). The supercooling level notably influenced the MAF crystallization rate, since the global constant of crystallization rate, Z, grew 3.3 times from 12 to 8°C (for fractions of fat solids between 0.25 and 0.75, Z was 0.2904, 0.1584 and 0.0879 min-1 at 8, 10 and 12°C, respectively) and the Avrami parameter r was higher than 4; this demonstrates the effect of fat system complexity due to its multi-component nature and the heterogeneous character of this crystallization process, which includes additional participation of nucleation sites. The modified model by Khanna and Taylor provided better parametral values than the other two studied for explaining MAF crystallization kinetic.

  20. A New Approach in Regression Analysis for Modeling Adsorption Isotherms

    PubMed Central

    Onjia, Antonije E.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous regression approaches to isotherm parameters estimation appear in the literature. The real insight into the proper modeling pattern can be achieved only by testing methods on a very big number of cases. Experimentally, it cannot be done in a reasonable time, so the Monte Carlo simulation method was applied. The objective of this paper is to introduce and compare numerical approaches that involve different levels of knowledge about the noise structure of the analytical method used for initial and equilibrium concentration determination. Six levels of homoscedastic noise and five types of heteroscedastic noise precision models were considered. Performance of the methods was statistically evaluated based on median percentage error and mean absolute relative error in parameter estimates. The present study showed a clear distinction between two cases. When equilibrium experiments are performed only once, for the homoscedastic case, the winning error function is ordinary least squares, while for the case of heteroscedastic noise the use of orthogonal distance regression or Margart's percent standard deviation is suggested. It was found that in case when experiments are repeated three times the simple method of weighted least squares performed as well as more complicated orthogonal distance regression method. PMID:24672394

  1. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly.

    PubMed

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly ('Gibson assembly') that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  2. Non-Isothermal Crystallization of PET/PLA Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huipeng; Pyda, Marek; Cebe, Peggy

    2011-03-01

    Binary blends of poly(ethylene terephthalate) with poly(lactic acid), PET/PLA, were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The solution cast blends were miscible in the melt over the entire composition range. We report the non-isothermal crystallization of: a.) PET, with and without presence of PLA crystals, and b.) PLA, with and without presence of PET crystals. PET can crystallize in all blends, regardless of whether PLA is amorphous or crystalline, and crystallinity of PET decreases as PLA content increases. PLA crystallization is strongly affected by the mobility of the PET. When PET is wholly amorphous, PLA can crystallize weakly even in 70/30 blends. When PET is crystalline, PLA cannot crystallize when its own content is below 0.90. The different behaviors may be related to the tendency of each polymer to form constrained chains, i.e., to form rigid amorphous fraction, RAF. PET is capable of forming a large amount of RAF, whereas relatively smaller amount of RAF forms in PLA. Like the crystals, rigid amorphous fraction of one component may inhibit growth of crystals of the other blend partner. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Polymers Program of the Division of Materials Research under DMR-0602473 and the MRI Program under DMR-0520655.

  3. Visualisation of isothermal large coherent structures in a swirl burner

    SciTech Connect

    Valera-Medina, A.; Syred, N.; Griffiths, A.

    2009-09-15

    Lean premixed combustion using swirl flame stabilisation is widespread amongst gas turbine manufacturers. The use of swirl mixing and flame stabilisation is also prevalent in many other non-premixed systems. Problems that emerge include loss of stabilisation as a function of combustor geometry and thermo-acoustic instabilities. Coherent structures and their relationship with combustion processes have been a concern for decades due to their complex nature. This paper thus adopts an experimental approach to characterise large coherent structures in swirl burners under isothermal conditions so as to reveal the effects of swirl in a number of geometries and cold flow patterns that are relevant in combustion. Aided by techniques such as Hot Wire Anemometry, High Speed Photography and Particle Image Velocimetry, the recognition of several structures was achieved in a 100 kW swirl burner model. Several varied, interacting, structures developed in the field as a consequence of the configurations used. New structures never observed before were identified, the results not only showing the existence of very well defined large structures, but also their dependency on geometrical and flow parameters. The PVC is confirmed to be a semi-helical structure, contrary to previous simulations performed on the system. The appearance of secondary recirculation zones and suppression of the vortical core as a consequence of geometrical constrictions are presented as a mechanism of flow control. The asymmetry of the Central Recirculation Zone in cold flows is observed in all the experiments, with its elongation dependent on Re and swirl number used. (author)

  4. Extended forward sensitivity analysis of one-dimensional isothermal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.; Zhao, H.

    2013-07-01

    Sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification is an important part of nuclear safety analysis. In this work, forward sensitivity analysis is used to compute solution sensitivities on 1-D fluid flow equations typical of those found in system level codes. Time step sensitivity analysis is included as a method for determining the accumulated error from time discretization. The ability to quantify numerical error arising from the time discretization is a unique and important feature of this method. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time step with other physical parameters, the simulation is allowed to run at optimized time steps without affecting the confidence of the physical parameter sensitivity results. The time step forward sensitivity analysis method can also replace the traditional time step convergence studies that are a key part of code verification with much less computational cost. One well-defined benchmark problem with manufactured solutions is utilized to verify the method; another test isothermal flow problem is used to demonstrate the extended forward sensitivity analysis process. Through these sample problems, the paper shows the feasibility and potential of using the forward sensitivity analysis method to quantify uncertainty in input parameters and time step size for a 1-D system-level thermal-hydraulic safety code. (authors)

  5. Quadratic isothermal amplification for the detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ruixue; Zuo, Xiaolei; Wang, Shutao; Quan, Xiyun; Chen, Dongliang; Chen, Zhifei; Jiang, Lei; Fan, Chunhai; Xia, Fan

    2014-03-01

    This protocol describes an isothermal amplification approach for ultrasensitive detection of specific microRNAs (miRNAs). It achieves this level of sensitivity through quadratic amplification of the target oligonucleotide by using a Bst DNA polymerase-induced strand-displacement reaction and a lambda exonuclease-aided recycling reaction. First, the target miRNA binds to a specifically designed molecular beacon, causing it to become a fluorescence emitter. A primer then binds to the activated beacon, and Bst polymerase initiates the synthesis of a double-stranded DNA segment templated on the molecular beacon. This causes the concomitant release of the target miRNA from the beacon--the first round of 'recycling'. Second, the duplex beacon thus produced is a suitable substrate for a nicking enzyme present in solution. After the duplex beacon is nicked, the lambda exonuclease digests the beacon and releases the DNA single strand just synthesized, which is complementary to the molecular beacon, inducing the second round of recycling. The miRNA detection limit of this protocol is 10 fmol at 37 °C and 1 amol at 4 °C. This approach also affords high selectivity when applied to miRNA extracted from MCF-7 and PC3 cell lines and even from breast cancer tissue samples. Upon isolation of miRNA, the detection process can be completed in ∼2 h.

