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Sample records for adsorptive transfer stripping

  1. Remediation of MTBE from drinking water: air stripping followed by off-gas adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Balaji; Sorial, George A; Speth, Thomas F; Clark, Patrick; Zaffiro, Alan; Patterson, Craig; Hand, David W

    2004-05-01

    The widespread use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) as an oxygenate in gasoline has resulted in the contamination of a large number of ground and surface water sources. Even though air stripping has been proven to be an effective treatment technology for MTBE removal, off-gas treatment often is required in conjunction with it. This study evaluated the combined treatment technologies of air stripping followed by off-gas adsorption on a pilot scale for the treatment of MTBE-contaminated water. The effect of air/water ratios on the treatment efficiency was studied, and the mass transfer coefficient was determined. Air/water ratios of 105:1, 151:1, 177:1, 190:1, 202:1, and 206:1 were used, and a treatment efficiency of >99% was achieved for all the runs conducted. The depth of packing required to achieve maximum treatment efficiency decreased with increasing air/water ratio. Relative humidity (RH) impacts on the MTBE adsorption capacity of a granular activated carbon (GAC) and carbonaceous resin were determined from pilot plant studies. Breakthrough profiles obtained from the pilot plant studies conducted at 20, 30, and 50% RH indicated that GAC has a higher adsorptive capacity than resin. The adsorptive capacity of GAC decreased with increasing RH, whereas RH did not impact the resin adsorptive capacity.

  2. Determination of secnidazole in urine by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Radi, A E; Hassanein, A

    2000-05-01

    Cyclic voltammetry was used to explore the adsorption behavior of secnidazole on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The effects of various operational parameters on the accumulation behavior of the adsorbed species were tested. Thus, a sensitive stripping voltammetry procedure for the determination of secnidazole with an adsorptive accumulation on the surface of HMDE has been developed. Measurements were taken by differential-pulse voltammetry after determination of the optimum conditions. The linear concentration range was 1 x 10(-8)-1 x 10(-7) s when using a 120 s preconcentration at -0.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl in acetate buffer of pH 4.0. The detection limit of secnidazole was 5 x 10(-9) M. The precision, expressed by the coefficient of variation, was 2.5% (n = 10) at a concentration of 1 x 10(-7) m. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of secnidazole in urine. PMID:10823692

  3. Analysis of mass transfer performance in an air stripping tower

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, T.W.; Lai, C.H.; Wu, H.

    1999-10-01

    The carryover of working solution in a traditional stripping tower is of serious concern in real applications. A U-shaped spray tower to prevent carryover has been designed to study the stripping of water vapor from aqueous desiccant solutions of 91.8 to 95.8 wt% triethylene glycol. In this study, water vapor was removed from the diluted desiccant solution by heating the solution and stripping it with the ambient air. Therefore, the solution was concentrated to a desired concentration. This spray tower was capable of handling air flow rates from 3.2 to 5.13 kg/min and liquid flow rates from 1.6 to 2.76 kg/min. Since the literature data on air stripping towers are limited, studies on the mass transfer coefficient and other mass transfer parameters were carried out in this study. Under the operating conditions, the overall mass transfer coefficient calculated from the experimental data varied from 0.053 to 0.169 mol/m{sup 3}{center{underscore}dot}s. These corresponded to heights of a transfer unit of 2.3 to 0.71 m, respectively. The rates of stripping in this spray tower were typically varied from 2.28 to 12.15 kg H{sub 2}O/h. A correlation of the mass transfer coefficient for the air stripping process was also developed in this study.

  4. Activated carbon adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor stripped from TCE-contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Yusaku; Sakoda, Akiyoshi; Yamanashi, Hiroaki; Kaneda, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Motoyuki

    2003-04-01

    Ground water contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) used in electronic, electric, dry cleaning and the like industries is often treated by air-stripping. In this treatment process, TCE in its vapor form is stripped from ground water by air stream and sometimes emitted into the atmosphere without any additional treatments. Activated carbon adsorption is one of the practical and useful processes for recovering the TCE vapor from the exhaust air stream. However, adsorption of the TCE vapor from the stripping air stream onto activated carbons is not so simple as that from dry air, since in the exhaust air stream the TCE vapor coexists with water vapor with relatively high concentrations. The understanding of the adsorption characteristics of the TCE vapor to be adsorbed on activated carbon in the water vapor-coexisting system is essential for successfully designing and operating the TCE recovery process. In this work, the adsorption equilibrium relations of the TCE vapor adsorption on activated carbons were elucidated as a function of various relative humidity. Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were used as model activated carbon. The adsorption equilibrium relations were studied by the column adsorption method. The adsorption isotherms of TCE vapor adsorbed on sample ACFs were successfully correlated by the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for both cases with and without coexistent water vapor. No effects of coexistent water vapor were found on the limiting adsorption volume. However, the adsorption characteristic energy was significantly reduced by the coexistence of water vapor and its reduction was successfully correlated with the equilibrium amount of water vapor adsorbed under the dynamic condition.

  5. Determination of oxcarbazepine by Square Wave Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Calvo, M Encarnación Burgoa; Renedo, Olga Domínguez; Martínez, M Julia Arcos

    2007-02-19

    A procedure for the determination of oxcarbazepine (OXC) by Square Wave Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (SWAdSV) has been optimized. Selection of the experimental parameters was made using experimental design methodology. The detection limit was 1.74 x 10(-7) mol dm(-3). This method was used to determine oxcarbazepine in pharmaceutical preparations.

  6. Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry of Environmental Indicators: Determination of Zinc in Algae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collado-Sanchez, C.; Hernandez-Brito, J. J.; Perez-Pena, J.; Torres-Padron, M. E.; Gelado-Caballero, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    A method for sample preparation and for the determination of average zinc content in algae using adsorptive stripping voltammetry are described. The students gain important didactic advantages through metal determination in environmental matrices, which include carrying out clean protocols for sampling and handling, and digesting samples using…

  7. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of the antidepressant drug sulpiride.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, O A

    2000-10-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of the antidepressant drug sulpiride (SP) at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) is investigated. Linear sweep cathodic stripping voltammetry (LSCSV) was used to determine sulpiride in the presence of 0.01 M sodium acetate medium pH 10.5 and 25 +/- 1 degrees C. Different parameters such as, supporting electrolyte, pH, accumulation potential, scan rate, accumulation time and ionic strength, were tested to optimize the conditions for the determination of SP. The adsorbed form is reduced irreversibly. The linear concentration range is from 2 x 10(-9) to 5 x 10(-8) M SP. Experimentally, 2 x 10(-9) M (0.68 ppb) with accumulation time 60 s can be determined successfully. Furthermore, a theoretical detection limit of 2 x 10(-10) M (0.068 ppb) Sp was calculated. The interferences of some metal ions, ascorbic acid and some amino acids were studied. The method was applied to the analysis of tablets and spiked urine, with recoveries of 104 +/- 3 and 101 + 3, and the relative standard deviation of 3.3 and 3.4%, respectively.

  8. Determination of tryptamine in foods using square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel J E; Martínez, Ana M; Ribeiro, Williame F; Bichinho, Kátia M; Di Nezio, María Susana; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Araujo, Mario C U

    2016-07-01

    Tryptamine, a biogenic amine, is an indole derivative with an electrophilic substituent at the C3 position of the pyrrole ring of the indole moiety. The electrochemical oxidation of tryptamine was investigated using glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and focusing on trace level determination in food products by square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV). The electrochemical responses of tryptamine were evaluated using differing voltammetric techniques over a wide pH range, a quasi-reversible electron-transfer to redox system represented by coupled peaks P1-P3, and an irreversible reaction for peak P2 were demonstrated. The proton and electron counts associated with the oxidation reactions were estimated. The nature of the mass transfer process was predominantly diffusion-limited for the oxidation process of P1, the most selective and sensitive analytical response (acetate buffer solution pH 5.3), being used for the development of SWAdSV method, under optimum conditions. The excellent response allowed the development of an electroanalytical method with a linear response range of from 4.7-54.5)×10(-)(8)molL(-1), low detection limit (0.8×10(-)(9)molL(-)(1)), and quantification limit (2.7×10(-9)molL(-1)), and acceptable levels of repeatability (3.6%), and reproducibility (3.8%). Tryptamine content was determined in bananas, tomatoes, cheese (mozzarella and gorgonzola), and cold meats (chicken sausage and pepperoni sausage), yielding recoveries above 90%, with excellent analytical performance using simple and low cost instrumentation.

  9. Container lid gasket protective strip for double door transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Jr., Burgess M

    2013-02-19

    An apparatus and a process for forming a protective barrier seal along a "ring of concern" of a transfer container used with double door systems is provided. A protective substrate is supplied between a "ring of concern" and a safety cover in which an adhesive layer of the substrate engages the "ring of concern". A compressive foam strip along an opposite side of the substrate engages a safety cover such that a compressive force is maintained between the "ring of concern" and the adhesive layer of the substrate.

  10. Critical adsorption in the undersaturated regime: Scaling and exact results in Ising strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciach, A.; Maciolek, A.; Stecki, J.

    1998-04-01

    Critical adsorption for weak surface field h1 is reconsidered. On the basis of physical heuristic arguments, approximate behavior of the scaling function is derived. New form of a scaling for weak h1 in finite systems is proposed and verified by testing against exact results obtained for this purpose in the 2D Ising strips. For weak h1 we find the approximate behavior of adsorption Γ˜τβ-Δ1 for the reduced temperatures h11/Δ1˜τ≪1. This behavior is consistent with experimental data [N. S. Desai, S. Peach, and C. Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995)] obtained for τ=10-5, and is in a very good agreement with exact results in the 2D Ising strip.

  11. Application of adsorptive stripping voltammetry for determination of selected methoxyimino cephalosporins in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Aleksić, Mara M; Kapetanović, Vera

    2010-09-01

    In last two decades different electroanalytical methods are used for sensitive and selective determination of cephalosporins. In this paper the electrochemical behavior of methoxyimino cephalosporins, reduction mechanism and nature of the process at the mercury electrode surface is presented. Special attention is paid to the cephalosporins adsorption at the mercury surface. Based on this phenomenon, the adsorptive stripping methods are established for determination of low concentration of these drugs in urine samples, both in-vitro, and in-vivo conditions. The application of the adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV) for determination of cefpodoxime proksetile (CP), cefotaxime (CF), desacetylcefotaxime (DCF) and cefetamet (CEF) is summarized. The best sensitivity of determination in-vitro in urine was achieved for CP, in acid solutions (LOD 7.410(-9)M and LOQ 2.410(-8)M), followed by CF, CEF and DCF. This is in accordance with the strength of their adsorption. Determination of CF and DCF by AdSDPV in-vivo is also presented. Compared to other analytical methods, AdSDPV showed advantages in simplicity of the sample preparation, and over the other voltamperometric methods, higher sensitivity and selectivity.

  12. Cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of uranium with potassium hydrogen phthalate.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, O A; Ghandour, M A

    1999-06-01

    The adsorption properties of dioxouranium (II)-Phathalate complexes onto hanging mercury drop electrode are exploited in developing a highly sensitive and selective stripping voltammetric procedure for the determination of uranium (VI). The reduction current of adsorbed complex ions of U(VI) was measured by both linear sweep (LSCSV) and differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (DPCSV), preceded by a period of preconcentration onto the electrode surface. As low as 2x10(-9) mol dm(-3) (0.5 mug/l) and 2x10(-8) mol dm(-3) (4.8 mug/l) with accumulation time 240 and 120 s using DPCSV and LSCSV, respectively, have been determined successfully. The relative standard deviation of 2.2% at the 5 ppm level was obtained. The interferences of some metal ions and anions were studied. The application of this method was tested in the determination of uranium in superphosphate fertilizer. PMID:18967571

  13. Anodic adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of the anesthetic drug: methohexital sodium.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, O A; El-Wadood, H M; Ghandour, M A

    1999-11-01

    Methohexital (MS) determination is based on the formation of insoluble mercury salt on a hanging mercury drop electrode after preaccumulation by adsorption. This property was exploited in developing a highly sensitive stripping voltammetric procedure for the determination of the drug. The anodic current of adsorbed compound is measured by linear sweep anodic stripping voltammetry (LSASV), preceded by a period of preconcentration. The effect of various parameters such as supporting electrolyte composition, pH, initial potential, scan rate, accumulation time and ionic strength are discussed to characterize the interfacial and redox behavior. The detection limit was found to be 2x10(-7) M (56.8 ppb) with 180-s accumulation time. The interference of some amino acids, ascorbic acid and some metal ions was investigated. The application of this method was tested in the determination of methohexital in spiked urine samples. The precision of the method is satisfactory with a relative standard deviation of 2.5%.

  14. Cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of uranium with potassium hydrogen phthalate.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, O A; Ghandour, M A

    1999-06-01

    The adsorption properties of dioxouranium (II)-Phathalate complexes onto hanging mercury drop electrode are exploited in developing a highly sensitive and selective stripping voltammetric procedure for the determination of uranium (VI). The reduction current of adsorbed complex ions of U(VI) was measured by both linear sweep (LSCSV) and differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (DPCSV), preceded by a period of preconcentration onto the electrode surface. As low as 2x10(-9) mol dm(-3) (0.5 mug/l) and 2x10(-8) mol dm(-3) (4.8 mug/l) with accumulation time 240 and 120 s using DPCSV and LSCSV, respectively, have been determined successfully. The relative standard deviation of 2.2% at the 5 ppm level was obtained. The interferences of some metal ions and anions were studied. The application of this method was tested in the determination of uranium in superphosphate fertilizer.

  15. Electrochemistry and analytical determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) via adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Merli, Daniele; Zamboni, Daniele; Protti, Stefano; Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella

    2014-12-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is hardly detectable and quantifiable in biological samples because of its low active dose. Although several analytical tests are available, routine analysis of this drug is rarely performed. In this article, we report a simple and accurate method for the determination of LSD, based on adsorptive stripping voltammetry in DMF/tetrabutylammonium perchlorate, with a linear range of 1-90 ng L(-1) for deposition times of 50s. LOD of 1.4 ng L(-1) and LOQ of 4.3 ng L(-1) were found. The method can be also applied to biological samples after a simple extraction with 1-chlorobutane. PMID:25159435

  16. Electrochemistry and analytical determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) via adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Merli, Daniele; Zamboni, Daniele; Protti, Stefano; Pesavento, Maria; Profumo, Antonella

    2014-12-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is hardly detectable and quantifiable in biological samples because of its low active dose. Although several analytical tests are available, routine analysis of this drug is rarely performed. In this article, we report a simple and accurate method for the determination of LSD, based on adsorptive stripping voltammetry in DMF/tetrabutylammonium perchlorate, with a linear range of 1-90 ng L(-1) for deposition times of 50s. LOD of 1.4 ng L(-1) and LOQ of 4.3 ng L(-1) were found. The method can be also applied to biological samples after a simple extraction with 1-chlorobutane.

  17. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Determination of Cefoperazone in Bulk Powder, Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms, and Human Urine

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Vu Dang; Huyen, Dao Thi; Phuc, Phan Hong

    2013-01-01

    The electroreduction behaviour and determination of cefoperazone using a hanging mercury drop electrode were investigated. Cyclic voltammograms of cefoperazone recorded in universal Britton-Robinson buffers pH 3–6 exhibited a single irreversible cathodic peak. The process was adsorption-controlled. Britton-Robinson buffer 0.04 M pH 4.0 was selected as a supporting electrolyte for quantitative purposes by differential pulse and square wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. The experimental voltammetric conditions were optimized using Central Composite Face design. A reduction wave was seen in the range from −0.7 to −0.8 V. These voltammetric techniques were successfully validated as per ICH guidelines and applied for the determination of cefoperazone in its single and sulbactam containing powders for injection and statistically comparable to USP-HPLC. They were further extended to determine cefoperazone in spiked human urine with no matrix effect. PMID:24109542

  18. Model for in situ air stripping of contaminated soils: Effects of hydrocarbon adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mehrotra, A.K.; Karan, K.; Chakma, A.

    1996-01-01

    Soil contamination due to organic compounds is a widespread problem. The contaminants enter the soil subsurface by a number of routes, such as the disposal of wastes in landfills, spills during transportation of chemicals, plant operation, and leakage from underground storage. Air stripping as a means of soil remediation has gained popularity in recent years. In this in situ process, clean air is injected into the contaminated soil zone to volatilize and strip the contaminants, which are then removed by the carrier gas. The process has been found to be effective especially for treating the vadose zone of the soil contaminated with volatile and semivolatile organics. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption experiments in this study were performed on a soil sample to establish its desorption characteristics. A field-scale model for the air stripping process has been developed to simulate the removal of semivolatile hydrocarbons. The numerical results show that the interphase contaminant transport from the sorbed to the vapor phase plays a dominant role in influencing the process effectiveness.

  19. Determination of allura red in some food samples by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ahmad H

    2005-01-01

    Square wave (SW) voltammetry was used to explore the adsorption properties of the food additive dye Allura Red on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). By using the adsorptive stripping voltammetric approach, we developed a sensitive electroanalytical method for the determination of this azo dye. A well-developed voltammetric peak probably related to the cathodic reduction of the azo moiety was obtained in pH 9 Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffer at 613 mV. Cyclic voltammetric studies indicated that the reduction process was irreversible and primarily controlled by adsorption. The adsorptive voltammetric signal was evaluated with respect to various experimental conditions; the optimized values were supporting electrolyte, B-R buffer; pH 11; accumulation time, 180 s; accumulation potential, 0.0 V; scan rate, 900 mV/s; pulse amplitude, 75 mV; and SW frequency, 90 Hz. Adsorptive voltammetric peak current showed a linear response for Allura Red in the concentration range of 2.5 x 10(-8) to 2.0 x 10(-7) mol/L (r = 0.998). The limit of detection was 8.5 x 10(-9) mol/L (4.2 ng/mL), the precision in terms of relative standard deviation was 1.3%, and the mean recovery was 102%. Possible interferences by several substances usually present in food products such as food additive azo dyes (E110, E102), gelatin, natural and artificial sweeteners, preservatives, and antioxidants were also evaluated. The proposed electrochemical procedure was successfully applied to the determination of this food dye in commercially available candy and a soft drink. The results were compared by statistical evaluation with those obtained by a reference spectrophotometric method.

  20. Determination of Lamotrigine in Pharmaceutical Preparations by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry Using Screen Printed Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Renedo, Olga; Calvo, M. Encarnación Burgoa; Arcos-Martínez, M. Julia

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure that has been optimized for the determination of lamotrigine by Differential Pulse Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (DPAdSV) using carbon screen-printed electrodes (CSPE) and mercury coated carbon screen-printed electrodes. Selection of the experimental parameters was made using experimental design methodology. The detection limit found was 5.0 × 10-6 M and 2.0 × 10-6 M for the non modified and Hg modified CSPE, respectively. In terms of reproducibility, the precision of the above mentioned methods was calculated in %RSD values at 9.83% for CSPE and 2.73% for Hg-CSPE. The Hg-coated CSPEs developed in this work were successfully applied in the determination of lamotrigine in pharmaceutical preparations.

  1. Determination of aluminium in tree samples by cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Opydo, J

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents a method of determination of aluminium in tree samples (wood, leaves, roots) based on the cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry. Al(III) complexed with alizarin S was determined by ASV method using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Optimal conditions were found to be: accumulation time 30-90 s, accumulation potential - 0.70 V versus SCE, supporting electrolyte 0.1 M ammonia-ammonium chloride buffer at pH 8.2 and concentration of alizarin 1 x 10(-5) M. The response of the system, a linear current-concentration relationship was observed up to 8 x 10(-6) M. The developed method has been tested by analysing international reference materials (BCR 62 Olive leaves and BCR 101 spruce needles). PMID:18966839

  2. Speciation study of aluminium in beverages by Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Magnier, A; Fekete, V; Van Loco, J; Bolle, F; Elskens, M

    2014-05-01

    Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry (CLE-AdSV) was used for determining the speciation of aluminium in commonly consumed beverages (water, tea, infusion, coffee, orange juice, tomato juice, beer and red wine). Aluminium determination involves the adsorption of Al-complexes with the ligand cupferron onto a hanging mercury drop electrode. All samples were studied at pH 6.5 with an accumulation step at -0.60 V (all potential values in the paper are given versus the Ag/AgCl, [KCl]=3 M reference electrode) during 60 s, and a final cupferron concentration of 4 × 10(-4)M. These conditions were used to establish (i) the concentration of electro-labile aluminium, (ii) the range of ligand concentrations and (iii) the conditional stability constants of beverage samples using titration procedures. The results based on Ruzic plots were compared to computer simulation with Visual MINTEQ. This comparison suggests that labile monomeric Al-forms and soluble organic complexes of low molecular weight can be quantified by the CLE-AdSV procedure. Overall the relative uncertainties on the determination of the electro-active Al fraction and the complexing parameters, i.e., concentration and conditional stability constant of natural ligands in the samples, are less than 15%. Thanks to these results, information on Al bioavailability in beverages was collected and discussed. This study also illustrates the value of computer simulations when complex, time-consuming voltammetric techniques are applied.

  3. Determination of Sudan I in drinks containing Sunset yellow by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Marisol; Arancibia, Verónica; Aliaga, Margarita; Núñez, Claudia; Rojas-Romo, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    An efficient, fast and sensitive method for the determination of Sudan I (SI) in drinks containing Sunset yellow (Sy) is developed and validated using an adsorptive stripping voltammetric procedure. Sy is currently added to a large number of foods; however during their synthesis SI may be produced. The determination is based on adsorption of Sy and SI onto HMDE and later reduction of the azo group at -0.71 and -0.82V, respectively. Using the best set of the experimental conditions (pH 12.3; Eads: -0.40V) for the determination of SI in Sy, a linear response for SI in the concentration range 0.5-27.2μgL(-1) was found, with a detection limit of 1.5μgL(-1) in a tads of only 30s. The method was applied to the determination of SI in commercial drinks with satisfactory results. The presence of SI was confirmed by mass spectrometry. PMID:27374598

  4. Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of danazol in capsules.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ahmed H; Belal, Fatallah F; Al-Omar, Mohamed A

    2006-06-01

    Based on the interfacial adsorptive character of danazol onto the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), a simple and sensitive square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric (SW-AdSV) procedure for the electrochemical analysis of this drug in pharmaceutical formulations has been developed and validated. Cyclic and SW-AdSV voltammograms showed a single well-defined irreversible cathodic peak. Various chemical and instrumental parameters affecting the monitored electroanalytical response were investigated and optimized for the danazol determination. Under these optimized conditions the SW-AdSV peak current showed a linear dependence on drug concentration over the range 7.5x10(-8)-3.75x10(-7) mol l-1 (r=0.999) with estimated detection limit (at a S/N ratio of 3) of 5.7x10(-9) mol l-1 (1.78 ng ml-1). A mean recovery of 100.9+/-1.2% and relative standard deviation of 1.07% were achieved. Possible interferences by substances usually present in the pharmaceutical tablets and formulations were also evaluated. The proposed electrochemical procedure was successfully applied for the determination of danazol in pharmaceutical capsules (Danol 100 mg) with mean recoveries of 100.48+/-0.87%. Results of the developed SW-AdSV method were comparable with those obtained by reported analytical procedures.

  5. Air stripping and emissions control technologies: Field testing of countercurrent packings, rotary air stripping, catalytic oxidation, and adsorption materials. Final report, April 1987-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.H.; Counce, R.M.; Lucero, A.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Singh, S.P.

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this activity was to field test innovative air stripping with emissions control technologies. The scale of the various components used in these tests was selected such that results would be useful for better predicting the performance of application-scale equipment. The goal of this effort was to provide managers and engineers with necessary information so that decisions relating to the application of this technology can proceed on a rational basis. Conventional countercurrent air stripping (with 4 different packing materials) were compared to a centrifugal contactor, also known as a rotary air stripper. Emissions control tests showed that the activity of the noble metal catalyst was lost before any useful abatement results were obtained. This loss in activity was attributed to poisoning by sulfur stripped from the groundwater. Control of the emissions by activated carbon was achieved. Significant quantities of lighter hydrocarbons were noted in the stripper effluent that were not effectively adsorbed by the carbon. No generally useful results ere obtained for control of emissions by molecular sieves.... Air stripping, Rotary air stripper, VOCs, Fuel contamination, Catalytic oxidations, Carbon adsorption, Molecular sieves.

  6. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  7. A square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric method for determination of fast green dye.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Ali F

    2009-01-01

    Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric (SW-AdSV) determinations of trace concentrations of the coloring agent fast green were described. The analytical methodology used was based on the adsorptive preconcentration of the dye on the hanging mercury drop electrode, and then a negative sweep was initiated. In pH 10 carbonate supporting electrolyte, fast green gave a well-defined and sensitive SW-AdSV peak at -1220 mV. The electroanalytical determination of this dye was found to be optimized in carbonate buffer (pH 10) with the following experimental conditions: accumulation time (120 s); accumulation potential (-0.8 V); scan rate (800 mV/s); pulse amplitude (90 mV); frequency (90 Hz); surface area of the working electrode (0.6 mm2); and the convection rate (2000 rpm). Under these optimized conditions, the AdSV peak current was proportional over the concentration range 2 x 10(-8) -6 x 10(-7) M (r = 0.999), with an LOD of 1.63 x 10(-10) M (0.132 ppb). This analytical approach possessed more enhanced sensitivity than conventional chromatography or spectrophotometry, and was simple and quick. The precision of the method in terms of RSD was 0.17%, whereas the accuracy was evaluated via the mean recovery of 99.6%. Possible interferences by several substances usually present as food additive azo dyes (E110, E102, E123, and E129), natural and artificial sweeteners, and antioxidants were also investigated. Applicability of the developed electroanalysis method was illustrated via the determination of fast green in ice cream and soft drink samples.

  8. Ammonia stripping, activated carbon adsorption and anaerobic biological oxidation as process combination for the treatment of oil shale wastewater.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Verônica M F; do Nascimento, Felipe V; Cammarota, Magali C

    2016-10-01

    Anaerobic biodegradability of oil shale wastewater was investigated after the following pretreatment sequence: ammonia stripping and activated carbon adsorption. Anaerobic biological treatment of oil shale wastewater is technically feasible after stripping at pH 11 for reducing the N-NH3 concentration, adsorption with 5 g/L of activated carbon in order to reduce recalcitrance and pH adjustment with CO2 so that the sulphate concentration in the medium remains low. After this pretreatment sequence, it was possible to submit the wastewater without dilution to an anaerobic treatment with 62.7% soluble chemical oxygen demand removal and specific methane production of 233.2 mL CH4STP/g CODremoved.

  9. Removing a small quantity of THT from gas storage groundwater through air stripping and gas-phase carbon adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Girod, J.F.; Leclerc, J.P.; Muhr, H.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with the response to a case of contaminated groundwater located in France. The natural gas is stored during summer in porous underground rocks. When energy requirements increase (particularly in winter), gas is drawn off, but water is also pumped during this operation. The water has a strong characteristic odour of the TetraHydroThiophene (THT), which has been used by Gaz de France as an additive in order to detect gas leakages because of its strong odour. Unfortunately, the presence of THT in medium other than natural gas can be responsible for safety problems. Gas stripping combined with adsorption on granular activated carbon was chosen to obtain removal of THT from the groundwater. The gas to water ratio for stripping column is higher than usual and the gas used for stripping was recycled in order to prevent air pollution. Carbon consumption is approximately 3 tons a year. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of diazinon in its insecticidal formulations.

    PubMed

    Guziejewski, Dariusz; Skrzypek, Sławomira; Ciesielski, Witold

    2012-11-01

    The pesticide diazinon was determined in its insecticidal formulations by square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry. The method of its determination is based on the irreversible reduction reaction at the hanging mercury drop electrode. The optimal signal was detected at -1.05 V vs. Ag/AgCl in Britton-Robinson buffer at pH 4.4. Various parameters such as pH, buffer concentration, frequency, amplitude, step potential, accumulation time, and potential were investigated to enhance the sensitivity of the determination. The highest response was recorded at an accumulation potential -0.4 V, accumulation time 60 s, amplitude 75 mV, frequency 100 Hz, and step potential 5 mV. The pesticide electrochemical behavior was considered under experimental conditions. The electroanalytical procedure enabled diazinon determination in the concentration range 4.0 × 10(-8)-3.9 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) in supporting electrolyte. The detection and quantification limit were found to be 1.1 × 10(-8) and 3.7 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), respectively. The method was applied successfully in the determination of the active ingredients in the insecticidal formulations Diazinon 10GR and Beaphar 275.

  11. Detecting Naturally-Produced Sulfide Nanoparticles by Adsorptive, Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helz, G. R.; Krznaric, D.; Bura-Nakic, E.; Ciglenecki, I.

    2007-12-01

    Growing evidence implies that metal sulfide nanoparticles of natural origin exist in some aquatic environments. These nanoparticles could play important roles as mediators of trace metal nutrition and toxicity. Thermodynamics suggests that in sulfidic environments (total transition metaltotal sulfide) the most insoluble metal sulfide (usually Hg or Cu) will form the predominant sulfide nanoparticle. New experimental methods for detecting and distinguishing between such nanoparticles are needed. We report that mercury electrodes effectively preconcentrate a number of different metal sulfide nanoparticles, enabling their detection by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Voltammetrically, nanoparticulate analytes differ fundamentally from dissolved analytes; e.g. analyte accumulation is very sensitive to electrolyte composition and concentration in accord with the Schulze-Hardy Rule. EDTA or acid treatment of samples is useful for distinguishing highly insoluble nanoparticles (HgS, CuS) from FeS. Nanoparticulate sulfur potentially interferes. Supersaturated solutions can generate artifactual analyte on Hg electrode surfaces. Despite such potential pitfalls, progress is encouraging. Preliminary, qualitative results from natural waters will be reported.

  12. Infiltration and adsorption of dissolved atrazine and atrazine metabolites in buffalograss filter strips.

    PubMed

    Krutz, L J; Senseman, S A; Dozier, M C; Hoffman, D W; Tierney, D P

    2003-01-01

    Vegetated filter strips (VFS) potentially reduce the off-site movement of herbicides from adjacent agricultural fields by increasing herbicide mass infiltrated (Minf) and mass adsorbed (Mas) compared with bare field soil. However, there are conflicting reports in the literature concerning the contribution of Mas to the VFS herbicide trapping efficiency (TE). Moreover, no study has evaluated TE among atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-isopropyl-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine) and atrazine metabolites. This study was conducted to compare TE, Minf, and Mas among atrazine, diaminoatrazine (DA, 6-chloro[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine), deisopropylatrazine (DIA, 6-chloro-N-ethyl-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine), desethylatrazine (DEA, 6-chloro-N-isopropyl-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine), and hydroxyatrazine (HA, 6-hydroxy-N-ethyl-N'-isopropyl-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine) in a buffalograss VFS. Runoff was applied as a point source upslope of a 1- x 3-m microwatershed plot at a rate of 750 L h(-1). The point source was fortified at 0.1 microg mL(-1) atrazine, DA, DIA, DEA, and HA. After crossing the length of the plot, water samples were collected at 5-min intervals. Water samples were extracted by solid phase extraction and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) photodiode array detection. During the 60-min simulation, TE was significantly greater for atrazine (22.2%) compared with atrazine metabolites (19.0%). Approximately 67 and 33% of the TE was attributed to Minf and Mas, respectively. These results demonstrate that herbicide adsorption to the VFS grass, grass thatch, and/or soil surface is an important retention mechanism, especially under saturated conditions. Values for Mas were significantly higher for atrazine compared with atrazine's metabolites. The Mas data indicate that atrazine was preferentially retained by the VFS grass, grass thatch, and/or soil surface compared with atrazine's metabolites.

  13. Determination of bismuth and copper using adsorptive stripping voltammetry couple with continuous wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Khaloo, Shokooh S; Ensafi, Ali A; Khayamian, T

    2007-01-15

    A new method is proposed for the determination of bismuth and copper in the presence of each other based on adsorptive stripping voltammetry of complexes of Bi(III)-chromazorul-S and Cu(II)-chromazorul-S at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). Copper is an interfering element for the determination of Bi(III) because, the voltammograms of Bi(III) and Cu(II) overlapped with each other. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) was applied to separate the voltammograms. In this regards, wavelet filter, resolution of the peaks and the fitness were optimized to obtain minimum detection limit for the elements. Through continuous wavelet transform Symlet4 (Sym4) wavelet filter at dilation 6, quantitative and qualitative analysis the mixture solutions of bismuth and copper was performed. It was also realized that copper imposes a matrix effect on the determination of Bi(III) and the standard addition method was able to cope with this effect. Bismuth does not have matrix effect on copper determination, therefore, the calibration curve using wavelet coefficients of CWT was used for determination of Cu(II) in the presence of Bi(III). The detection limits were 0.10 and 0.05ngml(-1) for bismuth and copper, respectively. The linear dynamic range of 0.1-30.0 and 0.1-32.0ngml(-1) were obtained for determination of bismuth in the presence of 24.0ngml(-1) of copper and copper in the presence of 24.0ngml(-1) of bismuth, respectively. The method was used for determination of these two cations in water and human hair samples. The results indicate the ability of method for the determination of these two elements in real samples. PMID:19071307

  14. Infiltration and adsorption of dissolved atrazine and atrazine metabolites in buffalograss filter strips.

    PubMed

    Krutz, L J; Senseman, S A; Dozier, M C; Hoffman, D W; Tierney, D P

    2003-01-01

    Vegetated filter strips (VFS) potentially reduce the off-site movement of herbicides from adjacent agricultural fields by increasing herbicide mass infiltrated (Minf) and mass adsorbed (Mas) compared with bare field soil. However, there are conflicting reports in the literature concerning the contribution of Mas to the VFS herbicide trapping efficiency (TE). Moreover, no study has evaluated TE among atrazine (6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-isopropyl-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine) and atrazine metabolites. This study was conducted to compare TE, Minf, and Mas among atrazine, diaminoatrazine (DA, 6-chloro[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine), deisopropylatrazine (DIA, 6-chloro-N-ethyl-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine), desethylatrazine (DEA, 6-chloro-N-isopropyl-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine), and hydroxyatrazine (HA, 6-hydroxy-N-ethyl-N'-isopropyl-[1,3,5]triazine-2,4-diamine) in a buffalograss VFS. Runoff was applied as a point source upslope of a 1- x 3-m microwatershed plot at a rate of 750 L h(-1). The point source was fortified at 0.1 microg mL(-1) atrazine, DA, DIA, DEA, and HA. After crossing the length of the plot, water samples were collected at 5-min intervals. Water samples were extracted by solid phase extraction and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) photodiode array detection. During the 60-min simulation, TE was significantly greater for atrazine (22.2%) compared with atrazine metabolites (19.0%). Approximately 67 and 33% of the TE was attributed to Minf and Mas, respectively. These results demonstrate that herbicide adsorption to the VFS grass, grass thatch, and/or soil surface is an important retention mechanism, especially under saturated conditions. Values for Mas were significantly higher for atrazine compared with atrazine's metabolites. The Mas data indicate that atrazine was preferentially retained by the VFS grass, grass thatch, and/or soil surface compared with atrazine's metabolites. PMID:14674556

  15. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent packed bed. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the bed. Overall transfer coefficients of them as properties for the simulation were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was clarified that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer does not strongly depend on the air flow rate through the packed bed, the averaged equivalent mass transfer is governed by surface and pore diffusion in a particle of adsorbent at low flow rate. Moreover, the coefficient during the adsorption process is slightly larger than desorption. An equation of the overall mass transfer coefficient is derived. It shows five times as large as the value estimated by experiment. Therefore, the correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  16. Treatment of MTBE by air stripping, carbon adsorption, and advanced oxidation: technical and economic comparison for five groundwaters.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, J; Adams, C; Kekobad, J

    2004-01-01

    An investigation was made of the treatability of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in five groundwaters with highly varied water quality characteristics. Air stripping, granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption, and the O(3)/H(2)O(2) and UV/H(2)O(2) advanced oxidation processes were compared in a mobile water treatment pilot plant under a variety of process conditions. Air stripping was shown to have the lower unit treatment costs for higher flowrates (i.e., 3800L/min), although relatively tall towers were required for greater treatment requirements. At low flowrates (i.e., 38L/min), advanced oxidation provided the lowest treatment costs for four of five waters (but was ineffective for a high chemical oxygen demand water). Both the O(3)/H(2)O(2) and UV/H(2)O(2) processes were more efficient at pH 7 versus 9 due in part to increased scavenging at higher pH. GAC was examined using rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT). GAC was effective at most conditions, although it was also the most costly alternative for most waters. The results of this study can help to provide specific guidance into process selection for treating MTBE in contaminated groundwaters.

  17. Air stripping of aqueous solutions. Engineering bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Air stripping is a means to transfer contaminants from aqueous solutions to air. Contaminants are not destroyed by air stripping but are physically separated from the aqueous solutions. Contaminant vapors are transferred into the air stream and, if necessary, can be treated by incineration, adsorption, or oxidation. Most frequently, contaminants are collected in carbon adsorption systems and then treated or destroyed in this concentrated form. The concentrated contaminants may be recovered, incinerated for waste heat recovery, or destroyed by other treatment technologies. Generally, air stripping is used as one in a series of unit operations and can reduce the overall cost for managing a particular site. Air stripping is applicable to volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. It is not applicable for treating metals and inorganic compounds. The bulletin provides information on the technology applicability, the technology limitations, a description of the technology, the types of residuals produced, site requirements, the latest performance data, the status of the technology, and sources of further information.

  18. Surface Charge Transfer Doping of Monolayer Phosphorene via Molecular Adsorption.

    PubMed

    He, Yuanyuan; Xia, Feifei; Shao, Zhibin; Zhao, Jianwei; Jie, Jiansheng

    2015-12-01

    Monolayer phosphorene has attracted much attention owing to its extraordinary electronic, optical, and structural properties. Rationally tuning the electrical transport characteristics of monolayer phosphorene is essential to its applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Herein, we study the electronic transport behaviors of monolayer phosphorene with surface charge transfer doping of electrophilic molecules, including 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4TCNQ), NO2, and MoO3, using density functional theory combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. F4TCNQ shows optimal performance in enhancing the p-type conductance of monolayer phosphorene. Static electronic properties indicate that the enhancement is originated from the charge transfer between adsorbed molecule and phosphorene layer. Dynamic transport behaviors demonstrate that additional channels for hole transport in host monolayer phosphorene were generated upon the adsorption of molecule. Our work unveils the great potential of surface charge transfer doping in tuning the electronic properties of monolayer phosphorene and is of significance to its application in high-performance devices.

  19. A cation trap for anodic stripping voltammetry: NH3-plasma treated carbon nanotubes for adsorption and detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Yang, Ran; Chen, Xing; Wang, Lun; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2012-11-28

    NH(3)-plasma treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (pn-MWCNTs) with cation traps for the detection of ultratrace quantities of Zn(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II) using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) is described. The pn-MWCNTs use their adsorption performance to enhance the sensitivity. It is found that under optimized conditions Zn(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Hg(II) were individually detected at potentials of -1.16, -0.78, -0.268 and 0.108 V, respectively. The detection limit (3σ method) of 0.314, 0.0272, 0.2263, and 0.1439 nM toward Zn(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II) is achievable, respectively. No interference could be seen during the simultaneous detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II). The pn-MWCNTs exhibit excellent selectivity owing to the different ability of adsorption. A study of the ability of pn-MWCNTs in practical application is carried out using a sample of water collected from Dongpu Reservoir in Hefei City, Anhui, China. It is found that the results were favorable when compared against inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) analysis.

  20. Electrochemical evaluation and adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of capsaicin or dihydrocapsaicin on a disposable pencil graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Yardım, Yavuz; Sentürk, Zühre

    2013-08-15

    Capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin are the two most abundant capsaicinoids in peppers, which are responsible for about 90% of the spiciness. A detailed study of the electrochemical properties of these compounds at pencil graphite (PG) electrode was carried out in the pH range 1.0-12.0 in aqueous solutions. The compounds underwent irreversible oxidation at PG electrode, which was an adsorption-controlled process with two protons and two electrons. The voltammetric data indicated that their oxidation proceeded via an ECE mechanism. Using the square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry with accumulation at a fixed potential of -0.1V for 120s, both of them yielded a well-defined voltammetric response at +0.31V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in Britton-Robinson buffer, pH 9.0. Capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin could be determined with detection limits of 1.12 ng mL(-1) (3.7×10(-9)M) and 0.28 ng mL(-1) (9.1×10(-10)M), respectively. The practical applicability of this methodology was tested in commercial Turkish pepper products. The concentration of total capsaicinoids was determined using capsaicin as standard.

  1. Fermi level pinning and the charge transfer contribution to the energy of adsorption at semiconducting surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krukowski, Stanisław; Kempisty, Paweł; Strak, Paweł; Sakowski, Konrad

    2014-01-28

    It is shown that charge transfer, the process analogous to formation of semiconductor p-n junction, contributes significantly to adsorption energy at semiconductor surfaces. For the processes without the charge transfer, such as molecular adsorption of closed shell systems, the adsorption energy is determined by the bonding only. In the case involving charge transfer, such as open shell systems like metal atoms or the dissociating molecules, the energy attains different value for the Fermi level differently pinned. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulation of species adsorption at different surfaces, such as SiC(0001) or GaN(0001) confirms these predictions: the molecular adsorption is independent on the coverage, while the dissociative process adsorption energy varies by several electronvolts.

  2. Evaporative heat transfer and enhancement performance of serpentine tubes with strip-type inserts using refrigerant-134a

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, S.S.; Jang, K.J.; Huang, M.T.

    1999-08-01

    Recent technological implications have given rise to increased interest in enhancement of the in-tube evaporation used in many air conditioning and refrigeration systems. Although many past studies have examined in-tube evaporative heat transfer enhancement and the associated pressure drop with internally finned tubes, in-tube evaporations with strip-type inserts, using R-134a as a refrigerant, have not been conducted. In addition, the fundamental phenomenon of nucleate boiling from a heated wall subject to a strip-type insert is as yet not well understood, especially for the flow in serpentine tubes. In this study, flow boiling tests were conducted in serpentine coil with inserts. To accomplish these tasks, experiments were performed in a seven-pass serpentine test tube with longitudinal strip and cross-strip types inserts, 10.6-mm inside diameter with R-134a as the boiling fluid immersed in a hot water bath.

  3. A square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric method for the determination of Amaranth, a food additive dye.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Ahmad H

    2005-01-01

    Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric (AdSV) determinations of trace concentrations of the azo coloring agent Amaranth are described. The analytical methodology used was based on the adsorptive preconcentration of the dye on the hanging mercury drop electrode, followed by initiation of a negative sweep. In a pH 10 carbonate supporting electrolyte, Amaranth gave a well-defined and sensitive AdSV peak at -518 mV. The electroanalytical determination of this azo dye was found to be optimal in carbonate buffer (pH 10) under the following experimental conditions: accumulation time, 120 s; accumulation potential, 0.0 V; scan rate, 600 mV/s; pulse amplitude, 90 mV; and frequency, 50 Hz. Under these optimized conditions the AdSV peak current was proportional over the concentration range 1 x 10(-8)-1.1 x 10(-7) mol/L (r = 0.999) with a detection limit of 1.7 x 10(-9) mol/L (1.03 ppb). This analytical approach possessed enhanced sensitivity, compared with conventional liquid chromatography or spectrophotometry and it was simple and fast. The precision of the method, expressed as the relative standard deviation, was 0.23%, whereas the accuracy, expressed as the mean recovery, was 104%. Possible interferences by several substances usually present as food additive azo dyes (E110, E102), gelatin, natural and artificial sweeteners, preservatives, and antioxidants were also investigated. The developed electroanalyticals method was applied to the determination of Amaranth in soft drink samples, and the results were compared with those obtained by a reference spectrophotometric method. Statistical analysis (paired t-test) of these data showed that the results of the 2 methods compared favorably.

  4. Determination of the Antiretroviral Drug Acyclovir in Diluted Alkaline Electrolyte by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry at the Mercury Film Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arnaldo Aguiar; Cordoves, Ana Isa Perez; Farias, Percio Augusto Mardini

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a stripping method for the determination of acyclovir at the submicromolar concentration level. This method is based on controlled adsorptive accumulation of acyclovir at thin-film mercury electrode, followed by a linear cyclic scan voltammetry measurement of the surface species. Optimal experimental conditions include a NaOH solution of 2.0 × 10−3 mol L−1 (supporting electrolyte), an accumulation potential of −0.40 V, and a scan rate of 100 mV s−1. The response of acyclovir is linear over the concentration range 0.02 to 0.12 ppm. For an accumulation time of 4 minutes, the detection limit was found to be 0.42 ppb (1.0 × 10−9 mol L−1). More convenient methods to measure the acyclovir in presence of the didanosine, efavirenz, nevirapine, nelfinavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine were also investigated. The utility of this method is demonstrated by the presence of acyclovir together with Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or DNA. PMID:23761958

  5. Determination of Xanthine in the Presence of Hypoxanthine by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry at the Mercury Film Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Percio Augusto Mardini; Castro, Arnaldo Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    A stripping method for the determination of xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine at the submicromolar concentration levels is described. The method is based on controlled adsorptive accumulation at the thin-film mercury electrode followed by a fast linear scan voltammetric measurement of the surface species. Optimum experimental conditions were found to be the use of 1.0 × 10−3 mol L−1 NaOH solution as supporting electrolyte, an accumulation potential of 0.00 V for xanthine and −0.50 V for hypoxanthine–copper, and a linear scan rate of 200 mV second−1. The response of xanthine is linear over the concentration ranges of 20–140 ppb. For an accumulation time of 30 minutes, the detection limit was found to be 36 ppt (2.3 × 10−10 mol L−1). Adequate conditions for measuring the xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine, copper and other metals, uric acid, and other nitrogenated bases were also investigated. The utility of the method is demonstrated by the presence of xanthine associated with hypoxanthine, uric acid, nitrogenated bases, ATP, and ssDNA. PMID:24940040

  6. Computer modeling of pesticide fate at the hillslope scale. Influence of vegetated filter strips on surface runoff pesticides transfer and partitioning between surface and subsurface fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djabelkhir, K.; Carluer, N.; Lauvernet, C.

    2012-04-01

    In France, agriculture uses large quantities of fertilizer and pesticides. Water contamination by pesticides is highlighted by monitoring networks, at local and national levels. Control and reduction of contamination are major issues, for the protection of drinking water resources and aquatic ecosystems. Thus, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms involved in mobilization, transfer and dissipation of these substances can help to perform risk of water contamination diagnosis, and to estimate the effectiveness of corrective solutions. In this context, landscape elements, like buffer zones, can be an effective way to reduce diffuse contamination of pesticides carried by surface runoff. They protect the water ressources of the drift of the products applied to crops and contribute to the reduction of the transfer of pesticides in surface runoff from the plots to the river. We are interested in our study to the vegetative filter strips. The main objective of this thesis is to develop a model simulating the processes governing the transfer and dissipation of pesticides from plots to surface water, on surface and subsurface, along a slope. This will be done by taking into account the influence of vegetative filter strips between plots and rivers on the transfer, by changing the flow paths and retention time of these products via several mechanisms (infiltration, filtration of runoff -sedimentation of MES-, adsorption and degradation of products on the surface of the vegetative filter strips or infiltrated). Several models describing the mechanisms of transfer of water and solutes (sometimes) at a hillslope scale exist, in particular : POLA (Pinheiro and al., 1995), Openfluid (LISAH), J2000-JAMS (Krause and al., 2006), CatFlow (Zehe and al., 2000), tRIBS (Ivanov and al., 2004), Cathy 3D (Bixio and al., 2000) and CMF (Kraft and al., 2011). It was decided to choose a spatially distributed and object-oriented model, allowing to couple hydrological processes occuring

  7. Determination of Sb(III) using an ex-situ bismuth screen-printed carbon electrode by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Romo, Carlos; Serrano, Núria; Ariño, Cristina; Arancibia, Verónica; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Esteban, Miquel

    2016-08-01

    The determination of Sb(III) on an ex-situ bismuth screen-printed carbon electrode (ex-situ BiSPCE) by means of adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) using quercetin-5'-sulfonic acid as chelating agent was optimized. The effect of different experimental parameters such pH, ligand concentration (CQSA), accumulation potential (Eacc) and accumulation time (tacc) were studied to obtain a wide linear range, the highest sensitivity and the lowest detection limit. Ex-situ BiSPCE was analytically compared with a sputtered bismuth screen-printed electrode (BispSPE) under optimal conditions. The obtained analytical parameters suggest that ex-situ BiSPCE behaves much better than BispSPE and the first was selected for this study. Optimal parameters were pH=4.6; CQSA=10.0 to 20.0×10(-6)molL(-1); Eacc=-0.5V and tacc=60s. Peak area is proportional to Sb(III) concentration up to 100.0μgL(-1) (tacc 60s) and 45.0μgL(-1) (tacc 120s) range, with detection limits of 1.2μgL(-)(1) (tacc 60s) and 0.8μgL(-1) (tacc 120s). The relative standard deviation for a Sb(III) solution (20.0μgL(-1)) was 3.9% for ten successive assays. Thus, the effect of various interfering metal ions was studied and the methodology was validated using a spiked groundwater reference material with very satisfactory results. PMID:27216652

  8. Bismuth-based electrochemical stripping analysis

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Joseph

    2004-01-27

    Method and apparatus for trace metal detection and analysis using bismuth-coated electrodes and electrochemical stripping analysis. Both anodic stripping voltammetry and adsorptive stripping analysis may be employed.

  9. Heat Transfer and Flow on the Blade Tip of a Gas Turbine Equipped with a Mean-Camberline Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies have been performed to investigate the detailed distribution of convective heat transfer coefficients on the first-stage blade tip surface for a geometry typical of large power generation turbines (greater than 100 MW) In a previous work the numerical heat transfer results for a sharp edge blade tip and a radiused blade tip were presented. More recently several other tip treatments have been considered for which the tip heat transfer has been measured and documented. This paper is concerned with the numerical prediction of the tip surface heat transfer for radiused blade tip equipped with mean-camberline strip (or "squealer" as it is often called). The heat transfer results are compared with the experimental results and discussed. The effectiveness of the mean-camberline strip in reducing the tip leakage and the tip heat transfer as compared to a radiused edge tip and sharp edge tip was studied. The calculations show that the sharp edge tip works best (among the cases considered) in reducing the tip leakage flow and the tip heat transfer.

  10. Kinetic and equilibrium studies for the adsorption process of cadmium(II) and copper(II) onto Pseudomonas aeruginosa using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry method.

    PubMed

    Kong, Bo; Tang, Biyu; Liu, Xiaoying; Zeng, Xiandong; Duan, Haiyan; Luo, Shenglian; Wei, Wanzhi

    2009-08-15

    A novel method for the simultaneous determination of cadmium(II) and copper(II) during the adsorption process onto Pseudomonas aeruginosa was developed. The concentration of the free metal ions was successfully detected by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) on the mercaptoethane sulfonate (MES) modified gold electrode, while the P. aeruginosa was efficiently avoided approaching to the electrode surface by the MES monolayer. And the anodic stripping peaks of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) appear at -0.13 and 0.34V respectively, at the concentration range of 5-50 microM, the peak currents of SWASV present linear relationships with the concentrations of cadmium and copper respectively. As the determination of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) was in real time and without pretreatment, the kinetic characteristics of the adsorption process were studied and all the corresponding regression parameters were obtained by fitting the electrochemical experimental data to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Moreover, Langmuir and Freundlich models well described the biosorption isotherms. And there were some differences in the amount of metal ion adsorbed at equilibrium (q(e)) and other kinetics parameters when the two ions coexisted were compared with the unaccompanied condition, which were also discussed in this paper. The proposed electrode system provides excellent platform for the simultaneous determination of trace metals in complex biosorption process.

