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Sample records for adsorptive media usepa

  1. Arsenic Removal: Adsorptive Media and Coagulation/Filtration Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides information on the results of three case studies from USEPA arsenic demonstration program. The first case study presented is on the Rimrock, AZ project that used an adsorptive media technology (E33 media) to remove arsenic. The second case study is on...

  2. Arsenic Removal - Adsorptive Media and Coagulation/Filtration Case Studies - Slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides information on the results of three case studies from USEPA arsenic demonstration program. The first case study presented is on the Rimrock, AZ project that used an adsorptive media technology (E33 media) to remove arsenic. The second case study is o...

  3. NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT TO ENHANCE AND IMPROVE COMMUNICATIONS AT USEPA'S NATIONAL RISK MANAGEMENT RESEARCH LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    New media technology (NT) interactive applications are currently being developed in house at ORD/NRMRL to enhance and improve communication of NRMRL's 1) research projects, 2) workshops/conferences and 3) specialized training. NT is an exciting mix of cutting-edge information tec...

  4. Extending the Life of Adsorptive Media for Arsenic Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation begins with a short summary of the USEPA arsenic demonstration program followed by some results of lab and pilot tests on the regeneration of a number of exhausted media products collected from several demonstration projects. Following this short introduction, the p...

  5. Regeneration of Full Scale Adsorptive Media Systems - Update

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation provides a short summary of the USEPA arsenic demonstration program followed by some results of lab and pilot tests on the regeneration of a number of exhausted media products collected from several demonstration projects. Following this short introduction, the pres...

  6. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTION MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BROWN CITY, MI SIX MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project in Brown City, MI. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of Severn Trent Services (...

  7. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA -- USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT ROLLINSFORD, NH, SIX MONTH EVALUTION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Rollinsford Water and Sewer District facility in Rollinsford, NH. The objectives of the project are to...

  8. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA, USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT RIMROCK, AZ, SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Rimrock, AZ. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Arsenic Package Uni...

  9. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media USEPA Demonstration Project at Rimrock AZ Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Arizona Water Company (AWC) facility in Rimrock, AZ. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: 1) the effectiveness of ...

  10. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media USEPA Demonstration Project at Bow, NH Final performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the White Rock Water Company (WRWC) public water system, a small residential drinking w...

  11. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA - USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT DESERT SANDS MDWCA, NM SIX MONTH EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during, and the results obtained from, the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Desert Sands Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association (MDWCA) facility in Anthony, NM. The object...

  12. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT VALLEY VISTA, AZ SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Arizona Water Company (AWC) facility in Sedona, AZ, commonly referred to as Valley Vista. The main objective of the...

  13. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT VALLEY VISTA, AZ FINAL PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at an Arizona Water Company (AWC) facility in Sedona, AZ, commonly referred to as Valley Vista. The objectives of the project were t...

  14. A pore network model for adsorption in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, Cengiz; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    1995-01-26

    Using a pore network model to represent porous media we investigate adsorption-desorption processes over the entire range of the relative pressure, highlighting in particular capillary condensation. The model incorporates recent advances from density functional theory for adsorption-desorption in narrow pores (of order as low as 1 nm), which improve upon the traditional multi-layer adsorption and Kelvin's equation for phase change and provide for the dependence of the critical pore size on temperature. The limited accessibility of the pore network gives rise to hysteresis in the adsorption-desorption cycle. This is due to the blocking of larger pores, where adsorbed liquid is allowed to but cannot desorb, by smaller pores containing liquid that may not desorb. By allowing for the existence of supercritical liquid in pores in the nm range, it is found that the hysteresis area increases with an increase in temperature, in agreement with experiments of water adsorption-desorption in rock samples from The Geysers. It is also found that the hysteresis increases if the porous medium is represented as a fractured (dual porosity) system. The paper finds applications to general adsorption-desorption problems but it is illustrated here for geothermal applications in The Geysers.

  15. Adsorption of plasmid DNA on anion exchange chromatography media.

    PubMed

    Tarmann, Christina; Jungbauer, Alois

    2008-08-01

    Anion exchange chromatography (AEC) is a useful and effective tool for DNA purification, but due to average pore sizes between 40 and 100 nm most AEC resins lack truly useful binding capacities for plasmid DNA (pDNA). Equilibrium binding capacities and uptake kinetics of AEC media including conventional media (Source 30 Q, Q Sepharose HP), a polymer grafted medium (Fractogel EMD DEAE (M)), media with large pores (Celbeads DEAE, PL SAX 4000 A 30 microm) and a monolithic medium (CIM-DEAE) were investigated by batch uptake or shallow bed experiments at two salt concentrations. Theoretical and experimental binding capacities suggest that the shape of the pDNA molecule can be described by a rod with a length to diameter ratio of 20:1 and that the molecule binds in upright position. The arrangement of DNA like a brush at the surface can be considered as entropy driven, kind of self-assembly process which is inherent to highly and uniformly charged DNA molecules. The initial phase of adsorption is very fast and levels off, associated with a change in mass transfer mechanism. Feed concentrations higher than 0.1 mg/mL pDNA pronounce this effect. Monolithic media showed the fastest adsorption rate and highest binding capacity with 13 mg pDNA per mL.

  16. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  17. USEPA/WSWRD MEMBRANE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA has been very active in membrane research. The following areas are currently being investigated: in-house fouling research, Information Collection Rule (ICR) treatment studies, inorganic scaling modeling, Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program implementati...

  18. DESIGN MANUAL - REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM DRINKING WATER SUPPLIES BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This design manual is an in-depth presentation of the steps required to design and operate a water treatment plant for removal of excess arsenic from drinking water using the adsorptive media process. The treatment process is very reliable, simple and cost-effective. The adsorpt...

  19. Bottom-up model of adsorption and transport in multiscale porous media.

    PubMed

    Boţan, Alexandru; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    We develop a model of transport in multiscale porous media which accounts for adsorption in the different porosity scales. This model employs statistical mechanics to upscale molecular simulation and describe adsorption and transport at larger time and length scales. Using atom-scale simulations, which capture the changes in adsorption and transport with temperature, pressure, pore size, etc., this approach does not assume any adsorption or flow type. Moreover, by relating the local chemical potential μ(r) and density ρ(r), the present model accounts for adsorption effects and possible changes in the confined fluid state upon transport. This model constitutes a bottom-up framework of adsorption and transport in multiscale materials as it (1) describes the adsorption-transport interplay, (2) accounts for the hydrodynamics breakdown at the nm scale, and (3) is multiscale.

  20. Removal of Uranium in Drinking Water: Brimac Environmental Services, Inc. Brimac HA 216 Adsorptive Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Brimac HA 216 Adsorptive Media was tested for uranium (U) removal from a drinking water source (well water) at Grappone Toyota located in Bow, New Hampshire. The HA 216 media is a hydroxyapatite-based material. A pilot unit, consisting of a TIGG Corporation Cansorb® C-5 ste...

  1. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Herbst, R. Scott; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.

    2008-05-06

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  2. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    2010-10-05

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  3. Spectral induced polarization signatures of hydroxyl adsorption in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Johnson, T. C.; Slater, L. D.; Redden, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    There is a growing interest in applying geophysical methods to monitor microbial enhanced mineral precipitation through urea hydrolysis. Sensing changes in mineral surface properties as well as changes in fluid chemistry could be used to track geochemical reactions fronts in subsurface environments. Frequency-dependent complex conductivity measured with the spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is sensitive to both fluid chemistry and mineral surface properties. We had previously observed phase shifts (φ) between current and voltage waveforms associated with hydroxyl concentration changes in a silica gel column during a urea hydrolysis experiment. In a study using less complex conditions we applied both SIP and geochemical measurements on a saturated column composed of sequential zones with Ottawa sand and silica gel in order to: 1) understand whether adsorption of hydroxyl contributes to the changes in complex conductivity, and 2) to determine whether changes in solution chemistry follow changes in surface chemistry in porous media (or vice versa). Silica gel is a highly porous form of silica (surface area is ~500 m2/g vs. <0.1 m2/g for Ottawa sand) and has a high sorption capacity for hydroxide ions. A column (48 cm) was packed with Ottawa sand at both the bottom and top sections, and with silica gel beads in the middle part of the column. The experiment started with a pH 7 sodium chloride solution (50 mM) flowing through the column at 10 ml/min, then sodium chloride solutions at higher pH (pH 8 and pH 10) replaced this solution and continued flow at the same rate for 49 hours. SIP measurements were made along the column as a function of time, and effluent samples along the column were taken for pH and conductivity measurements. The results show phase angle shifts (~4.5 mrad) in the silica gel, while no significant phase changes occurred in the Ottawa sands. Although changes in complex conductivity were only observed on synthetic high surface area

  4. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Herbst, R. Scott; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.

    2011-10-25

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  5. Development of synthetic and natural mineral based adsorptive and filter media containing cyclodextrin moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, E.; Rácz, I.; Erös, A.; Bánhegyi, Gy; Fenyvesi, É.; Takács, E.

    2013-12-01

    Adsorptive filter media were developed based on UHMWPE (ultra high molecular weight polyethylene), perlite mineral and sol-gel synthesized silica gel as support and various cyclodextrin oligomers and polymers as active adsorbents. Adsorptive capacity was characterized by dye adsorption before and after Soxhlet extraction in water to check the hydrolytic stability of the structures obtained. Morphological and in some cases spectroscopic studies were made to understand the differences in behaviour. At the present stage the development of such structures hardly exceeds the trial and error approach, nevertheless some promising formulations were found.

  6. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL AND ADSORPTIVE MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT STEWART, MN. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Stewart, MN facility. The main objective of the project is to evaluate the effectiveness of Siemens¿ Type II AERALA...

  7. Regeneration of Full Scale Adsorptive Media Systems - Update

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation provides an update of the regeneration studies conducted at Twentynine Palms, CA. Following a short introduction, the presentation summarizes the results of the three regeneration tests conducted on the exhausted media of the arsenic removal system at Twentynine Pal...

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Qu, Z G; Ding, T; Miao, J Y

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  9. Adsorptive infiltration of metals in urban drainage--media characteristics

    PubMed

    Sansalone

    1999-09-01

    Urban pavement drainage often contains significant quantities of anthropogenic metal elements, including Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn that exceed surface water discharge standards. In many urban areas low rainfall pH, results in predominately dissolved metal element mass. Such partitioning has critical implications for the selection of in-situ treatment. One such category of treatment is engineered infiltration systems. To be effective, such systems must adsorb dissolved metal elements to their fixed media while also acting as filters for particulate-bound fractions. One such strategy is called a partial exfiltration trench (PET). The PET contains oxide-coated sand (OCS); an amphoteric media of high surface area (5-15 m2/g) as compared to uncoated silica sand (0.01-0.05 m2/g). OCS was generated through heating a mixture of silica sand and ferric nitrate solution to dryness. This paper presents results of both media characterization and bench scale PET simulations. Media tested were OCS and plain silica sand. Media testing was carried out until capacity was exhausted, using both synthetic and actual stormwater loadings. Testing was conducted for pH levels of 6.5 and 8.0. Results indicated that OCS had greater capacity than silica sand for all dissolved fractions. As the pH was raised from 6.5 to 8.0, OCS capacity was improved. A PET configuration with porous pavement resulted in the highest in-situ treatment capacity for metal element bearing storm water.

  10. Assessing Arsenic Removal by Metal (Hydr)Oxide Adsorptive Media Using Rapid Small Scale Column Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid small scale column test (RSSCT) was use to evaluate the the performance of eight commercially available adsorptive media for the removal of arsenic. Side-by-side tests were conducted using RSSCTs and pilot/full-scale systems either in the field or in the laboratory. ...

  11. Regeneration of Exhausted Arsenic Adsorptive media of a Full Scale Treatment System

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will describe the method and results of laboratory tests showing the feasibility of regenerating exhausted, iron-based, adsorptive media and the results of a follow up regeneration test at a full scale system in Twentynine Palms CA. The laboratory studies on se...

  12. Polymer retention and adsorption in the flow of polymer solutions through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Y.; Christ, F.R.

    1986-03-01

    A new experimental technique based on a surface treatment process was developed for determining mobility reduction as a result of polymer adsorption in flow of polymer solutions through porous media. The experimental method also allowed the direct determination of adsorptive and nonadsorptive polymer retention from flow experiments. The adsorptive mobility reduction for the flow of polyacrylamide (J333) mobility control polymer through silica sand was found to be as high as 14% at the lowest experimental stress level of 3.75 dynes/cm/sup 2/ (0.375 Pa). This corresponded to an effective hydrodynamic thickness (EHT) of the adsorbed polymer layer of 0.57 ..mu..m. Both the mobility reduction and the EHT decreased with an increase in shear stress. The amount of adsorptive retention accounted for about 35.2% of the total retained polymer.

  13. Disposal of Regenerate Wastewater from Adsorptive Media Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation summarizes the result of the processing of the wastewater produced by the onsite regeneration of the exhausted media from two full scale arsenic removal systems at Twentynine Palms, CA and Goffstown, NH. Presentation describes the use and results of ferric chloride...

  14. Selecting the column configuration with lowest media replacement cost for small adsorption systems.

    PubMed

    Bausk, Artem S; Dvorak, Bruce I

    2016-04-15

    A framework was developed for preliminary evaluation of the relative media replacement costs of three alternative column configurations used for adsorption systems with two vessels, such as those serving small systems. The media replacement cost is the cost of fresh media and the replacement service cost (including transportation, labor, and other non-material costs). Cost normalization methods were developed in part based on the data from US EPA Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration Program. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics were modeled using the PSDM model and breakthrough curves were normalized using the target effluent to influent concentration ratio (C/Co) and the mass transfer zone fraction (%MTZBT). Two factors were found to be important for the relative replacement cost of each configuration - the frequency which at least one column needed replacement of media, and the cycle replacement cost (CRCost) which is a combination of the fresh media cost and the replacement service cost. The lead-lag configuration has the lowest annual replacement cost at low target C/Co, high %MTZBT, and high CRCost ratios. The parallel configuration performs better at high target C/Co, high %MTZBT, and high CRCost ratios. Although the single configuration (two columns operated in tandem and replaced simultaneously) has higher media consumption compared to lead-lag and parallel, it can result in the lowest replacement cost at short %MTZBT and very low CRCost ratios due to savings in the replacement service cost.

  15. Small System Use of a Solid Arsenic Oxidizing Media in Place of Chemical Oxidation to Enhance Arsenic Removals

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program, an arsenic removal adsorptive media treatment system (10 gpm) was installed at Head Start School in Buckeye Lake, Ohio on June 28, 2006. The source water (ground water) contained around 20 µg/L of arsenic, existing predominatel...

  16. Scaling up adsorption media reactors for copper removal with the aid of dimensionless numbers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Adsorption media may be used to sorb copper in an aquatic environment for pollution control. Effective design of adsorption media reactors is highly dependent on selection of the hydraulic residence time when scaling up a pilot-scale reactor to a field-scale reactor. This paper seeks to improve scaling-up technique of the reactor design process through the use of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers via a dimensional analysis. A new scaling-up theory is developed in this study through a joint consideration of the Damköhler and Péclet numbers for a constant media particle size such that a balance between transport control and reaction control can be harmonized. A series of column breakthrough tests at varying hydraulic residence times revealed a clear peak adsorption capacity at a Damköhler number of 2.74. The Péclet numbers for the column breakthrough tests indicated that mechanical dispersion is an important effect that requires further consideration in the scaling-up process. However, perfect similitude of the Damköhler number cannot be maintained for a constant media particle size, and relaxation of hydrodynamic similitude through variation of the Péclet number must occur.

  17. Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program. Task 4. Third Contractor Information Meeting. [Adsorption-desorption on geological media

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The study subject of this meeting was the adsorption and desorption of radionuclides on geologic media under repository conditions. This volume contans eight papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for all eight papers. (DLC)

  18. EPA/NSF ETV Equipment Verification Testing Plan for the Removal of Volatile Organic Chemical Contaminants by Adsorptive Media Processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Technology Specific Test Plan (TSTP) for evaluation of drinking water treatment equipment utilizing adsorptive media for synthetic organic chemical (SOC) removal. This TSTP is to be used within the structure provid...

  19. Removal of phosphorus from agricultural wastewaters using adsorption media prepared from acid mine drainage sludge.

    PubMed

    Sibrell, Philip L; Montgomery, Gary A; Ritenour, Kelsey L; Tucker, Travis W

    2009-05-01

    Excess phosphorus in wastewaters promotes eutrophication in receiving waterways. A cost-effective method for the removal of phosphorus from water would significantly reduce the impact of such wastewaters on the environment. Acid mine drainage sludge is a waste product produced by the neutralization of acid mine drainage, and consists mainly of the same metal hydroxides used in traditional wastewater treatment for the removal of phosphorus. In this paper, we describe a method for the drying and pelletization of acid mine drainage sludge that results in a particulate media, which we have termed Ferroxysorb, for the removal of phosphorus from wastewater in an efficient packed bed contactor. Adsorption capacities are high, and kinetics rapid, such that a contact time of less than 5 min is sufficient for removal of 60-90% of the phosphorus, depending on the feed concentration and time in service. In addition, the adsorption capacity of the Ferroxysorb media was increased dramatically by using two columns in an alternating sequence so that each sludge bed receives alternating rest and adsorption cycles. A stripping procedure based on treatment with dilute sodium hydroxide was also developed that allows for recovery of the P from the media, with the possibility of generating a marketable fertilizer product. These results indicate that acid mine drainage sludges -- hitherto thought of as undesirable wastes -- can be used to remove phosphorus from wastewater, thus offsetting a portion of acid mine drainage treatment costs while at the same time improving water quality in sensitive watersheds.

  20. Removal of phosphorus from agricultural wastewaters using adsorption media prepared from acid mine drainage sludge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Montgomery, Gary A.; Ritenour, Kelsey L.; Tucker, Travis W.

    2009-01-01

    Excess phosphorus in wastewaters promotes eutrophication in receiving waterways. A??cost-effective method for the removal of phosphorus from water would significantly reduce the impact of such wastewaters on the environment. Acid mine drainage sludge is a waste product produced by the neutralization of acid mine drainage, and consists mainly of the same metal hydroxides used in traditional wastewater treatment for the removal of phosphorus. In this paper, we describe a method for the drying and pelletization of acid mine drainage sludge that results in a particulate media, which we have termed Ferroxysorb, for the removal of phosphorus from wastewater in an efficient packed bed contactor. Adsorption capacities are high, and kinetics rapid, such that a contact time of less than 5 min is sufficient for removal of 60-90% of the phosphorus, depending on the feed concentration and time in service. In addition, the adsorption capacity of the Ferroxysorb media was increased dramatically by using two columns in an alternating sequence so that each sludge bed receives alternating rest and adsorption cycles. A stripping procedure based on treatment with dilute sodium hydroxide was also developed that allows for recovery of the P from the media, with the possibility of generating a marketable fertilizer product. These results indicate that acid mine drainage sludges - hitherto thought of as undesirable wastes - can be used to remove phosphorus from wastewater, thus offsetting a portion of acid mine drainage treatment costs while at the same time improving water quality in sensitive watersheds.

  1. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Green adsorption media with the inclusion of renewable and recycled materials can be applied as a stormwater best management practice for copper removal. A green adsorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was physicochemically evaluated for its potential use in an upflow media filter. A suite of tests were conducted on the media mixture and the individual media components including studies of particle size distribution, isotherms, column adsorption and reaction kinetics. Isotherm test results revealed that the coconut coir had the highest affinity for copper (q(max) = 71.1 mg g(-1)), and that adsorption was maximized at a pH of 7.0. The coconut coir also performed the best under dynamic conditions, having an equilibrium uptake of 1.63 mg g(-1). FE-SEM imaging found a strong correlation between the porosity of the micro pore structure and the adsorptive capacity. The use of the green adsorption media mixture in isolation or the coconut coir with an expanded clay filtration chamber could be an effective and reliable stormwater best management practice for copper removal.

  2. Microcalorimetric study of adsorption and disassembling of virus-like particles on anion exchange chromatography media.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mengran; Zhang, Songping; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Yanli; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-04-03

    Chromatographic purification of virus-like particles (VLPs) is important to the development of modern vaccines. However, disassembly of the VLPs on the solid-liquid interface during chromatography process could be a serious problem. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) measurements, together with chromatography experiments, were performed on the adsorption and disassembling of multi-subunits hepatitis B virus surface antigen virus-like particles (HB-VLPs). Two gigaporous ion-exchange chromatography (IEC) media, DEAE-AP-280 nm and DEAE-POROS, were used. The application of gigaporous media with high ligand density led to significantly increased irreversible disassembling of HB-VLPs and consequently low antigen activity recovery during IEC process. To elucidate the thermodynamic mechanism of the effect of ligand density on the adsorption and conformational change of VLPs, a thermodynamic model was proposed. With this model, one can obtain the intrinsic molar enthalpy changes related to the binding of VLPs and the accompanying conformational change on the liquid-solid interface during its adsorption. This model assumes that, when intact HB-VLPs interact with the IEC media, the total adsorbed proteins contain two states, the intact formation and the disassembled formation; accordingly, the apparent adsorption enthalpy, ΔappH, which can be directly measured from ITC experiments, presents the sum of three terms: (1) the intrinsic molar enthalpy change associated to the binding of intact HB-VLPs (ΔbindHintact), (2) the intrinsic molar enthalpy change associated to the binding of HB-VLPs disassembled formation (ΔbindHdis), and (3) the enthalpy change accompanying the disassembling of HB-VLPs (ΔconfHdis). The intrinsic binding of intact HB-VLPs and the disassembled HB-VLPs to both kinds of gigaporous media (each of which has three different ligand densities), were all observed to be entropically driven as indicated by positive values of

  3. USEPA RESEARCH ON INFILTRATION/INFLOW CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    From the late 60's to early 80's, the USEPA conducted a series of research, development, and demonsration projects on the characterization, cause and consequence, and control of infiltation/inflow (I/I) in both sanitary and combined sewers. The research effort was driven by the n...

  4. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - USEPA SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA experience in using Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) Technology to remediate Superfund sites is reviewed. Included are several case studies for insitu and exsitu treatment and sites containing both metals and organics, both separately, and mixed on the same site. Co...

  5. OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S SMALL SYSTEMS DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an overview of the USEPA Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration Program. The information includes the status of the projects on both round 1 and round 2 including some photos of the treatment systems. Limited information is given on the results of t...

  6. USEPA Santa Cruz River Public Survey Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Office of Research and Development, Western Ecology Division is investigating how urban households value different possibilities for the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona. A random sample of households in the Phoenix and Tucson areas are being asked to provide their ...

  7. SUPPORT FOR USEPA'S PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will discuss recommended and new resources for the USEPA's Pathogen Equivalency Committee including: 1) Committee's creation in 1985 and its purpose 2) Drexel University Professor Chuck Haas' 2001 report (Assessment of the PEC Process) and its findings 3) NAS/NR...

  8. USEPA RESEARCH ON INFILTRATION/INFLOW CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    From the late 60's to early 80's, the USEPA conducted a series of research, development, and demonstration projects on the characterization, cause and consequence, and control of infiltation/inflow (I/I) in both sanitary and combined sewers. The research effort was driven by the ...

  9. Functional surface modification of natural cellulose substances for colorimetric detection and adsorption of Hg2+ in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuehai; Huang, Jianguo

    2010-09-07

    Immobilization of ruthenium dye or mercaptosilane monolayer onto metal oxide ultrathin film pre-coated cellulose nanofibres of natural cellulose substances yielded colorimetric sensing materials with high sensitivity and selectivity as well as good reversibility, and trapping materials with high efficiency for detection and adsorption of Hg(2+) ions in aqueous media.

  10. Enhanced adsorption and regeneration with lignocellulose-based phosphorus removal media using molecular coating nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Mann, Justin D; Kwon, Soonjo

    2006-01-01

    The removal of phosphorus in point and non-point-source pollution has become one of the leading problems in water quality since the beginning of the 21st century. Several natural, domestic, and industrial treatment systems already exist, but with very limited efficiencies and serious procedural defects. Lignocellulose-based Anion Removal Media (LAM) was developed in association with iron nanocoating technology as means of phosphorus adsorption from various concentrations of contaminated water. Results revealed that trivalent iron coated lignocellulose pellets can be used to effectively remove phosphorus contaminants from point and non-point-source polluted water. Removal capacities of pelletized cotton media surpass existing materials for phosphorus removal by at least 22 times, while remaining both efficient and cost effective. The materials were also investigated for regeneration, yielding high removal capacities even after the fifth regeneration. Treatment methodology and outlines are proposed, and procedural mechanisms are explored in this study. An economic evaluation of this technology is also assessed for a practical application of LAM to point/non-point-source polluted water.

  11. Spectral Induced Polarization Signatures of Hydroxide Adsorption and Mineral Precipitation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chi; Slater, Lee; Redden, George D.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Johnson, Timothy C.; Fox, Don

    2012-04-17

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. To facilitate the understanding of position and chemical properties of reaction fronts that involve mineral precipitation in porous media, we investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a significant dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for noninvasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

  12. Dye adsorption onto mesoporous materials: pH influence, kinetics and equilibrium in buffered and saline media.

    PubMed

    Gómez, J M; Galán, J; Rodríguez, A; Walker, G M

    2014-12-15

    Mesoporous materials were used as adsorbents for dye removal in different media: non-ionic, buffered and saline. The mesoporous materials used were commercial (silica gel) as well as as-synthesised materials (SBA-15 and a novel mesoporous carbon). Dye adsorption onto all the materials was very fast and the equilibrium was reached before 1 h. The pH has a significant influence on the adsorption capacity for the siliceous materials since the electrostatic interactions are the driving forces. However, the influence of the pH on the adsorption capacity of the carbonaceous material was lower, since the van der Waals interactions are the driving forces. The ionic strength has a great impact on the siliceous materials adsorption capacity, being their adsorption capacity in a buffered medium six times higher than the corresponding to a non-ionic medium. Nevertheless, ionic strength does not influence on the dye adsorption on the mesoporous carbon. Overall, the as-synthesised carbon material presents a clear potential to treat dye effluents, showing high adsorption capacity (q(e) ≈ 200 mg/g) in all the pH range studied (from 3 to 11); even at low concentrations (C(e) ≈ 10 mg/L) and at short contact times (t(e) < 30 min).

  13. Adsorption and corrosion-inhibiting effect of Dacryodis edulis extract on low-carbon-steel corrosion in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Oguzie, E E; Enenebeaku, C K; Akalezi, C O; Okoro, S C; Ayuk, A A; Ejike, E N

    2010-09-01

    The inhibition of low-carbon-steel corrosion in 1M HCl and 0.5M H(2)SO(4) by extracts of Dacryodis edulis (DE) was investigated using gravimetric and electrochemical techniques. DE extract was found to inhibit the uniform and localized corrosion of carbon steel in the acidic media, affecting both the cathodic and anodic partial reactions. The corrosion process was inhibited by adsorption of the extracted organic matter onto the steel surface in a concentration-dependent manner and involved both protonated and molecular species. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to illustrate the process of adsorption of some specific components of the extract.

  14. Evaluation ecological risks using receptor-specific toxicity reference values and USEPA`s wildlife exposure factors handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, E.K.; Brenzikofer, A.M.; Schmeising, L.M.

    1995-12-31

    An ecological risk assessment was performed for a site at a closing US Air Force Base in Colorado; contaminated abiotic media included shallow soil, surface water, and sediment. To evaluate the potential for impacts on wildlife species exposed to contaminants in these media, a two-phased approach was used. First, dietary Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) were developed to represent No Observed Adverse Effect Levels (NOAELs) for each chemical of potential concern for the selected wildlife indicator species, red fox (Vulpes vulpes), deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), and mallard (Anasplatyrhynchos). TRVs were determined by applying a series of Uncertainty Factors (UFs) to dietary toxic effects data obtained from the literature for each chemical. UFs were assigned for three uncertainty categories (intertaxon, study duration, and study endpoint). Dietary TRVs were then compared to the site exposure-point concentrations for contaminants in each medium. If a TRV exceeded the site concentration for a given chemical, then that chemical was retained for the second phase of the evaluation, the exposure assessment. Exposure was evaluated for each species using predictive models for ingestion of soil/sediment, and water, as provided in the USEPA Wildlife Exposure Factors Handbook (1993). These models estimate the potential Average Daily Dose (ADD{sub pot}) received by wildlife species exposed to contaminants in abiotic media. The ADD{sub pot}s were then compared to the TRVs on a dose basis. If an ADD{sub pot} exceeded the dose-based TRV for a given chemical, it was assumed that the predicted amount of contaminant ingested was potentially capable of causing adverse effects to the wildlife indicator species. ADD{sub pot}s for each ingestion route were summed for species exposed to contaminants in multiple media to determine the total average daily dose received via all direct routes.

  15. Spectral induced polarization signatures of hydroxide adsorption and mineral precipitation in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Zhang; Lee Slater; George Redden; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy Johnson; Don Fox

    2012-04-01

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. We investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a strong dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for non-invasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

  16. Adsorption-Desorption Flow of Condensable Vapors through Mesoporous Media: Network Modeling and Percolation Theory.

    PubMed

    Tzevelekos; Kikkinides; Kainourgiakis; Stubos; Kanellopoulos; Kaselouri

    2000-03-01

    Flow of condensable vapors in mesoporous media is investigated theoretically and experimentally during adsorption and desorption processes. A typical permeability curve of a condensable vapor is strongly enhanced in the capillary condensation region. This is because additional capillary pressure gradients are imposed on the capillary-condensed pores, which act as "good" conductors compared to the noncondensed pores, which are considered "poor" conductors. The percolation scaling properties that hold for a system of "good" and "poor" conductors are confirmed for the cases examined. As the ratio of gas flow/capillary-enhanced flow decreases, the rise of permeability with pressure becomes sharper. The network connectivity has a strong impact on the maximum permeability value and on the width of the scaling law regions. The contribution of surface flow does not affect the permeability in the peak region, but results in a shrinkage of the scaling law regions. During desorption, a marked hysteresis in the permeability curves is found and it is attributed only to thermodynamic hysteresis. The maximum permeability values in this case are higher and shifted to lower relative pressures. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT RICHMOND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN SUSANVILLE, CA SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the performance evaluation study of the Aquatic Treatment Systems, Inc. (ATS) adsorptive media arsenic removal system at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, Californi...

  18. Hyperbolic theory for pH-dependent adsorption in reactive transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prigiobbe, V.; Hesse, M. A.; Bryant, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    We use the hyperbolic theory of conservation laws to analyze the transport of strontium (Sr2+) through a porous medium with surface complexation. An hydrophilic iron-oxide surface was considered where Sr2+ and hydrogen (H+) compete for the same site leading to competitive adsorption described by an pH-dependent Langmuir isotherm. Despite the importance of pH-dependent adsorption in environmental applications, the basic structure of the displacement has received little attention. In reactive transport problems with pH-dependent adsorption, one of the conservation laws is for the total hydrogen (cHtot = cH+-cOH-) in the system, also called the acidity. The presence of this equation gives rise to additional nonlinearity in the problems that distinguishes them from other competitive sorption problems where hydrogen is not involved. We analyze a 1D reactive transport model with an incompressible fluid containing H+, Sr2+, sodium (Na+), and chlorine (Cl-) flowing through a reactive porous media made of goethite. Under the assumption of overall charge balance and of only advection for Na+ and Cl-, the mathematical problem reduces to a strictly hyperbolic 3x3 system of partial dierential equations (PDEs) for cHtot, Sr2+ (cSr2+), and effective anions (ca = cCl--cNa+) which are coupled by the adsorption isotherms for H+ and Sr2+ and have the non-linearity in the accumulation terms. One characteristic field is linearly degenerate while the other two are non-genuinely nonlinear due to inflection loci in both isotherms. We derived the complete set of analytical solutions to the Riemann problem (constant initial and injected states) and described the characteristic waves that may arise, concluding that only nine combinations of a contact discontinuity with rarefactions, shocks, shock-rarefactions are possible. The composite shock-rarefaction waves arise from the inflection loci in the isotherms and are absent in classic competitive Langmuir sorption. The inflection loci divide

  19. Multicarboxylic hyperbranched polyglycerol modified SBA-15 for the adsorption of cationic dyes and copper ions from aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengji; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Faai; Yu, Chuanbai; Wei, Zhibo

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the potential of multicarboxylic hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) modified mesoporous SBA-15 (SBA/HPG-COOH) as adsorbent for the removal of cationic dyes or/and heavy metal ions from aqueous media. The SBA/HPG-COOH adsorbents can be facilely synthesized through two steps: in situ anionic ring-opening polymerization of glycidol and further modification of hydroxyl groups by succinic anhydride. The resulting SBA/HPG-COOH was characterized by means of FTIR, TGA, XRD, SEM and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results demonstrate that the SBA/HPG-COOH was successfully synthesized and the density of carboxylic groups on the SBA/HPG-COOH is calculated to be as high as 1.5 mmol/g, posing a powerful base for adsorbing cationic adsorbates. Four kinds of dyes and copper ions were chosen as representatives to investigate the adsorption ability of SBA/HPG-COOH. The SBA/HPG-COOH adsorbent showed quick adsorption rate, high adsorption capacity (e.g., its saturated adsorption capacity for methylene blue (MB) can reach 0.50 mmol/g, while for unmodified SBA-15 is lower than 0.05 mmol/g), and high selectivity for cationic adsorbates. The fitness of Langmuir adsorption model and pseudo second-order kinetics on describing the adsorption isotherm and kinetics of SBA/HPG-COOH for MB dye was examined, respectively. It is believed that this robust SBA/HPG-COOH adsorbent will find important application in removal of cationic adsorbates from aqueous solution.

  20. Enhanced stability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in biological media using a pH adjusted-BSA adsorption protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Si-Ming; Laromaine, Anna; Roig, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are widely used for biological applications due to their unique properties compared to their bulk counterparts, simplified SPIONs stabilization protocols applicable for a wide spectra of biological media remains a challenging issue. In this work, SPIONs with different surface coatings, tetramethylammonium hydroxide-coated SPIONs (T-SPIONs), and citrate-coated SPIONs (C-SPIONs) were synthesized by a facile, rapid and cost effective microwave-assisted method. C-SPIONs show robust stability in biological media of phosphate buffered saline and Roswell Park Memorial Institute Medium, while destabilize in DMEM. T-SPIONs were found to aggregate rapidly and significantly in all tested media. Then, a modified pH adjusted-BSA adsorption protocol and an addition of excess trisodium citrate dihydrate (Na3Cit) were used to enhance their stability in the media. The BSA adsorption protocol showed great efficiency in stabilizing the dispersed state of both SPIONs in the tested media, while the addition of excess Na3Cit showed limited effect, and it was only applicable for C-SPIONs. The formed BSA layer on SPIONs could be imaged by negative staining TEM, and revealed by Cryo-TEM, FTIR, DLS, and the zeta potential measurements. Results indicated that BSA forms a monolayer of a thickness of about 3 ± 1 nm and BSA interacts with C-SPIONs and T-SPIONs through their coating, rather than by replacing them. This synthetic method and stabilization protocol offer a general methodology to obtain SPIONs with a variety of surfactants, stable in different biological media in few minutes.

  1. Methods of removing a constituent from a feed stream using adsorption media

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    2011-05-24

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  2. COMPARISON OF USEPA FIELD SAMPLING METHODS FOR BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) macroinvertebrate sampling protocols were compared in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region. The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) wadeable streams protocol results in a single composite sample from nine transects...

  3. APPLICATION OF USEPA'S DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS TOWARDS RAINWATER CATCHMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainwater harvesting is receiving increased attention worldwide as an alternative source of drinking water. Although federal agencies such as the USEPA acknowledge the existence of rainwater collection systems, the monitoring of this water source is still typically carried out b...

  4. USEPA RESEARCH ACTIVITIES TO CHARACTERIZE CHILDREN'S ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given the vulnerability of children to effects from environmental exposures, understanding links between children's health and environmental exposures is critical. In recent years, significant research has been initiated at USEPA to characterize children's exposures.

  5. An affinity adsorption media that mimics heparan sulfate proteoglycans for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteremia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.

    2016-06-01

    Removal of several drug-resistant bacteria from blood by affinity adsorption onto a heparin-functional media is reported. Heparin is a chemical analogue of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, found on transmembrane proteins of endothelial cells. Many blood-borne human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi have been reported to target HS as an initial step in their pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate the binding and removal of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Extended-Spectrum Betalactamase Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL), and two Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (both CRE Escherichia coli and CRE K. pneumoniae) using 300 μm polyethylene beads surface modified with end-point-attached heparin. Depending on the specific bacteria, the amount removed ranged between 39% (ESBL) and 99.9% (CRE). The total amount of bacteria adsorbed ranged between 2.8 × 105 and 8.6 × 105 colony forming units (CFU) per gram of adsorption media. Based on a polymicrobial challenge which showed no competitive binding, MRSA and CRE apparently utilize different binding sequences on the immobilized heparin ligand. Since the total circulating bacterial load during bacteremia seldom exceeds 5 × 105 CFUs, it appears possible to significantly reduce bacterial concentration in infected patients by multi-pass recirculation of their blood through a small extracorporeal affinity filter containing the heparin-functional adsorption media. This 'dialysis-like therapy' is expected to improve patient outcomes and reduce the cost of care, particularly when there are no anti-infective drugs available to treat the infection.

  6. Removal of beta-blockers from aqueous media by adsorption onto graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kyzas, George Z; Koltsakidou, Anastasia; Nanaki, Stavroula G; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the present study is the evaluation of graphene oxide (GhO) as adsorbent material for the removal of beta-blockers (pharmaceutical compounds) in aqueous solutions. The composition and morphology of prepared materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Atenolol (ATL) and propranolol (PRO) were used as model drug molecules and their behavior were investigated in terms of GhO dosage, contact time, temperature and pH. Adsorption mechanisms were proposed and the pH-effect curves after adsorption were discussed. The kinetic behavior of GhO-drugs system was analyzed after fitting to pseudo-first and -second order equations. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich model calculating the maximum adsorption capacity (67 and 116 mg/g for PRO and ATL (25 °C), respectively). The temperature effect on adsorption was tested carrying out the equilibrium adsorption experiments at three different temperatures (25, 45, 65 °C). Then, the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy, free energy and entropy were calculated. Finally, the desorption of drugs from GhO was evaluated by using both aqueous eluants (pH2-10) and organic solvents.

  7. Adsorption and abiotic oxidation of arsenic by aged biofilter media: equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Sahabi, Danladi Mahuta; Takeda, Minoru; Suzuki, Ichiro; Koizumi, Jun-ichi

    2009-09-15

    Removal of arsenic from groundwater by biological adsorptive filtration depends largely on its interaction with biogenic iron and manganese oxides surfaces. In the present study we investigated the arsenic adsorption and abiotic oxidation capacities of an aged biofilter medium (BM2) collected from a long time established groundwater treatment plant for removal of iron and manganese by biological filtration. Batch oxidation/adsorption kinetic experiments indicated that BM2 can easily oxidize As(III) to As(V) with the rate of oxidation less affected by pH-variations from 4 to 8.5. The adsorption capacity of the biofilter medium for the produced or added As(V), however, depends strongly on the pH of the solution. The kinetics results have shown that As(III) sorption followed pseudo-second order kinetics, whereas the sorption of As(V) was best described by the intra-particle diffusion model, indicating that adsorptions of As(III) and As(V) onto BM2 were governed by different mechanisms. Adsorption isotherms at 25 degrees C were measured for a range of arsenite and arsenate initial concentrations of 0.67-20 micromol/L and the pH range from 4 to 9. Adsorption maxima were highest at pH 4 and decrease steadily as the pH increases. The equilibrium data for both As(III) and As(V) fitted very well to the Freundlich and Sips isotherm equations and, in most cases, the two isotherms overlapped with the same correlation coefficients, indicating sorption to be multilayer on the heterogeneous surface of BM2. The implication of the data for arsenic removal from water by biological filtration has been discussed.