  6. Enzyme kinetics determined by single-injection isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Transtrum, Mark K; Hansen, Lee D; Quinn, Colette

    2015-04-01

    The purposes of this paper are (a) to examine the effect of calorimeter time constant (τ) on heat rate data from a single enzyme injection into substrate in an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC), (b) to provide information that can be used to predict the optimum experimental conditions for determining the rate constant (k2), Michaelis constant (KM), and enthalpy change of the reaction (ΔRH), and (c) to describe methods for evaluating these parameters. We find that KM, k2 and ΔRH can be accurately estimated without correcting for the calorimeter time constant, τ, if (k2E/KM), where E is the total active enzyme concentration, is between 0.1/τ and 1/τ and the reaction goes to at least 99% completion. If experimental conditions are outside this domain and no correction is made for τ, errors in the inferred parameters quickly become unreasonable. A method for fitting single-injection data to the Michaelis-Menten or Briggs-Haldane model to simultaneously evaluate KM, k2, ΔRH, and τ is described and validated with experimental data. All four of these parameters can be accurately inferred provided the reaction time constant (k2E/KM) is larger than 1/τ and the data include enzyme saturated conditions.

  7. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly (‘Gibson assembly’) that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology. PMID:27615025

  8. STAR: a simple TAL effector assembly reaction using isothermal assembly.

    PubMed

    Gogolok, Sabine; Garcia-Diaz, Claudia; Pollard, Steven M

    2016-09-12

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain modular programmable DNA binding domains. Fusing TALEs with effector domains creates synthetic transcription factors (TALE-TFs) or nucleases (TALENs), enabling precise gene manipulations. The construction of TALEs remains challenging due to their repetitive sequences. Here we report a simple TALE assembly reaction (STAR) that enables individual laboratories to generate multiple TALEs in a facile manner. STAR uses an isothermal assembly ('Gibson assembly') that is labour- and cost-effective, accessible, rapid and scalable. A small 68-part fragment library is employed, and the specific TALE repeat sequence is generated within ~8 hours. Sequence-verified TALENs or TALE-TF plasmids targeting 17 bp target sequences can be produced within three days, without the need for stepwise intermediate plasmid production. We demonstrate the utility of STAR through production of functional TALE-TFs capable of activating human SOX2 expression. STAR addresses some of the shortcomings of existing Golden Gate or solid-phase assembly protocols and enables routine production of TALE-TFs that will complement emerging CRISPR/Cas9-based reagents across diverse applications in mammalian stem cell and synthetic biology.

  9. Isothermal Detection of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Directly from Respiratory Clinical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Brianna L.; Wolff, Bernard J.; DeLaney, Alexandra A.; Diaz, Maureen H.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) across patient populations of all ages. We have developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay that enables rapid, low-cost detection of M. pneumoniae from nucleic acid extracts and directly from various respiratory specimen types. The assay implements calcein to facilitate simple visual readout of positive results in approximately 1 h, making it ideal for use in primary care facilities and resource-poor settings. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was determined to be 100 fg by testing serial dilutions of target DNA ranging from 1 ng to 1 fg per reaction, and no cross-reactivity was observed against 17 other Mycoplasma species, 27 common respiratory agents, or human DNA. We demonstrated the utility of this assay by testing nucleic acid extracts (n = 252) and unextracted respiratory specimens (n = 72) collected during M. pneumoniae outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring in the United States from February 2010 to January 2014. The sensitivity of the LAMP assay was 88.5% tested on extracted nucleic acid and 82.1% evaluated on unextracted clinical specimens compared to a validated real-time PCR test. Further optimization and improvements to this method may lead to the availability of a rapid, cost-efficient laboratory test for M. pneumoniae detection that is more widely available to primary care facilities, ultimately facilitating prompt detection and appropriate responses to potential M. pneumoniae outbreaks and clusters within the community. PMID:26179304

  10. Energetics of genome ejection from phage revealed by isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeembaeva, Meerim; Jonsson, Bengt; Castelnovo, Martin; Evilevitch, Alex

    2009-03-01

    It has been experimentally shown that ejection of double-stranded DNA from phage is driven by internal pressure reaching tens of atmospheres. This internal pressure is partially responsible for delivery of DNA into the host cell. While several theoretical models and simulations nicely describe the experimental data of internal forces either resisting active packaging or equivalently favoring spontaneous ejection, there are no direct energy measurements available that would help to verify how quantitative these theories are. We performed direct measurements of the enthalpy responsible for DNA ejection from phage λ, using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry. The phage capsids were ``opened'' in vitro by titrating λ into a solution with LamB receptor and the enthalpy of DNA ejection process was measured. In his way, enthalpy stored in λ was determined as a function of packaged DNA length comparing wild-type phage λ (48.5 kb) with a shorter λ-DNA length mutant (37.7 kb). The temperature dependence of the ejection enthalpy was also investigated. The values obtained were in good agreement with existing models and provide a better understanding of ds- DNA packaging and release mechanisms in motor-packaged viruses (e.g., tailed bacteriophages, Herpes Simplex, and adenoviruses).

  11. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using two commercial laser-based spectrometers: an instrument characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-07-01

    Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic and mesoscale meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research). The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments, we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric water cycle and

  12. A mean field model of the decrease of the specific surface area of dry snow during isothermal metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legagneux, LoïC.; Domine, Florent

    2005-12-01

    The surface area of snow that is accessible to gases is an essential parameter for quantifying the exchange of trace gases between the snowpack and the atmosphere and is called the specific surface area (SSA). Snow SSA decreases during metamorphism, but this is not described in current snow models owing to the complexity of the physics and geometry of snow. In this paper, we test whether it is possible to model snow SSA changes during isothermal metamorphism without accounting for all the complexity of the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of real snow. We have developed a mean field model of snow metamorphism under isothermal conditions, grounded in the theoretical framework of transient Ostwald ripening and representing snow as a distribution of spherical particles. Analytical expressions of the growth rates of these spheres are obtained, and the evolution of two measurable parameters that characterize snow geometry, the SSA and the distribution of radii of curvature (DRC), are simulated and compared to experimental data obtained by X-ray tomography. The qualitative effects of temperature, snow density, and the condensation coefficient on the rate of SSA decrease are examined. The model predicts very well the rate of evolution of the particle size distribution, which validates our physical description of isothermal metamorphism. In particular, we find that vapor phase diffusion is rate limiting. However, the calculation of the SSA from the DRC appears delicate and evidences too crude approximations in our description of the 3-D geometry of snow. Finally, it is stressed that the initial DRC can greatly influence the rate of SSA decrease, while experimental measurements of the rate of SSA decrease suggest that all snow types evolve in a similar way. It is thus proposed that most natural fresh snows have similar DRCs.

  13. Comparative study of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying and isothermal heat treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Haque, M Amdadul; Aldred, Peter; Chen, Jie; Barrow, Colin J; Adhikari, Benu

    2013-11-15

    The extent and nature of denaturation of whey protein isolate (WPI) in convective air drying environments was measured and analysed using single droplet drying. A custom-built, single droplet drying instrument was used for this purpose. Single droplets having 5±0.1μl volume (initial droplet diameter 1.5±0.1mm) containing 10% (w/v) WPI were dried at air temperatures of 45, 65 and 80°C for 600s at constant air velocity of 0.5m/s. The extent and nature of denaturation of WPI in isothermal heat treatment processes was measured at 65 and 80°C for 600s and compared with those obtained from convective air drying. The extent of denaturation of WPI in a high hydrostatic pressure environment (600MPa for 600s) was also determined. The results showed that at the end of 600s of convective drying at 65°C the denaturation of WPI was 68.3%, while it was only 10.8% during isothermal heat treatment at the same medium temperature. When the medium temperature was maintained at 80°C, the denaturation loss of WPI was 90.0% and 68.7% during isothermal heat treatment and convective drying, respectively. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) fraction of WPI was found to be more stable in the convective drying conditions than β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin, especially at longer drying times. The extent of denaturation of WPI in convective air drying (65 and 80°C) and isotheral heat treatment (80°C) for 600s was found to be higher than its denaturation in a high hydrostatic pressure environment at ambient temperature (600MPa for 600s).