  11. First principles derived, transferable force fields for CO2 adsorption in Na-exchanged cationic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hanjun; Kamakoti, Preeti; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Aronson, Matthew; Paur, Charanjit; Sholl, David S

    2013-08-21

    The development of accurate force fields is vital for predicting adsorption in porous materials. Previously, we introduced a first principles-based transferable force field for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites (Fang et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 10692). In this study, we extend our approach to CO2 adsorption in cationic zeolites which possess more complex structures. Na-exchanged zeolites are chosen for demonstrating the approach. These methods account for several structural complexities including Al distribution, cation positions and cation mobility, all of which are important for predicting adsorption. The simulation results are validated with high-resolution experimental measurements of isotherms and microcalorimetric heats of adsorption on well-characterized materials. The choice of first-principles method has a significant influence on the ability of force fields to accurately describe CO2-zeolite interactions. The PBE-D2 derived force field, which performed well for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites, does not do so for Na-exchanged zeolites; the PBE-D2 method overestimates CO2 adsorption energies on multi-cation sites that are common in cationic zeolites with low Si/Al ratios. In contrast, a force field derived from the DFT/CC method performed well. Agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment not only for LTA-4A on which the force field fitting is based, but for other two common adsorbents, NaX and NaY.

  12. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: trace gas adsorption by sorbent-covered plate electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-15

    Varying degrees of mercury (Hg) capture have been reported within the electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) of coal-fired electric utility boilers. There has been some speculation that the adsorption takes place on the particulate-covered plate electrodes. This convective mass transfer analysis of laminar and turbulent channel flows provides the maximum potential for Hg adsorption by the plate electrodes within an ESP under those conditions. Mass transfer calculations, neglecting electro hydrodynamic (EHD) effects, reveal 65% removal of elemental Hg for a laminar flow within a 15-m-long channel of 0.2-m spacing and 42% removal for turbulent flow within a similar configuration. Both configurations represent specific collection areas (SCAs) that are significantly larger than conventional ESPs in use. Results reflecting more representative SCA values generally returned removal efficiencies of {lt}20%. EHD effects, although potentially substantial at low Reynolds numbers, diminish rapidly with increasing Reynolds number and become negligible at typical ESP operating conditions. The present results indicate maximum Hg removal efficiencies for ESPs that are much less than those observed in practice for comparable ESP operating conditions. Considering Hg adsorption kinetics and finite sorbent capacity in addition to the present mass transfer analyses would yield even lower adsorption efficiencies than the present results. In a subsequent paper, the author addresses the mass transfer potential presented by the charged, suspended particulates during their collection within an ESP and the role they potentially play in Hg capture within ESPs. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  13. A complementary experimental and numerical study of the flow and heat transfer in offset strip-fin heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    DeJong, N.C.; Zhang, L.W.; Jacobi, A.M.; Balachandar, S.; Tafti, D.K.

    1998-08-01

    A detailed analysis of experimental and numerical results for flow and heat transfer in similar offset strip-fin geometries is presented. Surface-average heat transfer and pressure drop, local Nusselt numbers and skin friction coefficients on the fin surface, instantaneous flow structures, and local time-averaged velocity profiles are contrasted for a range of Reynolds numbers using both prior and new experimental and numerical results. This contrast verifies that a two-dimensional unsteady numerical simulation captures the important features of the flow and heat transfer for a range of conditions. However, flow three-dimensionality appears to become important for Reynolds numbers greater than about 1,300, and thermal boundary conditions are important for Reynolds numbers below 1,000. The results indicate that boundary layer development, flow separation and reattachment, wake formation, and vortex shedding are all important in this complex geometry.

  14. The adsorption and mass-transfer process of cationic red X-GRL dye on natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingjing; Guan, Junfang; Gao, Huimin; Wen, Yafei; Ren, Zijie

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of natural zeolite was studied in order to determine the adsorption capacity and mass-transfer process of cationic red X-GRL (C(18)H(21)BrN(6)) onto the adsorbent. The adsorption tests to determine both the uptake capacity and the mass-transfer process at equilibrium were performed under batch conditions, which showed rapid uptake in general for the initial 5 min, corresponding to 92% total removal. The equilibrium adsorption capacity value (q(e,cal)) in pseudo-second-order kinetics was 13.51 mg/g at 293 K and the whole adsorption process was governed by physical adsorption with an endothermic, endothermic spontaneous nature. Adsorption tests indicated that the zeolite has great potential as an alternative low-cost material in the treatment of X-GRL drainage. However, the mass-transfer process to determine the rate-controlling steps showed that both film diffusion and pore diffusion were important in controlling the adsorption rate. The adsorption process was governed by film diffusion while pore diffusion was poor because the X-GRL molecules could not penetrate into the zeolite easily. The X-GRL molecules were only adsorbed on the external surface of the zeolite. Hence, to improve the adsorption capacity of natural zeolite further, modification to expand its micropores is necessary.

  15. The adsorption and mass-transfer process of cationic red X-GRL dye on natural zeolite.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingjing; Guan, Junfang; Gao, Huimin; Wen, Yafei; Ren, Zijie

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of natural zeolite was studied in order to determine the adsorption capacity and mass-transfer process of cationic red X-GRL (C(18)H(21)BrN(6)) onto the adsorbent. The adsorption tests to determine both the uptake capacity and the mass-transfer process at equilibrium were performed under batch conditions, which showed rapid uptake in general for the initial 5 min, corresponding to 92% total removal. The equilibrium adsorption capacity value (q(e,cal)) in pseudo-second-order kinetics was 13.51 mg/g at 293 K and the whole adsorption process was governed by physical adsorption with an endothermic, endothermic spontaneous nature. Adsorption tests indicated that the zeolite has great potential as an alternative low-cost material in the treatment of X-GRL drainage. However, the mass-transfer process to determine the rate-controlling steps showed that both film diffusion and pore diffusion were important in controlling the adsorption rate. The adsorption process was governed by film diffusion while pore diffusion was poor because the X-GRL molecules could not penetrate into the zeolite easily. The X-GRL molecules were only adsorbed on the external surface of the zeolite. Hence, to improve the adsorption capacity of natural zeolite further, modification to expand its micropores is necessary. PMID:27148713

  16. Mass transfer and adsorption equilibrium for low volatility alkanes in BPL activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Mahle, John J; Furtado, Amanda M B; Glover, T Grant; Buchanan, James H; Peterson, Gregory W; LeVan, M Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The structure of a molecule and its concentration can strongly influence diffusional properties for transport in nanoporous materials. We study mass transfer of alkanes in BPL activated carbon using the concentration-swing frequency response method, which can easily discriminate among mass transfer mechanisms. We measure concentration-dependent diffusion rates for n-hexane, n-octane, n-decane, 2,7-dimethyloctane, and cyclodecane, which have different carbon numbers and geometries: straight chain, branched chain, and cyclic. Micropore diffusion is determined to be the controlling mass transfer resistance except at low relative saturation for n-decane, where an external mass transfer resistance also becomes important, showing that the controlling mass transfer mechanism can change with system concentration. Micropore diffusion coefficients are found to be strongly concentration dependent. Adsorption isotherm slopes obtained from measured isotherms, the concentration-swing frequency response method, and a predictive method show reasonably good agreement.

  17. Phosphate mediated adsorption and electron transfer of cytochrome c. A time-resolved SERR spectroelectrochemical study.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Marmisollé, Waldemar A; Williams, Federico J; Murgida, Daniel H

    2013-04-21

    The study of proteins immobilized on biomimetic or biocompatible electrodes represents an active field of research as it pursues both fundamental and technological interests. In this context, adsorption and redox properties of cytochrome c (Cyt) on different electrode surfaces have been extensively reported, although in some cases with contradictory results. Here we report a SERR spectroelectrochemical study of the adsorption and electron transfer behaviour of the basic protein Cyt on electrodes coated with amino-terminated monolayers. The obtained results show that inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ATP anions are able to mediate high affinity binding of the protein with preservation of the native structure and rendering an average orientation that guarantees efficient pathways for direct electron transfer. These findings aid the design of Cyt-based bioelectronic devices and understanding the modulation by Pi and ATP of physiological functions of Cyt.

  18. Catalytic treatment of air-stripping effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Kosusko, M.; Mullins, M.E.; Rogers, T.N.; Ramanathan, K.

    1987-12-01

    The paper reviews the applicability of catalytic oxidation to control ground-water air-stripping gaseous effluents with emphasis on system designs and case histories. The contaminants and catalyst poisons encountered in stripping operations are also reviewed. Vapor-phase carbon adsorption and thermal incineration, the treatment methods that have been applied most often, have some disadvantages: adsorption merely transfers the contaminant to a solid phase, which in turn requires disposal or regeneration; and thermal incineration may be expensive, since it requires a substantial energy input to destroy dilute gas-phase contaminants. A new alternative is appearing in the form of catalytic oxidation. Like thermal incineration, it is an ultimate disposal method, but the energy costs are lower.

  19. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: in-flight adsorption of mercury by charged suspended particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitation is the dominant method of particulate control used for coal combustion, and varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across ESPs. Nevertheless, the fate of gas-phase mercury within an ESP remains poorly understood. The present analysis focuses on the gas-particle mass transfer that occurs within a charged aerosol in an ESP. As a necessary step in gas-phase mercury adsorption or transformation, gas-particle mass transfer - particularly in configurations other than fixed beds - has received far less attention than studies of adsorption kinetics. Our previous analysis showed that only a small fraction of gas-phase mercury entering an ESP is likely to be adsorbed by collected particulate matter on the plate electrodes. The present simplified analysis provides insight into gas-particle mass transfer within an ESP under two limiting conditions: laminar and turbulent fluid flows. The analysis reveals that during the process of particulate collection, gas-particle mass transfer can be quite high, easily exceeding the mass transfer to ESP plate electrodes in most cases. Decreasing particle size, increasing particle mass loading, and increasing temperature all result in increased gas-particle mass transfer. The analysis predicts significantly greater gas-particle mass transfer in the laminar limit than in the turbulent limit; however, the differences become negligible under conditions where other factors, such as total mass of suspended particulates, are the controlling mass transfer parameters. Results are compared to selected pilot- and full-scale sorbent injection data. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Physical adsorption and charge transfer of molecular Br2 on graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheyuan; Darancet, Pierre; Wang, Lei; Crowther, Andrew C; Gao, Yuanda; Dean, Cory R; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Hone, James; Marianetti, Chris A; Brus, Louis E

    2014-03-25

    We present a detailed study of gaseous Br2 adsorption and charge transfer on graphene, combining in situ Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). When graphene is encapsulated by hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers on both sides, in a h-BN/graphene/h-BN sandwich structure, it is protected from doping by strongly oxidizing Br2. Graphene supported on only one side by h-BN shows strong hole doping by adsorbed Br2. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determine the graphene charge density as a function of pressure. DFT calculations reveal the variation in charge transfer per adsorbed molecule as a function of coverage. The molecular adsorption isotherm (coverage versus pressure) is obtained by combining Raman spectra with DFT calculations. The Fowler-Guggenheim isotherm fits better than the Langmuir isotherm. The fitting yields the adsorption equilibrium constant (∼0.31 Torr(-1)) and repulsive lateral interaction (∼20 meV) between adsorbed Br2 molecules. The Br2 molecule binding energy is ∼0.35 eV. We estimate that at monolayer coverage each Br2 molecule accepts 0.09 e- from single-layer graphene. If graphene is supported on SiO2 instead of h-BN, a threshold pressure is observed for diffusion of Br2 along the (somewhat rough) SiO2/graphene interface. At high pressure, graphene supported on SiO2 is doped by adsorbed Br2 on both sides. PMID:24528378

  1. Modification of carbon screen-printed electrodes by adsorption of chemically synthesized Bi nanoparticles for the voltammetric stripping detection of Zn(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Rico, Ma Angeles Granado; Olivares-Marín, Mara; Gil, Eduardo Pinilla

    2009-12-15

    A simple procedure for the chemical synthesis of bismuth nanoparticles and subsequent adsorption on commercial screen-printed carbon electrodes offer reliable quantitation of trace zinc, cadmium and lead by anodic stripping square-wave voltammetry in nondeareated water samples. The influence of two hydrodynamic configurations (convective cell and flow cell) and the effect of various experimental variables upon the stripping signals at the bismuth-coated sensor are explored. The square-wave peak current signal is linear over the low ng mL(-1) range (120 s deposition), with detections limits ranging from 0.9 to 4.9 ng mL(-1) and good precision. Applicability to waste water certified reference material and drinking water samples is demonstrated. The attractive behaviour of the new disposable Bi nanoparticles modified carbon strip electrodes, coupled with the negligible toxicity of bismuth, hold great promise for decentralized heavy metal testing in environmental and industrial effluents waters.

  2. Gas transfer rates from airlifts used for concurrent aeration, carbon dioxide stripping, and recirculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Airlifts simplify recirculating aquaculture systems and can potentially reduce capital costs and minimize maintenance issues. Airlifts have the ability to move and aerate water as well as degass the water of any carbon dioxide. This study evaluated the oxygen transfer and carbon dioxide removal abil...

  3. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part II: development of gas transfer models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The basic mass transfer equation for gases such as oxygen and carbon dioxide can be derived from integration of the driving force equation. Because of the physical characteristics of the gas transfer processes, slightly different models are used for aerators tested under the non steady-state procedures, than for packed columns, or weirs. It is suggested that the standard condition for carbon dioxide should be 20 °C, 1 atm, CCO2=20 mg/kg, and XCO2=0.000285. The selection of the standard condition for carbon dioxide based on a fixed mole fraction ensures that standardized carbon dioxide transfer rates will be comparable even though the value of C*CO2 in the atmosphere is increasing with time. The computation of mass transfer for carbon dioxide is complicated by the impact of water depth and gas phase enrichment on the saturation concentration within the unit, although the importance of either factor depends strongly on the specific type of aerator. For some types of aerators, the most accurate gas phase model remains to be determined for carbon dioxide. The assumption that carbon dioxide can be treated as a non-reactive gas in packed columns may apply for cold acidic waters but not for warm alkaline waters.

  4. Differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of atorvastatin calcium in pharmaceutical and biological samples using a vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide electrode.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tiago Almeida; Zanin, Hudson; Vicentini, Fernando Campanhã; Corat, Evaldo José; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-06-01

    A novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide (VACNT-GO) electrode is proposed, and its ability to determine atorvastatin calcium (ATOR) in pharmaceutical and biological samples by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPAdSV) is evaluated. VACNT films were prepared on a Ti substrate by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method and then treated with oxygen plasma to produce the VACNT-GO electrode. The oxygen plasma treatment exfoliates the carbon nanotube tips exposing graphene foils and inserting oxygen functional groups, these effects improved the VACNT wettability (super-hydrophobic) which is crucial for its electrochemical application. The electrochemical behaviour of ATOR on the VACNT-GO electrode was studied by cyclic voltammetry, which showed that it underwent an irreversible oxidation process at a potential of +1.08 V in pHcond 2.0 (0.2 mol L(-1) buffer phosphate solution). By applying DPAdSV under optimized experimental conditions the analytical curve was found to be linear in the ATOR concentration range of 90 to 3.81 × 10(3) nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 9.4 nmol L(-1). The proposed DPAdSV method was successfully applied in the determination of ATOR in pharmaceutical and biological samples, and the results were in close agreement with those obtained by a comparative spectrophotometric method at a confidence level of 95%.

  5. Determination of oleuropein using multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode by adsorptive stripping square wave voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Cittan, Mustafa; Koçak, Süleyman; Çelik, Ali; Dost, Kenan

    2016-10-01

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode was used to prepare an electrochemical sensing platform for the determination of oleuropein. Results showed that, the accumulation of oleuropein on the prepared electrode takes place with the adsorption process. Electrochemical behavior of oleuropein was studied by using cyclic voltammetry. Compared to the bare GCE, the oxidation peak current of oleuropein increased about 340 times at MWCNT/GCE. Voltammetric determination of oleuropein on the surface of prepared electrode was studied using square wave voltammetry where the oxidation peak current of oleuropein was measured as an analytical signal. A calibration curve of oleuropein was performed between 0.01 and 0.70µM and a good linearity was obtained with a correlation coefficient of 0.9984. Detection and quantification limits of the method were obtained as 2.73 and 9.09nM, respectively. In addition, intra-day and inter-day precision studies indicated that the voltammetric method was sufficiently repeatable. Finally, the proposed electrochemical sensor was successfully applied to the determination of oleuropein in an olive leaf extract. Microwave-assisted extraction of oleuropein had good recovery values between 92% and 98%. The results obtained with the proposed electrochemical sensor were compared with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis.

  6. Air stripping, oxidation, and activated-carbon adsorption studies for removal of taste and odor organics from water

    SciTech Connect

    Lalezary-Craig, S.

    1987-01-01

    A major class of water-consumer complaints are attributed to naturally occurring causatives of tastes and odors, among which a subgroup - the earthy-musty taste and odor compounds, documented to be spread worldwide - provides a special challenge to the scientific community and water utilities. The study was designed and executed to develop a firm basis for an understanding of the problem, as well as for optimization of process parameters for different-treatment techniques. The investigation began with determination of the physicochemical properties of a group of five earthy-musty taste and odor compounds including geosmin, 2-isobutyl-3-methoxy pyrazine (IBMP), 2-isopropyl-3-methoxy pyrazine (IPMP), 2-methylisoborneol (MIB), and 2, 3, 6-trichloroanisole (TCA). The second phase of the study investigated aeration, the application of oxidants such as chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and potassium permanganate, and several absorbents including manganese dioxide, kaolinite, and bentonite, for the mitigation of taste-and-odor problem. Other treatment processes investigated were ozonation and activated carbon adsorption. To investigate the efficiency of powdered activated carbon and closely simulate full-scale treatment operations, pilot-plant studies were conducted at one of the several plants operated by the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.

  7. Decontamination of polyaromatic hydrocarbons from soil by steam stripping: mathematical modeling of the mass transfer and energy requirement.

    PubMed

    Braass, Oliver; Tiffert, Christian; Höhne, Joachim; Luo, Xing; Niemeyer, Bernd

    2003-11-01

    For cleaning of contaminated soil from polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a thermal separation process is applied. The process uses superheated steam that is supplied through a nozzle together with a suspension (approximately 40% soil content) of the contaminated soil into a tube reactor. In the reactor, the soil suspension is vaporized, and the PAH are stripped from the soil at temperatures of 140-300 degrees C. In a cyclone, a solid-vapor separation is carried out, and after going through a condenser, a separation of the condensed water and the PAH is obtained. For improvement of the economical performance, a heat recovery is integrated. This is realized by preheating the water/stream supplied to the evaporator by cooling the vapor steam leaving the reactor. For the mathematical description of the process, the removal of the PAH from the soil is considered to take place by a desorption process. Sorption isotherms are measured by batch experiments and can be described by isotherms of Langmuir type. A dispersion model is used to describe the mass transfer of the process. The process is mathematically modeled for instationary and stationary operation. The simulation predicts the lowest energy consumption at a good cleaning performance at a steam-to-suspension ratio of 5.

  8. Membrane air stripping utilizing a plate and frame configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, S.T.

    1991-01-01

    Membrane air stripping has recently been proposed as a possible method to remove volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and radon from drinking water supplies. Current and anticipated regulatory requirements, driven by health consequences, make the removal of these contaminants mandatory. This work examines the use of plate and frame membrane air stripping for the removal of VOCs and radon from a water supply. The theoretical basis of membrane air stripping and a literature review are included. The advantages of membrane air stripping versus other methods of removal, as well as the advantages of a plate and frame configuration versus a hollow fiber configuration for membrane air stripping are discussed. Multiple regression/correlation techniques are used to model mass transfer coefficients and fluid resistances. An economic evaluation is performed using the developed models. The costs of comparable membrane and packed tower air stripping systems are 4.86 cents per thousand gallons versus 4.36 cents per thousand gallons, respectively. This work indicates that plate and frame membrane air stripping may, in fact, prove to be an economical alternative to packed tower aeration and carbon adsorption for the removal of VOCs and radon.

  9. Determination of the mass transfer limiting step of dye adsorption onto commercial adsorbent by using mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Marin, Pricila; Borba, Carlos Eduardo; Módenes, Aparecido Nivaldo; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; de Oliveira, Silvia Priscila Dias; Kroumov, Alexander Dimitrov

    2014-01-01

    Reactive blue 5G dye removal in a fixed-bed column packed with Dowex Optipore SD-2 adsorbent was modelled. Three mathematical models were tested in order to determine the limiting step of the mass transfer of the dye adsorption process onto the adsorbent. The mass transfer resistance was considered to be a criterion for the determination of the difference between models. The models contained information about the external, internal, or surface adsorption limiting step. In the model development procedure, two hypotheses were applied to describe the internal mass transfer resistance. First, the mass transfer coefficient constant was considered. Second, the mass transfer coefficient was considered as a function of the dye concentration in the adsorbent. The experimental breakthrough curves were obtained for different particle diameters of the adsorbent, flow rates, and feed dye concentrations in order to evaluate the predictive power of the models. The values of the mass transfer parameters of the mathematical models were estimated by using the downhill simplex optimization method. The results showed that the model that considered internal resistance with a variable mass transfer coefficient was more flexible than the other ones and this model described the dynamics of the adsorption process of the dye in the fixed-bed column better. Hence, this model can be used for optimization and column design purposes for the investigated systems and similar ones.

  10. The influence of adsorption coating on molecular heat transfer in the system `rarefied gas — metal'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhov, A. I.; Borisov, S. F.; Porodnov, B. T.

    2010-03-01

    Based on the classical concept of atomic motion and the Goodman and Wachman lattice theory, we have developed a computer program to model the equilibrium and non-equilibrium scattering of helium atoms by 3D tungsten crystal lattice with allowance for adsorption surface coating. Within the concept of energy accommodation coefficient, we have calculated the rate of molecular heat transfer of helium to clean tungsten surface or to tungsten surface partially covered with an adsorbate. The calculations were performed for various surface temperatures. The calculated dependences were compared to test data obtained in experiments with surfaces controlled in terms of their chemical composition. Within the developed approach, the simulations proved capable of providing an adequate description to experimental data obtained for the equilibrium energy accommodation coefficient on the clean surface, and also for the non-equilibrium energy accommodation coefficient for the surface partially covered with adsorbate.

  11. Enhanced adsorption of arsenate onto a natural polymer-based sorbent by surface atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ting; Zheng, Yu-Ming; Paul Chen, J

    2011-04-01

    Arsenic contamination in water, especially in groundwater, has been recognized as an important issue of concern because of its high mobility and toxicity. In this study, N-methylglucamine was immobilized onto crosslinked chitosan beads via atom transfer radical polymerization for an efficient adsorption of arsenic. It was demonstrated that the immobilization significantly enhanced the adsorption capacity. The uptake onto the adsorbent was highly pH dependent, and a maximum adsorption capacity as high as 69.28 mg/g was obtained at the optimum pH of 5. Most of arsenate was rapidly adsorbed in the first 5h, and the adsorption equilibrium was established in 16 h, which was well described by an intraparticle diffusion model. The adsorbent exhibited a great uptake of the humic acid, which led to a decrease in the adsorption of arsenate. The effects of competitive anions on the adsorption exhibited the following descending sequence: sulfate ≫ phosphate>fluoride (negligible effect). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the arsenic adsorption resulted from the presence of tertiary amine and hydroxyl functional groups grafted on the crosslinked chitosan.

  12. Numerical Simulation of the Fluid Flow, Heat Transfer, and Solidification in a Twin-Roll Strip Continuous Casting Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mianguang; Zhu, Miaoyong; Wang, Guodong

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional enthalpy-porosity mixture solidification model is employed to describe the basic rules of heat transfer and solidification in a twin-roll strip continuous casting machine equipped with a multi-port trough-shaped feeding system, and reasons for the formation of these rules are analyzed. The two-layer zonal turbulence model is used to incorporate the turbulence in fluid flow, and the fluid flow in the wedge-shaped pool region in various conditions is studied. The results show that the fluid flow field in the pool region is quite different with/without the consideration of rotating rolls when the solidification is ignored, which indicates the importance of the consideration of rotating rolls in the water modeling equipment design. There are three aspects including molten steel jet impingement, roll rotating, and backward flow of the mushy zone, which strongly influence the temperature distribution in the pool region. The solidification process in the pool region could be divided into three stages: at the first stage, there exists a fast solidification region which obeys the square root law, and an approximately linear growth region could be found at the second stage, while a parabolic growth region could be found at the last stage. The formation of the first stage and the last stage could be mainly due to the geometry of the feeding system and the backward flow of the mushy zone, respectively. The first stage of solidification could be modified by a better designed feeding system, but the backward flow of mushy zone determined by the properties of metals and casting parameters could be one of the biggest obstacles for commercial production of steel sheets by a twin-roll caster.

  13. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU-PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  14. Simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) as 2-(5'-bromo-2'-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complexes by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry at a carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Enass M

    2010-07-15

    A simple and precise square-wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (SW-AdCSV) method has been described for simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in water samples using a carbon paste electrode. In 0.1 mol L(-1) acetate buffer (pH 5) containing 50 micromol L(-1) of 2-(5'-bromo-2'-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (5-Br-PADAP), Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) were simultaneously determined as metal-complexes with 5-Br-PADAP following preconcentration onto the carbon paste electrode by adsorptive accumulation at +1.0V (vs. Ag/AgCl/3M KCl). Insignificant interference from various cations (K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Al(3+), Bi(3+), Sb(3+), Se(4+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), V(5+), Ti(4+) and NH(4)(+)), anions (HCO(3)(-), Cl(-), NO(3-), SO(4)(2-) and PO(4)(3-)) and ascorbic acid was noticed. Limits of detection of 0.066, 0.108 and 0.093 microg L(-1) and limits of quantitation of 0.22, 0.36 and 0.31 microg L(-1) Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III), respectively, were achieved by the described method. The described stripping voltammetry method was successfully applied for simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in ground, tap and bottled natural water samples.

  15. Spin-polarized charge transfer induced by transition metal adsorption on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Castillo, Elisabetta; Cargnoni, Fausto; Soave, Raffaella; Trioni, Mario I.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic properties of transition metal atoms adsorbed on a graphene sheet are analyzed in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Particular attention is devoted to the spin dependence of the charge rearrangement upon the adsorption of magnetic adatoms. A comparison between the band structures and the charges in the atomic basins makes it possible to shed light on the different roles that the spin components play in the bond formation. This aspect is likely to be crucial in determining the spin-dependent properties required in spintronics applications and could help in tailoring them. We found that for early (Sc, Ti, and V) and late (Fe, Co) transition metals the two spin populations behave very differently, being involved in the bonding only the majority or the minority spin component for the lighter and heavier adsorbates, respectively. We expect that the response properties, in particular those related to the states at the Fermi level, will be very different for the two spin components. As a by-product of our study it becomes apparent that the QTAIM analysis is not the most suitable tool for catching the charge transfer phenomenon in the case of weakly interacting electronic populations.

  16. Enhancing selectivity in stripping voltammetry by different adsorption behaviors: the use of nanostructured Mg-Al-layered double hydroxides to detect Cd(II).

    PubMed

    Xu, Ren-Xia; Yu, Xin-Yao; Gao, Chao; Liu, Jin-Huai; Compton, Richard G; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2013-03-21

    We report the use of nanostructured layered double hydroxides (LDHs) for the highly selective and sensitive detection of Cd(2+) using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). In particular, the modification of a glassy carbon electrode promotes the sensitivity and selectivity towards Cd(2+) in the presence of Pb(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). The electrochemical characterization and anodic stripping voltammetric performance of Cd(2+) were evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) analysis. Operational parameters, including supporting electrolytes, pH value, deposition potential and deposition time were optimized. In addition, the selectivity, interference and stability were also investigated under the optimized conditions. The results showed that the fabricated electrode possessed good selectivity, stability and reproducibility. The proposed electrochemical sensing strategy is thus expected to open new opportunities to broaden the use of ASV in analysis for detecting heavy metal ions in the environment.

  17. Finite-element simulations of the influence of pore wall adsorption on cyclic voltammetry of ion transfer across a liquid-liquid interface formed at a micropore.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jonathan S; Strutwolf, Jörg; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2012-02-21

    Adsorption onto the walls of micropores was explored by computational simulations involving cyclic voltammetry of ion transfer across an interface between aqueous and organic phases located at the micropore. Micro-interfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (micro-ITIES) have been of particular research interest in recent years and show promise for biosensor and biomedical applications. The simulation model combines diffusion to and within the micropore, Butler-Volmer kinetics for ion transfer at the liquid-liquid interface, and Langmuir-style adsorption on the pore wall. Effects due to pore radius, adsorption and desorption rates, surface adsorption site density, and scan rates were examined. It was found that the magnitude of the reverse peak current decreased due to adsorption of the transferring ion on the pore wall; this decrease was more marked as the scan rate was increased. There was also a shift in the half-wave potential to lower values following adsorption, consistent with a wall adsorption process which provides a further driving force to transfer ions across the ITIES. Of particular interest was the disappearance of the reverse peak from the cyclic voltammogram at higher scan rates, compared to the increase in the reverse peak size in the absence of wall adsorption. This occurred for scan rates of 50 mV s(-1) and above and may be useful in biosensor applications using micropore-based ITIES.

  18. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  19. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; Baker, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  20. Simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) as 2-(5'-bromo-2'-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol complexes by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry at a carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Enass M

    2010-07-15

    A simple and precise square-wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (SW-AdCSV) method has been described for simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in water samples using a carbon paste electrode. In 0.1 mol L(-1) acetate buffer (pH 5) containing 50 micromol L(-1) of 2-(5'-bromo-2'-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (5-Br-PADAP), Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) were simultaneously determined as metal-complexes with 5-Br-PADAP following preconcentration onto the carbon paste electrode by adsorptive accumulation at +1.0V (vs. Ag/AgCl/3M KCl). Insignificant interference from various cations (K(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Al(3+), Bi(3+), Sb(3+), Se(4+), Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), V(5+), Ti(4+) and NH(4)(+)), anions (HCO(3)(-), Cl(-), NO(3-), SO(4)(2-) and PO(4)(3-)) and ascorbic acid was noticed. Limits of detection of 0.066, 0.108 and 0.093 microg L(-1) and limits of quantitation of 0.22, 0.36 and 0.31 microg L(-1) Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III), respectively, were achieved by the described method. The described stripping voltammetry method was successfully applied for simultaneous determination of Mn(II), Cu(II) and Fe(III) in ground, tap and bottled natural water samples. PMID:20602949

  1. Adsorptive potential of cationic Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) dye onto natural untreated clay (NUC) from aqueous phase: Mass transfer analysis, kinetic and equilibrium profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, A.; Malkoc, E.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, natural untreated clay (NUC) was studied for the removal of Basic Yellow 2 (BY2) from aqueous solution in batch system. The effects of initial BY2 concentration, contact time, solution temperature and solution pH on BY2 adsorption were investigated. Nitrogen sorption measurements were employed to investigate the variation in surface and pore properties after dye adsorption. The adsorbent was characterized by means of FTIR, PSD, TEM, XRD and BET analysis. The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Scatchard isotherm models. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 833.33 mg/g at 25 °C (at room temperature). The pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided the best fit to the experimental datas compared with pseudo-first-order kinetic adsorption models. To explain mass transfer mechanism of BY2 adsorption, obtained experimental datas were applied Weber and Morris model, Body and Frusawa and Smith models. The results show that the adsorption process is controlled by film diffusion. The thermodynamic parameters such as, Gibbs free energy changes (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were determined. Adsorption of BY2 on NUC is exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The calculated activation energy of adsorption was found to be 5.24 kJ/mol for BY2. This value indicates that the adsorption process is a physisorption.

  2. Air stripping for treatment of produced water

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.S.; Lin, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    In a laboratory study, air stripping shows a promising potential for treatment of produced water to meet new government regulations on total organic carbon (TOC). Reservoir hydrocarbons dissolved in water, such as volatile paraffins and aromatics, can be removed by air stripping through interphase mass transfer. However, air stripping cannot remove many chemicals added to crude oil by the operator.

  3. Ab Initio Modeling of Fe(II) Adsorption and Interfacial Electron Transfer at Goethite (α-FeOOH) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Vitali Y.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    Goethite (α-FeOOH) surfaces represent one of the most ubiquitous redox-active interfaces in the environment, playing an important role in biogeochemical metal cycling and contaminant residence in the subsurface. Fe(II)-catalyzed recrystallization of goethite is a fundamental process in this context, but the proposed Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite electron and iron atom exchange mechanism of recrystallization remains poorly understood at the atomic level. We examine the adsorption of aqueous Fe(II) and subsequent interfacial electron transfer (ET) between adsorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III) at the (110) and (021) goethite surfaces using density functional theory calculations including Hubbard U corrections (DFT+U) aided by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We investigate various surface sites for the adsorption of Fe2+(H2O)6 in different coordination environments. Calculated energies for adsorbed complexes at both surfaces favor monodentate complexes with reduced 4- and 5-fold coordination over higher-dentate structures and 6- fold coordination. The hydrolysis of H2O ligands is observed for some pre-ET adsorbed Fe(II) configurations. ET from the adsorbed Fe(II) into the goethite lattice is calculated to be energetically uphill always, but simultaneous proton transfer from H2O ligands of the adsorbed complexes to the surface oxygen species stabilizes post-ET states. We find that surface defects such as oxygen vacancies near the adsorption site also can stabilize post-ET states, enabling the Fe(II)aq-Fe(III)goethite interfacial electron transfer reaction implied from experiments to proceed.

  4. Experimental approach to the anion problem in DFT calculation of the partial charge transfer during adsorption at electrochemical interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marichev, V. A.

    2005-08-01

    In DFT calculation of the charge transfer (Δ N), anions pose a special problem since their electron affinities are unknown. There is no method for calculating reasonable values of the absolute electronegativity ( χA) and chemical hardness ( ηA) for ions from data of species themselves. We propose a new approach to the experimental measurement of χA at the condition: Δ N = 0 at which η values may be neglected and χA = χMe. Electrochemical parameters corresponding to this condition may be obtained by the contact electric resistance method during in situ investigation of anion adsorption in the particular system anion-metal.

  5. Resonance energy-transfer studies of the conformational change on the adsorption of oligonucleotides to a silica interface.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Colin A; Millar, David P; Gee, Michelle L; Smith, Trevor A

    2011-05-19

    Time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence studies have been carried out on a series of fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide sequences adsorbed to a silica surface from solution. The fluorescence decay profiles of a fluorescent energy donor group undergoing resonance energy transfer to a nonemissive energy-acceptor molecule have been analyzed in terms of a distribution of donor-acceptor distances to reveal the conformational changes that occur in these oligonucleotides upon adsorption. Evanescent wave-induced time-resolved Förster resonance energy-transfer (EW-TRFRET) measurements indicate that at a high electrolyte concentration, there is localized separation of the oligonucleotide strands, and the helical structure adopts an "unraveled" conformation as a result of adsorption. This is attributed to the flexibility within the oligonucleotide at high electrolyte concentration allowing multiple segments of the oligonucleotide to have direct surface interaction. In contrast, the EW-TRFRET measurements at a lower electrolyte concentration reveal that the oligonucleotide retains its helical conformation in a localized extended state. This behavior implies that the rigidity of the oligonucleotide at this electrolyte concentration restricts direct interaction with the silica to a few segments, which correspondingly introduces kinks in the double helix conformation and results in significant oligonucleotide segmental extension into solution.

  6. Atomic force microscopy study of the adsorption of protein molecules on transferred Langmuir monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Gainutdinov, R. V. Tolstikhina, A. L.; Stepina, N. D.; Novikova, N. N.; Yur'eva, E. A.; Khripunov, A. K.

    2010-09-15

    Ordered protein films have been obtained by the adsorption of protein molecules on a Langmuir monolayer, which had previously formed on a silicon substrate, using the Langmuir-Blodgett and molecular self-organization methods. A mixture of cholesterol with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and a polymer-cellulose acetopivalinate-were used as immobilization materials. Protein molecules (catalase and alkaline phosphatase) immobilized on solid substrates have been investigated by atomic force micros-copy. It was shown that the developed combined technique provides a deposition of homogeneous ultrathin protein films with a high degree of filling.

  7. 3-D Transient Heat Transfer Analysis of Slab Heating Characteristics in a Reheating Furnace in Hot Strip Mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, J. Y.; Lee, Y. W.; Lin, C. N.; Wang, C. H.

    2016-05-01

    A three-dimensional mathematical transient heat transfer model for the prediction of temperature distribution within the slab has been developed by considering the thermal radiation in the walking-beam-type reheating furnace chamber. The steel slabs are heated up through the non-firing, preheating, 1st-heating, 2nd-heating, and soaking zones in the furnace, respectively, where the furnace wall temperature is function of time. Comparison with the in-situ experimental data from Steel Company in Taiwan shows that the present heat transfer model works well for the prediction of thermal behavior of the slab in the reheating furnace. The effects of different skid button height (H=60mm, 90mm, and 120mm) and different gap distance between two slabs (S=50mm, 75mm, and 100mm) on the slab skid mark formation and temperature profiles are investigated. It is found that the skid mark severity decreases with an increase in the skid button height. The effect of gap distance is important only for the slab edge planes, while it is insignificant for the slab central planes.

  8. Vibrational energy transfer near a dissociative adsorption transition state: State-to-state study of HCl collisions at Au(111).

    PubMed

    Geweke, Jan; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Rahinov, Igor; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M

    2016-08-01

    In this work we seek to examine the nature of collisional energy transfer between HCl and Au(111) for nonreactive scattering events that sample geometries near the transition state for dissociative adsorption by varying both the vibrational and translational energy of the incident HCl molecules in the range near the dissociation barrier. Specifically, we report absolute vibrational excitation probabilities for HCl(v = 0 → 1) and HCl(v = 1 → 2) scattering from clean Au(111) as a function of surface temperature and incidence translational energy. The HCl(v = 2 → 3) channel could not be observed-presumably due to the onset of dissociation. The excitation probabilities can be decomposed into adiabatic and nonadiabatic contributions. We find that both contributions strongly increase with incidence vibrational state by a factor of 24 and 9, respectively. This suggests that V-T as well as V-EHP coupling can be enhanced near the transition state for dissociative adsorption at a metal surface. We also show that previously reported HCl(v = 0 → 1) excitation probabilities [Q. Ran et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 237601 (2007)]-50 times smaller than those reported here-were influenced by erroneous assignment of spectroscopic lines used in the data analysis. PMID:27497574

  9. Vibrational energy transfer near a dissociative adsorption transition state: State-to-state study of HCl collisions at Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geweke, Jan; Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Rahinov, Igor; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work we seek to examine the nature of collisional energy transfer between HCl and Au(111) for nonreactive scattering events that sample geometries near the transition state for dissociative adsorption by varying both the vibrational and translational energy of the incident HCl molecules in the range near the dissociation barrier. Specifically, we report absolute vibrational excitation probabilities for HCl(v = 0 → 1) and HCl(v = 1 → 2) scattering from clean Au(111) as a function of surface temperature and incidence translational energy. The HCl(v = 2 → 3) channel could not be observed—presumably due to the onset of dissociation. The excitation probabilities can be decomposed into adiabatic and nonadiabatic contributions. We find that both contributions strongly increase with incidence vibrational state by a factor of 24 and 9, respectively. This suggests that V-T as well as V-EHP coupling can be enhanced near the transition state for dissociative adsorption at a metal surface. We also show that previously reported HCl(v = 0 → 1) excitation probabilities [Q. Ran et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 237601 (2007)]—50 times smaller than those reported here—were influenced by erroneous assignment of spectroscopic lines used in the data analysis.

  10. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce{sup 3+} upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-07

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce{sup 3+}, while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  11. Charge transfer and formation of reduced Ce3+ upon adsorption of metal atoms at the ceria (110) surface.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael

    2012-04-01

    The modification of cerium dioxide with nanoscale metal clusters is intensely researched for catalysis applications, with gold, silver, and copper having been particularly well studied. The interaction of the metal cluster with ceria is driven principally by a localised interaction between a small number of metal atoms (as small as one) and the surface and understanding the fundamentals of the interaction of metal atoms with ceria surfaces is therefore of great interest. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of metals with the (111) surface of ceria, since this is the most stable surface and can be grown as films, which are probed experimentally. However, nanostructures exposing other surfaces such as (110) show high activity for reactions including CO oxidation and require further study; these nanostructures could be modified by deposition of metal atoms or small clusters, but there is no information to date on the atomic level details of metal-ceria interactions involving the (110) surface. This paper presents the results of density functional theory (DFT) corrected for on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT+U) calculations of the adsorption of a number of different metal atoms at an extended ceria (110) surface; the metals are Au, Ag, Cu, Al, Ga, In, La, Ce, V, Cr, and Fe. Upon adsorption all metals are oxidised, transferring electron(s) to the surface, resulting in localised surface distortions. The precise details depend on the identity of the metal atom. Au, Ag, Cu each transfer one electron to the surface, reducing one Ce ion to Ce(3+), while of the trivalent metals, Al and La are fully oxidised, but Ga and In are only partially oxidised. Ce and the transition metals are also partially oxidised, with the number of reduced Ce ions possible in this surface no more than three per adsorbed metal atom. The predicted oxidation states of the adsorbed metal atoms should be testable in experiments on ceria nanostructures modified with metal atoms.

  12. Fluorinated graphenes as advanced biosensors - effect of fluorine coverage on electron transfer properties and adsorption of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanová, Veronika; Karlický, František; Matěj, Adam; Šembera, Filip; Janoušek, Zbyněk; Perman, Jason A.; Ranc, Václav; Čépe, Klára; Michl, Josef; Otyepka, Michal; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-06-01

    Graphene derivatives are promising materials for the electrochemical sensing of diverse biomolecules and development of new biosensors owing to their improved electron transfer kinetics compared to pristine graphene. Here, we report complex electrochemical behavior and electrocatalytic performance of variously fluorinated graphene derivatives prepared by reaction of graphene with a nitrogen-fluorine mixture at 2 bars pressure. The fluorine content was simply controlled by varying the reaction time and temperature. The studies revealed that electron transfer kinetics and electrocatalytic activity of CFx strongly depend on the degree of fluorination. The versatility of fluorinated graphene as a biosensor platform was demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry for different biomolecules essential in physiological processes, i.e. NADH, ascorbic acid and dopamine. Importantly, the highest electrochemical performance, even higher than pristine graphene, was obtained for fluorinated graphene with the lowest fluorine content (CF0.084) due to its high conductivity and enhanced adsorption properties combining π-π stacking interaction with graphene regions with hydrogen-bonding interaction with fluorine atoms.Graphene derivatives are promising materials for the electrochemical sensing of diverse biomolecules and development of new biosensors owing to their improved electron transfer kinetics compared to pristine graphene. Here, we report complex electrochemical behavior and electrocatalytic performance of variously fluorinated graphene derivatives prepared by reaction of graphene with a nitrogen-fluorine mixture at 2 bars pressure. The fluorine content was simply controlled by varying the reaction time and temperature. The studies revealed that electron transfer kinetics and electrocatalytic activity of CFx strongly depend on the degree of fluorination. The versatility of fluorinated graphene as a biosensor platform was demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry for different biomolecules

  13. Additive Fabrication of Conductive Patterns by a Template Transfer Process Based on Benzotriazole Adsorption As a Separation Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Yang, Zhen-Guo

    2016-06-01

    The traditional subtractive process to fabricate conductive patterns is environmentally harmful, wasteful, and limited in line width. The additive process, including direct printing of conductive paste or ink, direct printing of catalytic ink, laser-induced forward transfer, etc., can solve these problems. However, the current additive process also faces many difficulties such as low electrical and adhesion properties, low pattern thickness, high cost, etc. Benzotriazole (BTA), as widely used corrosion inhibitor, can be adsorbed onto a copper surface. The electroplated copper film on BTA-adsorbed copper foil shows poor adhesion. On the basis of this phenomenon, a novel template transfer process to additively fabricate conductive patterns has been developed. A permeant antiadhesive mask is printed on carrier copper foil, and then, BTA is adsorbed onto the exposed area of the carrier foil, thus forming the template. The template is electroplated to grow conductive patterns in the exposed parts, and then can be adhered to the flexible substrate. The substrate is peeled off, with the transfer of the conductive patterns to the substrate, to form the designed conductive patterns on PET. By reimmersing the template into BTA solution, the template can be used again. The mechanism of BTA adsorption and the reason for the low peeling strength are researched using Raman spectra, XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Copper patterns more than 20 μm in thickness can be prepared on PET, the resistivity of the prepared copper patterns is 2.01 μΩ cm, which is about the same as bulk copper, and the peeling strength of the pattern on PET is measured to be 6.97 N/cm. This template transfer process, with no waste, low pollution, high electrical and adhesion properties, and low cost, shows high potential in the large scale manufacturing of electronic devices, such as RFID circuitry, FPCs, etc.

  14. Additive Fabrication of Conductive Patterns by a Template Transfer Process Based on Benzotriazole Adsorption As a Separation Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Yang, Zhen-Guo

    2016-06-01

    The traditional subtractive process to fabricate conductive patterns is environmentally harmful, wasteful, and limited in line width. The additive process, including direct printing of conductive paste or ink, direct printing of catalytic ink, laser-induced forward transfer, etc., can solve these problems. However, the current additive process also faces many difficulties such as low electrical and adhesion properties, low pattern thickness, high cost, etc. Benzotriazole (BTA), as widely used corrosion inhibitor, can be adsorbed onto a copper surface. The electroplated copper film on BTA-adsorbed copper foil shows poor adhesion. On the basis of this phenomenon, a novel template transfer process to additively fabricate conductive patterns has been developed. A permeant antiadhesive mask is printed on carrier copper foil, and then, BTA is adsorbed onto the exposed area of the carrier foil, thus forming the template. The template is electroplated to grow conductive patterns in the exposed parts, and then can be adhered to the flexible substrate. The substrate is peeled off, with the transfer of the conductive patterns to the substrate, to form the designed conductive patterns on PET. By reimmersing the template into BTA solution, the template can be used again. The mechanism of BTA adsorption and the reason for the low peeling strength are researched using Raman spectra, XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Copper patterns more than 20 μm in thickness can be prepared on PET, the resistivity of the prepared copper patterns is 2.01 μΩ cm, which is about the same as bulk copper, and the peeling strength of the pattern on PET is measured to be 6.97 N/cm. This template transfer process, with no waste, low pollution, high electrical and adhesion properties, and low cost, shows high potential in the large scale manufacturing of electronic devices, such as RFID circuitry, FPCs, etc. PMID:27171553

  15. Quantification of iron in seawater at the low picomolar range based on optimization of bromate/ammonia/dihydroxynaphtalene system by catalytic adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Laglera, Luis Miguel; Santos-Echeandía, Juan; Caprara, Salvatore; Monticelli, Damiano

    2013-02-19

    A new analytical protocol for the challenging analysis of total dissolved iron at the low picomolar level in oceanic waters suitable for onboard analysis is presented. The method is based on the revision of the adsorptive properties of the iron/2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (Fe/DHN) complexes on the hanging mercury drop electrode with catalytic enhancement by bromate ions. Although it was based on a previously proposed reagent combination, we show here that the addition of an acidification/alkalinization step is essential in order to cancel any organic complexation, and that an extra increment of the pH to 8.6-8.8 leads to the definition of a preconcentration-free procedure with the lowest detection limit described up to now. For total dissolved iron analysis, samples were acidified to pH 2.0 in the presence of 30 μM DHN and left to equilibrate overnight. A 10 mL sample was subsequently buffered to a pH of ∼8.7 in the presence of 20 mM bromate: a 60 s deposition at 0 V led to a sensitivity of 34 nA nM(-1) min(-1), a 4-fold improvement over previous methods, that translated in a limit of detection of 5 pM (2-20 fold improvement). Several tests proved that a nonreversible reaction in the time scale of the analysis, triggered by the acidification/alkalinization step, was behind the signal magnification. The new method was validated onboard via the analysis of reference material and via intercalibration against flow injection analysis-chemiluminescence on Southern Ocean surface samples.

  16. Robotic Stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    UltraStrip Systems, Inc.'s M-200 removes paint from the hulls of ships faster than traditional grit-blasting methods. And, it does so without producing toxic airborne particles common to traditional methods. The M-2000 magnetically attaches itself to the hull of the ship. Its water jets generate 40,000 pounds of pressure per square inch, blasting away paint down to the ships steel substrate. The only by product is water and dried paint chips and these are captured by a vacuum system so no toxic residue can escape. It was built out of a partnership between the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the National Robotics Engineering Consortium.

  17. Roles of adsorption sites in electron transfer from CdS quantum dots to molecular catalyst cobaloxime studied by time-resolved spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yun; Xu, Yuxing; Huang, Lei; Fan, Dayong; Feng, Zhaochi; Wang, Xiuli; Li, Can

    2016-06-29

    Electron transfer from CdS quantum dots (QDs) to cobaloxime (Co(dmgH)2pyCl) is demonstrated by transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS), and further confirmed using photoluminescence (PL) techniques. The analysis of the PL quenching results offers a novel way to understand the roles of the surface adsorption sites of CdS QDs in the performance of charge transfer in the CdS QDs-cobaloxime hybrid system. Two types of quenching dynamics reveal that there are two different adsorption modes of cobaloxime on the CdS QD surface. When cobaloxime substitutes the surface capping ligands of CdS QDs under low cobaloxime concentrations, the transfer is nearly unfavorable for both the free and trapped electrons. When cobaloxime occupies the surface defect sites of the CdS QDs under high cobaloxime concentrations, the transfer of both the free and trapped electrons is very effective, with an extremely high quenching rate constant of ∼10(12) M(-1) s(-1). Therefore, controlling the molecular adsorption sites and adjusting the surface defect properties of semiconductor QDs provide a strategy to improve the electron transfer efficiency of the QDs-cobaloxime photocatalytic system. PMID:27306688

  18. I. Gas adsorption properties and porosity of transition metal-based cyanogels. II. Novel energy transfer processes in organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Rahul Shrikant

    The gas adsorption properties and porosity of cyanide-bridged transition metal-based gels are investigated in the first part of this dissertation. The cyanide bridges, connecting two transition metal centers, are characteristic of these gels; hence, these gels are termed cyanogels. Aerogel versus xerogel structures have a profound effect, both, on the thermodynamics and kinetics of gas adsorption on these cyanogels. Carbon dioxide is selectively adsorbed on palladium-cobalt-based cyanogels; the adsorption is fully reversible on both types of gels discussed. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the gas adsorption processes on these gels are analyzed here. From the ease and reproducibility of the CO2 desorption and the associated enthalpy values, it is concluded that CO2 is physisorbed on these gels. Both the adsorption and desorption processes are first-order in the gels. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on the palladium-cobalt cyanogels is also investigated. Unlike CO 2 physisorption, carbon monoxide is chemisorbed on these gels. An uptake of CO brings about a profound change in the xerogel morphology. The palladium-cobalt-based aerogels possess both micro- and mesoporosity; the xerogels are predominantly microporous with a narrow microporosity. The aerogel surfaces are found to be fractal as analyzed by gas adsorption. Unlike the aerogels, the xerogels do not possess surface fractality. The mechanism of adsorption of different gases on these gels is analyzed based on the gel morphologies. These transition metal-based gels are promising for a variety of applications such as heterogeneous catalysts, gas filters and magnetic materials. The porosity of these gels can be exploited to make gel-embedded filters to separate mixtures of gases based on the their differential adsorption propensities. The reversible adsorption of CO2 can be harnessed practically by using these gels as CO2 storage reservoirs. In the second part of this dissertation, the first, balanced, white

  19. Introducing absorptive stripping voltammetry: wide concentration range voltammetric phenol detection.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Rita; Compton, Richard G

    2014-11-21

    Carbon paste electrodes are developed for the detection of phenols via a procedure in which the phenols are allowed to accumulate in the paste via transfer from an aqueous solution prior to electro-oxidation. Importantly, the use of such paste electrodes is shown to substantially overcome the "self-passivating" behaviour of the phenol oxidation which usually constrains the electrode process to low concentrations and single-shot experiments. In this paper, 4-phenoxyphenol could be detected in the range from 2.5 to 40 μM, phenol from 2.5 μM to 60 mM and 4-methoxyphenol from 5.0 to 40 μM. The electrodes were re-usable without surface renewal for concentrations up to 1.0 mM. The use of a bulk phenol solution for pre-concentration via absorptive uptake into a bulk phase followed by electrochemical quantification represents a new form of electroanalysis, namely "absorptive stripping voltammetry" complementary to "adsorptive stripping voltammetry" where accumulation occurs via adsorption on an electrode surface.