  8. Characteristics of adsorption interactions of cadmium(II) onto humin from peat soil in freshwater and seawater media.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Roy; Zhang, Jing

    2014-03-01

    The present study examined Cd solubility in pH 2-12 fresh and seawater media with and without humin to determine Cd species composition. The study, based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics model, was conducted to determine the kinetic parameters of Cd(II) adsorption onto humin. We employed the Langmuir and Freundlich models to derive thermodynamic parameters. Aquo (Cd(H2O) 6 (2+) ) and chloro- (CdCl(+) and CdCl2) complexes were responsible for Cd(II) adsorption onto humin. Results showed Cd as Cd(II) and Cd(H2O) 6 (+2) was water soluble at 2 < pH < 7; with a portion of the soluble Cd precipitating as Cd(OH)2. The Cd(II) rate constant (k) in freshwater was 0.5 × 10(-3) (min(-1)), occurring in a single phase, while in seawater fast and slow phase values for k were 31.88 × 10(-3) and 6.2 × 10(-3) (min(-1)), respectively. The adsorption curves showed a better fit with the Langmuir than the Freundlich model.

  9. Adsorptive micro-extraction techniques--novel analytical tools for trace levels of polar solutes in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Neng, N R; Silva, A R M; Nogueira, J M F

    2010-11-19

    A novel enrichment technique, adsorptive μ-extraction (AμE), is proposed for trace analysis of polar solutes in aqueous media. The preparation, stability tests and development of the analytical devices using two geometrical configurations, i.e. bar adsorptive μ-extraction (BAμE) and multi-spheres adsorptive μ-extraction (MSAμE) is fully discussed. From the several sorbent materials tested, activated carbons and polystyrene divinylbenzene phases demonstrated the best stability, robustness and to be the most suitable for analytical purposes. The application of both BAμE and MSAμE devices proved remarkable performance for the determination of trace levels of polar solutes and metabolites (e.g. pesticides, disinfection by-products, drugs of abuse and pharmaceuticals) in water matrices and biological fluids. By comparing AμE techniques with stir bar sorptive extraction based on polydimethylsiloxane phase, great effectiveness is attained overcoming the limitations of the latter enrichment approach regarding the more polar solutes. Furthermore, convenient sensitivity and selectivity is reached through AμE techniques, since the great advantage of this new analytical technology is the possibility to choose the most suitable sorbent to each particular type of application. The enrichment techniques proposed are cost-effective, easy to prepare and work-up, demonstrating robustness and to be a remarkable analytical tool for trace analysis of priority solutes in areas of recognized importance such as environment, forensic and other related life sciences.

  10. Ethylene adsorption and oxidation on Pt( h k l) in acidic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berná, Antonio; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M.

    Ethylene adsorption and oxidation on platinum electrodes have been investigated in acidic solution by means of cyclic voltammetry and in situ infrared spectroscopy. Ethylene oxidation is a surface structure-sensitive reaction being Pt(1 1 1) the only active electrode surface at potentials below surface oxidation. In situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) allows to identify the products formed during the adsorption and oxidation of ethylene. Vinylidene species were detected as oxidized adsorbates coming from ethylene and the only oxygen-containing species observed were on-top adsorbed CO and dissolved CO 2 that is the final oxidation product. A potential dependent equilibrium for transformation between two different adsorption configurations of adsorbed vinylidene, μ 3-η 2-C dbnd CH 2 and μ-C dbnd CH 2, has been observed.

  11. Mesoporous silica functionalized with 1-furoyl thiourea urea for Hg(II) adsorption from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Mureseanu, Mihaela; Reiss, Aurora; Cioatera, Nicoleta; Trandafir, Ion; Hulea, Vasile

    2010-10-15

    New organic-inorganic hybrid materials were prepared by covalently anchoring 1-furoyl thiourea on mesoporous silica (SBA-15). By means of various characterization techniques (X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, thermogravimetric analysis, and FTIR spectroscopy) it has been established that the organic groups were successfully anchored on the SBA-15 surfaces and the ordering of the inorganic support was preserved during the chemical modifications. The hybrid sorbents exhibited good ability to remove Hg(II) from aqueous solution. Thus, at pH 6, the adsorption capacity of mercury ions reached 0.61 mmol g(-1).

  12. Phosphate Removal using Modified Bayoxide®E33 Adsorption Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adsorption of phosphate onto modified Bayoxide® E33 (E33) and underlying mechanisms were comparatively investigated by batch kinetics, sorption isotherms, rapid small scale column tests, and material characterization. Synthesis of modified E33 was conducted by the addition of...

  13. Adsorption of phenolic compounds by organoclays: implications for the removal of organic pollutants from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Park, Yuri; Ayoko, Godwin A; Kurdi, Róbert; Horváth, Erzsébet; Kristóf, Janos; Frost, Ray L

    2013-09-15

    Montmorillonite (MMT) was converted to organoclays by intercalation of cationic surfactants into its interlayer space. Two types of organoclays were prepared from different surfactants (DDTMA and DDDMA) at different surfactant loadings, and the structural changes in the clays investigated using various techniques. The arrangements of surfactant molecules in the interlayer space was visually aided by molecular mechanical calculation (MM calculation), and the adsorption capacities of MMT and the organoclays for the removal of p-chlorophenol (PCP) and p-nitrophenol (PNP) from aqueous solutions were tested under different conditions. Two adsorption isotherm models (Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms) were used to determine the best fit model and the Freundlich isotherm was found to provide better fit for both PCP and PNP. Due to its hydrophobic properties, the adsorption is more favourable for PNP than PCP. Overall, the adsorption capacity of the organoclays was significantly improved by intercalation with large surfactant molecules as well as highly loaded surfactants as the intercalation with large surfactant molecules created the partitioning phase, which strongly attracted large amounts of organic pollutants. Possible mechanisms and the implications of the results for the use of these organoclays as adsorbents for the removal of phenols from the environment are discussed.

  14. Behavior of water in supercritical CO2: adsorption and capillary condensation in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Bryan, C. R.; Dewers, T. A.; Wang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical potential of water in supercritical CO2 (scCO2) may play an important role in water adsorption, capillary condensation, and evaporation under partially saturated conditions at geologic CO2 storage sites, especially if initially anhydrous CO2 is injected. Such processes may affect residual water saturations, relative permeability, shrink/swell of clays, and colloidal transport. We have developed a thermodynamic model of water or brine film thickness as a function of water relative humidity in scCO2. The model is based on investigations of liquid water configuration in the vadose zone and uses the augmented Young-Laplace equation, which incorporates both adsorptive and capillary components. The adsorptive component is based on the concept of disjoining pressure, which reflects force per area normal to the solid and water/brine-scCO2 interfaces. The disjoining pressure includes van der Waals, electrostatic, and structural interactions. The van der Waals term includes the effects of mutual dissolution of CO2 and water in the two fluid phases on partial molar volumes, dielectric coefficients, and refractive indices. Our approach treats the two interfaces as asymmetric surfaces in terms of charge densities and electrostatic potentials. We use the disjoining pressure isotherm to evaluate the type of wetting (e.g., total or partial wetting) for common reservoir and caprock minerals and kerogen. The capillary component incorporates water activity and is applied to simple pore geometries with slits and corners. Finally, we compare results of the model to a companion study by the coauthors on measurement of water adsorption to mineral phases using a quartz-crystal microbalance. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Particle size effects on protein and virus-like particle adsorption on perfusion chromatography media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2015-01-02

    The resin structure, chromatographic behavior, and adsorption kinetics of proteins and virus-like-particles (VLPs) are studied for POROS HS 20 and POROS HS 50 (23 and 52 μm mean diameter, respectively) to determine the effects of particle size on perfusion chromatography and to determine the predictive ability of available models. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inverse size-exclusion chromatography (iSEC) show similar structures for the two resins, both containing 200-1000 nm pores that transect a network of much smaller pores. For non-binding conditions, trends of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) as a function of reduced velocity are consistent with perfusion. The estimated intraparticle flow fractions for these conditions are 0.0018 and 0.00063 for POROS HS 20 and HS 50, respectively. For strong binding conditions, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) shows asymmetrical intraparticle concentrations profiles and enhanced rates of IgG adsorption on POROS HS 20 at 1000 cm/h. The corresponding effective diffusivity under flow is 2-3 times larger than for non-flow conditions and much larger than observed for POROS HS 50, consistent with available models. For VLPs, however, adsorption is confined to a thin layer near the particle surface for both resins, suggesting that the bound VLPs block the pores.

  16. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Seely-Brown Village in Pomfret, CT - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Seely-Brown Village in Pomfret, CT. The objectives of the project were to evaluate the effectiveness of ArsenXnp adsorption media in...

  17. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media, U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Lead, South Dakota - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Lead, South Dakota. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of SolmeteX’s adsorptive media system in removin...

  18. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Brown City, MI Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project in Brown City, MI. The objectives of the project were to evaluate (1) the effectiveness of a Severn Trent Services (STS) adsorptive media s...

  19. USEPA R&D Facility Open to Private Clients

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S.EPA) landmark Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 promised to provide safe drinking water to all Americans. Since that time many have not understood EPA involvement in the evaluation of drinking water technologies. To support a...

  20. CONCERNS/ISSUES OF USEPA'S ORD PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA/ORD's emphasis is on protection of public health and good science. EPA's approach of minimizing health risks of land application by reducing pathogens below the detection limit via Class A treatment or Class B treatment followed by natural attenuation is discussed. The June...

  1. USEPA MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A description of the upcoming USEPA manual is presented along with discussion of salient points of the conceptual approach employed in its development. The manual is the first to recognize and identify the primary removal mechanisms in these systems when they are applied to preli...

  2. USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's SITE program was created to meet the demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. The primary mission of the SITe Program is to expedite the cleanup of sites on the NPL. These sites often have multiple contaminants in soil and groundwater, and few...

  3. Bacteriophage adsorption during transport through porous media: Chemical perturbations and reversibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, R.C.; Hinkle, S.R.; Kroeger, T.W.; Stocking, K.; Gerba, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    In a series of seven column experiments, attachment of the bacteriophage PRD-1 and MS-2 to silica beads at pH's 5.0-5.5 was at least partially reversible; however, release of attached phage was slow and breakthrough curves exhibited significant tailing. Rate coefficients for attachment and detachment were on the order of 10-4 and 10-6-10-4 s-1, respectively. Corresponding time scales were hours for attachment and days for detachment. The sticking efficiency (??) for phage attachment was near 0.01. The rate of phage release was enhanced by raising pH and introducing surface-active chemical species, illustrating the importance of chemical perturbations in promoting biocolloid transport. In a series of batch experiments, MS-2 adsorbed strongly to a hydrophobic surface, octadecyltrichlorosilane-bonded silica, at both pH's 5 and 7. Adsorption to the unbonded silica at pH 5 was linear, but was 2.5 (with Ca2+) to 0.25% (without Ca2+) of that to the bonded surface. Neither MS-2 nor PRD-1 adsorbed to unbonded silica at pH 7. Hydrophobic effects appear to be important for adsorption of even relatively hydrophilic biocolloids. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  4. Characterization of non-specific protein adsorption induced by triazole groups on the chromatography media using Cu (I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reaction for ligand immobilization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming; Ren, Jun; Tian, Kaikai; Jia, Lingyun

    2016-12-09

    As an efficient and facile reaction, click chemistry has been growingly used in the preparation of chromatography media for immobilizing varying types of ligands. For the widely used Cu (I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide click reaction, a 1, 2, 3-triazole group will be inevitably introduced in the molecular linkage, which could give rise to unexpected non-specific adsorption especially for the media employing small compound ligands or high ligand density. Triazole-induced non-specific protein adsorption on sepharose resins was evaluated systematically in this work, by considering the effects of triazole content, length of spacer arm, and solution conditions. We found that triazole content of a resin played the key role. Protein adsorption became significant when the media was coupled with triazole at a medium density (about 60μmol/mL gel), and the binding amount further increased with triazole density. The resin with triazole content of about 100μmol/mL gel could adsorb human IgG, bovine serum albumin and lysozyme at the amount of 13.6, 30.0, and 5.1mg/mL respectively. Proteins tended to be adsorbed at higher amount as the pH of solution approached their isoelectric points, and increasing salt concentration could reduce triazole-induced adsorption but only within limited extent. This study can facilitate reasonable application of click chemistry in the synthesis of chromatography media, by providing some basic principles for optimizing structural properties of separation media and choosing suitable solution conditions.

  5. Measuring adsorption, diffusion and flow in chemical engineering: applications of magnetic resonance to porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladden, Lynn F.; Mitchell, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) techniques are increasingly used to improve our understanding of the multi-component, multi-phase processes encountered in chemical engineering. This review brings together many of the MR techniques used, and often developed specifically, to study chemical engineering systems and, in particular, processes occurring within porous media. Pulse sequences for relaxometry, pulsed field gradient measurements of diffusion, imaging and velocimetry measurements are described. Recent applications of these MR pulse sequences to microporous, mesoporous and macroporous structures are then reviewed. Considering the microporous and mesoporous systems, we focus attention on studies of rock cores, manufactured materials such as cement and gypsum plaster, and catalysts. When considering macroporous structures, the transport through packed beds of particles typical of fixed-bed catalytic reactors is reviewed; a brief overview of the increasing research interest in gas-solid fluidized beds is also presented. We highlight the field of sparse k-space sampling as an area that is in its infancy and suggest that, combined with Bayesian methods, it will offer new opportunities in both extending the application of high-field MR techniques to chemical engineering and increasing the range of measurements that can be carried out using low-field hardware.

  6. USEPA – Gulf Ecology Division is “Adapting to Change”

    EPA Science Inventory

    CERF 2011’s theme reflects a growing realization that human societies are an integral component of ecosystems and the dynamics of these societies and ecosystems are interactive - their futures are interdependent. The USEPA Gulf Ecology Division’s (USEPA-GED) mission is to conduc...

  7. Preparation of hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous silicas applied to mercury removal from aqueous media: Influence of the synthesis route on adsorption capacity and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Sánchez, Alfredo; Sierra, Isabel

    2016-06-15

    New hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous silicas were prepared by employing three different synthesis routes and mercury adsorption studies were done in aqueous media using the batch technique. The organic ligands employed for the functionalization were derivatives of 2-mercaptopyrimidine or 2-mercaptothiazoline, and the synthesis pathways used were post-synthesis, post-synthesis with surface ion-imprinting and co-condensation with ion-imprinting. The incorporation of functional groups and the presence of ordered mesopores in the organosilicas was confirmed by XRD, TEM and SEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, (13)C MAS-NMR, (29)Si MAS-NMR, elemental and thermogravimetric analysis. The highest adsorption capacity and selectivity observed was for the material functionalized with 2-mercaptothiazoline ligand by means the co-condensation with ion-imprinting route (1.03 mmol g(-1) at pH 6). The prepared material could be potential sorbent for the extraction of this heavy metal from environmental and drinking waters.

  8. Engineering and Design: Adsorption Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    adsorptive media addressed in- clude granular activated carbon (GAC) and other alternative adsorption carbon media, such as powdered activated carbon (PAC... Adsorption Media. a. Activated Carbon . Activated carbon can be manufactured from carbonaceous material, in- cluding coal (bituminous, subbituminous...information contained in Corps of Engineers Guide Specification 11225: Downflow Liquid Granular Activated Carbon

  9. Comparison of four USEPA digestion methods for trace metal analysis using certified and Florida soils

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.; Ma, L.Q.

    1998-11-01

    It is critical to compare existing sample digestion methods for evaluating soil contamination and remediation. USEPA Methods 3050, 3051, 3051a, and 3052 were used to digest standard reference materials and representative Florida surface soils. Fifteen trace metals (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Za), and six macro elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, and P) were analyzed. Precise analysis was achieved for all elements except for Cd, Mo, Se, and Sb in NIST SRMs 2704 and 2709 by USEPA Methods 3050 and 3051, and for all elements except for As, Mo, Sb, and Se in NIST SRM 2711 by USEPA Method 3052. No significant differences were observed for the three NIST SRMs between the microwave-assisted USEPA Methods 3051 and 3051A and the conventional USEPA Method 3050 Methods 3051 and 3051a and the conventional USEPA Method 3050 except for Hg, Sb, and Se. USEPA Method 3051a provided comparable values for NIST SRMs certified using USEPA Method 3050. However, for method correlation coefficients and elemental recoveries in 40 Florida surface soils, USEPA Method 3051a was an overall better alternative for Method 3050 than was Method 3051. Among the four digestion methods, the microwave-assisted USEPA Method 3052 achieved satisfactory recoveries for all elements except As and Mg using NIST SRM 2711. This total-total digestion method provided greater recoveries for 12 elements Ag, Be, Cr, Fe, K, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Zn, but lower recoveries for Mg in Florida soils than did the total-recoverable digestion methods.

  10. Preparation, characterization, and application of polypropylene-clinoptilolite composites for the selective adsorption of lead from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Motsa, Machawe M; Mamba, Bhekie B; Thwala, Justice M; Msagati, Titus A M

    2011-07-01

    A polymer composite of polypropylene (PP) and clinoptilolite (CLI) for the adsorption of lead has been prepared using the melt-mixing compounding technique in a rheomixer. Characterization of the composite was performed using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunuer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The influence of contact time, pH, initial metal-ion concentration, temperature, and pretreatment on the adsorption of lead (Pb) by the PP-CLI composite was investigated. Optimum pH was found to be between pH 6 and pH 8 while the maximum sorption of lead at optimal pH was 95%. No difference was observed between the adsorption behavior of composites functionalized with 20% and 30% clinoptilolite, respectively, while the pretreatment with HCl and NaCl made a slight difference to the adsorption capacity of composites. The findings from this study on the lead adsorption behavior of CLI-PP composite may have potential applications in wastewater and water purification works.

  11. Surface adsorption and self-assembly of Cu(II) ions on TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Oksman, Kristiina; Mathew, Aji P

    2016-02-15

    TEMPO-mediated oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCNFs) have shown potential in the bioremediation of metal ions from contaminated water due to their interaction with positively charged metal ions via electrostatic interactions involving surface carboxyl groups. Copper is one of the most common pollutants in industrial effluents and is thus the target metal in the current study. The specific surface adsorption of Cu(II) was similar for TOCNFs with different degrees of functionalization and directly impacted the zeta potential. SEM imaging of the TOCNF after Cu(II) adsorption revealed interesting nanostructured clusters that were attributable to Cu(II) ions first being adsorbed by carboxylate groups on the TOCNF and subsequently being reduced and self-assembled to Cu(0) nanoparticles (NPs) or copper oxide NPs by microprecipitation. TOCNF turned superhydrophilic and resulted in faster water filtration after copper adsorption due to the stronger polarity of the copper ions or the self-assembled Cu(0) NPs creating voids or highly water-permeable channels at the interface between the interconnected TEMPO-oxidized nanofibers. Thus, the adsorption of Cu(II) ions and self-assembly into the Cu NPs on TOCNF favors a faster water purification process and provides a viable route to reuse/recycle TOCNFs studded with Cu nanoparticles as biocidal materials.

  12. USEPA BIOMONITORING AND BIOINDICATOR CONCEPTS NEEDED TO EVALUATE THE BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter presents the current uses, concepts and anticipated future directions of biomonitoring and bioindicators in the regulatory and research programs of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The chapter provides a historical look on how biomonitoring...

  13. USEPA BIOMONITORING AND BIOINDICATORS CONCEPTS NEEDED TO EVALUATE THE BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter presents the current uses, concepts and anticipated future directions of biomonitoring and bioindicators in the regulatory and research programs of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The chapter provides a historical look on how biomonitoring ...

  14. SSOAP - A USEPA Toolbox for Sanitary Sewer Overflow Analysis and Control Planning - Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has identified a need to use proven methodologies to develop computer tools that help communities properly characterize rainfall-derived infiltration and inflow (RDII) into sanitary sewer systems and develop sanitary sewer...

  15. Optimization, isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Pb(II) ions adsorption onto N-maleated chitosan-immobilized TiO₂ nanoparticles from aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Medhat A; Yakout, Amr A

    2016-02-05

    Chitosan, CS was chemically engineered by maleic anhydride via simple protocol to produce N-maleated chitosan, MCS which immobilized on anatase TiO2 to synthesize novel eco-friendly nanosorbent (51±3.8 nm), MCS@TiO2 for cost-effective and efficient removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous media. The chemical structure, surface properties and morphology of MCS@TiO2 were recognized by FTIR, (1)H NMR, XRD, TEM, DLS and zeta-potential techniques. The relations between %removal of Pb(II) and different analytical parameters such as solution acidity (pH), MCS@TiO2 dosage, time of contact and initial Pb(II) concentration were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design (BBD) statistical procedures. The fitting of the experimental data to four different isotherm models at optimized conditions was carried out by various statistical treatments including the correlation coefficient (r), coefficient of determination (r(2)) and non-linear Chi-square (χ(2)) test analyses which all confirm the suitability of Langmuir model to explain the adsorption isotherm data. Also, statistics predicted that the pseudo-second-order model is the optimum kinetic model among four applied kinetic models to closely describe the rate equation of the adsorption process. Thermodynamics viewed the adsorption as endothermic and feasible physical process. EDTA could release the sorbed Pb(II) ions from MCS@TiO2 with a recovery above 92% after three sorption-desorption cycles. The novel synthesized nanosorbent is evidenced to be an excellent solid phase extractor for Pb(II) ions from wastewaters.

  16. Optimization, isotherm, kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Pb(II) ions adsorption onto N-maleated chitosan-immobilized TiO2 nanoparticles from aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaker, Medhat A.; Yakout, Amr A.

    2016-02-01

    Chitosan, CS was chemically engineered by maleic anhydride via simple protocol to produce N-maleated chitosan, MCS which immobilized on anatase TiO2 to synthesize novel eco-friendly nanosorbent (51 ± 3.8 nm), MCS@TiO2 for cost-effective and efficient removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous media. The chemical structure, surface properties and morphology of MCS@TiO2 were recognized by FTIR, 1H NMR, XRD, TEM, DLS and zeta-potential techniques. The relations between %removal of Pb(II) and different analytical parameters such as solution acidity (pH), MCS@TiO2 dosage, time of contact and initial Pb(II) concentration were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design (BBD) statistical procedures. The fitting of the experimental data to four different isotherm models at optimized conditions was carried out by various statistical treatments including the correlation coefficient (r), coefficient of determination (r2) and non-linear Chi-square (χ2) test analyses which all confirm the suitability of Langmuir model to explain the adsorption isotherm data. Also, statistics predicted that the pseudo-second-order model is the optimum kinetic model among four applied kinetic models to closely describe the rate equation of the adsorption process. Thermodynamics viewed the adsorption as endothermic and feasible physical process. EDTA could release the sorbed Pb(II) ions from MCS@TiO2 with a recovery above 92% after three sorption-desorption cycles. The novel synthesized nanosorbent is evidenced to be an excellent solid phase extractor for Pb(II) ions from wastewaters.

  17. Adsorption and capillary condensation in porous media as a function of the chemical potential of water in carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Jason E.; Bryan, Charles R.; Matteo, Edward N.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Wang, Yifeng; Sallaberry, Cédric J.

    2014-03-01

    The chemical potential of water may play an important role in adsorption and capillary condensation of water under multiphase conditions at geologic CO2 storage sites. Injection of large volumes of anhydrous CO2 will result in changing values of the chemical potential of water in the supercritical CO2 phase. We hypothesize that the chemical potential will at first reflect the low concentration of dissolved water in the dry CO2. As formation water dissolves into and is transported by the CO2 phase, the chemical potential of water will increase. We present a pore-scale model of the CO2-water interface or menisci configuration based on the augmented Young-Laplace equation, which combines adsorption on flat surfaces and capillary condensation in wedge-shaped pores as a function of chemical potential of water. The results suggest that, at a given chemical potential for triangular and square pores, liquid water saturation will be less in the CO2-water system under potential CO2 sequestration conditions relative to the air-water vadose zone system. The difference derives from lower surface tension of the CO2-water system and thinner liquid water films, important at pore sizes <1 × 10-6 m, relative to the air-water system. Water movement due to capillary effects will likely be minimal in reservoir rocks, but still may be important in finer grained, clayey caprocks, where very small pores may retain water and draw water back into the system via adsorption and capillary condensation, if dry-out and then rewetting were to occur.

  18. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SPRINGFIELD, OH. PROJECT SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a eight page summary of the final report on arsenic demonstration project at the Chateau Estates Mobile Home Park in Springfield, OH. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’ AD-33 media in removing arsenic to meet t...

  19. Cr(VI) adsorption on functionalized amorphous and mesoporous silica from aqueous and non-aqueous media

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian . E-mail: isabel.sierra@urjc.es

    2007-08-07

    A mesoporous silica (SBA-15) and amorphous silica (SG) have been chemically modified with 2-mercaptopyridine using the homogeneous route. This synthetic route involved the reaction of 2-mercaptopyridine with 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane prior to immobilization on the support. The resulting material has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen gas sorption, FT-IR and MAS NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and elemental analysis. The solid was employed as a Cr(VI) adsorbent from aqueous and non-aqueous solutions at room temperature. The effect of several variables (stirring time, pH, metal concentration and solvent polarity) has been studied using the batch technique. The results indicate that under the optimum conditions, the maximum adsorption value for Cr(VI) was 1.83 {+-} 0.03 mmol/g for MP-SBA-15, whereas the adsorption capacity of the MP-SG was 0.86 {+-} 0.02 mmol/g. On the basis of these results, it can be concluded that it is possible to modify chemically SBA-15 and SG with 2-mercaptopyridine and to use the resulting modified silicas as effective adsorbents for Cr(VI)

  20. Protein adsorption and transport in dextran-modified ion-exchange media. II. Intraparticle uptake and column breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Brian D; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2011-07-22

    Protein transport behavior was compared for the traditional SP Sepharose Fast Flow and the dextran-modified SP Sepharose XL and Capto S resins. Examination of the dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) revealed a fundamental difference in the balance between transport and equilibrium capacity limitations when comparing the two resin classes, as reflected by differences in the locations of the maximum DBCs as a function of salt. In order to quantitatively compare transport behavior, confocal microscopy and batch uptake experiments were used to obtain estimates of intraparticle protein diffusivities. For the traditional particle, such diffusivity estimates could be used to predict column breakthrough behavior accurately. However, for the dextran-modified media, neither the pore- nor the homogeneous-diffusion model was adequate, as experimental dynamic binding capacities were consistently lower than predicted. In examining the shapes of breakthrough curves, it was apparent that the model predictions failed to capture two features observed for the dextran-modified media, but never seen for the traditional resin. Comparison of estimated effective pore diffusivities from confocal microscopy and batch uptake experiments revealed a discrepancy that led to the hypothesis that protein uptake in the dextran-modified resins could occur with a shrinking-core-like sharp uptake front, but with incomplete saturation. The reason for the incomplete saturation is speculated to be that protein initially fills the dextran layer with inefficient packing, but can rearrange over time to accommodate more protein. A conceptual model was developed to account for the partial shrinking-core uptake to test whether the physical intuition led to predictions consistent with experimental behavior. The model could correctly reproduce the two unique features of the breakthrough curves and, in sample applications, parameters found from the fit of one breakthrough curve could be used to adequately match

  1. An evaluation of the USEPA calculations of greenhouse gas emissions from anaerobic lagoons.

    PubMed

    Lory, John A; Massey, R E; Zulovich, J M

    2010-01-01

    On 10 Apr. 2009, USEPA proposed and on 30 Oct. 2009 USEPA finalized reporting thresholds for a wide range of human-derived sources of greenhouse gas (GHG) as a first step in establishing emission limits in the United States. The only on-farm source category that required monitoring under the proposed and final rule was methane (CH(4)) and nitrous oxide (NO(2)) emissions from manure storage facilities. Our objective was to assess, through a literature review, the methodology used by USEPA to estimate current CH(4) emissions from uncovered anaerobic lagoons and the proposed methodology for reporting those emissions under the proposed rule. A review of the performance of uncovered anaerobic lagoons indicates that they are more effective at degrading volatile solids (VS) than predicted using parameters provided by USEPA that had been developed for anaerobic digesters. We also documented errors in the USEPA- and International Panel on Climate Change-estimated methane conversion factors for uncovered anaerobic lagoons. We suggest estimating CH(4) emissions from anaerobic lagoons based on VS degraded in the lagoon and B' (m(3) CH(4) generated kg(-1) VS destroyed). Our estimate of CH(4) released from uncovered anaerobic lagoons indicated the regulatory operation size threshold could be at least 65% smaller than predicted by USEPA in the proposed rule. Our calculated estimate of CH(4) emissions was substantially greater than the few estimates of CH(4) loss based on direct measurements on uncovered anaerobic lagoons. More research is needed before it will be possible to provide definitive estimates of CH(4) loss from uncovered anaerobic lagoons.

  2. Hysteresis of liquid adsorption in porous media by coarse-grained Monte Carlo with direct experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidman, Benjamin D.; Lu, Ning; Wu, David T.

    2016-05-01

    The effects of path-dependent wetting and drying manifest themselves in many types of physical systems, including nanomaterials, biological systems, and porous media such as soil. It is desirable to better understand how these hysteretic macroscopic properties result from a complex interplay between gasses, liquids, and solids at the pore scale. Coarse-Grained Monte Carlo (CGMC) is an appealing approach to model these phenomena in complex pore spaces, including ones determined experimentally. We present two-dimensional CGMC simulations of wetting and drying in two systems with pore spaces determined by sections from micro X-ray computed tomography: a system of randomly distributed spheres and a system of Ottawa sand. Results for the phase distribution, water uptake, and matric suction when corrected for extending to three dimensions show excellent agreement with experimental measurements on the same systems. This supports the hypothesis that CGMC can generate metastable configurations representative of experimental hysteresis and can also be used to predict hysteretic constitutive properties of particular experimental systems, given pore space images.

  3. EPA Method 544: A Case Study in USEPA Drinking Water Method Develpment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to establish a Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) of chemicals and microbes that the Agency will consider for future regulation. One of the key pieces of info...

  4. USEPA'S SITE PROGRAM IMPACT ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF INNOVATIVE HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's SITE Program was created to meet the increased demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. The primary mission of the SITe Program is to expedite the cleanup of sites on the NPL. The SITE Program has two components: The Demonstration Program and ...

  5. USEPA Safe and Sustainable Water Resources Program: Green Infrastructure for Stormwater Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water research portfolio of the USEPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) includes a significant focus on stormwater management as a major cause of contaminants in and degradation to surface waters. The importance of maintaining and restoring natural hydrology via green...

  6. USEPA PAST AND PLANNED RESEARCH ON CONTROL OF INFILTRATION/INFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    From the mid 1960s-1980s, the USEPA conducted a series of research, development and demonstration projects on the characterization, cause and consequence, and control of infiltartion/inflow (I/I) in sanitary sewers under the Storm and Combined Sewer pollution Control Research pro...

  7. REMOVING ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS OF REGULATORY INTEREST WITH MEMBRANE PROCESSES: USEPA'S SCREENING STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act require the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to establish a list of unregulated microbiological and chemical contaminants to aid in priority-setting for the Agency's drinking water program. This list, known as the Cont...

  8. Early Evolution of the Toxicity Identification Evaluation Process: Contributions from the USEPA Effluent Testing Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of its whole effluent testing program, the USEPA developed an effects-directed analysis (EDA) approach to identifying the cause of toxicity in toxic effluents or ambient waters, an EDA process termed a “Toxicity Identification Evaluation” (TIE), which is the focus of this...

  9. USEPA'S APPROACH TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act require USEPA to perform Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring (UCM) for chemicals of interest to the Agency for possible future regulation. Many of these chemicals fall into the category of "emerging contaminants". An important e...

  10. Ecosystem Services - An Emerging Direction for the U.S.EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty years ago the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S.EPA) was formed to “protect human health and the environment”. In those days the environment was being severely, and obviously, degraded by any number of pollution inputs, and it was clear that a healthy envi...

  11. THE USEPA'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY RISK SCREENING TOOL (MFFRST) AND POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL (MFFP2T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will provide an overview of the USEPA's Metal Finishing Facility Risk Screening Tool, including a discussion of the models used and outputs. The tool is currently being expanded to include pollution prevention considerations as part of the model. The current st...

  12. THE USEPA'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL (MFFP2T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA has developed a pre-release version of a process simulation tool, the Metal Finishing Facility Pollution Prevention Tool (MFFP2T), for the metal finishing industry. This presentation will provide a demonstration of the current version of this tool. The presentation will...

  13. THE USEPA'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL (MFFP2T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA has developed a pre-release version of a process simulation tool, the Metal Finishing Facility Pollution Prevention Tool (MFFP2T), for the metal finishing industry. This presentation will provide a demonstration of the current version of this tool. The presentation wi...

  14. ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AS A NEW STRATEGIC FOCUS FOR USEPA'S ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's Office of Research and Development has made ecosystem services the new strategic focus for its ecological research program (ERP). Recognizing that the protection and enhancement of ecosystem services can help maintain and improve human health, economic vitality and ov...

  15. Candidate Causes. Sediments. In: Causal Analysis, Diagnosis Decision Information System, USEPA Website

    EPA Science Inventory

    CADDIS is an online application that helps scientists and engineers in the Regions, States, and Tribes find, access, organize, use, and share information to conduct causal evaluations in aquatic systems. It is based on the USEPA stressor identification process, a formal method fo...

  16. IMPLEMENTATION OF USEPA'S METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL (MFFP2T) - 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help metal finishing facilities meet the goal of profitable pollution prevention, the USEPA is developing the Metal Finishing Facility Pollution Prevention Tool (MFFP2T), a computer program that estimates the rate of solid, liquid waste generation and air emissions. This progr...

  17. USEPA RESEARCH ON FISH - HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL MARSHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite numerous studies documenting fish use of particular habitat elements, the role of habitat mosaics in supporting wetland fishes is poorly understood. USEPA's Mid-Continent Ecology Division has initiated research to identify relationships of fish and habitat in coastal mars...

  18. USEPA RESEARCH ON FISH: HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL MARSHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Despite numerous studies documenting fish use of particular habitat elements, the role of habitat mosaics in supporting wetland fishes is poorly understood. The USEPA's Mid-Continent Ecology Division has initiated research to identify relationships among fish and habitat-based cr...

  19. Overview of USEPA Tests with Aquatic Vertebrates for Detecting and Assessing Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this short review is to describe fish and amphibian tests for EDCs that have been (or are being) developed by the Office of Research and Development of the USEPA. The initial impetus for development of these tests was to support the EPA screening and testing progr...

  20. USEPA'S SMALL DRINKING WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATIONS IN ECUADOR AND MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to support and help in the struggle to improve the quality of drinking water in the United States and abroad, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) conducts research studies for the demonstration and evaluation of alternative and innovative drinking w...

  1. Determining the Influence of Groundwater Composition on the Performance of Arsenic Adsorption Columns Using Rapid Small-Scale Column Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, A. R.; Siegel, M.

    2004-12-01

    The USEPA has established a more stringent drinking water standard for arsenic, reducing the maximum contaminant level (MCL) from 50 μ g/L to 10 μ g/L. This will affect many small communities in the US that lack the appropriate treatment infrastructure and funding to reduce arsenic to such levels. For such communities, adsorption systems are the preferred technology based on ease of operation and relatively lower costs. The performance of adsorption media for the removal of arsenic from drinking water is dependent on site-specific water quality. At certain concentrations, co-occurring solutes will compete effectively with arsenic for sorption sites, potentially reducing the sorption capacity of the media. Due to the site-specific nature of water quality and variations in media properties, pilot scale studies are typically carried out to ensure that a proposed treatment technique is cost effective before installation of a full-scale system. Sandia National Laboratories is currently developing an approach to utilize rapid small-scale columns in lieu of pilot columns to test innovative technologies that could significantly reduce the cost of treatment in small communities. Rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs) were developed to predict full-scale treatment of organic contaminants by adsorption onto granular activated carbon (GAC). This process greatly reduced the time and costs required to verify performance of GAC adsorption columns. In this study, the RSSCT methodology is used to predict the removal of inorganic arsenic using mixed metal oxyhydroxide adsorption media. The media are engineered and synthesized from materials that control arsenic behavior in natural and disturbed systems. We describe the underlying theory and application of RSSCTs for the performance evaluation of novel media in several groundwater compositions. Results of small-scale laboratory columns are being used to predict the performance of pilot-scale systems and ultimately to design full

  2. MONITORING METHODS ADAPTABLE TO VAPOR INTRUSION MONITORING - USEPA COMPENDIUM METHODS TO-15, TO-15 SUPPLEMENT (DRAFT), AND TO-17

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA ambient air monitoring methods for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using specially-prepared canisters and solid adsorbents are directly adaptable to monitoring for vapors in the indoor environment. The draft Method TO-15 Supplement, an extension of the USEPA Method TO-15,...

  3. Adsorption removal of antiviral drug oseltamivir and its metabolite oseltamivir carboxylate by carbon nanotubes: Effects of carbon nanotube properties and media.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Niu, Li-Xia; Wang, Chao; Sun, Ming-Chao; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2015-10-01

    This investigation evaluated the adsorption behavior of the antiviral drugs of oseltamivir (OE) and its metabolites (i.e., oseltamivir carboxylate (OC)) on three types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including single-walled CNT (SWCNT), multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), and carboxylated SWCNT (SWCNT-COOH). CNTs can efficiently remove more than 90% of the OE and OC from aqueous solution when the initial concentration was lower than 10(-4) mmol/L. The Polanyi-Manes model depicted the adsorption isotherms of OE and OC on CNTs better than the Langmuir and Freundlich models. The properties of OE/OC and the characteristics of CNTs, particularly the oxygen functional groups (e.g., SWCNT-COOH) played important roles during the adsorption processes. OE showed a higher adsorption affinity than OC. By comparing the different adsorbates adsorption on each CNT and each adsorbate adsorption on different CNTs, the adsorption mechanisms of hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, van der Waals force, and H-bonding were proposed as the contributing factors for OE and OC adsorption on CNTs. Particularly, for verifying the contribution of electrostatic interaction, the changes of adsorption partition efficiency (Kd) of OE and OC on CNTs were evaluated by varying pH from 2 to 11 and the importance of isoelectric point (pHIEP) of CNTs on OE and OC adsorption was addressed.

  4. Experimental studies on equilibrium adsorption isosteres and determination of the thermodynamic quantities of polar media on alumina Al2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonova, Albena

    2017-03-01

    The present work is a revieif of theoretical and experimental study on the adsorption performance of the adsorbent Alumina (Al2O3) used in the adsorption system. An experimental investigation on the equilibrium adsorption isosteres at low pressure (< 1 atm) of working pairs Al2O3/H2O and Al2O3/C2H6O2 is carried out. The isovolume measurement method is adopted in the test setup to directly measure the saturated vapor pressures of working pairs at vapor-liquid equilibrium (dG=0 and dμi=0). Quantity adsorbed is determined from pressure, volume and temperature using gas law. The isosteric heat of adsorption is calculated from the slope of the plot of lnP versus 1/T different amounts of adsorbate onto adsorbent as follows: 0,01 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,03 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,1 vol% Al2O3/H2O; 0,01 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2; 0,03 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2; 0,1 vol% Al2O3/C2H6O2. This study shows that adsorption working pair Al2O3 C2H6O2 has better adsorption performances than those of the A2O3/H2O. Surface acidity! is a most important property! far both adsorption and catalysis and therefore is examined structure of active sites of alumina surface. Thermodynamic parameters such as isosteric heat of adsorption, isosteric enthalpy and entropy of adsorption are critical design variables in estimating the performance and predicting the mechanism of an adsorption process and are also one of the basic requirements for the characterization and optimization of an adsorption process

  5. Comparison of activation media and pyrolysis temperature for activated carbons development by pyrolysis of potato peels for effective adsorption of endocrine disruptor bisphenol-A.