  14. Nanoscale zero-valent iron incorporated with nanomagnetic diatomite for catalytic degradation of methylene blue in heterogeneous Fenton system.

    PubMed

    Zha, Yiming; Zhou, Ziqing; He, Haibo; Wang, Tianlin; Luo, Liqiang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) incorporated with nanomagnetic diatomite (DE) composite material was prepared for catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) in heterogeneous Fenton system. The material was constructed by two facile steps: Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were supported on DE by chemical co-precipitation method, after which nZVI was incorporated into magnetic DE by liquid-phase chemical reduction strategy. The as-prepared catalyst was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, magnetic properties measurement and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm measurement. The novel nZVI@Fe3O4-diatomite nanocomposites showed a distinct catalytic activity and a desirable effect for degradation of MB. MB could be completely decolorized within 8 min and the removal efficiency of total organic carbon could reach to 90% after reaction for 1 h. PMID:27232419

  15. Magneto-Sensitive Adsorbents Modified by Functional Nitrogen-Containing Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnyk, Inna V.; Gdula, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Zub, Yuriy L.

    2016-02-01

    In order to obtain amino-functionalized silica materials with magnetic core, one-step synthesis was carried out. Several materials, differ in number and structure of amino groups, were synthesized on the basis of sol-gel method. The synthesized materials were examined by several analytical techniques. The presence and content of amino groups were measured by using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy and acid-base titration, respectively. Specific surface areas were measured by nitrogen/adsorption desorption isotherms. It was proved that sol-gel approach leads to obtain materials with high content of amino groups built into their surfaces (in the range 1.6-2.7 mmol/g). As-obtained materials were tested as potential adsorbents for copper(II) ions. The received maximum adsorption capacities were in the range 0.4-0.7 mmol/g.

  16. Magneto-Sensitive Adsorbents Modified by Functional Nitrogen-Containing Groups.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Inna V; Gdula, Karolina; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Zub, Yuriy L

    2016-12-01

    In order to obtain amino-functionalized silica materials with magnetic core, one-step synthesis was carried out. Several materials, differ in number and structure of amino groups, were synthesized on the basis of sol-gel method. The synthesized materials were examined by several analytical techniques. The presence and content of amino groups were measured by using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy and acid-base titration, respectively. Specific surface areas were measured by nitrogen/adsorption desorption isotherms. It was proved that sol-gel approach leads to obtain materials with high content of amino groups built into their surfaces (in the range 1.6-2.7 mmol/g). As-obtained materials were tested as potential adsorbents for copper(II) ions. The received maximum adsorption capacities were in the range 0.4-0.7 mmol/g. PMID:26842794

  17. Effects of pH and sugar concentration in Zygosaccharomyces rouxii growth and time for spoilage in concentrated grape juice at isothermal and non-isothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Rojo, M C; Arroyo López, F N; Lerena, M C; Mercado, L; Torres, A; Combina, M

    2014-04-01

    The effect of pH (1.7-3.2) and sugar concentration (64-68 °Brix) on the growth of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii MC9 using response surface methodology was studied. Experiments were carried out in concentrated grape juice inoculated with Z. rouxii at isothermal conditions (23 °C) for 60 days. pH was the variable with the highest effect on growth parameters (potential maximum growth rate and lag phase duration), although the effect of sugar concentration were also significant. In a second experiment, the time for spoilage by this microorganism in concentrated grape juice was evaluated at isothermal (23 °C) and non-isothermal conditions, in an effort to reproduce standard storage and overseas shipping temperature conditions, respectively. Results show that pH was again the environmental factor with the highest impact on delaying the spoilage of the product. Thereby, a pH value below 2.0 was enough to increase the shelf life of the product for more than 60 days in both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The information obtained in the present work could be used by producers and buyers to predict the growth and time for spoilage of Z. rouxii in concentrated grape juice.

  18. Isothermal solidification stage during transient liquid-phase bonding single-crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Naicheng; Liu, Jide; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2014-04-01

    In this work, the isothermal solidification stage during transient liquid-phase bonding (TLP) single-crystal superalloys has been investigated. Experiments were performed to ascertain the bonding microstructures and the kinetics during the isothermal solidification. The results have shown that the isothermal solidification stage deviates from the standard parabolic TLP models. Lots of the borides with fine, short bar and acicular morphologies formed in the diffusion affected zone (DAZ) in the thick wall and thin wall substrate specimens at the isothermal solidification stage. Electron probe microanalysis results have shown that there exists B composition peak in the DAZ. Examination of the bonding kinetics presented that there are three stages in the isothermal solidification stage: initial stage, transient stage and final stage with different growth velocity of the isothermal solidification zone (ISZ). And the relationship of the width of the ISZ with the square root of the bonding time didn't satisfy the parabolic relationship. Based on the microstructures and kinetics observed, a film ISZ mechanism is proposed, and a model is constructed to illustrate the isothermal solidification stage during bonding single-crystal superalloys.

  19. Measuring fast variations of δ^{18}O and δ^2H in atmospheric water vapour using laser spectroscopy: an instrument inter-comparison and characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-04-01

    Fast variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable lately using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This allows us to perform process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales of significant weather events. An important prerequisite for such studies implying automatic field measurements lasting for several weeks or even months is a detailed knowledge about sources of uncertainty and instrument properties. We present a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Resarch). The old versions (L1115-i, WVIA) and the new versions (L2130-i, WVIA-EP) of both systems were tested. The uncertainty components of the measurements were assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Knowledge from our laboratory experiments was used to setup a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the L1115-i and WVIA systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. Using this field measurement data we address the question of how well the deuterium excess (d=δ2H-8δ18O) of atmospheric water vapour can be determined with laser spectroscopy. The deuterium excess is an interesting parameter for process-based atmospheric water cycle studies, which depends on humidity and temperature conditions at source location of water vapour. Up to now only very few high-time-resolution measurements of deuterium excess exist. Our concurrent measurements of atmospheric isotopes in water vapour

  20. Simulations of isothermal processes in the semilocalized transition (SLT) model of thermoluminescence (TL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Kulp, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Semilocalized transition (SLT) kinetic models for thermoluminescence (TL) contain characteristics of both a localized transition (LT) and of a single trap model. TL glow curves within SLT models typically contain contain two TL peaks; the first peak corresponds to the intra-pair luminescence due to LTs and the second TL peak corresponds to delocalized transitions involving the conduction band (CB). The latter delocalized TL peak has also been found to exhibit non-typical double-peak structure, in which the main TL peak is accompanied by a smaller peak called the displacement peak. This paper describes the simulation of isothermal luminescence signals using a previously published SLT model. It is found that these simulated isothermal signals exhibit several unusual time characteristics. Isothermal signals associated with the LTs follow first order kinetics and are therefore described by single decaying exponentials. However, isothermal signals associated with delocalized transitions show a non-typical complex structure characterized by several time regions with different decay characteristics. For certain values of the parameters in the SLT model the isothermal signals can also exhibit non-monotonic behaviour as a function of time. Another notable result from the simulations is that isothermal currents (which are proportional to the concentration of electrons in the CB) can persist for very long periods of time, even after the apparent termination of the isothermal luminescence signals. It is concluded that isothermal processes described by the SLT model depend strongly on the presence of SLTs, in contrast to previous studies using Monte Carlo simulations, which showed a weak interdependence of these phenomena. The simulations in this paper suggest that isothermal experiments offer a sensitive method for detecting the presence of SLTs in a dosimetric material.