  20. Influence of surface adsorption on the interfacial electron transfer of flavin adenine dinucleotide and glucose oxidase at carbon nanotube and nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Goran, Jacob M; Mantilla, Sandra M; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-02-01

    The adsorption of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and glucose oxidase (GOx) onto carbon nanotube (CNT) and nitrogen-doped CNT (N-CNT) electrodes was investigated and found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm characteristics. The amount adsorbed and adsorption maximum are dependent on exposure time, the concentration of adsorbate, and the ionic strength of the solution. The formal potentials measured for FAD and GOx are identical, indicating that the observed electroactivity is from FAD, the redox reaction center of GOx. When glucose is added to GOx adsorbed onto CNT/N-CNT electrodes, direct electron transfer (DET) from enzyme-active FAD is not observed. However, efficient mediated electron transfer (MET) occurs if an appropriate electron mediator is placed in solution, or the natural electron mediator oxygen is used, indicating that GOx is adsorbed and active on CNT/N-CNT electrodes. The observed surface-confined redox reaction at both CNT and N-CNT electrodes is from FAD that either specifically adsorbs from solution or adsorbs from the holoprotein subsequently inactivating the enzyme. The splitting of cathodic and anodic peak potentials as a function of scan rate provides a way to measure the heterogeneous electron-transfer rate constant (k(s)) using Laviron's method. However, the measured k(s) was found to be under ohmic control, not under the kinetic control of an electron-transfer reaction, suggesting that k(s) for FAD on CNTs is faster than the measured value of 7.6 s(-1).

  1. Molecular adsorption on ZnO(1010) single-crystal surfaces: morphology and charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jixin; Ruther, Rose E; Tan, Yizheng; Bishop, Lee M; Hamers, Robert J

    2012-07-17

    While ZnO has excellent electrical properties, it has not been widely used for dye-sensitized solar cells, in part because ZnO is chemically less stable than widely used TiO(2). The functional groups typically used for surface passivation and for attaching dye molecules either bind weakly or etch the ZnO surface. We have compared the formation of molecular layers from alkane molecules with terminal carboxylic acid, alcohol, amine, phosphonic acid, or thiol functional groups on single-crystal zinc oxide (1010) surfaces. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show that alkyl carboxylic acids etch the surface whereas alkyl amine and alkyl alcohols bind only weakly on the ZnO(1010) surface. Phosphonic acid-terminated molecules were found to bind to the surface in a heterogeneous manner, forming clusters of molecules. Alkanethiols were found to bind to the surface, forming highly uniform monolayers with some etching detected after long immersion times in an alkanethiol solution. Monolayers of hexadecylphosphonic acid and octadecanethiol were further analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical measurements. AFM scratching shows that thiols were bound strongly to the ZnO surface, suggesting the formation of strong Zn-S covalent bonds. Surprisingly, the tridentate phosphonic acids adhered much more weakly than the monodentate thiol. The influence of organic grafting on the charge transfer to ZnO was studied by time-resolved surface photovoltage measurements and electrochemical impedance measurements. Our results show that the grafting of thiols to ZnO leads to robust surfaces and reduces the surface band bending due to midgap surface states.

  2. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  3. Adsorption Driven Regolith-Atmospheric Water Vapor Transfer on Mars: Analysis of Phoenix TECP and MSL REMS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, H. N.; Conner, M. B.; Chevrier, V. F.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.

    2016-09-01

    BET adsorption theory is implemented to explain sol-to-sol dependencies of temperature and humidity at the Phoenix landing site and along the MSL traverse and thus, the implications for transient, adsorbed, liquid water at the surface.

  4. Approximate strip exchanging.

    PubMed

    Roy, Swapnoneel; Thakur, Ashok Kumar

    2008-01-01

    Genome rearrangements have been modelled by a variety of primitives such as reversals, transpositions, block moves and block interchanges. We consider such a genome rearrangement primitive Strip Exchanges. Given a permutation, the challenge is to sort it by using minimum number of strip exchanges. A strip exchanging move interchanges the positions of two chosen strips so that they merge with other strips. The strip exchange problem is to sort a permutation using minimum number of strip exchanges. We present here the first non-trivial 2-approximation algorithm to this problem. We also observe that sorting by strip-exchanges is fixed-parameter-tractable. Lastly we discuss the application of strip exchanges in a different area Optical Character Recognition (OCR) with an example.

  5. Modeling the heat and mass transfers in temperature-swing adsorption of volatile organic compounds onto activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvain Giraudet; Pascaline Pre; Pierre Le Cloirec

    2009-02-15

    A theoretical model was built to simulate the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto activated carbons in a fixed bed. This model was validated on a set of experimental data obtained for the adsorption of acetone, ethyl formate, and dichloromethane onto five commercial activated carbons. The influence of operating conditions was modeled with various VOC contents at the inlet of the adsorber and superficial velocities of the gas-phase from 0.14 to 0.28 m.s{sup -1}. Breakthrough times and maximum temperature rises were computed with a coefficient of determination of 0.988 and 0.901, respectively. The simulation was then extended to the adsorption of mixtures of VOCs. From the comparison of simulation and experimental results, the advantage of accounting for dispersions of heat and mass is shown and the importance in taking into account the temperature effect on the equilibrium data is demonstrated. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: AIR STRIPPING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air striding is a means to transfer contaminants from aqueous solutions to air. ontaminants are not destroyed by air stripping but are physically separated from the aqueous solutions. ontaminant vapors are transferred into the air stream and, if necessary, can be treated by incin...

  7. Experimental and theoretical study of the adsorption behavior and mass transfer kinetics of propranolol enantiomers on cellulase protein as the selector

    SciTech Connect

    Fornstedt, T.; Zhong, G.; Bensetiti, Z.; Guiochon, G. |

    1996-07-15

    The thermodynamics and mass transfer kinetics of the retention of the R and S enantiomers of propranolol were investigated on a system comprising an acetic acid buffer solution as mobile phase and the protein cellobiohydrolase I immobilized on silica as the stationary phase. The bi-Langmuir isotherm model fitted best to each set of single-component isotherm data. The monolayer capacity of the nonchiral type of adsorption sites was 22.9 mM. For the chiral type of sites, it was 0.24 mM for the R enantiomer and 0.64 nM for the S enantiomer. Peak tailing was observed, even at very low concentrations allowing operation of the low-capacity chiral sites under linear conditions. This tailing can be explained on the basis of heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. At higher concentrations, which are often used in analytical applications, the isotherms on the chiral sites no longer have a linear behavior, and peak tailing is consequently more pronounced. Under those conditions, peak tailing originates from the combined effect of heterogeneous thermodynamics and heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. These complex phenomena are explained and modeled using the transport-dispersive model with a solid film linear driving force model modified to account for heterogeneous mass transfer kinetics. The rate coefficient of the mass transfer kinetics was found to be concentration dependent. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  9. Anatomy comic strips.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective imagination. The comics were drawn on paper and then recreated with digital graphics software. More than 500 comic strips have been drawn and labeled in Korean language, and some of them have been translated into English. All comic strips can be viewed on the Department of Anatomy homepage at the Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea. The comic strips were written and drawn by experienced anatomists, and responses from viewers have generally been favorable. These anatomy comic strips, designed to help students learn the complexities of anatomy in a straightforward and humorous way, are expected to be improved further by the authors and other interested anatomists.

  10. A mass transfer model for the fixed-bed adsorption of ferulic acid onto a polymeric resin: axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion.

    PubMed

    Davila-Guzman, Nancy E; Cerino-Córdova, Felipe J; Soto-Regalado, Eduardo; Loredo-Cancino, Margarita; Loredo-Medrano, José A; García-Reyes, Refugio B

    2016-08-01

    In this study, amberlite XAD-16 (XAD-16) bed column system was used to remove ferulic acid (FA) from aqueous solutions. Laboratory-scale column experiments were conducted in downflow fixed bed at initial FA concentration of 1 g/L, initial pH 3, and 25°C. The performance of the adsorbent bed under different flow rates (1.3-7.7 mL/min) was studied. The bed utilization efficiency was in the range of 64.64-72.21% at the studied flow rates. A mass transfer model considering both axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion was developed to predict the breakthrough curves of FA adsorption on XAD-16. This model predicted the experimental data better than Bohart-Adams model and Thomas model, based on the low deviation between predicted and experimental data. The axial dispersion coefficient value varied from 6.45 × 10(-6) to 1.10 × 10(-6) m(2)/s at flow rate from 1.3 to 7.7 mL/min, whereas the intraparticle diffusion coefficient was 1.04 × 10(-10) m(2)/s, being this last resistance the rate-limiting step. In conclusion, axial dispersion and intraparticle diffusion phenomena play the major role in predicting the adsorption of FA onto XAD-16 in fixed-bed columns.

  11. Dissociative adsorption of H2O on LiCoO2 (00l) surfaces: Co reduction induced by electron transfer from intrinsic defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkashinin, G.; Jaegermann, W.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the mechanism of the interaction of lithium ion conductors with water is crucial for both fundamental and technological points of view. Despite the generally accepted fact that water is one of main sources of the degradation of Li-ion recharge batteries, the physicochemical processes occurring at the water-lithium ion conductor interface are not fully understood. By using synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) and O K- and Co L- X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), we evidence that H2O is dissociatively adsorbed on LiCoO2 thin film at room temperature resulting in the formation of OH groups and the accumulation of the negative charge at the surface accompanied by electron transfer to the initial empty Co3d (e g* ) state. By considering the experimentally obtained energy diagram of the ionic conductor and water, direct charge transfer is not favorable due to a high difference in the chemical potential of the ionic conductor and electronic levels of the molecule. Here, we develop the model for the dissociative water adsorption which explains the electron transfer to LiCoO2 by using the atomistic approach. The model takes into account the intrinsic defects found on the surface (<2 nm depth) by using the depth resolved photoemission experiments and can be explored to other layered transition metal oxides to interpret the interaction of water with the surface of ionic conductors.

  12. Dissociative adsorption of H2O on LiCoO2 (00l) surfaces: Co reduction induced by electron transfer from intrinsic defects.

    PubMed

    Cherkashinin, G; Jaegermann, W

    2016-05-14

    Understanding the mechanism of the interaction of lithium ion conductors with water is crucial for both fundamental and technological points of view. Despite the generally accepted fact that water is one of main sources of the degradation of Li-ion recharge batteries, the physicochemical processes occurring at the water-lithium ion conductor interface are not fully understood. By using synchrotron X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) and O K- and Co L- X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), we evidence that H2O is dissociatively adsorbed on LiCoO2 thin film at room temperature resulting in the formation of OH groups and the accumulation of the negative charge at the surface accompanied by electron transfer to the initial empty Co3d (eg (*)) state. By considering the experimentally obtained energy diagram of the ionic conductor and water, direct charge transfer is not favorable due to a high difference in the chemical potential of the ionic conductor and electronic levels of the molecule. Here, we develop the model for the dissociative water adsorption which explains the electron transfer to LiCoO2 by using the atomistic approach. The model takes into account the intrinsic defects found on the surface (<2 nm depth) by using the depth resolved photoemission experiments and can be explored to other layered transition metal oxides to interpret the interaction of water with the surface of ionic conductors.

  13. Assessing the transfer of pesticides to the atmosphere during and after application. Development of a multiresidue method using adsorption on Tenax and thermal desorption-GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Briand, Olivier; Millet, Maurice; Bertrand, Florence; Clément, Michel; Seux, René

    2002-11-01

    An air sampling and analytical method based on adsorption on porous polymer (Tenax TA) followed by automatic thermal desorption (ATD) and GC/MS analysis was developed for ten pesticides commonly used on major crops in Britanny and some of their metabolites in air (from spray drift and volatilisation transfer processes): alachlor, atrazine (and two major degradation products: deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine), carbofuran, cyprodinil, epoxyconazole, iprodione (and 3,5-dichloroaniline), lindane (and -HCH, its isomer), metolachlor, terbuconazole and trifluralin. This method was established with special consideration for optimal thermal desorption conditions, linear ranges, limits of detection and quantification. Moreover, collection efficiencies of Tenax TA at room temperature were examined. This method was then applied to the determination of ambient pesticide levels during the spraying season at a rural area. The method was also applied to determine the vertical gradient of alachlor concentrations on a treated maize parcel to evaluate volatilisation fluxes.

  14. Analysis of wax esters in edible oils by automated on-line coupling liquid chromatography-gas chromatography using the through oven transfer adsorption desorption (TOTAD) interface.

    PubMed

    Aragón, Alvaro; Cortés, José M; Toledano, Rosa M; Villén, Jesús; Vázquez, Ana

    2011-07-29

    An automated method for the direct analysis of wax esters in edible oils is presented. The proposed method uses the TOTAD (through oven transfer adsorption desorption) interface for the on-line coupling of normal phase liquid chromatography and gas chromatography. In this fully automated system, the oil with C32 wax ester as internal standard and diluted with heptane is injected directly with no sample pre-treatment step other than filtration. The proposed method allows analysis of different wax esters, and is simpler and faster than the European Union Official Method, which is tedious and time-consuming. The obtained results closely match the certified values obtained from the median of the analytical results of the inter-labs certification study. Relative standard deviations of the concentrations are less than 5%. The method is appropriate for routine analysis as it is totally automated.

  15. Prefix Stripping Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taft, Marcus

    1981-01-01

    Presents and analyzes three experiments on prefix stripping. Results show that pseudoprefixed words are indiscriminately treated as prefixed words and concludes that prefix stripping does occur in word recognition and that prefixed words are accessed through a representation of their stem. (Author/BK)

  16. Anatomy Comic Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective…

  17. Science Comic Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Sun-Ja; Yoo, Chang Young; Chung, Min Suk

    2012-01-01

    Science comic strips entitled Dr. Scifun were planned to promote science jobs and studies among professionals (scientists, graduate and undergraduate students) and children. To this end, the authors collected intriguing science stories as the basis of scenarios, and drew four-cut comic strips, first on paper and subsequently as computer files.…

  18. Development and Demonstration of a High Efficiency, Rapid Heating, Low NOx Alternative to Conventional Heating of Round Steel Shapes, Steel Substrate (Strip) and Coil Box Transfer Bars

    SciTech Connect

    Kurek, Harry; Wagner, John

    2010-01-25

    Direct Flame Impingement involves the use of an array of very high-velocity flame jets impinging on a work piece to rapidly heat the work piece. The predominant mode of heat transfer is convection. Because of the locally high rate of heat transfer at the surface of the work piece, the refractory walls and exhaust gases of a DFI furnace are significantly cooler than in conventional radiant heating furnaces, resulting in high thermal efficiency and low NOx emissions. A DFI furnace is composed of a successive arrangement of heating modules through or by which the work piece is conveyed, and can be configured for square, round, flat, and curved metal shapes (e.g., billets, tubes, flat bars, and coiled bars) in single- or multi-stranded applications.

  19. Fabrication of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip for chromium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sureshkumar, Vaishnavi; Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Ruckmani, K.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-02-01

    Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals is a serious threat. In the present work, removal of chromium was carried out using chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at 80 °C. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer, which confirm the size, shape, crystalline nature and magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope revealed that the particle size was 15-30 nm and spherical in shape. The magnetite nanoparticles were mixed with chitosan solution to form hybrid nanocomposite. Chitosan strip was casted with and without nanoparticle. The affinity of hybrid nanocomposite for chromium was studied using K2Cr2O7 (potassium dichromate) solution as the heavy metal solution containing Cr(VI) ions. Adsorption tests were carried out using chitosan strip and hybrid nanocomposite strip at different time intervals. Amount of chromium adsorbed by chitosan strip and chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip from aqueous solution was evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the heavy metal removal efficiency of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip is 92.33 %, which is higher when compared to chitosan strip, which is 29.39 %.

  20. Theoretical consideration of the use of a Langmuir adsorption isotherm to describe the effect of light intensity on electron transfer in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Fragata, Mário; Viruvuru, Venkataramanaiah; Dudekula, Subhan

    2007-03-29

    Electron transport through photosystem II (PSII), measured as oxygen evolution, was investigated in isolated PSII particles and thylakoid membranes irradiated with white light of intensities (I) of 20 to about 4000 micromol of photons/(m2.s). In steady-state conditions, the evolution of oxygen varies with I according to the hyperbolic expression OEth = OEth(max)I/(L1/2 + I) (eq i) where OEth is the theoretical oxygen evolution, OEth(max) is the maximum oxygen evolution, and L1/2 is the light intensity giving OEth(max)/2. In this work, the mathematical derivation of this relationship was performed by using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and assuming that the photon interaction with the chlorophyll (Chl) in the PSII reaction center is a heterogeneous reaction in which the light is represented as a stream of particles instead of an electromagnetic wave (see discussion in Turro, N. J. Modern Molecular Photochemistry; University Science Books: Mill Valley, CA, 1991). In accordance with this approximation, the Chl molecules (P680) were taken as the adsorption surfaces (or heterogeneous catalysts), and the incident (or exciting) photons as the substrate, or the reagent. Using these notions, we demonstrated that eq i (Langmuir equation) is a reliable interpretation of the photon-P680 interaction and the subsequent electron transfer from the excited state P680, i.e., P680*, to the oxidized pheophytin (Phe), then from Phe- to the primary quinone QA. First, eq i contains specific functional and structural information that is apparent in the definition of OEth(max) as a measure of the maximal number of PSII reaction centers open for photochemistry, and L1/2 as the equilibrium between the electron transfer from Phe- to QA and the formation of reduced Phe in the PSII reaction center by electrons in provenance from P680*. Second, a physiological control mechanism in eq i is proved by the observation that the magnitudes of OEth(max) and L1/2 are affected differently by exogenous

  1. Stripping with dry ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    Mechanical-type stripping using dry ice (solid CO2) consists in blasting particles of dry ice onto the painted surface. This surface can be used alone or in duplex according to type of substrate to be treated. According to operating conditions, three physical mechanisms may be involved when blasting dry ice particles onto a paint system: thermal shock, differential thermal contraction, and mechanical shock. The blast nozzle, nozzle travel speed, blast angle, stripping distance, and compressed air pressure and media flow rate influence the stripping quality and the uniformity and efficiency obtained.

  2. Analysis of the adsorption process and of desiccant cooling systems: a pseudo- steady-state model for coupled heat and mass transfer. [DESSIM, DESSIM2, DESSIM4

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.

    1982-12-01

    A computer model to simulate the adiabatic adsorption/desorption process is documented. Developed to predict the performance of desiccant cooling systems, the model has been validated through comparison with experimental data for single-blow adsorption and desorption. A literature review on adsorption analysis, detailed discussions of the adsorption process, and an initial assessment of the potential for performance improvement through advanced component development are included.

  3. Electrochemical Stripping Analysis of Organophosphate Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-03-17

    A sensitive electrochemical stripping voltammetric method for analyzing organophosphate (OP) compounds was developed using a carbon paste electrochemical (CPE) transducer. OPs strongly adsorb on a CPE surface and provide facile electrochemical quantitative methods for electroactive OP compounds. Operational parameters have been optimized, and the stripping voltammetric performance has been studied using square wave voltammetry. The adsorptive stripping voltammetric response is highly linear over the 1-60 μM methyl parathion range examined (2-min adsorption), with a detection limit of 0.05 μmol/L (10 min accumulation) and good precision (RSD=3.2%, n =10). These findings can lead to a widespread use of electrochemical sensors to detect OP contaminates.

  4. Hydrocarbon product stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.; Siuta, M.T.

    1989-04-18

    A method is described for stripping light gasiform components from the liquid effluent of a catalytic hydrodesulfurization process, which comprises separating the liquid effluent containing relatively low boiling hydrocarbon components, relatively high boiling hydrocarbon components, hydrogen, and hydrogen sulfide.

  5. Air stripping of organics from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Valsaraj, K.T.; Wetzel, D.M. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    As awareness of the problem of contaminated ground water increases, the demand for reliable and cost-effective treatment processes will also increase. Although a number of treatment options exist or are under development, air stripping using counter current flow in packed columns is the current technology of choice in many situations. This paper reviews the basic principles of packed-column design and defines the limits of counter current contacting when applied to situations in which the resistance to mass transfer in the gas phase is important. The cascade crossflow configuration allows water and air flow to be varied independently, providing added design flexibility. Reductions in pressure drop by as much as two orders of magnitude result in stable column operation at air and water flow rates which would cause flooding in a counter current column. Mass transfer efficiencies comparable to, and in some cases greater than, counter current operation have been measured. Experimental results for cascade crossflow air stripping of 1,2-dichloroethane and methyl ethyl ketone are presented. The gas-phase, mass-transfer resistance is important for both compounds due to their small Henry's constants, 1,2-dichloroethane is considered to be difficult to strip using counter current contacting, while high efficiency air stripping of methyl ethyl ketone is impractical at ambient temperature.

  6. Design method for adsorption beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, R. L.; Jackson, J. K.

    1970-01-01

    Regenerable adsorption beds for long-term life support systems include synthetic geolite to remove carbon dioxide and silica gel to dehumidify the atmospheric gas prior to its passage through the geolite beds. Bed performance is evaluated from adsorption characteristics, heat and mass transfer, and pressure drop.

  7. Understanding the initial stages of reversible Mg deposition and stripping in inorganic nonaqueous electrolytes

    DOE PAGES

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cl–dissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interfacemore » but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~61–46.2 kJ mol–1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Lastly, observations of Mg–Cl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.« less

  8. Understanding the initial stages of reversible Mg deposition and stripping in inorganic nonaqueous electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Canepa, Pieremanuele; Gautam, Gopalakrishnan Sai; Malik, Rahul; Jayaraman, Saivenkataraman; Rong, Ziqin; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Persson, Kristin; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2015-04-08

    Multivalent (MV) battery architectures based on pairing a Mg metal anode with a high-voltage (~3 V) intercalation cathode offer a realistic design pathway toward significantly surpassing the energy storage performance of traditional Li-ion-based batteries, but there are currently only few electrolyte systems that support reversible Mg deposition. Using both static first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics, we perform a comprehensive adsorption study of several salt and solvent species at the interface of Mg metal with an electrolyte of Mg2+ and Cl–dissolved in liquid tetrahydrofuran (THF). Our findings not only provide a picture of the stable species at the interface but also explain how this system can support reversible Mg deposition, and as such, we provide insights in how to design other electrolytes for Mg plating and stripping. Furthermore, the active depositing species are identified to be (MgCl)+ monomers coordinated by THF, which exhibit preferential adsorption on Mg compared to possible passivating species (such as THF solvent or neutral MgCl2 complexes). We found that upon deposition, the energy to desolvate these adsorbed complexes and facilitate charge transfer is shown to be small (~61–46.2 kJ mol–1 to remove three THF from the strongest adsorbing complex), and the stable orientations of the adsorbed but desolvated (MgCl)+ complexes appear to be favorable for charge transfer. Lastly, observations of Mg–Cl dissociation at the Mg surface at very low THF coordinations (0 and 1) suggest that deleterious Cl incorporation in the anode may occur upon plating. In the stripping process, this is beneficial by further facilitating the Mg removal reaction.

  9. Air stripping industrial wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarre, B.; Shearouse, D.

    1994-09-01

    Industrial wastewater can be quickly, efficiently and economically treated using air strippers. Air stripping removes a range of volatile and semi-volatile contaminants from water. And the performance of various types and sizes of tray-type air stripper for treating contaminated water now is highly predictable because of laboratory studies. Air stripping can be a fast, efficient and economical approach to treating industrial wastewater. However, since every industrial wastewater stream is unique, each must be evaluated to determine its constituents, its potentially adverse effects on treatability, and any pretreatment steps necessary to ensure desired results. The general principles of air stripping are simple. In an air stripper, the surfaces area of a film of contaminated water is maximized while air is directed across it. Contaminants at the air/water interface volatilize and are discharged to the atmosphere or to an off-gas treatment system.

  10. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.; McQueen, M.A.

    1996-04-16

    A portable barrier strip is described having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use. 13 figs.

  11. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; Wowczuk, Andrew; Vellenoweth, Thomas E.

    2002-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture spikes for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture spikes have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture spikes removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The plurality of barrier blocks hare hingedly interconnected by complementary hinges integrally formed into the side of each barrier block which allow the strip to be rolled for easy storage and retrieval, but which prevent irregular or back bending of the strip. The shafts of adjacent barrier blocks are pivotally interconnected via a double hinged universal joint to accommodate irregularities in a roadway surface and to transmit torsional motion of the shaft from block to block. A single flexshaft cable is connected to the shaft of an end block to allow a user to selectively cause the shafts of a plurality of adjacently connected barrier blocks to rotate the tire-puncture spikes to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire, and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. The flexshaft is provided with a resiliently biased retracting mechanism, and a release latch for allowing the spikes to be quickly retracted after the intended vehicle tire is punctured.

  12. Retractable barrier strip

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Barker, Stacey G.; McQueen, Miles A.

    1996-01-01

    A portable barrier strip having retractable tire-puncture means for puncturing a vehicle tire. The tire-puncture means, such as spikes, have an armed position for puncturing a tire and a retracted position for not puncturing a tire. The strip comprises a plurality of barrier blocks having the tire-puncture means removably disposed in a shaft that is rotatably disposed in each barrier block. The shaft removably and pivotally interconnects the plurality of barrier blocks. Actuation cables cause the shaft to rotate the tire-puncture means to the armed position for puncturing a vehicle tire and to the retracted position for not puncturing the tire. Each tire-puncture means is received in a hollow-bed portion of its respective barrier block when in the retracted position. The barrier strip rests stable in its deployed position and substantially motionless as a tire rolls thereon and over. The strip is rolled up for retrieval, portability, and storage purposes, and extended and unrolled in its deployed position for use.

  13. Preparation of a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and analysis of protein adsorption resistance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuuki; Onodera, Yuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)) and assess its resistance to protein adsorption from the dissolved state of poly(MPC) chains in an aqueous condition. The thick poly(MPC) brush layer was prepared through the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of MPC with a free initiator from an initiator-immobilized substrate at given [Monomer]/[Free initiator] ratios. The ellipsometric thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layers could be controlled by the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) chains. The thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was larger than that in air, and this tendency became clearer when the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) increased. The maximum thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was around 110 nm. The static air contact angle of the poly(MPC) brush layer in water indicated a reasonably hydrophilic nature, which was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer at the surface. This result occurred because the hydrated state of the poly(MPC) chains is not influenced by the environment surrounding them. Finally, as measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, the amount of protein adsorbed from a fetal bovine serum solution (10% in phosphate-buffered saline) on the original substrate was 420 ng/cm(2). However, the poly(MPC) brush layer reduced this value dramatically to less than 50 ng/cm(2). This effect was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer for thicknesses between 20 nm and about 110 nm. These results indicated that the surface covered with a poly(MPC) brush layer is a promising platform to avoid biofouling and could also be applied to analyze the reactions of biological molecules with a high signal/noise ratio.

  14. Strip interpolation in silicon and germanium strip detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, E. A.; Phlips, B. F.; Johnson, W. N.; Kurfess, J. D.; Lister, C. J.; Kondev, F.; Physics; Naval Research Lab.

    2004-01-01

    The position resolution of double-sided strip detectors is limited by the strip pitch and a reduction in strip pitch necessitates more electronics. Improved position resolution would improve the imaging capabilities of Compton telescopes and PET detectors. Digitizing the preamplifier waveform yields more information than can be extracted with regular shaping electronics. In addition to the energy, depth of interaction, and which strip was hit, the digitized preamplifier signals can locate the interaction position to less than the strip pitch of the detector by looking at induced signals in neighboring strips. This allows the position of the interaction to be interpolated in three dimensions and improve the imaging capabilities of the system. In a 2 mm thick silicon strip detector with a strip pitch of 0.891 mm, strip interpolation located the interaction of 356 keV gamma rays to 0.3 mm FWHM. In a 2 cm thick germanium detector with a strip pitch of 5 mm, strip interpolation of 356 keV gamma rays yielded a position resolution of 1.5 mm FWHM.

  15. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1987-01-01

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  16. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  17. Niche for steam stripping in treating dilute SOC-contaminated waters

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, B.I.; Lawler, D.F.; Speitel, G.E. Jr.

    1996-09-01

    As regulatory limits for contaminants in air and water become increasingly stringent, interest in steam stripping to remove synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) from industrial waters has increased. To identify situations in which steam stripping could be a cost-competitive option for treating waters contaminated with low concentrations (<10 mg/L) of synthetic organic chemicals, the performance and cost of steam-stripping towers were modeled, and a range of hypothetical contaminated waters was examined. The cost of steam stripping was compared to that of air stripping, liquid-phase carbon adsorption, and air stripping with off-gas adsorption. Steam stripping was found to be a highly specialized treatment technology that will not frequently be cost-effective, but it does have a small niche in the environmental remediation market. Steam stripping is cost-effective when site-specific factors significantly reduce capital or operating costs, or when the target chemical is only marginally volatile, adsorbable, and biodegradable, effectively making all other conventional treatment methods more expensive.

  18. Air stripping of ammonia in a water-sparged aerocyclone reactor.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xuejun; Wang, Fuping; Zhao, Qinghua; Zhao, Tiantao; Xiang, Jinxin

    2009-10-30

    Air stripping of ammonia is a widely used process for the pretreatment of wastewater. Scaling and fouling on the packing surface in packed towers and a lower stripping efficiency are the two major problems in this process. New equipment that is suitable for the air stripping of wastewater with suspended solids has been developed. Air stripping of ammonia from water with Ca(OH)2 was performed in the newly designed gas-liquid contactor, a water-sparged aerocyclone (WSA). WSA exhibited a higher air stripping efficiency and an excellent mass transfer performance, it also consumed less air compared with stripping tanks and packed towers. In addition, no scaling and fouling was observed in the inner structure of the WSA. During the stripping process, the stripping efficiency and mass transfer coefficient naturally increases with the liquid phase temperature and air flow rate. There is a critical value for the air flow rate over which stripping efficiency and the mass transfer coefficient increases rapidly. An efficient air stripping of ammonia should be conducted at a higher ambient temperature (>25 degrees C), and a higher air flow rate (>1.4 l/s).

  19. Method and apparatus for improved FCC spent catalyst stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Harandi, M.N.; Owen, H.; Pappal, D.A.; Schipper, P.A.

    1990-11-20

    This patent describes a fluid catalytic cracking process. It comprises: mixing a hydrocarbon feed with a cracking catalyst in the lower section of the reactor riser of a riser-reactor fluid catalytic cracking unit; passing the mixture through the length of the reactor riser under conversion conditions whereby the hydrocarbon is catalytically cracked and the catalyst is deactivated; separating the cracked product and the deactivated catalyst; charging the deactivated catalyst to an annular stripping zone. The stripping zone positioned around the concentric with a lower section of the reactor riser; withdrawing the deactivated catalyst from the stripping zone; oxidatively regenerating the withdrawn deactivated catalyst in a regeneration zone remote from and in valved communication with the reactor riser, at a temperature above that of the stripping zone under oxygen-deficient conditions to generate a flue gas containing carbon monoxide; partially separating catalyst from the flue gas to evolve a hot flue gas stream containing entrained regenerated catalyst; flowing the hot flue gas stream containing entrained regenerated catalyst to a heat exchange conduit positioned within the stripping zone above; and mixing the flue gas stream containing regenerated catalyst above with oxygen-containing gas to exothermically convert carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide within the heat exchange conduit positioned within the stripping zone to indirectly transfer thermal energy from the closed heat exchange conduit to the stripping zone.

  20. Paresev on Taxi Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Test pilot Milton Thompson sitting in NASA Flight Research Center-built Paresev 1 (Paraglider Research Vehicle) on the taxi strip in front of the NASA Flight Research Center in 1962. In this photo the control stick can be seen coming from overhead and hanging in front of the pilot. The control system was a direct link with the wing membrane made of doped Irish linen. By maintaining simplicity during construction, it was possible to make control and configuration changes overnight and, in many instances, in minutes.

  1. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  2. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  3. Electronic rumble strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Donald R.; Lenz, James

    1997-02-01

    Single vehicle run-off-road accidents are responsible for significant numbers of injuries and fatalities, and significant property damage. This fact spurs interest in warning systems to alert drivers that vehicles are drifting towards the edge of the road, and that a run-off road accident is imminent. An early attempt at such a warning system is the use of machined grooves on the shoulder to create a rumble strip. Such a system only provides warning, however, as the vehicle actually leaves the traffic lane. More desirable is a system that warns in anticipation of such departure. Honeywell has under development a magnetic lateral guidance system that couples a sensitive magnetoresistive transducer with a magnetic traffic marking tape being developed by 3M. While this development was initially undertaken for use in automated highways, or for special tasks such as guiding snowplow owners, the system can provide an effective, all-weather warning system to provide alert of impending departure from the roadway. This electronic rumble strip is actually a simpler system than the baseline guidance system, and can monitor both distance from the traffic lane edge and the speed of approach to the edge with a low cost sensor.

  4. Ultra-stripped supernovae: progenitors and fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauris, Thomas M.; Langer, Norbert; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2015-08-01

    The explosion of ultra-stripped stars in close binaries can lead to ejecta masses <0.1 M⊙ and may explain some of the recent discoveries of weak and fast optical transients. In Tauris et al., it was demonstrated that helium star companions to neutron stars (NSs) may experience mass transfer and evolve into naked ˜1.5 M⊙ metal cores, barely above the Chandrasekhar mass limit. Here, we elaborate on this work and present a systematic investigation of the progenitor evolution leading to ultra-stripped supernovae (SNe). In particular, we examine the binary parameter space leading to electron-capture (EC SNe) and iron core-collapse SNe (Fe CCSNe), respectively, and determine the amount of helium ejected with applications to their observational classification as Type Ib or Type Ic. We mainly evolve systems where the SN progenitors are helium star donors of initial mass MHe = 2.5-3.5 M⊙ in tight binaries with orbital periods of Porb = 0.06-2.0 d, and hosting an accreting NS, but we also discuss the evolution of wider systems and of both more massive and lighter - as well as single - helium stars. In some cases, we are able to follow the evolution until the onset of silicon burning, just a few days prior to the SN explosion. We find that ultra-stripped SNe are possible for both EC SNe and Fe CCSNe. EC SNe only occur for MHe = 2.60-2.95 M⊙ depending on Porb. The general outcome, however, is an Fe CCSN above this mass interval and an ONeMg or CO white dwarf for smaller masses. For the exploding stars, the amount of helium ejected is correlated with Porb - the tightest systems even having donors being stripped down to envelopes of less than 0.01 M⊙. We estimate the rise time of ultra-stripped SNe to be in the range 12 h-8 d, and light-curve decay times between 1 and 50 d. A number of fitting formulae for our models are provided with applications to population synthesis. Ultra-stripped SNe may produce NSs in the mass range 1.10-1.80 M⊙ and are highly relevant for

  5. Stripped Crater Floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 February 2004 This full-resolution Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows details on the floor of an ancient meteor crater in the northeastern part of Noachis Terra. After the crater formed, layers of material--perhaps sediment--were deposited in the crater. These materials became somewhat solidified, but later were eroded to form the patterns shown here. Many windblown ripples in the scene indicate the presence of coarse-grained sediment that was not completely stripped away by wind. The picture is located near 22.1oS, 307.0oW. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the left/upper left; the image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  6. Microtube Strip Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, F.D.

    1990-12-27

    Doty Scientific (DSI) believes their Microtube-Strip Heat Exchanger will contribute significantly to (a) the closed Brayton cycles being pursued at MIT, NASA, and elsewhere; (b) reverse Brayton cycle cryocoolers, currently being investigated by NASA for space missions, being applied to MRI superconducting magnets; and (c) high-efficiency cryogenic gas separation schemes for CO{sub 2} removal from exhaust stacks. The goal of this current study is to show the potential for substantial progress in high-effectiveness, low-cost, gas-to-gas heat exchangers for diverse applications at temperatures from below 100 K to above 1000 K. To date, the highest effectiveness measured is about 98%, and relative pressure drops below 0.1% with a specific conductance of about 45 W/kgK are reported. During the pre-award period DSI built and tested a 3-module heat exchanger bank using 103-tube microtube strip (MTS) modules. To add to their analytical capabilities, DSI has acquired computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This report describes the pre-award work and the status of the ten tasks of the current project, which are: analyze flow distribution and thermal stresses within individual modules; design a heat exchanger bank of ten modules with 400 microtube per module; obtain production quality tubestrip die and AISI 304 tubestrips; obtain production quality microtubing; construct revised MTS heat exchanger; construct dies and fixtures for prototype heat exchanger; construct 100 MTS modules; assemble 8-10 prototype MTS heat exchangers; test prototype MTS heat exchanger; and verify test through independent means. 7 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab. (CK)

  7. STRIP BEING REDUCED IN CROSSSECTION AND ELONGATED ON RUNOUT LINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STRIP BEING REDUCED IN CROSS-SECTION AND ELONGATED ON RUN-OUT LINE OF #43 HOT MILL. MECHANICAL TRANSFER HAS MOVED INTO POSITION OVER FURNACE DISCHARGE LINE (L) TO RETRIEVE ANOTHER CAKE. - American Brass Foundry, 70 Sayre Street, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  8. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  9. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  10. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites (strip hybrids)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics were applied to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends to illustrate the use of these methods for the a priori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-glass random composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  11. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites /strip hybrids/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Results are described which were obtained by applying advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends. This was done in order to illustrate the use of these methods for the apriori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-Glass/Random Composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle, and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  12. The lateral tarsal strip revisited. The enhanced tarsal strip.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D R; Anderson, R L

    1989-04-01

    The lateral tarsal strip procedure was originally designed for the treatment of upper and lower eyelid laxity, or lateral canthal tendon laxity or malposition. Despite the excellent results with a standard tarsal strip procedure for those eyelids with laxity and excess skin, we have encountered a number of patients with lower eyelid or canthal malpositions or both who would benefit from a tarsal strip, but who do not have lax tissues (especially skin), and may in fact have a shortage of skin. These include cases of lower lid retraction or canthal malposition following trauma, blepharoplasty, or other operations, and patients with tendency toward or having cicatricial ectropion. Any anterior lamella removal in such patients would aggravate the lid malposition and weaken the lateral canthal tissues to be sutured. We suggest a modification of the tarsal strip (developed by one of us [R.L.A.]) to treat many such patients without requiring additional anterior lamella (skin graft) or more formidable procedures. We refer to this technique as the "enhanced tarsal strip" technique, and we use this technique more frequently than the original tarsal strip procedure.

  13. Mobius Strip underlying Nonlinear Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopaz, Edaurdo; Satija, Indubala

    2004-03-01

    Geometrical and topolgocial aspects of phase space orbits of driven nonlinear oscillators are shown to share many features with the circuits on the mobius strips. Most important characteristic shared by nonlinear oscillators and the mobius strip is the first order geometrical phase transition characterized in terms of local variable torsion and the global variable the geometrical phase . These geometrical transitions are geometrical resonances and lead to geometrical localization that underlie not only limit cycles but also the strange attractors.

  14. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, R

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described. PMID:2695323

  15. Adsorption of organic chemicals in soils.

    PubMed

    Calvet, R

    1989-11-01

    This paper presents a review on adsorption of organic chemicals on soils sediments and their constituents. The first part of this review deals with adsorption from gas and liquid phases and gives a discussion on the physical meaning of the shape of adsorption isotherms. Results show that no general rules can be proposed to describe univocally the relation between the shape of isotherms and the nature of adsorbate-adsorbent system. Kinetics of adsorption is discussed through the description of various models. Theoretical developments exist both for the thermodynamics and the kinetics of adsorption, but there is a strong need for experimental results. Possible adsorption mechanisms are ion exchange, interaction with metallic cations, hydrogen bonds, charge transfers, and London-van der Waals dispersion forces/hydrophobic effect. However, direct proofs of a given mechanism are rare. Several factors influence adsorption behavior. Electronic structure of adsorbed molecules, properties of adsorbents, and characteristics of the liquid phase are discussed in relation to adsorption. Such properties as water solubility, organic carbon content of adsorbing materials, and the composition of the liquid phase are particularly important. Evaluation of adsorption can be obtained through either laboratory measurements or use of several correlations. Adsorption measurements must be interpreted, taking into account treatment of adsorbent materials, experimental conditions, and secondary phenomena such as degradations. Correlations between adsorption coefficients and water-octanol partition coefficient or water solubility are numerous. They may be useful tools for prediction purposes. Relations with transport, bioavailability, and degradation are described.

  16. The Dark Side of the Moebius Strip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Gideon E.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are various models proposed for the Moebius strip. Included are a discussion of a smooth flat model and two smooth flat algebraic models, some results concerning the shortest Moebius strip, the Moebius strip of least elastic energy, and some observations on real-world Moebius strips. (KR)

  17. Field screening of chromium, cadmium, zinc, copper, and lead in sediments by stripping analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.B. ); Wang, J.; Setladji, R.; Lu, J. )

    1994-11-01

    Stripping analysis (SA) was successfully employed for field verification of metals contaminants in soils and sediments at hazardous waste sites. Microwave digestion procedures were tailored to meet the needs of field activities and electrochemical measurements. An adsorptive stripping voltammetric (AdSV) scheme was used for monitoring total chromium and for chromium speciation, while conventional anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) were used for measuring cadmium, zinc, copper, and lead. The results demonstrate that SA is capable of on-site identification of contaminated layers in soils and sediments. Concentration values measured by SA correlated well with those obtained by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved atomic or mass spectroscopy methods. The remarkable sensitivity, portability, low-power need, and low cost of SA make it an attractive choice for on-site analysis of selected metals during site characterization and remediation activities. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Adsorption on a stepped substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikoski, J.; Timonen, J.; Kaski, K.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of substrate steps on the adsorption of particles is considered. The problem is formulated as a lattice-gas model with nearest neighbor interactions and it is studied by a numerical transfer-matrix method. In particular, the influence of the substrate-induced row potential on adsorbed monolayers is discussed. It is found that strong row-transition-like features appear in the presence of a row potential and it is suggested that these may be seen in adsorption on vicinal faces.

  19. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGES

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  20. Stripping of phenols in model cooling towers

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, C.D.; Moe, T.A.; Wentz, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Cooling towers are used to remove waste heat from unit operations in chemical processing plants. Using cooling towers for wastewater treatment and disposal through internal recycling has become an important alternative because of stricter wastewater discharge standards, the expense of specialized wastewater treatment systems and the limited availability and cost of water in arid regions. Designs for synfuels plants must address the problem of wastewater disposal. Alternative systems under consideration usually include zero discharge designs that incorporate evaporative cooling towers in the system. The mechanisms for contaminant removal in cooling towers are biological oxidation, stripping and chemical precipitation. Chemical precipitation is generally considered undesirable because of losses in heat transfer efficiency. Predicting whether stripping or biological oxidation will be the primary removal mechanism for phenolic compounds from coal conversion wastewaters used as makeup in cooling towers does not appear to be possible based on the results of these tests. The tests do indicate that the biological oxidation of phenol is possible in forced draft cooling towers.

  1. Adsorption geometry, molecular interaction, and charge transfer of triphenylamine-based dye on rutile TiO{sub 2}(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Shun; Ahmadi, Sareh; Weissenrieder, Jonas; Goethelid, Mats; Zuleta, Marcelo; Tian Haining; Yang Xichuan; Schulte, Karina; Pietzsch, Annette; Hennies, Franz

    2010-12-14

    The fast development of new organic sensitizers leads to the need for a better understanding of the complexity and significance of their adsorption processes on TiO{sub 2} surfaces. We have investigated a prototype of the triphenylamine-cyanoacrylic acid (donor-acceptor) on rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surface with special attention on the monolayer region. This molecule belongs to the type of dye, some of which so far has delivered the record efficiency of 10%-10.3% for pure organic sensitizers [W. Zeng, Y. Cao, Y. Bai, Y. Wang, Y. Shi, M. Zhang, F. Wang, C. Pan, and P. Wang, Chem. Mater. 22, 1915 (2010)]. The molecular configuration of this dye on the TiO{sub 2} surface was found to vary with coverage and adopt gradually an upright geometry, as determined from near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Due to the molecular interaction within the increasingly dense packed layer, the molecular electronic structure changes systematically: all energy levels shift to higher binding energies, as shown by photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, the investigation of charge delocalization within the molecule was carried out by means of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy. A fast delocalization ({approx}1.8 fs) occurs at the donor part while a competing process between delocalization and localization takes place at the acceptor part. This depicts the ''push-pull'' concept in donor-acceptor molecular system in time scale.

  2. Groundwater air stripping: Effect on water toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, R.B.; Simpson, C.W.; Elliott, D.J.

    1995-02-01

    An air stripping unit was designed to reduce groundwater hydrocarbon content and biotoxicity to acceptable levels. A pilot plant study was conducted to determine the water treatability and to optimize the commercial unit design conditions. A measurement of the pilot plant effluent toxicity was obtained from {open_quotes}Microtox{close_quotes} analysis and rigorous bio-assays. These results indicated that reduction of the water hydrocarbon content to permitted discharge limits was accompanied by the elimination of water toxicity. The Onda mass transfer model was used to prepare the commercial unit design. A post-installation evaluation indicated that the model gave a good representation of the commercial unit performance. Toxicity reductions observed in the pilot plant were also observed in the commercial unit. 3 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  4. Characteristics of laminates with delamination control strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Goering, J. C.; Alper, J. M.; Gause, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    Tough resin is needed to resist delamination crack propagation. However, modulus often has to be compromised because it is difficult to retain both high modulus and toughness in a matrix material. A potential solution is to use a hybrid system in which tough resin strips are included within a conventional matrix composite. By adjusting the spacing of the tough resin strips, maximum delamination size can be controlled. Experimental results for impact damage and subsequent damage propagation in laminates containing tough resin strips are reported. Plain adhesive strips and fiber-reinforced tough resin composite strips were used in constructing the hybrid laminates. Test results indicated that size of delamination inflicted by impact was confined between the tough resin strips. As a result, significantly increased residual compressive strength was obtained. Impacted laminates containing tough resin strips were also fatigue tested. It was found that these strips reduced the growth of the impact damage area relative to the growth seen in coupons with no tough resin strips. Damage growth from an open hole under tension fatigue was evaluated using both tough resin strips and glass fiber reinforced tough resin strips. Unreinforced tough resin strips retarded delamination growth from the open hole, but did not stop matrix cracks growing in the fiber direction. Fiber reinforced tough resin strips did not contain axial delamination growth from the open hole. However, they did act as crack arresters, stopping the through-the-thickness tension crack originating from the hole.

  5. Spiral Galaxies Stripped Bare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    Six spectacular spiral galaxies are seen in a clear new light in images from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The pictures were taken in infrared light, using the impressive power of the HAWK-I camera, and will help astronomers understand how the remarkable spiral patterns in galaxies form and evolve. HAWK-I [1] is one of the newest and most powerful cameras on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is sensitive to infrared light, which means that much of the obscuring dust in the galaxies' spiral arms becomes transparent to its detectors. Compared to the earlier, and still much-used, VLT infrared camera ISAAC, HAWK-I has sixteen times as many pixels to cover a much larger area of sky in one shot and, by using newer technology than ISAAC, it has a greater sensitivity to faint infrared radiation [2]. Because HAWK-I can study galaxies stripped bare of the confusing effects of dust and glowing gas it is ideal for studying the vast numbers of stars that make up spiral arms. The six galaxies are part of a study of spiral structure led by Preben Grosbøl at ESO. These data were acquired to help understand the complex and subtle ways in which the stars in these systems form into such perfect spiral patterns. The first image shows NGC 5247, a spiral galaxy dominated by two huge arms, located 60-70 million light-years away. The galaxy lies face-on towards Earth, thus providing an excellent view of its pinwheel structure. It lies in the zodiacal constellation of Virgo (the Maiden). The galaxy in the second image is Messier 100, also known as NGC 4321, which was discovered in the 18th century. It is a fine example of a "grand design" spiral galaxy - a class of galaxies with very prominent and well-defined spiral arms. About 55 million light-years from Earth, Messier 100 is part of the Virgo Cluster of galaxies and lies in the constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair, named after the ancient Egyptian queen Berenice II). The third

  6. The Perils of Strip Searches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Every year, a few administrators mishandle school searches and create spectacles similar to the New Castle, Pennsylvania, incident involving six illegally strip-searched students. Principals using "cops-and-robber" techniques to unearth contraband may not realize the potential for infringing on students' constitutional privacy rights. Strip…

  7. Bimaterial Thermal Strip With Increased Flexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D.

    1994-01-01

    In proposed bimaterial thermal strip, one layer has negative coefficient of thermal expansion, thereby increasing difference between coefficients of thermal expansion of two outer layers and consequently increasing flexing caused by change in temperature. Proposed bimaterial strips used in thermostats.

  8. Template-Stripped Tunable Plasmonic Devices on Stretchable and Rollable Substrates.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Daehan; Johnson, Timothy W; Cherukulappurath, Sudhir; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-11-24

    We use template stripping to integrate metallic nanostructures onto flexible, stretchable, and rollable substrates. Using this approach, high-quality patterned metals that are replicated from reusable silicon templates can be directly transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. First we produce stretchable gold nanohole arrays and show that their optical transmission spectra can be modulated by mechanical stretching. Next we fabricate stretchable arrays of gold pyramids and demonstrate a modulation of the wavelength of light resonantly scattered from the tip of the pyramid by stretching the underlying PDMS film. The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate. As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens. These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication.

  9. Template-Stripped Tunable Plasmonic Devices on Stretchable and Rollable Substrates.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Daehan; Johnson, Timothy W; Cherukulappurath, Sudhir; Norris, David J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-11-24

    We use template stripping to integrate metallic nanostructures onto flexible, stretchable, and rollable substrates. Using this approach, high-quality patterned metals that are replicated from reusable silicon templates can be directly transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. First we produce stretchable gold nanohole arrays and show that their optical transmission spectra can be modulated by mechanical stretching. Next we fabricate stretchable arrays of gold pyramids and demonstrate a modulation of the wavelength of light resonantly scattered from the tip of the pyramid by stretching the underlying PDMS film. The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate. As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens. These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication. PMID:26402066

  10. Template-Stripped Tunable Plasmonic Devices on Stretchable and Rollable Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We use template stripping to integrate metallic nanostructures onto flexible, stretchable, and rollable substrates. Using this approach, high-quality patterned metals that are replicated from reusable silicon templates can be directly transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates. First we produce stretchable gold nanohole arrays and show that their optical transmission spectra can be modulated by mechanical stretching. Next we fabricate stretchable arrays of gold pyramids and demonstrate a modulation of the wavelength of light resonantly scattered from the tip of the pyramid by stretching the underlying PDMS film. The use of a flexible transfer layer also enables template stripping using a cylindrical roller as a substrate. As an example, we demonstrate roller template stripping of metallic nanoholes, nanodisks, wires, and pyramids onto the cylindrical surface of a glass rod lens. These nonplanar metallic structures produced via template stripping with flexible and stretchable films can facilitate many applications in sensing, display, plasmonics, metasurfaces, and roll-to-roll fabrication. PMID:26402066

  11. Numerical simulation of solid liquid interface behavior during continuous strip casting process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changbum; Yoon, Wooyoung; Shin, Seungwon; Lee, Jaewoo; Jang, Bo-Yun; Kim, Joonsoo; Ahn, Youngsoo; Lee, Jinseok

    2013-05-01

    A new metal-strip-casting process called continuous strip-casting (CSC) has been developed for making thin metal strips. A numerical simulation model to help understand solid-liquid interface behavior during CSC has been developed and used to identify the solidification morphologies of the strips and to determine the optimum processing conditions. In this study, we used a modified level contour reconstruction method (LCRM) and the sharp interface method to modify interface tracking, and performed a simulation analysis of the CSC process. The effects of process parameters such as heat-transfer coefficient and extrusion velocity on the behavior of the solid-liquid interface were estimated and used to improve the apparatus. A Sn (Tin) plate of dimensions 200 x 50 x 1 mm3 was successfully produced by CSC for a heat-transfer coefficient of 104 W/m2 K and an extrusion velocity of 0.2 m/s.