    PubMed

    Arampatzidou, Anastasia C; Deliyanni, Eleni A

    2016-03-15

    Activated carbon prepared from potato peels, a solid waste by product has been studied for the adsorption of an endocrine disruptor, Bisphenol-A, from aqueous solutions. The potato peels biomass was activated with H3PO4, KOH and ZnCl2 in order the effect of the activation agent to be evaluated. The activated biomass was carbonized at 400, 600 and/or 800 °C in order the effect of carbonization temperature on the texture, surface chemistry and adsorption properties to be found. The activated carbons prepared were characterized by nitrogen adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscope, thermal analysis and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Equilibrium adsorption data followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption followed second order rate kinetics. The adsorption capacity calculated from the Langmuir isotherm was found 454.62 mg g(-1) at an initial pH 3 at 25 °C for the phosphoric acid activated carbon carbonized at 400 °C that proved to be the best adsorbent.

  6. Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Column and Stability of the Antibiotic Oxytetracycline Supported on Zn(II)-[2-Methylimidazolate] Frameworks in Aqueous Media

    PubMed Central

    Anceski Bataglion, Giovana; Nogueira Eberlin, Marcos; Machado Ronconi, Célia

    2015-01-01

    A metal-organic framework, Zn-[2-methylimidazolate] frameworks (ZIF-8), was used as adsorbent material to remove different concentrations of oxytetracycline (OTC) antibiotic in a fixed-bed column. The OTC was studied at concentrations of 10, 25 and 40 mg L-1. At 40 mg L-1, the breakthrough point was reached after approximately 10 minutes, while at 10 and 25 mg L-1 this point was reached in about 30 minutes. The highest removal rate of 60% for the 10 mg L-1 concentration was reached after 200 minutes. The highest adsorption capacity (28.3 mg g-1) was attained for 25 mg L-1 of OTC. After the adsorption process, a band shift was observed in the UV-Vis spectrum of the eluate. Additional studies were carried out to determine the cause of this band shift, involving a mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of the supernatant liquid during the process. This investigation revealed that the main route of adsorption consisted of the coordination of OTC with the metallic zinc centers of ZIF-8. The materials were characterized by thermal analysis (TA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared spectroscopy (IR) before and after adsorption, confirming the presence of OTC in the ZIF-8 and the latter’s structural stability after the adsorption process. PMID:26057121

  7. Potential for use of industrial waste materials as filter media for removal of Al, Mo, As, V and Ga from alkaline drainage in constructed wetlands--adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Hua, T; Haynes, R J; Zhou, Y-F; Boullemant, A; Chandrawana, I

    2015-03-15

    The potential to remove Al, Mo, V, As and Ga from alkaline (pH 8.0-8.6) drainage originating from seawater neutralized bauxite processing residue storage areas using constructed wetland technology was studied in a laboratory study. Bauxite processing residue sand, bauxite, alum water treatment sludge and blast furnace slag were investigated as potential active filter materials. Al was shown to precipitate as Al(OH)3 in the pH range 7.0-8.0 in aqueous solution and 6.0-8.5 in the presence of silica sand particles that provided a surface for nucleation. For V As Mo and Ga, adsorption to the surfaces of the adsorbents decreased greatly at elevated pH values (>pH 6-9). Water treatment sludge and bauxite had a greater ability to adsorb V, As and Mo at high pH (As and V at pH 7-9 and Mo at pH 5-7) than processing sand and slag. Adsorption isotherm data for As and V onto all four adsorbent than processing sand and slag. Adsorption isotherm data for As and V onto all four adsorbent materials fitted equally well to the Langmuir and Freundlich equations but for Ga, and to a lesser extent Mo, the Freundlich equation gave higher R(2) values. For all four ions, the maximum adsorption capacity (Langmuir value qmax) was greatest for water treatment sludge. Bauxite adsorbed more Mo, Ga and V than residue sand or slag. The pseudo-second order equation gave a better fit to the experimental kinetic data than the pseudo-first order model suggesting that chemisorption rather than diffusion/exchange was the rate limiting step to adsorption. It was concluded that water treatment sludge and bauxite were the most effective adsorbents and that for effective removal of the target ions the pH of the drainage water needs to be decreased to 6.0-7.0.

  8. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Wellman, TX, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project in the City of Wellman, TX. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’ AD-33 media in remo...

  9. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Nambe Pueblo, New Mexico - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from this arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Nambe Pueblo, New Mexico. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies' AD-33 media i...

  10. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media - U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Rollinsford, NH, Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Rollinsford, New Hampshire. The objectives of the project were to evaluate: 1) the effectiveness of AdEdge Technologies’ AD -33TM media ...

  11. A New Sampling Strategy for the Detection of Fecal Bacteria Integrated with USEPA Method 1622/1623

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA Method 1622/1623 requires the concentration of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from 10 liters of water samples prior to detection. During this process the supernatant is discarded because it is assumed that most protozoa are retained in the filtration and centrifugation steps....

  12. Metals Fate And Transport Modelling In Streams And Watersheds: State Of The Science And USEPA Workshop Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metals pollution in surface waters from point and non-point sources (NPS) is a widespread problem in the United States and worldwide (Lofts et al., 2007; USEPA, 2007). In the western United States, metals associated with acid mine drainage (AMD) from hardrock mines in mou...

  13. METHOD-SPECIFIC PRECISION AND BIAS RELATIONSHIPS DEVELOPED FROM DATA SUBMITTED DURING USEPA WASTEWATER LABORATORY PERFORMANCE EVALUATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper documents the process used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to estimate the mean and standard deviation of data reported by in-control wastewater laboratories during Water Pollution (WP) studies. This process is then applied to the data rep...

  14. METHOD-SPECIFIC PRECISION AND BIAS RELATIONSHIPS DEVELOPED FROM DATA SUBMITTED DURING USEPA DRINKING WATER LABORATORY PERFORMANCE EVALUATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper documents the process used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to estimate the mean and standard deviation of data reported by in-control drinking water laboratories during Water Supply (WS) studies. This process is then applied to the data re...

  15. Metals fate and transport modelling in streams and watersheds: state of the science and USEPA workshop review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caruso, B.S.; Cox, T.J.; Runkel, Robert L.; Velleux, M.L.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Julien, P.Y.; Butler, B.A.; Alpers, Charles N.; Marion, A.; Smith, Kathleen S.

    2008-01-01

    Metals pollution in surface waters from point and non-point sources (NPS) is a widespread problem in the United States and worldwide (Lofts et al., 2007; USEPA, 2007). In the western United States, metals associated with acid mine drainage (AMD) from hardrock mines in mountainous areas impact aquatic ecosystems and human health (USEPA, 1997a; Caruso and Ward, 1998; Church et al., 2007). Metals fate and transport modelling in streams and watersheds is sometimes needed for assessment and restoration of surface waters, including mining-impacted streams (Runkel and Kimball, 2002; Caruso, 2003; Velleux et al., 2006). The Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP; Wool et al., 2001), developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), is an example of a model used for such analyses. Other approaches exist and appropriate model selection depends on site characteristics, data availability and modelling objectives. However, there are a wide range of assumptions, input parameters, data requirements and gaps, and calibration and validation issues that must be addressed by model developers, users and decision makers. Despite substantial work on model development, their successful application has been more limited because they are not often used by decision makers for stream and watershed assessment and restoration. Bringing together scientists, model developers, users and decision makers should stimulate the development of appropriate models and improve the applicability of their results. To address these issues, the USEPA Office of Research and Development and Region 8 (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming) hosted a workshop in Denver, Colorado on February 13–14, 2007. The workshop brought together approximately 35 experts from government, academia and consulting to address the state of the art for modelling metals fate and transport, knowledge gaps and future directions in metals modelling. It focused on modelling metals in high

  16. Preparation and certification of multicomponent VOC compressed gas standards for USEPA Method TO-14

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, M.S.; Behm, P.E.

    1996-12-31

    Title III of the Clean Air Act amendments (CAAA) of 1990 regulated 189 Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) of which there are > 100 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The USEPA in Compendium Method TO-14 (Toxic Organics) describes the use of nominal 10 ppmv multicomponent VOC compressed gas standards with a dynamic dilution device to produce ppb-level mixes for analytical system calibration, testing of canister sampling systems and preparing canister transfer standards. Although Method TO-14 specifies the use of NIST traceable gas standards, in actuality the number of VOC-containing Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) available from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is limited both in the number of components and the concentration range. Obviously reliable analytical measurements of these hazardous toxic organic compounds in ambient air require the availability of accurate, stable, multicomponent gas standards. The paper will describe methodology for the gravimetric preparation and analytical evaluation of multicomponent VOC compressed gas standards in the low ppm (1-10 ppm) range. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  17. A review of the USEPA's single breath canister (SBC) method for exhaled volatile organic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Andrew B; Pleil, Joachim D

    2002-01-01

    Exhaled alveolar breath can provide a great deal of information about an individual's health and previous exposure to potentially harmful xenobiotic materials. Because breath can be obtained non-invasively and its constituents directly reflect concentrations in the blood, its use has many potential applications in the field of biomarker research. This paper reviews the utility and application of the single breath canister (SBC) method of alveolar breath collection and analysis first developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in the 1990s. This review covers the development of the SBC technique in the laboratory and its application in a range of field studies. Together these studies specifically show how the SBC method (and exhaled breath analysis in general) can be used to clearly demonstrate recent exposure to volatile organic compounds, to link particular activities to specific exposures, to determine compound-specific uptake and elimination kinetics, and to assess the relative importance of various routes of exposure (i.e. dermal, ingestion, inhalation) in multi-pathway scenarios. Specific investigations covered in this overview include an assessment of exposures related to the residential use of contaminated groundwater, exposures to gasoline and fuel additives at self-service gas stations, swimmers' exposures to trihalomethanes, and occupational exposures to jet fuel.

  18. NASA-modified precipitation products to improve USEPA nonpoint source water quality modeling for the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Joseph; Toll, David; Partington, Ed; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Lee, Shihyan; Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica; Engman, Ted; Arsenault, Kristi

    2010-01-01

    The USEPA has estimated that over 20,000 water bodies within the United States do not meet water quality standards. One of the regulations in the Clean Water Act of 1972 requires states to monitor the total maximum daily load, or the amount of pollution that can be carried by a water body before it is determined to be "polluted," for any watershed in the United States (Copeland, 2005). In response to this mandate, the USEPA developed Better Assessment Science Integrating Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) as a decision support tool for assessing pollution and to guide the decision-making process for improving water quality. One of the models in BASINS, the Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF), computes continuous streamflow rates and pollutant concentration at each basin outlet. By design, precipitation and other meteorological data from weather stations serve as standard model input. In practice, these stations may be unable to capture the spatial heterogeneity of precipitation events, especially if they are few and far between. An attempt was made to resolve this issue by substituting station data with NASA-modified/NOAA precipitation data. Using these data within HSPF, streamflow was calculated for seven watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Basin during low flow periods, convective storm periods, and annual flows. In almost every case, the modeling performance of HSPF increased when using the NASA-modified precipitation data, resulting in better streamflow statistics and, potentially, in improved water quality assessment.

  19. Treatment of arsenic-contaminated water using akaganeite adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Cadena C., Fernando; Johnson, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention comprises a method and composition using akaganeite, an iron oxide, as an ion adsorption medium for the removal of arsenic from water and affixing it onto carrier media so that it can be used in filtration systems.

  20. Lead isotopic analyses of selected soil samples from the USEPA Vasquez Blvd.-I-70 study area, Denver, CO

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Unruh, D.M.

    2002-01-01

    Large amounts of arsenic contamination, in excess of 2000 ppm, have been found in some residential surface soils in northern Denver, Colorado (USEPA, 1999). Associated with the arsenic are elevated levels of metals such as lead, cadmium and mercury. Potential sources of this contamination include waste from smelters in the area and commercial herbicide containing arsenic trioxide and lead arsenate (USEPA, 1999). As a part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Vasquez Boulevard-I-70 Project (VBI70 project; USEPA, 1999), lead isotopic analyses of selected soil samples, smelter waste, and a commercial herbicide and a commercial lead arsenate pesticide have been performed in order to constrain the possible sources of elevated lead, and by proxy arsenic, found in these residential soils. The isotopes of lead can be used as a natural tracer in determining sources of contaminants in soils and stream sediments (e.g. Church and others, 1997; Fey and others, 1999; Unruh and others, 2000). The element lead (Pb) consists of four naturally occurring and stable isotopes, 204Pb, 206Pb, 207Pb, and 208Pb. Three of these, 206Pb, 207Pb, and 208Pb are radiogenic decay products of naturally occurring 238U, 235U, and 232Th, respectively. Owing to variations among the U/Pb and Th/Pb elemental abundance ratios among different types of geologic materials, variations in the relative abundances of the Pb isotopes are produced among different materials during geologic time. In order for the Pb isotope method to be useful for determining possible contaminant sources, two important criteria must be met (e.g. Church and others 1997): (1) It must be possible to obtain and measure the Pb isotopic compositions in all potential contaminant sources and in uncontaminated material and (2) the Pb isotopic compositions of the potential contaminant sources must be distinctly different from one another and from uncontaminated background. Variations among the Pb isotopic ratios in selected samples

  1. Apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2005-12-13

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  2. Method for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Matson, Dean W.; Drost, M. Kevin; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2003-10-07

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  3. Method and apparatus for thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Wegeng, Robert S.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Drost, Kevin; Vishwanathan, Vilayanur V.

    2004-06-08

    The present invention provides compact adsorption systems that are capable of rapid temperature swings and rapid cycling. Novel methods of thermal swing adsorption and thermally-enhanced pressure swing adsorption are also described. In some aspects of the invention, a gas is passed through the adsorbent thus allowing heat exchangers to be very close to all portions of the adsorbent and utilize less space. In another aspect, the adsorption media is selectively heated, thus reducing energy costs. Methods and systems for gas adsorption/desorption having improved energy efficiency with capability of short cycle times are also described. In another aspect, the apparatus or methods utilize heat exchange channels of varying lengths that have volumes controlled to provide equal heat fluxes. Methods of fuel cell startup are also described. Advantages of the invention include the ability to use (typically) 30-100 times less adsorbent compared to conventional systems.

  4. PROCEEDINGS AND SUMMARY REPORT OF THE USEPA WORKSHOP ON MANAGING ARSENIC RISKS TO THE ENVIRONMENT: CHARACTERIZATION OF WASTE, CHEMISTRY AND TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The workshop "Managing Arsenic Risks to the Environment: Charaterization of Waste, Chemistry and Treatment and Disposal," was held 5/1-3/2001 in Denver, CO. This workshop was sponsored and facilitated by USEPA's ORD and OSWER. The purpose of the workshop was to achieve three goal...

  5. Active biomonitoring with Corbicula for USEPA priority pollutant and metal sources in the Anacostia River (DC, Maryland, USA).

    PubMed

    Phelps, Harriette L

    2016-07-01

    The freshwater Anacostia River watershed (Maryland, DC, USA) was surveyed for the sources of bioavailable US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Priority Pollutants and toxic metals by active biomontoring (ABM) using the freshwater Asiatic clam Corbicula fluminea. The Anacostia River is a 456 km(2) tributary of the tidal freshwater Potomac River that includes the city of Washington, DC where edible fish are highly contaminated with PCBs and chlordane. From 1999 to 2011, Corbicula were collected for ABM from a Potomac reference site and translocated in cages placed at 45 sites in the tidal and nontidal Anacostia watershed. Minimum clam mortality and maximum contaminant bioaccumulation was with 2-week translocation. The clam tissues (28-50) were combined at sites and analyzed by TestAmerica for 66 USEPA Priority Pollutants plus technical chlordane, benz(e) pyrene, and 6 metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb). Tissue contaminants reflected water, not sediment, levels. To compare sites, all contaminant data above detection or reference were grouped as total metals (TMET), total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (TPAH), total PCB congeners (TPCB), total pesticides (TPEST), and total technical chlordane (TCHL). Tidal Anacostia ABM found highest TPAH and TCHL upstream at Bladensburg Marina (MD) except for TCHL at site PP near the confluence. Five nontidal MD subtributaries (94% of flow) had 17 sites with bioavailable TPAH, TPCB, or TCHL 2 to 3 times higher than found at the toxic-sediment "hotspots" near Washington. The only TMET noted was Fe at 1 site. TPAH in MD subtributaries was highest near industrial parks and Metro stations. A naphthalene spill was detected in Watts Branch. TPCB (low molecular weight) originated upstream at 1 industrial park. Total technical chlordane (80% of TPEST) was 2 to 5 times the US Food and Drug Administration action in 4 nontidal tributaries where heptachlor indicated legacy chlordane dumpsites. Total technical chlordane fell to reference

  6. Media Clips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vennebush, G. Patrick

    2004-01-01

    Media Clips aims to offer readers contemporary, authentic applications of quantitative reasoning based on print or electronic media. Clips may be in text or graphic format, and clip sources may be either print or electronic media.

  7. Poromechanics of microporous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard, L.; Vandamme, M.; Pellenq, R. J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    Microporous media, i.e., porous media made of pores with a nanometer size, are important for a variety of applications, for instance for sequestration of carbon dioxide in coal, or for storage of hydrogen in metal-organic frameworks. In a pore of nanometer size, fluid molecules are not in their bulk state anymore since they interact with the atoms of the solid: they are said to be in an adsorbed state. For such microporous media, conventional poromechanics breaks down. In this work we derive poroelastic constitutive equations which are valid for a generic porous medium, i.e., even for a porous medium with pores of nanometer size. The complete determination of the poromechanical behavior of a microporous medium requires knowing how the amount of fluid adsorbed depends on both the fluid bulk pressure and the strain of the medium. The derived constitutive equations are validated with the help of molecular simulations on one-dimensional microporous media. Even when a microporous medium behaves linearly in the absence of any fluid (i.e., its bulk modulus does not depend on strain), we show that fluid adsorption can induce non-linear behavior (i.e., its drained bulk modulus can then depend significantly on strain). We also show that adsorption can lead to an apparent Biot coefficient of the microporous medium greater than unity or smaller than zero. The poromechanical response of a microporous medium to adsorption significantly depends on the pore size distribution. Indeed, the commensurability (i.e., the ratio of the size of the pores to that of the fluid molecules) proves to play a major role. For a one-dimensional model of micropores with a variety of pore sizes, molecular simulations show that the amount of adsorbed fluid depends linearly on the strain of the medium. We derive linearized constitutive equations which are valid when such a linear dependence of the adsorbed amount of fluid on the strain is observed. As an application, the case of methane and coal is

  8. Thorough removal of inorganic and organic mercury from aqueous solutions by adsorption on Lemna minor powder.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Yang, Huang; Ni, Jian-Cong

    2011-02-15

    The adsorption ability of duckweed (Lemna minor) powders for removing inorganic and organic mercury (methyl and ethyl mercury) has been studied using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimal adsorption conditions were: (a) the pH value of the solution 7.0 for inorganic and ethyl mercury, 9.0 for methyl mercury, and (b) equilibrium adsorption time 10, 20, and 40 min for inorganic mercury, methyl mercury, and ethyl mercury, respectively. After adsorption by L. minor powder for 40 min, when the initial concentrations of inorganic and organic mercury were under 12.0 μg L(-1) and 50.0 μg L(-1), respectively, the residual concentrations of mercury could meet the criterion of drinking water (1.0 μg L(-1)) and the permitted discharge limit of wastewater (10.0 μg L(-1)) set by China and USEPA, respectively. Thorough removal of both inorganic and organic mercury from aqueous solutions was reported for the first time. The significant adsorption sites were C-O-P and phosphate groups by the surface electrostatic interactions with aqueous inorganic and organic mercury cations, and then the selective adsorption was resulted from the strong chelating interaction between amine groups and mercury on the surface of L. minor cells.

  9. Media education.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  10. USEPA WATERSHED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development has developed a well defined research plan to evaluate pollutants within watersheds. This plan is defined by long term goals and annual performance measures. The first goal is to provide the approache...

  11. USEPA Resistance Management Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    A significant increase in genetically modified corn planting driven by biofuel demand is expected for future planted acreages approaching 80% of total corn plantings in 2009. As demand increases, incidence of farmer non-compliance with mandated non-genetically modified refuge is...

  12. USEPA CAPSTONE REPORT: DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wet-weather flow (WWF), including combined-sewer overflow (CSO), sanitary-sewer overflow, and stormwater (SW) is a significant contributor of microbial contamination to surface water and ground water. Contamination with human-origin fecal coliform (FC) is of great concern for san...

  13. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  14. Media, Gadgets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes papers presented at the Sixth Biennial Conference on Chemical Education describing new media and gadgets, particularly models, computers, and other media. A bibliography of 15 presented papers on these topics is attached. (CS)

  15. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, V C

    1999-01-01

    For decades, media violence has been viewed as largely a Western problem. New studies indicate that Indian children have increasing access to the media and that media violence will subject them to the same problems as Western children: imitation, desensitization, fear, and inappropriate attitudes about violence and aggression. Solutions exist but will have to be implemented within the next decade to protect Indian children and adolescents from the harmful effects of media violence.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of gas-solid adsorption processes at pore scale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Chen, L.; Tao, W. Q.

    2015-11-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) approach was established to implement kinetic concentration boundary conditions in interfacial mass-transfer processes and to simulate the adsorption process in porous media at pore scale and mesoscopic levels. A general treatment was applied to conduct three types of concentration boundary conditions effectively and accurately. Applicability for adsorption was verified by two benchmark examples, which were representative of the interparticle mass transport and intraparticle mass transport in the adsorption system, respectively. The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed porous media at the pore scale level was numerically investigated. Mass-transfer processes of the adsorption reaction were simulated by executing Langmuir adsorption kinetics on surfaces of adsorbent particles. Meanwhile, the homogeneous solid diffusion model (HSDM) was used for mass transport in interior particles. The transient adsorbed amount was obtained in detail, and the impact of flow condition, porosity, and adsorbent particle size on the entire dynamic adsorption performance was investigated. The time needed to approach steady state decreased with increased fluid velocity. Transient adsorption capability and time consumption to equilibrium were nearly independent of porosity, whereas increasing pore size led to a moderating adsorption rate and more time was consumed to approach the saturation adsorption. Benefiting from the advantages of the LB method, both bulk and intraparticle mass transfer performances during adsorption can be obtained using the present pore scale approach. Thus, interparticle mass transfer and intraparticle mass transfer are the two primary segments, and intraparticle diffusion has the dominant role.

  17. New Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downtown Business Quarterly, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue explores lower Manhattan's burgeoning "New Media" industry, a growing source of jobs in lower Manhattan. The first article, "New Media Manpower Issues" (Rodney Alexander), addresses manpower, training, and workforce demands faced by new media companies in New York City. The second article, "Case Study:…

  18. Media Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marklund, Inger, Ed.; Hanse, Mona-Britt, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    The Swedish Media Panel is a research program about children and young persons and their use of mass media. The aim of the ten-year (1975-1985) project is to explain how media habits originate, how they change as children grow older, what factors on the part of children themselves and in their surroundings may be connected with a certain use of…

  19. Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    4 Table 2: Traditional Media Usage (% of consumers ...media can be described in terms of content authors and passive consumers . Traditional media sources have dominated the landscape of news distribution...delivering software as a continually-updated service that gets better the more people use it, consuming and remixing data from multiple sources

  20. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  1. Phosphate adsorption using modified iron oxide-based sorbents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Phosphate RemovalThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Lalley , J., C. Han , G. RamMohan , T. Speth , J. Garland , M. Nadagouda , and D. Dionysiou. Phosphate Removal using Modified Bayoxide®E33 Adsorption Media. WATER RESEARCH. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, issue}: 96-107, (2015).

  2. Human health risk assessment for off-shore media at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, E.

    1995-12-31

    A human health risk assessment for off-shore media was performed at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine. The purpose was to determine whether any potential human health risks could be posed by exposures to the estuary. Included in the study were the evaluations of potential risks existing from human exposures to surface water and sediment, as well as potential risks posed by ingestion of various species of fish and shellfish which are caught commercially and recreationally in the estuary. Three species were chosen for study. They were lobsters, mussels, and flounder. The USEPA prescribed protocols for performing human health risk assessments under CERCLA and RCRA were followed to estimate risks associated with ingestion of these species caught in the lower estuary, in the vicinity of the Shipyard. USEPA required the evaluation of two potential seafood ingestion scenarios recreational fishermen and subsistence fishermen. The results indicated that the USEPA risk target of 10{sup {minus}6} for carcinogens or the hazard index of one was exceeded in at least one species for the subsistence ingestion scenario for some inorganics and organic compounds. Based on these results, it was necessary to propose Media Protection Standards in the biota, which would represent the USEPA target risk level for carcinogens and noncarcinogens, as potential cleanup targets. In performing this task, a review of regional background levels for these chemicals found in biota throughout the Great Bay Estuarine System, at locations removed from the Shipyard, was performed. Also examined were regional Maine data from the NOAA Mussel Watch Program. Biota concentrations near the Shipyard were found to be within the range of biota concentrations for most of these chemicals throughout the region, suggesting possible multiple, non-point sources for the contaminants found in seafood throughout the region.

  3. Assessment of multi-mycotoxin adsorption efficacy of grape pomace.

    PubMed

    Avantaggiato, Giuseppina; Greco, Donato; Damascelli, Anna; Solfrizzo, Michele; Visconti, Angelo

    2014-01-15

    Grape pomace (pulp and skins) was investigated as a new biosorbent for removing mycotoxins from liquid media. In vitro adsorption experiments showed that the pomace obtained from Primitivo grapes is able to sequester rapidly and simultaneously different mycotoxins. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was the most adsorbed mycotoxin followed by zearalenone (ZEA), ochratoxin A (OTA), and fumonisin B1 (FB1), whereas the adsorption of deoxynivalenol (DON) was negligible. AFB1 and ZEA adsorptions were not affected by changing pH values in the pH 3-8 range, whereas OTA and FB1 adsorptions were significantly affected by pH. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms obtained at different temperatures (5-70 °C) and pH values (3 and 7) were modeled and evaluated using the Freundlich, Langmuir, Sips, and Hill models. The goodness of the fits and the parameters involved in the adsorption mechanism were calculated by the nonlinear regression analysis method. The best-fitting models to describe AFB1, ZEA, and OTA adsorption by grape pomace were the Sips, Langmuir, and Freundlich models, respectively. The Langmuir and Sips models were the best models for FB1 adsorption at pH 7 and 3, respectively. The theoretical maximum adsorption capacities (mmol/kg dried pomace) calculated at pH 7 and 3 decreased in the following order: AFB1 (15.0 and 15.1) > ZEA (8.6 and 8.3) > OTA (6.3-6.9) > FB1 (2.2 and 0.4). Single- and multi-mycotoxin adsorption isotherms showed that toxin adsorption is not affected by the simultaneous presence of different mycotoxins in the liquid medium. The profiles of adsorption isotherms obtained at different temperatures and pH and the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG°, ΔH°, ΔS°) suggest that mycotoxin adsorption is an exothermic and spontaneous process, which involves physisorption weak associations. Hydrophobic interactions may be associated with AFB1 and ZEA adsorption, whereas polar noncovalent interactions may be associated with OTA and FB1 adsorption. In conclusion, this study

  4. Assemblies of biomaterials in mesoporous media.

    PubMed

    Vinu, Ajayan; Miyahara, Masahiko; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2006-06-01

    Assemblies of biomaterials onto mechanically stable inorganic structure are advantageous for the practical applications because of the potential to improve the stability and performance of biomaterials in the biocatalytic processes. Among many kinds of inorganic materials, mesoporous materials such as mesoporous silica and mesoporous carbon have attracted special attention owing to their well-defined structures and perfectly controlled pore geometries, which would lead to unique functions such as size selective adsorption of biomaterials. In the first part of this review, adsorption behaviors of proteins, enzymes, vitamins, and amino acids in aqueous solutions onto mesoporous media are systematically explained. Pore geometries (pore diameter and volume) of mesoporous materials are the crucial factors for the size selective adsorption of biomaterials, especially proteins, which often have a size comparable to pore dimension. The studies on the adsorption of biomaterials on the mesoporous carbon reveal that hydrophobic interaction between guest molecules and surface of the mesoporous materials is an important parameter which controls the amount of biomaterials adsorption. Enhanced adsorption of biomaterials was commonly observed at their isoelectric point, where electrostatic repulsion is minimized between the biomaterials. In addition, several functions such as biomolecular separation, reactor function, controlled drug release, and photochemical properties are discussed in the latter sections. Studies on assemblies of biomaterials in mesoporous media are still in initial stage, but the development of appropriately designed mesoporous materials would powerfully promote researches in these fascinating unexplored fields.

  5. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  6. Generalized random sequential adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarjus, G.; Schaaf, P.; Talbot, J.

    1990-12-01

    Adsorption of hard spherical particles onto a flat uniform surface is analyzed by using generalized random sequential adsorption (RSA) models. These models are defined by releasing the condition of immobility present in the usual RSA rules to allow for desorption or surface diffusion. Contrary to the simple RSA case, generalized RSA processes are no longer irreversible and the system formed by the adsorbed particles on the surface may reach an equilibrium state. We show by using a distribution function approach that the kinetics of such processes can be described by means of an exact infinite hierarchy of equations reminiscent of the Kirkwood-Salsburg hierarchy for systems at equilibrium. We illustrate the way in which the systems produced by adsorption/desorption and by adsorption/diffusion evolve between the two limits represented by ``simple RSA'' and ``equilibrium'' by considering approximate solutions in terms of truncated density expansions.

  7. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  8. Mixed Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Erin

    2010-01-01

    While institutions do not often have a hook as compelling as an eagerly awaited movie, great content is critical for media relations success--and coupling it with the right distribution channel can ensure the story finds the right audience. Even better, retooling it for several media platforms can extend the life and reach of a story. The changes…

  9. Earned Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunshine, Alice

    2011-01-01

    "Earned media" is exactly what one thinks it is. The people who do the necessary work to earn coverage of their issue or battle are the ones who will get their story out to the public. Earning media coverage involves giving careful attention to the mechanics of reaching out to news outlets. Most people can learn the mechanics through…

  10. A novel experimental setup for simultaneous adsorption and induced deformation measurements in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, L.; Plantier, F.; Grégoire, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental setup is presented allowing the simultaneous measurement of adsorption isotherms and adsorption-induced deformations. It is composed of a manometric technique coupled with a digital image correlation setup for full-field displacement measurements. The manometric part is validated by comparing adsorption isotherms with those obtained by a gravimetric method. The principles and methods of both adsorption isotherm and induced deformation measurements are presented in detail. As a first application of this new apparatus, the coupling between adsorption and induced deformation is characterised for a microporous media (activated carbon) saturated by pure CO2 (318.15 K, [0-60] bars) and pure CH4 (303.15 K, [0-130] bars). For this very homogeneous porous material, the induced deformation is characteristic of a pure volumetric swelling but the full-field setup may allow the characterisation of the localised pattern of deformation for heterogenous or cracked microporous media.

  11. Media Publics and Media Trust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaziano, Cecilie; McGrath, Kristin

    To gain a perspective on the kinds of people who find newspapers and television to be high or low in credibility, a two-phase study combined demographic and other characteristics, media behavior, and attitudes toward the media. The first phase involved a series of focused group discussions, while the second was a national, representative sampling…

  12. Statistical methods for evaluating the attainment of cleanup standards. Volume 3, Reference-based standards for soils and solid media, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    This document is the third volume in a series of volumes sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Statistical Policy Branch, that provide statistical methods for evaluating the attainment of cleanup Standards at Superfund sites. Volume 1 (USEPA 1989a) provides sampling designs and tests for evaluating attainment of risk-based standards for soils and solid media. Volume 2 (USEPA 1992) provides designs and tests for evaluating attainment of risk-based standards for groundwater. The purpose of this third volume is to provide statistical procedures for designing sampling programs and conducting statistical tests to determine whether pollution parameters in remediated soils and solid media at Superfund sites attain site-specific reference-based standards. This.document is written for individuals who may not have extensive training or experience with statistical methods. The intended audience includes EPA regional remedial project managers, Superfund-site potentially responsible parties, state environmental protection agencies, and contractors for these groups.

  13. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Cantor, J

    2000-08-01

    Research on the effects of media violence is not well understood by the general public. Despite this fact, there is an overwhelming consensus in the scientific literature about the unhealthy effects of media violence. Meta-analyses show that media-violence viewing consistently is associated with higher levels of antisocial behavior, ranging from the trivial (imitative violence directed against toys) to the serious (criminal violence), with many consequential outcomes in between (acceptance of violence as a solution to problems, increased feelings of hostility, and the apparent delivery of painful stimulation to another person). Desensitization is another well-documented effect of viewing violence, which is observable in reduced arousal and emotional disturbance while witnessing violence, the reduced tendency to intervene in a fight, and less sympathy for the victims of violence. Although there is evidence that youth who are already violent are more likely to seek out violent entertainment, there is strong evidence that the relationship between violence viewing and antisocial behavior is bidirectional. There is growing evidence that media violence also engenders intense fear in children which often lasts days, months, and even years. The media's potential role in solutions to these problems is only beginning to be explored, in investigations examining the uses and effects of movie ratings, television ratings, and the V-chip, and the effects of media literacy programs and public education efforts. Future research should explore important individual differences in responses to media violence and effective ways to intervene in the negative effects.

  14. Adsorption of star polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.; Joanny, J. F.

    1991-06-01

    The adsorption of star polymers on a flat solid surface is analyzed by means of scalling arguments based on the Daoud-Cotton blob model. For the adsorption of a single star, consisting of f arms comprising each N monomers, we distinguish three regimes determined by the adsorption energy of a monomer at the surface, δ kT. 1) Strong adsorption characterized by the full adsorption of all arms occurs for δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) A “Sombrero” like structure comprising f_ads fully adsorbed arms and f{-}f_ads free arms is obtained for (f/N)^{3/5}> δ > f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. 3) Weakly adsorbed stars retain, essentially, the structure of a free star. This regime occurs for δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. The weakly adsorbed structure may also exist as a metastable state if δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}. Nous étudions l'adsorption de polymères en étoile sur une surface solide en utilisant une approche de lois d'échelles basée sur le modèle de blobs de Daoud et Cotton. Pour une étoile formée de f bras contenant chacun N monomères, nous distinguons trois régimes suivant la valeur de l'énergie d'adsorption d'un monomère sur la surface δ kT. 1) L'adsorption forte caractérisée par une adsorption complète de tous les bras se produit lorsque δ > (f/N)^{3/5}. 2) Une structure en “sombrero” avec f_ads bras adsorbés et f{-}f_ads bras libres est obtenue si f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}δ < (f/N)^{3/5}. 3) Les étoiles faiblement adsorbées gardent une structure très similaire à celle des étoiles libres en solution. Ce régime existe si δ < f^{9/20}/N^{3/5}. La structure correspondant aux étoiles faiblement adsorbées peut aussi exister comme un état métastable si δ > f^{9/5}/N^{3/5}.

  15. Media violence.

    PubMed

    Willis, E; Strasburger, V C

    1998-04-01

    American media are the most violent in the world, and American society is now paying a high price in terms of real life violence. Research has confirmed that mass media violence contributes to aggressive behavior, fear, and desensitization of violence. Television, movies, music videos, computer/video games are pervasive media and represent important influences on children and adolescents. Portraying rewards and punishments and showing the consequences of violence are probably the two most essential contextual factors for viewers as they interpret the meaning of what they are viewing on television. Public health efforts have emphasized public education, media literacy campaign for children and parents, and an increased use of technology to prevent access to certain harmful medial materials.

  16. From Augmentation Media to Meme Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Yuzuru

    Computers as meta media are now evolving from augmentation media vehicles to meme media vehicles. While an augmentation media system provides a seamlessly integrated environment of various tools and documents, meme media system provides further functions to edit and distribute tools and documents. Documents and tools on meme media can easily…

  17. The adsorption of plutonium IV and V on goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Arthur L.; Murray, James W.; Sibley, Thomas H.

    1985-11-01

    The adsorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) on goethite (αFeOOH) from NaNO 3 solution shows distinct differences related to the different hydrolytic character of these two oxidation states. Under similar solution conditions, the adsorption edge of the more strongly hydrolyzable Pu(IV) occurs in the pH range 3 to 5 while that for Pu(V) is at pH 5 to 7. The adsorption edge for Pu(V) shifts with time to lower pH values and this appears to be due to the reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) in the presence of the goethite surface. These results suggest that redox transformations may be an important aspect of Pu adsorption chemistry and the resulting scavenging of Pu from natural waters. Increasing ionic strength (from 0.1 M to 3 M NaCl or NaNO 3 and 0.03 M to 0.3 M Na 2SO 4) did not influence Pu(IV) or Pu(V) adsorption. In the presence of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Pu(V) reduction to Pu(IV) occurred in solution. Pu(IV) adsorption on goethite decreased by 30% in the presence of 240 ppm natural DOC found in Soap Lake, Washington waters. Increasing concentrations of carbonate ligands decreased Pu(IV) and Pu(V) adsorption on goethite, with an alkalinity of 1000 meq/l totally inhibiting adsorption. The Pu-goethite adsorption system provides the data base for developing a thermodynamic model of Pu interaction with an oxide surface and with dissolved ligands, using the MINEQL computer program. From the model calculations we determined equilibrium constants for the adsorption of Pu(IV) hydrolysis species. The model was then applied to Pu adsorption in carbonate media to see how the presence of CO 3-2 could influence the mobility of Pu. The decrease in adsorption appears to be due to formation of a Pu-CO 3 complex. Model calculations were used to predict what the adsorption curves would look like if Pu-CO 3 complexes formed.

  18. Effects of adsorption and confinement on nanoporous electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Bae, Je Hyun; Han, Ji-Hyung; Han, Donghyeop; Chung, Taek Dong

    2013-01-01

    Characteristic molecular dynamics of reactant molecules confined in the space of the nanometer scale augments the frequency of collisions with the electrified surface so that a given faradaic reaction can be enhanced at nanoporous electrodes, the so-called nano-confinement effect. Since this effect is grounded on diffusion inside nanopores, it is predicted that adsorption onto the surface will seriously affect the enhancement by nano-confinement. We experimentally explored the correlation between adsorption and the confinement effect by examining the oxidation of butanol isomers at platinum and gold nanoporous electrodes. The results showed that electrooxidation of 2-butanol, which is a non-adsorption reaction, was enhanced more than that of 1-butanol, which is an adsorption reaction, at nanoporous platinum in acidic media. In contrast, the nanoporous gold electrode, on which 1-butanol is less adsorptive than it is on platinum, enhanced the electrooxidation of 1-butanol greatly. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic activity of nanoporous gold for oxygen reduction reaction was improved so much as to be comparable with that of flat Pt. These findings show that the nano-confinement effect can be appreciable for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction as well as alcohol oxidation unless the adsorption is extensive, and suggests a new strategy in terms of material design for innovative non-noble metal electrocatalysts.

  19. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  20. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  1. A Two-Tiered-Testing Decision Tree for Assays in the USEPA-EDSP Screening Battery: Using 15 years of experience to improve screening and testing for endocrine active chemicals.@@

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1996 the Food Quality Protection and Safe Drinking Water Acts instructed the USEPA to determine “…whether the pesticide chemical may have an effect in humans that is similar to an effect produced by a naturally occurring estrogen or other endocrine effects;"*...

  2. A Two-Tiered-Testing Decision Tree for Assays in the USEPA-EDSP Screening Battery: Using 15 years of experience to improve screening and testing for endocrine active chemicals.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1996 the Food Quality Protection and Safe Drinking Water Acts instructed the USEPA to determine “…whether the pesticide chemical may have an effect in humans that is similar to an effect produced by a naturally occurring estrogen or other endocrine effects;"*...

  3. A set of scientific issues being considered by the Environmental Protection Agency regarding: pesticide exposure modeling and climate change. SAP Minutes No. 2011-01. USEPA FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USEPA Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) reviewed most of its human and ecological exposure assessment models for conventional pesticides to evaluate which inputs and parameters may be affected by changing climate conditions. To illustrate the approach used for considering potential effects of c...