  1. Propagating and nonpropagating compression waves in an isothermal atmosphere with uniform horizontal magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.; An, C.-H.

    1989-01-01

    Full analytical solutions to the wave equations for steady vertical compression waves in an isothermal hydrostatic atmosphere with a uniform horizontal magnetic field are presented. It is shown that, in the steady state approach, the behavior of upward waves and downward waves is very different. It is shown that the finding of Thomas (1983), indicating that the cutoff frequency for vertically propagating magnetoacoustic waves in an isothermal atmosphere with a horizontal magnetic field is the same for isothermal atmosphere with no magnetic field, is true only for the downward waves.

  2. Programmable, isothermal disassembly of DNA-linked colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tison, Christopher Kirby

    Colloidal particles serve as useful building blocks for materials applications ranging from controlled hand-gap materials to rationally designed drug delivery systems. Thus, developing approaches to direct the assembly and disassembly of sub-micron sized particles will be paramount to further advances in materials science engineering. This project focuses on using programmable and reversible binding between oligonucleotide strands to assemble and then disassemble polystyrene colloidal particles. It is shown that DNA-mediated assembly can be reversed at a fixed temperature using secondary oligonucleotide strands to competitively displace the primary strands linking particles together. It was found that (1) titrating the surface density of hybridizing probe strands and (2) adjusting the base length difference between primary and secondary target strands was key to successful isothermal disassembly. In order to titrate the surface density of primary probe-target duplexes, colloidal particles were conjugated with mixtures of probe strands and "diluent" strands in order to minimize the number of DNA linkages between particles. To reduce the steric interference of the diluent strands to hybridization events, diluent strands were clipped with a restriction enzyme in select cases. Kinetics studies revealed that a four to six base-length difference between primary and secondary target strands resulted in extensive competitive hybridization at secondary oligonucleotide concentrations as low as 10 nM. Importantly, it was found that the timing for release of either DNA alone or DNA-conjugated nanoparticles could be tuned through choices in the DNA sequences and concentration. Lastly, competitive hybridization was explored in select studies to drive the "shedding" of PEGylated DNA targets from microspheres to reveal underlying adhesive groups or ligands on the particle surface. Unlike prior work relying on elevated temperatures to melt DNA-linkages, this work presents an

  3. Thermomechanical and isothermal fatigue behavior of bare and coated superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kadioglu, Y.; Sehitoglu, H.

    1996-01-01

    Thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) and isothermal fatigue (IF) experiments were performed on bare Mar-M246 as well as bare and coated Mar-M247 nickel based superalloys at strain ranges from 0.335 to 1 percent. The experiments were conducted in air, through a temperature range of 500 to 1,038 C at a constant strain rate of 5.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} s{sup {minus}1}. Due to the coarse-grained structure of Mar-M246, TMF lives scattered considerably under low strain range conditions. Electron microscopy studies show that significant surface oxidation and gamma prime, {gamma}{prime}, depleted zones occur for Mar-M246 under these conditions. In the surface grain, where the change in {gamma}{prime} morphology is most pronounced, {gamma}{prime} rafted along axes {approx}{+-}45 deg from the loading axis. The influence of a protective coating on the IF and TMF lives of Mar-M247 was also examined. Results indicate that the coating does not significantly affect the fatigue lives of Mar-M247. The oxidation behavior of bare and coating Mar-M247 was investigated via X-ray microprobe and Auger Spectroscopy. Through these analyses, it is evident that the coating was completely degraded when exposed to the test environment for a long time. In both Mar-M246 and Mar-M247, in-phase thermomechanical fatigue (TMF IP) loading resulted in intergranular cracking. TMF IP loading promoted multiple cracks at the coating/substrate interface of coating Mar-M247. Finally, Eshelby techniques were used to calculate stress distributions in the vicinity of a surface oxide and second-phase particle at the coating/substrate interface.

  4. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, Michael G.; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane”) to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed.

  5. Integrated Microfluidic Nucleic Acid Isolation, Isothermal Amplification, and Amplicon Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Mauk, Michael G.; Liu, Changchun; Song, Jinzhao; Bau, Haim H.

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidic components and systems for rapid (<60 min), low-cost, convenient, field-deployable sequence-specific nucleic acid-based amplification tests (NAATs) are described. A microfluidic point-of-care (POC) diagnostics test to quantify HIV viral load from blood samples serves as a representative and instructive example to discuss the technical issues and capabilities of “lab on a chip” NAAT devices. A portable, miniaturized POC NAAT with performance comparable to conventional PCR (polymerase-chain reaction)-based tests in clinical laboratories can be realized with a disposable, palm-sized, plastic microfluidic chip in which: (1) nucleic acids (NAs) are extracted from relatively large (~mL) volume sample lysates using an embedded porous silica glass fiber or cellulose binding phase (“membrane”) to capture sample NAs in a flow-through, filtration mode; (2) NAs captured on the membrane are isothermally (~65 °C) amplified; (3) amplicon production is monitored by real-time fluorescence detection, such as with a smartphone CCD camera serving as a low-cost detector; and (4) paraffin-encapsulated, lyophilized reagents for temperature-activated release are pre-stored in the chip. Limits of Detection (LOD) better than 103 virons/sample can be achieved. A modified chip with conduits hosting a diffusion-mode amplification process provides a simple visual indicator to readily quantify sample NA template. In addition, a companion microfluidic device for extracting plasma from whole blood without a centrifuge, generating cell-free plasma for chip-based molecular diagnostics, is described. Extensions to a myriad of related applications including, for example, food testing, cancer screening, and insect genotyping are briefly surveyed. PMID:27600235

  6. AWM 4 - an isothermal cluster observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, E.; Vrtilek, J. M.; Kempner, J. C.; David, L. P.; Houck, J. C.