  12. Pesticide residue analysis by off-line SPE and on-line reversed-phase LC-GC using the through-oven-transfer adsorption/desorption interface.

    PubMed

    Perez, M; Alario, J; Vazquez, A; Villén, J

    2000-02-15

    A new method to determine pesticide residue in water is presented. The described method includes using off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) and on-line reversed-phase liquid chromatography-gas chromatography (RPLC-GC). An interface, based on a modified programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector, packed with a suitable trapping material, is used for on-line RPLC-GC. The changes made in the PTV injector affect the pneumatic system, sample introduction, and solvent elimination. The new interface is easily capable of automation. Methanol/wate (70/30) is used as the eluent in the LC preseparation step. The LC column flow during elution is different from the flow during the transfer step. The transferred volumes range from 500 to 1400 microL (volume of the fractions of interest). Solvent elimination is almost 100% before the sample reaches the GC column. The described system does not show any variation of the peak retention times. The detection limit for real samples ranges from 0.04 to 1.5 ng/L, using NP detection.

  13. 33 CFR 157.128 - Stripping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Stripping system. 157.128 Section... of the following devices for stripping oil from each cargo tank: (1) A positive displacement pump. (2... positive displacement pump or a self-priming centrifugal pump, the stripping system must have the...

  14. 33 CFR 157.128 - Stripping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Stripping system. 157.128 Section... of the following devices for stripping oil from each cargo tank: (1) A positive displacement pump. (2... positive displacement pump or a self-priming centrifugal pump, the stripping system must have the...

  15. Using Comic Strips in Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csabay, Noémi

    2006-01-01

    The author believes that using comic strips in language-learning classes has three main benefits. First, comic strips motivate younger learners. Second, they provide a context and logically connected sentences to help language learning. Third, their visual information is helpful for comprehension. The author argues that comic strips can be used in…

  16. Development of a Calibration Strip for Immunochromatographic Assay Detection Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yue-Ming; Wei, Jian-Chong; Mak, Peng-Un; Vai, Mang-I.; Du, Min; Pun, Sio-Hang

    2016-01-01

    With many benefits and applications, immunochromatographic (ICG) assay detection systems have been reported on a great deal. However, the existing research mainly focuses on increasing the dynamic detection range or application fields. Calibration of the detection system, which has a great influence on the detection accuracy, has not been addressed properly. In this context, this work develops a calibration strip for ICG assay photoelectric detection systems. An image of the test strip is captured by an image acquisition device, followed by performing a fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm and maximin-distance algorithm for image segmentation. Additionally, experiments are conducted to find the best characteristic quantity. By analyzing the linear coefficient, an average value of hue (H) at 14 min is chosen as the characteristic quantity and the empirical formula between H and optical density (OD) value is established. Therefore, H, saturation (S), and value (V) are calculated by a number of selected OD values. Then, H, S, and V values are transferred to the RGB color space and a high-resolution printer is used to print the strip images on cellulose nitrate membranes. Finally, verification of the printed calibration strips is conducted by analyzing the linear correlation between OD and the spectral reflectance, which shows a good linear correlation (R2 = 98.78%). PMID:27367694

  17. Development of a Calibration Strip for Immunochromatographic Assay Detection Systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yue-Ming; Wei, Jian-Chong; Mak, Peng-Un; Vai, Mang-I; Du, Min; Pun, Sio-Hang

    2016-01-01

    With many benefits and applications, immunochromatographic (ICG) assay detection systems have been reported on a great deal. However, the existing research mainly focuses on increasing the dynamic detection range or application fields. Calibration of the detection system, which has a great influence on the detection accuracy, has not been addressed properly. In this context, this work develops a calibration strip for ICG assay photoelectric detection systems. An image of the test strip is captured by an image acquisition device, followed by performing a fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithm and maximin-distance algorithm for image segmentation. Additionally, experiments are conducted to find the best characteristic quantity. By analyzing the linear coefficient, an average value of hue (H) at 14 min is chosen as the characteristic quantity and the empirical formula between H and optical density (OD) value is established. Therefore, H, saturation (S), and value (V) are calculated by a number of selected OD values. Then, H, S, and V values are transferred to the RGB color space and a high-resolution printer is used to print the strip images on cellulose nitrate membranes. Finally, verification of the printed calibration strips is conducted by analyzing the linear correlation between OD and the spectral reflectance, which shows a good linear correlation (R² = 98.78%). PMID:27367694

  18. Fast variation method for elastic strip calculation.

    PubMed

    Biryukov, Sergey V

    2002-05-01

    A new, fast, variation method (FVM) for determining an elastic strip response to stresses arbitrarily distributed on the flat side of the strip is proposed. The remaining surface of the strip may have an arbitrary form, and it is free of stresses. The FVM, as well as the well-known finite element method (FEM), starts with the variational principle. However, it does not use the meshing of the strip. A comparison of FVM results with the exact analytical solution in the special case of shear stresses and a rectangular strip demonstrates an excellent agreement.

  19. Enhanced photocatalytic and adsorptive degradation of organic dyes by mesoporous Cu/Al2O3-MCM-41: intra-particle mesoporosity, electron transfer and OH radical generation under visible light.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Amaresh C; Parida, K M; Nanda, Binita

    2011-07-28

    Mesoporous Cu/Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41 composite was synthesized by two step processes; in situ incorporation of high surface area mesoporous Al(2)O(3) (MA) into the framework of MCM-41 (in situ method) followed by impregnation of Cu(II) by incipient wetness method. The interesting thing is that starch was used for the first time as template for the preparation of high surface area MA. To evaluate the structural and electronic properties, these catalysts were characterized by low angle X-ray diffraction (LXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis DRS, FTIR and photoluminescent (PL) spectra. The various cationic dye such as methylene blue (MB), methyl violet (MV), malachite green (MG) and rhodamine 6G (Rd 6G) of high concentration 500 mg L(-1) were degraded and adsorbed very efficiently (100%) using the 5 Cu/Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41 composite within 30 and 60 min, respectively. The high and quick removal of such concerted cationic organic dyes and also mixed dyes (MB+MV+MG+Rd 6G) by means of photocatalysis/adsorption is basically due to the combined effect three characteristics of synthesized mesoporous 5 Cu/Al(2)O(3)-MCM-41 composite. These characteristics are intra-particle mesoporosity, electron transfer and ˙OH radical generation under solar light. PMID:21681290

  20. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = (3)He, (4)He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6-7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the accuracy of

  1. Transferability and accuracy by combining dispersionless density functional and incremental post-Hartree-Fock theories: Noble gases adsorption on coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Stoll, Hermann

    2015-11-21

    The accuracy and transferability of the electronic structure approach combining dispersionless density functional theory (DFT) [K. Pernal et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] with the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)], are validated for the interaction between the noble-gas Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and coronene/graphene/graphite surfaces. This approach uses the method of increments for surface cluster models to extract intermonomer dispersion-like (2- and 3-body) correlation terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, while periodic dispersionless density functionals calculations are performed to estimate the sum of Hartree-Fock and intramonomer correlation contributions. Dispersion energy contributions are also obtained using DFT-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory [SAPT(DFT)]. An analysis of the structure of the X/surface (X = Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) interaction energies shows the excellent transferability properties of the leading intermonomer correlation contributions across the sequence of noble-gas atoms, which are also discussed using the Drude oscillator model. We further compare these results with van der Waals-(vdW)-corrected DFT-based approaches. As a test of accuracy, the energies of the low-lying nuclear bound states supported by the laterally averaged X/graphite potentials (X = {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) are calculated and compared with the best estimations from experimental measurements and an atom-bond potential model using the ab initio-assisted fine-tuning of semiempirical parameters. The bound-state energies determined differ by less than 6–7 meV (6%) from the atom-bond potential model. The crucial importance of including incremental 3-body dispersion-type terms is clearly demonstrated, showing that the SAPT(DFT) approach effectively account for these terms. With the deviations from the best experimental-based estimations smaller than 2.3 meV (1.9%), the

  2. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-10-21

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  3. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-03-18

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  4. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H-Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption.

    PubMed

    Janke, Svenja M; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M; Kandratsenka, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H-Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  5. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H–Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Svenja M.; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Kandratsenka, Alexander; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2015-09-28

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H–Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab.

  6. Stripping volatile organic compounds and petroleum hydrocarbons from water

    SciTech Connect

    LaBranche, D.F.; Collins, M. R.

    1996-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and petroleum products are ubiquitous groundwater contaminants. Petroleum products, for example, diesel fuel, contain a wide array of volatile, semivolatile, and large-chain hydrocarbon compounds. This research sought to determine whether air stripping can provide a site-specific treatment solution for petroleum-contaminated groundwaters and to document the abilities and limitations of tray-type (ShallowTray{sup TM}) air-stripping technology. Full factorial experimental trials were conducted to determine the influence of inlet water flow rate and temperature on trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal. As expected, TPH removal controlled air stripper performance, and liquid temperature affected removal more than flow rate. The mass-transfer rate of TCE and PCE from water to air was controlled by the compound`s volatility, whereas the TPH mass-transfer rate was controlled by the compound`s concentration gradient. Results indicate that economical air stripping of VOC and TPH compounds can be achieved using low liquid flow rates (20 to 75 L/min), high air/water ratios (225 to 898), and medium liquid temperatures (16{degree}C to 28{degree}C) in tray-type air strippers. 19 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Radically New Adsorption Cycles for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    James A. Ritter; Armin D. Ebner; James A. McIntyre; Steven P. Reynolds; Sarang A. Gadre

    2005-10-11

    In Parts I and II of this project, a rigorous pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process simulator was used to study new, high temperature, PSA cycles, based on the use of a K-promoted HTlc adsorbent and 4- and 5-step (bed) vacuum swing PSA cycles, which were designed to process a typical stack gas effluent at 575 K containing (in vol%) 15 % CO{sub 2}, 75% N{sub 2} and 10% H{sub 2}O into a light product stream depleted of CO{sub 2} and a heavy product stream enriched in CO{sub 2}. Literally, thousands (2,850) of simulations were carried out to the periodic state to study the effects of the light product purge to feed ratio ({gamma}), cycle step time (t{sub s}) or cycle time (t{sub c}), high to low pressure ratio ({pi}{sub T}), and heavy product recycle ratio (R{sub R}) on the process performance, while changing the cycle configuration from 4- to 5-step (bed) designs utilizing combinations of light and heavy reflux steps, two different depressurization modes, and two sets of CO{sub 2}-HTlc mass transfer coefficients. The process performance was judged in terms of the CO{sub 2} purity and recovery, and the feed throughput. The best process performance was obtained from a 5-step (bed) stripping PSA cycle with a light reflux step and a heavy reflux step (with the heavy reflux gas obtained from the low pressure purge step), with a CO{sub 2} purity of 78.9%, a CO{sub 2} recovery of 57.4%, and a throughput of 11.5 L STP/hr/kg. This performance improved substantially when the CO{sub 2}-HTlc adsorption and desorption mass transfer coefficients (uncertain quantities at this time) were increased by factors of five, with a CO{sub 2} purity of 90.3%, a CO{sub 2} recovery of 73.6%, and a throughput of 34.6 L STP/hr/kg. Overall, this preliminary study disclosed the importance of cycle configuration through the heavy and dual reflux concepts, and the importance of knowing well defined mass transfer coefficients to the performance of a high temperature PSA process for CO{sub 2

  8. Doping dependence of the adsorption of proteins on proton-doped WO3 film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimakopoulos, V.; Mastichiadis, C.; Kakabakos, S.; Davazoglou, D.

    2005-01-01

    Configurations consisting of electrochromic (EC) strips of the kind SnO2:F/WO3 were fabricated on glass substrates with dimensions 5 × 5 cm2. For the fabrication, SnO2:F strips were formed first with standard lithography and etching. A tungsten film was subsequently deposited on the patterned substrate by low pressure chemical vapor deposition from W (CO)6 vapors, which was removed from the uncovered (by SnO2:F) parts of the glass substrate and oxidized to WO3 in O2 at 550 °C. These EC strips were colored at various degrees in an aqueous solution of NaCl using potentials varying from 0 to 5 V. After coloration strips were coated with a protein solution with pH varying between 6 and 9, then with a fluorescent antibody, washed and dried. The adsorption of proteins on EC strips was studied by fluorescent microscopy. It was found that rabbit gamma globulins were adsorbed on uncolored strips and as soon as the coloration voltage increased, adsorption decreased. Adsorption was also slightly dependent on pH and increases as the pH decreases

  9. Robotic sensors for aircraft paint stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weniger, Richard J.

    1990-10-01

    Aircraft of all types need to have paint routinely removed from their outer surfaces. Any method needs to be controlled to remove all the paint and not damage the surface of the aircraft. Human operators get bored with the monotonous task of stripping paint from an aircraft and thus do not control the process very well. This type of tedious operation tends itself to robotics. A robot that strips paint from aircraft needs to have feedback as to the state of the stripping process, its location in respect to the aircraft, and the availability of stripping material. This paper describes the sensors used on the paint stripping robot being developed for the United States Air Force's Manufacturing Technology Program. Particular attention is given to the paint sensor which is the feedback element for determining the state of the stripping process.

  10. Buffer strips in composites at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The composite material 'buffer strip' concept is presently investigated at elevated temperatures for the case of graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels using a (45/0/45/90)2S layup, where the buffer strip material was 0-deg S-glass/polyimide. Each panel was loaded in tension until it failed, and radiographs and crack opening displacements were recorded during the tests to determine fracture onset, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after crack arrest. At 177 + or - 3 C, the buffer strips increased the panel strength by at least 40 percent in comparison with panels without buffer strips. Compared to similar panels tested at room temperature, those tested at elevated temperature had lower residual strengths, but higher failure strains.

  11. Kinetic Interpretation of Water Vapor Adsorption-Desorption Behavior of a Desiccant Rotor Showing S-shaped Adsorption Isotherm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kumiko; Oshima, Kazunori; Takewaki, Takahiko; Kodama, Akio

    Adsorption / desorption behavior of water vapor in a desiccant rotor containing an iron aluminophosphate type zeolite FAM-Z01 (Functional Adsorbent Material Zeolite 01) was experimentally investigated for humidity swing. This rotor exhibited an S-shaped adsorption isotherm with its temperature dependence. Humidity swing, using a small piece of the rotor, could be usefully applied to interpret adsorption / desorption mechanisms by observing their rates. The most significant finding was that the adsorption / desorption rates in humidity swing could be described by the amount of adsorption, temperature and amplitude of the humidity swing, not by cycle time. Also, using the liner driving force (LDF) model, the overall mass transfer coefficient changed with the elapse of time or with the amount of adsorbed water. This implied that the LDF model, considering constant value of the overall mass transfer coefficient, was probably unable to explain the water adsorption / desorption behavior of FAM-Z01 desiccant rotor.

  12. Studies of NICADD Extruded Scintillator Strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dychkant, Alexandre; et al.

    2005-03-01

    About four hundred one meter long, 10 cm wide and 5 mm thick extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. The results of measurements strip responses to a radioactive source {sup 90}Sr are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. This work was essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  13. Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay Test Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    As easy to read as a home pregnancy test, three Quantifiable Lateral Flow Assay (QLFA) strips used to test water for E. coli show different results. The brightly glowing control line on the far right of each strip indicates that all three tests ran successfully. But the glowing test line on the middle left and bottom strips reveal their samples were contaminated with E. coli bacteria at two different concentrations. The color intensity correlates with concentration of contamination.

  14. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Terry A.; Law, Jack D.; Herbst, R. Scott; Romanovskiy, Valeriy N.; Smirnov, Igor V.; Babain, Vasily A.; Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M.

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  15. Strip of heat-recoverable articles

    SciTech Connect

    McLoughlin, R.H.; Kirkham, S.W.

    1985-01-29

    A strip of hollow heat-recoverable articles formed side-by-side by tear welding two lengths of polymeric material together at intervals so that individual articles may be torn off. A preferred method of making the strip involves cross-linking after the tear welding, heating the strip, and inflating the hollow articles to render them heat-recoverable by introducing pressure via an interconnecting passage formed for that purpose during the tear welding.

  16. Ammonia stripping of biologically treated liquid manure.

    PubMed

    Alitalo, Anni; Kyrö, Aleksis; Aura, Erkki

    2012-01-01

    A prerequisite for efficient ammonia removal in air stripping is that the pH of the liquid to be stripped is sufficiently high. Swine manure pH is usually around 7. At pH 7 (at 20°C), only 0.4% of ammonium is in ammonia form, and it is necessary to raise the pH of swine slurry to achieve efficient ammonia removal. Because manure has a very high buffering capacity, large amounts of chemicals are needed to change the slurry pH. The present study showed that efficient air stripping of manure can be achieved with a small amount of chemicals and without strong bases like NaOH. Slurry was subjected to aerobic biological treatment to raise pH before stripping. This facilitated 8 to 32% ammonia removal without chemical treatment. The slurry was further subjected to repeated cycles of stripping with MgO and Ca(OH)(2) additions after the first and second strippings, respectively, to raise slurry pH in between the stripping cycles. After three consecutive stripping cycles, 59 to 86% of the original ammonium had been removed. It was shown that the reduction in buffer capacity of the slurry was due to ammonia and carbonate removal during the stripping cycles.

  17. Optimization of ferric hydroxide coprecipitation process for selenium removal from petroleum refinery stripped four water

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, M.B.; Marrs, D.R.; Roehl, R.

    1996-12-31

    Iron coprecipitation was used in bench-scale tests to remove selenium from stripped sour water generated by two petroleum refineries. Chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide were found to convert selenocyanate in the stripped sour water to selenite, which can be removed by iron coprecipitation. An iodometric titration procedure was developed to determine the required oxidant dose. Iron coprecipitation reduced selenium concentrations by 40 to 99 percent in stripped sour water after chlorine dioxide pretreatment Removal was less effective with hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant: total selenium concentrations were reduced by 28 to 92 percent in stripped sour water after hydrogen peroxide pretreatment. Highest removals were obtained at the highest oxidant and iron doses. Sludges produced in coprecipitation tests were hazardous under California regulations. Ozone oxidized selenocyanate but prevented ferric hydroxide precipitation or coagulation. Air was ineffective at selenocyanate oxidation. Repeatedly contacting iron hydroxide with stripped sour water pretreated with hydrogen peroxide, in a simulation of a countercurrent adsorption process, increased the selenium adsorbed on the solids from 32 to 147 pg selenium per mg of iron, but some of the adsorbed selenite was oxidized to selenate and desorbed back into solution.

  18. Bonded orthotropic strips with cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.

    1979-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for a nonhomogeneous plane which consists of two sets of periodically arranged dissimilar orthotropic strips is considered. It is assumed that the plane contains a series of collinear cracks perpendicular to the interfaces and is loaded in tension away from and perpendicular to the cracks. The problem of cracks fully imbedded into the homogeneous strips is considered. The singular behavior of the stresses for two special crack geometries is studied. The first is the case of a broken laminate in which the crack tips touch the interfaces. The second is the case of cracks crossing the interfaces. An interesting result found from the analysis of the latter is that for certain orthotropic material combinations the stress state at the point of intersection of a crack and an interface may be bounded whereas in isotropic materials at this point stresses are always singular. A number of numerical examples are worked out to separate the primary material parameters influencing the stress intensity factors and the powers of stress singularity, and to determine the trends regarding the influence of the secondary parameters. Some numerical results are given for the stress intensity factors in certain basic crack geometries and for typical material combinations.

  19. The Whipple Strip Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertzman, M. P.

    As part of the normal operation of the Whipple 10m Gamma Ray telescope, ten minute drift scan “zenith” runs are made each night of observation for use as calibration. Most of the events recorded during a zenith run are due to the background of cosmic ray showers. However, it would be possible for a hitherto unknown source of gamma rays to drift through the field. This paper reports the results of a search for serendipitous high energy gamma ray sources in the Whipple 10m nightly calibration zenith data. From 2000-2004 nightly calibration runs were taken at an elevation of 89 º. A 2- D analysis of these drift scan runs produces a strip of width ~ 3.5º in declination and spanning the full range of right ascension. In the 2004-05 observing season the calibration runs were taken at elevations of 86° and 83°. Beginning in the 2005-06 season, the nightly calibration runs were taken at an elevation of 80º. Collectively, these drift scans cover a strip approximately 12.5º wide in declination, centered at declination 37.18º, and spanning the full range of RA. The analysis procedures developed for drift scan data, the sensitivity of the method, and the results will be presented.

  20. Arsenic speciation in natural waters by cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Gibbon-Walsh, Kristoff; Salaün, Pascal; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2010-03-01

    Contamination of groundwater with arsenic (As) is a major health risk through contamination of drinking and irrigation water supplies. In geochemically reducing conditions As is mostly present as As(III), its most toxic species. Various methods exist to determine As in water but these are not suitable for monitoring arsenic speciation at its original pH and without preparation. We present a method that uses cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) to determine reactive As(III) at a vibrating, gold, microwire electrode. The As(III) is detected after adsorptive deposition of As(OH)(3)(0), followed by a potential scan to measure the reduction current from As(III) to As(0). The method is suitable for waters of pH 7-12, has an analytical range of 1 nM to 100 microM As (0.07-7500 ppb) and a limit of detection of 0.5 nM with a 60 s deposition time. The As speciation protocol involves measuring reactive As(III) by CSV at the original pH and acidification to pH 1 to determine inorganic As(III)+As(V) by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) using the same electrode. Total dissolved As is determined by ASV after UV-digestion at pH 1. The method was successfully tested on various raw groundwater samples from boreholes in the UK and West Bengal.

  1. Air stripping VOCs from groundwater: Process design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, B.R.; Edwards, M.D. )

    1992-02-01

    Considerations for evaluating and designing the air stripping process are presented by case study. The case study involves the design of an air stripping process to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a National Priorities List site in Tacoma, WA. Design objectives included developing a tower with minimum volume and energy requirements while complying with discharge air and water quality standards. A two-phase resistance model using Onda Correlations to determine liquid- and gas-phase mass transfer coefficients was used to assist in the evaluation and design. Considerations for applying the two-phase resistance model to air stripping tower design are presented. The ability of the model to simulate process performance is demonstrated by comparison with actual data for 11 priority pollutant list VOCs evaluated during an onsite pilot study. Design procedures with which to develop a tower with minimum volume and energy requirements are described. Other considerations involving the evaluation of VOC emissions and the precipitation and buildup of inorganic constituents within the internal packing media are described.

  2. On the performance of a cascade crossflow air stripping column

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Y.; Valsaraj, K.T.; Wetzel, D.M.; Harrison, D.P.

    1996-10-01

    The cascade crossflow packed column is an innovative design that offers the separation advantages of countercurrent flow while avoiding flooding limitations. Liquid and gas cross-sectional flow areas and path length in contact with packing may be controlled independently. These features are illustrated by studying the air stripping of methylene chloride (MeCl), 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). Stripping efficiencies in the cascade crossflow column were generally slightly smaller than in countercurrent flow at equal liquid and gas flow rates. However larger gas-to-liquid ratios were possible in crossflow, permitting larger maximum stripping efficiencies to be attained. The experimental mass transfer coefficients were smaller than predicted by the Onda correlation. Modifications to the gas-phase Onda correlation are proposed that reduce the magnitude of the average deviation between experiment and prediction for 40 tests to about 12%. Experimental values of 38 of 40 tests were within {+-}30% of modified Onda correlation predictions. Additional applications for the cascade crossflow concept are suggested, such as vacuum distillation columns and trickle-bed reactors, which require low pressure drop and/or large gas-to-liquid ratios.

  3. Cross-flow versus counterflow air-stripping towers

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.C.; Marinas, B.J.

    1997-07-01

    Mass-transfer and pressure-drop packing performance correlations are used together with tower design equations and detailed cost models to compare the effectiveness of cross-flow and counterflow air stripping towers over a wide range of contaminant volatility. Cross-flow towers are shown to offer a significant economic advantage over counterflow towers when stripping low volatility organic contaminants primarily due to savings in energy costs. These savings increase as contaminant volatility decreases and as water flow rate increases. A further advantage of the cross-flow configuration is that it extends the feasible operating range for air stripping as cross-flow towers can accommodate higher air-to-water flow ratios than conventional counterflow towers. Finally it is shown that the optimized least-cost design for both counterflow and cross-flow towers varies with Henry`s law constant, water flow rate, and percent removal, but that the optimum is virtually insensitive to other cost and operating variables. This greatly simplifies the tower design procedure.

  4. Ultra-stripped Type Ic Supernovae from Close Binary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauris, T. M.; Langer, N.; Moriya, T. J.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Yoon, S.-C.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries of weak and fast optical transients raise the question of their origin. We investigate the minimum ejecta mass associated with core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of Type Ic. We show that mass transfer from a helium star to a compact companion can produce an ultra-stripped core which undergoes iron core collapse and leads to an extremely fast and faint SN Ic. In this Letter, a detailed example is presented in which the pre-SN stellar mass is barely above the Chandrasekhar limit, resulting in the ejection of only ~0.05-0.20 M ⊙ of material and the formation of a low-mass neutron star (NS). We compute synthetic light curves of this case and demonstrate that SN 2005ek could be explained by our model. We estimate that the fraction of such ultra-stripped to all SNe could be as high as 10-3-10-2. Finally, we argue that the second explosion in some double NS systems (for example, the double pulsar PSR J0737-3039B) was likely associated with an ultra-stripped SN Ic.

  5. Adsorption analysis of ammonia in an aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Arman, B.; Panchal, C.B.

    1993-08-01

    An analysis is carried out to determine the effects of the diffusional resistance on the rate of the adsorption of ammonia in an aqueous solution. A performance prediction model is developed to calculate the local rate of heat and mass transfer, including physical and thermodynamic property calculations of the mixture. An algorithm is developed for calculating the interfacial conditions. The local heat- and mass-transfer calculation is then incorporated into the performance prediction method for adsorption for a given geometry.

  6. Smooth Muscle Strips for Intestinal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Walthers, Christopher M.; Lee, Min; Wu, Benjamin M.; Dunn, James C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Functionally contracting smooth muscle is an essential part of the engineered intestine that has not been replicated in vitro. The purpose of this study is to produce contracting smooth muscle in culture by maintaining the native smooth muscle organization. We employed intact smooth muscle strips and compared them to dissociated smooth muscle cells in culture for 14 days. Cells isolated by enzymatic digestion quickly lost maturity markers for smooth muscle cells and contained few enteric neural and glial cells. Cultured smooth muscle strips exhibited periodic contraction and maintained neural and glial markers. Smooth muscle strips cultured for 14 days also exhibited regular fluctuation of intracellular calcium, whereas cultured smooth muscle cells did not. After implantation in omentum for 14 days on polycaprolactone scaffolds, smooth muscle strip constructs expressed high levels of smooth muscle maturity markers as well as enteric neural and glial cells. Intact smooth muscle strips may be a useful component for engineered intestinal smooth muscle. PMID:25486279

  7. Ultrasonic examination of JBK-75 strip material

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Lewis, J.C.; McClung, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    An ultrasonic inspection system was assembled to inspect the JBK-75 stainless steel sheath material (for the Large Coil Project) for the Westinghouse-Airco superconducting magnet program. The mechanical system provided for handling the 180-kg (400-lb) coils of strip material (1.6 mm thick by 78 mm wide by 90 to 120 m long (0.064 by 3.07 in. by 300 to 400 ft)), feeding the strip through the ultrasonic inspection and cleaning stations, and respooling the coils. We inspected 54 coils of strip for both longitudinal and laminar flaws. Simulated flaws were used to calibrate both inspections. Saw-cut notches (0.28 mm deep (0.011 in., about 17% of the strip thickness)) were used to calibrate the longitudinal flaw inspections; 1.59-mm-diam (0.063-in.) flat-bottom holes drilled halfway through a calibration strip were used to calibrate the laminar flaw tests.

  8. Adsorption Behavior of Nonplanar Phthalocyanines: Competition of Different Adsorption Conformations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using density functional theory augmented with state-of-the-art van der Waals corrections, we studied the geometric and electronic properties of nonplanar chlorogallium-phthalocyanine GaClPc molecules adsorbed on Cu(111). Comparing these results with published experimental data for adsorption heights, we found indications for breaking of the metal–halogen bond when the molecule is heated during or after the deposition process. Interestingly, the work-function change induced by this dissociated geometry is the same as that computed for an intact adsorbate layer in the “Cl-down” configuration, with both agreeing well with the experimental photoemission data. This is unexpected, as the chemical natures of the adsorbates and the adsorption distances are markedly different in the two cases. The observation is explained as a consequence of Fermi-level pinning due to fractional charge transfer at the interface. Our results show that rationalizing the adsorption configurations on the basis of electronic interface properties alone can be ambiguous and that additional insight from dispersion-corrected DFT simulations is desirable. PMID:27066160

  9. Crossflow air stripping and catalytic oxidation of chlorinated hydrocarbons from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Gavaskar, A.R.; Kim, B.C.; Rosansky, S.H.; Ong, S.K.; Marchand, E.G.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes air stripping of chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants from groundwater in a crossflow air stripping tower and destruction of the organic compounds by catalytic oxidation. Crossflow stripping has an advantage over conventional countercurrent stripping. In typical stripping operations, the mass transfer coefficient is insensitive to the velocity of the gas stream. The crossflow stripping tower is a geometry that increases the cross section of gas flow while making minimal disturbances to the liquid flow, allowing high gas-liquid ratios without flooding. By increasing the flow cross section for the gas stream, pressure drop (and thus fan power) can be reduced significantly. A field demonstration of the crossflow column was performed at a contaminated groundwater site. The groundwater was pumped out and sent to two 17-ft-high (5.2-m) towers in a parallel arrangement. One tower was a crossflow air stripper and the other a conventional countercurrent design. The performance of the two was compared. The key organic species targeted was dichloroethane, which has a low Henry`s law constant. Three different baffle configurations were tested in the crossflow tower. The results of this demonstration were used to develop design criteria for crossflow air strippers to be used for destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons. 4 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Multipass membrane air-stripping (MAS) for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from surfactant micellar solutions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa; Hu, Yuanan; Luo, Jian; Sabatini, David A

    2009-10-30

    Air-stripping is one of the most effective technologies for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from surfactant solutions, although the presence of surfactant poses some unique challenges. This study evaluated the effect of a mixed surfactant system on the apparent Henry's law constant of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and the efficiency of PCE removal from surfactant solutions using a lab-scale hollow fiber membrane contactor. Results show that the presence of surfactant significantly reduced the apparent Henry's law constant of PCE, and the reduction was proportional to the total surfactant concentration. PCE removal efficiency by membrane air-stripping (MAS) decreased as the surfactant system transitioned from solubilization to supersolubilization. Besides significantly reducing the apparent volatility of VOCs, the presence of surfactant brings additional mass transfer resistance in air-stripping, which makes it difficult to achieve high levels of contaminant removal, even at very high air/liquid (A/L) ratios. In contrast, multipass/multistage MAS operated at low A/L ratios could achieve near 100% contaminant removal because of less mass transfer limitation during each stripping pass/stage. Experimental results, together with model calculations demonstrate multipass (and multistage) air-stripping as a cost-effective alternative for removing VOCs from surfactant micellar solutions compared to the options of using large air strippers or operating at high A/L ratios.

  11. Mathematical model for strip surface roughness of stainless steel in cold rolling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jinshan; Li, Changsheng; Zhu, Tao; Han, Wenlong; Cao, Yong

    2013-05-01

    Surface roughness control is one of the most important subjects during producing stainless steel strips. In this paper, under the conditions of introducing to the concepts of transferring ratio and genetic factor and through the further theoretical analysis, a set of theoretical models about strip surface roughness were put forward in stainless steel cold tandem rolling. Meanwhile, the lubrication experiment in cold rolling process of SUS430 stainless steel strip was carried out in order to comprehensively study surface roughness. The effect of main factors on transferring ratio and genetic factor was analyzed quantitatively, such as reduction, initial thickness, deformation resistance, emulsion technological parameters and so on. Attenuation function equations used for describing roll surface roughness were set up, and also strip surface roughness at the entry of last mill was solved approximately. Ultimately, mathematical model on strip surface roughness for cold tandem rolling of stainless steel was built, and then it was used into the practical production. A great number of statistical results show that experimental data is in excellent agreement with the given regression equations, and exactly, the relative deviation on roughness between calculated and measured is less than 6.34%.

  12. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears.

  13. A Strip Cell in Pyroelectric Devices.

    PubMed

    Siao, An-Shen; Chao, Ching-Kong; Hsiao, Chun-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The pyroelectric effect affords the opportunity to convert temporal temperature fluctuations into usable electrical energy in order to develop abundantly available waste heat. A strip pyroelectric cell, used to enhance temperature variation rates by lateral temperature gradients and to reduce cell capacitance to further promote the induced voltage, is described as a means of improving pyroelectric energy transformation. A precision dicing saw was successfully applied in fabricating the pyroelectric cell with a strip form. The strip pyroelectric cell with a high-narrow cross section is able to greatly absorb thermal energy via the side walls of the strips, thereby inducing lateral temperature gradients and increasing temperature variation rates in a thicker pyroelectric cell. Both simulation and experimentation show that the strip pyroelectric cell improves the electrical outputs of pyroelectric cells and enhances the efficiency of pyroelectric harvesters. The strip-type pyroelectric cell has a larger temperature variation when compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by about 1.9 and 2.4 times, respectively. The measured electrical output of the strip type demonstrates a conspicuous increase in stored energy as compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by of about 15.6 and 19.8 times, respectively. PMID:26999134

  14. A Strip Cell in Pyroelectric Devices

    PubMed Central

    Siao, An-Shen; Chao, Ching-Kong; Hsiao, Chun-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The pyroelectric effect affords the opportunity to convert temporal temperature fluctuations into usable electrical energy in order to develop abundantly available waste heat. A strip pyroelectric cell, used to enhance temperature variation rates by lateral temperature gradients and to reduce cell capacitance to further promote the induced voltage, is described as a means of improving pyroelectric energy transformation. A precision dicing saw was successfully applied in fabricating the pyroelectric cell with a strip form. The strip pyroelectric cell with a high-narrow cross section is able to greatly absorb thermal energy via the side walls of the strips, thereby inducing lateral temperature gradients and increasing temperature variation rates in a thicker pyroelectric cell. Both simulation and experimentation show that the strip pyroelectric cell improves the electrical outputs of pyroelectric cells and enhances the efficiency of pyroelectric harvesters. The strip-type pyroelectric cell has a larger temperature variation when compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by about 1.9 and 2.4 times, respectively. The measured electrical output of the strip type demonstrates a conspicuous increase in stored energy as compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by of about 15.6 and 19.8 times, respectively. PMID:26999134

  15. Application of pig slurry to soils. Effect of air stripping treatment on nitrogen and TOC leaching.

    PubMed

    Bolado-Rodríguez, Silvia; García-Sinovas, David; Alvarez-Benedí, Javier

    2010-12-01

    The effect of physical-chemical slurry treatment on the mobility and transformation of nitrogen and organic matter from pig slurry after soil application is evaluated. Two different pig slurries (one treated by stripping with air at pH=9 and another non-treated) were applied at the top of a soil column, containing approximately 100 kg of soil. Effluents were monitored measuring concentration values of ammonia, nitrites, nitrates and total organic carbon (TOC). The breakthrough curves were modelled using STANMOD and HYDRUS 1D codes. Low concentrations of ammonia were detected in the effluent recovered at the bottom of the soil profile for both types of slurry. Nitrate concentration in effluent was lower and more homogenous over time when applying stripping treated pig slurry. In N modelling, adsorption of ammonia by soil proved an important process, nitrite and nitrate adsorption being less significant, although not negligible. Transformation from ammonia to nitrite controls the kinetics of the nitrification process. Total organic carbon in the column effluent was higher in the experiment using treated pig slurry, which can be attributed to organic matter solubilisation in the stripping treatment process.

  16. Retractable spiked barrier strip for law enforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Marts, D.J.; Barker, S.G.

    1995-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has designed an laboratory tested a prototype retractable spiked barrier strip for law enforcement. The proposed system, which is ready for controlled field testing, expands the functionality of existing spiked barrier strips. A retractable barrier strip, one that can place the spikes in either the active (vertical) or passive (horizontal) position, would allow law enforcement personnel to lay the unobtrusive strip across a road far in advance of a fleeing vehicle. No damage occurs to passing vehicles until the spikes are activated, and that can be done from a safe distance and at a strategic location when the offending vehicle is close to the strip. The concept also allows the strips to be place safely across several roadways that are potential paths of a fleeing vehicle. Since they are not activated until needed, they are harmless to nonoffending vehicles. The laboratory tests conducted on the system indicate that it will puncture tires only when the spikes are rotated to the active position and is safe to travel over when the spikes are in the down position. The strip itself will not cause instability to a vehicle driving over it, nor is the strip disturbed or adversely affected by vehicles driving over it. The spikes can be quickly rotated between the active (vertical) and passive (horizontal) position. However, the laboratory tests have only demonstrated that the retractable spiked barrier strip can perform its intended function in a laboratory environment. Field tests are needed to finalize the design and develop the system into a functional law enforcement tool.

  17. Adsorption Refrigeration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption refrigeration is an environmentally friendly cooling technology which could be driven by recovered waste heat or low-grade heat such as solar energy. In comparison with absorption system, an adsorption system has no problems such as corrosion at high temperature and salt crystallization. In comparison with vapor compression refrigeration system, it has the advantages of simple control, no moving parts and less noise. This paper introduces the basic theory of adsorption cycle as well as the advanced adsorption cycles such as heat and mass recovery cycle, thermal wave cycle and convection thermal wave cycle. The types, characteristics, advantages and drawbacks of different adsorbents used in adsorption refrigeration systems are also summarized. This article will increase the awareness of this emerging cooling technology among the HVAC engineers and help them select appropriate adsorption systems in energy-efficient building design.

  18. Saving Energy Through Advanced Power Strips (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.

    2013-10-01

    Advanced Power Strips (APS) look just like ordinary power strips, except that they have built-in features that are designed to reduce the amount of energy used by many consumer electronics. There are several different types of APSs on the market, but they all operate on the same basic principle of shutting off the supply power to devices that are not in use. By replacing your standard power strip with an APS, you can signifcantly cut the amount of electricity used by your home office and entertainment center devices, and save money on your electric bill. This illustration summarizes the different options.

  19. Tin electroplating/stripping evaluation. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, M.R.

    1995-08-01

    An evaluation was conducted to determine possible replacement chemistries for electroplating and stripping of tin-lead. The driver for this project was two-fold. Our first goal dealt with hazardous waste reduction. It was desired to eliminate lead (a heavy metal) from the electroplating process and thiourea (a known carcinogen) from the stripping process. We also sought to reduce the cost of nonconformance (CONC) realized by this process in the form of rough plating, broken paths, poor solderability, and overetching. Three suppliers` tin chemistries were evaluated as replacements for electroplating and stripping of tin-lead. Based on preliminary testing, one chemistry was chosen, evaluated, and approved for production use.

  20. Instabilities and Solitons in Minimal Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machon, Thomas; Alexander, Gareth P.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Pesci, Adriana I.

    2016-07-01

    We show that highly twisted minimal strips can undergo a nonsingular transition, unlike the singular transitions seen in the Möbius strip and the catenoid. If the strip is nonorientable, this transition is topologically frustrated, and the resulting surface contains a helicoidal defect. Through a controlled analytic approximation, the system can be mapped onto a scalar ϕ4 theory on a nonorientable line bundle over the circle, where the defect becomes a topologically protected kink soliton or domain wall, thus establishing their existence in minimal surfaces. Demonstrations with soap films confirm these results and show how the position of the defect can be controlled through boundary deformation.

  1. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  2. Instabilities and Solitons in Minimal Strips.

    PubMed

    Machon, Thomas; Alexander, Gareth P; Goldstein, Raymond E; Pesci, Adriana I

    2016-07-01

    We show that highly twisted minimal strips can undergo a nonsingular transition, unlike the singular transitions seen in the Möbius strip and the catenoid. If the strip is nonorientable, this transition is topologically frustrated, and the resulting surface contains a helicoidal defect. Through a controlled analytic approximation, the system can be mapped onto a scalar ϕ^{4} theory on a nonorientable line bundle over the circle, where the defect becomes a topologically protected kink soliton or domain wall, thus establishing their existence in minimal surfaces. Demonstrations with soap films confirm these results and show how the position of the defect can be controlled through boundary deformation. PMID:27419593

  3. How a Curved Elastic Strip Opens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barois, Thomas; Tadrist, Loïc; Quilliet, Catherine; Forterre, Yoël

    2014-11-01

    An elastic strip is transversely clamped in a curved frame. The induced curvature decreases as the strip opens and connects to its flat natural shape. Various ribbon profiles are measured and the scaling law for the opening length validates a description where the in-plane stretching gradually relaxes the bending stress. An analytical model of the strip profile is proposed and a quantitative agreement is found with both experiments and simulations of the plates equations. This result provides a unique illustration of smooth nondevelopable solutions in thin sheets.

  4. Kinetics of salicylic acid adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Polakovic, Milan; Gorner, Tatiana; Villiéras, Frédéric; de Donato, Philippe; Bersillon, Jean Luc

    2005-03-29

    The adsorption and desorption of salicylic acid from water solutions was investigated in HPLC microcolumns packed with activated carbon. The adsorption isotherm was obtained by the step-up frontal analysis method in a concentration range of 0-400 mg/L and was well fitted with the Langmuir equation. The investigation of rate aspects of salicylic acid adsorption was based on adsorption/desorption column experiments where different inlet concentrations of salicylic acid were applied in the adsorption phase and desorption was conducted with pure water. The concentration profiles of individual adsorption/desorption cycles data were fitted using several single-parameter models of the fixed-bed adsorption to assess the influence of different phenomena on the column behavior. It was found that the effects of axial dispersion and extraparticle mass transfer were negligible. A rate-determining factor of fixed-bed column dynamics was the kinetics of pore surface adsorption. A bimodal kinetic model reflecting the heterogeneous character of adsorbent pores was verified by a simultaneous fit of the column outlet concentration in four adsorption/desorption cycles. The fitted parameters were the fraction of mesopores and the adsorption rate constants in micropores and mesopores, respectively. It was shown that the former rate constant was an intrinsic one whereas the latter one was an apparent value due to the effects of pore blocking and diffusional hindrances in the micropores. PMID:15779975

  5. Nonlocality in deuteron stripping reactions.

    PubMed

    Timofeyuk, N K; Johnson, R C

    2013-03-15

    We propose a new method for the analysis of deuteron stripping reactions, A(d,p)B, in which the nonlocality of nucleon-nucleus interactions and three-body degrees of freedom are accounted for in a consistent way. The model deals with equivalent local nucleon potentials taken at an energy shifted by ∼40  MeV from the "E(d)/2" value frequently used in the analysis of experimental data, where E(d) is the incident deuteron energy. The "E(d)/2" rule lies at the heart of all three-body analyses of (d, p) reactions performed so far with the aim of obtaining nuclear structure properties such as spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients that are crucial for our understanding of nuclear shell evolution in neutron- and proton-rich regions of the nuclear periodic table and for predicting the cross sections of stellar reactions. The large predicted shift arises from the large relative kinetic energy of the neutron and proton in the incident deuteron in those components of the n+p+A wave function that dominate the (d, p) reaction amplitude. The large shift reduces the effective d-A potentials and leads to a change in predicted (d, p) cross sections, thus affecting the interpretation of these reactions in terms of nuclear structure. PMID:25166525

  6. A video strip chart program

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, N.L.

    1994-12-31

    A strip chart recorder has been utilized for trend analysis of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory EN tandem since 1987. At the EN, the author could not afford the nice eight channel thermal pen recorder that was used at the 25 URC. He had to suffice with two channel fiber tip or capillary pen type recorders retrieved from salvage and maintained with parts from other salvaged recorders. After cycling through several machines that eventually became completely unserviceable, a search for a new thermal recorder was begun. As much as he hates to write computer code, he decided to try his hand at getting an old data acquisition unit, that had been retrieved several years ago from salvage, to meet his needs. A BASIC language compiler was used because time was not available to learn a more advanced language. While attempting to increase acquisition and scroll speed on the 6 MHz 80286 that the code was first developed on, it became apparent that scrolling only the first small portion of the screen at high speed and then averaging that region and histogramming the average provided both the speed necessary for capturing fairly short duration events, and a trend record without use of back scrolling and disk storage routines. This turned out to be quite sufficient.

  7. Study and numerical solution of a generalized mathematical model of isothermal adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Komissarov, Yu.A.; Vetokhin, V.N.; Tsenev, V.A.; Gordeeva, E.L.

    1995-06-01

    A generalized mathematical model of isothermal adsorption that takes into account mass transfer on the surface of a particle, diffusion in micro- and macropores, and dispersion along the length of the apparatus is considered The parameters {lambda} and {var_phi}{sup 2} determine the dominating effect of any of the mass transfer mechanisms of the adsorption process. A numerical algorithm for solving the generalized adsorption model is suggested.

  8. Sieve tray performances for steam stripping toluene from water in a 4-ft diameter column

    SciTech Connect

    Kunesh, J.G.; Ognisty, T.P.; Sakata, M.; Chen, G.X.

    1996-08-01

    The liquid holdup, pressure drop, and mass transfer efficiency of sieve trays for the steam stripping trace toluene from water were measured from a 4-ft column at atmospheric pressure. The measured data were then compared with predictions from often-used models. It was found that the published efficiency models whether based on distillation or stripping systems are unable to predict both the trend and value of the measured efficiency. Since the 4-ft column owned by Fractionation Research, Inc. (FRI) can be considered as an industrial-scale column, the measured efficiency provides immediate design guidelines for such services.

  9. Ram Pressure Stripping: The Long Goodbye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnesen, Stephanie; Lu, Yu; Benson, Andrew; Peter, Annika; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Weisz, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    What turns off star formation in satellite galaxies? Ram pressure stripping, the removal of a galaxy's gas through direct interaction with the gas halo in which it orbits, is an attractive quenching mechanism, particularly in the Milky Way halo where the radial distribution of quenching is dramatic. However, many implementations of this process in semi-analytic models result in overly-rapid gas removal when compared with observations. We use high resolution hydrodynamical simulations run with Enzo to parameterize the stripping of disk and halo gas from an orbiting satellite galaxy for use in the semi-analytic modeling code Galacticus. We find that using the instantaneous ram pressure overestimates the amount of gas that is stripped, and present a physically-motivated module for including ram pressure stripping in semi-analytic models that uses the integral of the ram pressure experienced by a satellite galaxy. We will compare our results to observations of the Milky Way satellites.

  10. Fabrication of MMC Strip by CRB Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaati, Roohollah; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza

    2012-06-01

    In this study, Al/Al2O3 composite strips were produced by the cold roll bonding (CRB) process. Microhardness, tensile strength, and elongation of composite strips were investigated as a result of changes in thickness reduction, quantity of alumina particles, and the production method used. It was found that higher values of reduction and quantities of alumina improved microhardness and tensile strength but decreased elongation. Furthermore, as-received strips exhibited the highest values for microhardness and tensile strength but the lowest for elongation. In contrast, post-rolling annealed strips recorded the lowest values for microhardness and tensile strength but the highest for elongation. Finally, it was found that pre-rolling annealing was the best method for producing this composite via the CRB process.

  11. Technique for stripping Teflon insulated wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, B. D.

    1967-01-01

    Cryogenic stripping of Teflon insulated wire leaves no residue and produces no physical damage. After the wire is immersed in liquid nitrogen, bent slightly, and returned to room temperature, the Teflon is removed by fingernails or flat-nosed pliers.

  12. Topological insulators on a Mobius strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lang-Tao; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2011-11-01

    We study the two-dimensional Chern insulator and spin Hall insulator on a nonorientable Riemann surface, the Mobius strip, where the usual band-structure topological invariant is not defined. We show that while the flow pattern of edge currents can detect the twist of the Mobius strip in the case of Chern insulator, it can not do so for the spin Hall insulator.

  13. Topological insulators on a Mobius Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lang-Tao; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2012-02-01

    We study the two dimensional Chern insulator and spin Hall insulator on a non-orientable Riemann surface, the Mobius strip, where the usual bandstructure topological invariant is not defined. We show that while the flow pattern of edge currents can detect the twist of the Mobius strip in the case of Chern insulator, it can not do so in spin Hall insulator [1]. [4pt] [1] Lang-Tao Huang and Dung-Hai Lee, Phys. Rev. B 84, 193106 (2011)

  14. Flow in Rotating Serpentine Coolant Passages With Skewed Trip Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, David G.N.; Steuber, Gary

    1996-01-01

    Laser velocimetry was utilized to map the velocity field in serpentine turbine blade cooling passages with skewed trip strips. The measurements were obtained at Reynolds and Rotation numbers of 25,000 and 0.24 to assess the influence of trips, passage curvature and Coriolis force on the flow field. The interaction of the secondary flows induced by skewed trips with the passage rotation produces a swirling vortex and a corner recirculation zone. With trips skewed at +45 deg, the secondary flows remain unaltered as the cross-flow proceeds from the passage to the turn. However, the flow characteristics at these locations differ when trips are skewed at -45 deg. Changes in the flow structure are expected to augment heat transfer, in agreement with the heat transfer measurements of Johnson, et al. The present results show that trips are skewed at -45 deg in the outward flow passage and trips are skewed at +45 deg in the inward flow passage maximize heat transfer. Details of the present measurements were related to the heat transfer measurements of Johnson, et al. to relate fluid flow and heat transfer measurements.

  15. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  16. Automated Laser Paint Stripping (ALPS) update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovoi, Paul

    1993-03-01

    To date, the DoD has played a major role in funding a number of paint stripping programs. Some technologies have proven less effective than contemplated. Others are still in the validation phase. Paint stripping is one of the hottest issues being addressed by the finishing industry since the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated that chemical stripping using methylene chloride/phenolic type strippers be stopped. The DoD and commercial aircraft companies are hard-pressed to find an alternative. Automated laser paint stripping has been identified as a technique for removing coatings from aircraft surfaces. International Technical Associates (InTA) was awarded a Navy contract for an automated laser paint stripping system (ALPS) that will remove paint from metallic and composite substrates. For the program, which will validate laser paint stripping, InTA will design, build, test, and install a system for fighter-sized aircraft at both the Norfolk and North Island (San Diego) Aviation Depots.