  4. Media Training

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  5. Media Training

    SciTech Connect

    2009-12-11

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  6. Streaming Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulley, John

    2009-01-01

    At a time when the evolutionary pace of new media resembles the real-time mutation of certain microorganisms, the age-old question of how best to connect with constituents can seem impossibly complex--even for an elite institution plugged into the motherboard of Silicon Valley. Identifying the most effective vehicle for reaching a particular…

  7. Media Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.; Pyrillis, Rita; Rosario, Ruben; Stuart, Reginald; Zinngrabe, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    This article presents five vignettes, written by veteran journalists, that focus on the current and future state of journalism. Despite almost daily reports of media consolidation and newspaper layoffs, the journalists sound a cautionary but optimistic tone about the industry. They weigh in on everything from the threats to diversity to the future…

  8. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  9. Diffusion Influenced Adsorption Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toshiaki; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-27

    When the kinetics of adsorption is influenced by the diffusive flow of solutes, the solute concentration at the surface is influenced by the surface coverage of solutes, which is given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation. The diffusion equation with the boundary condition given by the Langmuir-Hinshelwood adsorption equation leads to the nonlinear integro-differential equation for the surface coverage. In this paper, we solved the nonlinear integro-differential equation using the Grünwald-Letnikov formula developed to solve fractional kinetics. Guided by the numerical results, analytical expressions for the upper and lower bounds of the exact numerical results were obtained. The upper and lower bounds were close to the exact numerical results in the diffusion- and reaction-controlled limits, respectively. We examined the validity of the two simple analytical expressions obtained in the diffusion-controlled limit. The results were generalized to include the effect of dispersive diffusion. We also investigated the effect of molecular rearrangement of anisotropic molecules on surface coverage.

  10. [Chronic otitis mediaChronic Otitis Media].

    PubMed

    Kohles, N; Schulz, T; Eßer, D

    2015-11-01

    There are 2 different kinds of chronic otitis media: Otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and otitis media chronica epitympanalis (cholesteatoma). The incidence of chronic otitis media as reported in literature differs in a wide range. The incidence rates vary between 0.45 and 46%. Both, otitis media chronica mesotympanalis and cholesteatoma, lead to eardrum perforation due to lengthy and recurring inflammations. Furthermore, chronic otitis media is characterized by frequently recurring otorrhea and conductive hearing loss.

  11. On Media Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    This monograph analyzes the theory and practice of media education and media literacy. The book also includes the list of Russian media education literature and addresses of websites of the associations for media education.

  12. Eriobotrya japonica seed biocomposite efficiency for copper adsorption: Isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamic and desorption studies.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Mehwish; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Noreen, Saima

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption techniques are widely used to remove pollutants from wastewater; however, composites are gaining more importance due to their excellent adsorption properties. Bentonite composite with Eriobotrya japonica seed was prepared and used for the adsorption of copper (Cu) metal from aqueous media. The process variables such as pH, Cu(II) ions initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were optimized for maximum Cu(II) adsorption. At pH 5, adsorbent dose 0.1 g, contact time 45 min, Cu(II) ions initial concentration 75 mg/L and temperature 45 °C, maximum Cu(II) adsorption was achieved. Desorption studies revealed that biocomposite is recyclable. Langmuir, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura isotherms as well as pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were applied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) suggest that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the adsorption data. Results showed that biocomposite was more efficient for Cu(II) adsorption in comparison to individuals native Eriobotrya japonica seed biomass and Na-bentonite.

  13. Biochar as potential adsorptive media for estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals are an emerging problem in water pollution due to their toxic effects on humans and wildlife. Estrogenic compounds are a subset of endocrine disrupting chemicals that are particularly dangerous since they are very potent and can affect fish at concentrations as low as ...

  14. News Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    and airwaves clogged with commercials. In addition, consolidation allows only a few organizations to exert control over program content, an issue...estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining... control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2005 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE News Media 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  15. Understanding mechanisms of asphaltene adsorption from organic solvent on mica.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Anand; Kuznicki, Natalie; Harbottle, David; Masliyah, Jacob; Zeng, Hongbo; Xu, Zhenghe

    2014-08-12

    The adsorption process of asphaltene onto molecularly smooth mica surfaces from toluene solutions of various concentrations (0.01-1 wt %) was studied using a surface forces apparatus (SFA). Adsorption of asphaltenes onto mica was found to be highly dependent on adsorption time and asphaltene concentration of the solution. The adsorption of asphaltenes led to an attractive bridging force between the mica surfaces in asphaltene solution. The adsorption process was identified as being controlled by the diffusion of asphaltenes from the bulk solution to the mica surface with a diffusion coefficient on the order of 10(-10) m(2)/s at room temperature, depending on the asphaltene bulk concentration. This diffusion coefficient corresponds to a hydrodynamic molecular radius of approximately 0.5 nm, indicating that asphaltene diffuses to mica surfaces as individual molecules at very low concentration (e.g., 0.01 wt %). Atomic force microscopy images of the adsorbed asphaltenes on mica support the results of the SFA force measurements. The results from the SFA force measurements provide valuable insights into the molecular interactions (e.g., steric repulsion and bridging attraction as a function of distance) of asphaltenes in organic media and hence their roles in crude oil and bitumen production.

  16. Media matters.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L M

    1995-01-01

    The impact of the mass media on woman's status was addressed at two 1995 conferences: the Fourth World Conference on Women, held in Beijing, China, and the Congress of the World Association for Christian Communication, held in Puebla, Mexico. The globalization process facilitated by the mass media has served to increase the power of patriarchy, with no advantages to the cause of women's rights. Coverage of popular movements has been suppressed out of deference to male-controlled governments. Coverage of the Beijing Conference highlighted celebrities and personal stories, to the exclusion of the economic and political issues under debate. Television has commodified women, reinforcing their oppression. On the other hand, the alternative media, which tend to be decentralized, democratic, low-cost, and low in technology, are presenting women as subjects rather than objects and deconstructing gender stereotypes. Of concern, however, is the tendency of computer technology to widen the gap between social classes and developed and developing countries. Women must use information networks to disseminate information on women's rights and strengthen the links between women throughout the world.

  17. Media Education Initiatives by Media Organizations: The Uses of Media Literacy in Hong Kong Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Donna; Lee, Alice Y. L.

    2014-01-01

    As more media organizations have engaged in media education, this paper investigates the goals and practices of these activities. This article coins media education initiatives by media organizations with the term "media-organization media literac"y (MOML). Four MOML projects in Hong Kong were selected for examination. Built on critical…

  18. Metal adsorption by agricultural biosorbents: Adsorption isotherm, kinetic and biosorbents chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Sadeek, Sadeek A; Negm, Nabel A; Hefni, Hassan H H; Wahab, Mostafa M Abdel

    2015-11-01

    Biosorption of Cu(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) ions from aqueous solutions by rice husk, palm leaf and water hyacinth was investigated as a function of initial pH, initial heavy metal ions concentration and treatment time. The adsorption process was examined by two adsorption isotherms: Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data of biosorption process were analyzed using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order kinetic models. The equilibrium biosorption isotherms showed that the three studied biosorbents possess high affinity and sorption capacity for Cu(II), Co(II) and Fe(III) ions. Rice husk showed more efficiency than palm leaf and water hyacinth. Adsorption of Cu(II) and Co(II) was more efficient in alkaline medium (pH 9) than neutral medium due to the high solubility of metal ion complexes. The metal removal efficiency of each biosorbent was correlated to its chemical structure. DTA studies showed formation of metal complex between the biosorbents and the metal ions. The obtained results showed that the tested biosorbents are efficient and alternate low-cost biosorbent for removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous media.

  19. Adsorption of zwitterionic surfactant on limestone measured with high-performance liquid chromatography: micelle-vesicle influence.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Alvarez, David Aaron; Zamudio-Rivera, Luis S; Luna-Rojero, Erick E; Rodríguez-Otamendi, Dinora I; Marín-León, Adlaí; Hernández-Altamirano, Raúl; Mena-Cervantes, Violeta Y; Chávez-Miyauchi, Tomás Eduardo

    2014-10-21

    Herein is presented a new methodology to determine the static adsorption of a zwitterionic surfactant on limestone in three different aqueous media [high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) water, seawater, and connate water] with the use of HPLC at room temperature and 70 °C. The results showed that, in both HPLC water and seawater, the surfactant adsorption followed a monolayer Langmuir tendency. In contrast, for connate water, the surfactant presented a new adsorption profile, characterized by two regions: (i) At surfactant concentrations below 1500 mg L(-1), an increase of adsorption is observed as the amount of divalent cations increases in the aqueous media. (ii) At surfactant concentrations above 1500 mg L(-1), the adsorption decreases because the equilibrium, monomer ⇆ micelle ⇆ vesicle, is shifted to the formation of vesicles, giving as a result a decrease in the concentration of monomers, thus reducing the interaction between the surfactant and the rock, and therefore, lower adsorption values were obtained. The behavior of the surfactant adsorption under different concentrations of divalent cations was well-described by the use of a new modified Langmuir model: (dΓ/dt)ads = k(ads)c(Γ∞ - Γ) - k(cmc)(c - c(cmc))(n)ΓH(c - c(cmc)). It was also observed that, as the temperature increases, the adsorption is reduced because of the exothermic nature of the adsorption processes.

  20. Examination of pulverized waste recycled glass as filter media in slow sand filtration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pulverization of waste recycled glass to produce glass sand for slow sand filters. Pulverization experiments were performed using a fail mill pulverizer. The glass sand product from the pulverizer meets the size distribution requirements of ASTM-C-33 without size distribution adjustment. The size distribution must be adjusted to meet the grain size distribution requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media used in slow sand filters. Pulverized glass that meet slow sand filter media specifications is an effective alternative to silica sand as a filter media for slow sand filtration. Three pilot plant slow sand filters with glass sand filter media were compared to a fourth filter containing silica sand filter media. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good or better than the silica sands, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; 99.92% and 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.

  1. Trichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption using sustainable organic mulch.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zongsu; Seo, Youngwoo

    2010-09-15

    Soluble substrates (electron donors) have been commonly injected into chlorinated solvent contaminated plume to stimulate reductive dechlorination. Recently, different types of organic mulches with economic advantages and sustainable benefits have received much attention as new supporting materials that can provide long term sources of electron donors for chlorinated solvent bioremediation in engineered biowall systems. However, sorption capacities of organic mulches for chlorinated solvents have not been studied yet. In this study, the physiochemical properties of organic mulches (pine, hardwood and cypress mulches) were measured and their adsorption capacity as a potential media was elucidated. Single, binary and quaternary isotherm tests were conducted with trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trans-dichloroethylene (trans-DCE) and cis-dichloroethylene (cis-DCE). Among the three tested mulches, pine mulch showed the highest sorption capacity for the majority of the tested chemicals in single isotherm test. In binary or quaternary isotherm tests, competition among chemicals appears to diminish the differences in Q(e) for tested mulches. However, pine mulch also showed higher adsorption capacity for most chemicals when compared to hardwood and cypress mulches in the two isotherm tests. Based upon physicochemical properties of the three mulches, higher sorption capacity of pine mulch over hardwood and cypress mulches appears to be attributed to a higher organic carbon content and the lower polarity.

  2. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  3. Characterization of recycled rubber media for hydrogen sulphide (H2S) control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Park, Jaeyoung; Evans, Eric A; Ellis, Timothy G

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) adsorption capacities on recycled rubber media, tyre-derived rubber particle (TDRP), and other rubber material (ORM) have been evaluated. As part of the research, densities, moisture contents, and surface properties of TDRP and ORM have been determined. The research team findings show that TDRP and ORM are more particulate in nature and not highly porous-like activated carbon. The characteristics of surface area, pore size, and moisture content support chemisorption on the macrosurface rather than physical adsorption in micropores. For example, moisture content is essential for H2S adsorption on ORM, and an increase in moisture content results in an increase in adsorption capacity.

  4. USEPA Resistance Management Model development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA requires registrants of plant incorporated protectant (PIP) crops to provide information relating to the time frame for pest resistance development related to the control traits of the crop. Simulation models are used to evaluate the future conditions for resistance de...

  5. USEPA PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE RETREAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pathogen Equivalency Committee held its retreat from September 20-21, 2005 at Hueston Woods State Park in College Corner, Ohio. This presentation will update the PEC’s membership on emerging pathogens, analytical methods, disinfection techniques, risk analysis, preparat...

  6. USEPA PERSPECTIVE ON CONTROLLING PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA minimizes the risk of infectious diseases from the beneficial use of sludge by requiring its treatment to reduce pathogen levels below the detection limit. How new treatment processes can be shown equivalent to ones specified in 40CFR503 will be discussed together with ways t...

  7. USEPA-USGS Case Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of emerging contaminants (ECs) in the environment is an area of growing concern for the scientific community and the general public. ECs include a broad range of chemicals including personal care products, pharmaceuticles, industrial compounds, pesticides, and hormo...

  8. Measuring News Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksl, Adam; Ashley, Seth; Craft, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    News media literacy refers to the knowledge and motivations needed to identify and engage with journalism. This study measured levels of news media literacy among 500 teenagers using a new scale measure based on Potter's model of media literacy and adapted to news media specifically. The adapted model posits that news media literate individuals…

  9. Geographic Media Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukinbeal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    While the use of media permeates geographic research and pedagogic practice, the underlying literacies that link geography and media remain uncharted. This article argues that geographic media literacy incorporates visual literacy, information technology literacy, information literacy, and media literacy. Geographic media literacy is the ability…

  10. Adolescents and media literacy.

    PubMed

    McCannon, Robert

    2005-06-01

    In the face of media industry consolidation, fewer people control media content which makes it harder for parents and citizens to know the research about media-related issues, such as video game violence, nutrition, and sexual risk-taking. Media literacy offers a popular and potentially successful way to counter the misinformation that is spread by Big Media public relations.

  11. The Mass Media Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  12. Chromium adsorption by lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Lalvani, S.B.; Huebner, A.; Wiltowski, T.S.

    2000-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a known carcinogen, and its maximum contamination level in drinking water is determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Chromium in the wastewaters from plating and metal finishing, tanning, and photographic industries poses environmental problems. A commercially available lignin was used for the removal of hexavalent as well as trivalent chromium from aqueous solution. It is known that hexavalent chromium is present as an anionic species in the solution. It was found that lignin can remove up to 63% hexavalent and 100% trivalent chromium from aqueous solutions. The removal of chromium ions was also investigated using a commercially available activated carbon. This absorbent facilitated very little hexavalent and almost complete trivalent chromium removal. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics data on the metal removal by lignin and activated carbon are presented and discussed.

  13. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  14. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  15. Blocking effect of colloids on arsenate adsorption during co-transport through saturated sand columns.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Guo, Huaming; Lei, Mei; Wan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hanzhi; Feng, Xiaojuan; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun

    2016-06-01

    Transport of environmental pollutants through porous media is influenced by colloids. Co-transport of As(V) and soil colloids at different pH were systematically investigated by monitoring breakthrough curves (BTCs) in saturated sand columns. A solute transport model was applied to characterize transport and retention sites of As(V) in saturated sand in the presence of soil colloids. A colloid transport model and the DLVO theory were used to reveal the mechanism and hypothesis of soil colloid-promoted As(V) transport in the columns. Results showed that rapid transport of soil colloids, regulated by pH and ionic strength, promoted As(V) transport by blocking As(V) adsorption onto sand, although soil colloids had low adsorption for As(V). The promoted transport was more significant at higher concentrations of soil colloids (between 25 mg L(-1) and 150 mg L(-1)) due to greater blocking effect on As(V) adsorption onto the sand surfaces. The blocking effect of colloids was explained by the decreases in both instantaneous (equilibrium) As adsorption and first-order kinetic As adsorption on the sand surface sites. The discovery of this blocking effect improves our understanding of colloid-promoted As transport in saturated porous media, which provides new insights into role of colloids, especially colloids with low As adsorption capacity, in As transport and mobilization in soil-groundwater systems.

  16. Highly enhanced adsorption for decontamination of lead ions from battery wastewaters using chitosan functionalized with xanthate.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Divya; Sankararamakrishnan, Nalini

    2008-12-01

    Decontamination of lead ions from aqueous media has been investigated using cross linked xanthated chitosan (CMC) as an adsorbent. Various physico-chemical parameters such as contact time, amount of adsorbent, concentration of adsorbate were optimized to simulate the best conditions which can be used to decontaminate lead from aqueous media using CMC as an adsorbent. The atomic absorption spectrometric technique was used to determine the distribution of lead. Maximum adsorption was observed at both pH 4 and 5. The adsorption data followed both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Langmuir isotherm gave a saturated capacity of 322.6+/-1.2mg/g at pH 4. From the FTIR spectra analysis, it was concluded that xanthate and amino group participate in the adsorption process. The developed procedure was successfully applied for the removal of lead ions from real battery wastewater samples.

  17. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  18. Galactose adsorption on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatalo, Matti; Puisto, Mikko

    2014-03-01

    In order to understand the valorisation of biomass, it is essential to study the behavior of sugar molecules on catalytic surfaces. We have studied the adsorption of galactose molecules on the Ru(0001) surface using first principles calculations. We present results for the fully relaxed configurations of the molecule at different adsorption sites. We also compare the effect of the inclusion of the van der Waals interactions on both the energetics of the free galactose molecule and the adsorption energy of galactose on Ru(0001). We compare our results, obtained using periodically repeated supercells, to those obtained with cluster calculations.

  19. Adsorption mechanism of BMP-7 on hydroxyapatite (001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hailong; Wu, Tao; Dong, Xiuli; Wang, Qi . E-mail: qiwang@zju.edu.cn; Shen, Jiawei

    2007-09-14

    Many properties and functions of bone-related proteins perform through the interface with the hydroxyapatite. However, the mechanism of difference of proteins adsorbing behaviors caused by the variation of calcium and phosphate ions on hydroxyapatite is still unclear at atomic level. In this work, we investigated the site-selective adhesion and the adsorption mechanism of protein BMP-7 to the hydroxyapatite surfaces in aqueous media during adsorption and desorption processes. Molecular dynamics (MD) and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations combined with trajectory analysis were employed to give insight into the underlying behaviors of BMP-7 binding. The results suggest that the adsorption sites could be divided into two categories: COO{sup -} and NH{sub 2}/NH3+. For COO{sup -}, the adsorption phenomenon is driven by the electrostatic interaction formed between the negative charged carboxylate groups and the Ca1 cations on the hydroxyapatite surface. While for NH{sub 2}/NH3+, the interaction is through the intermolecular H-bonds between the N-containing groups and the phosphate on the hydroxyapatite surface.

  20. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  1. [Water treatment residual as a bioretention media amendment for phosphorus removal].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Jun; Li, Tian; Zhang, Ying

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of phosphorus adsorption of both soil and water treatment residual (WTR) were investigated through batch tests. The removal of phosphorus in runoff by bioretention column was evaluated. Furthermore, the feasibility of taking the WTR as a bioretention amendment was discussed. The results indicated that the phosphorus adsorptive capacity of WTR was significantly higher than that of soil. With a high influent phosphorus concentrations (1.0 mg x L(-1)), the columns with amended media showed a better long-term removal efficiency than the columns with traditional media. The concentrations of TP in effluent from columns with amended media were less than 0.050 mg x L(-1) after 7 months' continuous operation. According to batch test results, it was estimated that the phosphorus adsorptive capacity of amended media, which was mixed with 4% of WTR, was 4 times as high as the traditional media under same conditions. Adsorption and precipitation by amorphous iron and aluminum is the main mechanism for phosphorus removal in amended media. It is recommended that the mixture with 4% - 5% of WTR by mass in media would improve the phosphorus removal of bioretention in engineering practice.

  2. Ceramic media amended with metal oxide for the capture of viruses in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Sobsey, M D

    2009-04-01

    Ceramic materials that can adsorb and/or inactivate viruses in water may find widespread application in low-tech drinking-water treatment technologies in developing countries, where porous ceramic filters and ceramic granular media filters are increasingly promoted for that purpose. We examined the adsorption and subsequent inactivation of bacteriophages MS2 and (phiX-174 on five ceramic media in batch adsorption studies to determine media suitability for use in a ceramic water filter application. The media examined were a kaolinitic ceramic medium and four kaolinitic ceramic media amended with iron or aluminium oxides that had been incorporated into the kaolinitic clays before firing. Batch adsorption tests indicate increased sorption and inactivation of surrogate viruses by media amended with Fe and Al oxide, with FeOOH-amended ceramic inactivating all bacteriophages up to 8 log10. Unmodified ceramic was a poor adsorbent of bacteriophages at less than 1 log10 adsorption-inactivation and high recovery of sorbed phages. These studies suggest that contact with ceramic media, modified with electropositive Fe or Al oxides, can reduce bacteriophages in waters to a greater extent than unmodified ceramic.

  3. Bromide Adsorption by Reference Minerals and Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bromide, Br-, adsorption behavior was investigated on amorphous Al and Fe oxide, montmorillonite, kaolinite, and temperate and tropical soils. Bromide adsorption decreased with increasing solution pH with minimal adsorption occurring above pH 7. Bromide adsorption was higher for amorphous oxides t...

  4. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  5. Accounting for adsorption and desorption in lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Maximilien; Duvail, Magali; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Frenkel, Daan; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-07-01

    We report a Lattice-Boltzmann scheme that accounts for adsorption and desorption in the calculation of mesoscale dynamical properties of tracers in media of arbitrary complexity. Lattice Boltzmann simulations made it possible to solve numerically the coupled Navier-Stokes equations of fluid dynamics and Nernst-Planck equations of electrokinetics in complex, heterogeneous media. With the moment propagation scheme, it became possible to extract the effective diffusion and dispersion coefficients of tracers, or solutes, of any charge, e.g., in porous media. Nevertheless, the dynamical properties of tracers depend on the tracer-surface affinity, which is not purely electrostatic and also includes a species-specific contribution. In order to capture this important feature, we introduce specific adsorption and desorption processes in a lattice Boltzmann scheme through a modified moment propagation algorithm, in which tracers may adsorb and desorb from surfaces through kinetic reaction rates. The method is validated on exact results for pure diffusion and diffusion-advection in Poiseuille flows in a simple geometry. We finally illustrate the importance of taking such processes into account in the time-dependent diffusion coefficient in a more complex porous medium.

  6. Multilayer adsorption on fractal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vajda, Péter; Felinger, Attila

    2014-01-10

    Multilayer adsorption is often observed in liquid chromatography. The most frequently employed model for multilayer adsorption is the BET isotherm equation. In this study we introduce an interpretation of multilayer adsorption measured on liquid chromatographic stationary phases based on the fractal theory. The fractal BET isotherm model was successfully used to determine the apparent fractal dimension of the adsorbent surface. The nonlinear fitting of the fractal BET equation gives us the estimation of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the monolayer saturation capacity of the adsorbent as well. In our experiments, aniline and proline were used as test molecules on reversed phase and normal phase columns, respectively. Our results suggest an apparent fractal dimension 2.88-2.99 in the case of reversed phase adsorbents, in the contrast with a bare silica column with a fractal dimension of 2.54.

  7. Molecular diffusion between walls with adsorption and desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Maximilien; Bénichou, Olivier; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The time dependency of the diffusion coefficient of particles in porous media is an efficient probe of their geometry. The analysis of this quantity, measured, e.g., by nuclear magnetic resonance, can provide rich information pertaining to porosity, pore size distribution, permeability, and surface-to-volume ratio of porous materials. Nevertheless, in numerous if not all practical situations, transport is confined by walls where adsorption and desorption processes may occur. In this article, we derive explicitly the expression of the time-dependent diffusion coefficient between two confining walls in the presence of adsorption and desorption. We show that they strongly modify the time-dependency of the diffusion coefficient, even in this simple geometry. We finally propose several applications, from sorption rates measurements to the use as a reference for numerical implementations for more complex geometries.

  8. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  9. Adsorption hysteresis in nanopores

    PubMed

    Neimark; Ravikovitch; Vishnyakov

    2000-08-01

    Capillary condensation hysteresis in nanopores is studied by Monte Carlo simulations and the nonlocal density functional theory. Comparing the theoretical results with the experimental data on low temperature sorption of nitrogen and argon in cylindrical channels of mesoporous siliceous molecular sieves of MCM-41 type, we have revealed four qualitatively different sorption regimes depending on the temperature and pore size. As the pore size increases at a given temperature, or as the temperature decreases at a given pore size, the following regimes are consequently observed: volume filling without phase separation, reversible stepwise capillary condensation, irreversible capillary condensation with developing hysteresis, and capillary condensation with developed hysteresis. We show that, in the regime of developed hysteresis (pores wider than 5 nm in the case of nitrogen sorption at 77 K), condensation occurs spontaneously at the vaporlike spinodal while desorption takes place at the equilibrium. A quantitative agreement is found between the modeling results and the experimental hysteresis loops formed by the adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results obtained provide a better understanding of the general behavior of confined fluids and the specifics of sorption and phase transitions in nanomaterials.

  10. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  11. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  12. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  13. The Media Teacher's Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarratt, Elaine, Ed.; Davison, Jon, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "The Media Teacher's Handbook" is an indispensible guide for all teachers, both specialist and non-specialist, delivering Media Studies and media education in secondary schools and colleges. It is the first text to draw together the three key elements of secondary sector teaching in relation to media study--the "theoretical",…

  14. How the Media Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Carlos E.

    2005-01-01

    The mass media teach whether or not mediamakers intend to or realize it, and users learn from the media whether or not they try or are even aware of it. This means all of the media, including newspapers, magazines, movies, television, radio, and the new cyberspace media serve as informal yet omnipresent nonschool textbooks. This raises an…

  15. Selecting Media for Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, L. J.

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of instruction on using a formal media selection procedure on the media selection choices made by novice instructional designers. Twenty-nine male and female graduate students enrolled in a media design course at Arizona State University participated in the study. Media design problems were used…

  16. Living within the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Erin

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author shares how media affects her as a teenager. The author says that media has such a relationship with the world today, specifically with teenagers like her. Media gives off so much information that can be valid or invalid, positive or negative. The media can persuade anyone to do something or to think a certain way.…

  17. Media Literacy Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Provides an up-to-date bibliography of resources available for teaching media literacy. Groups resources into the areas of media education methodology, mass media texts, general background, television, film, the news and medium of print, advertising, gender and the media, popular culture, popular music and rock video, periodicals, and…

  18. Why Media Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locatis, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Whether media affect learning has been debated for decades. The discussion of media's effectiveness has raised questions about the usefulness of comparison studies, not only in assessing applications of technology but in other areas as well. Arguments that media do not affect learning are re-examined and issues concerning media effects on expert…

  19. Media Violence and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groebel, Jo

    1998-01-01

    Presents the results of the UNESCO global study on media violence and children which was conducted between 1996 and 1997. Highlights include the role of the media, media heroes as role models, media violence and aggression, differences by gender, rural versus urban environments, the pervasiveness of television, and recommendations. (Author/LRW)

  20. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  1. Social media networking: blogging.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrew; Jackson, Rem; Baum, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Social media networking is not your teenager's social media. It is a powerful tool that will change the way you communicate with your patients. This article will review the impact of social media and how social media can be a valuable tool for your medical practice. This is the first of a three-part article on social media and will discuss the use of blogging for medical practices.

  2. Simulating the Effect of Alternative Climate Change Scenarios on Pollutant Loading Reduction Requirements for Meeting Water Quality Standards Under USEPA's Total Maximum Daily Load Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronewold, A. D.; Alameddine, I.; Anderson, R.; Wolpert, R.; Reckhow, K.

    2008-12-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) total maximum daily load (TMDL) program requires that individual states assess the condition of surface waters and identify those which fail to meet ambient water quality standards. Waters failing to meet those standards must have a TMDL assessment conducted to determine the maximum allowable pollutant load which can enter the water without violating water quality standards. While most of the nearly 30,000 TMDL assessments completed since 1995 use mechanistic or empirical water quality models to forecast water quality conditions under alternative pollutant loading reduction scenarios, few, if any, also simulate water quality conditions under alternative climate change scenarios. As a result, model-based loading reduction requirements (which serve as the cornerstone for implementing water resource management plans, and initiating environmental management infrastructure projects), believed to improve water quality in impaired waters and reinstate their designated use, may misrepresent the actual required reduction when future climate change scenarios are considered. For example, recent research indicates a potential long term future increase in both the number of days between, and the intensity of, individual precipitation events. In coastal terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, such climate conditions could lead to an increased accumulation of pollutants on the landscape between precipitation events, followed by a washoff event with a relatively high pollutant load. On the other hand, anticipated increases in average temperature and evaporation rate might not only reduce effective rainfall rates (resulting in less energy for transporting pollutants from the landscape) but also reduce the tidal exchange ratio in shallow estuaries (many of which are valuable recreational, commercial, and aesthetic natural resources). Here, we develop and apply a comprehensive watershed-scale model for simulating water quality in

  3. Adsorption of oxygen on W/100/ - Adsorption kinetics and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, E.; Poppa, H.; Viswanath, Y.

    1976-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on W(100) single-crystal surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), flash desorption, low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and retarding-field work-function measurements. The AES results reveal stepwise changes in the sticking coefficients in the coverage range 0 to 1 and activated adsorption at higher coverages. Upon room-temperature adsorption, a series of complex LEED patterns is observed. In layers adsorbed at 1050 K and cooled to room temperature, the p(2 x 1) structure is the first ordered structure observed. This structure shows a reversible order-disorder transition between 700 and 1000 K and is characterized by a work function which is lower than that of the clean surface. Heating room-temperature adsorbates changes their structure irreversibly. At temperatures below 750 K, some new structures are observed.

  4. Adsorptive desulfurization by activated alumina.

    PubMed

    Srivastav, Ankur; Srivastava, Vimal Chandra

    2009-10-30

    This study reports usage of commercial grade activated alumina (aluminum oxide) as adsorbent for the removal of sulfur from model oil (dibenthiophene (DBT) dissolved in n-hexane). Bulk density of alumina was found to be 1177.77 kg/m(3). The BET surface area of alumina was found to decrease from 143.6 to 66.4 m(2)/g after the loading of DBT at optimum conditions. The carbon-oxygen functional groups present on the surface of alumina were found to be effective in the adsorption of DBT onto alumina. Optimum adsorbent dose was found to be 20 g/l. The adsorption of DBT on alumina was found to be gradual process, and quasi-equilibrium reached in 24 h. Langmuir isotherm best represented the equilibrium adsorption data. The heat of adsorption and change in entropy for DBT adsorption onto alumina was found to be 19.5 kJ/mol and 139.2 kJ/mol K, respectively.

  5. Reduced protein adsorption by osmolytes.

    PubMed

    Evers, Florian; Steitz, Roland; Tolan, Metin; Czeslik, Claus

    2011-06-07

    Osmolytes are substances that affect osmosis and are used by cells to adapt to environmental stress. Here, we report a neutron reflectivity study on the influence of some osmolytes on protein adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces. Bovine ribonuclease A (RNase) and bovine insulin were used as model proteins adsorbing at a hydrophilic silica and at a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. From the neutron reflectivity data, the adsorbed protein layers were characterized in terms of layer thickness, protein packing density, and adsorbed protein mass in the absence and presence of urea, trehalose, sucrose, and glycerol. All data point to the clear effect of these nonionic cosolvents on the degree of protein adsorption. For example, 1 M sucrose leads to a reduction of the adsorbed amount of RNase by 39% on a silica surface and by 71% on a polystyrene surface. Trehalose was found to exhibit activity similar to that of sucrose. The changes in adsorbed protein mass can be attributed to a decreased packing density of the proteins in the adsorbed layers. Moreover, we investigated insulin adsorption at a hydrophobic surface in the absence and presence of glycerol. The degree of insulin adsorption is decreased by even 80% in the presence of 4 M of glycerol. The results of this study demonstrate that nonionic cosolvents can be used to tune and control nonspecific protein adsorption at aqueous-solid interfaces, which might be relevant for biomedical applications.

  6. A biological oil adsorption filter.

    PubMed

    Pasila, Antti

    2004-12-01

    A new oil adsorption method called adsorption filtration (AF) has been developed. It is a technology where by oil residues can be cleaned from water by running it through a simple filter made from freeze treated, dried, milled and then fragmented plant material. By choosing suitable plants and fragmentation sizes it is possible to produce filters, which pass water but adsorb oil. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of manufacturing oil adsorbing filter materials from reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) or hemp fibre (Cannabis sativa L.). The oil (80 ml) was mixed with de-ionised water (200 ml) and this mixture was filtered through 10 or 20 g adsorption filters. Fine spring harvested hemp fibre (diameter less than 1 mm) and reed canary grass fragments adsorb 2-4 g of oil per gram of adsorption material compared to 1-3 g of water. Adsorption filtration is thus a novel way of gathering spilled oil in shallow coastal waters before the oil reaches the shore.

  7. Metal adsorption on mosses: Toward a universal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Pokrovsky, O S

    2014-02-01

    This study quantifies the adsorption of heavy metals on 4 typical moss species used for environmental monitoring in the moss bag technique. The adsorption of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto Hypnum sp., Sphagnum sp., Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachytecium rutabulum has been investigated using a batch reactor in a wide range of pH (1.3-11.0) and metal concentrations in solution (1.6μM-3.8mM). A Linear Programming Model (LPM) was applied for the experimental data to derive equilibrium constants and the number of surface binding sites. The surface acid-base titration performed for 4 mosses at a pH range of 3-10 in 0.1M NaNO3 demonstrated that Sphagnum sp. is the most efficient adsorbent as it has the maximal number of proton-binding sites on the surface (0.65mmol g(-1)). The pKa computed for all the moss species suggested the presence of 5 major functional groups: phosphodiester, carboxyl, phosphoryl, amine and polyphenols. The results of pH-edge experiments demonstrated that B. rutabulum exhibits the highest percentage of metal adsorption and has the highest number of available sites for most of the metals studied. However, according to the results of the constant pH "Langmuirian" isotherm, Sphagnum sp. can be considered as the strongest adsorbent, although the relative difference from other mosses is within 20%. The LPM was found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data in the full range of the studied solution parameters. The results of this study demonstrate a rather similar pattern of five metal adsorptions on mosses, both as a function of pH and as a metal concentration, which is further corroborated by similar values of adsorption constants. Therefore, despite the species and geographic differences between the mosses, a universal adsorption edge and constant pH adsorption isotherm can be recommended for 4 studied mosses. The quantitative comparison of metal adsorption with other common natural organic and inorganic materials demonstrates

  8. Cytokine adsorption/release on uniform magnetic nanoparticles for localized drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mejías, Raquel; Costo, Rocío; Roca, Alejandro G; Arias, Cristina F; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; González-Carreño, Teresita; del Puerto Morales, María; Serna, Carlos J; Mañes, Santos; Barber, Domingo F

    2008-09-10

    Attachment of cytokines to magnetic nanoparticles has been developed as a system for controlled local drug release in cancer therapy. We studied the adsorption/release of murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) on negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles prepared by three different methods, including coprecipitation, decomposition in organic media, and laser pyrolysis. To facilitate IFN-gamma adsorption, magnetic nanoparticles were surface modified by distinct molecules to achieve high negative charge at pH 7, maintaining small aggregate size and stability in biological media. We analyzed carboxylate-based coatings and studied the colloidal properties of the resulting dispersions. Finally, we incubated the magnetic dispersions with IFN-gamma and determined optimal conditions for protein adsorption onto the particles, as well as the release capacity at different pH and as a function of time. Particles prepared by decomposition in organic media and further modified with dimercaptosuccinic acid showed the most efficient adsorption/release capacity. IFN-gamma adsorbed on these nanoparticles would allow concentration of this protein or other biomolecules at specific sites for treatment of cancer or other diseases.

  9. Pursuing "zero" protein adsorption of poly(carboxybetaine) from undiluted blood serum and plasma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Xue, Hong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jinli; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2009-10-06

    Human blood serum and plasma pose significant challenges to blood-contacting devices and implanted materials because of their high nonspecific adsorption onto surfaces. In this work, we investigated nonspecific protein adsorption from single protein solutions and complex media such as undiluted human blood serum and plasma onto poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (polyCBAA)-grafted surfaces at different temperatures. The polyCBAA grafting was done via atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with varying film thicknesses. The objective is to create a surface that experiences "zero" protein adsorption from complex undiluted human blood serum and plasma. Results show that protein adsorption from undiluted human blood serum, plasma, and aged serum on the polyCBAA-grafted surface is undetectable at both 25 and 37 degrees C by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. This was achieved with a film thickness of approximately 21 nm. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the polyCBAA surfaces after antibody immobilization maintain undetectable protein adsorption from undiluted human blood serum. This is the first time that an effective nonfouling material suitable for applications in complex blood media has been demonstrated.

  10. Mass Media: The Invisible Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glessing, Robert J.; White, William P.

    This anthology for students of media consists of essays and articles grouped under four topics: media forms, media content, media environments, and "the last word." Media forms deals with the nature of these kinds of media: electronic, print, film, music, and comics, graffiti, and clothing. Media content contains articles on the news, advertising,…

  11. Adsorption isotherms of charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Bakhshandeh, Amin; Diehl, Alexandre; Levin, Yan

    2016-10-19

    We present theory and simulations which allow us to quantitatively calculate the amount of surface adsorption excess of charged nanoparticles onto a charged surface. The theory is very accurate for weakly charged nanoparticles and can be used at physiological concentrations of salt. We have also developed an efficient simulation algorithm which can be used for dilute suspensions of nanoparticles of any charge, even at very large salt concentrations. With the help of the new simulation method, we are able to efficiently calculate the adsorption isotherms of highly charged nanoparticles in suspensions containing multivalent ions, for which there are no accurate theoretical methods available.

  12. Thermodynamic features of dioxins' adsorption.

    PubMed

    Prisciandaro, Marina; Piemonte, Vincenzo; di Celso, Giuseppe Mazziotti; Ronconi, Silvia; Capocelli, Mauro

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, the six more poisonous species among all congeners of dioxin group are taken into account, and the P-T diagram for each of them is developed. Starting from the knowledge of vapour tensions and thermodynamic parameters, the theoretical adsorption isotherms are calculated according to the Langmuir's model. In particular, the Langmuir isotherm parameters (K and wmax) have been validated through the estimation of the adsorption heat (ΔHads), which varies in the range 20-24kJ/mol, in agreement with literature values. This result will allow to put the thermodynamical basis for a rational design of different process units devoted to dioxins removal.

  13. Counterion release and electrostatic adsorption

    PubMed

    Sens; Joanny

    2000-05-22

    The effective charge of a rigid polyelectrolyte (PE) approaching an oppositely charged surface is studied. The cases of a weak (annealed) and strongly charged PE with condensed counterions (such as DNA) are discussed. In the most interesting case of the adsorption onto a substrate of low dielectric constant (such as a lipid membrane or a mica sheet) the condensed counterions are not always released as the PE approaches the substrate, because of the major importance of the image-charge effect. For the adsorption onto a surface with freely moving charges, the image-charge effect becomes less important and full release is often expected.

  14. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  15. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  16. Using Social Media to Teach Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheingold, Howard

    2008-01-01

    By showing students how to use Web-based channels to inform publics, advocate positions, contest claims, and organize action around issues they care about, participatory media education can influence civic behavior positively throughout their lives. Participatory media literacy is necessarily a hands-on enterprise, requiring active use of digital…

  17. The effect of elastomer chain flexibility on protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vyner, Moira C; Liu, Lina; Sheardown, Heather D; Amsden, Brian G

    2013-12-01

    Cells are known to respond differently when grown on materials of varying stiffness. However, the mechanism by which a cell senses substrate stiffness is unknown. Lower crosslink density elastomers formed from acrylated star-poly(d,l lactide-co-ϵ-caprolactone) have previously been shown to support higher smooth muscle cell proliferation in in vitro culture. This difference in growth was hypothesized to be due to differences in protein adsorption that resulted from differences in polymer chain mobility at the surface. Therefore, layer mass and viscoelastic properties were measured for HSA, IgG, fibronectin, vitronectin, and serum supplemented media adsorbed to elastomers of two crosslink densities. Significantly more fibronectin adsorbed to the lower crosslink density surface while significantly more IgG adsorbed to the higher crosslink density surface. Furthermore, differences in fibronectin and IgG layer shear moduli were observed, suggesting that there was a difference in the conformation of the adsorbed protein. ATR-FTIR analysis showed that the lower crosslink density elastomer absorbed more surface water. The increased amount of water may cause greater entropic gains upon protein adsorption to the lower crosslink density surface, which increases total protein adsorption from serum and may cause differences in protein conformation and thus cell behavior.