    2005-03-01

    We present an analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of the poor cluster AWM 4. The cluster is relaxed and its X-ray halo is regular with no apparent substructure. Azimuthally averaged radial spectral profiles suggest that the cluster is isothermal to a radius of at least 160 kpc, with no evidence of a central cooling region. Spectral mapping shows some significant temperature and abundance substructure, but no evidence of strong cooling in the cluster core. Abundance increases in the core, but not to the extent expected, and we find some indication of gas mixing. Modelling the three-dimensional properties of the system, we show that ongoing heating by an active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the dominant elliptical, NGC 6051, is likely to be responsible for the lack of cooling. We also compare AWM 4 to MKW 4, a cluster of similar mass observed recently with XMM-Newton. While the two systems have similar gravitational mass profiles, MKW 4 has a cool core and a somewhat steeper gas density profile, which leads to a lower core entropy. AWM 4 has a considerably larger gas fraction at 0.1R200, and we show that these differences result from the difference in mass between the two dominant galaxies and the activity cycles of their AGN. We estimate the energy required to raise the temperature profile of MKW 4 to match that of AWM 4 to be 9 × 1058 erg or 3 × 1043 erg s-1 for 100 Myr, comparable to the likely power output of the AGN in AWM 4.

  7. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper.

  8. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper. PMID:27089183

  9. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Peptide Ligands Explored by Competition Assay and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gaucher, Jean-François; Desole, Claudia; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Brachet, Franck; Broutin, Isabelle; Vidal, Michel; Broussy, Sylvain

    2015-08-25

    The v114* cyclic peptide has been identified as a tight vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ligand. Here we report on the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), 96-well plate competition assay, and circular dichroism (CD) to explore the binding determinants of a new set of related peptides. Anti-VEGF antibodies are currently used in the clinic for regulating angiogenesis in cancer and age-related macular degeneration treatment. In this context, our aim is to develop smaller molecular entities with high affinity for the growth factor by a structure activity relationship approach. The cyclic disulfide peptide v114* was modified in several ways, including truncation, substitution, and variation of the size and nature of the cycle. The results indicated that truncation or substitution of the four N-terminal amino acids did not cause severe loss in affinity, allowing potential peptide labeling. Increase of the cycle size or substitution of the disulfide bridge with a thioether linkage drastically decreased the affinity, due to an enthalpy penalty. The leucine C-terminal residue positively contributed to affinity. Cysteine N-terminal acetylation induced favorable ΔΔG° and ΔΔH° of binding, which correlated with free peptide CD spectra changes. We also propose a biochemical model to extrapolate Ki from IC50 values measured in the displacement assay. These calculated Ki correlate well with the Kd values determined by extensive direct and reverse ITC measurements. PMID:26222917

  10. Precipitation and Phase Transformations in 2101 Lean Duplex Stainless Steel During Isothermal Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maetz, Jean-Yves; Cazottes, Sophie; Verdu, Catherine; Kleber, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The effect of isothermal aging at 963 K (690 °C) on the microstructure of a 2101 lean duplex stainless steel, with the composition Fe-21.5Cr-5Mn-1.6Ni-0.22N-0.3Mo, was investigated using a multi-technique and multi-scale approach. The kinetics of phase transformation and precipitation was followed from a few minutes to thousands of hours using thermoelectric power measurements; based on these results, certain aging states were selected for electron microscopy characterization. Scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were used to quantitatively describe the microstructural evolution through crystallographic analysis, chemical analysis, and volume fraction measurements from the macroscopic scale down to the nanometric scale. During aging, the precipitation of M23C6 carbides, Cr2N nitrides, and σ phase as well as the transformation of ferrite into austenite and austenite into martensite was observed. These complex microstructural changes are controlled by Cr volume diffusion. The precipitation and phase transformation mechanisms are described.

  11. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Peptide Ligands Explored by Competition Assay and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Reille-Seroussi, Marie; Gaucher, Jean-François; Desole, Claudia; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Brachet, Franck; Broutin, Isabelle; Vidal, Michel; Broussy, Sylvain

    2015-08-25

    The v114* cyclic peptide has been identified as a tight vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) ligand. Here we report on the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), 96-well plate competition assay, and circular dichroism (CD) to explore the binding determinants of a new set of related peptides. Anti-VEGF antibodies are currently used in the clinic for regulating angiogenesis in cancer and age-related macular degeneration treatment. In this context, our aim is to develop smaller molecular entities with high affinity for the growth factor by a structure activity relationship approach. The cyclic disulfide peptide v114* was modified in several ways, including truncation, substitution, and variation of the size and nature of the cycle. The results indicated that truncation or substitution of the four N-terminal amino acids did not cause severe loss in affinity, allowing potential peptide labeling. Increase of the cycle size or substitution of the disulfide bridge with a thioether linkage drastically decreased the affinity, due to an enthalpy penalty. The leucine C-terminal residue positively contributed to affinity. Cysteine N-terminal acetylation induced favorable ΔΔG° and ΔΔH° of binding, which correlated with free peptide CD spectra changes. We also propose a biochemical model to extrapolate Ki from IC50 values measured in the displacement assay. These calculated Ki correlate well with the Kd values determined by extensive direct and reverse ITC measurements.

  12. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298 K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper.

  13. Measuring $\

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  14. Thermodynamic Study of Interactions Between ZnO and ZnO Binding Peptides Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Limo, Marion J; Perry, Carole C

    2015-06-23

    While material-specific peptide binding sequences have been identified using a combination of combinatorial methods and computational modeling tools, a deep molecular level understanding of the fundamental principles through which these interactions occur and in some instances modify the morphology of inorganic materials is far from being fully realized. Understanding the thermodynamic changes that occur during peptide-inorganic interactions and correlating these to structural modifications of the inorganic materials could be the key to achieving and mastering control over material formation processes. This study is a detailed investigation applying isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to directly probe thermodynamic changes that occur during interaction of ZnO binding peptides (ZnO-BPs) and ZnO. The ZnO-BPs used are reported sequences G-12 (GLHVMHKVAPPR), GT-16 (GLHVMHKVAPPR-GGGC), and alanine mutants of G-12 (G-12A6, G-12A11, and G-12A12) whose interaction with ZnO during solution synthesis studies have been extensively investigated. The interactions of the ZnO-BPs with ZnO yielded biphasic isotherms comprising both an endothermic and an exothermic event. Qualitative differences were observed in the isothermal profiles of the different peptides and ZnO particles studied. Measured ΔG values were between -6 and -8.5 kcal/mol, and high adsorption affinity values indicated the occurrence of favorable ZnO-BP-ZnO interactions. ITC has great potential in its use to understand peptide-inorganic interactions, and with continued development, the knowledge gained may be instrumental for simplification of selection processes of organic molecules for the advancement of material synthesis and design.

  15. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.

    2011-07-27

    Laboratory experiments were performed to investigate the contribution of variable grain sizes to uranium adsorption/desorption in a sediment collected from the US DOE Hanford site. The sediment was wet-sieved into four size fractions: coarse sand (1-2 mm), medium sand (0.2-1 mm), fine sand (0.05-0.2 mm), and clay/silt fraction (< 0.05mm). For each size fraction and their composite (sediment), batch experiments were performed to determine uranium adsorption isotherms, and stirred flow-cell experiments were conducted to derive kinetic data of uranium adsorption and subsequent desorption. The results showed that uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics were size-specific, reflecting the effects of size-specific adsorption site concentration and kinetic rate constants. The larger-size fraction had a larger mass percentage in the sediment, but with a smaller adsorption site concentration and generally a slower uranium adsorption/desorption rate. The same equilibrium surface complexation reaction and reaction constant could describe uranium adsorption isotherms for all size fractions and the composite after accounting for the effect of adsorption site concentration. Mass-weighted, linear additivity was observed for both uranium adsorption isotherms and adsorption/desorption kinetics in the composite. Our analysis also showed that uranium adsorption site concentration estimated from the adsorption isotherms was 3 orders of magnitude less than a site concentration estimated from sediment surface area and generic site density. One important implication of this study is that grain size distribution may be used to estimate uranium adsorption site, and adsorption/desorption kinetic rates in heterogeneous sediments from a common location.