  17. A Simple Adsorption Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guirado, Gonzalo; Ayllon, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    The study of adsorption phenomenon is one of the most relevant and traditional physical chemistry experiments performed by chemistry undergraduate students in laboratory courses. In this article, we describe an easy, inexpensive, and straightforward way to experimentally determine adsorption isotherms using pieces of filter paper as the adsorbent…

  18. Anodic Stripping Voltammetry of Silver Nanoparticles: Aggregation Leads to Incomplete Stripping

    PubMed Central

    Cloake, Samantha J; Toh, Her Shuang; Lee, Patricia T; Salter, Chris; Johnston, Colin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-01-01

    The influence of nanoparticle aggregation on anodic stripping voltammetry is reported. Dopamine-capped silver nanoparticles were chosen as a model system, and melamine was used to induce aggregation in the nanoparticles. Through the anodic stripping of the silver nanoparticles that were aggregated to different extents, it was found that the peak area of the oxidative signal corresponding to the stripping of silver to silver(I) ions decreases with increasing aggregation. Aggregation causes incomplete stripping of the silver nanoparticles. Two possible mechanisms of ‘partial oxidation’ and ‘inactivation’ of the nanoparticles are proposed to account for this finding. Aggregation effects must be considered when anodic stripping voltammetry is used for nanoparticle detection and quantification. Hence, drop casting, which is known to lead to aggregation, is not encouraged for preparing electrodes for analytical purposes. PMID:25861566

  19. Mastering Interproximal Stripping: With Innovations in Slenderization

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastav, Sunita S; Hazarey, Pushpa V

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crowding and irregularity remain a consistent problem for children. Management of space problems continues to play an important role in a dental practice. It also represents an area of major interaction between the primary provider and the specialists. Proximal stripping is routinely carried out to avoid extraction in borderline cases where space discrepancy is less and in cases where there is a discrepancy between the mesio- distal width of maxillary and mandibular teeth to satisfy Bolton ratio. Proximal stripping is carried out using of metallic abrasive strip, safe sided carborundum disk, or with long thin tapered fissure burs with air rotor. The use of rotary cutting instrument can harm the pulp by exposure of mechanical vibration and heat generation (in some cases). Whereas, the large diameter of the disk obstructs vision of the working area. Also fracturing away a portion is a common problem with disk. Tapered fissure burs cut the tooth structure as the width of bur or overcutting may occur of the tooth structure due to high speed. The use of metallic abrasive strip is the safest procedure amongst the above. The strip can be placed in the anterior region without any difficulty but using it in the posterior region is difficult as, it is difficult to hold it with fingers while stripping the posterior teeth. To avoid this inconvenience here with a simple and economical way of fabricating strip holder from routine lab material is presented. Clinical implications: Proper management of space in the primary and mixed dentitions can prevent unnecessary loss in arch length. Diagnosing and treating space problems requires an understanding of the etiology of crowding and the development of the dentition to render treatment for the mild, moderate and severe crowding cases. Most crowding problems with less than 4.5 mm can be resolved through preservation of the leeway space, regaining space or limited expansion in the late mixed dentition. In cases with 5 to 9 mm

  20. Superconducting nano-strip particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiano, R.; Ejrnaes, M.; Casaburi, A.; Zen, N.; Ohkubo, M.

    2015-12-01

    We review progress in the development and applications of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors. Particle detectors based on superconducting nano-strips stem from the parent devices developed for single photon detection (SSPD) and share with them ultra-fast response times (sub-nanosecond) and the ability to operate at a relatively high temperature (2-5 K) compared with other cryogenic detectors. SSPDs have been used in the detection of electrons, neutral and charged ions, and biological macromolecules; nevertheless, the development of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors has mainly been driven by their use in time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) where the goal of 100% efficiency at large mass values can be achieved. Special emphasis will be given to this case, reporting on the great progress which has been achieved and which permits us to overcome the limitations of existing mass spectrometers represented by low detection efficiency at large masses and charge/mass ambiguity. Furthermore, such progress could represent a breakthrough in the field. In this review article we will introduce the device concept and detection principle, stressing the peculiarities of the nano-strip particle detector as well as its similarities with photon detectors. The development of parallel strip configuration is introduced and extensively discussed, since it has contributed to the significant progress of TOF-MS applications.

  1. Bimetallic strip for low temperature use

    DOEpatents

    Bussiere, Jean F.; Welch, David O.; Suenaga, Masaki

    1981-01-01

    There is provided a class of mechanically pre-stressed structures, suitably bi-layer strips comprising a layer of group 5 transition metals in intimate contact with a layer of an intermetallic compound of said transition metals with certain group 3A, 4A or 5A metals or metalloids suitably gallium, indium, silicon, germanium, tin, arsenic or antimony. The changes of Young's modulus of these bi-layered combinations at temperatures in the region of but somewhat above absolute zero provides a useful means of sensing temperature changes. Such bi-metallic strips may be used as control strips in thermostats, in direct dial reading instruments, or the like. The structures are made by preparing a sandwich of a group 5B transition metal strip between the substantially thicker strips of an alloy between copper and a predetermined group 3A, 4A or 5A metal or metalloid, holding the three layers of the sandwich in intimate contact heating the same, cooling the same and removing the copper alloy and then removing one of the two thus formed interlayer alloys between said transition metal and the metal previously alloyed with copper.

  2. Domain Wall structures in wide permalloy strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez, Virginia; Laurson, Lasse

    2015-03-01

    We analyze numerically the equilibrium micromagnetic domain wall structures encountered in Permalloy strips of a wide range of thicknesses and widths, with strip widths up to several micrometers. By performing an extensive set of micromagnetic simulations, we show that the equilibrium phase diagram of the domain wall structures exhibits in addition to the previously found structures (symmetric and asymmetric transverse wall and vortex wall) also a double-vortex domain wall for large enough strip widths and thicknesses. In general, shape anisotropy is less important for wider strips, and thus energy minima with more complex spin structures closing the flux more efficiently than those found before for narrow strips may appear. Also several metastable domain wall structures are found, such as structures with three or four vortices or two vortices and an antivortex. We discuss the details of the relaxation process, including the effect of varying the magnitude of the Gilbert damping constant, and the role of using different initial conditions. Finally, we also consider the field-driven dynamics of the double-vortex domain wall.

  3. ERTS-1 data applied to strip mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. T.; Schubert, J.

    1976-01-01

    Two coal basins within the western region of the Potomac River Basin contain the largest strip-mining operations in western Maryland and West Virginia. The disturbed strip-mine areas were delineated along with the surrounding geological and vegetation features by using ERTS-1 data in both analog and digital form. The two digital systems employed were (1) the ERTS analysis system, a point-by-point digital analysis of spectral signatures based on known spectral values and (2) the LARS automatic data processing system. These two systems aided in efforts to determine the extent and state of strip mining in this region. Aircraft data, ground-verification information, and geological field studies also aided in the application of ERTS-1 imagery to perform an integrated analysis that assessed the adverse effects of strip mining. The results indicated that ERTS can both monitor and map the extent of strip mining to determine immediately the acreage affected and to indicate where future reclamation and revegetation may be necessary.

  4. Evaluation of the adsorption capacity of alkali-treated waste materials for the adsorption of sulphamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Lisha

    2012-01-01

    The present work is to develop potential adsorbents from waste material and employ them for the removal of a hazardous antibacterial, sulphamethoxazole, from the wastewater by the Adsorption technique. The Adsorption technique was used to impound the dangerous antibiotics from wastewater using Deoiled Soya (DOS), an agricultural waste, and Water Hyacinth (WH), a prolific colonizer. The adsorption capacity of these adsorbents was further enhanced by treating them with sodium hydroxide solution and it was seen that the adsorption capacity increases by 10 to 25%. Hence a comparative account of the adsorption studies of all the four adsorbents, i.e. DOS, Alkali-treated DOS, WH and Alkali-treated Water Hyacinth has been discussed in this paper. Different isotherms like Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich were also deduced from the adsorption data. Isotherm studies were in turn used in estimating the thermodynamic parameters. DOS showed sorption capacity of 0.0007 mol g(-1) while Alkali-treated Deoiled Soya exhibited 0.0011 mol g(-1) of sorption capacity, which reveals that the adsorption is higher in case of alkali-treated adsorbent. The mean sorption energy (E) was obtained between 9 and 12 kJ mol, which shows that the reaction proceeds by ion exchange reaction. Kinetic study reveals that the reaction follows pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, mass transfer studies performed for the ongoing processes show that the mass transfer coefficient obtained for alkali-treated moieties was higher than the parent moieties. The breakthrough curves plotted from the column studies show percentage saturation of 90-98%. About 87-97% of sulphamethoxazole was recovered from column by desorption. PMID:22508113

  5. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  6. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  7. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  8. Hydrogen adsorption on sulphur-doped SiC nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevak Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is an energy carrier and clean fuel that can be used for a broad range of applications that include fuel cell vehicles. Therefore, development of materials for hydrogen storage is demanded. Nanotubes, in this context, are appropriate materials. Recently, silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNTs) have been predicted as potential nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, and atomic doping into the nanotubes improves the H2 adsorption. Here, we report H2 adsorption properties of sulphur-doped (S-doped) SiCNTs using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The H2 adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of energy band structures, density of states (DOS), adsorption energy and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that, compared to the intrinsic SiCNT, S-doped SiCNT is more sensitive to H2 adsorption. H2 gas adsorption on S-doped C-sites of SiCNT brings about significant modulation of the electronic structure of the nanotube, which results in charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas, and dipole-dipole interactions cause chemisorptions of hydrogen. However, in the case of H2 gas adsorption on S-doped Si-sites of the nanotube, lesser charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas results in physisorptions of the gas. The efficient hydrogen sensing properties of S-doped SiCNTs, studied here, may have potential for its practical realization for hydrogen storage application.

  9. Hydrogen adsorption on sulphur-doped SiC nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevak Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is an energy carrier and clean fuel that can be used for a broad range of applications that include fuel cell vehicles. Therefore, development of materials for hydrogen storage is demanded. Nanotubes, in this context, are appropriate materials. Recently, silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNTs) have been predicted as potential nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, and atomic doping into the nanotubes improves the H2 adsorption. Here, we report H2 adsorption properties of sulphur-doped (S-doped) SiCNTs using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The H2 adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of energy band structures, density of states (DOS), adsorption energy and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that, compared to the intrinsic SiCNT, S-doped SiCNT is more sensitive to H2 adsorption. H2 gas adsorption on S-doped C-sites of SiCNT brings about significant modulation of the electronic structure of the nanotube, which results in charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas, and dipole–dipole interactions cause chemisorptions of hydrogen. However, in the case of H2 gas adsorption on S-doped Si-sites of the nanotube, lesser charge transfer from the nanotube to the gas results in physisorptions of the gas. The efficient hydrogen sensing properties of S-doped SiCNTs, studied here, may have potential for its practical realization for hydrogen storage application.

  10. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip for Transportation Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. McHugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; J.-P. Delplanque; S. B. Johnson

    2005-02-01

    Spray rolling is a novel strip casting technology in which molten aluminum alloy is atomized and deposited into the roll gap of mill rolls to produce aluminum strip. A combined experimental/modeling approach has been followed in developing this technology with active participation from industry. The feasibility of this technology has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale and it is currently being scaled-up. This paper provides an overview of the process and compares the microstructure and properties of spray-rolled 2124 aluminum alloy with commercial ingot-processed material

  11. Validation of the Hot Strip Mill Model

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Shulkosky; David Rosberg; Jerrud Chapman

    2005-03-30

    The Hot Strip Mill Model (HSMM) is an off-line, PC based software originally developed by the University of British Columbia (UBC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) under the AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program. The HSMM was developed to predict the temperatures, deformations, microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of steel strip or plate rolled in a hot mill. INTEG process group inc. undertook the current task of enhancing and validating the technology. With the support of 5 North American steel producers, INTEG process group tested and validated the model using actual operating data from the steel plants and enhanced the model to improve prediction results.

  12. Grain size control of rhenium strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gary B.

    1991-01-01

    Ensuring the desired grain size in the pure Re strip employed by the SP-100 space nuclear reactor design entails the establishment of an initial grain size in the as-received strip and the avoidance of excessive grain growth during subsequent fabrication. Pure Re tapered tensile specimens have been fabricated and tested in order to quantify the effects of grain-boundary migration. Grain size could be rendered fine and uniform by means of a rolling procedure that uses rather large reductions between short intermediate anneals. The critical strain regime varies inversely with annealing temperature.

  13. Electrostatics of crossed arrays of strips.

    PubMed

    Danicki, Eugene

    2010-07-01

    The BIS-expansion method is widely applied in analysis of SAW devices. Its generalization is presented for two planar periodic systems of perfectly conducting strips arranged perpendicularly on both sides of a dielectric layer. The generalized method can be applied in the evaluation of capacitances of strips on printed circuits boards and certain microwave devices, but primarily it may help in evaluation of 2-D piezoelectric sensors and actuators, with row and column addressing their elements, and also piezoelectric bulk wave resonators. PMID:20639164

  14. BHZ model edge states on Mobius strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogni, Christopher; Vakaryuk, Victor; Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2014-03-01

    We present analytical edge state solutions to the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang (BHZ) model of a quantum spin hall topological insulator with Mobius geometry. The edge state solutions are obtained by solving the differential equations governing the BHZ model. The edge states satisfy both inverted periodic boundary conditions and single-valuedness boundary conditions. Furthermore, we develop a classification of boundary conditions compatible with the BHZ model insulator with Mobius geometry. We demonstrate that in the limit of large strip length that there exists a finite energy gap between the edge states. This energy gap does not exist for strips with periodic boundary conditions.

  15. Adsorptive separation of rhodium(III) using Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M.S.; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu; Ishibashi, Hideaki

    1998-03-01

    The oxine type of chemically modified chitosan was prepared by the template crosslinking method using Fe(III) as a template ion. Batchwise adsorption of rhodium(III) on this chemically modified chitosan was examined from chloride media in the absence and presence of a large amount of tin(II). It was observed that the Fe(III)-templated oxine type of chemically modified chitosan shows better performance for rhodium adsorption than that of the original chitosan. When Sn(II) is absent from the solution, Rh(III) is hardly adsorbed on the modified chitosan and the order of selectivity of the adsorption of Rh(III), Pt(IV), and Cu(II) was found to be Pt(IV) > Cu(II) {approx} Rh(III). On the other hand, adsorption of rhodium is significantly increased in the presence of Sn(II) and the selectivity order of the adsorption was drastically changed to Rh(III) > Pt(IV) {much_gt} Cu(II), which ensures selective separation of Rh(III) from their mixture. Adsorption of Rh(III) increases with an increase in the concentration of Sn(II) in the aqueous solution, and maximum adsorption is achieved at a molar ratio, [Sn]/[Rh], of >6. The adsorption of Rh(III) decreases at a high concentration of hydrochloric acid. The maximum adsorption capacity was evaluated to be 0.92 mol/kg-dry adsorbent. Stripping tests of rhodium from the loaded chemically modified chitosan were carried out using different kinds of stripping agents containing some oxidizing agent. The maximum stripping of rhodium under these experimental conditions was found to be 72.5% by a single contact with 0.5 M HCl + 8 M HNO{sub 3}.

  16. Investigation of Mercury Reduction in Gold Stripping Process at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramudya, Irawan

    Mercury is present in many gold ores. By processing these ores, there is a potential of emitting mercury to the environment. Carbon regeneration kiln stacks have been observed as one of the primary source of mercury emission into the atmosphere. Before it is recycled back into the carbon in leach (CIL) or carbon in columns (CIC), carbon used in the gold extraction process needs to be reactivated thermally. Emission of mercury can be minimized by keeping the mercury left in the carbon low before it goes to the carbon regeneration kiln stacks. The objective of this study is establishing the optimum elution conditions of mercury cyanide from loaded carbon (which includes the eluent, concentration, temperature and elution time) with respect to gold stripping. Several methods such as acid washing (UNR-100, HCl or ethanol/UNR-100) were investigated prior to the stripping process. Furthermore, conventional pressurized Zadra and modified Zadra were also studied with regards to mercury concentration in the solution and vapor state as well as maximizing the gold stripping from industrial loaded carbon. 7% UNR-100 acid washing of loaded carbon at 80°C was able to wash out approximately 90% of mercury while maintaining the gold adsorption on the carbon (selective washing). The addition of alcohol in the UNR-100 acid washing solution was able to enhance mercury washing from 90% to 97%. Furthermore, mercury stripping using conventional pressurized (cyanide-alkaline) Zadra was best performed at 80°C (minimal amount of mercury reduced and volatilized) whereas using the same process only 40% of gold was stripped, which makes this process not viable. When alcohol was added to the stripping solution, at 80°C, 95% of gold was detected in the solution while keeping the reduction and volatilization of mercury low. The outcome of this study provides a better understanding of mercury behavior during the acid washing and stripping processes so that the risk of mercury exposure and

  17. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part III: model verification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Based on conventional mass transfer models developed for oxygen, the use of the non-linear ASCE method, 2-point method, and one parameter linear-regression method were evaluated for carbon dioxide stripping data. For values of KLaCO2 < approximately 1.5/h, the 2-point or ASCE method are a good fit to experimental data, but the fit breaks down at higher values of KLaCO2. How to correct KLaCO2 for gas phase enrichment remains to be determined. The one-parameter linear regression model was used to vary the C*CO2 over the test, but it did not result in a better fit to the experimental data when compared to the ASCE or fixed C*CO2 assumptions.

  18. Butanol production from wood pulping hydrolysate in an integrated fermentation-gas stripping process

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, CC; Dong, J; Yang, ST

    2013-09-01

    Wood pulping hydrolysate (WPH) containing mainly xylose and glucose as a potential substrate for acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was studied. Due to the inhibitors present in the hydrolysate, several dilution levels and detoxification treatments, including overliming, activated charcoal adsorption, and resin adsorption, were evaluated for their effectiveness in relieving the inhibition on fermentation. Detoxification using resin and evaporation was found to be the most effective method in reducing the toxicity of WPH. ABE production in batch fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii increased 68%, from 6.73 g/L in the non-treated and non-diluted WPH to 11.35 g/L in the resin treated WPH. With gas stripping for in situ product removal, ABE production from WPH increased to 17.73 g/L, demonstrating that gas stripping was effective in alleviating butanol toxicity by selectively separating butanol from the fermentation broth, which greatly improved solvents production and sugar conversion in the fermentation. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of contaminated groundwaters with granular activated carbon and air stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, M.H.; Gupta, U.S.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past several years there have been increasing reports of cases of contaminated groundwater. Many cases were caused by leaking from surface impoundments or landfills, or leakage from underground storage tanks. Treatment of groundwater use, discharge or recharge into the aquifer is becoming a major concern. Two widely used treatment techniques are adsorption with granular activated carbon and packed tower air stripping. Granular activated carbon is often applied when organic contaminants need to be removed to nondetectable levels, and should be a part of the process if nonvolatile contaminants are present. Air stripping is capable of 95-99% reduction of volatile contaminants and can be a cost effective treatment technology if nondetectable contaminant levels are not required and air pollution is not a factor. Should off-gas from an air stripper require treatment for removal of organic contaminants, granular activated carbon adsorption can be effectively applied as it was in the water phase. Selection of a groundwater treatment technology depends on factors such as contaminant type, end use of the water and air pollution concern, and each case requires consideration of these factors to arrive at the most cost effective solution.

  20. Graphene electroanalysis: inhibitory effects in the stripping voltammetry of cadmium with surfactant free graphene.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Dale A C; Lacombe, Alexandre C; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Banks, Craig E

    2012-01-21

    We explore the use of surfactant free graphene towards the electroanalytical sensing of cadmium(II) ions via anodic stripping voltammetry. In line with literature methodologies, we modify an electrode substrate which exhibits relatively fast electron transfer with commercially available graphene which is free from surfactants. Surprisingly, we find that graphene reduces the analytical performance and hence inhibits the electrochemical detection of cadmium(II) ions, with calibration plots in model aqueous solutions revealing no advantages of employing graphene in this analytical context.

  1. Technical development of double-clad process for thin strip casting of carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, H.L.; Forkel, C.E.; Knudson, D.L.

    1984-08-01

    This report documents the technical development for a patent disclosure of a double-clad process for the continuous casting of thin-strip carbon steel. The fundamental idea of the disclosure is to form a product strip by depositing molten steel between two, cooled, clad strips of the same material. The claimed benefits include: (a) the conservation of energy in steel making through the elimination of soaking pits and reheat cycles, and (b) an improved surface on both sides of the as-cast product such that it will be suitable for direct feed to a cold-reduction mill. However, the process as conceived is not necessarily limited to the casting of carbon steel, but may be also applied to other metals and alloys. The work is described under three headings as follows. Preliminary Considerations and Scoping Analysis presents the basic idea of the double-clad, thin-strip casting process; the energy conservation potential; scoping heat transfer calculations for the casting process; and independent review of this work. Thermal Analysis for Roller Configuration of Double-Clad Process, presents the development, results, and independent review of a finite-element thermal analysis for the casting process as originally conceived (using only chilled rollers in direct contact with the clad material of the product strip). Further Considerations for Belt Configuration of Double-Clad Process deals with a modified equipment design which interposes two product support belts, one on each side of the product, between the clad strip and the rollers. In addition to the process description, this section presents the preliminary mechanical calculations for the endless metal belts and the work scope and results for the computer model revision and thermal analysis for the modified concept.

  2. Experiment on mass-stripping of interstellar cloud following shock passage

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J F; Robey, H F; Klein, R I; Miles, A R

    2006-10-17

    The interaction of supernova shocks and interstellar clouds is an important astrophysical phenomenon which can lead to mass-stripping (transfer of material from cloud to surrounding flow, ''mass-loading'' the flow) and possibly increase the compression in the cloud to high enough densities to trigger star formation. Our experiments attempt to simulate and quantify the mass-stripping as it occurs when a shock passes through interstellar clouds. We drive a strong shock using 5 kJ of the 30 kJ Omega laser into a cylinder filled with low-density foam with an embedded 120 {micro}m Al sphere simulating an interstellar cloud. The density ratio between Al and foam is {approx} 9. Time-resolved x-ray radiographs show the cloud getting compressed by the shock (t {approx} 5 ns), undergoing a classical Kelvin-Helmholtz roll-up (12 ns) followed by a Widnall instability (30 ns), an inherently 3d effect that breaks the 2d symmetry of the experiment. Material is continuously being stripped from the cloud at a rate which is shown to be inconsistent with laminar models for mass-stripping (the cloud is fully stripped by 80 ns-100 ns, ten times faster than the laminar model). We present a new model for turbulent mass-stripping that agrees with the observed rate and which should scale to astrophysical conditions, which occur at even higher Reynolds numbers than the current experiment. The new model combines the integral momentum equations, potential flow past a sphere, flat plate skin friction coefficients, and Spalding's law of the wall for turbulent boundary layers.

  3. Hexahedron Projection by Triangle Fans and Strips

    2007-05-10

    The program divides the projection of a hexahedron with not-necessarily-planar quadrilateral faces, such as would arise in a curvilinear grid, by the projections of its edges, into polygons overlapped by a single front-facing and a single back-facing face. These polygons are further organized into triangle strips and fans, for rapid volume rendering in graphics hardware.

  4. Strip edge cracking simulation in cold rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, C.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Dubois, A.

    2011-01-17

    This research work focuses on a specific defect which occurs during cold rolling of steel strips: edge-serration. Investigations on the industrial processes have led to the conclusion that this defect is the result of the edge-trimming and cold rolling sequences. The aim of this research work is to analyze the effect of the cutting process and the cold rolling on cracks occurrence, especially on strip edges.This study is performed using an experimental testing stand called Upsetting Rolling Test (URT). It allows to reproduce cold rolling contact parameters such as forward slip, reduction ratio and friction coefficients. Specimens sampled near trimmed industrial strip edges are deformed using the URT stand. Two sets of specimens with different stress states, obtained by annealing, are submitted to two reduction passes with extreme forward slips.Scanning electron microscopy observations added to 3D optical surface profiler topographies show that on one hand, forward slip has a major effect on cracks opening. On the other hand, cracks opening decreases according to high roll strip speed gradient. Concerning the heat-treated specimens, no crack appeared after all reduction passes, showing a large influence of the cutting process and consequently of the local stress state in the vicinity of the burnish and fracture regions.

  5. Cardiac Muscle Studies with Rat Ventricular Strips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitten, Bert K.; Faleschini, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Details undergraduate physiology laboratory experiments that demonstrate mechanical properties of cardiac muscle, using strips from the ventricle of a rat heart. Includes procedures for obtaining length-tension curves, demonstrating the role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, and showing effects of several cardiovascular drugs…

  6. Single-sided CZT strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macri, John R.; Dönmez, Burçin; Widholm, Mark; Hamel, Louis-Andre; Julien, Manuel; Narita, Tomohiko; Ryan, James M.; McConnell, Mark L.

    2004-09-01

    We report progress in the study of thick CZT strip detectors for 3-d imaging and spectroscopy and discuss two approaches to device design. We present the spectroscopic, imaging, detection efficiency and response uniformity performance of prototype devices. Unlike double-sided strip detectors, these devices feature both row and column contacts implemented on the anode surface. This electron-only approach circumvents problems associated with poor hole transport in CZT that normally limit the thickness and energy range of double-sided strip detectors. These devices can achieve similar performance to pixel detectors. The work includes laboratory and simulation studies aimed at developing compact, efficient, detector modules for 0.05 to 1 MeV gamma radiation measurements. The low channel count strip detector approach can significantly reduce the complexity and power requirements of the readout electronics. This is particularly important in space-based coded aperture or Compton telescope instruments requiring large area, large volume detector arrays. Such arrays will be required for NASA's Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP) and Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT).

  7. Nanoscale Test Strips for Multiplexed Blood Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    A critical component of the DNA Medicine Institute's Reusable Handheld Electrolyte and Lab Technology for Humans (rHEALTH) sensor are nanoscale test strips, or nanostrips, that enable multiplexed blood analysis. Nanostrips are conceptually similar to the standard urinalysis test strip, but the strips are shrunk down a billionfold to the microscale. Each nanostrip can have several sensor pads that fluoresce in response to different targets in a sample. The strips carry identification tags that permit differentiation of a specific panel from hundreds of other nanostrip panels during a single measurement session. In Phase I of the project, the company fabricated, tested, and demonstrated functional parathyroid hormone and vitamin D nanostrips for bone metabolism, and thrombin aptamer and immunoglobulin G antibody nanostrips. In Phase II, numerous nanostrips were developed to address key space flight-based medical needs: assessment of bone metabolism, immune response, cardiac status, liver metabolism, and lipid profiles. This unique approach holds genuine promise for space-based portable biodiagnostics and for point-of-care (POC) health monitoring and diagnostics here on Earth.

  8. 33 CFR 157.128 - Stripping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; or (2) Any other means accepted by the Commandant. (c) Each stripping system must have at least one...) A pressure gauge at the discharge connection to the pump. (2) At least one of the following... pressure gauge at each driving fluid intake and at each discharge; and (2) A pressure/vacuum gauge at...

  9. 33 CFR 157.128 - Stripping system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: (1) In the stripping system piping: (i) A pressure gauge at the inlet connection to the pump; and (ii) A pressure gauge at the discharge connection to the pump. (2) At least one of the following... pressure gauge at each driving fluid intake and at each discharge; and (2) A pressure/vacuum gauge at...

  10. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: CII. Automated Anodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.; Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents details of anodic stripping analysis (ASV) in college chemistry laboratory experiments. Provides block diagrams of the analyzer system, circuitry and power supplies of the automated stripping analyzer, and instructions for implementing microcomputer control of the ASV. (CS)

  11. Dry stripping as a surface treatment method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Ilkka

    1992-03-01

    High environmental and safety standards as well as use of new paint and substrate materials have created the need for developing stripping methods to substitute chemical and mechanical methods and on the other hand for expanding the applicability of blasting as a surface treatment. Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) (alternatively Dry Stripping System (DSS)) is an emerging technology first used in aircraft maintenance for paint stripping. Traditionally this task is performed by brushing and grinding or by using chemical solvents. With plastic media it is possible to remove thick paints with high adhesion without damaging the substrate and even layer by layer. If suitable type of plastic media, blasting pressure low enough, media concentration high enough and on the other right blasting time, blasting distance and blasting angle are chosen, the effectiveness of PMB can be varied to a large extent. In regard to the hardness of media plastic particles are situated between some organic materials and shots used in sand blasting. Therefore composite materials can be treated without damaging the substrate or thin metal plates without causing any deformations. The principle of plastic media blasting equipment is similar to traditional blasting equipment. Nevertheless the properties of plastic media are different to harder particles used in shot peening resulting in higher demands for filtration, ventilation and recycling systems. In addition the facilities have to contain proper recovery equipment, because plastic media can be reused, even 20 times. In recycling systems plastic media is cleaned, too large and too small particles are removed, hard and magnetic particles are removed from reusable media and dust is separated from media. In addition to paint stripping PMB can successfully be used for cleaning of surfaces from contamination and to some extent for polishing, grinding and roughening. Paint stripping has been the main application so far, but there may be many other

  12. Refuges, flower strips, biodiversity and agronomic interest.

    PubMed

    Roy, Grégory; Wateau, Karine; Legrand, Mickaël; Oste, Sandrine

    2008-01-01

    Several arthropods are natural predators of pests, and they are able to reduce and control their population development. FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais (Federation Regionate de Defense contre les Organismes Nuisibles = Regional Federation for Pest Control) has begun for a long time to form farmers to the recognition of beneficial arthropods and to show them their usefulness. These beneficial insects or arachnids are present everywhere, in orchards and even in fields which are areas relatively poor in biodiversity. Adults feed in the flower strips instead larvae and some adults feed on preys such as aphids or caterpillars. Most of the time, beneficial insects can regulate pest but sometimes, in agricultural area, they can't make it early enough and efficiently. Their action begin too late and there biodiversity and number are too low. It's possible to enhance their action by manipulating the ecological infrastructures, like sewing flower strips or installing refuges. Flower strips increase the density of natural enemies and make them be present earlier in the field in order to control pests. Refuges permit beneficial's to spend winter on the spot. So they're able to be active and to grow in number earlier. From 2004 to 2007, on the one hand, FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais has developed a research program. Its purpose was to inventory practices and also tools and means available and to judge the advisability of using such or such beneficial refuge in orchards. On the second hand, it studied the impact in orchard of refuges on population of beneficial's and the difference there were between manufactured refuges and homemade refuges. Interesting prospects were obtained with some of them. Otherwise, since 2003, FREDON has studied flower strips influence on beneficial population and their impact on pest control. In cabbage fields, results of trials have shown that flower strips lead to a reduction of aphid number under acceptable economic level, up to 50 meters from flower strips

  13. Air stripping. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the application of air stripping techniques to water treatment, including groundwater decontamination and wastewater purification. The advantages and disadvantages of air stripping over other water treatment processes are discussed. Cleanup of the organic emissions generated by air stripping is also considered. The primary applications of air stripping are in groundwater and soil cleanup. (Contains a minimum of 71 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Fracture of composite plates containing periodic buffer strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Bakioglu, M.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture of a composite plate which consists of perfectly bonded parallel load carrying laminates and buffer strips is considered. Fatigue cracks appear and spread in main laminates or in buffer strips or in both perpendicular to the interfaces. The external load is applied to the plate parallel to the strips and away from the crack region. The problem is solved for fully imbedded cracks and for broken laminates or strips. Corresponding stress intensity factors are calculated.

  15. Adsorptive behavior and electrochemical determination of the anti-fungal agent ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Peng, T Z; Cheng, Q; Yang, C F

    2001-08-01

    The adsorptive properties and electrochemical behavior of ketoconazole, an oral anti-fungal agent, are demonstrated at a glassy carbon electrode. The adsorption of the compound obeys the Frumkin isotherm with an interaction factor (alpha) of 0.985 and adsorptive coefficient (beta) of 1.98 x 10(6) L mol(-1). The Gibbs energy of adsorption (deltaG) is -3.59 x 10(4) J mol(-1) at 25 degrees C. A very sensitive electroanalytical method has been developed for determination of the drug with a detection limit of 4.0 x 10(-11) mol L(-1). Relationships between stripping current and concentration of ketoconazole were linear in the range 10(-6)-10(-10) mol L(-1) with different preconcentration periods. The method has been used to measure the ketoconazole content of tablets.

  16. Study the Z-Plane Strip Capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, H.; Swain, S.; /SLAC

    2005-12-15

    The BaBaR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is currently undergoing an upgrade to improve its muon and neutral hadron detection system. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that had been used till now have deteriorated in performance over the past few years and are being replaced by Limited Streamer Tube (LSTs). Each layer of the system consists of a set of up to 10 streamer tube modules which provide one coordinate ({phi} coordinate) and a single ''Z-plane'' which provides the Z coordinate of the hit. The large area Z-planes (up to 12m{sup 2}) are 1mm thick and contain 96 copper strips that detect the induced charge from avalanches created in the streamer tube wires. All the Z-planes needed for the upgrade have already been constructed, but only a third of the planes were installed last summer. After installing the 24 Z-planes last year, it was learned that 0.7% of the strips were dead when put inside the detector. This was mainly due to the delicate solder joint between the read-out cable and the strip, and since it is difficult to access or replace the Z-planes inside the detector, it is very important to perform various tests to make sure that the Z-planes will be efficient and effective in the long term. We measure the capacitance between the copper strips and the ground plane, and compare it to the theoretical value that we expect. Instead of measuring the capacitance channel by channel, which would be a very tedious job, we developed a more effective method of measuring the capacitance. Since all the Z-planes were built at SLAC, we also built a smaller 46 cm by 30 cm Z-plane with 12 strips just to see how they were constructed and to gain a better understanding about the solder joints.

  17. Analysis of a simple biodegradation process for the removal of volatile organic chemicals from wastewater based on a gas stripping principle.

    PubMed

    Dahlan, M H; Xing, X H; Yoshikawa, Y; Matsumoto, K

    1999-01-01

    A simple biodegradation system consisting of an air stripping tank and a bioreactor was proposed for the treatment of volatile organic chemicals in wastewater. Toluene was used as a model of volatile organic chemicals. An aqueous solution of toluene and a basic mineral medium were placed in the air stripping tank and bioreactor, respectively. Toluene was stripped by supplying compressed air into the stripping tank through a sparger, and the stripped toluene was degraded by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 (ATCC 33015) in the bioreactor under aerobic conditions. The effect of the air stripping rate on bacterial growth was examined. A quantitative relationship was found between the air flow rate in the air stripping tank (Qa) and the stripping rate constant. During cultivation, the bacterial cells grew by utilizing toluene as the sole carbon source, and reached their maximum cell concentration (Xm) at the stationary phase. Xm showed a gradual decrease with increase in Qa from 1.8 to 7.2 l/h, indicating a decrease in the rate of toluene degradation with increasing Qa. The Xm at Qa=1.8 l/h was the highest among the experiments under different values of Qa, which was almost twice that at Qa=7.2 l/h. Mathematical analysis taking the growth kinetics and mass transfer of toluene into consideration satisfactorily explained the system performance.

  18. Equilibrium and kinetics of adsorption of Freon-12 at infinite dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, T.C.; Sircar, S. )

    1994-06-01

    Equilibrium and kinetic data for adsorption of trace CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] (Freon-12) from various carrier gased on BPL activated carbon are reported. Coadsorption of the bulk carrier gas can severely reduce the equilibrium adsorption capacity and adsorptive mass-transfer coefficient of strongly adsorbed CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The difference in size between CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] and the bulk carrier gas molecules plays a major role in establishing the binary or multicomponent equilibrium adsorption properties. The multisite (singe and multicomponent) Langmuir model, which accounts for differences in adsorbate sizes, provides a reasonable framework for describing the size effects. The adsorptive mass transfer of CF[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] under the experimental conditions investigated is dominated by surface diffusion into the pores of the activated carbon. The surface diffusivity is a strong function of the extent of coverage and strength of adsorption of the bulk components.

  19. Adsorption kinetic character of copper ions onto a modified chitosan transparent thin membrane from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zihong; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Han, Mei; Ma, Wei

    2010-10-15

    A modified chitosan transparent thin membrane (MCTTM) was prepared and used as the adsorbent to investigate the adsorption kinetics due to excellent capacity of removing copper ions in water solution. The structure and morphology of MCTTM were characterized by SEM analysis and FTIR analysis. External mass transfer, intra particle diffusion, and pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models were used to describe the adsorption process. The results obtained from the study illustrated that the adsorption process could be described by the pseudo-second order model, which indicated adsorption process was a chemical adsorption behavior of chelation ion exchange proved by the FTIR and adsorption free energy analysis. External mass transfer and intra particle diffusion processes were the rate-controlling steps.

  20. Adsorption of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane by various adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Lin, R.C.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate gas-phase adsorption characteristics of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) by activated carbon fiber, extruded activated carbon, granular activated carbon, activated alumina, and molecular sieve. HGC-134a is currently regarded as an excellent replacement for chlorofluorocarbon-12, a refrigerating and cooling agent extensively used previously in all automobiles and many cooling systems. Performances of HFC-134a adsorption were characterized by the equilibrium adsorption capacity, time to reach equilibrium, and desorption efficiency of exhausted adsorbent. A simple thermal treatment process with proper operating temperature and treatment duration was found to be effective for the regeneration of exhausted absorbents. Adsorption isotherms of the empirical Freundlich and Hossens types were observed to adequately represent the equilibrium adsorption data. A mass transfer model based on the pseudo steady state squared driving force was adopted to describe the mass transfer process of HFC-134a adsorption.

  1. Adsorption kinetic character of copper ions onto a modified chitosan transparent thin membrane from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zihong; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Han, Mei; Ma, Wei

    2010-10-15

    A modified chitosan transparent thin membrane (MCTTM) was prepared and used as the adsorbent to investigate the adsorption kinetics due to excellent capacity of removing copper ions in water solution. The structure and morphology of MCTTM were characterized by SEM analysis and FTIR analysis. External mass transfer, intra particle diffusion, and pseudo-first and pseudo-second order models were used to describe the adsorption process. The results obtained from the study illustrated that the adsorption process could be described by the pseudo-second order model, which indicated adsorption process was a chemical adsorption behavior of chelation ion exchange proved by the FTIR and adsorption free energy analysis. External mass transfer and intra particle diffusion processes were the rate-controlling steps. PMID:20634000

  2. Adsorption of silver dimer on graphene - A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2014-04-24

    We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of silver dimer (Ag{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA (Spanish Initiative for Electronic Simulations with Thousands of Atoms) package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Ag2-graphene system are calculated. The minimum energy configuration for a silver dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms directly above the centre of carbon-carbon bond. The negligible charge transfer between the dimer and the surface is also indicative of a weak bond. The methodology demonstrated in this paper may be applied to larger silver clusters on graphene sheet.

  3. Evaluation of strips of centipede grass for sediment load reduction.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Takahiro; Haraguchi, Noburo; Miyamoto, Kuniaki; Shinogi, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Teruhito; Kameyama, Koji

    2008-01-01

    Reddish sediment runoff from agricultural fields results in coastal environmental problems in Okinawa, Japan. Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of strips of centipede grass (Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro) Hack.), a perennial turf grass, in reducing the sediment loads from farmlands. However, sufficient information has not been provided to determine the appropriate strip specifications in the grass strip design. This study evaluated centipede grass strips for reduction of reddish sediment runoff from farmlands in Okinawa, Japan. A numerical model simulating the reddish sediment transport in the grass strip was constructed to determine the sediment removal efficiency of the strip. The model was verified using data obtained from field plot experiments with the grass strips under natural conditions. The sensitivity analysis of the model showed that the length of the grass strip (i.e. the dimension of the strip in the direction of flow) and unit inflow discharge have a great effect on sediment removal efficiency. The sediment removal efficiency obtained from the model simulation increased with the length of the strip and the increment of the efficiency decreased with the length of the strip. Therefore, these results indicate that the effective and efficient length of a centipede grass strip is 3 m for the reduction of reddish sediment loads under typical farmland conditions in Okinawa.

  4. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  5. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  6. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  7. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  8. 21 CFR 880.2200 - Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. 880... Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2200 Liquid crystal forehead temperature strip. (a) Identification. A liquid crystal forehead temperature strip is a device applied to the forehead that is used to...

  9. Conveyorized Photoresist Stripping Replacement for Flex Circuit Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Megan Donahue

    2009-02-24

    A replacement conveyorized photoresist stripping system was characterized to replace the ASI photoresist stripping system. This system uses the qualified ADF-25c chemistry for the fabrication of flex circuits, while the ASI uses the qualified potassium hydroxide chemistry. The stripping process removes photoresist, which is used to protect the copper traces being formed during the etch process.

  10. Bird community response to filter strips in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blank, P.J.; Dively, G.P.; Gill, D.E.; Rewa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Filter strips are strips of herbaceous vegetation planted along agricultural field margins adjacent to streams or wetlands and are designed to intercept sediment, nutrients, and agrichemicals. Roughly 16,000 ha of filter strips have been established in Maryland through the United States Department of Agriculture's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program. Filter strips often represent the only uncultivated herbaceous areas on farmland in Maryland and therefore may be important habitat for early-successional bird species. Most filter strips in Maryland are planted to either native warm-season grasses or cool-season grasses and range in width from 10.7 m to 91.4 m. From 2004 to 2007 we studied the breeding and wintering bird communities in filter strips adjacent to wooded edges and non-buffered field edges and the effect that grass type and width of filter strips had on bird community composition. We used 5 bird community metrics (total bird density, species richness, scrub-shrub bird density, grassland bird density, and total avian conservation value), species-specific densities, nest densities, and nest survival estimates to assess the habitat value of filter strips for birds. Breeding and wintering bird community metrics were greater in filter strips than in non-buffered field edges but did not differ between cool-season and warm-season grass filter strips. Most breeding bird community metrics were negatively related to the percent cover of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) in ???1 yr. Breeding bird density was greater in narrow (60 m) filter strips. Our results suggest that narrow filter strips adjacent to wooded edges can provide habitat for many bird species but that wide filter strips provide better habitat for grassland birds, particularly obligate grassland species. If bird conservation is an objective, avoid planting orchardgrass in filter strips and reduce or eliminate orchardgrass from filter strips through management practices. Copyright ?? 2011 The

  11. Analysis of a hybrid, unidirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after crack arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing-to-width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  12. Analysis of a hybrid-undirectional buffer strip laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    A method of analysis capable of predicting accurately the fracture behavior of a unidirectional composite laminate containing symmetrically placed buffer strips is presented. As an example, for a damaged graphite/epoxy laminate, the results demonstrate the manner in which to select the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties necessary to inhibit crack growth. Ultimate failure of the laminate after the arrest can occur under increasing load either by continued crack extension through the buffer strips or the crack can jump the buffer strips. For some typical hybrid materials it is found that a buffer strip spacing to width ratio of about four to one is the most efficient.

  13. Thermal Insulation Strips Conserve Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Launching the space shuttle involves an interesting paradox: While the temperatures inside the shuttle s main engines climb higher than 6,000 F hot enough to boil iron for fuel, the engines use liquid hydrogen, the second coldest liquid on Earth after liquid helium. Maintained below 20 K (-423 F), the liquid hydrogen is contained in the shuttle s rust-colored external tank. The external tank also contains liquid oxygen (kept below a somewhat less chilly 90 K or -297 F) that combines with the hydrogen to create an explosive mixture that along with the shuttle s two, powdered aluminum-fueled solid rocket boosters allows the shuttle to escape Earth s gravity. The cryogenic temperatures of the main engines liquid fuel can cause ice, frost, or liquefied air to build up on the external tank and other parts of the numerous launch fueling systems, posing a possible debris risk when the ice breaks off during launch and causing difficulties in the transfer and control of these cryogenic liquid propellants. Keeping the fuel at the necessary ultra-cold temperatures while minimizing ice buildup and other safety hazards, as well as reducing the operational maintenance costs, has required NASA to explore innovative ways for providing superior thermal insulation systems. To address the challenge, the Agency turned to an insulating technology so effective that, even though it is mostly air, a thin sheet can prevent a blowtorch from igniting a match. Aerogels were invented in 1931 and demonstrate properties that make them the most extraordinary insulating materials known; a 1-inch-thick piece of aerogel provides the same insulation as layering 15 panes of glass with air pockets in between. Derived from silica, aluminum oxide, or carbon gels using a supercritical drying process - resulting in a composition of almost 99-percent air - aerogels are the world s lightest solid (among 15 other titles they hold in the Guinness World Records), can float indefinitely on water if treated to be

  14. New Adsorption Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wankat, Phillip C.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a simple method for following the movement of a solute in an adsorption or ion exchange system. This movement is used to study a variety of operational methods, including continuous flow and pulsed flow counter-current operations and simulated counter-current systems. Effect of changing thermodynamic variables is also considered. (JM)

  15. Sulfate adsorption on goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Rietra, R.P.J.J.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1999-10-15

    Recent spectroscopic work has suggested that only one surface species of sulfate is dominant on hematite. Sulfate is therefore a very suitable anion to test and develop adsorption models for variable charge minerals. The authors have studied sulfate adsorption on goethite covering a large range of sulfate concentrations, surface coverages, pH values, and electrolyte concentrations. Four different techniques were used to cover the entire range of conditions. For characterization at low sulfate concentrations, below the detection limit of sulfate with ICP-AES, the authors used proton-sulfate titrations at constant pH. Adsorption isotherms were studied for the intermediate sulfate concentration range. Acid-base titrations in sodium sulfate and electromobility were used for high sulfate concentrations. All the data can be modeled with one adsorbed species if it is assumed that the charge of adsorbed sulfate is spatially distributed in the interface. The charge distribution of sulfate follows directly from modeling the proton-sulfate adsorption stoichoimemtry sine this stoichiometry is independent of the intrinsic affinity constant of sulfate. The charge distribution can be related to the structure of the surface complex by use of the Pauling bond valence concept and is in accordance with the microscopic structure found by spectroscopy. The intrinsic affinity constant follows from the other measurements. Modeling of the proton-ion stoichoimetry with the commonly used 2-pK models, where adsorbed ions are treated as point charges, is possible only if at least two surface species for sulfate are used.

  16. SEPARATION BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, C.S.

    1959-06-16

    Separation of Pu from fission products by adsorption on hydrous aluminum silicate is described. The Pu in a HNO/sub 3/ solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state and contacted with the silicate which adsorbs fission products. (T.R.H.)

  17. Adsorption dynamics of trichlorofluoromethane in activated carbon fiber beds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Jiaqi; Wei, Chaohai; Bi, Hsiaotao T

    2011-02-28

    Adsorption on carbon fixed-beds is considered as an inexpensive and highly effective way for controlling chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emissions. In the present work, a dynamic model under constant-pattern wave conditions has been developed to predict the breakthrough behavior of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) adsorption in a fixed bed packed with activated carbon fibers (ACFs). The adsorption of CFC-11 vapor onto viscose-based ACFs was performed in a fixed bed at different test conditions. The results showed that, in a deep bed (>120 mm), the analytical model based on the external mass transfer with the Langmuir isotherm could describe the adsorption dynamics well. The model parameters, the characteristic breakthrough time and the film mass-transfer coefficients are related to such operating parameters as the superficial gas velocity, feed concentration and bed height. It was found from the breakthrough dynamics that the mass transfer from the fluid phase to the fiber surface dominated the CFC-11 adsorption onto ACFs in fixed beds.

  18. Adsorption dynamics of trichlorofluoromethane in activated carbon fiber beds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Xin; Hu, Jiaqi; Wei, Chaohai; Bi, Hsiaotao T

    2011-02-28

    Adsorption on carbon fixed-beds is considered as an inexpensive and highly effective way for controlling chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) emissions. In the present work, a dynamic model under constant-pattern wave conditions has been developed to predict the breakthrough behavior of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) adsorption in a fixed bed packed with activated carbon fibers (ACFs). The adsorption of CFC-11 vapor onto viscose-based ACFs was performed in a fixed bed at different test conditions. The results showed that, in a deep bed (>120 mm), the analytical model based on the external mass transfer with the Langmuir isotherm could describe the adsorption dynamics well. The model parameters, the characteristic breakthrough time and the film mass-transfer coefficients are related to such operating parameters as the superficial gas velocity, feed concentration and bed height. It was found from the breakthrough dynamics that the mass transfer from the fluid phase to the fiber surface dominated the CFC-11 adsorption onto ACFs in fixed beds. PMID:21216098

  19. Noble metal chain adsorption on graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hamdollah; Moaddeli, Mohammad; Amiri, Peiman

    2016-05-01

    Van-der-Waals dispersion force plays a crucial role in physisorption mechanisms. Using density functional theory, the adsorption of noble metal (Cu, Ag, and Au) chains on graphene sheet was studied within two possible adsorption geometries, the zig-zag and the preferred armchair one. In order to take the portion of non-local correlations into account, we applied both semi-empirical and ab-initio van-der-Waals functionals in our calculations. The interaction leads to a charge transfer at the physisorption interface and makes graphene p-doped. Not only does the Fermi level shifts with respect to the Dirac point, but also a small band gap opening is predicted. Work function calculations confirm the presence of physisorption mechanism at the interface.

  20. Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Payne, Jason A.; Ottesen, Cory W.

    2008-08-05

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

  1. Mechanics of Thin Strip Steering in Hot Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhengyi; Tieu, Kiet A.

    2004-06-01

    The hot rolling of thin strip can result in several problems in hot rolling, for instance, the control of strip steering, strip shape and flatness and surface roughness etc. Therefore, the hot rolling of thin strip brings out a requirement of innovative technologies such as the extended control of shape and flatness, steering control and reduction of load by roll gap lubrication. In this paper, the authors focus on the analysis of thin strip snaking movement, as well as solve the related problems such as the shape and flatness due to a larger reduction applied when the strip is thinner. A finite element method was used to simulate this nonsymmetricity rolling considering the non-uniform reduction along the strip width. The calculated spread is compared with the measured values obtained from the rolling mill in laboratory and the friction effect is also discussed.

  2. Membrane air-stripping: Effects of pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, K. ); Zander, A.K. . Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1995-03-01

    As a result of the Safe Drinking Water Act and its 1986 amendments, the number of regulated volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) has increased substantially. The discovery of drinking water supply sources contaminated by VOCs is also increasing. These factors have led to the development of alternative treatment methods for control of VOCs. Microporous polypropylene hollow-fiber membranes offer significant advantages over packed-tower aeration for removing volatile organic chemicals. A laboratory study assessed the performance of membrane air-stripping in continuous operation, while exposed to various pretreatments. Results indicate that membrane air-stripping is compatible with low-pH or low-chlorine waters but not with waters of high pH or high-chlorine concentration or those that are ozonated.

  3. ITCS Test Strip Development and Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrigan, Caitlin; Adam, Niklas; Pickering, Karen; Gazda, Daniel; Piowaty, Hailey

    2011-01-01

    Internal coolant loops used for International Space Station thermal control must be periodically monitored for system health, including pH, biocide levels and any indication of ammonia. The presence of ammonia, possible via a microleak in the interface between the internal and external thermal control systems, could be a danger to the crew. The Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Sampling Kit uses test strips as a colorimetric indicator of pH and concentrations of biocide and free ammonia. This paper describes the challenges in designing an ammonia colorimetric indicator in a variable pH environment, as well as lessons learned, ultimately resulting in a robust test strip to indicate a hazardous ammonia leak.

  4. Coiling Temperature Control in Hot Strip Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanari, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Hiroaki

    Coiling temperature is one of the most significant factors in products of hot strip mill to determine material properties such as strength, toughness of steel, so it is very important to achieve accurate coiling temperature control (CTC). Usually there are a few pyrometers on the run out table in hot strip mill, therefore temperature model and its adapting system have large influences on the accuracy of CTC. Also unscheduled change of rolling speed has a bad effect to keep coiling temperature as its target. Newly developed CTC system is able to get very accurate coiling temperature against uncertain factors and disturbances by adopting easily identified temperature model, learning method and dynamic set up function. The features of the CTC system are discussed with actual data, and the effectiveness of the system is shown by actual control results.

  5. Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.