  18. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  19. Media, Metaphors, and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, William V.

    1988-01-01

    Explores how students are influenced by media technology, specifically television and computers. Notes that media are not just a vehicle of information, but are primarily models of how to see, think, read, write, and reason. (MM)

  20. Pacific Southwest Media Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    News media, state and local officials, and others can find press releases, media events and contacts in EPA's Pacific Southwest. Additional resources include newsletters, annual reports, and library services that support regional activities.

  1. Catholic Media and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes, Stephen A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the impact of media on youth and suggests some possible directions for the Catholic media, especially in the areas of textbooks, magazines, television, movies, and radio, in responding to the needs of youth. (Author/FM)

  2. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  3. Adsorption of pesticides on resins.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulos, Grigorios; Hourdakis, Adamadia; Doulia, Danae

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the capability of organic hydrophobic polymeric resins Amberlite XAD-4 and XAD-7 to remove the pesticides alachlor and amitrole from water. The pesticides adsorption on the two different adsorbents was measured by batch equilibrium technique and isotherm types and parameters were estimated. Two theoretical models were applied based on a Freundlich and a Langmuir isotherms. The effect of pesticides chemical composition and structure as well as the nature of solid surface on the efficiency of adsorption was evaluated. The influence of pH also was studied. In low pH solutions adsorption of amitrole was higher upon the nonionic aliphatic acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 in comparison to the nonionic, crosslinked macroreticular copolymer of styrene divinylbenzene XAD-4. In neutral and intermediate pH solutions the polar acrylic ester copolymer XAD-7 was more effective to the retention of alachlor. The acrylic ester copolymer showed at pH 3 the lower effectiveness in alachlor removal from water. The data of the adsorption isotherms of pesticides upon the examined polymeric resins seemed to conform to both the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherm models.

  4. Trends in media use.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Donald F; Foehr, Ulla G

    2008-01-01

    American youth are awash in media. They have television sets in their bedrooms, personal computers in their family rooms, and digital music players and cell phones in their backpacks. They spend more time with media than any single activity other than sleeping, with the average American eight- to eighteen-year-old reporting more than six hours of daily media use. The growing phenomenon of "media multitasking"--using several media concurrently--multiplies that figure to eight and a half hours of media exposure daily. Donald Roberts and Ulla Foehr examine how both media use and media exposure vary with demographic factors such as age, race and ethnicity, and household socioeconomic status, and with psychosocial variables such as academic performance and personal adjustment. They note that media exposure begins early, increases until children begin school, drops off briefly, then climbs again to peak at almost eight hours daily among eleven- and twelve-year-olds. Television and video exposure is particularly high among African American youth. Media exposure is negatively related to indicators of socioeconomic status, but that relationship may be diminishing. Media exposure is positively related to risk-taking behaviors and is negatively related to personal adjustment and school performance. Roberts and Foehr also review evidence pointing to the existence of a digital divide--variations in access to personal computers and allied technologies by socioeconomic status and by race and ethnicity. The authors also examine how the recent emergence of digital media such as personal computers, video game consoles, and portable music players, as well as the media multitasking phenomenon they facilitate, has increased young people's exposure to media messages while leaving media use time largely unchanged. Newer media, they point out, are not displacing older media but are being used in concert with them. The authors note which young people are more or less likely to use several

  5. Mass Media: A Casebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Richard F., Ed.

    Recognizing that mass media--now at a stage of viewing critically its effects and responsibilities--and society at large are interdependent, this casebook reviews the many facets of the media and mass communication as they relate to both producers and consumers of messages. The 23 chapters include discussions of the media's responsibility toward…

  6. Media Education: Sociology Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    In Russia as well as in foreign countries we can witness sort of the confusion of the terms of "media education" and "media literacy". There are quite a few differences in theoretical approaches to media education, to distinguishing of the most important aims, objectives, means of introduction into the teaching process, etc.…

  7. Children's Media Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Amy B.

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems…

  8. Media, Minds, and Masses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggot, James; Vino, Faith

    This booklet describes the language arts course "Media, Minds, and Masses," written for the Dade County, Fla., public schools. Topics for the course include the workings of contemporary radio, television, newspapers, magazines, and movies; the present status and power of media; the history and development of media; and the influences of…

  9. Sizing Up Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jerold

    2010-01-01

    Most people are aware of the increasing importance of social media to institutional advancement, and many colleges and universities have started investing resources in these media. The next step is to measure the impact of social media on the institution and evaluate the success of one's efforts. Every advancement leader should understand how…

  10. Modern Media Education Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The author supposed that media education models can be divided into the following groups: (1) educational-information models (the study of the theory, history, language of media culture, etc.), based on the cultural, aesthetic, semiotic, socio-cultural theories of media education; (2) educational-ethical models (the study of moral, religions,…

  11. Media in the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klaver, Franca

    This 2-part report summarizes Dutch policy on mass media and reviews the status of cable television in the Netherlands. The first part defines the underlying principles of a national policy on mass media in relation to the press, commercial and educational television broadcasting, radio, cable television, and media research. Parliamentary debate…

  12. Youth Media and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauge, Chelsey

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses how capacity is conceived of and understood in youth media/civic education programming, and how beliefs about agency, development, relationality and youth manifests in the discourses, programmes, and practices of organizations operating youth media programmes. Through attention to a youth media and development programme in…

  13. Administering Instructional Media Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Carlton W. H.

    This book presents a wide discussion of the educational and administrative tasks of the instructional media program director. It includes guidelines, principles, case studies, and examples of advanced media use, with emphasis on audiovisual media, the area in which innovation has occurred most. Strong leadership, technological competence, and good…

  14. Adolescents and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburgber, Victor C., Ed.; Comstock, George A., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    In the 1990s, the media represent the single most easily modifiable influence on children and adolescents. This series of articles offers medically oriented practitioners a review of current research on the influence of the media on children and adolescents. The 13 articles are: (1) "Children, Adolescents, and the Media: Five Crucial…

  15. The Media Workshop Hybrid in Media Education Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Jeffrey M.

    The media workshop and the media laboratory can fit meaningfully into the reforms of mass communication education, but there are distinct differences in their roles. The media workshop is a place where students can serve on-campus apprenticeships with a traditional media organization. The media laboratory is a futuristic media facility that…

  16. Modification of cellulose films by adsorption of CMC and chitosan for controlled attachment of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Orelma, Hannes; Filpponen, Ilari; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Laine, Janne; Rojas, Orlando J

    2011-12-12

    The adsorption of human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on cellulose supports were investigated. The dynamics and extent of related adsorption processes were monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Amine groups were installed on the cellulose substrate by adsorption of chitosan from aqueous solution, which allowed for hIgG to physisorb from acid media and produced a functionalized substrate with high surface density (10 mg/m(2)). hIgG adsorption from neutral and alkaline conditions was found to yield lower adsorbed amounts. The installation of the carboxyl groups on cellulose substrate via carboxymethylated cellulose (CMC) adsorption from aqueous solution enhanced the physisorption of hIgG at acidic (adsorbed amount of 5.6 mg/m(2)) and neutral conditions. hIgG adsorption from alkaline conditions reduced the surface density. BSA was used to examine protein attachment on cellulose after modification with chitosan or carboxymethyl cellulose. At the isoelectric point of BSA (pI 5), both of the surface modifications enhanced the adsorption of this protein when compared to that on unmodified cellulose (a 2-fold increase from 1.7 to 3.5 mg/m(2)). At pH 4, the electrostatic interactions favored the adsorption of BSA on the CMC-modified cellulose, revealing the affinity of the system and the possibility of tailoring biomolecule binding by choice of the surface modifier and pH of the medium.

  17. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC.

  18. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  19. Adsorption modeling for macroscopic contaminant dispersal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Axley, J.W.

    1990-05-01

    Two families of macroscopic adsorption models are formulated, based on fundamental principles of adsorption science and technology, that may be used for macroscopic (such as whole-building) contaminant dispersal analysis. The first family of adsorption models - the Equilibrium Adsorption (EA) Models - are based upon the simple requirement of equilibrium between adsorbent and room air. The second family - the Boundary Layer Diffusion Controlled Adsorption (BLDC) Models - add to the equilibrium requirement a boundary layer model for diffusion of the adsorbate from the room air to the adsorbent surface. Two members of each of these families are explicitly discussed, one based on the linear adsorption isotherm model and the other on the Langmuir model. The linear variants of each family are applied to model the adsorption dynamics of formaldehyde in gypsum wall board and compared to measured data.

  20. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  1. Adsorption of molecular gases on porous materials in the SAFT-VR approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M.; Martinez, R.; Martinez, A.; Rosu, H. C.

    2010-08-01

    A simple molecular thermodynamic approach is applied to the study of the adsorption of gases of chain molecules on solid surfaces. We use a model based on the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory for Variable Range (SAFT-VR) potentials [A. Gil-Villegas, A. Galindo, P.J. Whitehead, S.J. Mills, G. Jackson, A.N. Burgess, J. Chem. Phys. 106 (1997) 4168] that we extend by including quasi-two-dimensional approximation to describe the adsorption properties of these types of real gas [A. Martínez, M. Castro, C. McCabe, A. Gil-Villegas, J. Chem. Phys. 126 (2007) 074707]. The model is applied to ethane, ethylene, propane, and carbon dioxide adsorbed on activated carbon and silica gel, which are porous media of significant industrial interest. We show that the adsorption isotherms obtained by means of the present SAFT-VR modeling are in fair agreement with the experimental results provided in the literature.

  2. Investigation of Microgranular Adsorptive Filtration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhenxiao

    Over the past few decades, enormous advances have been made in the application of low-pressure membrane filtration to both drinking water and wastewater treatment. Nevertheless, the full potential of this technology has not been reached, due primarily to limitations imposed by membrane fouling. In drinking water treatment, much of the fouling is caused by soluble and particulate natural organic matter (NOM). Efforts to overcome the problem have focused on removal of NOM from the feed solution, usually by addition of conventional coagulants like alum and ferric chloride (FeCl3) or adsorbents like powdered activated carbon (PAC). While coagulants and adsorbents can remove a portion of the NOM, their performance with respect to fouling control has been inconsistent, often reducing fouling but sometimes having no effect or even exacerbating fouling. This research investigated microgranular adsorptive filtration (muGAF), a process that combines three existing technologies---granular media filtration, packed bed adsorption, and membrane filtration---in a novel way to reduce membrane fouling while simultaneously removing NOM from water. In this technology, a thin layer of micron-sized adsorbent particles is deposited on the membrane prior to delivering the feed to the system. The research reported here represents the first systematic study of muGAF, and the results demonstrate the promising potential of this process. A new, aluminum-oxide-based adsorbent---heated aluminum oxide particles (HAOPs)---was synthesized and shown to be very effective for NOM removal as well as fouling reduction in muGAF systems. muGAF has also been demonstrated to work well with powdered activated carbon (PAC) as the adsorbent, but not as well as when HAOPs are used; the process has also been successful when used with several different membrane types and configurations. Experiments using a wide range of operational parameters and several analytical tools lead to the conclusion that the fouling

  3. Selective removal of phosphate from wastewater using hydrated metal oxides dispersed within anionic exchange media.

    PubMed

    Acelas, Nancy Y; Martin, Benjamin D; López, Diana; Jefferson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Hydrated ferric oxide (HFeO), hydrated zirconium oxide (HZrO) and hydrated copper oxide (HCuO) were immobilized within a microporous anion exchange resin (IRA-400), forming hybrid media for enhanced phosphate removal from aqueous systems. Empirical data from batch kinetic trials fitted the pseudo second order mechanism for chemical adsorption and each media was rate limited by intraparticle diffusion overall. These models were also used to predict the adsorption rate constants and the equilibrium adsorption capacities, which ranged from 26.51 to 30.44 mgP g(-1), and from 24.15 to 27.90 mgP g(-1) of media for the calculated and experimental capacities, respectively. The phosphate adsorption behavior by the hybrid materials fit both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms (R(2)>0.94), and the maximum adsorption capacities were 111.1 mgP g(-1) for HFeO, 91.74 mgP g(-1) for HZrO and 74.07 mgP g(-1) for HCuO. The effect of competing ions such as sulfate reduced these capacities to 18.52 mgP g(-1) for HFeO and 18.97 mgP g(-1) for HZrO. Despite this decrease, HFeO was capable of reducing the phosphate in a real wastewater matrix by 83%, and the HZrO media was able to reduce it by 86%, suggesting that such hybrid media have the potential for application at full scale.

  4. Studies on Vapor Adsorption Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamsundar, N.; Ramotowski, M.

    1998-01-01

    The project consisted of performing experiments on single and dual bed vapor adsorption systems, thermodynamic cycle optimization, and thermal modeling. The work was described in a technical paper that appeared in conference proceedings and a Master's thesis, which were previously submitted to NASA. The present report describes some additional thermal modeling work done subsequently, and includes listings of computer codes developed during the project. Recommendations for future work are provided.

  5. Phenol Removal from Aqueous Environment by Adsorption onto Pomegranate Peel Carbon

    PubMed Central

    Afsharnia, Mojtaba; Saeidi, Mahdi; Zarei, Amin; Narooie, Mohammad Reza; Biglari, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Phenol and its derivatives are the most common poisonous compounds which are stable in aqueous media and lead to many health issues. In this study, application of the carbon resulted from pomegranate peel is investigated in removal of phenol by adsorption method. Methods to perform this cross-sectional study, first, samples of phenol with concentrations of 10 to 100 mg/L were prepared for six months in 2016. Then, the impacts of parameters such as pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and initial concentration of phenol in adsorption process were investigated independently in Gonabad Chemistry Lab using a spectrophotometer at 505 nm as the wavelength. Furthermore, adherence of the samples to the isotherm models of Langmuir and Freundlich was determined by Excel 2016 and descriptive statistical methods were then reported. Results The obtained results demonstrated a maximum adsorption capacity (ash) of 148.38 mgg-1 at pH 7, initial concentration of 100 mg L−1, and temperature of 23 ± 2 °C. The phenol removal rate was found to correlate directly to the adsorbent dosage and contact time, and inversely to the initial concentration of phenol. In addition, the investigations showed that the adsorption of phenol on the pomegranate peel ash follows the Freundlich model well with a correlation coefficient of R2 0.9056. Conclusion Pomegranate peel ash could be used as an efficient and low-cost adsorbent for phenol removal from aqueous media. PMID:28070259

  6. Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, A. L.; Rojas, S.; Dias-Droguett, D. E.; Bhuyan, H.; Aomoa, N.; Kakati, M.

    2013-03-01

    We have studied hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanoparticles using a quartz crystal microbalance. The carbon nanoparticles were synthesized from a thermal plasma jet at different pressure (15 - 263 torr) of the reactants and different current (50 - 250 A) to generate the plasma. The as-prepared carbon nanoparticles were directly deposited on top of the gold electrode of a quartz crystal and we monitored in-situ the changes in resonance frequency while the chamber was pressurized at different hydrogen pressures. These changes enabled determination of absorbed hydrogen mass in order to get H/C mass ratio curves as a function of H2 pressure. Adsorption curves obtained in some carbon nanoparticles indicated the formation of hydrogen monolayer inside the pores of the carbon nanoparticles. Using the value of the jump due to the formation of a H2\\ monolayer, a surface area was estimated between 40-60 m2/g for hydrogen adsorption. In other carbon samples, hydrogen uptake curves indicated that H2 was filling the sample's pores when pore volume was large. These observations will be discussed in detail for several carbon nanoparticles samples. Funds provided by VRI Puente 9/2012 and 10/2012

  7. Neptunium(V) Adsorption to Bacteria at Low and High Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, D.; Swanson, J. S.; Reed, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO2+ aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, interacts weakly with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface containment. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO2+) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacteria/Np mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria used were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. The observed adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities and differences in the characteristics of the moieties between the cell walls of common gram-negative soil and halophilic bacteria. Moreover, differences in adsorption behavior may also reflect ionic

  8. Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A; Swanson, Juliet S; Reed, Donald T; Fein, Jeremy B

    2010-12-08

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO{sub 2}{sup +} aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than

  9. Adsorption of Gemini surfactants onto clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Salako, O; Lo, C; Couzis, A; Somasundaran, P; Lee, J W

    2013-12-15

    This work addresses the adsorption of two Gemini surfactants at the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate-water interface. The Gemini surfactants investigated here are Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 that have two anionic head groups and one hydrophobic tail group. The adsorption of these surfactants was quantified using adsorption isotherms and the adsorption isotherms were determined using liquid-liquid titrations. Even if the Gemini surfactant adsorption isotherms show multi-layer adsorption, they possess the first Langmuir layer with the second adsorption layer only evident in the 2A1 adsorption isotherm. Zeta potentials of CP hydrate particles in the surfactant solution of various concentrations of Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were measured to further explain their adsorption behavior at the CP hydrate-water interface. Zeta potentials of alumina particles as a model particle system in different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were also measured to confirm the configuration of all the surfactants at the interface. The determination of the isotherms and zeta-potentials provides an understanding framework for the adsorption behavior of the two Gemini surfactants at the hydrate-water interface.

  10. Cu2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ adsorption from aqueous solutions by pyrite and synthetic iron sulphide.

    PubMed

    Ozverdi, Arzu; Erdem, Mehmet

    2006-09-01

    In this study, removal of Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto pyrite and synthetic iron sulphide (SIS) was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial metal concentration and temperature. It has been determined that the adsorption of metal ions onto both adsorbents is pH dependent and the adsorption capacities increase with the increasing temperature. The mechanisms governing the metal removal processes were determined as chemical precipitation at low pH (<3) due to H(2)S generation and adsorption at high pH (in the range of 3-6). The metal adsorption yields also increased with the increasing adsorbent dosage and contact time and reached to equilibrium for both adsorbents. The Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) adsorption capacities of both adsorbents decrease in the order of Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Cd(2+). Except for cadmium, little fraction of copper and lead in the solid adsorption residues was desorbed in acidic media.

  11. Pervasive media violence.

    PubMed

    Schooler, C; Flora, J A

    1996-01-01

    In this review, we focus our discussion on studies examining effects on children and young adults. We believe that the current epidemic of youth violence in the United States justifies a focus on this vulnerable segment of society. We consider media effects on individual children's behaviors, such as imitating aggressive acts. In addition, we examine how the media influence young people's perceptions of norms regarding interpersonal relationships. Next, we assess mass media effects on societal beliefs, or what children and adolescents think the "real world" is like. We suggest these media influences are cumulative and mutually reinforcing, and discuss the implications of repeated exposure to prominent and prevalent violent media messages. Finally, we catalog multiple intervention possibilities ranging from education to regulation. From a public health perspective, therefore, we evaluate the effects that pervasive media messages depicting violence have on young people and present multiple strategies to promote more healthful outcomes.

  12. Division Level Social Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-12

    operating budget. The social media manager or group is responsible for posting pictures, stories, and links to social media pages. Every divisional unit...09-026– Responsible and Effective Use of Internet-based Capabilities; 5. Army’s Slide Share– Social Media Round Up. The U.S. Army Public Affairs...Officer is responsible for safeguarding information and government organizations and those who work for it. It is the first enclosure of the Social

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: ADI INTERNATIONAL INC. ADI PILOT TEST UNIT NO. 2002-09 WITH MEDIA G2®; PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the ADI International Inc. Unit No. 2002-09 with MEDIA G2® arsenic adsorption media filter system was conducted at the Hilltown Township Water and Sewer Authority (HTWSA) Well Station No. 1 in Sellersville, Pennsylvania from October 8, 2003 through May 28,...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: PHASE 1-ADI PILOT TEST UNIT NO. 2002-09 WITH MEDIA G2®

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrity verification testing of the ADI International Inc. Pilot Test Unit No. 2002-09 with MEDIA G2® arsenic adsorption media filter system was conducted at the Hilltown Township Water and Sewer Authority (HTWSA) Well Station No. 1 in Sellersville, Pennsylvania from October 8...

  15. Media multitasking in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Cain, Matthew S; Leonard, Julia A; Gabrieli, John D E; Finn, Amy S

    2016-12-01

    Media use has been on the rise in adolescents overall, and in particular, the amount of media multitasking-multiple media consumed simultaneously, such as having a text message conversation while watching TV-has been increasing. In adults, heavy media multitasking has been linked with poorer performance on a number of laboratory measures of cognition, but no relationship has yet been established between media-multitasking behavior and real-world outcomes. Examining individual differences across a group of adolescents, we found that more frequent media multitasking in daily life was associated with poorer performance on statewide standardized achievement tests of math and English in the classroom, poorer performance on behavioral measures of executive function (working memory capacity) in the laboratory, and traits of greater impulsivity and lesser growth mindset. Greater media multitasking had a relatively circumscribed set of associations, and was not related to behavioral measures of cognitive processing speed, implicit learning, or manual dexterity, or to traits of grit and conscientiousness. Thus, individual differences in adolescent media multitasking were related to specific differences in executive function and in performance on real-world academic achievement measures: More media multitasking was associated with poorer executive function ability, worse academic achievement, and a reduced growth mindset.

  16. Media Monopoly in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Roberto; Guimaraes, Cesar

    1994-01-01

    Documents the process of broadcasting media development in Brazil, the failure of new technologies to produce democratization, and the barriers to democratization erected by monopolization and "metastasis." (SR)

  17. Overview: new media.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Gwenn Schurgin

    2012-06-01

    Pediatricians care for children's growth and development from the time they are born until they become adults. In addition, pediatricians must be vigilant for external influences. Technology influences children of all ages. Seventy-five percent of teenagers own cell phones, with 25% using them for social media. Technology can lead to an increase in skills and social benefits but there is also the potential for harm such as sexting, cyberbullying, privacy issues, and Internet addiction, all of which can affect health. Pediatricians must become well versed in the new media to provide media-oriented anticipatory guidance and advice on media-related issues.

  18. DNA stickers promote polymer adsorption onto cellulose.

    PubMed

    Sato, Teruaki; Ali, Md Monsur; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2012-10-08

    Adsorption of oligonucleotides onto model cellulose surfaces was investigated by comparing the Boese and Breaker's cellulose binding oligonucleotide (CBO) with a nonspecific oligonucleotide control (NSO). Measurements using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique confirmed that CBO adsorbed onto cellulose more than NSO, particularly at high ionic strengths (100 mM CaCl(2)). CBO showed a higher maximum adsorption on nanofibrillated and nanocrystalline cellulose than on regenerated cellulose, indicating a preference for the native cellulose I crystal structure under conditions that favored specific adsorption over calcium-mediated electrostatically driven adsorption. In addition, an anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM) with grafted CBO also adsorbed onto the surface of cellulose in CaCl(2), whereas the unmodified A-PAM did not. This work shows that CBO performs as a "sticker", facilitating the adsorption of polyacrylamide onto cellulose, even under high ionic strength conditions where the adsorption of conventional polyelectrolytes is inhibited.

  19. Adsorption of goethite onto quartz and kaolinite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Weiner, Eugene R.; Boymel, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of colloidal goethite onto quartz and kaolinite substrates has been studied as a function of pH and NaCl concentration. Goethite adsorption was measured quantitatively by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that adsorption onto both substrates is due primarily to coulombic forces; however, the pH dependence of adsorption is very different for the two substrates. This is explained by the fact that the surface charge on quartz is entirely pH-dependent, while kaolinite has surface faces which carry a permanent negative charge. Adsorption of goethite on to kaolinite increases markedly with increasing NaCl concentration, while adsorption onto quartz is relatively independent of NaCl concentration. This can be explained by the influence of NaCl concentration upon the development of surface charge on the substrates. A method is described for separating surface-bound goethite from free goethite.

  20. ENHANCING THE STABILITY OF POROUS CATALYSTS WITH SUPERCRITICAL REACTION MEDIA. (R826034)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorption/desorption and pore-transport are key parameters influencing the activity and product selectivity in porous catalysts. With conventional reaction media (gas or liquid phase), one of these parameters is generally favorable while the other is not. For instance, while ...

  1. A KINETIC MODEL FOR CELL DENSITY DEPENDENT BACTERIAL TRANSPORT IN POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A kinetic transport model with the ability to account for variations in cell density of the aqueous and solid phases was developed for bacteria in porous media. Sorption kinetics in the advective-dispersive-sorptive equation was described by assuming that adsorption was proportio...

  2. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  3. Adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported on: adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks; theoretical investigation of adsorption; estimation of adsorption parameters from transient experiments; transient adsorption experiment -- salinity and noncondensible gas effects; the physics of injection of water into, transport and storage of fluids within, and production of vapor from geothermal reservoirs; injection optimization at the Geysers Geothermal Field; a model to test multiwell data interpretation for heterogeneous reservoirs; earth tide effects on downhole pressure measurements; and a finite-difference model for free surface gravity drainage well test analysis.

  4. Adsorption of acid dye onto organobentonite.

    PubMed

    Baskaralingam, P; Pulikesi, M; Elango, D; Ramamurthi, V; Sivanesan, S

    2006-02-06

    Removal of Acid Red 151 from aqueous solution at different dye concentrations, adsorbent doses and pH has been studied. The bentonite clay has been modified using cationic surfactants, which has been confirmed using XRD and FT-IR analyses. Experimental result has shown that the acidic pH favours the adsorption. The adsorption isotherms are described by means of Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The adsorption capacity has been found to be 357.14 and 416.66 mg g(-1) for the cetyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride-bentonite (CDBA-bent) and cetylpyridinium chloride-bentonite (CP-bent), respectively. Kinetic studies show that the adsorption followed second-order kinetics.

  5. Ozone adsorption on carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassard, Guillaume; Gosselin, Sylvie; Visez, Nicolas; Petitprez, Denis

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous particles produced by incomplete combustion or thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. On these particles are adsorbed hundreds of chemical species. Those of great concern to health are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). During atmospheric transport, particulate PAHs react with gaseous oxidants. The induced chemical transformations may change toxicity and hygroscopicity of these potentially inhalable particles. The interaction between ozone and carbon particles has been extensively investigated in literature. However ozone adsorption and surface reaction mechanisms are still ambiguous. Some studies described a fast catalytic decomposition of ozone initiated by an atomic oxygen chemisorption followed by a molecular oxygen release [1-3]. Others suggested a reversible ozone adsorption according to Langmuir-type behaviour [4,5]. The aim of this present study is a better understanding of ozone interaction with carbon surfaces. An aerosol of carbon nanoparticles was generated by flowing synthetic air in a glass tube containing pure carbon (primary particles < 50 nm), under magnetic stirring. The aerosol was then mixed with ozone in an aerosol flow tube. Ozone uptake experiments were performed with different particles concentrations with a fixed ozone concentration. The influence of several factors on kinetics was examined: initial ozone concentration, particle size (50 nm ≤ Dp ≤ 200 nm) and competitive adsorption (with probe molecule and water). The effect of initial ozone concentration was first studied. Accordingly to literature, it has been observed that the number of gas-phase ozone molecules lost per unit particle surface area tends towards a plateau for high ozone concentration suggesting a reversible ozone adsorption according to a Langmuir mechanism. We calculated the initial reaction probability between O3 and carbon particles.An initial uptake coefficient of 1.10-4 was obtained. Similar experiments were

  6. Media Education and Native Peoples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Sandy

    1991-01-01

    Media literacy encourages critical thinking about the news media, advertising, and popular culture. Media education of American Indian students challenges mass media's stereotyped aboriginal representations and the mainstream values of egotism and consumerism. Integrated across the curriculum at all grades, media education is empowering and…

  7. Anion adsorption induced surface reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    2005-11-01

    Surface stress plays an important role in the behavior of solid surfaces. Potential-controlled anion adsorption in electrolytes alters the surface stress of the electrode and results in morphology changes to the surfaces. With a combination of potential-induced surface stress measurement and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), it is demonstrated that anion adsorption induces changes in structure of thin films and modifies the growth morphology and stress evolution in epitaxially grown films. Surface structural transitions in the heteroepitaxial system consisting of one to two gold monolayers on platinum substrates were observed. By increasing the potential, structural transitions, from (1 x 1), to a striped phase, to a hexagonal structure, occurred in the gold bilayer. This hexagonal structure was related to the formation of an ordered sulfate adlayer with a ( 3x7 ) structure. Such transitions were repeatable by cycling the potential. Furthermore, the transitions between various dislocation structures were affected by anion adsorption. The surface composition of the gold bilayer on Pt was measured by underpotential deposition of copper. By subtracting the contribution of a pure Pt surface from the gold bi-layer on Pt, a stress change of -2.4 N/m was observed, which agrees with the stress change of -2.46 N/m predicted to accompany formation of 1.5 MLs of coherent Au on Pt(111) from epitaxy theory. The Cu monolayer deposited on Au(111) from an acid sulfate electrolyte was found to be pseudomorphic while the Cu monolayer formed on Au(111) in vacuum was incoherent. The stress-thickness change associated with the coherent monolayer of copper on Au(111) in electrolyte was -0.6 N/m, while conventional epitaxy theories predict a value of +7.76 N/m. STM results elucidated the sulfate adsorption on the copper monolayer caused an expansion of the layer as evidenced by a Moire Structure. For the Cu monolayer on Au(111), the sulfate-induced expansion

  8. Charcoal/Nitrogen Adsorption Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Refrigerator with no wear-related moving parts produces 0.5 W of cooling at 118 K. When fully developed, refrigerator needs no electrical power, and life expectancy of more than 10 yr, operates unattended to cool sensitive infrared detectors for long periods. Only moving parts in adsorption cryocooler are check valves. As charcoal is cooled in canister, gas pressure drops, allowing inlet check valve to open and admit more nitrogen. When canister is heated, pressure rises, closing inlet valve and eventually opening outlet valve.

  9. Moisture adsorption in optical coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macleod, H. Angus

    1988-01-01

    The thin film filter is a very large aperture component which is exceedingly useful because of its small size, flexibility and ease of mounting. Thin film components, however, do have defects of performance and especially of stability which can cause problems in systems, particularly where long-term measurements are being made. Of all of the problems, those associated with moisture absorption are the most serious. Moisture absorption occurs in the pore-shaped voids inherent in the columnar structure of the layers. Ion-assisted deposition is a promising technique for substantially reducing moisture adsorption effects in thin film structures.

  10. Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    MacArthur launched the digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, socialize, communicate, and play. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than $100 million for research, development of innovative new technologies, new learning environments for youth,…

  11. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  12. EMMSE Media Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.

    This index provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The index is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…

  13. Computer Produced Media Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffcott, Janet B.

    To increase access to the media collection at the Madison Area Technical College (Wisconsin) a computer-produced key work index was created using an International Business Machine (IBM) 360 model 40 computer and a duplicating facility with offset capability. A standard 80 column IBM card was used reserving columns 1-9 for the media item number,…

  14. Minorities in the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherard, Regina G., Comp.; And Others

    The four reports in this compilation focus on the role of blacks in the various media. The first report provides a general discussion of the status of blacks in the media, and notes that it has been largely analogous to their political and economic development. The second report traces the changing image of blacks as it has been portrayed on…

  15. Trends in Media Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Donald F.; Foehr, Ulla G.

    2008-01-01

    American youth are awash in media. They have television sets in their bedrooms, personal computers in their family rooms, and digital music players and cell phones in their backpacks. They spend more time with media than any single activity other than sleeping, with the average American eight- to eighteen-year-old reporting more than six hours of…

  16. Social Media. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    The growing use of social media by students and adults is impacting schools. A recent Pew study found that 73% of teens use social-networking sites to connect with others. Social media includes blogs, wikis, and podcasts as well as sites such as MySpace, Facebook, and Linkedin. While such sites promote connection with others, their use has created…

  17. News Media Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    convergence of media types, rapidly evolving technology, changing consumer behavior , and traditionalists ensconced in the ways of the past all...changing consumer behavior have all contributed to uncertain times for these media icons. Newspaper readership and subscriptions levels continue to...consistently center on changing technologies, corporate pressures, changing consumer behavior and revenue generation (advertising). Because it’s

  18. The Media Gospel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christians, Clifford G.; Fortner, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Examines four recent books on the religious media: Ben Armstrong's "The Electric Church," James F. Engel's "Contemporary Christian Communications: Its Theory and Practice," Malcolm Muggeridge's "Christ and the Media," and Virginia Stem Owens'"The Total Image: or Selling Jesus in the Modern Age." Evaluates…

  19. Advertising Pressures on Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammitt, Harry

    The majority of the media in the United States is funded through revenues derived from the sale of advertising space. The problem that arises from this situation is fundamentally an economic one: if advertisers are paying the bills for the media, how much control over content should they have? This report offers a review of instances in which…

  20. Accessing the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Judy

    This guide for school districts offers a quick outline for developing good communications skills and public relations with news media personnel. Guidelines for good press relations are provided that emphasize the importance of keeping two-way, open communications with the media, with attention to: accuracy; being prepared; sharing the bad news as…

  1. Writing and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Waes, Luuk, Ed.; Leijten, Marielle, Ed.; Neuwirth, Chris, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known…

  2. Literacy, Learning, and Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dennis; Hamm, Mary

    2000-01-01

    Considers the expanding definition of literacy from traditional reading and writing skills to include technological, visual, information, and networking literacy. Discusses the impact of media on social interactions and intellectual development; linking technology to educational goals; influences of new media symbol systems on communication;…

  3. Media: Eyeing the News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Susan

    1990-01-01

    This issue of "Teachergram" addresses media-related issues such as the kind of world picture Canadians receive from mainstream media, the ability of television to describe the complexity of world events, and the claim of distorted and simplistic portrayal of developing nations. Students are encouraged critical perspective--to help them…

  4. Choosing Training Delivery Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hybert, Peter R.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on decisionmaking about delivery media, and introduces CADDI's Performance-based, Accelerated, Customer-Stakeholder-driven Training & Development(SM) (PACT) Processes for training and development (T&D). Describes the media decisions that correspond with the design three levels of PACT: Curriculum Architecture Design, Modular Curriculum…

  5. Folk Media in Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructional Technology Report, 1975

    1975-01-01

    This issue is dedicated to folk media. Using Indonesia for his case study, Dr. Nat Colletta analyzes traditional culture as a medium for development. Juan Diaz Bordenave expresses doubts about adapting folk media to development objectives; Susan Hostetler and Arthur Gillette report on uses of the theater to promote development objectives; and…

  6. Remodeling the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baule, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses items that need to be considered when remodeling a school media center. Highlights include space and location for various functions, including projections of print versus electronic media; electrical and data wiring needs; lighting; security and supervision; and reuse of existing furniture and equipment. (LRW)

  7. Building Social Media Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferriter, William N.; Ramsden, Jason T.; Sheninger, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating social media tools into your professional practices does not have to be intimidating as long as you are willing to tackle five action steps. It is far easier to articulate the strengths--and to imagine the possibilities--of social media spaces as tools for communication and professional development when you are actively using those…

  8. Working with News Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosenbaugh, Dick

    To work effectively with personnel in the news media, one needs to assist them in doing their job by getting accurate information to them (in plenty of time for their deadline) and in providing information about meetings (when they do not have a reporter to cover the event). Familiarity aids in communication with news media personnel so one should…

  9. Wisconsin Ideas in Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Rose, Ed.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    These two documents contain a variety of articles on media use in education. The first provides 16 articles that focus on justifying media programs in the 1980's. Topics include selling your program to administrators; reorganization of the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction; video literacy; student-made videotape recordings; interactive…

  10. Fate and transport with material response characterization of green sorption media for copper removal via desorption process.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Houmann, Cameron; Lin, Kuen-Song; Wanielista, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple adsorption and desorption cycles are required to achieve the reliable operation of copper removal and recovery. A green sorption media mixture composed of recycled tire chunk, expanded clay aggregate, and coconut coir was evaluated in this study for its desorptive characteristics as a companion study of the corresponding adsorption process in an earlier publication. We conducted a screening of potential desorbing agents, batch desorption equilibrium and kinetic studies, and batch tests through 3 adsorption/desorption cycles. The desorbing agent screening revealed that hydrochloric acid has good potential for copper desorption. Equilibrium data fit the Freundlich isotherm, whereas kinetic data had high correlation with the Lagergren pseudo second-order model and revealed a rapid desorption reaction. Batch equilibrium data over 3 adsorption/desorption cycles showed that the coconut coir and media mixture were the most resilient, demonstrating they could be used through 3 or more adsorption/desorption cycles. FE-SEM imaging, XRD, and EDS analyses supported the batch adsorption and desorption results showing significant surface sorption of CuO species in the media mixture and coconut coir, followed by partial desorption using 0.1 M HCl as a desorbing agent.

  11. Use of industrial by-products and natural media to adsorb nutrients, metals and organic carbon from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Grace, Maebh A; Healy, Mark G; Clifford, Eoghan

    2015-06-15

    Filtration technology is well established in the water sector but is limited by inability to remove targeted contaminants, found in surface and groundwater, which can be damaging to human health. This study optimises the design of filters by examining the efficacy of seven media (fly ash, bottom ash, Bayer residue, granular blast furnace slag (GBS), pyritic fill, granular activated carbon (GAC) and zeolite), to adsorb nitrate, ammonium, total organic carbon (TOC), aluminium, copper (Cu) and phosphorus. Each medium and contaminant was modelled to a Langmuir, Freundlich or Temkin adsorption isotherm, and the impact of pH and temperature (ranging from 10 °C to 29 °C) on their performance was quantified. As retention time within water filters is important in contaminant removal, kinetic studies were carried out to observe the adsorption behaviour over a 24h period. Fly ash and Bayer residue had good TOC, nutrient and Cu adsorption capacity. Granular blast furnace slag and pyritic fill, previously un-investigated in water treatment, showed adsorption potential for all contaminants. In general, pH or temperature adjustment was not necessary to achieve effective adsorption. Kinetic studies showed that at least 60% of adsorption had occurred after 8h for all media. These media show potential for use in a multifunctional water treatment unit for the targeted treatment of specific contaminants.

  12. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption on functionalized nanoporous activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X B; Xiao, B; Fletcher, A J; Thomas, K M

    2005-05-12

    There is considerable interest in hydrogen adsorption on carbon nanotubes and porous carbons as a method of storage for transport and related energy applications. This investigation has involved a systematic investigation of the role of functional groups and porous structure characteristics in determining the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of porous carbons. Suites of carbons were prepared with a wide range of nitrogen and oxygen contents and types of functional groups to investigate their effect on hydrogen adsorption. The porous structures of the carbons were characterized by nitrogen (77 K) and carbon dioxide (273 K) adsorption methods. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were studied at 77 K and pressure up to 100 kPa. All the isotherms were Type I in the IUPAC classification scheme. Hydrogen isobars indicated that the adsorption of hydrogen is very temperature dependent with little or no hydrogen adsorption above 195 K. The isosteric enthalpies of adsorption at zero surface coverage were obtained using a virial equation, while the values at various surface coverages were obtained from the van't Hoff isochore. The values were in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ mol(-1) for the carbons studied. The thermodynamics of the adsorption process are discussed in relation to temperature limitations for hydrogen storage applications. The maximum amounts of hydrogen adsorbed correlated with the micropore volume obtained from extrapolation of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for carbon dioxide adsorption. Functional groups have a small detrimental effect on hydrogen adsorption, and this is related to decreased adsorbate-adsorbent and increased adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

  14. Social Justice and Media. Media Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Joseph A., III, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that the end of slavery, women's suffrage, and the civil rights movement were watershed events of social justice in U.S. history. Provides reviews of two media-based sets of instructional materials that can help students understand the struggle by disenfranchised groups to become full participants in society. (CFR)

  15. Media Roles and Legislators' New Media Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffe, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Surveys 82 Alabama legislators and finds officials' views of the press as adversary or agent of consensus relates to perceived value of media for job-relevant information. Suggests a dysfunction of the "watch-dog" role because those believing the consensus model found the press more useful than those seeing the press as an adversary. (MG)

  16. Removal of E. coli from water using surface-modified activated carbon filter media and its performance over an extended use.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukdeb; Joardar, J; Song, Joon Myong

    2006-10-01

    Modification of activated carbon (AC) by aluminum hydroxychloride (AHC), and diatomaceous earth by zinc hydroxide changed the zeta potentials of these filter media from negative to positive. The modification method is amenable to room temperature, and eliminates the essential requirement of strong base treatment for making metal hydroxide coated filter media. Solid-state MAS 27Al NMR spectra suggested the presence of Al13-mer in the AHC-treated AC. AHC-modified AC samples were further treated with silver halide, and two antibacterial compounds to prevent microbial growth on filter media. In situ precipitation of silver bromide on AC resulted in formation of nanosized AgBr crystals. Bacteria removal performances of the modified media were tested in columns. For the first time, we demonstrated that only 30 g of either AHC-treated AC (60 x 200 mesh) or nano AgBr supported AC could provide >6 log E. coli removal over approximately 1000 L when the input water had a bacterial load of 10(7) CFU/mL. The filter media were robust enough to perform even when water was passed at superficial velocities 3-10 times the typical velocity (6 cm/min) of water treatment processes. Metal leaching from the modified media was found to be less than the USEPA specified Maximum Contaminant Level.