  16. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition (T manikin  = T a  = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin. PMID:26542017

  17. Effect of two sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance in a so-called isothermal condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yehu; Wang, Faming; Peng, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The effect of sweating simulation methods on clothing evaporative resistance was investigated in a so-called isothermal condition ( T manikin = T a = T r ). Two sweating simulation methods, namely, the pre-wetted fabric "skin" (PW) and the water supplied sweating (WS), were applied to determine clothing evaporative resistance on a "Newton" thermal manikin. Results indicated that the clothing evaporative resistance determined by the WS method was significantly lower than that measured by the PW method. In addition, the evaporative resistances measured by the two methods were correlated and exhibited a linear relationship. Validation experiments demonstrated that the empirical regression equation showed highly acceptable estimations. The study contributes to improving the accuracy of measurements of clothing evaporative resistance by means of a sweating manikin.

  18. Rapid isothermal detection of Phytophthora species on plant samples using recombinase polymerase amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently several isothermal amplification techniques have been developed that are extremely tolerant towards inhibitors present in many plant extracts. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assays for the genus Phytophthora have been developed which provide a simple and rapid method to macerate...

  19. Nonequilibrium Contribution to the Rate of Reaction. III. Isothermal Multicomponent Systems

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Shizgal, B.; Karplus, M.

    1970-10-01

    The nonequilibrium contribution to the reaction rate of an isothermal multicomponent system is obtained by solution of the appropriate Chapman-Enskog equation; the system is composed of reactive species in contact with a heat bath of inert atoms M.

  20. 0 °C isotherm height for satellite communication in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandeep, J. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 0 °C isotherm height is an important parameter for prediction of rain attenuation of microwave and millimeter wave for Earth-space communication. The variations of 0 °C isotherm heights for two monsoon seasons have been studied based on an analysis of radiosonde over three stations. The exceedence probability statistics of rain height are compared between the two seasons. The results on the 0 °C isotherm height can be utilized for the estimation of attenuation of microwave and millimeter wave due to rain over Earth-space paths. Attenuations of radio wave due to rain at frequencies above 10 GHz and above have also been estimated using the 0 °C isotherm height so derived.

  1. ISOTHERMAL PHASE TRANSFORMATION CYCLING IN STEEL BY APPLICATION OF A HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Jaramillo, Roger A; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz-; Kisner, Roger A; Wilgen, John B

    2007-01-01

    A phase transformation reversal via the application and removal of a large magnetic field was investigated. Because a large magnetic field can alter the phase equilibrium between paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic ferrite, volume fractions for each phase constituent can be modified at constant temperature by changing the magnetic field strength. In this research elevated temperature isothermal hold experiments were performed for 5160 steel. During the isothermal hold, the magnetic field was cycled between 0 and 30 Tesla. As companion experiments, temperature cycling and isothermal holds were performed without magnetic fields. The resulting microstructures were examined using optical and SEM metallography. These microstructures indicate that a portion of the microstructure experiences isothermal transformation cycling between austenite and ferrite due to the application and removal of the 30T (Tesla) magnetic field.

  2. Tomography-based monitoring of isothermal snow metamorphism under advective conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, P. P.; Schneebeli, M.; Steinfeld, A.

    2015-07-01

    Time-lapse X-ray microtomography was used to investigate the structural dynamics of isothermal snow metamorphism exposed to an advective airflow. The effect of diffusion and advection across the snow pores on the snow microstructure were analysed in controlled laboratory experiments and possible effects on natural snowpacks discussed. The 3-D digital geometry obtained by tomographic scans was used in direct pore-level numerical simulations to determine the effective permeability. The results showed that isothermal advection with saturated air have no influence on the coarsening rate that is typical for isothermal snow metamorphism. Isothermal snow metamorphism is driven by sublimation deposition caused by the Kelvin effect and is the limiting factor independently of the transport regime in the pores.

  3. Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on model soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, F.; Picaud, S.; Hoang, P. N. M.; Jedlovszky, P.

    2007-10-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the adsorption isotherms of water molecules on different types of model soot particles. The soot particles are modeled by graphite-type layers arranged in an onionlike structure that contains randomly distributed hydrophilic sites, such as OH and COOH groups. The calculated water adsorption isotherm at 298K exhibits different characteristic shapes depending both on the type and the location of the hydrophilic sites and also on the size of the pores inside the soot particle. The different shapes of the adsorption isotherms result from different ways of water aggregation in or/and around the soot particle. The present results show the very weak influence of the OH sites on the water adsorption process when compared to the COOH sites. The results of these simulations can help in interpreting the experimental isotherms of water adsorbed on aircraft soot.

  4. Synthesis of mesoporous titania nanoparticles with anatase frameworks and investigation of their photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohamed B; Suzuki, Norihiro; Shimasaki, Kotaro; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi; Huang, Yu-Tzu; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2012-06-01

    In this research paper, we synthesize various types of mesoporous titania nanoparticles (MTNs) with suitable surface area and pore size while creating anatase frameworks by applying hydrothermal treatment or calcination at different temperatures. Wide-angle XRD patterns and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms reveal that the MTNs with crystallized anatase frameworks can be synthesized after an optimized hydrothermal treatment. In contrast, calcination of MTNs at high temperature caused the collapse of mesoporous structure, resulted in drastic reduction of the surface area of the MTNs. In addition, we investigate the photocatalytic activity of the prepared MTNs by measuring the degradation of methylene blue (MB). The results show that the reaction rates of the photocatalytic MB decomposition strongly depend on the degree of crystallinity in the MTNs frameworks and on the surface area of MTNs.

  5. Analyzing the kinetic response of tin oxide-carbon and tin oxide-CNT composites gas sensors for alcohols detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamble, Vinayak; Umarji, Arun

    2015-03-01

    Tin oxide nanoparticles are synthesized using solution combustion technique and tin oxide - carbon composite thick films are fabricated with amorphous carbon as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements show that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are having rutile phase with average crystallite size ˜7 nm and ˜95 m2/g surface area. The difference between morphologies of the carbon doped and CNT doped SnO2 thick films, are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption-desorption kinetics and transient response curves are analyzed using Langmuir isotherm curve fittings and modeled using power law of semiconductor gas sensors.

  6. Analyzing the kinetic response of tin oxide-carbon and tin oxide-CNT composites gas sensors for alcohols detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kamble, Vinayak Umarji, Arun

    2015-03-15

    Tin oxide nanoparticles are synthesized using solution combustion technique and tin oxide – carbon composite thick films are fabricated with amorphous carbon as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and porosity measurements show that the as-synthesized nanoparticles are having rutile phase with average crystallite size ∼7 nm and ∼95 m{sup 2}/g surface area. The difference between morphologies of the carbon doped and CNT doped SnO{sub 2} thick films, are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption-desorption kinetics and transient response curves are analyzed using Langmuir isotherm curve fittings and modeled using power law of semiconductor gas sensors.