    2001-03-26

    This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

  6. Microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption for ion migration control.

    PubMed

    Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2012-09-01

    A new microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption capability (cMDC) was developed to solve the ion migration problem facing current MDC systems. Traditional MDCs remove salts by transferring ions to the anode and cathode chambers, which may prohibit wastewater beneficial reuse due to increased salinity. The cMDC uses adsorptive activated carbon cloth (ACC) as the electrodes and utilizes the formed capacitive double layers for electrochemical ion adsorption. The cMDC removed an average of 69.4% of the salt from the desalination chamber through electrode adsorption during one batch cycle, and it did not add salts to the anode or cathode chamber. It was estimated that 61-82.2mg of total dissolved solids (TDS) was adsorbed to 1g of ACC electrode. The cMDC provides a new approach for salt management, organic removal, and energy production. Further studies will be conducted to optimize reactor configuration and achieve in situ electrode regeneration.

  7. Exploiting differential electrochemical stripping behaviors of Fe3O4 nanocrystals toward heavy metal ions by crystal cutting.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xian-Zhi; Guo, Zheng; Yuan, Qing-Hong; Liu, Zhong-Gang; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2014-08-13

    This study attempts to understand the intrinsic impact of different morphologies of nanocrystals on their electrochemical stripping behaviors toward heavy metal ions. Two differently shaped Fe3O4 nanocrystals, i.e., (100)-bound cubic and (111)-bound octahedral, have been synthesized for the experiments. Electrochemical results indicate that Fe3O4 nanocrystals with different shapes show different stripping behaviors toward heavy metal ions. Octahedral Fe3O4 nanocrystals show better electrochemical sensing performances toward the investigated heavy metal ions such as Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Cu(II), and Hg(II), in comparison with cubic ones. Specifically, Pb(II) is found to have the best stripping performance on both the (100) and (111) facets. To clarify these phenomena, adsorption abilities of as-prepared Fe3O4 nanocrystals have been investigated toward heavy metal ions. Most importantly, combined with theoretical calculations, their different electrochemical stripping behaviors in view of facet effects have been further studied and enclosed at the level of molecular/atom. Finally, as a trial to find a disposable platform completely free from noble metals, the potential application of the Fe3O4 nanocrystals for electrochemical detection of As(III) in drinking water is demonstrated.

  8. Multitwist optical Möbius strips.

    PubMed

    Freund, Isaac

    2010-01-15

    Circularly polarized Gauss-Laguerre GL00 and GL01 laser beams that cross at their waists at a small angle are shown to generate a quasi-paraxial field that contains a line of circular polarization, a C line, surrounded by polarization ellipses whose major and minor axes generate multitwist Möbius strips with twist numbers that increase with the distance from the C point.

  9. Stripping organics from groundwater and wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarre, B.; Shearouse, D.

    1996-03-01

    At thousands of installations worldwide, air stripping has been used as an efficient method for removing volatile and semi-volatile contaminants from water -- both groundwater and industrial wastewater streams. In addition to numerous field installations, extensive laboratory analysis has confirmed the performance of various types and sizes of air strippers, and has made the practice highly predictable for a wide range of contaminants. The general principles of air stripping are quite simple. Within an air stripper, an air stream is directed across a thin film of contaminated water. Contaminants at the air-water interface volatilize and are discharged to the atmosphere, or to an off-gas treatment system. The two main types of air strippers are packed towers and try-type strippers. In many cases, air stripping can be a fast, efficient and economical approach to treating organics-laden water streams. However, since different wastewater streams can vary significantly, each must be evaluated to characterize its constitutents, determine each constituent`s potential affinity or resistance to being volatilized, and identify any pre-treatment steps that need to be taken to produce the desired results.

  10. TCT measurements with slim edge strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandić, Igor; Cindro, Vladimir; Gorišek, Andrej; Kramberger, Gregor; Mikuž, Marko; Zavrtanik, Marko; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Sadrozinski, Hartmut F.-W.; Christophersen, Marc; Phlips, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Transient current technique (TCT) measurements with focused laser light on miniature silicon strip detectors (n+-type strips on p-type bulk) with one inactive edge thinned to about 100 μm using the Scribe-Cleave-Passivate (SCP) method are presented. Pulses of focused IR (λ=1064 nm) laser light were directed to the surface of the detector and charge collection properties near the slim edge were investigated. Measurements before and after irradiation with reactor neutrons up to 1 MeV equivalent fluence of 1.5×1015 neq/cm2 showed that SCP thinning of detector edge does not influence its charge collection properties. TCT measurements were done also with focused red laser beam (λ=640 nm) directed to the SCP processed side of the detector. The absorption length of red light in silicon is about 3 μm so with this measurement information about the electric field at the edge can be obtained. Observations of laser induced signals indicate that the electric field distribution along the depth of the detector at the detector edge is different than in the detector bulk: electric field is higher near the strip side and lower at the back side. This is a consequence of negative surface charge caused by passivation of the cleaved edge with Al2O3. The difference between bulk and edge electric field distributions gets smaller after irradiation.

  11. Automating and controlling dry paint stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunliffe, F. R., III

    1989-03-01

    The key parameters which affect the efficiency and success of the dry paint-stripping process are discussed, including pressure at the nozzle, the size of the nozzle, the angle of blasting, the distance from the work-piece, the hardness and the size of the media, and the media flow. It is pointed out that, by automating the dry paint stripping process, many of these parameters can be controlled, making it possible to reproduce the same result, time and again. Attention is given to a recently developed automated aircraft wheel stripping machine, whose units are operated by joy stick controls from outside the cabinet. The wheel can be rotated and moved forward and backward in order to gain access to all of the surfaces; the operator also controls the nozzle manipulator which is a five-axis unit. At present, robotic systems are being developed for small aircraft and for the jumbo jets in use throughout the commercial airline fleets of the world.

  12. Navajo mine; Multiple seam dragline stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    The Navajo mine is exclusively a multiple-seam surface coal mine located in the northwest corner of New Mexico. The property is situated entirely on the Navajo Indian Reservation. It is owned and operated by the Broken Hill Propriety Co. Ltd., of Melbourne, Australia. The mine began production in January 1963 with a long-term fuel supply agreement with the Four Corners power plant. The 2175 MW nominal generating capacity of the Four Corners power plant consumes 7.2 Mt to 7.7 Mt/a (8 million to 8.5 million stpy) of coal. The Navajo Mine has estimated reserves totaling 1 Gt (1.1 billion st) of strip minable coal. Only about one-third of that total is presently committed to the generating station. As development continued over the years, mining operations advanced into more complex geologic areas to satisfy the utility's demand for coal. This case study of the fourth production cut highlights a variety of dragline stripping techniques including highwall bench (overburden) side cast, intermediate highwall bench (parting-interburden) side cast and spoilside bench (partings-interburden) stripping methods. The Dixon Pit offers considerable challenges in the surface recovery of up to seven seams of coal within the 1432 m (4700 ft) of total pit length.

  13. Ram pressure stripping in the Virgo Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo, C.; Combes, F.; Dasyra, K.; Salomé, P.; Braine, J.

    2015-10-01

    Gas can be violently stripped from their galaxy disks in rich clusters, and be dispersed over 100 kpc-scale tails or plumes. Young stars have been observed in these tails, suggesting they are formed in situ. This will contribute to the intracluster light, in addition to tidal stripping of old stars. We want to quantify the efficiency of intracluster star formation. We present CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) observations, made with the IRAM-30 m telescope, towards the ram-pressure stripped tail northeast of NGC 4388 in Virgo. We selected HII regions found all along the tails, together with dust patches, as observing targets. We detect molecular gas in 4 positions along the tail, with masses between 7 × 105 to 2 × 106M⊙. Given the large distance from the NGC 4388 galaxy, the molecular clouds must have formed in situ, from the HI gas plume. We compute the relation between surface densities of star formation and molecular gas in these regions, and find that the star formation has very low efficiency. The corresponding depletion time of the molecular gas can be up to 500 Gyr and more. Since this value exceeds a by far Hubble time, this gas will not be converted into stars, and will stay in a gaseous phase to join the intracluster medium.

  14. Wide field strip-imaging optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Arthur H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strip imaging wide angle optical system is provided. The optical system is provided with a 'virtual' material stop to avoid aberrational effects inherent in wide angle optical systems. The optical system includes a spherical mirror section for receiving light from a 180-degree strip or arc of a target image. Light received by the spherical mirror section is reflected to a frusto-conical mirror section for subsequent rereflection to a row of optical fibers. Each optical fiber transmits a portion of the received light to a detector. The optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance associated with optical fibers to substantially eliminate vignetting effects inherent in wide-angle systems. Further, the optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance of the optical fibers to substantially limit spherical aberration. The optical system is ideally suited for any application wherein a 180-degree strip image need be detected, and is particularly well adapted for use in hostile environments such as in planetary exploration.

  15. Sustainable Water and Energy in Gaza Strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, L.; Zarei, M.; Chianelli, R.; Gardner, E.

    2007-12-01

    Shortage of fresh water is a common problem in different areas of the world including the Middle East. Desalination of seawater and brackish water is the cheapest way to obtain fresh water in many regions. This research focuses on the situation in Gaza Strip where there is a severe shortage in the energy and water supply. The depletion of fresh water supplies and lack of wastewater treatments result in environmental problems. A solar powered cogeneration plant producing water and energy is proposed to be a suitable solution for Gaza Strip. Solar energy, using Concentrating Solar thermal Power (CSP) technologies, is used to produce electricity by a steam cycle power plant. Then the steam is directed to a desalination plant where it is used to heat the seawater to obtain freshwater. The main objective of this research is to outline a solution for the water problems in Gaza Strip, which includes a cogeneration (power and water) solar powered plant. The research includes four specific objectives: 1- an environmental and economic comparison between solar and fossil fuel energies; 2- technical details for the cogeneration plant; 3- cost and funding, 4- the benefits.

  16. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

    2002-06-25

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

  17. Evaluation of vermicompost as a raw natural adsorbent for adsorption of pesticide methylparathion.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Camila Bitencourt; Lima, Giovana de Fátima; Alves, Vanessa Nunes; Coelho, Nívia Maria Melo; Dragunski, Douglas Cardoso; Tarley, César Ricardo Teixeira

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of vermicompost (VC) as a low-cost and alternative adsorbent for the removal of the pesticide methylparathion (MP) from an aqueous medium has been investigated by batch and column experiments. Parameters related to MP adsorption, i.e. equilibrium time (61.5 min) and adsorption pH (6.8) were optimized by using Doehlert design. The initial and final MP concentrations after adsorption assays were determined by square-wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry using an electrode composed of a multiwalled carbon nanotube dispersed in mineral oil. Batch adsorption experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm adsorptions, and a very good fit to the Langmuir linear model, giving a maximum adsorption capacity (MAC) of 0.17 mg g(-1). This result was very similar to that obtained with the column experiments. In order to evaluate the MP desorption from column packed VC, 100.0 ml of nitric acid solution (pH 3.0) has been percolated through material. No leaching of MP was observed, thus confirming the strong interaction between MP and VC. The satisfactory MAC obtained and low cost makes the VC a reliable natural material for the removal of MP from aqueous effluents.

  18. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  19. Adsorption of ionisable pesticides in soils.

    PubMed

    Kah, M; Brown, C D

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the fate of a pesticide in soil is fundamental to the accurate assessment of its environmental behaviour and vital in ensuring the safe use of new and existing products. Ionisable pesticides comprise a significant proportion of both existing and new active substances registered for use in agriculture worldwide. This group of pesticides includes chemicals that are frequently found in groundwater and surface waters in many different countries. Despite this, approaches to predict the influence of soil properties on the behaviour of ionisable pesticides in soils are poorly developed. Current regulatory assessments frequently default to methods developed for nonionic chemicals, although it is evident that ionisable compounds do not often react like neutral molecules. This review presents the state of knowledge on the adsorption of ionisable pesticides in soils. It first introduces the issues concerning adsorption and the characteristics of this particular kind of chemical. The mechanisms postulated for the adsorption of ionisable pesticides are then described: these are hydrophobic partitioning, ionic exchange, charge transfer, ligand exchange, cation or water bridging, and the formation of bound residues. Relatively little experimental evidence is available, and we are still unable to determine the quantitative contribution of each process in a particular situation. Knowledge is still lacking concerning phenomena occurring at the surfaces of soil particles. Measurements do not allow determination of the operative pH at the surface of soil particles or in microenvironments, and the influence of ionic strength or competition effects is difficult to assess. Subsequently, the review focuses on the influence of soil properties on adsorption and on potential to predict the behaviour of ionisable pesticides in soils. Unlike hydrophobic compounds, adsorption of ionisable pesticides is highly sensitive to variation in pH. This relationship mainly derives from the

  20. Stripping volatile organic compounds and petroleum hydrocarbons from water by tray aeration

    SciTech Connect

    Labranche, D.F.; Collins, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) and petroleum products are ubiquitous groundwater contaminants. Petroleum products, e.g., diesel fuel, contain a wide array of volatile, semivolatile, and long chain hydrocarbon compounds. This research sought to determine whether air stripping can provide a site specific treatment solution for petroleum contaminated groundwaters and to document the abilities and limitations of tray type (Shallow Tray) air stripping technology. Full factorial experimental trials were conducted to determine the influence of inlet water flow rate and temperature on trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE) and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) removal. As expected, TPH removal controlled air stripper performance, and liquid temperature affected removal more than flow rate. The mass transfer rate of TCE and PCE from water to air was controlled by the compound`s volatility, while the TPH mass transfer rate was controlled by the compound`s concentration gradient. Results indicate that economical air stripping of VOC and TPH compounds can be achieved using low liquid flow rates (20-75 L/min) and medium liquid temperatures (16-28 deg C) in tray type air strippers.

  1. Measurement of the thermal conductivity of thin insulating anisotropic material with a stationary hot strip method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannot, Yves; Degiovanni, Alain; Félix, Vincent; Bal, Harouna

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a method dedicated to the thermal conductivity measurement of thin insulating anisotropic materials. The method is based on three hot-strip-type experiments in which the stationary temperature is measured at the center of the hot strip. A 3D model of the heat transfer in the system is established and simulated to determine the validity of a 2D transfer hypothesis at the center of the hot strip. A simplified 2D model is then developed leading to the definition of a geometrical factor calculable from a polynomial expression. A very simple calculation method enabling the estimation of the directional thermal conductivities from the three stationary temperature measurements and from the geometrical factor is presented. The uncertainties on each conductivity are estimated. The method is then validated by measurements on polyethylene foam and Ayous (anistropic low-density tropical wood); the estimated values of the thermal conductivities are in good agreement with the values estimated using the hot plate and the flash method. The method is finally applied on a thin super-insulating fibrous material for which no other method is able to measure the in-plane conductivity.

  2. AIR STRIPPING AND OFF-GAS ADSORPTION FOR THE REMOVAL OF MTBE FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methyl-tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is a synthetic organic chemical, primarily used for oxgenating fuel. The 1990 Federal Clean Air Act Amendments mandated the use of fuel oxgenates in areas where air quality did not meet national standards, which led to widespread use of MTBE in...

  3. ADSORPTIVE STRIPPING ANALYSIS OF TRACE NICKEL AT IRIDIUM-BASED ULTRAMICROELECTRODE ARRAYS. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Damage tolerance of woven graphite-epoxy buffer strip panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite-epoxy panels with S glass buffer strips were tested in tension and shear to measure their residual strengths with crack-like damage. The buffer strips were regularly spaced narrow strips of continuous S glass. Panels were made with a uniweave graphite cloth where the S glass buffer material was woven directly into the cloth. Panels were made with different width and thickness buffer strips. The panels were loaded to failure while remote strain, strain at the end of the slit, and crack opening displacement were monitoring. The notched region and nearby buffer strips were radiographed periodically to reveal crack growth and damage. Except for panels with short slits, the buffer strips arrested the propagating crack. The strength (or failing strain) of the panels was significantly higher than the strength of all-graphite panels with the same length slit. Panels with wide, thick buffer strips were stronger than panels with thin, narrow buffer strips. A shear-lag model predicted the failing strength of tension panels with wide buffer strips accurately, but over-estimated the strength of the shear panels and the tension panels with narrow buffer strips.

  5. Extracorporeal adsorption of endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Staubach, K H; Rosenfeldt, J A; Veit, O; Bruch, H P

    1997-02-01

    In a porcine endotoxin shock model using a continuous intravenous endotoxin infusion of 250 ng/kg body weight per hour, the cardiorespiratory and hematologic parameters were studied while applying a new on-line polymyxin B immobilized adsorption system. This preliminary report shows that the new adsorbent can remove endotoxin selectively from the circulation and confers a good amount of protection from endotoxin-induced cardiopulmonary decompensation as well as hematologic alterations. Survival time could be extended from 216 min to 313 min. Whereas cardiac output and mean arterial pressure declined critically after 3 h in the controls, the treated group remained stable for another 3 h. These data show that endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B coupled covalently to acrylic spheres as an adjunctive on-line measure in the septic syndrome seems feasible. PMID:10225785

  6. Membrane air stripping: A process for removal of organics from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmud, H.; Kumar, A.; Narbaitz, R.M.; Matsuura, T.

    1998-10-01

    The membrane air-stripping (MAS) process using microporous polypropylene hollow fiber membranes has shown potential for the removal of volatile organics from aqueous streams over conventional treatment processes, particularly in reducing the size of the equipment. This paper reviews the theoretical aspects and experimental investigations on the performance of these membranes in terms of overall mass transfer capabilities in the removal of organics from aqueous solutions. The reported findings of the effect of pH, ozone, chlorine, influence of packing density and possible fouling on the performance of these hollow fibers membranes are presented. The fate of the stripped air is discussed. Other possible applications as well as the future research needs are highlighted, along with critical assessment of the reported work.

  7. Physical and clinical evaluation of new high-strip-density radiographic grids

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, K.; Frank, P.H.; Chan, H.P.; Vyborny, C.J.; Makino, S.; Iida, N.; Carlin, M.

    1983-05-01

    The imaging performance of new high-strip-density (HSD) grids having 57 lines/cm was compared with that of conventional low-strip-density (LSD) grids having 33 or 40 lines/cm. The unique advantage of HSD grids is that, under most standard radiographic conditions, the grid lines are not noticeable on the final image, even if the grid is stationary. This is due to the combined effect of the high fundamental spatial frequency of HSD grids, the modulation transfer function of screen-film systems and of the human visual system, and scattered radiation. Monte Carlo simulation studies, phantom images, and clinical evaluation indicate that HSD grids can provide contrast improvement factors and Bucky factors that are comparable to or slightly better than those obtained with LSD grids. Therefore, it may now be possible to eliminate moving Bucky trays from radiographic tables and fluoroscopic devices.

  8. FIRST HST HARDWARE FOR SECOND SERVICING MISSION ARRIVES AT SKID STRIP AT CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    FIRST HST HARDWARE FOR SECOND SERVICING MISSION ARRIVES AT SKID STRIP AT CCAS KSC-396C-3184.14 The first payload flight hardware for the second Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission arrives in Florida from Goddard Space Flight Center, Md. The equipment was shipped via C-5 cargo aircraft to the Skid Strip here on Cape Canaveral Air Station before being transferred to the Vertical Processing Facility on KSC. The flight support equipment shipment includes a clamp fixture called the Flight Support System (FSS) for securing the telescope in the orbiter payload bay and carriers for holding the two new scientific instruments slated to be installed on Hubble. The carriers are called the Second Axial Carrier (SAC) and Orbital Replacement Unit Carrier (ORUC). The second HST servicing is set to occur during Shuttle Mission STS-82 in February 1997.

  9. FIRST HST HARDWARE FOR SECOND SERVICING MISSION ARRIVES AT SKID STRIP AT CCAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    FIRST HST HARDWARE FOR SECOND SERVICING MISSION ARRIVES AT SKID STRIP AT CCAS KSC-396C-3186.9 The first payload flight hardware for the second Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission arrives in Florida from Goddard Space Flight Center, Md. The equipment was shipped via C-5 cargo aircraft to the Skid Strip here on Cape Canaveral Air Station before being transferred to the Vertical Processing Facility on KSC. The flight support equipment shipment includes a clamp fixture called the Flight Support System (FSS) for securing the telescope in the orbiter payload bay and carriers for holding the two new scientific instruments slated to be installed on Hubble. The carriers are called the Second Axial Carrier (SAC) and Orbital Replacement Unit Carrier (ORUC). The second HST servicing is set to occur during Shuttle Mission STS-82 in February 1997.

  10. Regenerable adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir (Inventor); Perry, Jay (Inventor); Walsh, Dennis (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method for regenerable adsorption includes providing a substrate that defines at least one layer of ultra short channel length mesh capable of conducting an electrical current therethrough, coating at least a portion of the substrate with a desired sorbent for trace contaminant control or CO.sub.2 sorption, resistively heating the substrate, and passing a flowstream through the substrate and in contact with the sorbent.

  11. Van der Waals corrected DFT study of adsorption of groups VA and VIA hydrides on graphene monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notash, M. Yaghoobi; Ebrahimzadeh, A. Rastkar

    2016-06-01

    Adsorption properties of H2O, H2S, NH3 and PH3 on graphene monoxide (GMO) nano flack are investigated using density functional theory (DFT). Calculations were carried out by van der Waals correction and general gradient approximation. The adsorption energies and charge transfer between species are obtained and discussed for the considered positions of adsorbate molecules. Charge transfer analysis show that the gas molecules act as an electron acceptor in all cases. The analysis of the adsorption energies suggest GMO can be a good candidate for the adsorption of these molecules.

  12. Kinetics of Remazol Black B adsorption onto carbon prepared from sugar beet pulp.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Arzu Y; Tepe, Ozlem; Uslu, Gülşad; Dursun, Gülbeyi; Saatci, Yusuf

    2013-04-01

    Dried sugar beet pulp, an agricultural solid waste, was used for the production of carbon. Carbonised beet pulp was tested in the adsorption of Remazol Black B dye, and adsorption studies with real textile wastewater were also performed. Batch kinetic studies showed that an equilibrium time of 180 min was needed for the adsorption. The maximum dye adsorption capacity was obtained as 80.0 mg g(-1) at the temperature of 25 °C at pH = 1.0. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the adsorption equilibrium, and it was reported that experimental data fitted very well to the Langmuir model. Mass transfer and kinetic models were applied to the experimental data to examine the mechanisms of adsorption and potential rate-controlling steps. It was found that both external mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion played an important role in the adsorption mechanisms of dye, and adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order type kinetic model. The thermodynamic analysis indicated that the sorption process was exothermic and spontaneous in nature.

  13. Uranium stripping from tributyl phosphate by urea solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripchenko, S. Yu.; Titova, S. M.; Smirnov, A. L.; Rychkov, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    The process of uranium stripping from tri-n-butyl phosphate in kerosene by urea solutions was investigated at the volume ratio of the organic and aqueous phases of (1-10) : 1 in the temperature range of 20-60 °C. The stripping of uranium from a loaded organic phase increased with increasing urea content in the solution and with increasing temperature. Maximum recovery of uranium from tributyl phosphate was obtained using a solution that contained 8-12 mol/l of urea. The application of a urea solution for uranium stripping resulted in the strip product solution containing 200-240 g/L of uranium. The process of uranium stripping by dilute nitric acid was also investigated. Results of uranium stripping by the two methods are compared and discussed.

  14. Adsorption of organics from tar sand water by activated carbon in packed beds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, A.L.; Pedram, E.O.

    1982-12-30

    The adsorption of TS-1S and TS-2C tar sand waters were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K on activated carbon in both batch and packed bed experiments. The isotherms were nonlinear over the entire liquid concentration ranges. Breakthrough curves were obtained in packed bed experiments as a function of bed lengths, particle size, and liquid velocity. A mechanistic approach was used to solve the mass transfer equations for the packed adsorber, the mass transfer coefficients and the rates of adsorption were calculated. Also the breakthrough curves were analyzed to establish the relative importance of the various individual mechanisms that contributed to the overall adsorption process.

  15. Textures of strip cast Fe16%Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, D.; Reher, F.; Luecke, K. ); Hoelscher, M. )

    1993-07-01

    Ferritic stainless steels with a Cr content of 16% are mainly manufactured by continuous casting, hot rolling, cold rolling and final recrystallization. The recent development of the strip casting method, which provides sheets with an equivalent geometry, i.e. thickness and width as the hot rolled band, yields significant improvements in comparison to the conventional processing. The weak initial strip texture and the homogeneous microstructure through the sample thickness have shown evidence of avoiding the well known ridging phenomenon of the finally rolled and annealed product. The occurrence of ridging in conventionally processed FeCr steel has been attributed to the collective shear of grains with (hkl)<110>, i.e. [alpha]-fibre orientations, which become oriented and topologically arranged during hot rolling. In the present paper the textures of a stainless ferritic steel with 16% Cr and 0.02% C, strip casted (SC) as well as hot rolled (HR), were thus investigated. The textures were examined by measuring the four incomplete pole figures (110), (200), (112) and (103) in the back reflection mode. The orientation distribution function (ODF) was calculated by the series expansion method (1[sup max]=22). In the case of cubic crystal symmetry and orthorhombic sample symmetry an orientation can then be presented by the three Euler angles [var phi][sub 1], [var phi], [var phi][sub 2] in the reducted Euler space. Since bcc steels tend to develop characteristic fibre textures, it is favorable to present the ODFs as isointensity diagrams in [var phi][sub 1]-sections through the Eulerspace. In this work the [alpha]-fibre and the [gamma]-fibre are of major interest.

  16. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  17. Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. Arizona Strip Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, T.C.

    1993-05-01

    Founded in 1975 by uranium pioneer, Robert W. Adams, Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. (EFNI) emerged as the largest US uranium mining company by the mid-1980s. Confronting the challenges of declining uranium market prices and the development of high-grade ore bodies in Australia and Canada, EFNI aggressively pursued exploration and development of breccia-pipe ore bodies in Northwestern Arizona. As a result, EFNI's production for the Arizona Strip of 18.9 million pounds U[sub 3]O[sub 8] over the period 1980 through 1991, maintained the company's status as a leading US uranium producer.

  18. Recent developments in metastable β strip alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanning, J. C.; Fox, S. P.

    2005-12-01

    The strip producibility, good fabricability, and excellent mechanical properties of β alloys make them useful for a variety of fabricated sheet metal structures on aircraft. TIMETAL 15-3 is currently used for environmental control system ducting on the Boeing 777 and, more recently, has been used on the Airbus A380. For applications that require exposure to higher temperatures, such as the exhaust assemblies, TIMETAL 21S is now used on the Boeing 777, Airbus A340, and various other civil and military aircraft.

  19. Fermilab silicon strip readout chip for BTev

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Raymond; Hoff, Jim; Mekkaoui, Abderrezak; Manghisoni, Massimo; Re, Valerio; Angeleri, Valentina; Manfredi, Pier Francesco; Ratti, Lodovico; Speziali, Valeria; /Fermilab /Bergamo U. /INFN, Pavia /Pavia U.

    2005-05-01

    A chip has been developed for reading out the silicon strip detectors in the new BTeV colliding beam experiment at Fermilab. The chip has been designed in a 0.25 {micro}m CMOS technology for high radiation tolerance. Numerous programmable features have been added to the chip, such as setup for operation at different beam crossing intervals. A full size chip has been fabricated and successfully tested. The design philosophy, circuit features, and test results are presented in this paper.

  20. Power and control in gay strip clubs.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Joseph R G

    2007-01-01

    The gay strip club is a place in which more than displays of male beauty take place. The mix of customers, performers, liquor, and nudity results in fascinating dynamics. Of interest in this article are the power relationships and issues of control played out both among and between strippers and customers. Based on extensive participant observation conducted in eight cities and numerous bars/clubs and including more than 150 in-depth interviews, this article concerns just one aspect of the world of male strippers who perform for men. PMID:18019071

  1. Method for forming a solar array strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, R. I.; Yasui, R. K. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A flexible solar array strip is formed by a method which lends itself to automatic production techniques. Solder pads are deposited on printed circuitry deposited on a flexible structure. The resultant substrate is stored on a drum from which it is withdrawn and incrementally advanced along a linear path. Solderless solar cells are serially transported into engagement with the pads which are then heated in order to attach the cells to the circuitry. Excess flux is cleaned from the cells which are encapsulated in a protective coating. The resultant array is then spirally wound on a drum.

  2. Spray-formed tooling and aluminum strip

    SciTech Connect

    McHugh, K.M.

    1995-11-01

    Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. De Laval nozzles offer an alternative method to the more conventional spray nozzle designs. Two applications are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the production of specialized tooling, such as injection molds and dies, for rapid prototyping.

  3. Space Vehicle Heat Shield Having Edgewise Strips of Ablative Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Poteet, Carl C. (Inventor); Bouslog, Stan A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A heat shield for a space vehicle comprises a plurality of phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) blocks secured to a surface of the space vehicle and arranged in a pattern with gaps therebetween. The heat shield further comprises a plurality of PICA strips disposed in the gaps between the PICA blocks. The PICA strips are mounted edgewise, such that the structural orientation of the PICA strips is substantially perpendicular to the structural orientation of the PICA blocks.

  4. Stripping voltammetric and polarographic techniques for the determination of anti-fungal ketoconazole on the mercury electrode.

    PubMed

    Arranz, Pablo; Arranz, Adela; Moreda, José María; Cid, Adolfo; Arranz, Juan Francisco

    2003-11-24

    The electroanalytical behaviour of ketoconazole in Britton-Robinson buffer is described. The reduction process on the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) gives rise to one peak over -1.6 V (vs. Ag/AgCl/sat.KCl), within the pH range studied (4.7-9.6). The results showed that the reduction of ketoconazole is irreversible and the limiting current is adsorption controlled. The dependence of the peak current on the concentration was studied by means of different polarographic and voltammetric techniques. Using adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdS-DPV), the detection limit (DL) reached was 5.3 x 10(-11) mol l(-1). Two procedures, based on differential pulse polarography (DPP) and AdS-DPV in aqueous medium were developed for the determination of ketoconazole in a gel formulation and spiked urine samples, respectively.

  5. The problem of an inclined crack in an orthotropic strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Bakirtas, I.; Erdogan, F.

    1978-01-01

    The elastostatic problem for an infinite orthotropic strip containing crack was considered. It was assumed that the orthogonal axes of material orthotropy may have an arbitrary angular orientation with respect to the orthogonal axes of geometric symmetry of the uncracked strip. The crack was located along an axis of orthotropy, hence, at an arbitrary angle with respect to the sides of the strip. The general problem was formulated in terms of a system of singular integral equations for arbitrary crack surface tractions. As examples Modes 1 and 2 stress intensity factors were calculated for the strip having an internal or an edge crack with various lengths and angular orientations.

  6. An assessment of buffer strips for improving damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.; Kennedy, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy panels with buffer strips were tested in tension to measure their residual strength with crack-like damage. Panels were made with 45/0/-45/90(2S) and 45/0/450(2S) layups. The buffer strips were parallel to the loading directions. They were made by replacing narrow strips of the 0 deg graphite plies with strips of either 0 deg S-Glass/epoxy or Kevlar-49/epoxy on either a one for one or a two for one basis. In a third case, O deg graphite/epoxy was used as the buffer material and thin, perforated Mylar strips were placed between the 0 deg piles and the cross-plies to weaken the interfaces and thus to isolate the 0 deg plies. Some panels were made with buffer strips of different widths and spacings. The buffer strips arrested the cracks and increased the residual strengths significantly over those plain laminates without buffer strips. A shear-lag type stress analysis correctly predicted the effects of layups, buffer material, buffer strip width and spacing, and the number of plies of buffer material.

  7. Carbon dioxide adsorption in Brazilian coals

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Luciano Soares; Andre L.B. Oberziner; Humberto J. Jose; Alirio E. Rodrigues; Regina F.P.M. Moreira

    2007-01-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is one of the most important greenhouse gases. In the period between 1980 and 1998, CO{sub 2} emissions increased more than 21% and projections suggest that the emissions will continue to increase globally by 2.2% between 2000 and 2020 and 3.3% in the developed countries. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep unminable coal beds is one of the more promising of several methods of geological sequestration that are currently being investigated. CO{sub 2} can adsorb onto coal, and there are several studies demonstrating that CO{sub 2} dissolves in coals and swells them. At very low pressures (P {lt} 1 bar), CO{sub 2} dissolution does not seem to be a problem; however, high pressures are necessary for CO{sub 2} sequestration (P {gt} 50 bar). In this study, we evaluated the kinetics and equilibrium of sorption of CO{sub 2} on Brazilian coals at low pressures. The adsorption equilibrium isotherm at room temperature (30{sup o}C) was measured through the static method. The results showed that the Freundlich model or the Langmuir model is suitable to describe the equilibrium experimental results. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of Brazilian coals are in the range of 0.089-0.186 mmol CO{sub 2}/g, which are typical values for coals with high ash content. The dynamics of adsorption in a fixed-bed column that contains granular coal (particle sizes of 0.8, 2.4, and 4.8 mm) showed that the adsorption rate is fast and a mathematical model was developed to describe the CO{sub 2} dynamics of the adsorption in a fixed-bed column. The linear driving force (LDF) was used to describe the rate of adsorption and the mass-transfer constants of the LDF model (K{sub s}) are in the range of 1.0-2.0 min{sup -1}. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Liquid crystal elastomer strips as soft crawlers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSimone, Antonio; Gidoni, Paolo; Noselli, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we speculate on a possible application of Liquid Crystal Elastomers to the field of soft robotics. In particular, we study a concept for limbless locomotion that is amenable to miniaturisation. For this purpose, we formulate and solve the evolution equations for a strip of nematic elastomer, subject to directional frictional interactions with a flat solid substrate, and cyclically actuated by a spatially uniform, time-periodic stimulus (e.g., temperature change). The presence of frictional forces that are sensitive to the direction of sliding transforms reciprocal, 'breathing-like' deformations into directed forward motion. We derive formulas quantifying this motion in the case of distributed friction, by solving a differential inclusion for the displacement field. The simpler case of concentrated frictional interactions at the two ends of the strip is also solved, in order to provide a benchmark to compare the continuously distributed case with a finite-dimensional benchmark. We also provide explicit formulas for the axial force along the crawler body.

  9. Transparent Helium in Stripped Envelope Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  10. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like ‘top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and ‘bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2–3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated. PMID:27193558

  11. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S.

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  12. Solder flow on narrow copper strips

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Holm, E.A.; Michael, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Various solderability tests have been developed over the years to quantify the wetting behavior of solder on metallic surfaces. None offer an exact measure of capillary flow normally associated with conventional plated-through-hole and surface mount soldering. With shrinking package designs, increasing reliability requirements, and the emergence of new soldering technologies, there is a growing need to better understand and predict the flow of solder on printed wiring board (PWB) surfaces. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a capillary flow solderability test, through a joint effort with the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, that considers this fundamental wetting issue for surface mount technology. The test geometry consists of a metal strip (width, {delta}) connected to a circular metal pad (radius, r{sub c}). Solder flow from the pad onto the strip depends on the geometric relationship between {delta} and r{sub c}. Test methodology, experimental results, and validation of a flow model are presented in this paper. 17 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Therapeutic surfactant-stripped frozen micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Song, Wentao; Geng, Jumin; Chitgupi, Upendra; Unsal, Hande; Federizon, Jasmin; Rzayev, Javid; Sukumaran, Dinesh K.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2016-05-01

    Injectable hydrophobic drugs are typically dissolved in surfactants and non-aqueous solvents which can induce negative side-effects. Alternatives like `top-down' fine milling of excipient-free injectable drug suspensions are not yet clinically viable and `bottom-up' self-assembled delivery systems usually substitute one solubilizing excipient for another, bringing new issues to consider. Here, we show that Pluronic (Poloxamer) block copolymers are amenable to low-temperature processing to strip away all free and loosely bound surfactant, leaving behind concentrated, kinetically frozen drug micelles containing minimal solubilizing excipient. This approach was validated for phylloquinone, cyclosporine, testosterone undecanoate, cabazitaxel and seven other bioactive molecules, achieving sizes between 45 and 160 nm and drug to solubilizer molar ratios 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than current formulations. Hypertonic saline or co-loaded cargo was found to prevent aggregation in some cases. Use of surfactant-stripped micelles avoided potential risks associated with other injectable formulations. Mechanistic insights are elucidated and therapeutic dose responses are demonstrated.

  14. SNS Laser Stripping for H- Injection

    SciTech Connect

    V.V. Danilov, Y. Liu, K.B. Beard, V.G. Dudnikov, R.P. Johnson, Michelle D. Shinn

    2009-05-01

    The ORNL spallation neutron source (SNS) user facility requires a reliable, intense beams of protons. The technique of H- charge exchange injection into a storage ring or synchrotron has the potential to provide the needed beam currents, but it will be limited by intrinsic limitations of carbon and diamond stripping foils. A laser in combination with magnetic stripping has been used to demonstrate a new technique for high intensity proton injection, but several problems need to be solved before a practical system can be realized. Technology developed for use in Free Electron Lasers is being used to address the remaining challenges to practical implementation of laser controlled H- charge exchange injection for the SNS. These technical challenges include (1) operation in vacuum, (2) the control of the UV laser beam to synchronize with the H- beam and to shape the proton beam, (3) the control and stabilization of the Fabry-Perot resonator, and (4) protection of the mirrors from radiation.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Qu, Z G; Ding, T; Miao, J Y

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems. PMID:27176384

  16. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of the gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Qu, Z. G.; Ding, T.; Miao, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The gas-solid adsorption process in reconstructed random porous media is numerically studied with the lattice Boltzmann (LB) method at the pore scale with consideration of interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer performances. Adsorbent structures are reconstructed in two dimensions by employing the quartet structure generation set approach. To implement boundary conditions accurately, all the porous interfacial nodes are recognized and classified into 14 types using a proposed universal program called the boundary recognition and classification program. The multiple-relaxation-time LB model and single-relaxation-time LB model are adopted to simulate flow and mass transport, respectively. The interparticle, interfacial, and intraparticle mass transfer capacities are evaluated with the permeability factor and interparticle transfer coefficient, Langmuir adsorption kinetics, and the solid diffusion model, respectively. Adsorption processes are performed in two groups of adsorbent media with different porosities and particle sizes. External and internal mass transfer resistances govern the adsorption system. A large porosity leads to an early time for adsorption equilibrium because of the controlling factor of external resistance. External and internal resistances are dominant at small and large particle sizes, respectively. Particle size, under which the total resistance is minimum, ranges from 3 to 7 μm with the preset parameters. Pore-scale simulation clearly explains the effect of both external and internal mass transfer resistances. The present paper provides both theoretical and practical guidance for the design and optimization of adsorption systems.

  17. Occultation Predictions Using CCD Strip-Scanning Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, Edward W.; Ford, C. H.; Stone, R. P. S.; McDonald, S. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Elliot, J. L.; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We are developing the method of CCD strip-scanning astrometry for the purpose of deriving reliable advance predictions for occultations involving small objects in the outer solar system. We are using a camera system based on a Ford/Loral 2Kx2K CCD with the Crossley telescope at Lick Observatory for this work. The columns of die CCD are aligned East-West, the telescope drive is stopped, and the CCD is clocked at the same rate that the stars drift across it. In this way we obtain arbitrary length strip images 20 arcmin wide with 0.58" pixels. Since planets move mainly in RA, it is possible to obtain images of the planet and star to be occulted on the same strip well before the occultation occurs. The strip-to-strip precision (i.e. reproducibility) of positions is limited by atmospheric image motion to about 0.1" rms per strip. However, for objects that are nearby in R.A., the image motion is highly correlated and their relative positions are good to 0.02" rms per strip. We will show that the effects of atmospheric image motion on a given strip can be removed if a sufficient number of strips of a given area have been obtained. Thus, it is possible to reach an rms precision of 0.02" per strip, corresponding to about 0.3 of Pluto or Triton's angular radius. The ultimate accuracy of a prediction based on strip-scanning astrometry is currently limited by the accuracy of the positions of the stars in the astrometric network used and by systematic errors most likely due to the optical system. We will show the results of . the prediction of some recent occultations as examples of the current capabilities and limitations of this technique.

  18. Software design of the ATLAS Muon Cathode Strip Chamber ROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, R.; Huffer, M.; Claus, R.; Herbst, R.; Lankford, A.; Schernau, M.; Panetta, J.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Eschrich, I.; Deng, J.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS Cathode Strip Chamber system consists of two end-caps with 16 chambers each. The CSC Readout Drivers (RODs) are purpose-built boards encapsulating 13 DSPs and around 40 FPGAs. The principal responsibility of each ROD is for the extraction of data from two chambers at a maximum trigger rate of 75 KHz. In addition, each ROD is in charge of the setup, control and monitoring of the on-detector electronics. This paper introduces the design of the CSC ROD software. The main features of this design include an event flow schema that decentralizes the different dataflow streams, which can thus operate asynchronously at its own natural rate; an event building mechanism that associates data transferred by the asynchronous streams belonging to the same event; and a sparcification algorithm that discards uninteresting events and thus reduces the data occupancy volume. The time constraints imposed by the trigger rate have made paramount the use of optimization techniques such as the curiously recurrent template pattern and the programming of critical code in assembly language. The behaviour of the CSC RODs has been characterized in order to validate its performance.

  19. Modeling Air Stripping of Ammonia in an Agitated Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Kofi, Adu-Wusu; Martino, Christopher J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Bennett, William M.; Peters, Robert s.

    2005-11-29

    A model has been developed to predict the rate of removal of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) from solution in a sparged agitated vessel. The model is first-order with respect to liquid-phase concentration of NH{sub 3}. The rate constant for the first-order equation is a function of parameters related to the vessel/impeller characteristics, the air/liquid properties as well as the process conditions. However, the vessel/impeller characteristics, the air/liquid properties, and the process conditions reduce the rate constant dependence to only three parameters, namely, the air sparge rate, the liquid volume or batch size, and the Henry's law constant of NH{sub 3} for the liquid or solution. Thus, the rate of removal is not mass-transfer limited. High air sparge rates, high temperatures, and low liquid volumes or batch sizes increase the rate of removal of NH{sub 3} from solution. The Henry's law constant effect is somewhat reflected in the temperature since Henry's law constant increases with increasing temperature. Data obtained from actual air stripping operation agree fairly well with the model predictions.

  20. The readout chain for the bar PANDA MVD strip detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, R.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Di Pietro, V.; Kleines, H.; Goerres, A.; Riccardi, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Sohlbach, H.; Zaunick, H.-G.

    2015-02-01

    The bar PANDA (antiProton ANnihilation at DArmstadt) experiment will study the strong interaction in annihilation reactions between an antiproton beam and a stationary gas jet target. The detector will comprise different sub-detectors for tracking, particle identification and calorimetry. The Micro-Vertex Detector (MVD) as the innermost part of the tracking system will allow precise tracking and detection of secondary vertices. For the readout of the double-sided silicon strip sensors a custom-made ASIC is being developed, employing the Time-over-Threshold (ToT) technique for digitization and utilize time-to-digital converters (TDC) to provide a high-precision time stamp of the hit. A custom-made Module Data Concentrator ASIC (MDC) will multiplex the data of all front-ends of one sensor towards the CERN-developed GBT chip set (GigaBit Transceiver). The MicroTCA-based MVD Multiplexer Board (MMB) at the off-detector site will receive and concentrate the data from the GBT links and transfer it to FPGA-based compute nodes for global event building.

  1. Adsorption and desorption of chlorpyrifos to soils and sediments.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Seyoum Yami; Beutel, Marc W; Yonge, David R; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B

    2012-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos, one of the most widely used insecticides, has been detected in air, rain, marine sediments, surface waters, drinking water wells, and solid and liquid dietary samples collected from urban and rural areas. Its metabolite, TCP, has also been widely detected in urinary samples collected from people of various age groups. With a goal of elucidating the factors that control the environmental contamination, impact, persistence, and ecotoxicity of chlorpyrifos, we examine, in this review, the peer-reviewed literature relating to chlorpyrifos adsorption and desorption behavior in various solid-phase matrices. Adsorption tends to reduce chlorpyrifos mobility, but adsorption to erodible particulates, dissolved organic matter, or mobile inorganic colloids enhances its mobility. Adsorption to suspended sediments and particulates constitutes a major off-site migration route for chlorpyrifos to surface waters, wherein it poses a potential danger to aquatic organisms. Adsorption increases the persistence of chlorpyrifos in the environment by reducing its avail- ability to a wide range of dissipative and degradative forces, whereas the effect of adsorption on its ecotoxicity is dependent upon the route of exposure. Chlorpyrifos adsorbs to soils, aquatic sediments, organic matter, and clay minerals to differing degrees. Its adsorption strongly correlates with organic carbon con- tent of the soils and sediments. A comprehensive review of studies that relied on the batch equilibrium technique yields mean and median Kd values for chlorpyrifos of 271 and 116 L/kg for soils, and 385 and 403 L/kg for aquatic sediments. Chlorpyrifos adsorption coefficients spanned two orders of magnitude in soils. Normalizing the partition coefficient to organic content failed to substantially reduce variability to commonly acceptable level of variation. Mean and median values for chlorpyrifos partition coefficients normalized to organic carbon, K, were 8,163 and 7,227 L/kg for soils and 13

  2. Adequate model complexity for scenario analysis of VOC stripping in a trickling filter.

    PubMed

    Vanhooren, H; Verbrugge, T; Boeije, G; Demey, D; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2001-01-01

    Two models describing the stripping of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) in an industrial trickling filter system are developed. The aim of the models is to investigate the effect of different operating conditions (VOC loads and air flow rates) on the efficiency of VOC stripping and the resulting concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. The first model uses the same principles as the steady-state non-equilibrium activated sludge model Simple Treat, in combination with an existing biofilm model. The second model is a simple mass balance based model only incorporating air and liquid and thus neglecting biofilm effects. In a first approach, the first model was incorporated in a five-layer hydrodynamic model of the trickling filter, using the carrier material design specifications for porosity, water hold-up and specific surface area. A tracer test with lithium was used to validate this approach, and the gas mixing in the filters was studied using continuous CO2 and O2 measurements. With the tracer test results, the biodegradation model was adapted, and it became clear that biodegradation and adsorption to solids can be neglected. On this basis, a simple dynamic mass balance model was built. Simulations with this model reveal that changing the air flow rate in the trickling filter system has little effect on the VOC stripping efficiency at steady state. However, immediately after an air flow rate change, quite high flux and concentration peaks of VOCs can be expected. These phenomena are of major importance for the design of an off-gas treatment facility. PMID:11385860

  3. Cd adsorption onto bacterial surfaces: A universal adsorption edge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Nathan; Fein, Jeremy

    2001-07-01

    In this study, we measure the thermodynamic stability constants for proton and Cd binding onto the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus megaturium, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Sporosarcina ureae, and Bacillus cereus. Potentiometric titrations and Cd-bacteria adsorption experiments yield average values for the carboxyl site pK a, site concentration, and log stability constant for the bacterial surface Cd-carboxyl complex of 5.0, 2.0 × 10 -3 mol/g and 4.0 respectively. Our results indicate that a wide range of bacterial species exhibit nearly identical Cd adsorption behavior as a function of pH. We propose that metal-bacteria adsorption is not dependent on the bacterial species involved, and we develop a generalized adsorption model which may greatly simplify the task of quantifying the effects of bacterial adsorption on dissolved mass transport in realistic geologic systems.

  4. Rethinking Critical Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Peach, Sarah; Polak, Robert D.

    1996-03-01

    Recent reflectivity experiments on near-critical mixtures of carbon disulfide and nitromethane contained in glass cells footnote Niraj S. Desai, Sarah Peach, and Carl Franck, Phys. Rev. E 52, 4129 (1995) have shown that preferential adsorption of one liquid component onto the wall can be controlled by chemical modification of the glass. The glass was treated with varying amounts of hexamethyldisilazane to decrease surface polarity and therefore enhance the adsorption of carbon disulfide in a surprisingly continuous way. The effect of the glass wall on the local liquid composition can be described by two different scaling hypotheses: using a short range field on the liquid closest to the wall, or pinning the amplitude of the order parameter at the surface. We have found that only the second approach is consistent with the experimental data, although this is difficult to reconcile with observed wetting critical phenomena. We also have reexamined the issue of substrate inhomogeneity and conclude that the substrates were indeed homogeneous on relevant length scales. Supported by the NSF under DMR-9320910 and the central facilities of the Materials Science Center at Cornell University.

  5. 7 CFR 29.6128 - Straight Stripped (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Straight Stripped (X Group). 29.6128 Section 29.6128 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6128 Straight Stripped (X Group). This group consists...

  6. 7 CFR 29.6128 - Straight Stripped (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Straight Stripped (X Group). 29.6128 Section 29.6128 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6128 Straight Stripped (X Group). This group consists...

  7. 7 CFR 29.6128 - Straight Stripped (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Straight Stripped (X Group). 29.6128 Section 29.6128 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6128 Straight Stripped (X Group). This group consists...

  8. 7 CFR 29.6128 - Straight Stripped (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Straight Stripped (X Group). 29.6128 Section 29.6128 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6128 Straight Stripped (X Group). This group consists...

  9. Emission reduction by multipurpose buffer strips on arable fields.

    PubMed

    Sloots, K; van der Vlies, A W

    2007-01-01

    In the area managed by Hollandse Delta, agriculture is under great pressure and the social awareness of the agricultural sector is increasing steadily. In recent years, a stand-still has been observed in water quality, in terms of agrochemicals, and concentrations even exceed the standard. To improve the waterquality a multi-purpose Field Margin Regulation was drafted for the Hoeksche Waard island in 2005. The regulation prescribes a crop-free strip, 3.5 m wide, alongside wet drainage ditches. The strip must be sown with mixtures of grasses, flowers or herbs. No crop protection chemicals or fertilizer may be used on the strips. A total length of approximately 200 km of buffer strip has now been laid. Besides reducing emissions, the buffer strips also stimulate natural pest control methods and encourage local tourism. Finally, the strips should lead to an improvement in the farmers' image. The regulation has proved to be successful. The buffer strips boosted both local tourism and the image of the agricultural sector. Above all, the strips provided a natural shield for emission to surface water, which will lead to an improvement of the water quality and raise the farmers' awareness of water quality and the environment.

  10. Design and Use of the Stratigraphic Strip Log.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fichter, Lynn Stanton

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the use of a strip log as a diagrammatic representation of the information available in a sequence of sedimentary rocks. Describes the design of the strip log (both symbolically and by visual/spatial patterns) and some of the possible interpretations that can be made using them. (TW)

  11. 7 CFR 29.6128 - Straight Stripped (X Group).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Straight Stripped (X Group). 29.6128 Section 29.6128 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6128 Straight Stripped (X Group). This group consists...

  12. Electrode/Dielectric Strip For High-Energy-Density Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.

    1994-01-01

    Improved unitary electrode/dielectric strip serves as winding in high-energy-density capacitor in pulsed power supply. Offers combination of qualities essential for high energy density: high permittivity of dielectric layers, thinness, and high resistance to breakdown of dielectric at high electric fields. Capacitors with strip material not impregnated with liquid.

  13. Magnetic domain-wall dynamics in wide permalloy strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estévez, Virginia; Laurson, Lasse

    2016-02-01

    Domain walls in soft permalloy strips may exhibit various equilibrium micromagnetic structures depending on the width and thickness of the strip, ranging from the well-known transverse and vortex walls in narrow and thin strips to double and triple vortex walls recently reported in wider strips [V. Estévez and L. Laurson, Phys. Rev. B 91, 054407 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.054407]. Here, we analyze the field driven dynamics of such domain walls in permalloy strips of widths from 240 nm up to 6 μ m , using the known equilibrium domain wall structures as initial configurations. Our micromagnetic simulations show that the domain wall dynamics in wide strips is very complex, and depends strongly on the geometry of the system, as well as on the magnitude of the driving field. We discuss in detail the rich variety of the dynamical behaviors found, including dynamic transitions between different domain wall structures, periodic dynamics of a vortex core close to the strip edge, transitions towards simpler domain wall structures of the multi-vortex domain walls controlled by vortex polarity, and the fact that for some combinations of the strip geometry and the driving field the system cannot support a compact domain wall.