  17. MediaTracker system

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D. M.; Strittmatter, R. B.; Abeyta, J. D.; Brown, J.; Marks, T. , Jr.; Martinez, B. J.; Jones, D. B.; Hsue, W.

    2004-01-01

    The initial objectives of this effort were to provide a hardware and software platform that can address the requirements for the accountability of classified removable electronic media and vault access logging. The Media Tracker system software assists classified media custodian in managing vault access logging and Media Tracking to prevent the inadvertent violation of rules or policies for the access to a restricted area and the movement and use of tracked items. The MediaTracker system includes the software tools to track and account for high consequence security assets and high value items. The overall benefits include: (1) real-time access to the disposition of all Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM), (2) streamlined security procedures and requirements, (3) removal of ambiguity and managerial inconsistencies, (4) prevention of incidents that can and should be prevented, (5) alignment with the DOE's initiative to achieve improvements in security and facility operations through technology deployment, and (6) enhanced individual responsibility by providing a consistent method of dealing with daily responsibilities. In response to initiatives to enhance the control of classified removable electronic media (CREM), the Media Tracker software suite was developed, piloted and implemented at the Los Alamos National Laboratory beginning in July 2000. The Media Tracker software suite assists in the accountability and tracking of CREM and other high-value assets. One component of the MediaTracker software suite provides a Laboratory-approved media tracking system. Using commercial touch screen and bar code technology, the MediaTracker (MT) component of the MediaTracker software suite provides an efficient and effective means to meet current Laboratory requirements and provides new-engineered controls to help assure compliance with those requirements. It also establishes a computer infrastructure at vault entrances for vault access logging, and can accommodate

  18. Adsorption of beta blockers to environmental surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kibbey, Tohren C G; Paruchuri, Rajiv; Sabatini, David A; Chen, Lixia

    2007-08-01

    Beta-adrenergic blocking agents (beta blockers) are widely used pharmaceuticals which have been detected in the environment. Predicting the transport and ultimate fate of beta blockers in the environment requires understanding their adsorption to soils and sediments, something for which little information is currently available. The objective of this work was to examine the adsorption of three beta blockers, propranolol, metoprolol and nadolol, to a natural alluvial material, as well as to six minerals present as components of the alluvial material. Batch adsorption experiments indicate that, for most of the minerals studied, compound hydrophobicity is an important predictor of adsorption, with propranolol,the most hydrophobic compound studied, adsorbing to the greatest extent. Results further suggest that, for the minerals studied, electrostatic effects are not a good predictor of adsorption; adsorption extent was not well-predicted by either surface zeta potential or by the difference between experiment pH and point of zero charge, despite the cationic nature af the three beta blockers at experiment pH values. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), on adsorption. Results indicate that SDBS significantly increases the adsorption of propranolol to two different sorbents. This result is potentially important because surfactants such as SDBS are likely to be present in wastewater effluents with beta blockers and could influence their mobility in the environment.

  19. Polychelated cryogels: hemoglobin adsorption from human blood.

    PubMed

    Erol, Kadir

    2017-02-01

    The separation and purification methods are extremely important for the hemoglobin (Hb) which is a crucial biomolecule. The adsorption technique is popular among these methods and the cryogels have been used quite much due to their macropores and interconnected flow channels. In this study, the Hb adsorption onto the Cu(II) immobilized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-glycidyl methacrylate), poly(HEMA-GMA)-Cu(II), cryogels was investigated under different conditions (pH, interaction time, initial Hb concentration, temperature and ionic strength) to optimize adsorption conditions. The swelling test, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), surface area (BET), elemental and ICP-OES analysis were performed for the characterization of cryogels. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) molecule was used as a Cu(II)-chelating ligand. The Hb adsorption capacity of cryogels was determined as 193.8 mg Hb/g cryogel. The isolation of Hb from human blood was also studied under optimum adsorption conditions determined and the Hb (124.5 mg/g cryogel) was isolated. The adsorption model was investigated in the light of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models and it was determined to be more appropriate to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  20. Arsenate adsorption by unsaturated alluvial sediments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arsenate adsorption as a function of solution arsenic concentration and solution pH was investigated on five alluvial sediments from the Antelope Valley, Western Mojave Desert, California. Arsenate adsorption increased with increasing solution pH, exhibited a maximum around pH 4 to 5, and then decr...

  1. BSA adsorption on bimodal PEO brushes.

    PubMed

    Bosker, W T E; Iakovlev, P A; Norde, W; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2005-06-15

    BSA adsorption onto bimodal PEO brushes at a solid surface was measured using optical reflectometry. Bimodal brushes consist of long (N=770) and short (N=48) PEO chains and were prepared on PS surfaces, applying mixtures of PS(29)-PEO(48) and PS(37)-PEO(770) block copolymers and using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Pi-A isotherms of (mixtures of) the block copolymers were measured to establish the brush regime. The isotherms of PS(29)-PEO(48) show hysteresis between compression and expansion cycles, indicating aggregation of the PS(29)-PEO(48) upon compression. Mixtures of PS(29)-PEO(48) and PS(37)-PEO(770) demonstrate a similar hysteresis effect, which eventually vanishes when the ratio of PS(37)-PEO(770) to PS(29)-PEO(48) is increased. The adsorption of BSA was determined at brushes for which the grafting density of the long PEO chains was varied, while the total grafting density was kept constant. BSA adsorption onto monomodal PEO(48) and PEO(770) brushes was determined for comparison. The BSA adsorption behavior of the bimodal brushes is similar to the adsorption of BSA at PEO(770) monomodal brushes. The maximum of BSA adsorption at low grafting density of PEO(770) can be explained by ternary adsorption, implying an attraction between BSA and PEO. The contribution of primary adsorption to the total adsorbed amount is negligible.

  2. Ion Exchange and Adsorption of Inorganic Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the first part of the chapter, the fundamentals of ion exchange and adsorption processes are explained, with the goal of demonstrating how these principles influence process design for inorganic contaminant removal. In the second part, ion exchange and adsorption processes th...

  3. Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica for uranium adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guo; Yurun, Feng; Li, Ma; Dezhi, Gao; Jie, Jing; Jincheng, Yu; Haibin, Sun; Hongyu, Gong; Yujun, Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Phosphoryl functionalized mesoporous silica (TBP-SBA-15) was synthesized by modified mesoporous silica with γ-amino propyl triethoxy silane and tributyl phosphate. The obtained samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXRD), thermo-gravimetric/differential thermalanalyzer (TG/DTA), N2 adsorption-desorption (BET) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Results showed that TBP-SBA-15 had large surface areas with ordered channel structure. Moreover, the effects of adsorption time, sorbent dose, solution pH, initial uranium concentration and temperature on the uranium adsorption behaviors were investigated. TBP-SBA-15 showed a high uranium adsorption capacity in a broad range of pH values. The U(VI) adsorption rate of TBP-SBA-15 was fast and nearly achieved completion in 10 min with the sorbent dose of 1 g/L. The U(VI) adsorption of TBP-SBA-15 followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Freundlich isotherm model, indicating that the process was belonged to chemical adsorption. Furthermore, the thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0) confirmed that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous.

  4. How Surface Heterogeneity Affects Protein Adsorption: Annealing of OTS Patterns and Albumin Adsorption Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Gerald N.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy and intensity histogram analysis techniques were used to monitor spatially-resolved albumin adsorption kinetics to model heterogeneous surfaces on sub-μm scales. Several distinct protein subpopulations were resolved, each represented by a normal distribution of adsorption densities on the adsorbent surface. Histogram analyses provided dynamic information of mean adsorption density, spread in adsorption density, and surface area coverage for each distinct protein subpopulation. A simple adsorption model is proposed in which individual protein binding events are predicted by the summation of multiple protein's surface sub-site interactions with different binding energy sub-sites on adsorbent surfaces. This model is predictive of the albumin adsorption on the patterns produced by one step μ-contact printing (μCP) of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) on glass but fails to describe adsorption once the same patterns are altered by a thermal annealing step. PMID:19746205

  5. Factors affecting drug adsorption on beta zeolites.

    PubMed

    Pasti, Luisa; Sarti, Elena; Cavazzini, Alberto; Marchetti, Nicola; Dondi, Francesco; Martucci, Annalisa

    2013-05-01

    The adsorption behaviour of three commonly used drugs, namely ketoprofen, hydrochlorothiazide and atenolol, from diluted aqueous solutions on beta zeolites with different SiO2/Al2O3 ratio (i.e. 25, 38 and 360) was investigated by changing the ionic strength and the pH, before and after thermal treatment of the adsorbents. The selective adsorption of drugs was confirmed by thermogravimetry and X-ray diffraction. The adsorption capacity of beta zeolites was strongly dependent on both the solution pH and the alumina content of the adsorbent. Such a remarkable difference was interpreted as a function of the interactions between drug molecules and zeolite surface functional groups. Atenolol was readily adsorbed on the less hydrophobic zeolite, under pH conditions in which electrostatic interactions were predominant. On the other hand, ketoprofen adsorption was mainly driven by hydrophobic interactions. For undissociated molecules the adsorption capability increased with the increase of hydrophobicity.

  6. Adsorption and desorption of reversible supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweistra, Henk J. A.; Besseling, N. A. M.

    2006-08-01

    We report numerical mean-field results on the quasichemical level of approximation that describe adsorption of reversible supramolecular polymers at a flat interface. Emphasis is laid on the regime of strong adsorption from a dilute solution. There are two differences with respect to macromolecular polymer adsorption: (i) adsorption sets in at relatively high monomer concentrations of the surrounding solution, and (ii) the surface is filled within a much narrower concentration range. Contrary to macromolecular polymers, supramolecular polymers can therefore be desorbed by dilution of the equilibrium solution by solvent within an experimentally accessible concentration window. Based on simple thermodynamic arguments, we provide a quantitative explanation why supramolecular polymers adsorb at relatively high concentrations. Moreover, we discuss the (by comparison) narrow concentration window wherein filling of the surface occurs. This is attributed to the cooperative nature of supramolecular polymer adsorption. The degree of cooperativity is quantified by means of the Hill parameter n .

  7. Adsorption of xenon and krypton on shales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podosek, F. A.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Kramer, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    A method that uses a mass spectrometer as a manometer is employed in the measurement of Xe and Kr adsorption parameters on shales and related samples, where gas partial pressures were lower than 10 to the -11th atm, corresponding adsorption coverages are only small fractions of a monolayer, and Henry's Law behavior is expected and observed. Results show heats of adsorption in the 2-7 kcal/mol range, and Henry constants at 0-25 C of 1 cu cm STP/g per atmosphere are extrapolated. Although the adsorption properties obtained are variable by sample, the range obtained suggests that shales may be capable of an equilibrium adsorption with modern air high enough to account for a significant fraction of the atmospheric inventory of Xe, and perhaps even of Kr. This effect will nevertheless not account for the factor-of-25 defficiency of atmospheric Xe, in comparison with the planetary gas patterns observed in meteorites.

  8. Media violence and youth.

    PubMed

    Beresin, E V

    1999-06-01

    This column reviews the literature on violence in the media and its effects on youth. The author summarizes the findings of naturalistic, longitudinal, and population-based studies conducted over the last 30 years. The literature provides compelling evidence that exposure of media violence to children plays a major role in the etiology of aggressive behavior. Psychiatrists can facilitate primary prevention of violence in our society by discussing the problem of media violence with parents, medical students, residents, and allied health and school professionals.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamics of fractal media

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2006-05-15

    The fractal distribution of charged particles is considered. An example of this distribution is the charged particles that are distributed over the fractal. The fractional integrals are used to describe fractal distribution. These integrals are considered as approximations of integrals on fractals. Typical turbulent media could be of a fractal structure and the corresponding equations should be changed to include the fractal features of the media. The magnetohydrodynamics equations for fractal media are derived from the fractional generalization of integral Maxwell equations and integral hydrodynamics (balance) equations. Possible equilibrium states for these equations are considered.

  10. Ethics and social media.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2014-10-01

    Nurses' use of social media has increased significantly with growing numbers of media-sharing opportunities, platforms, and emerging forms of electronic applications. With the proliferation, opportunities and limitations surface regarding the responsibilities and accountability that nurses have in choosing technology applications with an embedded philosophical ethos that is consistent with the discipline's societal mandate of serving humankind in ways that honor human dignity. This article begins a discussion addressing possible disciplinary obligations and responsibilities for the implementation of social media platforms and possible implications for its future use in the discipline of nursing.

  11. Enhanced adsorption of puerarin onto a novel hydrophilic and polar modified post-crosslinked resin from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaowei; Chen, Hongbo; Zheng, Yi; Tao, Wei; Fan, Yunge; Huang, Laiqiang; Mei, Lin

    2012-11-01

    A novel of hydrophilic and polar N-vinylpyrrolidone modified post-crosslinked resin was synthesized and the adsorption behaviors toward puerarin from aqueous solution were investigated. The post-crosslinked adsorbent PNVP-DVBpc was prepared by Friedel-Crafts reaction of residual double bonds without external crosslinking agent. The specific surface area of precursor PNVP-DVB increased obviously after post-crosslinking modification. The synthesized adsorbents were characterized by BET surface area, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption behaviors of puerarin from aqueous solution onto precursor PNVP-DVB and post-crosslinked adsorbent PNVP-DVBpc were thoroughly researched. Commercial polymeric adsorbents Amberlite XAD-4 and AB-8 were chosen as the comparison. Among the four media, PNVP-DVBpc presented the largest adsorption capacity of puerarin, which resulted from the synergistic effect of high specific surface area and polar groups (amide groups) onto the adsorbent matrix. Experimental results showed that equilibrium isotherms could be fitted by Freundlich model and the kinetic data could be characterized by pseudo-second order model reasonably. Column adsorption experiments indicated that the puerarin could be completely desorbed by 4.0 BV industrial alcohol. Continuous column adsorption-regeneration cycles demonstrated the PNVP-DVBpc without any significant adsorption capacity loss during operation.

  12. Development of sustainable dye adsorption system using Nutraceutical Industrial Fennel Seed Spent - Studies with Congo Red dye.

    PubMed

    Taqui, Syed Noeman; Yahya, Rosiyah; Hassan, Aziz; Nayak, Nayan; Syed, Akheel Ahmed

    2017-01-25

    Fennel seed spent (FSS) - an inexpensive nutraceutical industrial spent has been used as an efficient biosorbent for the removal of Congo Red (CR) from aqueous media. Results show that pH of 2 - 4 and temperature of 30°C was ideal for maximum adsorption. Based on regression fitting of the data it was determined that the SIPS isotherm (R(2) = 0.994, χ(2) = 0.5) adequately described the mechanism of adsorption, suggesting that the adsorption occurs in a homogeneous layer by layer with favourable interaction between layers. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the adsorption is favourable (negative values for ΔG°) and endothermic (ΔH° = 12-20 kJ mol(-1)) for an initial dye concentration of 25, 50 and 100 ppm. The low ΔH° value indicates that the adsorption is a physical process involving weak chemical interactions like hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The kinetics revealed that the adsorption process showed pseudo second order tendencies with the equal influence of intra-particle as well as film diffusion. The SEM images of FSS show a highly fibrous matrix with a hierarchical porous structure. The FTIR analysis of the spent confirmed the presence of cellulosic and ligno-cellulosic matter giving it both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties. The investigations indicate that FSS is a cost-effective and efficient biosorbent for the remediation of toxic Congo Red dye.

  13. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media: influence of flow velocity and influent concentration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Du, Lina; Horton, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces. A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations. Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients, which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns. Consequently, retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed. These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix. Accordingly, this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  14. Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Mulloth, Lila M.; Affleck, Dave L.

    2001-01-01

    Closing the oxygen loop in an air revitalization system based on four-bed molecular sieve and Sabatier reactor technology requires a vacuum pump-compressor that can take the low-pressure CO, from the 4BMS and compress and store for use by a Sabatier reactor. NASA Ames Research Center proposed a solid-state temperature-swing adsorption (TSA) compressor that appears to meet performance requirements, be quiet and reliable, and consume less power than a comparable mechanical compressor/accumulator combination. Under this task, TSA compressor technology is being advanced through development of a complete prototype system. A liquid-cooled TSA compressor has been partially tested, and the rest of the system is being fabricated. An air-cooled TSA compressor is also being designed.

  15. Teaching Media-Savvy Students about the Popular Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maness, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    A framework for media education that helps students enhance their understanding of the media and use their knowledge to influence individual and community action is proposed. It is experienced that the problem with educating children against, rather than about, the media is the assumption that students are passive audiences of the media, lacking…

  16. Mechanism of highly efficient adsorption of 2-chlorophenol onto ultrasonic graphene materials: Comparison and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Tayyebeh; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    The deficiencies of the recently reported improved Hummers method for the synthesis of graphene oxide (GO), such as high reaction temperature (60°C) and long reaction time (10h), were successfully solved using a low-intensity ultrasonic bath for 30min at 40°C. Furthermore, compared to its conventional synthesis counterpart, a facile and fast, one-step ultrasonic method that excluded hydrazine hydrate was developed to synthesize reduced GO (rGO) from graphite (10min, 50°C) in the presence of hydrazine hydrate (rGO-C, 12h, 90°C). The adsorption characteristics of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) from an aqueous solution were investigated using rGOs and GOs prepared by ultrasonic (rGO-Us/GO-Us) and conventional (rGO-C/GO-C) methods. Whereas 2-CP was completely removed with rGO-Us after 50min, only 40% of 2-CP was eliminated with rGO-C. The maximum adsorption capacity of 2-CP calculated by the Langmuir model onto rGO-Us (208.67mg/g) was much higher than that onto GO-Us (134.49mg/g). In addition, the ultrasonic graphene adsorption capacities were much higher than the corresponding values of rGO-C (49.9mg/g) and GO-C (32.06mg/g). The enhanced adsorption for rGO-Us and GO-Us is attributed to their greater surface areas, excellent oxygenated groups for GO-Us and superior π-electron-rich matrix for rGO-Us, compared to other adsorbents. The adsorption of 2-CP on the rGO materials increased with increasing solution pH to a maximum around its pKa (pKa=8.85), while the adsorption for the GO materials increased with decreasing solution pH. The adsorption mechanism proceeded via hydrogen bonding in neutral and acidic media, but via π-π electron donor-accepter (EDA) interactions between 2-CP and graphene materials in basic medium. The FTIR spectrum of GO-Us after adsorption indicates that the position and intensity of many peaks of GO-Us were affected due to the adsorption of different 2-CP groups at different pHs.

  17. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  18. TECHNETIUM SORPTION MEDIA REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    DUNCAN JB; KELLY SE; ROBBINS RA; ADAMS RD; THORSON MA; HAASS CC

    2011-08-25

    This report presents information and references to aid in the selection of 99Tc sorption media for feasibility studies regarding the removal of 99Tc from Hanford's low activity waste. The report contains literature search material for sorption media (including ion exchange media) for the most tested media to date, including SuperLig 639, Reillex HPQ, TAM (Kruion), Purolite A520E and A530E, and Dowex 1X8. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for management and completion of the River Protection Project (RPP) mission, which comprises both the Hanford Site tank farms and the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The RPP mission is to store, retrieve and treat Hanford's tank waste; store and dispose of treated wastes; and close the tank farm waste management areas and treatment facilities in a safe, environmentally compliant, cost-effective and energy-effective manner.

  19. Congressional and Media Protocols

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The OIG's Office of Congressional and Public Affairs is the primary point of contact for all media and congressional inquiries on matters related to the OIG, which ensures that they are handled expeditiously.

  20. Media independent interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The work done on the Media Independent Interface (MII) Interface Control Document (ICD) program is described and recommendations based on it were made. Explanations and rationale for the content of the ICD itself are presented.

  1. Communications and media services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcculla, James W.; Kukowski, James F.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's internal and external communication methods are reviewed. NASA information services for the media, for the public, and for employees are discussed. Consideration is given to electron information distribution, the NASA TV-audio system, the NASA broadcast news service, astronaut appearances, technology and information exhibits, speaker services, and NASA news reports for internal communications. Also, the NASA worldwide electronic mail network is described and trends for future NASA communications and media services are outlined.

  2. Batch uptake of lysozyme: effect of solution viscosity and mass transfer on adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wright, P R; Muzzio, F J; Glasser, B J

    1998-01-01

    In this study, solid-phase adsorption by macroporous and hyper-diffusive resins was investigated in a batch uptake adsorption system to quantify solid-phase diffusion rates as a function of bulk phase viscosity. The performance of chromatographic resins used for adsorption of proteins is dependent on several factors including solid and liquid-phase diffusivity, boundary layer mass transfer, and intraparticle mass transfer effects. Understanding these effects is critical to process development and optimization of both packed and fluidized bed adsorption systems. The macroporous resin used here was Streamline SP, and the hyper-diffusive resin was S-HyperD LS. Both have been frequently used in fluidized bed adsorption of proteins; however, factors that affect uptake rates of these media are not well quantified. Adsorption isotherms were well represented by an empirical fit of a Langmuir isotherm. Solid-phase diffusion coefficients obtained from simulations were in agreement with other models for macroporous and hyper-diffusive particles. S-HyperD LS in the buffer system had the highest uptake rate, but increased bulk phase viscosity decreased the rate by approximately 50%. Increases in bulk phase viscosity increased film mass transfer effects, and uptake was observed to be a strong function of the film mass transfer coefficient. Uptake by Streamline SP particles was slower than S-HyperD in buffer, due to a greater degree of intraparticle mass transfer resistance. The effect of increased film mass transfer resistance coupled with intraparticle mass transfer resistances at an increased bulk phase viscosity resulted in a decrease of 80% in the uptake rate by Streamline SP relative to S-HyperD.

  3. Adsorption of water vapor by poly(styrenesulfonic acid), sodium salt: isothermal and isobaric adsorption equilibria.

    PubMed

    Toribio, F; Bellat, J P; Nguyen, P H; Dupont, M

    2004-12-15

    Air conditioning and dehumidifying systems based on sorption on solids are of great interest, especially in humid climates, because they allow reduction of thermal loads and use of chlorofluorocarbons. Previous studies have shown that hydrophilic polymers such as sulfonic polymers can have very high performance in water adsorption from air. The aim of this study was to characterize the water vapor adsorption properties of fully sulfonated and monosulfonated poly(styrenesulfonic acid), sodium salt, and to elucidate the mechanism of adsorption on these materials. Adsorption isotherms have been determined by TGA between 298 and 317 K for pressures ranging from 0.1 to 45 hPa. They have type II of the IUPAC classification and a small hysteresis loop between adsorption and desorption processes was observed only for the monosulfonated sample. Water content is up to 80% weight at 80% relative humidity. Adsorption isotherms have been well fitted with the FHH model. Adsorption-desorption isobars have been determined by TGA under 37 hPa in the temperature range 298-373 K. They show that these polymers can be completely regenerated by heating at 313 K under humidified air. No degradation of the adsorption properties has been observed after several regenerations. Adsorption enthalpies and entropies have been deduced from the Clapeyron equation and from DSC measurements. A good agreement was found. A mechanism of adsorption is proposed considering two kinds of adsorbate: bounded water in electrostatic interaction with functional groups and free water resulting from condensation.

  4. Modeling the adsorption of mixed gases based on pure gas adsorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzabar, N.; Holland, H. J.; Vermeer, C. H.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Sorption-based Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocoolers usually operate with pure gases. A sorption-based compressor has many benefits; however, it is limited by the pressure ratios it can provide. Using a mixed-refrigerant (MR) instead of a pure refrigerant in JT cryocoolers allows working at much lower pressure ratios. Therefore, it is attractive using MRs in sorption- based cryocoolers in order to reduce one of its main limitations. The adsorption of mixed gases is usually investigated under steady-state conditions, mainly for storage and separation processes. However, the process in a sorption compressor goes through various temperatures, pressures and adsorption concentrations; therefore, it differs from the common mixed gases adsorption applications. In order to simulate the sorption process in a compressor a numerical analysis for mixed gases is developed, based on pure gas adsorption characteristics. The pure gas adsorption properties have been measured for four gases (nitrogen, methane, ethane, and propane) with Norit-RB2 activated carbon. A single adsorption model is desired to describe the adsorption of all four gases. This model is further developed to a mixed-gas adsorption model. In future work more adsorbents will be tested using these four gases and the adsorption model will be verified against experimental results of mixed-gas adsorption measurements.

  5. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of Protein Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.; Belfort, Georges

    2008-03-01

    Amyloidogenic diseases, such as, Alzheimer's are caused by adsorption and aggregation of partially unfolded proteins. Adsorption of proteins is a concern in design of biomedical devices, such as dialysis membranes. Protein adsorption is often accompanied by conformational rearrangements in protein molecules. Such conformational rearrangements are thought to affect many properties of adsorbed protein molecules such as their adhesion strength to the surface, biological activity, and aggregation tendency. It has been experimentally shown that many naturally occurring proteins, upon adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces, undergo a helix to sheet or random coil secondary structural rearrangement. However, to better understand the equilibrium structural complexities of this phenomenon, we have performed Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of adsorption of a four helix bundle, modeled as a lattice protein, and studied the adsorption behavior and equilibrium protein conformations at different temperatures and degrees of surface hydrophobicity. To study the free energy and entropic effects on adsorption, Canonical ensemble MC simulations have been combined with Weighted Histogram Analysis Method(WHAM). Conformational transitions of proteins on surfaces will be discussed as a function of surface hydrophobicity and compared to analogous bulk transitions.

  7. Functionalized SBA-15 materials for bilirubin adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tao; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Yao; Wu, Dong; Xu, Jun; Deng, Feng

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the driving force for bilirubin adsorption on mesoporous materials, a comparative study was carried out between pure siliceous SBA-15 and three functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous materials: CH 3-SBA-15 (MS), NH 2-SBA-15 (AS), and CH 3/NH 2-SBA-15 (AMS) that were synthesized by one-pot method. The obtained materials exhibited large surface areas (553-810 m 2/g) and pore size (6.6-7.1 nm) demonstrated by XRD and N 2-ad/desorption analysis. The SEM images showed that the materials had similar fiberlike morphology. The functionalization extent was calculated according to 29Si MAS NMR spectra and it was close to the designed value (10%). The synthesized mesoporous materials were used as bilirubin adsorbents and showed higher bilirubin adsorption capacities than the commercial active carbon. The adsorption capacities of amine functionalized samples AMS and AS were larger than those of pure siliceous SBA-15 and MS, indicating that electrostatic interaction was the dominant driving force for bilirubin adsorption on mesoporous materials. Increasing the ionic strength of bilirubin solution by adding NaCl would decrease the bilirubin adsorption capacity of mesoporous material, which further demonstrated that the electrostatic interaction was the dominant driving force for bilirubin adsorption. In addition, the hydrophobic interaction provided by methyl groups could promote the bilirubin adsorption.

  8. Media preparation and bacteriological tools.

    PubMed

    Elbing, Karen; Brent, Roger

    2002-08-01

    Recipes are provided in this unit for minimal liquid media, rich liquid media, solid media, top agar, and stab agar. Also included are descriptions and useful information about tools used with growth media such as inoculating loops, sterile toothpicks and spreaders.

  9. Media Education: An Indian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Keval Joe

    This paper provides both a preliminary analysis of a survey on media education in India, and reviews of the research on media education in the western world, the limited media education research already done in India, and the more extensive research that has been done on the sociology of Indian youth and the media. The purpose of the survey was to…

  10. Mass Media as Community Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookfield, Stephen D.

    1990-01-01

    Despite the image of the pernicious effects of mass media, media consumers are not passive receptors of media-generated beliefs and ideas. Educators can help adults become media literate by helping them decode, filter, and interpret the messages they read, see, and hear through content and context analysis. (SK)

  11. Media Services and Captioned Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwood, Malcolm J.

    1972-01-01

    Described are organizational changes which brought the Clearinghouse for Exceptional Children, Regional Media Centers for the Deaf, the Educational Media Distribution Center, and the forthcoming National Center for Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped under the Media Services and Captioned Films Branch of the Division of Educational…

  12. The Economics of Educational Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Leslie

    This guide to the economic analysis of media use in education reviews the evidence on the costs and benefits of educational media and provides a methodology for future decision-making. It includes chapters on establishing a framework for media choice, evaluating the effectiveness of media use, and analyzing costs. The empirical evidence from past…

  13. Simultaneous sorption and mechanical entrapment during polymer flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajzadeh, R.; Bedrikovetsky, P.; Lotfollahi, M.; Lake, L. W.

    2016-03-01

    Physical adsorption and mechanical entrapment are two major causes of polymer retention in porous media. Physical adsorption is considered an equilibrium process and is often modeled by assuming a Langmuir isotherm. The outcome is a steady state pressure response because the permeability reduction is also accounted for by adsorption. However, some experimental data show gradual increase of pressure with time, implying that polymer retention is a time-dependent process. We discuss simultaneous effect of sorption and mechanical entrapment on the polymer retention in porous media. An exact solution for 1-D flow problem for the case of constant filtration coefficient and Langmuir-sorption isotherm, including explicit formulae for breakthrough concentration and pressure drop across the core is derived. The general model with a varying filtration coefficient was successfully matched with experimental data confirming the occurrence of simultaneous sorption with deep-bed filtration during polymer flow in porous media. In the absence of mechanical entrapment, the physical adsorption causes delay in the polymer front and does not affect the polymer concentration behind the front. Addition of mechanical entrapment results in slow recovery of the injected concentration at the outlet (for a varying filtration coefficient) or reaching to a steady state concentration, which is only a fraction of the injected concentration (for a constant filtration coefficient). Accurate assessment and quantification of the polymer retention requires both pressure and effluent concentration data at the outlet of the porous medium.

  14. Children's media policy.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B

    2008-01-01

    Amy Jordan addresses the need to balance the media industry's potentially important contributions to the healthy development of America's children against the consequences of excessive and age-inappropriate media exposure. Much of the philosophical tension regarding how much say the government should have about media content and delivery stems from the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment protection against government interference in free speech, including commercial speech. Courts, Jordan says, have repeatedly had to weigh the rights of commercial entities to say what they please against the need to protect vulnerable citizens such as children. This balancing act is complicated even further, she says, because many government regulations apply only to broadcast television and not to non-broadcast media such as the Internet or cable television, though Congress has addressed the need to protect children's privacy online. The need to protect both free speech and children has given rise to a fluid media policy mix of federal mandates and industry self-regulation. Jordan describes the role of the three branches of the federal government in formulating and implementing media policy. She also notes the jockeying for influence in policymaking by industry lobbies, child advocacy groups, and academic researchers. The media industry itself, says Jordan, is spurred to self-regulation when public disapproval grows severe enough to raise the possibility of new government action. Jordan surveys a range of government and industry actions, from legislatively required parental monitoring tools, such as the V-Chip blocking device on television sets, to the voluntary industry ratings systems governing television, movies, and video games, to voluntary social website disclosures to outright government bans, such as indecency and child privacy information collection. She considers the success of these efforts in limiting children's exposure to damaging content and in improving parents

  15. Adsorption of amylase enzyme on ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Beier, Søren Prip; Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M; Hansen, Ernst B; Jonsson, Gunnar

    2007-08-28

    A method to measure the static adsorption on membrane surfaces has been developed and described. The static adsorption of amylase-F has been measured on two different ultrafiltration membranes, both with a cutoff value of 10 kDa (a PES membrane and the ETNA10PP membrane, which is a surface-modified PVDF membrane). The adsorption follows the Langmuir adsorption theory. Thus, the static adsorption consists of monolayer coverage and is expressed both as a permeability drop and an adsorption resistance. From the adsorption isotherms, the maximum static permeability drops and the maximum static adsorption resistances are determined. The maximum static permeability drop for the hydrophobic PES membrane is 75%, and the maximum static adsorption resistance is 0.014 m2.h.bar/L. The maximum static permeability drop for the hydrophilic surface-modified PVDF membrane (ETNA10PP) is 23%, and the maximum static adsorption resistance is 0.0046 m2.h.bar/L. The difference in maximum static adsorption, by a factor of around 3, affects the performance during the filtration of a 5 g/L amylase-F solution at 2 bar. The two membranes behave very similarly during filtration with almost equal fluxes and retentions even though the initial water permeability of the PES membrane is around 3 times larger than the initial water permeability of the ETNA10PP membrane. This is mainly attributed to the larger maximum static adsorption of the PES membrane. The permeability drop during filtration exceeds the maximum static permeability drop, indicating that the buildup layer on the membranes during filtration exceeds monolayer coverage, which is also seen by the increase in fouling resistance during filtration. The accumulated layer on the membrane surface can be described as a continually increasing cake-layer thickness, which is independent of the membrane type. At higher concentrations of enzyme, concentration polarization effects cannot be neglected. Therefore, stagnant film theory and the osmotic

  16. Apparatus for the study of macromolecular adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, C. S.; Hallock, R. B.

    1989-04-01

    A surface plasmon adsorbate monitor (SPAM) is described which allows the adsorption of macromolecules or other adsorbates to a metal surface to be monitored. Surface plasmons are employed and the apparatus has no moving parts. The kinetics of adsorption may be studied on a time scale of seconds rather than the more common time scale of minutes; a simple improvement in computer memory access should allow temporal studies in the millisecond range. As an illustration, the adsorption of carboxyl-terminated polystyrene from a solution with acetone onto a silver surface is measured.

  17. Adsorption of lead over graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Olanipekun, Opeyemi; Oyefusi, Adebola; Neelgund, Gururaj M; Oki, Aderemi

    2014-01-24

    The adsorption efficiency and kinetics of removal of lead in presence of graphite oxide (GO) was determined using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The GO was prepared by the chemical oxidation of graphite and characterized using FTIR, SEM, TGA and XRD. The adsorption efficiency of GO for the solution containing 50, 100 and 150 ppm of Pb(2+) was found to be 98%, 91% and 71% respectively. The adsorption ability of GO was found to be higher than graphite. Therefore, the oxidation of activated carbon in removal of heavy metals may be a viable option to reduce pollution in portable water.

  18. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model (R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  19. Preparation of Fiber Based Binder Materials to Enhance the Gas Adsorption Efficiency of Carbon Air Filter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Hwan; Choi, Jeong Rak; Lim, Dae Young; Lee, So Hee; Yeo, Sang Young

    2015-10-01

    Fiber binder adapted carbon air filter is prepared to increase gas adsorption efficiency and environmental stability. The filter prevents harmful gases, as well as particle dusts in the air from entering the body when a human inhales. The basic structure of carbon air filter is composed of spunbond/meltblown/activated carbon/bottom substrate. Activated carbons and meltblown layer are adapted to increase gas adsorption and dust filtration efficiency, respectively. Liquid type adhesive is used in the conventional carbon air filter as a binder material between activated carbons and other layers. However, it is thought that the liquid binder is not an ideal material with respect to its bonding strength and liquid flow behavior that reduce gas adsorption efficiency. To overcome these disadvantages, fiber type binder is introduced in our study. It is confirmed that fiber type binder adapted air filter media show higher strip strength, and their gas adsorption efficiencies are measured over 42% during 60 sec. These values are higher than those of conventional filter. Although the differential pressure of fiber binder adapted air filter is relatively high compared to the conventional one, short fibers have a good potential as a binder materials of activated carbon based air filter.

  20. The characterization of the adsorption of cadmium from aqueous solution using natural fibers treated with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rediske, Nicole M.

    The objective of this research was to characterize natural carbon fibers from coconut husks, both bare and impregnated with metallic nanoparticles, in removing cadmium from aqueous media. The adsorbent load, kinetics, isotherm parameters, removal efficiencies, desorption capacity and possible contaminant removal mechanisms were evaluated. It was found that the fibers treated with metallic nanoparticles performed better than the bare fibers in removing cadmium from water. The ideal conditions were found to be neutral pH with low initial cadmium concentrations. Through the kinetic analyses, the adsorption process was first thought to be pseudo first order with two separate adsorption mechanisms apparent. Upon further analysis, it was seen that the first mechanism does not follow the pseudo first order kinetics model. An increase in calcium and magnesium concentrations was observed as the cadmium concentrations decreases. This increase corresponds with first mechanism. This suggests the cadmium removal in the first mechanism is due to ion exchange. The second mechanism's rate constant was consistently lower than the first mechanisms rate constant by an order of magnitude. This led to the hypothesis that the second mechanism is controlled by van de Waals forces, specifically ion-induced dipole interactions, and physical adsorption. It was also found that the cadmium does not effectively desorb from the wasted fibers in DI water. Keywords: Adsorption; kinetics; pseudo first order; cadmium; metallic nanoparticles; natural fibers; removal efficiencies; ion exchange.

  1. Removal of geosmin and MIB by biofiltration--an investigation discriminating between adsorption and biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Persson, F; Heinicke, G; Hedberg, T; Hermansson, M; Uhl, W

    2007-01-01

    Geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) are two substances causing earthy/musty odours that are difficult to remove by conventional chemical drinking water treatment. In this study removal of geosmin and MIB by biofiltration of untreated surface water was investigated using granular activated carbon (GAC) and crushed expanded clay (EC) as filter media. Biofiltration through both GAC and EC removed geosmin and MIB present at low (20 ng l(-1)) concentrations by at least 97% at an empty bed contact time of 30 minutes and a temperature of 15 degrees C. At lower temperature (6-12 degrees C) and simultaneously lower biomass concentrations, removal efficiency was similar in the GAC but considerably lower in the EC biofilter, pointing to a second mechanism different from biodegradation. Consequently, microbial activity was suppressed with azide to enable discrimination between biodegradation and adsorption. During azide dosage, the GAC biofilters still removed geosmin and MIB nearly unaffectedly. In the EC biofilter, however, removal of both odorants ceased completely. Methylene blue adsorption confirmed that the GAC, even after almost four years of operation receiving surface water, had capacity to remove geosmin and MIB by adsorption. Since odour episodes commonly occur during the warm season when microbiological activity is high, EC constitutes a viable option as carrier medium for direct biological filtration of surface water. The additional GAC adsorption capacity however adds robustness to the removal process.

  2. Probing Immobilization Mechanism of alpha-chymotrypsin onto Carbon Nanotube in Organic Media by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liyun; Xiao, Xiuchan; Yuan, Yuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Li, Menglong; Pu, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme immobilization has been adopted to enhance the activity and stability of enzymes in non-aqueous enzymatic catalysis. However, the activation and stabilization mechanism has been poorly understood on experiments. Thus, we used molecular dynamics simulation to study the adsorption of α-chymotrypsin (α-ChT) on carbon nanotube (CNT) in aqueous solution and heptane media. The results indicate that α-ChT has stronger affinity with CNT in aqueous solution than in heptane media, as confirmed by more adsorption atoms, larger contact area and higher binding free energies. Although the immobilization causes significant structure deviations from the crystal one, no significant changes in secondary structure of the enzyme upon adsorption are observed in the two media. Different from aqueous solution, the stabilization effects on some local regions far from the surface of CNT were observed in heptane media, in particular for S1 pocket, which should contribute to the preservation of specificity reported by experiments. Also, CNT displays to some extent stabilization role in retaining the catalytic H-bond network of the active site in heptane media, which should be associated with the enhanced activity of enzymes. The observations from the work can provide valuable information for improving the catalytic properties of enzymes in non-aqueous media. PMID:25787884

  3. Albumin (BSA) Adsorption over Graphene in Aqueous Environment: Influence of Orientation, Adsorption Protocol, and Solvent Treatment.