  7. Influence of difference quantity La-doped TiO2 photoanodes on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells: A strategy for choosing an appropriate doping quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zige; Li, Guoxiang; Cui, Zijian; Zhang, Kaiyue; Feng, Yaqing; Meng, Shuxian

    2016-05-01

    Facilitated by TiO2 particles adsorbing lanthanide ions in hydrosol, La-doped TiO2 was produced by a hydrothermal method. The structure, optical and photoluminescence properties of down-converting photoelectrode with the La3+ were characterized by X-ray (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms measurement. The photoelectric conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabricated with 0.05 g-La/TiO2 reached 7.02%, which gave an efficiency improved by 10.36% compared with that of cells fabricated from pure TiO2. The improvement in efficiency was ascribed to more dyes adsorbed on the surface of TiO2.

  8. Delamination of layered zeolite precursors under mild conditions: synthesis of UCB-1 via fluoride/chloride anion-promoted exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Isao; Nigra, Michael M; Hwang, Son-Jong; Ha, Jeong-Myeong; Rea, Thomas; Zones, Stacey I; Katz, Alexander

    2011-03-16

    New material UCB-1 is synthesized via the delamination of zeolite precursor MCM-22 (P) at pH 9 using an aqueous solution of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, tetrabutylammonium fluoride, and tetrabutylammonium chloride at 353 K. Characterization by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen physisorption at 77 K indicates the same degree of delamination in UCB-1 as previously reported for delaminated zeolite precursors, which require a pH of greater than 13.5 and sonication in order to achieve exfoliation. UCB-1 consists of a high degree of structural integrity via (29)Si MAS NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies, and no detectable formation of amorphous silica phase via transmission electron microscopy. Porosimetry measurements demonstrate a lack of hysteresis in the N(2) adsorption/desorption isotherms and macroporosity in UCB-1. The new method is generalizable to a variety of Si:Al ratios and leads to delaminated zeolite precursor materials lacking amorphization. PMID:21341663

  9. Zinc Oxide LB Films with Improved Antireflective, Photoactive and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naszályi Nagy, Lívia; Ábrahám, Nóra; Kovács, Attila L.; van der Lee, Arie; Rouessac, Vincent; Cot, Didier; Ayral, André; Hórvölgyi, Z.

    Multifunctional Langmuir-Blodgett films were prepared using sol-gel derived ZnO and silica nanoparticles synthesized by the procedure of Seelig et al. [1] and Stöber et al. [2], respectively. High inherent porosity was observed for ZnO particles (30-40%) by pycnometry, scanning angle reflectometry, N2 adsorption-desorption and ellipsometric porosimetry methods. Water contact angle of ZnO nanoparticles was determined from the non-dissipative part of the obtained surface pressure-surface area isotherms, and by scanning angle reflectometry measurements in a Wilhelmy film balance. Antireflective and photocatalytically active coatings of ZnO particles were deposited on glass, conductive glass and silicon substrates. The antireflectivity of ZnO LB films was improved by the integration of silica nanoparticles in the LB film. The photocatalytic activity and the mechanical stability of the samples were enhanced by means of surface modification with 3-methacryloxypropyl(trimethoxy)silane.

  10. Capture of formaldehyde by adsorption on nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Bezverkhyy, Igor; Weber, Guy; Royer, Sébastien; Averlant, Remy; Giraudon, Jean-Marc; Lamonier, Jean-François

    2015-12-30

    The aim of this work is to assess the capability of a series of nanoporous materials to capture gaseous formaldehyde by adsorption in order to develop air treatment process and gas detection in workspaces or housings. Adsorption-desorption isotherms have been accurately measured at room temperature by TGA under very low pressure (p<2 hPa) on various adsorbents, such as zeolites, mesoporous silica (SBA15), activated carbon (AC NORIT RB3) and metal organic framework (MOF, Ga-MIL-53), exhibiting a wide range of pore sizes and surface properties. Results reveal that the NaX, NaY and CuX faujasite (FAU) zeolites are materials which show strong adsorption capacity and high affinity toward formaldehyde. In addition, these materials can be completely regenerated by heating at 200°C under vacuum. These cationic zeolites are therefore promising candidates as adsorbents for the design of air depollution process or gas sensing applications.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Monodisperse Magnetic Porous Nickel Microspheres as Novel Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chao; He, Jie; Zhu, Lili; Ren, Lianbing; Chen, Jiwei; Hong, Mei; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    A facile and efficient hard-templating strategy is reported for the preparation of porous nickel microspheres with excellent uniformity and strong magnetism. The strategy involves impregnation of porous polymer microspheres with nickel precursors, calcination to remove the template, followed by thermal reduction. The morphology, structure, and the property of the Ni microspheres were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis, and magnetic hysteresis measurement. The obtained porous nickel microspheres were monodispersed with a particle size of 0.91 μm and crystallite size of 52 nm. Their saturation magnetization was much higher than that of Ni nanoparticles. The unique porous nanostructured Ni microspheres possess catalytic activity and excellent recyclability, as demonstrated in the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. The micropherical Ni catalysts could be easily separated either by an external magnetic field or by simple filtration.

  12. Experimental and Particle-Tracking Model Analysis of Anomalous Transport and Sorption of Nickel in Natural Soil Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edery, Y.; Rubin, S.; Dror, I.; Berkowitz, B.

    2012-12-01

    Nickel migration measured in laboratory-scale, natural soil column experiments is shown to display anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and non-equilibrium adsorption and desorption patterns. Similar experiments using a conservative tracer also exhibit anomalous behavior. In parallel batch experiments, adsorption and desorption isotherms demonstrate hysteresis, indicating some permanent adsorption. While adsorption is described by the Langmuir isotherm, equilibrium concentrations are higher than those predicted by the same model for desorption. Furthermore, batch and flow-through column experiments show the occurrence of ion exchange of nickel with magnesium and potassium in the soil; aluminum and other ion concentrations are also affected by the presence of nickel. Strong retention of nickel during transport in soil columns leads to delayed initial breakthrough (~40 pore volumes), slow increase in concentration, and extended concentration tailing at long times. Standard models, including two-site non-equilibrium formulations, fail to capture these features quantitatively. We describe the mechanisms of transport and adsorption/desorption in terms of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, and use a particle tracking formulation to simulate the nickel migration in the column. This approach allows us to capture the non-Fickian transport and the subtle local effects of adsorption and desorption. The model uses transport parameters estimated from the conservative tracer and, as a starting point, adsorption/desorption parameters based on the batch experiments to account for the reactions. It is shown that the batch parameters under-estimate the actual adsorption in the column. The CTRW particle tracking model is shown to capture both the full evolution of the measured breakthrough curve and the measured spatial concentration profile. Analysis of these results provides further understanding of the interaction and dynamics between transport and sorption mechanisms in

  13. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the systems 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1997-03-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for the three binary systems (1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane + hydrogen fluoride, and chlorodifluoromethane + hydrogen fluoride) have been measured. The experimental data for the binary systems are correlated with the NRTL equation with the vapor-phase association model for the mixtures containing hydrogen fluoride, and the relevant parameters are presented. All of the systems form minimum boiling heterogeneous azeotropes.