  14. Using Comic Strips as a Book Report Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Comic strips are great to share with parents, younger students, and peers. This article presents an activity where students use a six-paneled comic strip to summarize a story. This activity allows for multiple interpretations and enhances comprehension by drawing attention to story elements.

  15. Creating Comic Strips. ArtsEdge Curricula, Lessons and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State, Chico

    In society, information/ideas are communicated through various media (words, symbols, illustrations, etc.). When analyzing comic strips, it is noticeable that each has a different style, point of view, setting, plot, and summary, communicated not only through words, but through illustrations and style--creating comic strips can summarize various…

  16. ULTRA-STRIPPED TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE FROM CLOSE BINARY EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Tauris, T. M.; Langer, N.; Moriya, T. J.; Podsiadlowski, Ph.; Yoon, S.-C.; Blinnikov, S. I.

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries of weak and fast optical transients raise the question of their origin. We investigate the minimum ejecta mass associated with core-collapse supernovae (SNe) of Type Ic. We show that mass transfer from a helium star to a compact companion can produce an ultra-stripped core which undergoes iron core collapse and leads to an extremely fast and faint SN Ic. In this Letter, a detailed example is presented in which the pre-SN stellar mass is barely above the Chandrasekhar limit, resulting in the ejection of only ∼0.05-0.20 M {sub ☉} of material and the formation of a low-mass neutron star (NS). We compute synthetic light curves of this case and demonstrate that SN 2005ek could be explained by our model. We estimate that the fraction of such ultra-stripped to all SNe could be as high as 10{sup –3}-10{sup –2}. Finally, we argue that the second explosion in some double NS systems (for example, the double pulsar PSR J0737–3039B) was likely associated with an ultra-stripped SN Ic.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Filling Process During Twin-Roll Strip Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Qinghua; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Jieyu

    2014-01-01

    The modeling and controlling of flow and solidification of melt metal in the filling process is important for obtaining the optimal pool level and the formation of the solidified metal layer on the surface of twin-rolls during the twin-roll strip casting. The proper delivery system and processing parameters plays a key role to control flow characteristics in the initial filling stage of the twin-roll strip casting process. In this paper, a commercial CFD software was employed to simulate the transient fluid flow, heat transfer, and solidifications behaviors during the pouring stage of twin-roll strip casting process using different delivery systems. A 3D model was set up to solve the coupled set of governing differential equations for mass, momentum, and energy balance. The transient free-surface problem was treated with the volume of fluid approach, a k-ɛ turbulence model was employed to handle the turbulence effect and an enthalpy method was used to predict phase change during solidification. The predicted results showed that a wedge-shaped delivery system might have a beneficial impact on the distribution of molten steel and solidification. The predicted surface profile agreed well with the measured values in water model.

  18. Automatic flatness control strategy with a Smith predictor for steel strip rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruicheng; Zheng, Xin

    2011-10-01

    The simplified transfer function diagram block for a automatic flatness control (AFC) system of strip steel rolling process was investigated. For the problem of automatic flatness control (AFC) in cold tandem mills this paper proposes control techniques based on Smith predictor to compensate for the numerous delays present in the mill. After a Smith predictor was used to the AFC system, the control laws were deduced for both proportional and integral regulators. Control algorithms are tested in simulation considering a tandem mill with four stands as a benchmark, and results are shown to demonstrate the performance of the proposed schemes.

  19. Siloxane treatment by adsorption into porous materials.

    PubMed

    Ricaurte Ortega, D; Subrenat, A

    2009-09-01

    Siloxanes are widely used in different applications: health care, dry cleaning, household products, paints and coatings, paper, personal care, for example. This explains their prevalence in the environment. Because of their volatile nature, most of the time they are dispersed in the atmosphere, but they can also be present in the slurry from landfills. During anaerobic digestion, when the temperature goes up to 60 degrees C, siloxanes are volatilized, forming part of the biogas. Operational problems using biogas to produce energy, heat and hydrogen have been identified. At high temperatures the siloxanes are transformed into silicate dioxide (commonly called sand transmission). These white deposits may adhere to metal or catalytic substrate surfaces, seriously reducing equipment efficiency, and this can be a reason for changing equipment warranties. Consequently, elimination of siloxanes has become very important. Unfortunately, relatively little information can be found on this subject. Nevertheless some authors have described different analytical methods for siloxane quantification, and recent studies have looked at the presence of siloxanes in landfills and the restriction on the energy recovery equipment using the biogas produced. The growing consumption of siloxanes and silicones in industrial processes consequently increase their prevalence in the environment, hampering the use of biogas as a source of 'green energy'. Therefore, the principal focus of this study is the treatment of siloxanes. Their elimination was carried out using an adsorption process with four different porous materials: activated carbon cloths (ACC), granular activated carbon (GAC), zeolite and silica gel. Two representative siloxane compounds were used in this study, hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4). Adsorption kinetics and isotherms in batch reactors were performed. It was observed that the mass transfer into the porous material was more rapid for the

  20. Global versus local adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzat, Françoise; Marloie, Gael; Markovits, Alexis; Ellinger, Yves

    2015-10-01

    The origin of the enantiomeric excess found in the amino acids present in the organic matter of carbonaceous meteorites is still unclear. Selective adsorption of one of the two enantiomers existing after a racemic formation could be part of the answer. Hereafter we report a comparative study of the adsorption of the R and S enantiomers of α-alanine and lactic acid on the hydroxylated { } chiral surface of α-quartz using numerical simulation techniques. Structurally different adsorption sites were found with opposite R versus S selectivity for the same molecule-surface couple, raising the problem of whether to consider adsorption as a local property or as a global response characteristic of the whole surface. To deal with the second term of this alternative, a statistical approach was designed, based on the occurrence of each adsorption site whose energy was calculated using first principle periodic density functional theory. It was found that R-alanine and S-lactic acid are the enantiomers preferentially adsorbed, even if the adsorption process on the quartz { } surface stays with a disappointingly poor enantio-selectivity. Nevertheless, it highlighted the important point that considering adsorption as a global property changes perspectives in the search for more efficient enantio-selective supports and more generally changes the way to apprehend adsorption processes in astro-chemistry/biology.

  1. Liquid-Phase Adsorption Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooney, David O.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an experiment developed and used in the unit operations laboratory course at the University of Wyoming. Involves the liquid-phase adsorption of an organic compound from aqueous solution on activated carbon, and is relevant to adsorption processes in general. (TW)

  2. Air-stripping effects on cell growth with volatile substrates.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Hill, G A

    1987-09-01

    The removal of substate molecules from aerobic microbial cultures is due to both consumption by microorganisms and stripping by the air stream. The air stripping component can be described by a constant parameter for low concentrations of volatile substrates. This air stripping parameter was found to have a value of 0.0033 h(-1) for phenol molecules in a typical fermentation situation. The determination and inclusion of this constant is important for modeling microbial growth. For Pseudomonas putida growing on phenol, it is shown that air stripping is responsible for all of the original decline in phenol concentration. Further, the kinetic inhibition constant is sensitive to both the value of the air stripping parameter and the value of the initial concentration of bacteria. The experimental data for Pseudomonas putida growing on phenol was fit by a non-linear, least squares technique to isolate the inhibition constant between 100 and 600 ppm.

  3. Evaluation of anatomy comic strips for further production and applications.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Dae Hyun; Park, Jin Seo; Jang, Hae Gwon; Chung, Min Suk

    2013-09-01

    The corresponding author of the study has been sketching comic strips to explain anatomy in a humorous manner. All the anatomy comic strips, including those in Korean (650 episodes) and English (451 episodes), can be viewed on the homepage (http://anatomy.co.kr). Such comic strips were created with the aim of assisting medical students. However, their impact was unknown, and therefore, we surveyed the students' responses. We noted that anatomy grades were better in the students who read the comic strips. The comics helped the trainees chat with individuals with and without a medical background. The authors also considered comments on the problems with the comic strips and attempted to find solutions. The episodes are being currently used and further produced for educational purposes. To support this effort, the readers' valuable opinions will be continuously collected and assessed.

  4. [Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK)].

    PubMed

    Cursiefen, C; Kruse, F E

    2009-10-01

    Penetrating keratoplasty has been the gold standard for the surgical treatment of corneal endothelial pathologies, but tremendous progress has been made in recent years in improving the technology of posterior lamellar keratoplasty techniques such as Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK). This progress is shown by a literature review using PubMed sources and our own clinical and experimental data. Posterior lamellar keratoplasty using a microkeratome is a reliable surgical technique for Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy and pseudophakic bullous keratopathy. Visual rehabilitation is faster with lamellar compared with penetrating keratoplasty, but final visual acuity seems to be a bit reduced. Posterior lamellar keratoplasty techniques such as DSAEK may replace penetrating keratoplasty as the gold standard for treating a large proportion of corneal endothelial pathologies. PMID:19798505

  5. Robotic dry stripping of airframes - Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauli, Robert A.; Wittenberg, Art M.

    1989-03-01

    This paper describes a program for the development of a dust-free closed-cycle robotic system for dry stripping of airframes, designed to insure dust-free work environment and reduce plastic-media loss, the contamination risk, and the media inventory requirement. Phase I of the program involved building a prototype of the proposed robotic arm and its dust enclosure to prove basic automation concepts, showing reasonable paint removal rate from a curved surface, and establishing that the process is dust-free and recovers plastic media in a closed-cycle fashion. This paper contains calculations on the effect of different blasting parameters in order to determine optimum values required for the completion of Phase I. Also presented is the progress achieved by the Phase II of the program, which is to prove the total concept by building the complete system and demonstrating its capability.

  6. Method and apparatus for corrugating strips

    DOEpatents

    Day, Jack R.; Curtis, Charles H.

    1983-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a machine for transversely corrugating a continuous strip of metallic foil. The product foil comprises a succession of alternately disposed corrugations, each defining in cross section, a major segment of a circle. The foil to be corrugated is positioned to extend within a vertical passage in the machine. The walls of the passage are heated to promote the desired deformation of the foil. Foil-deforming rollers are alternately passed obliquely across the passage to respectively engage transverse sections of the foil. The rollers and their respective section of deformed foil comprise a stacked assembly which is moved incrementally through the heated passageway. As the assembly emerges from the passageway, the rollers spill from the corrugated foil and are recovered for re-use.

  7. Method and apparatus for corrugating strips

    DOEpatents

    Day, J.R.; Curtis, C.H.

    1981-10-27

    The invention relates to a method and a machine for transversely corrugating a continuous strip of metallic foil. The product foil comprises a succession of alternately disposed corrugations, each defining in a cross section, a major segment of a circle. The foil to be corrugated is positioned to extend within a vertical passage in the machine. The walls of the passage are heated to promote the desired deformation of the foil. Foil-deforming rollers are alternately passed obliquely across the passage to respectively engage transverse sections of the foil. The rollers and their respective section of deformed foil comprise a stacked assembly which is moved incrementally through the heated passageway. As the assembly emerges from the passageway, the rollers spill from the corrugated foil and are recovered for re-use.

  8. [Obstetrical handbook in comic strip form].

    PubMed

    1998-04-01

    An obstetric handbook was created in comic strip form in cooperation with the Ministry of Health in the region of Segou, Mali, for training of traditional midwives living far from community health centers. The drawings illustrate pregnancies at risk that the midwife should be able to identify in order to advise women to stay near the health facility before onset of labor. Drawings indicate pregnancies that are at risk because of the following: small stature, limping as a result of polio or sciatic paralysis, high parity, prior cesarean delivery, heart disease, overly large uterus, or prior stillbirth. Serious complications requiring referral to a health service are also illustrated and include severe anemia, genital bleeding, and signs of toxemia and edema. The midwife should accompany the woman during transport.

  9. Multistability of spontaneously curved anisotropic strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Luca; Mahadevan, L.

    2010-03-01

    Multistable structures are elastic objects, typically composite plates or shells, with more than one stable conformation. The common tape measure or the steel band enclosed inside the bright fabric cover of a ``slap bracelet'', are classic examples of plates that exhibit two stable configurations: folded and unfolded. Multistable structures have many potential applications, from the simple construction of objects of adjustable size to the design of mechanical devices that switch between a discrete number of states. In this talk I will discuss multistability in a quasi-one-dimensional anisotropic strip. The reduced dimensionality allows an exact analytical treatment in terms of the classic F"oppl - von K'arm'an theory of plates. In the conclusions I will comment on the possible occurrence of multistability in biological materials.

  10. Dynamic underground stripping. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) is a combination of technologies targeted to remediate soil and ground water contaminated with organic compounds. DUS is effective both above and below the water table and is especially well suited for sites with interbedded sand and clay layers. The main technologies comprising DUS are steam injection at the periphery of a contaminated area to heat permeable subsurface areas, vaporize volatile compounds bound to the soil, and drive contaminants to centrally located vacuum extraction wells; electrical heating of less permeable sediments to vaporize contaminants and drive them into the steam zone; and underground imaging such as Electrical Resistance Tomography to delineate heated areas to ensure total cleanup and process control. A full-scale demonstration was conducted on a gasoline spill site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California from November 1992 through December 1993.

  11. Square-wave stripping voltammetric determination of caffeic acid on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide-Nafion composite film.

    PubMed

    Filik, Hayati; Çetintaş, Gamze; Avan, Asiye Aslıhan; Aydar, Sevda; Koç, Serkan Naci; Boz, İsmail

    2013-11-15

    An electrochemical sensor composed of Nafion-graphene nanocomposite film for the voltammetric determination of caffeic acid (CA) was studied. A Nafion graphene oxide-modified glassy carbon electrode was fabricated by a simple drop-casting method and then graphene oxide was electrochemically reduced over the glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical analysis method was based on the adsorption of caffeic acid on Nafion/ER-GO/GCE and then the oxidation of CA during the stripping step. The resulting electrode showed an excellent electrocatalytical response to the oxidation of caffeic acid (CA). The electrochemistry of caffeic acid on Nafion/ER-GO modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) were studied by cyclic voltammetry and square-wave adsorption stripping voltammetry (SW-AdSV). At optimized test conditions, the calibration curve for CA showed two linear segments: the first linear segment increased from 0.1 to 1.5 and second linear segment increased up to 10 µM. The detection limit was determined as 9.1×10(-8) mol L(-1) using SW-AdSV. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used to determine CA in white wine samples.

  12. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray; Watson, Tony Leroy

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  13. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-12-31

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with super-heated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200{degrees}C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220{degrees}C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: (1) At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. (2) There is no significant temperature effect. (3) Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. (4) Pores smaller than 15 {Angstrom} do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  14. High temperature adsorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bertani, R.; Parisi, L.; Perini, R.; Tarquini, B.

    1996-01-24

    Adsorption phenomena are a rich and rather new field of study in geothermal research, in particular at very high temperature. ENEL is interested in the exploitation of geothermal regions with superheated steam, and it is important to understand the behavior of water-rock interaction. We have analyzed in the 170-200 °C temperature range four samples of Monteverdi cuttings; the next experimental effort will be at 220 °C and over in 1996. The first results of the 1995 runs are collected in this paper. We can highlight four main items: 1. At relative pressures over 0.6 the capillarity forces are very important. 2. There is no significant temperature effect. 3. Adsorbed water can be present, and it is able to multiply by a factor of 15 the estimated reserve of super-heated steam only. 4. Pores smaller than 15 Å do not contribute to the adsorbed mass.

  15. Predicting pesticide removal efficacy of vegetated filter strips: A meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huajin; Grieneisen, Michael L; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-04-01

    Vegetated Filter Strips (VFS's) are widely used for alleviating agricultural pesticide loadings to surface water bodies. However, effective tools are lacking to quantify the performance of VFS's in reducing off-site pesticide transport. In this study, we applied meta-regression to develop a model for predicting VFS pesticide retention efficiency based on hydrologic responses of VFS's, incoming pollutant characteristics and the interaction within and between these two factor groups (R(2)=0.83). In cross-validation analysis, our model (Q(2)=0.81) outperformed the existing pesticide retention module of VFSMOD (Q(2)=0.72) by explicitly accounting for interaction effect and the categorical effect of pesticide adsorption properties. Based on the 181 data points studied, infiltration had a leading, positive influence on pesticide retention, followed by sedimentation and interaction between the two. Interaction between infiltration and pesticide adsorption properties was also prominent, as the influence of infiltration was significantly lower for strongly adsorbed pesticides. In addition, the clay content of incoming sediment was negatively associated with pesticide retention. Our model is not only valuable in predicting VFS performance, but also provides a quantitative characterization of the interacting VFS processes, thereby facilitating a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Well-defined critical association concentration and rapid adsorption at the air/water interface of a short amphiphilic polymer, amphipol A8-35: a study by Förster resonance energy transfer and dynamic surface tension measurements.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Fabrice; Popot, Jean-Luc; Tribet, Christophe

    2012-07-17

    Amphipols (APols) are short amphiphilic polymers designed to handle membrane proteins (MPs) in aqueous solutions as an alternative to small surfactants (detergents). APols adsorb onto the transmembrane, hydrophobic surface of MPs, forming small, water-soluble complexes, in which the protein is biochemically stabilized. At variance with MP/detergent complexes, MP/APol ones remain stable even at extreme dilutions. Pure APol solutions self-associate into well-defined micelle-like globules comprising a few APol molecules, a rather unusual behavior for amphiphilic polymers, which typically form ill-defined assemblies. The best characterized APol to date, A8-35, is a random copolymer of acrylic acid, isopropylacrylamide, and octylacrylamide. In the present work, the concentration threshold for self-association of A8-35 in salty buffer (NaCl 100 mM, Tris/HCl 20 mM, pH 8.0) has been studied by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements and tensiometry. In a 1:1 mol/mol mixture of APols grafted with either rhodamine or 7-nitro-1,2,3-benzoxadiazole, the FRET signal as a function of A8-35 concentration is essentially zero below a threshold concentration of 0.002 g·L(-1) and increases linearly with concentration above this threshold. This indicates that assembly takes place in a narrow concentration interval around 0.002 g·L(-1). Surface tension measurements decreases regularly with concentration until a threshold of ca. 0.004 g·L(-1), beyond which it reaches a plateau at ca. 30 mN·m(-1). Within experimental uncertainties, the two techniques thus yield a comparable estimate of the critical self-assembly concentration. The kinetics of variation of the surface tension was analyzed by dynamic surface tension measurements in the time window 10 ms-100 s. The rate of surface tension decrease was similar in solutions of A8-35 and of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate when both compounds were at a similar molar concentration of n-alkyl moieties. Overall, the

  17. Iron organic speciation determination in rainwater using cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Cheize, Marie; Sarthou, Géraldine; Croot, Peter L; Bucciarelli, Eva; Baudoux, Anne-Claire; Baker, Alex R

    2012-07-29

    A sensitive method using Competitive Ligand Exchange-Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (CLE-ACSV) has been developed to determine for the first time iron (Fe) organic speciation in rainwater over the typical natural range of pH. We have adapted techniques previously developed in other natural waters to rainwater samples, using the competing ligand 1-nitroso-2-naphthol (NN). The blank was equal to 0.17±0.05 nM (n=14) and the detection limit (DL) for labile Fe was 0.15 nM which is 10-70 times lower than that of previously published methods. The conditional stability constant for NN under rainwater conditions was calibrated over the pH range 5.52-6.20 through competition with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The calculated value of the logarithm of β'(Fe(3+)(NN)(3)) increased linearly with increasing pH according to log β'(Fe(3+)(NN)(3)) (salinity=2.9, T=20 °C). The validation of the method was carried out using desferrioxamine mesylate B (DFOB) as a natural model ligand for Fe. Adequate detection windows were defined to detect this class of ligands in rainwater with 40 μM of NN from pH 5.52 to 6.20. The concentration of Fe-complexing natural ligands was determined for the first time in three unfiltered and one filtered rainwater samples. Organic Fe-complexing ligand concentrations varied from 104.2±4.1 nM equivalent of Fe(III) to 336.2±19.0 nM equivalent of Fe(III) and the logarithm of the conditional stability constants, with respect to Fe(3+), varied from 21.1±0.2 to 22.8±0.3. This method will provide important data for improving our understanding of the role of wet deposition in the biogeochemical cycling of iron.

  18. Co-adsorption of Trichloroethylene and Arsenate by Iron-Impregnated Granular Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Deng, Baolin; Kim, Eun-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Co-adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and arsenate [As(V)] was investigated using modified granular activated carbons (GAC): untreated, sodium hypochlorite-treated (NaClO-GAC), and NaClO with iron-treated GAC (NaClO/Fe-GAC). Batch experiments of single- [TCE or As(V)] and binary- [TCE and As(V)] components solutions are evaluated through Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and adsorption kinetic tests. In the single-component system, the adsorption capacity of As(V) was increased by the NaClO-GAC and the NaClO/Fe-GAC. The untreated GAC showed a low adsorption capacity for As(V). Adsorption of TCE by the NaClO/Fe-GAC was maximized, with an increased Freundlich constant. Removal of TCE in the binary-component system was decreased 15% by the untreated GAC, and NaClO- and NaClO/Fe-GAC showed similar efficiency to the single-component system because of the different chemical status of the GAC surfaces. Results of the adsorption isotherms of As(V) in the binary-component system were similar to adsorption isotherms of the single-component system. The adsorption affinities of single- and binary-component systems corresponded with electron transfer, competitive adsorption, and physicochemical properties.

  19. Co-adsorption of Trichloroethylene and Arsenate by Iron-Impregnated Granular Activated Carbon.

    PubMed

    Deng, Baolin; Kim, Eun-Sik

    2016-05-01

    Co-adsorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and arsenate [As(V)] was investigated using modified granular activated carbons (GAC): untreated, sodium hypochlorite-treated (NaClO-GAC), and NaClO with iron-treated GAC (NaClO/Fe-GAC). Batch experiments of single- [TCE or As(V)] and binary- [TCE and As(V)] components solutions are evaluated through Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and adsorption kinetic tests. In the single-component system, the adsorption capacity of As(V) was increased by the NaClO-GAC and the NaClO/Fe-GAC. The untreated GAC showed a low adsorption capacity for As(V). Adsorption of TCE by the NaClO/Fe-GAC was maximized, with an increased Freundlich constant. Removal of TCE in the binary-component system was decreased 15% by the untreated GAC, and NaClO- and NaClO/Fe-GAC showed similar efficiency to the single-component system because of the different chemical status of the GAC surfaces. Results of the adsorption isotherms of As(V) in the binary-component system were similar to adsorption isotherms of the single-component system. The adsorption affinities of single- and binary-component systems corresponded with electron transfer, competitive adsorption, and physicochemical properties. PMID:27131303

  20. Robust design of binary countercurrent adsorption separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Storti, G. ); Mazzotti, M.; Morbidelli, M.; Carra, S. )

    1993-03-01

    The separation of a binary mixture, using a third component having intermediate adsorptivity as desorbent, in a four section countercurrent adsorption separation unit is considered. A procedure for the optimal and robust design of the unit is developed in the frame of Equilibrium Theory, using a model where the adsorption equilibria are described through the constant selectivity stoichiometric model, while mass-transfer resistances and axial mixing are neglected. By requiring that the unit achieves complete separation, it is possible to identify a set of implicity constraints on the operating parameters, that is, the flow rate ratios in the four sections of the unit. From these constraints explicit bounds on the operating parameters are obtained, thus yielding a region in the operating parameters space, which can be drawn a priori in terms of the adsorption equilibrium constants and the feed composition. This result provides a very convenient tool to determine both optimal and robust operating conditions. The latter issue is addressed by first analyzing the various possible sources of disturbances, as well as their effect on the separation performance. Next, the criteria for the robust design of the unit are discussed. Finally, these theoretical findings are compared with a set of experimental results obtained in a six port simulated moving bed adsorption separation unit operated in the vapor phase.

  1. Characterization and Calibration of Large Area Resistive Strip Micromegas Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lösel, Philipp; ATLAS Muon Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Resistive strip Micromegas detectors have been tested extensively as small detectors of about 10×10 cm2 in size and they work reliably at high rates of 100 kHz/cm2 and above. Tracking resolution well below 100 μm has been observed for 100 GeV muons and pions. Micromegas detectors are meanwhile proposed as large area muon precision trackers of 2-3 m2 in size. To investigate possible differences between small and large detectors, a 1 m2 detector with 2048 resistive strips at a pitch of 450 μm was studied in the LMU Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility (CRMF) using two 4×2.2 m2 large Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for cosmic muon reference tracking. A segmentation of the resistive strip anode plane in 57.6 mm×93 mm large areas has been realized by the readout of 128 strips with one APV25 chip each and by eleven 93 mm broad trigger scintillators placed along the readout strips. This allows for mapping of homogeneity in pulse height and efficiency, determination of signal propagation along the 1 m long anode strips and calibration of the position of the anode strips.

  2. A preference test for sweet taste that uses edible strips.

    PubMed

    Smutzer, Gregory; Patel, Janki Y; Stull, Judith C; Abarintos, Ray A; Khan, Neiladri K; Park, Kevin C

    2014-02-01

    A novel delivery method is described for the rapid determination of taste preferences for sweet taste in humans. This forced-choice paired comparison approach incorporates the non-caloric sweetener sucralose into a set of one-inch square edible strips for the rapid determination of sweet taste preferences. When compared to aqueous sucrose solutions, significantly lower amounts of sucralose were required to identify the preference for sweet taste. The validity of this approach was determined by comparing sweet taste preferences obtained with five different sucralose-containing edible strips to a set of five intensity-matched sucrose solutions. When compared to the solution test, edible strips required approximately the same number of steps to identify the preferred amount of sweet taste stimulus. Both approaches yielded similar distribution patterns for the preferred amount of sweet taste stimulus. In addition, taste intensity values for the preferred amount of sucralose in strips were similar to that of sucrose in solution. The hedonic values for the preferred amount of sucralose were lower than for sucrose, but the taste quality of the preferred sucralose strip was described as sweet. When taste intensity values between sucralose strips and sucralose solutions containing identical amounts of taste stimulus were compared, sucralose strips produced a greater taste intensity and more positive hedonic response. A preference test that uses edible strips for stimulus delivery should be useful for identifying preferences for sweet taste in young children, and in clinical populations. This test should also be useful for identifying sweet taste preferences outside of the lab or clinic. Finally, edible strips should be useful for developing preference tests for other primary taste stimuli and for taste mixtures.

  3. The looped adhesive strip: An example of coplanar delamination interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bottega, W. J.

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of peeling and debonding of thin layers is a subject of interest to those concerned with adhesives, thin films, and layered materials. In recent years much attention has been focused on such problems as a result of increased interest and application of advanced composites and thin film coatings. A related problem which is of interest for its own sake but also represents a simple example of a tangled adhesive strip and of coplanar delamination interaction, is the problem of a looped adhesive strip. This is the subject of the present study. Researchers consider here the problem of an elastic strip which possesses an adherend on (at least) one of its surfaces. If the strip is deformed so that two portions of such a surface are brought into contact, a position of the strip becomes bonded and a loop is formed. Researchers are interested in determining the equilibrium configuration of such a strip and investigating the behavior of the strip when its edges are pulled apart. The problem is approached as a moving interior boundary problem in the calculus of variations with the strip modeled as an inextensible elastica and the bond strength characterized by its surface energy. A Griffith type energy criterion is employed for debonding, and solutions corresponding to the problem of interest obtained. The solution obtained will be seen to predict the interesting phenomenon of bond point propagation, as well as the more standard peeling type behavior. Numerical results demonstrating the phenomena of interest are presented as well and will be seen to reveal both stable and unstable propagation of the boundaries of the bonded portion of the strip, depending upon the loading conditions.

  4. The water crisis in the gaza strip: prospects for resolution.

    PubMed

    Weinthal, E; Vengosh, A; Marei, A; Kloppmann, W

    2005-01-01

    Israel and the Palestinian Authority share the southern Mediterranean coastal aquifer. Long-term overexploitation in the Gaza Strip has resulted in a decreasing water table, accompanied by the degradation of its water quality. Due to high levels of salinity and nitrate and boron pollution, most of the ground water is inadequate for both domestic and agricultural consumption. The rapid rate of population growth in the Gaza Strip and dependence upon ground water as a single water source present a serious challenge for future political stability and economic development. Here, we integrate the results of geochemical studies and numerical modeling to postulate different management scenarios for joint management between Israel and the Palestinian Authority. The chemical and isotopic data show that most of the salinity phenomena in the Gaza Strip are derived from the natural flow of saline ground water from Israel toward the Gaza Strip. As a result, the southern coastal aquifer does not resemble a classic "upstream-downstream" dispute because Israel's pumping of the saline ground water reduces the salinization rates of ground water in the Gaza Strip. Simulation of different pumping scenarios using a monolayer, hydrodynamic, two-dimensional model (MARTHE) confirms the hypothesis that increasing pumping along the Gaza Strip border combined with a moderate reduction of pumping within the Gaza Strip would improve ground water quality within the Gaza Strip. We find that pumping the saline ground water for a source of reverse-osmosis desalination and then supplying the desalinated water to the Gaza Strip should be an essential component of a future joint management strategy between Israel and the Palestinian Authority.

  5. Random sequential adsorption on fractals.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Michal; Barbasz, Jakub

    2012-07-28

    Irreversible adsorption of spheres on flat collectors having dimension d < 2 is studied. Molecules are adsorbed on Sierpinski's triangle and carpet-like fractals (1 < d < 2), and on general Cantor set (d < 1). Adsorption process is modeled numerically using random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. The paper concentrates on measurement of fundamental properties of coverages, i.e., maximal random coverage ratio and density autocorrelation function, as well as RSA kinetics. Obtained results allow to improve phenomenological relation between maximal random coverage ratio and collector dimension. Moreover, simulations show that, in general, most of known dimensional properties of adsorbed monolayers are valid for non-integer dimensions.

  6. Evaluating non-equilibrum herbicides transport in undisturbed grassed buffer strips soil columns.

    PubMed

    Martinez Cordon, M J; Yra, A; Pot, V; Benoit, P

    2003-01-01

    Possible contamination of water resources by applied pesticides (including insecticides and herbicides) is a problem currently. Grassed buffer strips have been considered to limit pesticide transfer to surface waters by reducing run-off and erosion. As reduction of run-off mainly involves infiltration in the grassed strip soils, possibility of groundwater contamination by rapid transfer of pesticides via the numerous root channels and macropores presents in grassed soils can not be excluded so far. The beneficial impact of high pesticide retention in the superficial horizons of these soils, related to their high organic matter content, could therefore be strongly reduced by the occurrence of preferential flows. Displacement studies on leaching of bromide (water tracer) and two herbicides, metribuzin (weakly adsorbed) and isoproturon (moderately adsorbed) were conducted in two undisturbed soil columns (length 30 cm, diameter 14 cm) collected from La Jaillière (Loire Atlantique, France) under non saturated conditions. The infiltration fluxes, delivered through a rainfall simulator, were 1.5 and 3 mm/h for one of the columns and 0.6, 1.5 and 3 mm/h for the second column. We obtained asymmetrical shapes of the breakthrough curves, with early breakthrough and increased tailing, qualitatively indicating the presence of preferential flow and confirming the risk of pesticide vertical transport through grassed strips superficial soil horizons. The results showed that leaching of both herbicides increased with the intensity of rainfall applied. This could be explained by a decrease of herbicides sorption due to a lower residence time in the soil.

  7. Enhancement Of Water-Jet Stripping Of Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, Steven A.; Shockney, Charles H.; Bates, Keith E.; Shalala, John P.; Daniels, Larry S.

    1995-01-01

    Improved robotic high-pressure-water-jet system strips foam insulation from parts without removing adjacent coating materials like paints, primers, and sealants. Even injects water into crevices and blind holes to clean out foam, without harming adjacent areas. Eliminates both cost of full stripping and recoating and problem of disposing of toxic solutions used in preparation for coating. Developed for postflight refurbishing of aft skirts of booster rockets. System includes six-axis robot provided with special end effector and specially written control software, called Aftfoam. Adaptable to cleaning and stripping in other industrial settings.

  8. Intelligent control of robotic paint stripping using color vision feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, D. N.; Rogers, T. W.

    1993-08-01

    The paper describes a color-based machine vision system which is capable of functioning as a real-time process control system for a robotic work cell currently being developed for stripping paint from both large and small aircraft. The system is based on hue, saturation, and intensity representation of the image data and on rapid analysis techniques and is capable of differentiating between painted, primed, stripped, and roughened aircraft surfaces. These techniques were tested on a large number of aircraft paint schemes under actual stripping conditions, and were found to be fast and robust enough for real-time process control.

  9. Autoionization of He atoms by partially stripped ion impact

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Olson, R.E.

    2005-08-15

    A study of the autoionization process induced by partially stripped ion impact is performed. Electron spectra in momentum space are predicted within a classical model for partially stripped ions. The results are compared with those obtained for pure Coulomb-like projectiles. A quantum-mechanical extension of the Barrachina-Macek model is proposed for partially stripped projectiles. Structure on the electron angular distribution arising in quantum and classical treatments is identified and compared. The presence of rainbow scattering interference is observed in the binary ring profile of the outgoing autoionized electrons for positive-ion impact.

  10. Automated strip mine and reclamation mapping from ERTS. [Ohio coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettyjohn, W. A.; Rogers, R. H.; Reed, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    In response to the urgent need for a faster and more economical means of generating strip mine and reclamation maps, a study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of using ERTS computer compatible tape for automatic mapping. The procedure uses computer target spectral recognition techniques as a basis for classification. The area encompassed by this investigation includes five counties in eastern Ohio that comprise nearly 7,500 square kilometers (3,000 square miles). The counties have been disrupted by coal mining since the early 1800's, and strip mining has been practiced in all of them. The environmental effects of strip mining are also discussed.

  11. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, F.J. Jr.

    1983-06-16

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  12. Reductive stripping process for uranium recovery from organic extracts

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, Jr., Fred J.

    1985-01-01

    In the reductive stripping of uranium from an organic extractant in a uranium recovery process, the use of phosphoric acid having a molarity in the range of 8 to 10 increases the efficiency of the reductive stripping and allows the strip step to operate with lower aqueous to organic recycle ratios and shorter retention time in the mixer stages. Under these operating conditions, less solvent is required in the process, and smaller, less expensive process equipment can be utilized. The high strength H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 is available from the evaporator stage of the process.

  13. Rapid analytical detection of microcystins using gold colloidal immunochromatographic strip.

    PubMed

    Pyo, Dongjin; Choi, Jongchon; Hong, Jonguk; Oo, Hlaing Hlaing

    2006-01-01

    Routine monitoring of microcystin in natural waters is difficult because the concentration of the toxin is low and the detection method is usually complicated. We developed a rapid analytical detection method of microcystins gold colloidal immunochromatogeraphic strip. The sensitivity of the strip is about 1 ng/mL for microcystin LR; it is able to distinguish visually among different concentrations of microcystin solutions. The developed gold colloidal strip can detect microcystins within 15 min and does not require either a complicated extraction system, or trained or qualified experts.

  14. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  15. A generalized adsorption-phase transition model to describe adsorption rates in flexible metal organic framework RPM3-Zn.

    PubMed

    Lueking, Angela D; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Sircar, Sarmishtha; Malencia, Christopher; Wang, Hao; Li, Jing

    2016-03-14

    Flexible gate-opening metal organic frameworks (GO-MOFs) expand or contract to minimize the overall free energy of the system upon accommodation of an adsorbate. The thermodynamics of the GO process are well described by a number of models, but the kinetics of the process are relatively unexplored. A flexible GO-MOF, RPM3-Zn, exhibits a significant induction period for opening by N2 and Ar at low temperatures, both above and below the GO pressure. A similar induction period is not observed for H2 or O2 at comparable pressures and temperatures, suggesting the rate of opening is strongly influenced by the gas-surface interaction rather than an external stress. The induction period leads to severe mass transfer limitations for adsorption and over-prediction of the gate-opening pressure. After review of a number of existing adsorption rate models, we find that none adequately describe the experimental rate data and similar timescales for diffusion and opening invalidate prior reaction-diffusion models. Statistically, the rate data are best described by a compressed exponential function. The resulting fitted parameters exceed the expectations for adsorption but fall within those expected for phase transition. By treating adsorption as a phase transition, we generalize the Avrami theory of phase transition kinetics to describe adsorption in both rigid and flexible hosts. The generalized theory is consistent with observed experimental trends relating to induction period, temperature, pressure, and gas-substrate interaction.

  16. DFT-Derived Force Fields for Modeling Hydrocarbon Adsorption in MIL-47(V).

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R; Sholl, David S

    2015-08-01

    Generic force fields such as UFF and DREIDING are widely used for predicting molecular adsorption and diffusion in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), but the accuracy of these force fields is unclear. We describe a general framework for developing transferable force fields for modeling the adsorption of alkanes in a nonflexible MIL-47(V) MOF using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. By calculating the interaction energies for a large number of energetically favorable adsorbate configurations using DFT, we obtain a force field that gives good predictions of adsorption isotherms, heats of adsorption, and diffusion properties for a wide range of alkanes and alkenes in MIL-47(V). The force field is shown to be transferable to related materials such as MIL-53(Cr) and is used to calculate the free-energy differences for the experimentally observed phases of MIL-53(Fe).

  17. Adsorption of molecular oxygen on VIIIB transition metal-doped graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehnia, F.; Seifi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of molecular oxygen with a triplet ground state on Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Ru-, Rh-, Pd-, OS-, Ir- and Pt-doped graphene is studied using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The calculations show that O2 molecule is chemisorbed on the doped graphene sheets with large adsorption energies ranging from -0.653 eV to -1.851 eV and the adsorption process is irreversible. Mulliken atomic charge analysis of the structure shows that charge transfer from doped graphene sheets to O2 molecule. The amounts of transferred charge are between 0.375e- to 0.650e-, indicating a considerable change in the structures conductance. These results imply that the effect of O2 adsorption on transition metal-doped graphene structures can alter the possibility of using these materials as a toxic-gas (carbon monoxide, hydrogen fluoride, etc.) sensor.

  18. Adsorption of Carbon Dioxide by MIL-101(Cr): Regeneration Conditions and Influence of Flue Gas Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Ning, Liqi; Zheng, Shudong; Tao, Mengna; Shi, Yao; He, Yi

    2013-01-01

    MIL-101(Cr) has drawn much attention due to its high stability compared with other metal-organic frameworks. In this study, three trace flue gas contaminants (H2O, NO, SO2) were each added to a 10 vol% CO2/N2 feed flow and found to have a minimal impact on the adsorption capacity of CO2. In dynamic CO2 regeneration experiments, complete regeneration occurred in 10 min at 328 K for temperature swing adsorption-N2-stripping under a 50 cm3/min N2 flow and at 348 K for vacuum-temperature swing adsorption at 20 KPa. Almost 99% of the pre-regeneration adsorption capacity was preserved after 5 cycles of adsorption/desorption under a gas flow of 10 vol% CO2, 100 ppm SO2, 100 ppm NO, and 10% RH, respectively. Strong resistance to flue gas contaminants, mild recovery conditions, and excellent recycling efficiency make MIL-101(Cr) an attractive adsorbent support for CO2 capture. PMID:24107974

  19. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  20. Branched pore kinetic model analysis of geosmin adsorption on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2009-07-01

    Super-powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) is activated carbon of much finer particle size than powdered activated carbon (PAC). Geosmin is a naturally occurring taste and odor compound that impairs aesthetic quality in drinking water. Experiments on geosmin adsorption on S-PAC and PAC were conducted, and the results using adsorption kinetic models were analyzed. PAC pulverization, which produced the S-PAC, did not change geosmin adsorption capacity, and geosmin adsorption capacities did not differ between S-PAC and PAC. Geosmin adsorption kinetics, however, were much higher on S-PAC than on PAC. A solution to the branched pore kinetic model (BPKM) was developed, and experimental adsorption kinetic data were analyzed by BPKM and by a homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM). The HSDM describing the adsorption behavior of geosmin required different surface diffusivity values for S-PAC and PAC, which indicated a decrease in surface diffusivity apparently associated with activated carbon particle size. The BPKM, consisting of macropore diffusion followed by mass transfer from macropore to micropore, successfully described the batch adsorption kinetics on S-PAC and PAC with the same set of model parameter values, including surface diffusivity. The BPKM simulation clearly showed geosmin removal was improved as activated carbon particle size decreased. The simulation also implied that the rate-determining step in overall mass transfer shifted from intraparticle radial diffusion in macropores to local mass transfer from macropore to micropore. Sensitivity analysis showed that adsorptive removal of geosmin improved with decrease in activated carbon particle size down to 1microm, but further particle size reduction produced little improvement.

  1. Unstable strip resonators with misaligned circular mirrors.

    PubMed

    Santana, C; Felsen, L B

    1978-08-01

    The waveguide approach developed previously by the authors is here applied to unstable strip resonators with unequal sharp-edged circular mirrors that have been tilted with respect to the resonator axis. An equivalent resonator with nontilted mirrors is defined wherein the mirror edges form asymmetrically placed terminations of the open-ended transverse waveguide. The eigenmode losses are found by calculating the waveguide mode reflection coefficients for each pair of edges and inserting these into the previously derived resonance equation. Numerical calculations for the low-loss detached mode are presented for the special case of symmetrical resonators with equally tilted mirrors since results for this configuration, for moderately large Fresnel numbers, have previously been given by Sanderson and Streifer. Our solutions agree with those of Sanderson and Streifer but accommodate also the range of large Fresnel numbers. It is found that misalignment introduces additional ripples into the power loss vs Fresnel number curves. A ray-optical interpretation in terms of edge diffraction is shown to account for this behavior. PMID:20203787

  2. An improved rolled strip pulse forming line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Song; Qian, Bao-Liang; Yang, Han-Wu; Gao, Jing-Ming; Liu, Zhao-Xi

    2013-06-01

    The rolled strip pulse forming line (RSPFL) has advantages of compactness, portability, and long pulse achievability which could well meet the requirements of industrial application of the pulse power technology. In this paper, an improved RSPFL with an additional insulator between the grounded conductors is investigated numerically and experimentally. Results demonstrate that the jitter on the flat-top of the output voltage waveform is reduced to 3.8% due to the improved structure. Theoretical analysis shows that the electromagnetic coupling between the conductors of the RSPFL strongly influences the output voltage waveform. Therefore, the new structure was designed to minimize the detrimental effect of the electromagnetic coupling. Simulation results show that the electromagnetic coupling can be efficiently reduced in the improved RSPFL. Experimental results illustrate that the improved RSPFL, with dimensions and weight of Φ 290 × 250 mm and 16 kg, when used as a simple pulse forming line, could generate a well shaped quasi-square pulse with output power of hundreds of MW and pulse duration of 250 ns. Importantly, the improved RSPFL was successfully used as a Blumlein pulse forming line, and a 10.8 kV, 260 ns quasi-square pulse was obtained on a 2 Ω dummy load. Experiments show reasonable agreement with numerical analysis.

  3. Semiautomatic reconstruction of strip-shredded documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smet, Patrick; De Bock, Johan; Philips, Wilfried

    2005-03-01

    Until recently, the forensic or investigative reconstruction of shredded documents has always been dismissed as an important but unsolvable problem. Manual reassembly of the physical remnants can always be considered, but for large amounts of shreds this problem can quickly become an intangible task that requires vast amounts of time and/or personnel. In this paper we propose and discuss several image processing techniques that can be used to enable the reconstruction of strip-shredded documents stored within a database of digital images. The technical content of this paper mainly revolves around the use of feature based matching and grouping methods for classifying the initial database of shreds, and the subsequent procedure for computing more accurate pairing results for the obtained classes of shreds. Additionally, we discuss the actual reassembly of the different shreds on top of a common image canvas. We illustrate our algorithms with example matching and reconstruction results obtained for a real shred database containing various types of shredded document pages. Finally, we briefly discuss the impact of our findings on secure document management strategies and the possibilities for applying the proposed techniques within the context of forensic investigation.

  4. Optimization of Strip Isolation for Silicon Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentan, M.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Irmler, C.; Huemer, E.; Treberspurg, W.

    Precision machines like electron-positron-colliders and b-factories demand for low material budget and high position resolution when it comes to particle tracking. A low material budget can be achieved by using thin double-sided silicon detectors (DSSDs) and lightweight construction. Since thin sensors give low signals, one has to be very careful to achieve high charge collection efficiency, which requires an appropriate sensor design. In this paper we present a detailed investigation of different p-stop patterns used for strip isolation on the n-side of double-sided microstrip sensors with n-type bulk. We designed test sensors featuring the common p-stop, the atoll p-stop and a combined p-stop pattern, and for every pattern four different geometric layouts were considered. These sensors were tested at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland) in a 120 GeV/c hadron beam. Then they were irradiated to 700 kGy with a 60Co source and subsequently tested in the same beam as before. One geometric layout of the atoll p-stop pattern turned out to perform best, both before and after irradiation. The conclusions of these tests will be applied to the design of DSSDs for the Belle II experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan).

  5. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  6. Fractional quantum conductance values in Au nanoelectrodes due to hydrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, M.; Martín-González, M. S.; Costa-Krämer, J. L.

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in gold nanocontact electrodes in electrochemical solution is experimentally discerned. This is performed with gold nanocontact conductance histograms in an electrochemical environment in which both the electrochemical potential and the electrolyte type are varied. Different salts, acids, and hydrogen peroxide electrolytes are studied. Salts and acids exhibit at negative electrochemical potentials different fractional quantum conductance histograms peaks associated to extra stable structures due to H adsorption while these peaks do not appear for H 2O 2 where electron transfer between solution and electrodes occurs without hydrogen formation or hydrogen adsorption on the gold electrode.

  7. NO adsorption and dissociation on palladium clusters: The importance of charged state and metal doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Zhang, Li Mei; Kong, Chun Cai; Yang, Zhi Mao; Chen, Yong Mei

    2016-08-01

    The NO adsorption and dissociation on neutral, charged and Ni-doped Pd13 clusters were studied by using density functional calculations. Our results revealed that NO always prefers to adsorb on the hollow site rather than the top or bridge sites. However, the charge state and Ni doping remarkably influence NO adsorption energy, dissociation barrier and reaction energy. The reaction on Pd13- has the lowest energy barrier and largest reaction energy. The Hirshfeld charge analysis discloses that the origin of the catalytic activity difference is the charge transfer from clusters to NO in the metastable NO adsorption state.

  8. Weber Blockade Theory of Magnetoresistance Oscillations in Superconducting Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, David; Refael, Gil; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2011-07-01

    Recent experiments on the conductance of thin, narrow superconducting strips have found periodic fluctuations, as a function of the perpendicular magnetic field, with a period corresponding to approximately two flux quanta per strip area [A. Johansson , Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 116805 (2005)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.116805]. We argue that the low-energy degrees of freedom responsible for dissipation correspond to vortex motion. Using vortex-charge duality, we show that the superconducting strip behaves as the dual of a quantum dot, with the vortices, magnetic field, and bias current respectively playing the roles of the electrons, gate voltage, and source-drain voltage. In the bias-current versus magnetic-field plane, the strip conductance displays regions of small vortex conductance (i.e., small electrical resistance) that we term “Weber blockade” diamonds, which are dual to Coulomb blockade diamonds in quantum dots.

  9. Analysis of a unidirectional, symmetric buffer strip laminate with damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharani, L. R.; Goree, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A method for predicting the fracture behavior of hybrid buffer strip laminates is presented in which the classical shear-lag model is used to represent the shear stress distribution between adjacent fibers. The method is demonstrated by applying it to a notched graphite/epoxy laminate, and the results show clearly the manner in which the most efficient combination of buffer strip properties can be selected in order to arrest the crack. The ultimate failure stress of the laminate is plotted vs the buffer strip width. It is shown that in the case of graphite-epoxy and S-glass epoxy laminates, the optimum buffer strip spacing to width ratio should be about four to one.

  10. 40. STEEL, INGOTS, ON INGOT BUGGIES, WAIT TO BE STRIPPED. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. STEEL, INGOTS, ON INGOT BUGGIES, WAIT TO BE STRIPPED. STRIPPER CRANE CAN BE SEEN AT THE END OF THE RAILROAD TRACKS, AT CENTER. - Corrigan, McKinney Steel Company, 3100 East Forty-fifth Street, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  11. Stability of flow over axisymmetric bodies with porous suction strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Reed, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Linear triple deck, closed form solutions for mean-flow quantities are developed for axisymmetric incompressible flow past a body with porous strips. The solutions account for upstream influence and are linear superpositions of the flow past the body without suction plus the perturbations due to the suction strips. Flow past the suctionless body is calculated using the Transition Analysis Program System, and a simple linear optimization scheme to determine number, spacing, and mass flow rate through the strips on an axisymmetric body is developed using the linear, triple-deck, closed-form solutions. The theory is demonstrated by predicting optimal strip distributions, and the effect of various adverse pressure-gradient situations on stability is studied.

  12. Electroplating and stripping copper on molybdenum and niobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Molybdenum and niobium are often electroplated and subsequently stripped of copper. Since general standard plating techniques produce poor quality coatings, general procedures have been optimized and specified to give good results.

  13. Results of Laboratory Testing of Advanced Power Strips: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, L.; Sparn, B.

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes the results of a laboratory investigation to evaluate the technical performance of advanced power strip (APS) devices when subjected to a range of home entertainment center and home office usage scenarios.

  14. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  15. PDMS compound adsorption in context.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianzhen; Schwartz, Michael; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    Soft lithography of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), an elastomeric polymer, has enabled rapid and inexpensive fabrication of microfluidic devices for various biotechnology applications. However, concerns remain about adsorption of compounds on PDMS surfaces because of its porosity and hydrophobicity. Here, the adsorption of 2 small fluorescent dyes of different hydrophobicity (calcein and 5- (and 6-)carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR)) on PDMS surface has been systematically characterized, and PDMS adsorption has been compared with 2 traditional substrates: glass and polystyrene. To characterize adsorption in a regimen that is more relevant to microfluidic applications, the adsorption and desorption of the 2 compounds in PDMS microfluidic channels under flow conditions were also studied. Results showed that there was minimal adsorption of the hydrophilic compound calcein on PDMS, whereas the more hydrophobic TMR adsorbed on PDMS up to 4 times of that on glass or polystyrene. Under flow conditions, the desorption profiles and times needed to drop desorbed compound concentrations to negligible levels (desorption time constant, 10-42 s) were characterized. In the worst case scenario, after a 4-min exposure to TMR, 4 min of continuous wash resulted in compound concentrations in the microchannels to drop to values below 2 x 10(- 5) of the initial concentration.