    PubMed

    Vilhena, J G; Rubio-Pereda, Pamela; Vellosillo, Perceval; Serena, P A; Pérez, Rubén

    2016-02-23

    We report 150 ns explicit solvent MD simulations of the adsorption on graphene of albumin (BSA) in two orientations and using two different adsorption protocols, i.e., free and forced adsorption. Our results show that free adsorption occurs with little structural rearrangements. Even taking adsorption to an extreme, by forcing it with a 5 nN downward force applied during the initial 20 ns, we show that along a particular orientation BSA is able to preserve the structural properties of the majority of its binding sites. Furthermore, in all the cases considered in this work, the ibuprofen binding site has shown a strong resilience to structural changes. Finally, we compare these results with implicit solvent simulations and find that the latter predicts an extreme protein unfolding upon adsorption. The origin of this discrepancy is attributed to a poor description of the water entropic forces at interfaces in the implicit solvent methods.

  4. Film thickness dependence of protein adsorption from blood serum and plasma onto poly(sulfobetaine)-grafted surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Chen, Shengfu; Cheng, Gang; Vaisocherová, Hana; Xue, Hong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jinli; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2008-09-02

    In this work, we investigate protein adsorption from single protein solutions and complex media such as 100% blood serum and plasma onto poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA)-grafted surfaces via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at varying film thicknesses. It is interesting to observe that protein adsorption exhibits a minimum at a medium film thickness. Results show that the surface with 62 nm polySBMA brushes presents the best nonfouling character in 100% blood serum and plasma although all of these surfaces are highly resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption from single fibrinogen and lysozyme solutions. Surface resistance to 100% blood serum or plasma is necessary for many applications from blood-contacting devices to drug delivery. This work provides a new in vitro evaluation standard for the application of biomaterials in vivo.

  5. MBBR system performance improvement for petroleum hydrocarbon removal using modified media with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Sayyahzadeh, Amir Hossein; Ganjidoust, Hossein; Ayati, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system has a successful operation in the treatment of different types of wastewater. Since the media, i.e. the place of growth and formation of biofilm, play the main role in the treatment in this system, MBBR systems were operated in the present research with modified Bee-cell media. Activated carbon granules of almond or walnut shells were placed in media pores to improve the treatment of refinery oil wastewater and their operation with MBBR system was compared with the conventional Bee-cell media. In these experiments, the effects of organic loading rate, hydraulic retention time (HRT), media filling ratio (MFR), and activated carbon concentration (ACC) used in the media were investigated on the operation of MBBR systems. The analysis of results estimated the optimal values of HRT, MFR, and ACC used in the media between the studied levels, being equal to 22 h, 50%, and 7.5 g/L, respectively. Under these conditions, total petroleum hydrocarbons removal efficiencies for MBBR systems using Bee-cell media with carbon of almond, carbon of walnut shells, and a carbon-free system were 95 ± 1.17%, 91 ± 1.11%, and 57 ± 1.7%, respectively, which confirms the adsorption ability of systems with the media containing activated carbon in the removal of petroleum compounds from wastewater.

  6. [Bioretention Media Screening for the Removal of Phosphorus in Urban Stormwater].

    PubMed

    Li, Li-qing; Gong, Yan-fang; Yan, Zi-qin; Shan, Bao-qing

    2015-07-01

    Urban runoff is an increasingly important source of excess phosphorus (P) to local receiving waters. Bioretention, a promising technology for urban stormwater pollution treatment, was investigated to determine whether the mixture of purple soil and sand could adsorb sufficient P at low concentrations in urban stormwater. The TP concentrations of urban runoff from variously impervious areas in Chongqing City ranged from 0. 04 to 7. 00 mg . L-1 (mean ± S. D. = 0. 75 mg . L-1 ± 1. 08 mg . L-1); the TDP concentrations ranged from 0. 02-0. 46 mg . L-1 ( mean ± S. D. = 0. 15 mg . L-1 ± 0. 10 mg . L-1). The media adsorption benchmark was determined for a bioretention facility sized at 10% of the 100% impervious catchment area and having 10 years of capacity according to annual rainfall pattern and the runoff TDP range. The media benchmark for adsorption was calculated as 7. 5 mg . kg-1 at soluble P concentration of 0. 30 mg . L-1 which provided the necessary stormwater treatment. The oxalate-extractable aluminum and iron content influenced the P sorption capacity for neutral and acid purple soils. A strong positive linear relationship was observed between the oxalate ratio [OR = (Alox + Feox)/Pox] and media P sorption capacity. The media mixture of 20% purple soil and 80% sand showed excellent P removal, meeting the developed benchmark for adsorptive behavior. The media mixture in a large-scale (60 cm) column consistently produced soluble reactive phosphorus effluent event with mean concentrations <0. 05 mg . L-1. The media mixture of purple soil and sand can be used as a bioretention media to treat low-concentration phosphorus in urban runoff under various hydrologic and pollutant concentration conditions.

  7. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  8. Indaziflam adsorption in soils amended with olive cake and olive cake biochar: Effect of dose and temperature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indaziflam has been approved by the USEPA for weed control in residential and commercial areas, golf courses, and nurseries. Recently, the use has been expanded to citrus, walnuts and olives, among other crops. According to the USEPA, indaziflam is a herbicide that can be mobile in soils, leaching ...

  9. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  10. Capillary condensation and adsorption of binary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, B; Darkrim-Lamari, F; Levesque, D

    2006-06-21

    The adsorption of equimolar binary mixtures of hydrogen-carbon dioxide, hydrogen-methane, and methane-carbon dioxide in porous material models is determined by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The material models have an adsorbent surface similar to that of nanofibers with a herringbone structure. Our main result, which is relevant for hydrogen purification and carbon dioxide capture, is that the adsorption selectivities calculated for the mixtures can differ significantly from those deduced from simulations of the adsorption of pure gases, in particular, when one of the adsorbed gases presents a capillary condensation induced by confinement within the pore network. A comparison of our data is also made with theoretical models used in the literature for predicting the properties of the mixture adsorption.

  11. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  12. Adsorption of nisin and pediocin on nanoclays.

    PubMed

    Meira, Stela Maris Meister; Jardim, Arthur Izé; Brandelli, Adriano

    2015-12-01

    Three different nanoclays (bentonite, octadecylamine-modified montmorillonite and halloysite) were studied as potential carriers for the antimicrobial peptides nisin and pediocin. Adsorption occurred from peptide solutions in contact with nanoclays at room temperature. Higher adsorption of nisin and pediocin was obtained on bentonite. The antimicrobial activity of the resultant bacteriocin-nanoclay systems was analyzed using skimmed milk agar as food simulant and the largest inhibition zones were observed against Gram-positive bacteria for halloysite samples. Bacteriocins were intercalated into the interlayer space of montmorillonites as deduced from the increase of the basal spacing measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) assay. Infrared spectroscopy suggested non-electrostatic interactions, such as hydrogen bonding between siloxane groups from clays and peptide molecules. Transmission electron microscopy did not show any alteration in morphologies after adsorption of antimicrobial peptides on bentonite and halloysite. These results indicate that nanoclays, especially halloysite, are suitable nanocarriers for nisin and pediocin adsorption.

  13. Ionic Adsorption and Desorption of CNT Nanoropes

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jun-Jun; Yang, Qing-Sheng; Yan, Xiao-Hui; He, Xiao-Qiao; Liew, Kim-Meow

    2016-01-01

    A nanorope is comprised of several carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different chiralities. A molecular dynamic model is built to investigate the ionic adsorption and desorption of the CNT nanoropes. The charge distribution on the nanorope is obtained by using a modified gradient method based on classical electrostatic theory. The electrostatic interactions among charged carbon atoms are calculated by using the Coulomb law. It was found here that the charged nanorope can adsorb heavy metal ions, and the adsorption and desorption can be realized by controlling the strength of applied electric field. The distance between the ions and the nanorope as well as the amount of ions have an effect on the adsorption capacity of the nanorope. The desorption process takes less time than that of adsorption. The study indicates that the CNT nanorope can be used as a core element of devices for sewage treatment. PMID:28335306

  14. H2O Adsorption Kinetics on Smectites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zent, Aaron P.; Howard, J.; Quinn, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The adsorptive equilibration of H2O with montomorillonite has been measured. At low temperatures and pressures equilibration can require many hours, effectively preventing smectites at the martian surface from responding to diurnal pressure and temperature variations.

  15. Argon adsorption and the lunar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The results of Ar adsorption experiments on a terrestrial labradorite and lunar rock 15415 crushed in vacuo are reported. The experiments were designed to test lunar atmosphere simulation models for the behavior of Ar on the lunar surface, as determined from the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer results. These models (Hodges, 1980, 1982) used a single adsorption potential to characterize the surfaces of lunar soil grains, with the result that high (6-7 kcal/mol) heats of adsorption were inferred. The present experimental results show that very high adsorption potentials are indeed associated with fresh mineral surfaces, but that these energetic surfaces occupy only small fractions of the total surface area. Nonetheless, these small fractions of surface, if they can be maintained in the lunar regolith in steady-state condition, could be sufficient to account for the Apollo 17 mass spectrometer observations.

  16. Krypton based adsorption type cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Schember, Helene R. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Krypton and a monolithic porous carbon such as Saran carbon are used respectively as the sorbate and sorbent of an adsorption type refrigerator to improve refrigeration efficiency and operational longevity.

  17. Methane Adsorption on Aggregates of Fullerenes: Site-Selective Storage Capacities and Adsorption Energies

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Alexander; Zöttl, Samuel; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Scheier, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Methane adsorption on positively charged aggregates of C60 is investigated by both mass spectrometry and computer simulations. Calculated adsorption energies of 118–281 meV are in the optimal range for high-density storage of natural gas. Groove sites, dimple sites, and the first complete adsorption shells are identified experimentally and confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, using a newly developed force field for methane–methane and fullerene–methane interaction. The effects of corrugation and curvature are discussed and compared with data for adsorption on graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. PMID:23744834

  18. Methane adsorption on aggregates of fullerenes: site-selective storage capacities and adsorption energies.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Zöttl, Samuel; Bartl, Peter; Leidlmair, Christian; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Denifl, Stephan; Echt, Olof; Scheier, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Methane adsorption on positively charged aggregates of C60 is investigated by both mass spectrometry and computer simulations. Calculated adsorption energies of 118-281 meV are in the optimal range for high-density storage of natural gas. Groove sites, dimple sites, and the first complete adsorption shells are identified experimentally and confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, using a newly developed force field for methane-methane and fullerene-methane interaction. The effects of corrugation and curvature are discussed and compared with data for adsorption on graphite, graphene, and carbon nanotubes.

  19. Assessing the effects of adsorptive polymeric resin additions on fungal secondary metabolite chemical diversity

    PubMed Central

    González-Menéndez, Víctor; Asensio, Francisco; Moreno, Catalina; de Pedro, Nuria; Monteiro, Maria Candida; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Vicente, Francisca; Bills, Gerald F.; Reyes, Fernando; Genilloud, Olga; Tormo, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorptive polymeric resins have been occasionally described to enhance the production of specific secondary metabolites (SMs) of interest. Methods that induce the expression of new chemical entities in fungal fermentations may lead to the discovery of new bioactive molecules and should be addressed as possible tools for the creation of new microbial chemical libraries for drug lead discovery. Herein, we apply both biological activity and chemical evaluations to assess the use of adsorptive resins as tools for the differential expression of SMs in fungal strain sets. Data automation approaches were applied to ultra high performance liquid chromatography analysis of extracts to evaluate the general influence in generating new chemical entities or in changing the production of specific SMs by fungi grown in the presence of resins and different base media. PMID:25379340

  20. Environmental remediation of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution through hydrogel adsorption: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Muya, Francis Ntumba; Sunday, Christopher Edoze; Baker, Priscilla; Iwuoha, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal ions such as Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), and Hg(2+) from industrial waste water constitute a major cause of pollution for ground water sources. These ions are toxic to man and aquatic life as well, and should be removed from wastewater before disposal. Various treatment technologies have been reported to remediate the potential toxic elements from aqueous media, such as adsorption, precipitation and coagulation. Most of these technologies are associated with some shortcomings, and challenges in terms of applicability, effectiveness and cost. However, adsorption techniques have the capability of effectively removing heavy metals at very low concentration (1-100 mg/L). Various adsorbents have been reported in the literature for this purpose, including, to a lesser extent, the use of hydrogel adsorbents for heavy metal removal in aqueous phase. Here, we provide an in-depth perspective on the design, application and efficiency of hydrogel systems as adsorbents.

  1. Biologically and chemically mediated adsorption and precipitation of phosphorus from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Chris; Parsons, Simon A; Soares, Ana; Martin, Ben D

    2012-12-01

    Biologically and chemically mediated adsorption and precipitation processes offer a range of approaches for removing phosphorus (P) from agricultural, domestic and industrial effluents. Technologies implemented at full-scale include filtration by adsorbent media, such as steel slag, and recovery of phosphorus as struvite, which has been successfully commercialised as a fertiliser. Other promising technologies under investigation include P removal by polymers and nanomaterials as well as struvite formation by bacteria. There is a need to focus future research on improving the efficiency of P removal by adsorption and precipitation. This can be achieved by techniques such as regenerating filters, polymers and nanomaterials for renewed P removal. Research is also needed to optimise the fertiliser potential of struvite precipitates.

  2. Defluoridation of drinking water using adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Kandasamy, Jaya; Naidu, Ravi

    2013-03-15

    Excessive intake of fluoride (F), mainly through drinking water, is a serious health hazard affecting humans worldwide. There are several methods used for the defluoridation of drinking water, of which adsorption processes are generally considered attractive because of their effectiveness, convenience, ease of operation, simplicity of design, and for economic and environmental reasons. In this paper, we present a comprehensive and a critical literature review on various adsorbents used for defluoridation, their relative effectiveness, mechanisms and thermodynamics of adsorption, and suggestions are made on choice of adsorbents for various circumstances. Effects of pH, temperature, kinetics and co-existing anions on F adsorption are also reviewed. Because the adsorption is very weak in extremely low or high pHs, depending on the adsorbent, acids or alkalis are used to desorb F and regenerate the adsorbents. However, adsorption capacity generally decreases with repeated use of the regenerated adsorbent. Future research needs to explore highly efficient, low cost adsorbents that can be easily regenerated for reuse over several cycles of operations without significant loss of adsorptive capacity and which have good hydraulic conductivity to prevent filter clogging during the fixed-bed treatment process.

  3. Gibbs adsorption and the compressibility equation

    SciTech Connect

    Aranovich, G.L.; Donohue, M.D.

    1995-08-08

    A new approach for deriving the equation of state is developed. It is shown that the integral in the compressibility equation is identical to the isotherm for Gibbs adsorption in radial coordinates. The Henry, Langmuir, and Frumkin adsorption isotherms are converted into equations of state. It is shown that using Henry`s law gives an expression for the second virial coefficient that is identical to the result from statistical mechanics. Using the Langmuir isotherm leads to a new analytic expression for the hard-sphere equation of state which can be explicit in either pressure or density. The Frumkin isotherm results in a new equation of state for the square-well potential fluid. Conversely, new adsorption isotherms can be derived from equations of state using the compressibility equation. It is shown that the van der Waals equation gives an adsorption isotherm equation that describes both polymolecular adsorption and the unusual adsorption behavior observed for supercritical fluids. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Differential Heat of Adsorption and Isosteres.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yun; Wu, Jianzhong

    2017-01-31

    Heat of adsorption is a basic thermodynamic property extensively used not only for understanding thermal effects and heat management in industrial gas storage and separation processes but also for development and validation of adsorption models and materials force fields. Despite a long history of theoretical studies and a vast experimental literature, controversies often arise in the thermodynamic analysis of heat effects due to various assumptions used to describe gas adsorption and inconsistencies between direct calorimetric measurements and isosteric heat obtained from various adsorption isotherms. Here we present a rigorous theoretical procedure for predicting isosteric heat without any assumption about the geometry of porous adsorbents or operating conditions. Quantitative relations between the differential heat and various isosteres have been established with the grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulation for gas adsorption in amorphous as well as crystalline porous materials. The inconsistencies and practical issues with conventional methods for the analysis of the heat effect have been clarified in the context of the exact results for model systems. Via the resolution of a number of controversies about heat analysis, we hope that the new theoretical procedure will be adopted for both fundamental research and industrial applications of gas adsorption processes.

  5. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; ...

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  6. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challenging due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.

  7. Carbon dioxide adsorption in graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Ramaprabhu, Sundara

    2011-09-01

    Control over the CO2 emission via automobiles and industrial exhaust in atmosphere, is one of the major concerns to render environmental friendly milieu. Adsorption can be considered to be one of the more promising methods, offering potential energy savings compared to absorbent systems. Different carbon nanostructures (activated carbon and carbon nanotubes) have attracted attention as CO2 adsorbents due to their unique surface morphology. In the present work, we have demonstrated the CO2 adsorption capacity of graphene, prepared via hydrogen induced exfoliation of graphitic oxide at moderate temperatures. The CO2 adsorption study was performed using high pressure Sieverts apparatus and capacity was calculated by gas equation using van der Waals corrections. Physical adsorption of CO2 molecules in graphene was confirmed by FTIR study. Synthesis of graphene sheets via hydrogen exfoliation is possible at large scale and lower cost and higher adsorption capacity of as prepared graphene compared to other carbon nanostructures suggests its possible use as CO2 adsorbent for industrial application. Maximum adsorption capacity of 21.6 mmole/g was observed at 11 bar pressure and room temperature (25 °C).

  8. Open Media Training Session

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Have you ever wondered how the media work and why some topics make it into the news and other don't? Would you like to know how to (and how not to) give an interview to a journalist? With the LHC preparing for first collisions at high energies, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. Follow the webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  9. Using a Solid Oxidizing Media to Enhance Arsenic (As[III]) Removal at a Very Small System

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adsorptive media system at the LEADS Head Start School (LHSS) Building in Buckeye Lake, OH, one of the 50 U.S. EPA Arsenic Removal Technology Demonstration sites, was relocated, after modifications, to Plainview Christian School in Plain City, OH to help bring the non-transien...

  10. Media and risky behaviors.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Anderson, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Liliana Escobar-Chaves and Craig Anderson investigate two important trends among American youth and examine the extent to which the two trends might be related. First, the authors note that U.S. youth are spending increasing amounts of time using electronic media, with the average American youngster now spending one-third of each day with some form of electronic media. Second, the authors demonstrate that American adolescents are engaging in a number of unhealthful behaviors that impose huge societal costs. Escobar-Chaves and Anderson detail the extent of five critical types of adolescent health risk behaviors identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-obesity, smoking, drinking, sexual risk taking, and violence. Obesity, the authors note, has become an epidemic among America's young people. Cigarette smoking among adolescents is one of the ten leading health indicators of greatest government concern. Alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence are widespread problems among the nation's youth and are the source of the three leading causes of death among youth. More than 20 percent of American high school students have sexual intercourse for the first time before they reach the age of fourteen. And twelve- to twenty-year-olds perpetrated 28 percent of the single-offender and 41 percent of multiple-offender violent crimes in the United States in 2005. Escobar-Chaves and Anderson present and evaluate research findings on the influence of electronic media on these five risk behaviors among adolescents. Researchers, they say, have found modest evidence that media consumption contributes to the problem of obesity, modest to strong evidence that it contributes to drinking and smoking, and strong evidence that it contributes to violence. Research has been insufficient to find links between heavy media exposure and early sexual initiation. The authors note the need for more large-scale longitudinal studies that specifically examine the cumulative effects of

  11. Acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen

    2014-03-01

    One in 4 children will have at least 1 episode of acute otitis media (AOM) by age 10 years. AOM results from infection of fluid that has become trapped in the middle ear. The bacteria that most often cause AOM are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Differentiating AOM from otitis media with effusion (OME) is a critical skill for physicians, as accurate diagnosis will guide appropriate treatment of these conditions. Although fluid is present in the middle ear in both conditions, the fluid is not infected in OME as is seen in AOM patients.

  12. Otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; Wallis, Sebastian; Coatesworth, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    Otitis media with effusion (OME) is a common problem facing general practitioners, pediatricians and otolaryngologists. This article reviews the etiopathogenesis, epidemiology, presentation, natural history and management of OME. The literature was reviewed by using the PubMed search engine and entering a combination of terms including 'otitis media with effusion', 'epidemiology' and 'management'. Relevant articles were identified and examined for content. What is the take home message? While OME is a very common entity in the pediatric population, the majority of cases will resolve spontaneously. Surgery in the form of grommet insertion, with or without adenoidectomy is the most effective treatment in persistent symptomatic cases.

  13. Media and Influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, William H.

    The public information media provides information on current events (news), entertainment (programming), and opinions offered by trusted public sources (e.g., business, academic or religious spokespersons, journalists, and government officials). Consequently, it is a major force in shaping a populace's attitudes toward significant social issues and of great interest to intervention planners. The chapter attempts to provide modelers and intervention analysts alike with sufficient understanding of media mechanisms and current research that they can begin contributing to, and benefiting from this important area of study.

  14. Mass media influences on sexuality.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jane D

    2002-02-01

    The mainstream mass media (television, magazines, movies, music, and the Internet) provide increasingly frequent portrayals of sexuality. We still know relatively little about how this content is used and how it affects sexual beliefs and behaviors. The few available studies suggest that the media do have an impact because the media keep sexual behavior on public and personal agendas, media portrayals reinforce a relatively consistent set of sexual and relationship norms, and the media rarely depict sexually responsible models. More longitudinal research, especially with early adolescents is needed to learn more about how media content is attended to, interpreted, and incorporated into developing sexual lives.

  15. USEPA MANUAL OF METHODS FOR VIROLOGY | Science ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This chapter describes procedures for the detection of coliphases in water matrices. These procedures are based on those presented in the Supplement to the 20th Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Eastewater and EPA Methods 1601 and 1602. Two quantitative procedures and one qualitative, presence-absence procedures are presented. The procedures can be used, without supplementary methods, to assay small volumes of water (10 mL to 1L). For larger volumes (>100L), large-scale concentration methods such as described in Chapter 14 may be incorporated into the assay scheme. However, as some concentration procedures may result in appreciable loss or inactivation of coliphage, it is recommended that the suitability of any large volume concentration method be evaluated in measured recovery trials before implementation. Develop sensitive techniques to detect and identify emerging human waterborne pathogenic viruses and viruses on the CCL.Determine effectiveness of viral indicators to measure microbial quality in water matrices.Support activities: (a) culture and distribution of mammalian cells for Agency and scientific community research needs, (b) provide operator expertise for research requiring confocal and electron microscopy, (c) glassware cleaning, sterilization and biological waste disposal for the Cincinnati EPA facility, (d) operation of infectious pathogenic suite, (e) maintenance of walk-in constant temperature rooms and (f) provid

  16. USEPA MANUAL OF METHODS FOR VIROLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes procedures for the detection of coliphases in water matrices. These procedures are based on those presented in the Supplement to the 20th Edition of Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Eastewater and EPA Methods 1601 and 1602. Two quantitati...

  17. USEPA CAPSTONE REPORT: CONTROL AND TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined-sewer overflows (CSOs), sanitary-sewer overflows and stormwater (SW) are significant contributors of contamination to surface waters. During a rain event, the flow in a combined sewer system may exceed the capacity of the intercepting sewer leading to the wastewater trea...

  18. USEPA ORD Aging Water Infrastructure Research Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes research that is being conducted under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Aging Water Infrastructure (AWI) Research Program, which will help U.S. water infrastructure to be more effectively and sustainably managed. The AWI research program see...

  19. OVERVIEW OF USEPA'S ARSENIC TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a summary on the Arsenic Treatment Technology Demonstration Program. The information includes the history and the current status of the demonstration projects on both round 1 and round 2 including some photos of the treatment systems. The presentation m...

  20. USEPA EXAMPLE EXIT LEVEL ANALYSIS RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developed by NERL/ERD for the Office of Solid Waste, the enclosed product provides an example uncertainty analysis (UA) and initial process-based sensitivity analysis (SA) of hazardous waste "exit" concentrations for 7 chemicals and metals using the 3MRA Version 1.0 Modeling Syst...

  1. USEPA'S ARSENIC TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation will discuss the status of the arsenic treatment technology demonstration program. The presentation will include a review of the past activities of the site solicitation announcement, site selection, technology solicittion and response to technology solicitation. Fu...

  2. USEPA Inland HAB Risk Management - Lake Harsha

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater inland lakes and reservoirs supply approximately 70% of the nation’s drinking water and industrial needs. These are typically open ecological systems and susceptible to Harmful algal blooms (HABs) which are increasing in frequency, intensity, and geographic range. I...

  3. Adsorption of aqueous copper on peanut hulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Kanika Octavia

    A method was established for measuring the adsorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solution to unmodified and modified peanut hulls at constant temperature and pH. Modification of the hulls was performed by oxidation with alkaline hydrogen peroxide. During the modification process, the hydrogen peroxide solubilizes the lignin component, making the surface more porous which increases the availability of binding sites, while simultaneously oxidizing the cellulose. The oxidation of alcohol groups creates more binding sites by creating functional groups such as COO-, which increases chelation to metal ions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms delignification of the peanut hulls by the disappearance of carboxyl peaks of the modified hulls, which were originally produced from the lignin content. Although, oxidation is not fully confirmed, it is not ruled out because the expected carboxylate peak (1680 cm-1) maybe overshadowed by a broad peak due to OH bending of water adsorbed to the hulls. Hulls adsorbed copper from solutions in the concentration range of 50-1000 ppm of CuCl2. Concentrations of pre- and post-adsorption solutions were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The adsorption isotherms were fit to known two and three-parameter models, evaluated and the binding mechanism was inferred. Maximum surface coverage was 3.5 +/- 0.6 mg Cu2+ /g hull for unmodified hulls and 11 +/- 1 mg Cu2+/g hull for modified hulls. The adsorption for the hulls is best described by the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer, homogeneous adsorption. With a free energy of adsorption of 10.5 +/- 0.9 kJ/mol for unmodified hulls and 14.5 +/-0.4 kJ/mol for modified hulls, the process is categorized as chemisorption for both types of hulls. The adsorption for both hulls is also described by the Redlich-Peterson model, giving beta nearer to 1 than 0, which further suggests homogeneous adsorption described by the Langmuir model. After rinsing the hulls

  4. Assessing the Adsorption Properties of Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fine-grained rocks, such as shales, contain a significant amount of nanopores that can significantly contribute to their storage capacity through the mechanism of adsorption. The current ability to extract natural gas that is adsorbed in the rock's matrix is limited and current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures, thus leading to very low recovery efficiencies. Shales constitute also a great portion of so-called caprocks above potential CO2 sequestration sites; hereby, the adsorption process may limit the CO2 mobility within the cap-rock, thus minimizing leakage phenomena. Whether it is a reservoir or a caprock, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of adsorption in these natural materials is key to improve the engineering design of subsurface operations. Results will be presented from a laboratory study that combines conventional techniques for the measurement of adsorption isotherms with novel methods that allows for the imaging of adsorption using x-rays. Various nanoporous materials are considered, thus including rocks, such as shales and coals, pure clay minerals and engineered adsorbents with well-defined nanopore structures, such as zeolites. Supercritical CO2 adsorption isotherms have been measured with a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension balance by covering the pressure range 0.1-20~MPa. A medical x-ray CT scanner has been used to identify three-dimensional patterns of the adsorption properties of a packed-bed of adsorbent, thus enabling to assess the spatial variability of the adsorption isotherm. The data are analyzed by using thermodynamically rigorous measures of adsorption and a graphical method is applied for their interpretation. The density of the adsorbed phase is estimated and compared to data reported in the literature; the latter is key to disclose gas-reserves and/or potential storage capacity estimates. When evaluated against classic adsorbent materials, the adsorption mechanism in shales is further complicated by

  5. Adsorption of superplasticizer admixtures on alkali-activated slag pastes

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, M. Houst, Y.F.; Bowen, P.; Puertas, F.

    2009-08-15

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) binders are obtained by a manufacturing process less energy-intensive than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and involves lower greenhouse gasses emission. These alkaline cements allow the production of high mechanical strength and durable concretes. In the present work, the adsorption of different superplasticizer admixtures (naphthalene-based, melamine-based and a vinyl copolymer) on the slag particles in AAS pastes using alkaline solutions with different pH values have been studied in detail. The effect of the superplasticizers on the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the AAS and OPC pastes have been also evaluated. The results obtained allowed us to conclude that the adsorption of the superplasticizers on AAS pastes is independent of the pH of the alkaline solutions used and lower than on OPC pastes. However, the effect of the admixtures on the rheological parameters depends directly on the type and dosage of the superplasticizer as well as of the binder used and, in the case of the AAS, on the pH of the alkaline activator solution. In 11.7-pH NaOH-AAS pastes the dosages of the superplasticizers required to attain similar reduction in the yield stress are ten-fold lower than for Portland cement. In this case the superplasticizers studied show a fluidizing effect considerably higher in 11.7-pH NaOH-AAS pastes than in OPC pastes. In 13.6-pH NaOH-AAS pastes, the only admixture observed to affect the rheological parameters is the naphthalene-based admixture due to its higher chemical stability in such extremely alkaline media.

  6. Heavy metal adsorption changes of EAF steel slag after phosphorus adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanling; Cao, Lijing; Chen, Xiao; Hou, Wenhua; Wang, Qunhui

    2012-01-01

    A kind of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag was phosphated, and its isothermal and dynamic adsorptions of copper, cadmium, and lead ions were measured to determine if heavy metal adsorption changes after phosphorus adsorption. The surface area increased greatly after the slag was phosphated. Isothermal adsorption experiments showed that the theoretical Q(max) of the EAF steel slag on Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) improved 59, 50, and 89% respectively after it was phosphated. Dynamic adsorption results showed that the greatest adsorption capacities of unit volume of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) were 2.2, 1.8, and 1.8 times that of the column packed with original EAF steel slag when the column was packed with phosphate EAF steel slag at the same heavy metal ion concentration. The breakthrough time, the exhaustion time and elution efficiency of the column also increased when the column was packed with phosphated EAF steel slag compared with that packed with original EAF steel slag. Phosphorus adsorption could further improve the heavy metal ion adsorption of the EAF steel slag.

  7. Library Media Services Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnipeg School Div. Number 1, Manitoba (Canada).

    This 1991 edition of the handbook for Winnipeg School Division Number 1 school library media programs presents detailed program guidelines, objectives, philosophies, and goals in five major sections: (1) Library Policy and Practices (statement of the division's educational philosophy and goals, philosophy and goals of the division's library…

  8. Cyberbullying via Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittaker, Elizabeth; Kowalski, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a surge of research on cyberbullying. In this article, three studies examined prevalence rates of cyberbullying among college-age students, venues through which cyberbullying occurs, with a particular focus on social media, and perceptions of cyberbullying as a function of features of the target (e.g., peer, celebrity,…

  9. The Media in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howkins, John

    1980-01-01

    Provides a brief history of television and radio in China and describes the use of television, radio, and film there, noting the number of television sets, radios, public loudspeakers, and cinemas. Article is comprised of extracts from the author's 193-page publication "China Media Industry Report 1980." (JD)

  10. Teleconferencing and Interactive Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Lorne A., Comp.; Olgren, Christine H., Comp.

    This publication contains more than 50 papers on the latest developments and applications of interactive media to link distant locations. The contributors, who represent business, government, education, medical, and telecommunications organizations in the United States, Canada, England, and Australia, have had direct experience with the full range…

  11. Media and Risky Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Anderson, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    Liliana Escobar-Chaves and Craig Anderson investigate two important trends among American youth and examine the extent to which the two trends might be related. First, the authors note that U.S. youth are spending increasing amounts of time using electronic media, with the average American youngster now spending one-third of each day with some…

  12. Basic Media in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, John

    Intended as a guide to the use of different media for use in the classroom, this document demonstrates alternative approaches that may be taken to depicting and communicating images and concepts to others. Some basic tools and materials--including a ruler, matte knife, rubber cement, stapler, felt-tip pens, paint brushes, and lettering pens--are…

  13. Media Specialist's Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrini, Michelle; Kittlaus, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Presents resources relating to this issue of "Insights on Law and Society" that are intended for students, teachers, and school library media specialists. Includes resources, such as primary documents for students, Web sites, Supreme Court cases, books, an online article, and lessons. (CMK)

  14. Media Specialist's Corner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrini, Michelle; Kittlaus, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of resources for students, teachers, and school library media specialists related to the topic, "Youth, Rights, and the Constitution," found in this issue of "Insights on Law and Society." Includes books and primary sources for students. (CMK)

  15. Photochemistry in Organized Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Janos H.

    1983-01-01

    Describes common artificially produced organized media such as colloids, surfactants, and polymers and their usefulness in studying complex biochemical processes. Discusses selected recent photophysical and photochemical exploitations of these systems, including artificial photosynthesis, in situ generation of colloidal gold and platinum,…

  16. The Indian Media Scenario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eapen, K. E.

    As background information for a discussion of India's communication system and its potential for social change, this paper briefly describes the country's physical characteristics, some of its cultural heritage and demographics, and the development of its education and railways. After a discussion of the folk media (traditional changes) of…

  17. THE EDUCATIONAL MEDIA INDEX.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Media Council, Inc., New York, NY.

    THIS 14-VOLUME SERIES INCLUDES TITLES AND DESCRIPTIONS FOR ALL CURRENT AND GENERALLY AVAILABLE EDUCATIONAL MEDIA, EXCLUDING STANDARD PRINT MATERIALS. EACH VOLUME COVERS A SPECIFIC SUBJECT AREA, LISTS TITLES ALPHABETICALLY AND BY SUBJECT, DESCRIBES EACH ENTRY, AND LISTS NAMES AND ADDRESSES OF SOURCES FOR THE MATERIALS. VOLUME 14 IS A CUMULATIVE…

  18. The Media Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Joan; Crow, Jeanne

    This student text and activity book provides information on and suggests ways to examine seven of the mass media: movies, television, advertising, magazines, comics, radio, and newspapers. Much of the learning takes place by actual examination of actual products to learn characteristics common to them. The first section investigates the process of…

  19. Mass Media and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Alan

    Designed to serve as a basic text for general liberal arts courses in mass communication, this book presents essays, largely from recent magazine articles, written from the layman (although there are a few more overtly scholarly articles). It begins with an examination of the media industries in the United States, treating them as complex…

  20. Contextualised Media for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jong, Tim; Specht, Marcus; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse how contextualised media can be used to support learning. Additionally, the advantages of contextualised learning and the types of learning that are fit to be supported are discussed. Our focus throughout the paper will be on lifelong learning, and the integration of formal and informal learning therein. However, we…

  1. Archive Storage Media Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Reviews requirements for a data archive system and describes storage media alternatives that are currently available. Topics discussed include data storage; data distribution; hierarchical storage architecture, including inline storage, online storage, nearline storage, and offline storage; magnetic disks; optical disks; conventional magnetic…

  2. Media Matters in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Kell

    1998-01-01

    Describes how a teacher helped transform a K-12 Christian school near Sydney, Australia, from a book-bound media studies program into a hands-on learning experience for students. Various projects allow students to operate advanced equipment, evaluate their own and their peers' work, present research results to the class, and produce live media…

  3. New-Media Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Being literate in a real-world sense means being able to read and write using the media forms of the day, whatever they may be. For centuries, consuming and producing words through reading and writing and, to a lesser extent, listening and speaking were sufficient. But because of inexpensive, easy-to-use, and widely available new tools, literacy…

  4. Educational Media Yearbook 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James W., Ed.

    This collection of articles brings together the historical, statistical, and factual data needed to lend perspective to the attempt to understand the past and foresee the future of educational media. Coinciding with the 50th anniversary of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, the Yearbook stresses the need for cooperation…

  5. Media Literacy: Good News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenner, Adam; Rivera, Sheryl

    2007-01-01

    Media has always had the power to affect people on a nonverbal and emotional level. At its best, it can be a source of aesthetic pleasure and deep personal satisfaction. At its worst, citizens and consumers are exposed to psychological and political manipulation which may make them anxious and depressed, dissatisfied with what they have,…

  6. Looking at Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sive, Mary Robinson

    1979-01-01

    This article offers a bibliography of recent inexpensive filmstrips, slide sets, and study prints that can expand students' awareness of such issues as psychic manipulation in TV commercials, the intrusion of show biz into news reporting, and the role of the advertiser in determining media content. (Editor/SJL)

  7. Language and the Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Allan

    1995-01-01

    Reviews recent research on the use of language in the mass media, focusing on the work of Teun van Dijk, A. Bell, Roger Fowler, and Norman Fairclough, as well as research on broadcast interviews, talk shows, and advertising. An annotated bibliography discusses 16 important works in the field. (58 references) (MDM)

  8. English in Indian Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khubchandani, Lachman M.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the use of English in urban India, with specific focus on the three domains of mass media, print, television, and advertising. Points to the emergence of Angrezi, which can potentially take a divergent path as an Ausbau language different from the global English. Brings under discussion interesting examples of bilingual and biscriptal…

  9. Microphones and Educational Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marilyn

    This paper describes the types of microphones that are available for use in media production. Definitions of 16 words and phrases used to describe microphones are followed by detailed descriptions of the two kinds of microphones as classified by mode of operation, i.e., velocity, or ribbon microphones, and pressure operated microphones, which…

  10. Polypropylene non-woven meshes with conformal glycosylated layer for lectin affinity adsorption: the effect of side chain length.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Zhi-Kang

    2014-03-01

    The unique characteristics of polypropylene non-woven meshes (PPNWMs), like random network of overlapped fibers, multiple connected pores and overall high porosity, make them high potentials for use as separation or adsorption media. Meanwhile, carbohydrates can specifically recognize certain lectin through multivalent interactions. Therefore glycosylated PPNWMs, combing the merits of both, can be regarded as superior affinity membranes for lectin adsorption and purification. Here, we describe a versatile strategy for the glycosylation of PPNWMs. Two hydrophilic polymers with different side chain length, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (POEGMA), were first conformally tethered on the polypropylene fiber surface by a modified plasma pretreatment and benzophenone (BP) entrapment UV irradiation process. Then glucose ligands were bound through the reaction between the hydroxyl group and acetyl glucose. Chemical changes of the PPNWMs surface were monitored by FT-IR/ATR. SEM pictures show that conformal glucose ligands can be achieved through the modified process. After deprotection, the glycosylated PPNWMs became superhydrophilic and had high specific recognition capability toward Concanavalin A (Con A). Static Con A adsorption experiments were further performed and the results indicate that fast adsorption kinetics and high binding capacity can be accomplished at the same time. We also found that increasing the side chain length of polymer brushes had positive effect on protein binding capacity due to improved chain mobility. Model studies suggest a multilayer adsorption behavior of Con A.

  11. An efficient removal of RB5 from aqueous solution by adsorption onto nano-ZnO/Chitosan composite beads.

    PubMed

    Çınar, Seda; Kaynar, Ümit H; Aydemir, Tülin; Çam Kaynar, Sermin; Ayvacıklı, Mehmet

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the removal of Reactive Black 5 (RB-5) by nano-ZnO/Chitosan composite beads (nano-ZnO/CT-CB) from aqueous solution was investigated. ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by the via the microwave-assisted combustion technique. And then nano-ZnO/Chitosan composite beads were prepared by polymerization in the presence of nano-ZnO and chitosan. Characterization of composite beads were conducted using SEM, TEM, FTIR, TGA and XRD. Several important parameters influencing the removal of RB 5 such as contact time, pH and temperature were investigated systematically by batch experiments. At optimum conditions of pH 4 and adsorbent concentration of 0.2g, dye removal efficiency was found 76%. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin adsorption models were used to describe adsorption isotherms and constants. The maximum adsorption capacity (qm) by Langmuir isotherm has been found to be 189.44mg/g. Isotherms have also been used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters such as free energy, enthalpy and entropy of adsorption. The positive value of the enthalpy change (32.7kJ/mol) indicated that the adsorption is an endothermic process. The obtained results showed that the tested adsorbents are efficient and alternate low-cost adsorbent for removal of dyes from aqueous media.