  14. A model for analysis of the temperature field downstream of a heated jet injected into an isothermal crossflow at an angle of 90 deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, V. L.; Eckert, E. R. G.; Goldstein, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    The temperature distribution downstream of a heated jet entering an isothermal crossflow at an angle of 90 deg is predicted using two conduction models with energy sources above the point of injection, in one case a point source and in the second a line source. The models use effective turbulent diffusivities that are determined empirically from previous measurements. Temperatures predicted by the models are compared to experimental results.

  15. Isotherm study of reactive Blue 19 adsorption by an alum sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khim, Ong Keat; Nor, Mohd Asri Md; Mohamad, Syuriya; Nasaruddin, Nas Aulia Ahmad; Jamari, Nor Laili-Azua; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the adsorption of Reactive Blue 19 using dewatered alum sludge. The dewatered alum sludge was a sludge produced from drinking water treatment plant. Batch adsorption experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of the dye adsorption. The adsorption was rapid at its initial stage but the rate decreased as it approached equilibrium. The adsorption data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models but was best described by the Langmuir isotherm model as it gave the highest correlation.

  16. DhITACT: DNA Hydrogel Formation by Isothermal Amplification of Complementary Target in Fluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Yeon; Jeong, Hansaem; Jung, Il Young; Jang, Bora; Seo, Young Chang; Lee, Haeshin; Lee, Hyukjin

    2015-06-17

    DNA hydrogel formation by isothermal amplification of complementary targets in microfluidic channels (DhITACT) is a new platform for rapid and accurate detection of infectious pathogens. DNA hydrogel is formed in situ within microfluidic channels by the isothermal rolling circle amplification process upon the selective binding of target strands from the biological fluid. Once the volume of DNA hydrogel sufficiently enlarges, it can selectively block the matching channels with target pathogens.

  17. Brief review of monitoring methods for loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuzhi; Lowe, Stuart B; Gooding, John Justin

    2014-11-15

    The loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique has the potential to revolutionize molecular biology because it allows DNA amplification under isothermal conditions and is highly compatible with point-of-care analysis. To achieve efficient genetic analysis of samples, the method of real-time or endpoint determination selected to monitor the biochemical reaction is of great importance. In this paper we briefly review progress in the development of monitoring methods for LAMP.

  18. Isothermal fatigue mechanisms in Ti-based metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Bhaskar S.; Newaz, Golam M.

    1993-01-01

    Stress-controlled isothermal fatigue experiments were performed at room temperature (RT) and 548 C (in argon) on (0)8 SCS6/Ti 15-3 metal matrix composites (MMC's) with 15 and 41 volume percent SCS6 (SiC) fibers. The primary objectives were to evaluate the mechanical responses, and to obtain a clear understanding of the damage mechanisms leading to failure of the MMC's. The mechanical data indicated that strain ranges attained fairly constant values in the stress-controlled experiments at both RT and 538 C, and remained so for more than 85 percent of life. The fatigue data for MMC's with different volume fraction fibers showed that MMC life was controlled by the imposed strain range rather than the stress range. At RT, and at low and intermediate strain ranges, the dominant fatigue mechanism was matrix fatigue, and this was confirmed metallurgically from fractographic evidence as well as from observations of channel type dislocation structures in the matrix of fatigued MMC specimens. Reaction-zone cracks acted as important crack initiating sites at RT, with their role being to facilitate slip band formation and consequent matrix crack initiation through classical fatigue mechanisms. MMC life agreed with matrix life at the lower strain ranges, but was smaller than matrix life at higher strain ranges. Unlike the case of monotonic deformation, debonding damage was another major damage mechanism during fatigue at RT, and it increased for higher strain ranges. At high strain ranges at RT, fractography and metallography showed an absence of matrix cracks, but long lengths of debonds in the outer layers of the SCS6 fibers. Such debonding and consequent rubbing during fatigue is believed to have caused fiber damage and their failure at high strain ranges. Thus, whereas life was matrix dominated at low and intermediate strain ranges, it was fiber dominated at high strain ranges. At 538 C, the mean stain constantly increased (ratchetting) with the number of cycles. At high

  19. Bondi-Hoyle accretion in an isothermal magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Aaron T.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.; Cunningham, Andrew J.

    2014-03-01

    In regions of star formation, protostars and newborn stars will accrete mass from their natal clouds. These clouds are threaded by magnetic fields with a strength characterized by the plasma β—the ratio of thermal and magnetic pressures. Observations show that molecular clouds have β ≲ 1, so magnetic fields have the potential to play a significant role in the accretion process. We have carried out a numerical study of the effect of large-scale magnetic fields on the rate of accretion onto a uniformly moving point particle from a uniform, non-self-gravitating, isothermal gas. We consider gas moving with sonic Mach numbers of up to M≈45; magnetic fields that are either parallel, perpendicular, or oriented 45° to the flow; and β as low as 0.01. Our simulations utilize adaptive mesh refinement in order to obtain high spatial resolution where it is needed; this also allows the boundaries to be far from the accreting object to avoid unphysical effects arising from boundary conditions. Additionally, we show that our results are independent of our exact prescription for accreting mass in the sink particle. We give simple expressions for the steady-state accretion rate as a function of β and M for the parallel and perpendicular orientations. Using typical molecular cloud values of M∼5 and β ∼ 0.04 from the literature, our fits suggest that a 0.4 M {sub ☉} star accretes ∼4 × 10{sup –9} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, almost a factor of two less than accretion rates predicted by hydrodynamic models. This disparity can grow to orders of magnitude for stronger fields and lower Mach numbers. We also discuss the applicability of these accretion rates versus accretion rates expected from gravitational collapse, and under what conditions a steady state is possible. The reduction in the accretion rate in a magnetized medium leads to an increase in the time required to form stars in competitive accretion models, making such models less efficient than predicted by

  20. Real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Wang, Chenguang; Zhu, Pengyu; Guo, Tianxiao; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-04-21

    Techniques of isothermal amplification have recently made great strides, and have generated significant interest in the field of point-of-care detection. Nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification (NEMA) is an example of simple isothermal technology. In this paper, a real-time quantitative nicking endonuclease-mediated isothermal amplification with small molecular beacons (SMB-NEMA) of improved specificity and sensitivity is described. First, we optimized the prohibition of de novo synthesis by choosing Nt·BstNBI endonuclease. Second, the whole genome was successfully amplified with Nt·BstNBI (6 U), betaine (1 M) and trehalose (60 mM) for the first time. Third, we achieved 10 pg sensitivity for the first time after adding a small molecular beacon that spontaneously undergoes a conformational change when hybridizing to target, and the practical test validated the assay's application. The small molecular beacon has a similar melting temperature to the reaction temperature, but is approximately 10 bp shorter than the length of a traditional molecular beacon. A new threshold regulation was also established for isothermal conditions. Finally, we established a thermodynamic model for designing small molecular beacons. This multistate model is more correct than the traditional algorithm. This theoretical and practical basis will help us to monitor SMB-NEMA in a quantitative way. In summary, our SMB-NEMA method allows the simple, specific and sensitive assessment of isothermal DNA quantification. PMID:27027375