  12. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  13. Poliovirus Adsorption by 34 Minerals and Soils

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Rebecca S.; Taylor, Dene H.; Sturman, Lawrence S.; Reddy, Michael M.; Fuhs, G. Wolfgang

    1981-01-01

    The adsorption of radiolabeled infectious poliovirus type 2 by 34 well-defined soils and mineral substrates was analyzed in a synthetic freshwater medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 and 1.25 mM NaHCO3 at pH 7. In a model system, adsorption of poliovirus by Ottawa sand was rapid and reached equilibrium within 1 h at 4°C. Near saturation, the adsorption could be described by the Langmuir equation; the apparent surface saturation was 2.5 × 106 plaque-forming units of poliovirus per mg of Ottawa sand. At low surface coverage, adsorption was described by the Freundlich equation. The soils and minerals used ranged from acidic to basic and from high in organic content to organic free. The available negative surface charge on each substrate was measured by the adsorption of a cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. Most of the substrates adsorbed more than 95% of the virus. In general, soils, in comparison with minerals, were weak adsorbents. Among the soils, muck and Genesee silt loam were the poorest adsorbents; among the minerals, montmorillonite, glauconite, and bituminous shale were the least effective. The most effective adsorbents were magnetite sand and hematite, which are predominantly oxides of iron. Correlation coefficients for substrate properties and virus adsorption revealed that the elemental composition of the adsorbents had little effect on poliovirus uptake. Substrate surface area and pH, by themselves, were not significantly correlated with poliovirus uptake. A strong negative correlation was found between poliovirus adsorption and both the contents of organic matter and the available negative surface charge on the substrates as determined by their capacities for adsorbing the cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride. PMID:6274259

  14. Toward Accurate Adsorption Energetics on Clay Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in nature, and the manner in which they interact with their surroundings has important industrial and environmental implications. Consequently, a molecular-level understanding of the adsorption of molecules on clay surfaces is crucial. In this regard computer simulations play an important role, yet the accuracy of widely used empirical force fields (FF) and density functional theory (DFT) exchange-correlation functionals is often unclear in adsorption systems dominated by weak interactions. Herein we present results from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) for water and methanol adsorption on the prototypical clay kaolinite. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time QMC has been used to investigate adsorption at a complex, natural surface such as a clay. As well as being valuable in their own right, the QMC benchmarks obtained provide reference data against which the performance of cheaper DFT methods can be tested. Indeed using various DFT exchange-correlation functionals yields a very broad range of adsorption energies, and it is unclear a priori which evaluation is better. QMC reveals that in the systems considered here it is essential to account for van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces since this alters both the absolute and relative adsorption energies of water and methanol. We show, via FF simulations, that incorrect relative energies can lead to significant changes in the interfacial densities of water and methanol solutions at the kaolinite interface. Despite the clear improvements offered by the vdW-corrected and the vdW-inclusive functionals, absolute adsorption energies are often overestimated, suggesting that the treatment of vdW forces in DFT is not yet a solved problem. PMID:27917256

  15. Media Now: A Historical Review of a Media Literacy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesem, Yonty; Quaglia, Diane; Crane, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The Elizabeth Thoman Archive at the Harrington School of Communication and Media, University of Rhode Island, has the last complete kit of one of the milestones in the early chronology of media literacy, the 1972 Media Now curriculum. This curriculum was the first of its kind, using self-contained lesson modules that were part of a larger series…

  16. Need for Orientation, Media Uses and Gratifications, and Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, David

    In order to study the influence of need for orientation and media gratifications on media use and media effects in political communication, two previous surveys were studied to compare the causal modeling approach and the contingent conditions approach. In the first study, 339 personal interviews were conducted with registered voters during a…

  17. Media, Media Technologies, and Language Learning: Some Applied Linguistic Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, David

    An applied linguistic framework is presented within which specific applications of media technologies may be applied to language learning. The first two parts of the paper focus on the impact of media on linguistic communication and the possibilities offered by media technologies such as newspapers, radio, television, telephone/telex, computer…

  18. Synthesis and gas adsorption study of porous metal-organic framework materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Bin

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) or porous coordination polymers (PCPs) have become the focus of intense study over the past decade due to their potential for advancing a variety of applications including air purification, gas storage, adsorption separations, catalysis, gas sensing, drug delivery, and so on. These materials have some distinct advantages over traditional porous materials such as the well-defined structures, uniform pore sizes, chemically functionalized sorption sites, and potential for postsynthetic modification, etc. Thus, synthesis and adsorption studies of porous MOFs have increased substantially in recent years. Among various prospective applications, air purification is one of the most immediate concerns, which has urgent requirements to improve current nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) filters involving commercial and military purposes. Thus, the major goal of this funded project is to search, synthesize, and test these novel hybrid porous materials for adsorptive removal of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and chemical warfare agents (CWAs), and to install the benchmark for new-generation NBC filters. The objective of this study is three-fold: (i) Advance our understanding of coordination chemistry by synthesizing novel MOFs and characterizing these porous coordination polymers; (ii) Evaluate porous MOF materials for gasadsorption applications including CO2 capture, CH4 storage, other light gas adsorption and separations, and examine the chemical and physical properties of these solid adsorbents including thermal stability and heat capacity of MOFs; (iii) Evaluate porous MOF materials for next-generation NBC filter media by adsorption breakthrough measurements of TICs on MOFs, and advance our understanding about structureproperty relationships of these novel adsorbents.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of polymer brushes for controlled adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoy, Olha

    Performance of biomedical devices to a large extent depends on the interactions between the device surface and the biological liquids/protein molecules. To achieve controllable interactions between the device and biomolecules and still retain the required mechanical strength on the whole, modification of the surface is often done. In the present study surface properties were modified through a polymer brush approach. After the modification, surfaces gain tunability toward protein adsorption. Mixed polymer brushes consisting of protein repelling and protein attractive components were used, with a "grafting to" method employed for the synthesis of polymer layers. First, poly(ethylene glycol), the protein repelling component of the mixed polymer brush, was tethered to the surface. Then, polyacrylic acid-b-polystyrene (the protein attractive component) was grafted on top of the previous layer. As one part of this study, the temperature dependence of grafting of the mixed brush components was studied. Surface morphology and surface properties of the mixed polymer brush were altered by treating the brush with different organic solvents. Changes in surface morphology and properties resulting from the solvent treatment were studied in dry conditions and in aqueous media. Hydrophobic interactions of the mixed polymer brush in different pH environments were also estimated. Synthesized mixed polymer brushes demonstrated a clear dependency between the external stimuli applied to the brush and the amount of the protein adsorbed onto the brush surface, allowing an effective control of protein adsorption. Attraction forces between the protein molecules and surface of he mixed polymer brush were measured using AFM and these supported the findings from the protein adsorption studies. 2-D molecular imprinting of the polymer brush approach was used to synthesize a surface with controlled positioning of the protein molecules on the surface. Protein adsorption onto the surface of the

  20. Conceptual adsorption models and open issues pertaining to performance assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J.

    1991-10-01

    Recently several articles have been published that question the appropriateness of the distribution coefficient, Rd, concept to quantify radionuclide migration. Several distinct issues are raised by various critics. In this paper I provide some perspective on issues surrounding the modeling of nuclide retardation. The first section defines adsorption terminology and discusses various adsorption processes. The next section describes five commonly used adsorption conceptual models, specifically emphasizing what attributes that affect adsorption are explicitly accommodated in each model. I also review efforts to incorporate each adsorption model into performance assessment transport computer codes. The five adsorption conceptual models are (1) the constant Rd model, (2) the parametric Rd model, (3) isotherm adsorption models, (4) mass-action adsorption models, and (5) surface-complexation with electrostatics models. The final section discusses the adequacy of the distribution ratio concept, the adequacy of transport calculations that rely on constant retardation factors and the status of incorporating sophisticated adsorption models into transport codes.

  1. Adsorption of phenolic compound by aged-refuse.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Youcai, Zhao

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by aged-refuse has been studied. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol and the data fits well to the Freundlich equation. The chlorinated phenols are absorbed more strongly than the phenol and the adsorption capacity has an oblivious relationship with the numbers and the position of chlorine subsistent. The experiment data suggests that both the partition function and the chemical adsorption involve in the adsorption process. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model were applied to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption and the results show that it fit the pseudo-second-order model. More than one step involves in the adsorption process and the overall rate of the adsorption process appears to be controlled by the chemical reaction. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and endothermic.

  2. Children and the Mass Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Shirley

    1970-01-01

    Resume of testimony given at hearings at the White House Conference on Children, September, 1970. Topics considered were the influence of the mass media on children and ways to improve media products. (NH)

  3. Demography and the Mass Media.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    discussion of demography, its history, methodology and limitations, followed by a review of communications theory as it applies to the mass media . The...interrelations among the mass media , the government, and target audiences are demonstrated. (Modified author abstract)

  4. Data Mining in Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Geoffrey; Liu, Huan

    The rise of online social media is providing a wealth of social network data. Data mining techniques provide researchers and practitioners the tools needed to analyze large, complex, and frequently changing social media data. This chapter introduces the basics of data mining, reviews social media, discusses how to mine social media data, and highlights some illustrative examples with an emphasis on social networking sites and blogs.

  5. Neptunium(V) adsorption to calcite.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Frank; Brendebach, Boris; Bosbach, Dirk

    2008-12-12

    The migration behavior of the actinyl ions U(VI)O2(2+), Np(V)O2+ and Pu(V,VI)O2(+,2+) in the geosphere is to a large extend controlled by sorption reactions (inner- or outer-sphere adsorption, ion-exchange, coprecipitation/structural incorporation) with minerals. Here NpO2+ adsorption onto calcite is studied in batch type experiments over a wide range of pH (6.0-9.4) and concentration (0.4 microM-40 microM) conditions. pH is adjusted by variation of CO2 partial pressure. Adsorption is found to be pH dependent with maximal adsorption at pH 8.3 decreasing with increasing and decreasing pH. pH dependence of adsorption decreases with increasing Np(V) concentration. EXAFS data of neptunyl adsorbed to calcite and neptunyl in the supernatant shows differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance, 1.85+/-0.01 angstroms for the adsorbed and 1.82+/-0.01 angstroms for the solution species. The equatorial environment of the neptunyl in solution shows about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.45+/-0.02 angstroms. For adsorbed neptunyl there are also about 5 oxygen neighbours at 2.46+/-0.01 angstroms. An additional feature in the adsorbed species' R-space spectrum can be related to carbonate neighbours, 3 to 6 carbon backscatterers (C-eq) at 3.05+/-0.03 angstroms and 3 to 6 oxygen backscatterers (O-eq2) at 3.31+/-0.02 angstroms. The differences in the Np(V)-O-yl distance and the C-eq and O-eq2 backscatterers which are only present for the adsorbed species indicate inner-sphere bonding of the adsorbed neptunyl species to the calcite surface. Experiments on adsorption kinetics indicate that after a fast surface adsorption process a continuous slow uptake occurs which may be explained by incorporation via surface dissolution and reprecipitation processes. This is also indicated by the part irreversibility of the adsorption as shown by increased KD values after desorption compared to adsorption.

  6. Capacitive Deionization: a coupled 2D electro-adsorption/convective-diffusive simulation for various system configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidrovo, Carlos; Salamat, Yasamin

    2016-11-01

    Capacitive Deionization (CDI) is a relatively new electrically based desalination method that uses porous media to adsorb ions in solution from water, with the potential to recover part of the energy used during the desalination process. Previous studies have investigated the physics underlying the electro-adsorption process in the electrical double layers in the CDI porous electrodes. In order to improve CDI performance in terms of minimum average concentration, total amount of water treated, and duration of the desalination process, herein we propose and evaluate different CDI architectures. Two previously validated 2D and 1D models are used alongside each other to study different CDI system configurations based on various convective-diffusive layer regimes. Moreover, the effects of micro pore and macro pore capacities on the total number of ions adsorbed in the porous media is investigated. This will open new opportunities for further researches toward engineered CDI units for better desalination.

  7. Phosphorus recovery using pelletized adsorptive materials ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Phosphorous (P) is one of the essential nutrients for growth and is generally the most limiting nutrient since, it cannot be fixed from the atmosphere. Methods for recovering phosphorous from water systems already exist, but advances are being made to find a more economic, efficient, effective and easy to use method that can allow for reuse of the recovered P. One area of study is in adsorption, which involves finding the best material for adsorption of phosphorous from water and for releasing it back into the environment through desorption or leaching. The goal of this research was to first optimize the capacity for a pelletized adsorptive material that was synthesized with varying amounts of a binder material from 0-20 % and then to study recovering the phosphate for reuse. The pelletized materials were studied through kinetics experiments as well as isotherm experiments to gain insight into the adsorption capacity and mechanism. Following successful adsorption, a simple leaching study was conducted to see how much phosphate would be released back into water without any added desorption aid. Desorption was then studied by changing the pH of solution. Presenting my thesis work with a poster at ACS.

  8. Adsorption behavior of heavy metals on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Minamisawa, Mayumi; Minamisawa, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shoichiro; Takai, Nobuharu

    2004-09-08

    We have investigated adsorption of Cd(II) and Pb(II) at pH 2-6.7 onto the biomaterials chitosan, coffee, green tea, tea, yuzu, aloe, and Japanese coarse tea, and onto the inorganic adsorbents, activated carbon and zeolite. High adsorptive capabilities were observed for all of the biomaterials at pH 4 and 6.7. In the adsorption of Cd(II), blend coffee, tea, green tea, and coarse tea have comparable loading capacities to activated carbon and zeolite. Although activated carbon, zeolite, and chitosan are utilized in a variety of fields such as wastewater treatment, chemical and metallurgical engineering, and analytical chemistry, these adsorbents are costly. On the other hand, processing of the test biomaterials was inexpensive, and all the biomaterials except for chitosan were able to adsorb large amounts of Pb(II) and Cd(II) ions after a convenient pretreatment of washing with water followed by drying. The high adsorption capability of the biomaterials prepared from plant materials is promising in the development of a novel, low-cost adsorbent. From these results, it is concluded that heavy metal removal using biomaterials would be an effective method for the economic treatment of wastewater. The proposed adsorption method was applied to the determination of amounts of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in water samples.

  9. Sulfate adsorption in Michigan forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    The occurrence of acidic atmospheric deposition raised concerns over adverse cation leaching effects on Michigan forest soils with low cation exchange capacities. Leaching effects of acid deposition depend on mobility of sulfate in the soil. Little was known, however, concerning the ability of these soils to adsorb sulfate. The objectives of this study were to determine the ability of representative Michigan forest soils to adsorb sulfate, to relate sulfate adsorption to soil properties, and to develop equations to predict sulfate adsorption in similar forest soils. Frigid zone soil series studied were Grayling (Typic Udipsamments), Rubicon (Entic Haplorthods), Kalkaska (Typic Haplorthods), and Montcalm (Eutric Glossoboralfs). Mesic zone series studied were Spinks (Psammentic Hapludals) and Oshtemo (Typic Hapludalfs). Six randomly located pedons of each series were sampled. Sulfate adsorption was determined by shaking 10 gram soil samples for 24 hours in 50 mL 0.01 M CaCl/sub 2/ solution containing 10 mg SO/sub 4/-S L/sup -1/. Solution filtrates were turbidimetrically analyzed for SO/sub 4/-S and adsorption was calculated from reduction in SO/sub 4/-S concentration. Bw, Bs, and Bh horizons of frigid zone soils and E and Bt horizons of mesic zone soils had the highest sulfate adsorbing abilities. No significant differences were found between series in total sulfate adsorptive capacity.

  10. DNA adsorption by indium tin oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-01-01

    The high conductivity and optical transparency of indium tin oxide (ITO) has made it a popular material in the electronic industry. Recently, its application in biosensors is also explored. To understand its biointerface chemistry, we herein investigate its interaction with fluorescently labeled single-stranded oligonucleotides using ITO nanoparticles (NPs). The fluorescence of DNA is efficiently quenched after adsorption, and the interaction between DNA and ITO NPs is strongly dependent on the surface charge of ITO. At low pH, the ITO surface is positively charged to afford a high DNA adsorption capacity. Adsorption is also influenced by the sequence and length of DNA. For its components, In2O3 adsorbs DNA more strongly while SnO2 repels DNA at neutral pH. The DNA adsorption property of ITO is an averaging result from both components. DNA adsorption is confirmed to be mainly by the phosphate backbone via displacement experiments using free phosphate or DNA bases. Last, DNA-induced DNA desorption by forming duplex DNA is demonstrated on ITO, while the same reaction is more difficult to achieve on other metal oxides including CeO2, TiO2, and Fe3O4 because these particles adsorb DNA more tightly.

  11. Adsorption of Wine Constituents on Functionalized Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A

    2016-10-18

    The adsorption of macromolecules on solid surfaces is of great importance in the field of nanotechnology, biomaterials, biotechnological, and food processes. In the field of oenology adsorption of wine macromolecules such as polyphenols, polysaccharides, and proteins is much less desirable on membrane materials because of fouling and reduced filtering performance. On the other hand, adsorption of these molecules on processing aids is very beneficial for achieving wine clarity and stability. In this article, the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of white, rosé, and red wine constituents was evaluated. Allylamine, acrylic acid, and ethanol were selected as precursors for plasma polymerization in order to generate coatings rich in amine, carboxyl, and hydroxyl chemical groups, respectively. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ability of different surface chemical functionalities to adsorb wine constituents were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results demonstrated that the amine and carboxyl modified surfaces encourage adsorption of constituents from white wine. The hydroxyl modified surfaces have the ability to preferentially adsorb rosé wine constituents, whereas red wine adsorbed to the highest extent on acrylic acid surface.

  12. Adsorption of phenanthrene on natural snow.

    PubMed

    Domine, Florent; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Bonnaud, Elodie; Martellini, Tania; Picaud, Sylvain

    2007-09-01

    The snowpack is a reservoir for semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and, in particular, for persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which are sequestered in winter and released to the atmosphere or hydrosphere in the spring. Modeling these processes usually assumes that SVOCs are incorporated into the snowpack by adsorption to snow surfaces, but this has never been proven because the specific surface area (SSA) of snow has never been measured together with snow composition. Here we expose natural snow to phenanthrene vapors (one of the more volatile POPs) and measure for the first time both the SSA and the chemical composition of the snow. The results are consistent with an adsorption equilibrium. The measured Henry's law constant is H(Phen)(T) = 2.88 x 10(22) exp(-10660/7) Pa m2 mol(-1), with Tin Kelvin. The adsorption enthalpy is delta H(ads) = -89 +/- 18 kJ mol(-1). We also perform molecular dynamics calculations of phenanthrene adsorption to ice and obtain AHads = -85 +/- 8 kJ mol(-1), close to the experimental value. Results are applied to the adsorption of phenanthrene to the Arctic and subarctic snowpacks. The subarctic snowpack, with a low snow area index (SAI = 1000), is a negligible reservoir of phenanthrene, butthe colder Arctic snowpack, with SAI = 2500, sequesters most of the phenanthrene present in the (snow + boundary layer) system.

  13. Adsorption of gases on carbon molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, S.N.; Patwardhan, S.R.; Vijayalakshmi, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Ganesh, K.S. )

    1994-12-01

    Adsorption on carbon molecular sieves (CMS) prepared by coke deposition has become an interesting area of adsorption due to its microporous nature and favorable separation factor on size and shape selectivity basis for many gaseous systems. In the present work CMS was synthesized from coconut shell through three major steps, namely, carbonization, activation, and coke deposition by hydrocarbon cracking. The crushed, washed, and sieved granules of coconut shell (particle size 2--3 mm) were pretreated with sodium silicate solution and oven-dried at 150 C to create the inorganic sites necessary for coke deposition. Carbonization and activation of the dried granules were carried out at 800 C, for 30 min each. The activated char thus produced was subjected to hydrocarbon cracking at 600 C for periods varying from 30 to 180 min. The product samples were characterized in terms of adsorption isotherm, kinetic adsorption curve, surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and characteristic energy for adsorption by using O[sub 2], N[sub 2], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 6], and CH[sub 4].

  14. Comparative isosteric ion adsorption for minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omenyi, Samuel N.; Herren, Blair J.; Snyder, Robert S.; Seaman, Geoffrey V. F.

    1986-01-01

    A comparative isosteric ion adsorption study for minerals (kaolinite, rutile, and quartz) was performed in aqueous solutions of CaCl2, LaCl3, and Th(NO3)4 in the presence of the neutral salt NaCl. It was observed that the concentration of Ca(2+) ions required to produce a standard reduction in the electrophoretic mobility of mineral particles was always appreciably greater than the concentration required for the Th(4+) ions. The effectiveness of adsorption of the cations differed from particle to particle and showed that ion adsorption on a mineral surface depends, among other things, on the nature of the mineral surface and on the particular adsorbed cation. The number of cation binding sites on mineral surfaces and the electrochemical free energies of cation adsorption were calculated. It was found that the adsorption energy of La(3+) and Th(4+) ions on rutile, kaolinite, and quartz was greater than that of Ca(2+) on these minerals.

  15. Improved media performance in optimally coupled exchange spring layer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Supper, N.; Ikeda, Y.; Lengsfield, B.; Moser, A.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2008-09-01

    We have studied the recording performance of perpendicular exchange spring layer (ESL)-media for hard disk drive recording. In particular, we investigated the role of interlayer coupling by varying the thickness of a nonmagnetic coupling layer (CL). We demonstrate that not only the media writeability is improved upon optimizing the CL thickness, but also that substantial recording performance improvements can be achieved due to improved media noise properties. The potential of these media structures for high areal density recording is demonstrated by performing areal density measurements, which showed a substantial improvement for optimally coupled ESL-media.

  16. [Media for 21st century--towards human communication media].

    PubMed

    Harashima, H

    2000-05-01

    Today, with the approach of the 21st century, attention is focused on multi-media communications combining computer, visual and audio technologies. This article discusses the communication media target and the technological problems constituting the nucleus of multi-media. The communication media is becoming an environment from which no one can escape. Since the media has such a great power, what is needed now is not to predict the future technologies, but to estimate the future world and take to responsibility for future environments.

  17. The Impact of Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldrich, Pearl G.

    In order to bring the student's contemporary environment into the classroom for study and to avoid topicality, this book provides general principles by which to evaluate current media offerings, outlines the patterns from which media materials are cut for public consumption, and focuses the student's attention on the mass media themselves. Each of…

  18. Media Literacy. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    The media play an increasingly strong role in transmitting values; behaviors; social norms; attitudes; and knowledge to youth and adults. Media literacy involves the ability to ask questions about what is watched, heard, or read. It involves learning what to look for, what to ask, and how to question these many influences. Media literacy also…

  19. MASS MEDIA AND SOCIAL CHANGE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The relationships between mass media of communication and social change are discussed, and the significance and roles of the mass media in developing and modernized countries are summarized. On the assumption that the contents of the... mass media mirror as well as affect the perspectives and values

  20. Approaching the media with confidence.

    PubMed

    Meade, C D

    1992-09-01

    The media are useful in communicating health information to the public. They are also a powerful way to promote and maintain positive nursing images. This paper examines the past portrayals of nurses in the media, explores the benefits of communicating nursing knowledge to the profession and to the community, and suggests strategies to access the media.

  1. Issues in Media Management, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, David R., Ed.

    Nine papers from a two-day workshop concentrate on curriculum development, guidance, and counseling. Topics covered in these papers include media and instruction, humanistic education, the instructional team approach, media and methods, Title IV Elementary Secondary Education Act, media and guidance, and the art of writing a grant. (DS)

  2. Transmedia Play: Literacy across Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Meryl; Herr-Stephenson, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Transmedia play is a new way to understand how children develop critical media literacy and new media literacies through their interactions with contemporary media that links stories and structures across platforms. This essay highlights five characteristics of transmedia play that make it particularly useful for learning:…

  3. REPORT ON UNDERSTANDING NEW MEDIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCLUHAN, MARSHALL

    IN TYPICAL MCLUHAN STYLE, THE AUTHOR OF THIS WORKING PAPER TRACES HISTORICAL-CULTURAL TRANSITIONS FROM PHONETIC ALPHABET TECHNOLOGY TO MEDIA OF THE NEW ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY. THESE MEDIA ARE VIEWED AS EXTENSIONS OF MAN'S SENSES, AND AS LANGUAGES THEMSELVES, WHOSE ONLY CONTENT ARE OTHER MEDIA. EACH MEDIUM (E.G. SPEECH, WRITING, PRINT, PHOTOGRAPHY,…

  4. Media Violence and Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaks, Harold R.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of a connection between violence in the media and actual adolescent behavior. Explores the nature of the connection, why it exists, and possible courses of action to correct the problem. States that 3,000 studies have explored the link between media violence and adolescent behavior. Concludes that the media should show…

  5. Memory Processes in Media Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellermann, Kathy

    1985-01-01

    Explores the role of memory in mediating mass communication effects. Examines (1) the nature of memory, (2) issues in retention and recall of media messages, (3) methods of promoting retention and recall of media messages, and (4) implications of memory processes for mass media effects. (PD)

  6. Adsorption of plutonium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Moritz; Wilson, Richard E; Lee, Sang Soo; Soderholm, L; Fenter, P

    2012-02-07

    Adsorption of monodisperse cubic plutonium oxide nanoparticles ("Pu-NP", [Pu(38)O(56)Cl(x)(H(2)O)(y)]((40-x)+), with a fluorite-related lattice, approximately 1 nm in edge size) to the muscovite (001) basal plane from aqueous solutions was observed in situ (in 100 mM NaCl background electrolyte at pH 2.6). Uptake capacity of the surface quantified by α-spectrometry was 0.92 μg Pu/cm(2), corresponding to 10.8 Pu per unit cell area (A(UC)). This amount is significantly larger than that of Pu(4+) needed for satisfying the negative surface charge (0.25 Pu(4+) for 1 e(-)/A(UC)). The adsorbed Pu-NPs cover 17% of the surface area, determined by X-ray reflectivity (XR). This correlates to one Pu-NP for every 14 unit cells of muscovite, suggesting that each particle compensates the charge of the unit cells onto which it adsorbs as well as those in its direct proximity. Structural investigation by resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity distinguished two different sorption states of Pu-NPs on the surface at two different regimes of distance from the surface. A fraction of Pu is distributed within 11 Å from the surface. The distribution width matches the Pu-NP size, indicating that this species represents Pu-NPs adsorbed directly on the surface. Beyond the first layer, an additional fraction of sorbed Pu was observed to extend more broadly up to more than 100 Å from the surface. This distribution is interpreted as resulting from "stacking" or aggregation of the nanoparticles driven by sorption and accumulation of Pu-NPs at the interface although these Pu-NPs do not aggregate in the solution. These results are the first in situ observation of the interaction of nanoparticles with a charged mineral-water interface yielding information important to understanding the environmental transport of Pu and other nanophase inorganic species.

  7. Water adsorption constrained Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory: Montmorillonite and illite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Courtney D.; Greenaway, Ann L.; Christie, Matthew J.; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    Fresh mineral aerosol has recently been found to be effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and contribute to the number of cloud droplets in the atmosphere due to the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. The work described here uses experimental water adsorption measurements on Na-montmorillonite and illite clay to determine empirical adsorption parameters that can be used in a recently derived theoretical framework (Frenkel-Halsey-Hill Activation Theory, FHH-AT) that accounts for the effect of water adsorption on CCN activation. Upon fitting the Frenkel-Halsey-Hill (FHH) adsorption model to water adsorption measurements, we find FHH adsorption parameters, AFHH and BFHH, to be 98 ± 22 and 1.79 ± 0.11 for montmorillonite and 75 ± 17 and 1.77 ± 0.11 for illite, respectively. The AFHH and BFHH values obtained from water adsorption measurements differ from values reported previously determined by applying FHH-AT to CCN activation measurements. Differences in FHH adsorption parameters were attributed to different methods used to obtain them and the hydratable nature of the clays. FHH adsorption parameters determined from water adsorption measurements were then used to calculate the critical super-saturation (sc) for CCN activation using FHH-AT. The relationship between sc and the dry particle diameter (Ddry) gave CCN activation curve exponents (xFHH) of -0.61 and -0.64 for montmorillonite and illite, respectively. The xFHH values were slightly lower than reported previously for mineral aerosol. The lower exponent suggests that the CCN activity of hydratable clays is less sensitive to changes in Ddry and the hygroscopicity parameter exhibits a broader variability with Ddry compared to more soluble aerosols. Despite the differences in AFHH, BFHH and xFHH, the FHH-AT derived CCN activities of montmorillonite and illite are quite similar to each other and in excellent agreement with experimental CCN measurements resulting from wet-generated clay aerosol

  8. Adsorption on Highly Ordered Porous Alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistura, Giampaolo; Bruschi, Lorenzo; Lee, Woo

    2016-10-01

    Porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) is characterized by a regular arrangement of the pores with a narrow pore size distribution over extended areas, uniform pore depth, and solid pore walls without micropores. Thanks to significant improvements in anodization techniques, structural engineering of AAO allows to accurately tailor the pore morphology. These features make porous AAO an excellent substrate to study adsorption phenomena. In this paper, we review recent experiments involving the adsorption in porous AAO. Particular attention will be devoted to adsorption in straight and structured pores with a closed end which shed new light on fundamental issues like the origin of hysteresis in closed end pores and the nature of evaporation from ink-bottle pores. The results will be compared to those obtained in other synthetic materials like porous silicon and silica.

  9. Porous silicon functionalization for possible arsenic adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Thiol-functionalized porous silicon (PS) monolayer was evaluated for its possible application in As (III) adsorption. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) attached to mesoporous silicon via amide bond linkages was used as a chelate for As (III). Two different aminosilanes namely 3-(aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-aminopropyl (diethoxy)-methylsilane (APDEMS) were tested as linkers to evaluate the relative response for DMSA attachment. The aminosilane-modified PS samples were attached to DMSA by wet impregnation followed by the adsorption of As (III). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to identify the functional groups and to estimate the As (III) content, respectively. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the covalent bonding of DMSA with amide and R-COOH groups on the nanostructured porous surface. XPS confirms the preferred arsenic adsorption on the surface of PS/DMSA samples as compared to the aminosilane-modified and bare PS substrates. PMID:25249826

  10. Bromate adsorption using Fe-pillared bentonite.

    PubMed

    He, Shilong; Zhang, Dandan; Gu, Li; Zhang, Shenghua; Yu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Bromate is an emerging hazardous substance in drinking water. In this study, the removal ofbromate by Fe-pillared bentonite was investigated using various experimental parameters: contact time, initial concentration (Co), temperature, initial pH and competing anions. The adsorption ofbromate followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic better than it followed other kinetic models, and the pseudo-second-order kinetic study showed that equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Equilibrium isotherms were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson and Toth isotherm models. The Toth and Redlich-Peterson models better represented the bromate adsorption. Results also indicated that, other than the competing anions and solution pH, temperature was a key parameter affecting adsorption. It was ultimately concluded that Fe-pillared bentonite was effective at removing bromate from water.

  11. Adsorption kinetics of silicic acid on akaganeite.

    PubMed

    Naren, Gaowa; Ohashi, Hironori; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2013-06-01

    As part of a series of studies on the interaction between ferric ions and silicic acid in the hydrosphere, the adsorption of silicic acid on akaganeite was investigated kinetically at various pH values. The adsorption of silicic acid increased with increasing pH over an initial pH range of 4-11.5. In the kinetic experiment, the Cl(-) was released from akaganeite much faster than silicic acid was adsorbed. From this result, we concluded that chloride ions bound on the surface of akaganeite are released and Fe-OH or Fe-O(-) sites are formed, which then acts as an adsorption site for silicic acid. The uptake mechanism of silicic acid by akaganeite is significantly different from that by schwertmannite, despite the presence of the same tunnel structure.

  12. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  13. Adsorption of monoclonal antibodies to glass microparticles.

    PubMed

    Hoehne, Matthew; Samuel, Fauna; Dong, Aichun; Wurth, Christine; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2011-01-01

    Microparticulate glass represents a potential contamination to protein formulations that may occur as a result of processing conditions or glass types. The effect of added microparticulate glass to formulations of three humanized antibodies was tested. Under the three formulation conditions tested, all three antibodies adsorbed irreversibly at near monolayer surface coverages to the glass microparticles. Analysis of the secondary structure of the adsorbed antibodies by infrared spectroscopy reveal only minor perturbations as a result of adsorption. Likewise, front-face fluorescence quenching measurements reflected minimal tertiary structural changes upon adsorption. In contrast to the minimal effects on protein structure, adsorption of protein to suspensions of glass microparticles induced significant colloidal destabilization and flocculation of the suspension.

  14. Novel nano bearings constructed by physical adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-09-01

    The paper proposes a novel nano bearing formed by the physical adsorption of the confined fluid to the solid wall. The bearing is formed between two parallel smooth solid plane walls sliding against one another, where conventional hydrodynamic lubrication theory predicted no lubricating effect. In this bearing, the stationary solid wall is divided into two subzones which respectively have different interaction strengths with the lubricating fluid. It leads to different physical adsorption and slip properties of the lubricating fluid at the stationary solid wall respectively in these two subzones. It was found that a significant load-carrying capacity of the bearing can be generated for low lubricating film thicknesses, because of the strong physical adsorption and non-continuum effects of the lubricating film.

  15. Utilisation of chitinous materials in pigment adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, San-Lang; Chen, Yan-Cheng; Yen, Yue-Horng; Liang, Tzu-Wen

    2012-12-01

    The effect of adding the cells of four lactobacilli to a squid pen powder (SPP)-containing medium on prodigiosin (PG) production by Serratia marcescens TKU011 is examined. The best increase in PG productivity was shown by strain TKU012. Among the samples of strain TKU012 and the chitinous materials of cicada casting powder (CCP), shrimp shell powder (SSP), squid pen powder (SPP), α-chitin, and β-chitin, TKU012 cells displayed the best adsorption rate (84%) for PG, followed by CCP, SSP, SPP, α-chitin, and β-chitin. As for the water-soluble food colourants, Allura Red AC (R40) and Tartrazne (Y4), SPP and SSP had better adsorptive powers than pure chitin preparations, strain TKU012, and CCP. Treatment with organic solvents, hot alkali, or proteases (papain, bromelain) diminished the adsorption rates of the biosorbents.

  16. Effect of polymer adsorption on mobility ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, A.E.

    1983-03-01

    Several properties of two of the viscous polymer fluids used in rheological control were investigated. Polymer adsorption on the rock surfaces of porous sandstones and its effect on permeability of producing formation was studied. A naturally occurring polymer, a Guar gum, was found greatly to reduce the permeability of the producing formation, although the use of a breaker solution was found to restore the permeability lost through polymer plugging. Use of appropriate breaker solution was found to reduce the permeability loss to only one or two per cent of the original value. Adsorption of the synthetic polymer, acrylamide, was found to be directly related to the shaliness of the porous sand. Deactivation of polymer due to adsorption was found to be significant in formations having large surface areas. The results indicate that polymer loss eventually results in a water bank ahead of the polymer solution and thus greatly reduces the polymer's effectiveness in water-flooding.

  17. Novel nano bearings constructed by physical adsorption

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes a novel nano bearing formed by the physical adsorption of the confined fluid to the solid wall. The bearing is formed between two parallel smooth solid plane walls sliding against one another, where conventional hydrodynamic lubrication theory predicted no lubricating effect. In this bearing, the stationary solid wall is divided into two subzones which respectively have different interaction strengths with the lubricating fluid. It leads to different physical adsorption and slip properties of the lubricating fluid at the stationary solid wall respectively in these two subzones. It was found that a significant load-carrying capacity of the bearing can be generated for low lubricating film thicknesses, because of the strong physical adsorption and non-continuum effects of the lubricating film. PMID:26412488

  18. Porous silicon functionalization for possible arsenic adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-Valadez, Ruth Fabiola; Agarwal, Vivechana

    2014-09-01

    Thiol-functionalized porous silicon (PS) monolayer was evaluated for its possible application in As (III) adsorption. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) attached to mesoporous silicon via amide bond linkages was used as a chelate for As (III). Two different aminosilanes namely 3-(aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-aminopropyl (diethoxy)-methylsilane (APDEMS) were tested as linkers to evaluate the relative response for DMSA attachment. The aminosilane-modified PS samples were attached to DMSA by wet impregnation followed by the adsorption of As (III). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used to identify the functional groups and to estimate the As (III) content, respectively. FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the covalent bonding of DMSA with amide and R-COOH groups on the nanostructured porous surface. XPS confirms the preferred arsenic adsorption on the surface of PS/DMSA samples as compared to the aminosilane-modified and bare PS substrates.

  19. Adsorption of Gases on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbaye, Mamadou Thiao

    2014-01-01

    This research focus in studying the interaction between various classical and quantum gases with novel carbon nanostructures, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Since their discovery by the Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima [1] carbon nanotubes have, experimentally and theoretically, been subjected to many scientific investigation. Studies of adsorption on CNTs are particularly directed toward their better usage in gas storage, gas separation, catalyst, drug delivery, and water purification. We explore the adsorption of different gases entrapped in a single, double, or multi-bundles of CNTs using computer simulations. The first system we investigate consists of Ar and Kr films adsorbed on zigzag or armchair nanotubes. Our simulations revealed that Kr atoms on intermediate size zigzag NTs undergo two phase transitions: A liquid-vapor (L→V), and liquid-commensurate (L→CS) with a fractional coverage of one Kr atoms adsorbed for every four carbon atoms. For Ar on zigzag and armchair NTs, the only transition observed is a L→V. In the second problem, we explore the adsorption of CO2 molecules in a nanotube bundle and calculate the isosteric heat of adsorption of the entrapped molecules within the groove. We observed that the lower the temperature, the higher the isosteric of adsorption. Last, we investigate the adsorption of hydrogen, Helium, and Neon gases on the groove site of two parallel nanotubes. At low temperature, the transverse motion on the plane perpendicular to the tubes' axis is frozen out and as a consequence, the heat capacity is reduced to 1/2. At high temperature, the atoms gain more degree of freedom and as a consequence the heat capacity is 5/2.

  20. Adsorption of arsenate on untreated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, G M; Mehawej, M

    2007-09-05

    Raw dolomite powder was evaluated for its efficiency in adsorbing As(V) from water. An experimental setup comprised of a fluidized dolomite powder bed was used to assess the impact of various test variables on the efficiency of removal of As(V). Test influents including distilled water (DW), synthetic groundwater (SGW) and filtered sewage effluent (FSE) were employed to assess the effect of influent parameters on the adsorption process and the quality of the effluent generated. Dolomite exhibited good As(V) removal levels for distilled water (>92%) and synthetic ground water (>84%) influents at all initial As(V) concentrations tested (0.055-0.600 ppm). Breakthrough of dolomite bed occurred after 45 bed volumes for DW and 20 bed volumes for SGW influents with complete breakthrough taking place at more than 300 bed volumes. As(V) removal from FSE influents was relatively unsuccessful as compared to the DW and SGW influents. Partial removal in the order of 32% from filtered sewage effluent at initial concentration of 0.6 mg/L started at 75 bed volumes and gradually stopped at 165 bed volumes. Varying degrees of As(V) adsorption capacities were observed by the different test influents employed, which indicate that the adsorption of As(V) is adversely affected by competing species, mainly sulfates and phosphates present in the influent. The adsorptive behavior of dolomite was described by fitting data generated from the study into the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Both models described well the adsorption of dolomite. The average isotherm adsorptive capacity was determined at 5.02 mug/g. Regeneration of the dolomite bed can be achieved with the use of caustic soda solution at a pH of 10.5.