  16. Volatile organic compound adsorption in a gas-solid fluidized bed.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y L; Yan, R; Tsen, L T S; Yong, L C; Liu, M; Liang, D T

    2004-01-01

    Fluidization finds many process applications in the areas of catalytic reactions, drying, coating, combustion, gasification and microbial culturing. This work aims to compare the dynamic adsorption characteristics and adsorption rates in a bubbling fluidized bed and a fixed bed at the same gas flow-rate, gas residence time and bed height. Adsorption with 520 ppm methanol and 489 ppm isobutane by the ZSM-5 zeolite of different particle size in the two beds enabled the differentiation of the adsorption characteristics and rates due to bed type, intraparticle mass transfer and adsorbate-adsorbent interaction. Adsorption of isobutane by the more commonly used activated carbon provided the comparison of adsorption between the two adsorbent types. With the same gas residence time of 0.79 seconds in both the bubbling bed and fixed bed of the same bed size of 40 mm diameter and 48 mm height, the experimental results showed a higher rate of adsorption in the bubbling bed as compared to the fixed bed. Intraparticle mass transfer and adsorbent-adsorbate interaction played significant roles in affecting the rate of adsorption, with intraparticle mass transfer being more dominant. The bubbling bed was observed to have a steeper decline in adsorption rate with respect to increasing outlet concentration compared to the fixed bed. The adsorption capacities of zeolite for the adsorbates studied were comparatively similar in both beds; fluidizing, and using smaller particles in the bubbling bed did not increase the adsorption capacity of the ZSM-5 zeolite. The adsorption capacity of activated carbon for isobutane was much higher than the ZSM-5 zeolite for isobutane, although at a lower adsorption rate. Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy was used as an analytical tool for the quantification of gas concentration. Calibration was done using a series of standards prepared by in situ dilution with nitrogen gas, based on the ideal gas law and relating partial pressure to gas

  17. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles not only increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with the transverse velocity of the nozzle as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Since orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifice located near the center, the energy impact force of the water stream from the outer orifice is spread over a larger area than the water streams from the inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the energy impact to compensate for its wider force distribution. The total flow rate from the combination of orifices must be monitored and kept below the pump capacity while choosing an orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section, contributing to the stripping in this area while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping in the shell area at the extreme outside edge of the nozzle. From t he outer most shell to the center section, more orifices contribute to the stripping in each progressively reduced diameter shell. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation responds by graphically indicating the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The results from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  18. High Pressure Water Stripping Using Multi-Orifice Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, David

    1999-01-01

    The use of multi-orifice rotary nozzles greatly increases the speed and stripping effectiveness of high pressure water blasting systems, but also greatly increases the complexity of selecting and optimizing the operating parameters. The rotational speed of the nozzle must be coupled with its transverse velocity as it passes across the surface of the substrate being stripped. The radial and angular positions of each orifice must be included in the analysis of the nozzle configuration. Orifices at the outer edge of the nozzle head move at a faster rate than the orifices located near the center. The energy transmitted to the surface from the impact force of the water stream from an outer orifice is therefore spread over a larger area than energy from an inner orifice. Utilizing a larger diameter orifice in the outer radial positions increases the total energy transmitted from the outer orifice to compensate for the wider distribution of energy. The total flow rate from the combination of all orifices must be monitored and should be kept below the pump capacity while choosing orifice to insert in each position. The energy distribution from the orifice pattern is further complicated since the rotary path of all the orifices in the nozzle head pass through the center section. All orifices contribute to the stripping in the center of the path while only the outer most orifice contributes to the stripping at the edge of the nozzle. Additional orifices contribute to the stripping from the outer edge toward the center section. With all these parameters to configure and each parameter change affecting the others, a computer model was developed to track and coordinate these parameters. The computer simulation graphically indicates the cumulative affect from each parameter selected. The result from the proper choices in parameters is a well designed, highly efficient stripping system. A poorly chosen set of parameters will cause the nozzle to strip aggressively in some areas

  19. Ultralow Concentration Mercury Treatment Using Chemical Reduction and Air Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.

    2001-05-21

    Field, laboratory and engineering data confirmed the efficacy of chemical reduction and air stripping as an ultralow concentration mercury treatment concept for water containing Hg(II). The simple process consists of dosing the water with low levels of stannous chloride (Sn(II)) to cover the mercury to Hg degrees. This mercury species can easily be removed from the water by air stripping or sparging.

  20. Detection of Bacteria Using Inkjet-Printed Enzymatic Test Strips

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Low-cost diagnostics for drinking water contamination have the potential to save millions of lives. We report a method that uses inkjet printing to copattern an enzyme–nanoparticle sensor and substrate on a paper-based test strip for rapid detection of bacteria. A colorimetric response is generated on the paper substrate that allows visual detection of contamination without the need for expensive instrumentation. These strips demonstrate a viable nanomanufacturing strategy for low-cost bacterial detection. PMID:25318086

  1. The diagonal strip system in the Macro experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devicenzi, M.; Lipari, P.; Martellotti, G.; Pellizzoni, G.

    1988-11-01

    The Macro scintillation counter modular system with streamer tubes and track-etch detectors is presented, and the characteristics, manufacturing, and assembling of its pick-up strips are described. The strips are composed of thin conducting plates 31 mm long, spaced 2.6 mm apart, and bonded on a 1 mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ribbon with a grounded metal surface on the other side of the ribbon. The manufacturing is done by bonding the aluminum elements on the PVC ribbon.

  2. Detection of bacteria using inkjet-printed enzymatic test strips.

    PubMed

    Creran, Brian; Li, Xiaoning; Duncan, Bradley; Kim, Chang Soo; Moyano, Daniel F; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-11-26

    Low-cost diagnostics for drinking water contamination have the potential to save millions of lives. We report a method that uses inkjet printing to copattern an enzyme-nanoparticle sensor and substrate on a paper-based test strip for rapid detection of bacteria. A colorimetric response is generated on the paper substrate that allows visual detection of contamination without the need for expensive instrumentation. These strips demonstrate a viable nanomanufacturing strategy for low-cost bacterial detection.

  3. Computational Molecular Simulation of the Oxidative Adsorption of Ferrous Iron at the Hematite (001)-Water Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2015-04-30

    The interaction of Fe(II) with ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide phases is central to the biogeochemical redox chemistry of iron. Molecular simulation techniques were employed to determine the mechanisms and quantify the rates of Fe(II) oxidative adsorption at the hematite (001)-water interface. Molecular dynamics potential of mean force calculations of Fe(II) adsorbing on the hematite surface revealed the presence of three free energy minima corresponding to Fe(II) adsorbed in an outersphere complex, a monodentate innersphere complex, and a tridentate innersphere complex. The free energy barrier for adsorption from the outersphere position to the monodentate innersphere site was calculated to be similar to the activation enthalpy for water exchange around aqueous Fe(II). Adsorption at both innersphere sites was predicted to be unfavorable unless accompanied by release of protons. Molecular dynamics umbrella sampling simulations and ab initio cluster calculations were performed to determine the rates of electron transfer from Fe(II) adsorbed as an innersphere and outersphere complex. The electron transfer rates were calculated to range from 10^-4 to 10^2 s-1, depending on the adsorption site and the potential parameter set, and were generally slower than those obtained in the bulk hematite lattice. The most reliable estimate of the rate of electron transfer from Fe(II) adsorbed as an outersphere complex to lattice Fe(III) was commensurate with the rate of adsorption as an innersphere complex suggesting that adsorption does not necessarily need to precede oxidation.

  4. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  5. 26 CFR 1.1286-2 - Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments... Losses § 1.1286-2 Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments. Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments. If a Treasury Inflation-Protected Security is stripped under the Department of the...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1286-2 - Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments... Losses § 1.1286-2 Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments. Stripped inflation-protected debt instruments. If a Treasury Inflation-Protected Security is stripped under the Department of the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1286-2 - Stripped inflation-indexed debt instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stripped inflation-indexed debt instruments. 1... Losses § 1.1286-2 Stripped inflation-indexed debt instruments. Stripped inflation-indexed debt instruments. If a Treasury Inflation-Indexed Security is stripped under the Department of the...

  8. Ammonia stripping for enhanced biomethanization of piggery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Lee, Yong-Woo; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-01-15

    In this study, the effects of ammonia removal by air stripping as a pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of piggery wastewater were investigated. Ammonia stripping results indicated that ammonia removal was strongly dependent on pH and aeration rate, and the ammonia removal rate followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics. A significant enhancement of biomethanization was observed for wastewaters of which ammonia was air-stripped at pH 9.5 and pH 10.0. The methane productivity increased from 0.23 ± 0.08 L CH(4)/Ld of the control (raw piggery wastewater) to 0.75 ± 0.11 L CH(4)/Ld (ammonia-stripped at pH 9.5) and 0.57 ± 0.04 L CH(4)/Ld (ammonia-stripped at pH 10.0). However, the improvement of methane production from the piggery wastewater pretreated at pH 11.0 was negligible compared to the control, which was thought to be due to the high concentration of sodium ions supplied from sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment. From these results, it was concluded that ammonia removal through air stripping at the alkaline pH could be a viable option for preventing the failure of anaerobic digestion of the raw piggery wastewater. Additionally, it was also found that a high concentration of sodium ion originated from sodium hydroxide for pH adjustment inhibited methane production.

  9. Preliminary Design and Evaluation of Portable Electronic Flight Progress Strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doble, Nathan A.; Hansman, R. John

    2002-01-01

    There has been growing interest in using electronic alternatives to the paper Flight Progress Strip (FPS) for air traffic control. However, most research has been centered on radar-based control environments, and has not considered the unique operational needs of the airport air traffic control tower. Based on an analysis of the human factors issues for control tower Decision Support Tool (DST) interfaces, a requirement has been identified for an interaction mechanism which replicates the advantages of the paper FPS (e.g., head-up operation, portability) but also enables input and output with DSTs. An approach has been developed which uses a Portable Electronic FPS that has attributes of both a paper strip and an electronic strip. The prototype flight strip system uses Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) to replace individual paper strips in addition to a central management interface which is displayed on a desktop computer. Each PDA is connected to the management interface via a wireless local area network. The Portable Electronic FPSs replicate the core functionality of paper flight strips and have additional features which provide a heads-up interface to a DST. A departure DST is used as a motivating example. The central management interface is used for aircraft scheduling and sequencing and provides an overview of airport departure operations. This paper will present the design of the Portable Electronic FPS system as well as preliminary evaluation results.

  10. Rigorous LiDAR Strip Adjustment with Triangulated Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. J.; Xiong, X. D.; Hu, X. Y.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method. Firstly, aero-triangulation of the simultaneously obtained aerial images is conducted with a few photogrammetry-specific ground control points. Secondly, LiDAR intensity images are generated from the reflectance signals of laser foot points, and conjugate points are automatically matched between the LiDAR intensity image and the aero-triangulated aerial image. Control points used in LiDAR strip adjustment are derived from these conjugate points. Finally, LiDAR strip adjustment of real data is conducted with the POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method proposed in this paper, and comparison experiment using three-dimensional similarity transformation method is also performed. The results indicate that the POS aided LiDAR strip adjustment method can significantly correct the planimetric and vertical errors of LiDAR strips. The planimetric correction accuracy is higher than average point distance while the vertical correction accuracy is comparable to that of the result of aero-triangulation. Moreover, the proposed method is obliviously superior to the traditional three-dimensional similarity transformation method.

  11. Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

  12. Interpretation of the human skin biotribological behaviour after tape stripping

    PubMed Central

    Pailler-Mattei, C.; Guerret-Piécourt, C.; Zahouani, H.; Nicoli, S.

    2011-01-01

    The present study deals with the modification of the human skin biotribological behaviour after tape stripping. The tape-stripping procedure consists in the sequential application and removal of adhesive tapes on the skin surface in order to remove stratum corneum (SC) layers, which electrically charges the skin surface. The skin electric charges generated by tape stripping highly change the skin friction behaviour by increasing the adhesion component of the skin friction coefficient. It has been proposed to rewrite the friction adhesion component as the sum of two terms: the first classical adhesion term depending on the intrinsic shear strength, τ0, and the second term depending on the electric shear strength, τelec. The experimental results allowed to estimate a numerical value of the electric shear strength τelec. Moreover, a plan capacitor model with a dielectric material inside was used to modelize the experimental system. This physical model permitted to evaluate the friction electric force and the electric shear strength values to calculate the skin friction coefficient after the tape stripping. The comparison between the experimental and the theoretical value of the skin friction coefficient after the tape stripping has shown the importance of the electric charges on skin biotribological behaviour. The static electric charges produced by tape stripping on the skin surface are probably able to highly modify the interaction of formulations with the skin surface and their spreading properties. This phenomenon, generally overlooked, should be taken into consideration as it could be involved in alteration of drug absorption. PMID:21227961

  13. Adsorption and removal of clofibric acid and diclofenac from water with MIEX resin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xian; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Chen, Juxiang; Zhang, Yansen; Wang, Qiongfang; Lu, Yuqi

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrates the use of MIEX resin as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of clofibric acid (CA) and diclofenac (DCF). The adsorption performance of CA and DCF are investigated by a batch mode in single-component or bi-component adsorption system. Various factors influencing the adsorption of CA and DCF, including initial concentration, contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial solution pH, agitation speed, natural organic matter and coexistent anions are studied. The Langmuir model can well describe CA adsorption in single-component system, while the Freundlich model gives better fitting in bi-component system. The DCF adsorption can be well fitted by the Freundlich model in both systems. Thermodynamic analyses show that the adsorption of CA and DCF is an endothermic (ΔH(o) > 0), entropy driven (ΔS(o) > 0) process and more randomness exists in the DCF adsorption process. The values of Gibbs free energy (ΔG(o) < 0) indicate the adsorption of DCF is spontaneous but nonspontaneous (ΔG(o) > 0) for CA adsorption. The kinetic data suggest the adsorption of CA and DCF follow the pseudo-first-order model in both systems and the intra-particle is not the unique rate-limiting step. The adsorption process is controlled simultaneously by external mass transfer and surface diffusion according to the surface diffusion modified Biot number (Bis) ranging from 1.06 to 26.15. Moreover, the possible removal mechanism for CA and DCF is respectively proposed based on the ion exchange stoichiometry. PMID:27448753

  14. Application of quantum descriptors for predicting adsorption performance of starch and cyclodextrin adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Okoli, Chukwunonso Peter; Guo, Qing Jun; Adewuyi, Gregory Olufemi

    2014-01-30

    Adsorption trend of aromatic compounds on epichlorohydrin (EPI), 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), and 4,4-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) cross-linked starch and cyclodextrin adsorbents were comparatively studied by density functional theorem (DFT) based interaction descriptors and batch adsorption studies. The DFT quantum chemical descriptors predicted adsorption trend of MDI adsorbents>HDI adsorbents>EPI adsorbents. The values of the fractional number of electrons transferred (ΔN) for all the studied adsorbent-adsorbate pair were negative, indicating that the adsorbents were electron donors in the studied adsorption interaction. The batch adsorption performance for the studied cross-linked adsorbents was in agreement with the DFT predictions. Energy gap, chemical hardness, and softness showed good linear correlation (R(2)=0.8,073 ± 0.2259) to the batch adsorption performance for most of the studied adsorbent-adsorbate pairs. The present study demonstrated that DFT quantum chemical parameters are suitable adsorption descriptors for predicting adsorption performance of cross-linked adsorbents.

  15. Development of equations for differential and integral enthalpy change of adsorption for simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Do, D D; Nicholson, D; Fan, Chunyan

    2011-12-01

    We present equations to calculate the differential and integral enthalpy changes of adsorption for their use in Monte Carlo simulation. Adsorption of a system of N molecules, subject to an external potential energy, is viewed as one of transferring these molecules from a reference gas phase (state 1) to the adsorption system (state 2) at the same temperature and equilibrium pressure (same chemical potential). The excess amount adsorbed is the difference between N and the hypothetical amount of gas occupying the accessible volume of the system at the same density as the reference gas. The enthalpy change is a state function, which is defined as the difference between the enthalpies of state 2 and state 1, and the isosteric heat is defined as the negative of the derivative of this enthalpy change with respect to the excess amount of adsorption. It is suitable to determine how the system behaves for a differential increment in the excess phase adsorbed under subcritical conditions. For supercritical conditions, use of the integral enthalpy of adsorption per particle is recommended since the isosteric heat becomes infinite at the maximum excess concentration. With these unambiguous definitions we derive equations which are applicable for a general case of adsorption and demonstrate how they can be used in a Monte Carlo simulation. We apply the new equations to argon adsorption at various temperatures on a graphite surface to illustrate the need to use the correct equation to describe isosteric heat of adsorption.

  16. Subnanomolar detection limit of stripping voltammetric Ca²⁺-selective electrode: effects of analyte charge and sample contamination.

    PubMed

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Garada, Mohammed B; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasensitive ion-selective electrode measurements based on stripping voltammetry are an emerging sensor technology with low- and subnanomolar detection limits. Here, we report on stripping voltammetry of down to 0.1 nM Ca(2+) by using a thin-polymer-coated electrode and demonstrate the advantageous effects of the divalent charge on sensitivity. A simple theory predicts that the maximum concentration of an analyte ion preconcentrated in the thin membrane depends exponentially on the charge and that the current response based on exhaustive ion stripping from the thin membrane is proportional to the square of the charge. The theoretical predictions are quantitatively confirmed by using a thin ionophore-doped polymer membrane spin-coated on a conducting-polymer-modified electrode. The potentiostatic transfer of hydrophilic Ca(2+) from an aqueous sample into the hydrophobic double-polymer membrane is facilitated by an ionophore with high Ca(2+) affinity and selectivity. The resultant concentration of the Ca(2+)-ionophore complex in the ~1 μm-thick membrane can be at least 5 × 10(6) times higher than the aqueous Ca(2+) concentration. The stripping voltammetric current response to the divalent ion is enhanced to achieve a subnanomolar detection limit under the condition where a low-nanomolar detection limit is expected for a monovalent ion. Significantly, charge-dependent sensitivity is attractive for the ultrasensitive detection of multivalent ions with environmental and biomedical importance such as heavy metal ions and polyionic drugs. Importantly, this stripping voltammetric approach enables the absolute determination of subnanomolar Ca(2+) contamination in ultrapure water containing 10 mM supporting electrolytes, i.e., an 8 orders of magnitude higher background concentration. PMID:24992261

  17. Mass-Transfer-Controlled Dynamic Interfacial Tension in Microfluidic Emulsification Processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wanlu; Luo, Guangsheng

    2016-04-01

    Varied interfacial tension caused by the unsaturated adsorption of surfactants on dripping droplet surfaces is experimentally studied. The mass transfer and adsorption of surfactants, as well as the generation of fresh interfaces, are considered the main factors dominating the surfactant adsorption ratio on droplet surfaces. The diffusion and convective mass transfer of the surfactants are first distinguished by comparing the adsorption depth and the mass flux boundary layer thickness. A characterized mass transfer time is then calculated by introducing an effective diffusion coefficient. A time ratio is furthermore defined by dividing the droplet generation time by the characteristic mass transfer time, t/tm, in order to compare the rates of surfactant mass transfer and droplet generation. Different control mechanisms for different surfactants are analyzed based on the range of t/t(m), and a criterion time ratio using a simplified characteristic mass transfer time, t(m)*, is finally proposed for predicting the appearance of dynamic interfacial tension.

  18. Stripping voltammetric determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in freshwater and sediment samples from South African water resources.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, C; Silwana, B; Iwuoha, E; Somerset, V

    2012-01-01

    Stripping voltammetry as technique has proved to be very useful in the analysis of heavy and other metal ions due to its excellent detection limits and its sensitivity in the presence of different metal species or interfering ions. Recent assessments of aquatic samples have shown increased levels of platinum group metals (PGMs) in aquatic ecosystems, caused by automobile exhaust emissions and mining activities. The development of an analytical sensor for the detection and characterisation of PGMs were investigated, since there is an ongoing need to find new sensing materials with suitable recognition elements that can respond selectively and reversibly to specific metal ions in environmental samples. The work reported shows the successful application of another mercury-free sensor electrode for the determination of platinum group metals in environmental samples. The work reported in this study entails the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with a bismuth film for the determination of platinum (Pt(2+)), palladium (Pd(2+)) or rhodium (Rh(2+)) by means of adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Optimised experimental conditions included composition of the supporting electrolyte, complexing agent concentration, deposition potential, deposition time and instrumental voltammetry parameters for Pt(2+), Pd(2+) and Rh(2+) determination. Adsorptive differential pulse stripping voltammetric measurements for PGMs were performed in the presence of dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as complexing agent. The glassy carbon bismuth film electrode (GC/BiFE) employed in this study exhibit good and reproducible sensor characteristics. Application of GC/BiFE sensor exhibited well-defined peaks and highly linear behaviour for the stripping analysis of the PGMs in the concentration range between 0 and 3.5 μg/L. The detection limit of Pd, Pt and Rh was found to be 0.12 μg/L, 0.04 μg/L and 0.23 μg/L, respectively for the deposition times of 90 s (Pd) and 150 s (for both Pt and Rh). Good

  19. Stripping voltammetric determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in freshwater and sediment samples from South African water resources.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, C; Silwana, B; Iwuoha, E; Somerset, V

    2012-01-01

    Stripping voltammetry as technique has proved to be very useful in the analysis of heavy and other metal ions due to its excellent detection limits and its sensitivity in the presence of different metal species or interfering ions. Recent assessments of aquatic samples have shown increased levels of platinum group metals (PGMs) in aquatic ecosystems, caused by automobile exhaust emissions and mining activities. The development of an analytical sensor for the detection and characterisation of PGMs were investigated, since there is an ongoing need to find new sensing materials with suitable recognition elements that can respond selectively and reversibly to specific metal ions in environmental samples. The work reported shows the successful application of another mercury-free sensor electrode for the determination of platinum group metals in environmental samples. The work reported in this study entails the use of a glassy carbon electrode modified with a bismuth film for the determination of platinum (Pt(2+)), palladium (Pd(2+)) or rhodium (Rh(2+)) by means of adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Optimised experimental conditions included composition of the supporting electrolyte, complexing agent concentration, deposition potential, deposition time and instrumental voltammetry parameters for Pt(2+), Pd(2+) and Rh(2+) determination. Adsorptive differential pulse stripping voltammetric measurements for PGMs were performed in the presence of dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as complexing agent. The glassy carbon bismuth film electrode (GC/BiFE) employed in this study exhibit good and reproducible sensor characteristics. Application of GC/BiFE sensor exhibited well-defined peaks and highly linear behaviour for the stripping analysis of the PGMs in the concentration range between 0 and 3.5 μg/L. The detection limit of Pd, Pt and Rh was found to be 0.12 μg/L, 0.04 μg/L and 0.23 μg/L, respectively for the deposition times of 90 s (Pd) and 150 s (for both Pt and Rh). Good

  20. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Modeling of the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Processing of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, S.; Isac, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys have shown exceptional potential as structural materials for transportation applications. These alloys have proved to be good candidates to be processed as thin strips via the horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) process. The HSBC process is a near-net-shape casting technology, which involves casting molten metal directly into thin strips, close to the final product thickness, at higher cooling rates than conventional continuous casting and thin-slab casting processes. It offers an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly approach to the production of metal strips. Fluid mechanics and associated heat transfer are important aspects of any casting process, and the novel HSBC process is no exception. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 were performed, in order to assess the importance and effects of the various operational conditions of the HSBC process. This enabled process parameter optimization. Numerical predictions were validated against experimental casting results.

  1. An FE Based On-line Model for the Prediction of Work Roll Thermal Profile in Hot Strip Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji Won; Lee, Jung Hyeung; Sun, Cheng Gang; Hwang, Sang Moo

    2010-06-01

    Prediction and control of the thermal deformation of the work roll is vital for enhancing product quality in hot strip and plate rolling. In this paper, we present an on-line model for the prediction of the work roll thermal profile. The model is developed on the basis of an integrated finite element model for the coupled analysis of heat transfer and deformation occurring at the bite zone, to rigorously take into account the effect of various rolling parameters on the thermal behavior of the work roll. The validity of the model is demonstrated through comparison with measurements made in an industrial hot strip mill. Also, an emphasis is given to the examination the effect of some selected rolling parameters in an actual production environment.

  2. Study on the irreversible thermodynamics of a marine engine exhaust-powered adsorption refrigerating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yingchun; Mei, Ning; Xu, Zhen

    2006-04-01

    This study investigates the heat and mass transfer mechanism of a marine engine exhaust-powered adsorption refrigerating system by using irreversible thermodynamics. The equations of entropy-production rate and the linear phenomenological equations of thermodynamic flux and force are established. The conventional experimental facilities of unit tube are developed and the phenomenological coefficients are obtained by fitting the experimental data. It is concluded that the thermodynamic process in the adsorbent bed is determined by the coupling effect of the heat and mass transfer; furthermore, the mass transfer is determined by the heat transfer. Taking some measures to increase heat transfer can improve the performance of the adsorption refrigerating system. The conclusions presented in this paper may be of value to the engineering applications of the system.

  3. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-09-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  4. Study on adsorption and desorption of ammonia on graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengwei; Zhang, Xinfang; Luo, Wei; Yang, Hang; He, Yanlan; Liu, Yixing; Zhang, Xueao; Peng, Gang

    2015-12-01

    The gas sensor based on pristine graphene with conductance type was studied theoretically and experimentally. The time response of conductance measurements showed a quickly and largely increased conductivity when the sensor was exposed to ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water. However, the desorption process in vacuum took more than 1 h which indicated that there was a larger number of transferred carriers and a strong adsorption force between ammonia and graphene. The desorption time could be greatly shortened down to about 2 min by adding the flow of water-vapor-enriched air at the beginning of the recovery stage which had been confirmed as a rapid and high-efficiency desorption process. Moreover, the optimum geometries, adsorption energies, and the charge transfer number of the composite systems were studied with first-principle calculations. However, the theoretical results showed that the adsorption energy between NH3 and graphene was too small to fit for the experimental phenomenon, and there were few charges transferred between graphene and NH3 molecules, which was completely different from the experiment measurement. The adsorption energy between NH4 and graphene increased stage by stage which showed NH4 was a strong donor. The calculation suggested that H2O molecule could help a quick desorption of NH4 from graphene by converting NH4 to NH3 or (NH3)n(H2O)m groups, which was consistent with the experimental results. This study demonstrates that the ammonia gas produced by a bubble system of ammonia water is mainly ammonium groups of NH3 and NH4, and the NH4 moleculars are ideal candidates for the molecular doping of graphene while the interaction between graphene and the NH3 moleculars is weak.

  5. A novel solid state fermentation coupled with gas stripping enhancing the sweet sorghum stalk conversion performance for bioethanol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol production from biomass is becoming a hot topic internationally. Traditional static solid state fermentation (TS-SSF) for bioethanol production is similar to the traditional method of intermittent operation. The main problems of its large-scale intensive production are the low efficiency of mass and heat transfer and the high ethanol inhibition effect. In order to achieve continuous production and high conversion efficiency, gas stripping solid state fermentation (GS-SSF) for bioethanol production from sweet sorghum stalk (SSS) was systematically investigated in the present study. Results TS-SSF and GS-SSF were conducted and evaluated based on different SSS particle thicknesses under identical conditions. The ethanol yield reached 22.7 g/100 g dry SSS during GS-SSF, which was obviously higher than that during TS-SSF. The optimal initial gas stripping time, gas stripping temperature, fermentation time, and particle thickness of GS-SSF were 10 h, 35°C, 28 h, and 0.15 cm, respectively, and the corresponding ethanol stripping efficiency was 77.5%. The ethanol yield apparently increased by 30% with the particle thickness decreasing from 0.4 cm to 0.05 cm during GS-SSF. Meanwhile, the ethanol yield increased by 6% to 10% during GS-SSF compared with that during TS-SSF under the same particle thickness. The results revealed that gas stripping removed the ethanol inhibition effect and improved the mass and heat transfer efficiency, and hence strongly enhanced the solid state fermentation (SSF) performance of SSS. GS-SSF also eliminated the need for separate reactors and further simplified the bioethanol production process from SSS. As a result, a continuous conversion process of SSS and online separation of bioethanol were achieved by GS-SSF. Conclusions SSF coupled with gas stripping meet the requirements of high yield and efficient industrial bioethanol production. It should be a novel bioconversion process for bioethanol production from SSS

  6. Metal adsorption on mosses: Toward a universal adsorption model.

    PubMed

    González, A G; Pokrovsky, O S

    2014-02-01

    This study quantifies the adsorption of heavy metals on 4 typical moss species used for environmental monitoring in the moss bag technique. The adsorption of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto Hypnum sp., Sphagnum sp., Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachytecium rutabulum has been investigated using a batch reactor in a wide range of pH (1.3-11.0) and metal concentrations in solution (1.6μM-3.8mM). A Linear Programming Model (LPM) was applied for the experimental data to derive equilibrium constants and the number of surface binding sites. The surface acid-base titration performed for 4 mosses at a pH range of 3-10 in 0.1M NaNO3 demonstrated that Sphagnum sp. is the most efficient adsorbent as it has the maximal number of proton-binding sites on the surface (0.65mmol g(-1)). The pKa computed for all the moss species suggested the presence of 5 major functional groups: phosphodiester, carboxyl, phosphoryl, amine and polyphenols. The results of pH-edge experiments demonstrated that B. rutabulum exhibits the highest percentage of metal adsorption and has the highest number of available sites for most of the metals studied. However, according to the results of the constant pH "Langmuirian" isotherm, Sphagnum sp. can be considered as the strongest adsorbent, although the relative difference from other mosses is within 20%. The LPM was found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data in the full range of the studied solution parameters. The results of this study demonstrate a rather similar pattern of five metal adsorptions on mosses, both as a function of pH and as a metal concentration, which is further corroborated by similar values of adsorption constants. Therefore, despite the species and geographic differences between the mosses, a universal adsorption edge and constant pH adsorption isotherm can be recommended for 4 studied mosses. The quantitative comparison of metal adsorption with other common natural organic and inorganic materials demonstrates

  7. Synthesizing 3D Surfaces from Parameterized Strip Charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Peter I.; Gomez, Julian; Morehouse, Michael; Gawdiak, Yuri

    2004-01-01

    We believe 3D information visualization has the power to unlock new levels of productivity in the monitoring and control of complex processes. Our goal is to provide visual methods to allow for rapid human insight into systems consisting of thousands to millions of parameters. We explore this hypothesis in two complex domains: NASA program management and NASA International Space Station (ISS) spacecraft computer operations. We seek to extend a common form of visualization called the strip chart from 2D to 3D. A strip chart can display the time series progression of a parameter and allows for trends and events to be identified. Strip charts can be overlayed when multiple parameters need to visualized in order to correlate their events. When many parameters are involved, the direct overlaying of strip charts can become confusing and may not fully utilize the graphing area to convey the relationships between the parameters. We provide a solution to this problem by generating 3D surfaces from parameterized strip charts. The 3D surface utilizes significantly more screen area to illustrate the differences in the parameters and the overlayed strip charts, and it can rapidly be scanned by humans to gain insight. The selection of the third dimension must be a parallel or parameterized homogenous resource in the target domain, defined using a finite, ordered, enumerated type, and not a heterogeneous type. We demonstrate our concepts with examples from the NASA program management domain (assessing the state of many plans) and the computers of the ISS (assessing the state of many computers). We identify 2D strip charts in each domain and show how to construct the corresponding 3D surfaces. The user can navigate the surface, zooming in on regions of interest, setting a mark and drilling down to source documents from which the data points have been derived. We close by discussing design issues, related work, and implementation challenges.

  8. A continuous flow evaluation of the galvanic stripping process

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera-Godinez, J.A.; O`Keefe, T.J.

    1999-09-01

    The concept of galvanically stripping cations such as Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, and Au{sup 3+} from organic solvents using solid metal reductants has been demonstrated on a batch test basis in a number of previous studies. In this research the first evaluation of a continuous flow system for the process was made, with Fe{sup 3+} removal from D2EHPA being the primary objective. The effect of operation type (separate or simultaneous stripping), the iron concentration in the organic feed, the organic flow rate, the aqueous-to-organic volume ratio (A/O), the metal reductant (pure zinc vs lead-zinc alloy), the reductant surface area and acidity of the stripping phase on the iron and zinc removal percentages, and the process rate and stoichiometry were evaluated by using continuous flow mixed reactors. The steady-state condition was reached in all the tests after about 40 minutes. In particular, the rate of iron removal was found to be greater for simultaneous than for separate galvanic stripping. A longer organic residence time produced a slightly lower rate, but increasing the aqueous-to-organic ratio augmented the overall rate. The pH of the aqueous phase controlled the iron and zinc stripping percentages, and increasing the reductant surface area increased the iron removal percent. In general, the results agreed with previous batch-type studies on galvanic stripping, and the data indicated that the galvanic stripping process rate and reactor behavior can be assessed by using mechanically agitated continuous flow mixed reactors.

  9. Cardiovascular, diabetes, and cancer strips: evidences, mechanisms, and classifications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing-Hua; Hu, Da-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To report and name firstly that there are cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancers (CDC) strips; and disclose their mechanisms, classifications, and clinical significances. Study design Narrative and systematic review study and interpretive analysis. Methods Data sources and study selection: to collect and present related evidences on CDC strips from evidence-based, open-access, both Chinese- and English-language literatures in recent 10 years on clinical trials from PubMed according to keywords “CVD, DM and cancers” as well as authors’ extensive clinical experience with the treatment of more than fifty thousands of patients with CVD, diabetes and cancers over the past decades, and analyze their related mechanisms and categories which based on authors’ previous works. Data extraction: data were mainly extracted from 48 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review. Qualitative, quantitative and mixed data were included, narratively and systematically reviewed. Results With several conceptual and technical breakthrough, authors present related evidences on CDC strips, these are, CVD and DM, DM and cancers, cancers and CVD linked, respectively; And “Bad SEED” +/– “bad soil” theory or doctrine may explain this phenomenon due to “internal environmental injure, abnormal or unbalance” in human body resulting from the role of risk factors (RFs) related multi-pathways and multi-targets, which including organ & tissue (e.g., vascular-specific), cell and gene-based mechanisms. Their classifications include main strips/type B, and Branches/type A as showed by tables and figures in this article. Conclusions There are CDC strips and related mechanisms and classifications. CDC strips may help us to understand, prevent, and control related common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) as well as these high risk strips. PMID:25276377

  10. Fractional Statistical Theory of Adsorption of Polyatomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardo, J. L.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Romá, F.

    2004-10-01

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane’s statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory.

  11. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption of polyatomics.

    PubMed

    Riccardo, J L; Ramirez-Pastor, A J; Romá, F

    2004-10-29

    A new theoretical description of fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA) phenomena is presented based on Haldane's statistics. Thermodynamic functions for adsorption of polyatomics are analytically developed. The entropy is characterized by an exclusion parameter g, which relates to the configuration of the admolecules and surface geometry. FSTA provides a simple framework to address a large class of complex adsorption systems. Comparisons of theoretical adsorption isotherms with experiments and simulations indicate that adsorption configuration and adsorption energy can accurately be assessed from this theory. PMID:15525184

  12. Method of making steel strapping and strip

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Reilly

    2000-02-16

    The technical progress obtained for this time frame consisted of the awarding of two contracts for determination of metallurgical parameters for heat treatment of strapping and strip which are unavailable from current technology and/or published data in this field. The two contractors were Bricmont, Inc. and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Technological Institute of Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. Phase 1 of the two stage contract with Bricmont, Inc. which provided a computer analysis of the cooling rates of a typical range of thickness' of strapping was completed. This study was developed for the purpose of determining the time parameters for quenching low carbon steels to a martensitic microstructure within the time frame of the design of the proposed process. It also provides design criteria for cooling to ambient for the total process. This data is required for Phase 2 of the Bricmont proposal which completes the design and specifications of the total heat treating and cooling system for the process. This becomes the basis for developing the cost and space requirements for this component of the production line. The authors do not intend to award Phase 2 until the work done at Northwestern University discussed hereafter is completed. On or about May 1, 1999 a contract for a project entitled ``Effects of Steel Composition and Quench Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Strapping'' to be performed at the Department of Materials Science and Engineering was awarded. The delay in initiating this project was due to the legal interpretation and final agreement of the intellectual provisions of the award by the author's attorneys, Northwestern's attorneys and the legal representative in the Chicago office of the DOE. The work to date includes rapid quenching of a number of different steel compositions and microstructure on an existing drop quench test apparatus. It was initially assumed that this procedure would simulate

  13. Riparian buffer strips as a multifunctional management tool in agricultural landscapes: introduction.

    PubMed

    Stutter, Marc I; Chardon, Wim J; Kronvang, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Catchment riparian areas are considered key zones to target mitigation measures aimed at interrupting the movement of diffuse substances from agricultural land to surface waters. Hence, unfertilized buffer strips have become a widely studied and implemented "edge of field" mitigation measure assumed to provide an effective physical barrier against nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and sediment transfer. To ease the legislative process, these buffers are often narrow mandatory strips along streams and rivers, across different riparian soil water conditions, between bordering land uses of differing pollution burdens, and without prescribed buffer management. It would be easy to criticize such regulation for not providing the opportunity for riparian ecosystems to maximize their provision for a wider range of ecosystem goods and services. The scientific basis for judging the best course of action in designing and placing buffers to enhance their multifunctionality has slowly increased over the last five years. This collection of papers aims to add to this body of knowledge by giving examples of studies related to riparian buffer management and assessment throughout Europe. This introductory paper summarizes discussion sessions and 13 selected papers from a workshop held in Ballater, UK, highlighting research on riparian buffers brought together under the EU COST Action 869 knowledge exchange program. The themes addressed are (i) evidence of catchment- to national-scale effectiveness, (ii) ecological functioning linking terrestrial and aquatic habitats, (iii) modeling tools for assessment of effectiveness and costs, and (iv) process understanding enabling management and manipulation to enhance pollutant retention in buffers. The combined understanding led us to consider four principle key questions to challenge buffer strip research and policy.

  14. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries.

  15. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  16. Adsorption-induced colloidal aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, B. M.; Petit, J.-M.; Beysens, D.

    1998-03-01

    Reversible colloidal aggregation in binary liquid mixtures has been studied for a number of years. As the phase separation temperature of the liquid mixture is approached the thickness of an adsorption layer around the colloidal particles increases. Beysens and coworkers have demonstrated experimentally that this adsorption layer is intimately connected with the aggregation of the colloidal particles, however, no definitive theory has been available which can explain all of the experimental observations. In this contribution we describe an extension of the Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek theory of colloidal aggregation which takes into account the presence of the adsorption layer and which more realistically models the attractive dispersion interactions. This modified theory can quantitatively account for many of the observed experimental features such as the characteristics of the aggregated state, the general shape of the aggregation line, and the temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient for a lutidine-water mixture containing a small volume fraction of silica colloidal particles.

  17. Stripped Elliptical Galaxies as Probes of ICM Physics: I. Tails, Wakes, and Flow Patterns in and Around Stripped Ellipticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, E.; Kraft, R. P.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Machacek, M.; Randall, S.; Jones, C.; Churazov, E.; Kokotanekova, R.

    2015-06-01

    Elliptical cluster galaxies are progressively stripped of their atmospheres due to their motion through the intracluster medium (ICM). Deep X-ray observations reveal the fine-structure of the galaxy’s remnant atmosphere and its gas tail and wake. This fine-structure depends on dynamic conditions (galaxy potential, initial gas contents, orbit through the host cluster), orbital stage (early infall, pre-/post-pericenter passage), and ICM plasma properties (thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field structure). We aim to disentangle dynamic and plasma effects in order to use stripped ellipticals as probes of ICM plasma properties. This first paper of a series investigates the hydrodynamics of progressive gas stripping by means of inviscid hydrodynamical simulations. We distinguish a long-lasting initial relaxation phase and a quasi-steady stripping phase. During quasi-steady stripping, the ICM flow around the remnant atmosphere resembles the flow around solid bodies, including a “deadwater” region in the near wake. Gas is stripped from the remnant atmosphere predominantly at its sides via Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The downstream atmosphere is largely shielded from the ICM wind and thus shaped into a tail. Observationally, both this “remnant tail” and the stripped gas in the wake can appear as a “tail”, but only in the wake can galactic gas mix with the ambient ICM. While the qualitative results are generic, the simulations presented here are tailored to the Virgo elliptical galaxy M89 (NGC 4552) for the most direct comparison to observations. Papers II and III of this series describe the effect of viscosity and compare to Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, respectively.

  18. STRIPPED ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES AS PROBES OF ICM PHYSICS. I. TAILS, WAKES, AND FLOW PATTERNS IN AND AROUND STRIPPED ELLIPTICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Roediger, E.; Kraft, R. P.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Forman, W. R.; Machacek, M.; Randall, S.; Jones, C.; Kokotanekova, R.

    2015-06-10

    Elliptical cluster galaxies are progressively stripped of their atmospheres due to their motion through the intracluster medium (ICM). Deep X-ray observations reveal the fine-structure of the galaxy’s remnant atmosphere and its gas tail and wake. This fine-structure depends on dynamic conditions (galaxy potential, initial gas contents, orbit through the host cluster), orbital stage (early infall, pre-/post-pericenter passage), and ICM plasma properties (thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field structure). We aim to disentangle dynamic and plasma effects in order to use stripped ellipticals as probes of ICM plasma properties. This first paper of a series investigates the hydrodynamics of progressive gas stripping by means of inviscid hydrodynamical simulations. We distinguish a long-lasting initial relaxation phase and a quasi-steady stripping phase. During quasi-steady stripping, the ICM flow around the remnant atmosphere resembles the flow around solid bodies, including a “deadwater” region in the near wake. Gas is stripped from the remnant atmosphere predominantly at its sides via Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities. The downstream atmosphere is largely shielded from the ICM wind and thus shaped into a tail. Observationally, both this “remnant tail” and the stripped gas in the wake can appear as a “tail”, but only in the wake can galactic gas mix with the ambient ICM. While the qualitative results are generic, the simulations presented here are tailored to the Virgo elliptical galaxy M89 (NGC 4552) for the most direct comparison to observations. Papers II and III of this series describe the effect of viscosity and compare to Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, respectively.

  19. VTT's micron-scale silicon rib+strip waveguide platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, Timo; Harjanne, Mikko; Cherchi, Matteo

    2016-05-01

    Silicon rib waveguides enable single-mode (SM) operation even with the combination of multi-micron core dimensions and high refractive index contrast. In such large waveguides the optical mode field is almost completely confined inside the Si core, which leads to small propagation losses and small polarization dependency. The unique SM condition of the rib waveguide also enables the use of an ultra-wide wavelength range, for example from 1.2 to <1.7 μm, without sacrificing either SM operation or low propagation loss. This makes micron-scale Si waveguides particularly well-suited for spectroscopy and extensive wavelength division multiplexing. However, rib waveguides require large bending radii, which lead to large circuit sizes. There are two solutions for this. So-called Euler bends in Si strip waveguides enable low-loss bends down to 1 μm bending radius with less than 0.1 dB/90° loss for both polarizations. Another alternative is a total-internal reflection mirror that can have loss as low as 0.1 dB for both polarizations in either strip or rib waveguides. The excitation of higher order modes in large strip waveguides is avoided by using adiabatic rib-strip converters and low-loss components. With rib and strip waveguides it is possible to reach a unique combination of low loss, extremely small footprint, small polarization dependency, ultra-wide bandwidth and tolerance to high optical powers.

  20. Politics of protest: people and strip mining in Western Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Finnissey, J.C. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The problem considered was that given the widespread grievances against strip mining in Western Maryland, what accounted for the lack of authoritative decisions being made within the State Capital to remedy the situation. This problem was studied from a power prospective. A power relationship may exist where there is a suppression of grievances through nondecision-making and thus there is an absence of both overt conflict and grievances. Cases were documented where the ownership or control of strip mining companies by absentee interests was masked. The strip-mining industry has portrayed itself as being local. Consequently, the fact that the area is being drained of its coal wealth is a nonissue, thwarting the possible enactment of ameliorative legislation requiring that the profits obtained by absentee interests be reinvested in businesses in the area, providing much longed for employment. The Citizens' Coalition on Surface Mining has attempted to organize the mountaineers in protesting against strip mining, and placing grievances on the political agenda for amelioration. The prospect for change in the short-term appeared dim given the indifference in the State Capital as evident in the lack or inadequate enforcement of existing regulations by state authorities; the indirect influence which the strip mining interests are perceived to have over legislators from the area and the retainer of a lobbyist by the Maryland Coal.

  1. Optimization of Focusing by Strip and Pixel Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G J; White, D A; Thompson, C A

    2005-06-30

    Professor Kevin Webb and students at Purdue University have demonstrated the design of conducting strip and pixel arrays for focusing electromagnetic waves [1, 2]. Their key point was to design structures to focus waves in the near field using full wave modeling and optimization methods for design. Their designs included arrays of conducting strips optimized with a downhill search algorithm and arrays of conducting and dielectric pixels optimized with the iterative direct binary search method. They used a finite element code for modeling. This report documents our attempts to duplicate and verify their results. We have modeled 2D conducting strips and both conducting and dielectric pixel arrays with moment method and FDTD codes to compare with Webb's results. New designs for strip arrays were developed with optimization by the downhill simplex method with simulated annealing. Strip arrays were optimized to focus an incident plane wave at a point or at two separated points and to switch between focusing points with a change in frequency. We also tried putting a line current source at the focus point for the plane wave to see how it would work as a directive antenna. We have not tried optimizing the conducting or dielectric pixel arrays, but modeled the structures designed by Webb with the moment method and FDTD to compare with the Purdue results.

  2. Prototype indicator strip for tank ammunition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, B.; Griest, W.

    1993-10-31

    Combustible nitrocellulose ordnance casings offer advantages of: light weight, low cost, low detectability, and quick cycling of rounds by immediate disposal. However, mechanical strength is degraded with time by the action of humidity and nitroester diffusion through the casing to adhesives. The primary development effort of this study is a means to detect nitroester migration to the crucial skive joint which binds an assortment of warhead choices to propellant casings. This work has developed a prototype colorimetric indicator strip which, when applied in a field environment, produces a purple tint proportional to casing nitroester concentration, and inversely proportional to remaining adhesive joint strength. This work addressed the three steps in indicator strip use: (1) A suggested protocol for indicator strip preparation was developed. Various coatings, support reagents, and backings were examined resulting in a choice of polyethylene tape coating over separate AB- and C-impregnated cellulose punches. Various methods of punch creation and impregnation were tried resulting in stirred aqueous solutions and suspensions of AB and C, respectively. (2) Suggested protocols for indicator strip application to lab backings and field casings were developed. After chemical stripper was applied to the alumina-polyurethane paint on casings, C and AB punches were stacked and double-tape sealed. (3) A means for indicator strip monitoring was developed. From known time of indicator reaction, casing humidity, and indicator color, a means for field concentration determination was determined. Lab time-lapse photography was used to calibrate the indicator at a single level of humidity.

  3. Grayscale gel lithography: From umlti-strips to responsive origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Myunghwan; Hayward, Ryan; Santangelo, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Non-uniform swelling of hydrogel sheets with two-dimensional (2D) patterns of crosslink density has the potential to yield a rich array of three-dimensional (3D) structures, yet many of the design rules remain poorly understood. Here, we study the geometrically simple case of ``multi-strips'', consisting of alternating parallel strips of high and low crosslink density. These materials are patterned using sequential UV exposure of a photo-crosslinkable polymer film through two photomasks. We show that these materials deform by rolling around the axis perpendicular to the interface between the regions, with a characteristic dimension that depends on the strip width and sheet thickness. However, beyond a critical minimum strip width, the material remains flat, instead forming an anisotropically swelled state that provides fruitful information on the contrast in modulus between the two regions. We also consider the deformation of sheets patterned with multiple regions that define geometrically incompatible rolling axis. Finally, we discuss the formation of hinges based on symmetric tri-strips that can be used to defined fold patterns, yielding responsive gel origami structures.

  4. Gas stripping in galaxy clusters: a new SPH simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáchym, P.; Palouš, J.; Köppen, J.; Combes, F.

    2007-09-01

    Aims:The influence of a time-varying ram pressure on spiral galaxies in clusters is explored with a new simulation method based on the N-body SPH/tree code GADGET. Methods: We have adapted the code to describe the interaction of two different gas phases, the diffuse hot intracluster medium (ICM) and the denser and colder interstellar medium (ISM). Both the ICM and ISM components are introduced as SPH particles. As a galaxy arrives on a highly radial orbit from outskirts to cluster center, it crosses the ICM density peak and experiences a time-varying wind. Results: Depending on the duration and intensity of the ISM-ICM interaction, early and late type galaxies in galaxy clusters with either a large or small ICM distribution are found to show different stripping efficiencies, amounts of reaccretion of the extra-planar ISM, and final masses. We compare the numerical results with analytical approximations of different complexity and indicate the limits of the Gunn & Gott simple stripping formula. Conclusions: Our investigations emphasize the role of the galactic orbital history to the stripping amount. We discuss the contribution of ram pressure stripping to the origin of the ICM and its metallicity. We propose gas accumulations like tails, filaments, or ripples to be responsible for stripping in regions with low overall ICM occurrence. Appendix A is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Fractional statistical theory of adsorption applied to protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, E; Centres, P M; Ochoa, N A; Ramirez-Pastor, A J

    2013-01-15

    Experimental adsorption isotherms of bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed on sulfonated microspheres were described by means of two analytical models: the first is the well-known Langmuir-Freundlich model (LF), and the second, called fractional statistical theory of adsorption (FSTA), is a statistical thermodynamics model developed recently by Ramirez-Pastor et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 186101]. The experimental data, obtained by Hu et al. [Biochem. Eng. J. 23 (2005) 259] for different concentrations of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres, were correlated by using a fitting algorithm based on least-squares statistics. The combination of LF and FSTA models, along with the choice of an adequate fitting procedure, allowed us to obtain several conclusions: (i) as previously reported in the literature, the maximum amount adsorbed increases as the amount of sulfonate group increases; (ii) the equilibrium constant does not appear as a sensitive parameter to the amount of sulfonate group on the surface of the microspheres; and (iii) the values of the fitting parameters obtained from FSTA may be indicative of a mismatch between the equilibrium separation of the intermolecular interaction and the distance between the adsorption sites. The exhaustive study presented here has shown that FSTA model is a good one considering the complexity of the physical situation, which is intended to be described and could be more useful in interpreting experimental data of adsorption of molecules with different sizes and shapes. PMID:23084559

  6. TRANSFER STUDY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GREIVE, DONALD E.

    THIS 1967 STUDY AT LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE (LCCC) WAS UNDERTAKEN TO DISCOVER (1) THE PERCENTAGE OF CREDIT HOURS IN A UNIVERSITY PARALLEL PROGRAM ACCEPTED BY TRANSFER INSTITUTIONS, (2) THE STUDENT'S GPA BEFORE AND AFTER TRANSFER, AND (3) HOW MANY COLLEGES ACCEPTED LCCC'S TRANSFERS. INSTITUTIONS TO WHICH LCCC STUDENTS HAD HAD THEIR…

  7. Semiquantitative determination of urinary glucose: comparison of home-made strip and routine tests.

    PubMed

    Koonakosit, R

    2000-03-01

    Glucose oxidase paper strips for semiquantitative determination of glucose in urine are commercially available but details of their preparation are not published. The purpose of this study was to produce such strips, using a coupled enzyme glucose oxidase-peroxidase reaction which would yield purple color with ortho-tolidine, and safranin upon dipping into urine containing glucose. In this present study, without any special equipment, special humidity and temperature control, the new reagent strip named R-strip could be successfully prepared in the atmospheric conditions of Thailand. R-strips were evaluated against random urine added with various amounts of glucose in comparison with a commercial strip (T-strip), Benedict's test, and a commercial tablet (C-tablet), routinely used in laboratories. The developed strips were found to be as specific as T-strip and more sensitive than other tests. PMID:10865423

  8. Beta-thujaplicin: new quantitative CZE method and adsorption to goethite.

    PubMed

    Dyrskov, Lone; Strobel, Bjarne W; Svensmark, Bo; Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun

    2004-03-24

    Beta-thujaplicin (beta-TH) is a toxic tropolone derivative present in the heartwood of western red cedar (Thuja plicata) and is used as a preservative and antimicrobial additive in a number of commercial goods. beta-TH released from western red cedar timber used outdoor and from other products containing beta-TH may transfer to soil and leach to groundwater and surface waters. The objective of this study was to quantify the adsorption of beta-TH to goethite as a typical model for geosorbents. Adsorption was studied using pH-adjusted goethite suspensions with solid:solution ratios of 1:500, 0.01 M NaNO(3) electrolyte, and 20 degrees C. beta-TH was determined using a new capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method providing a detection limit of 0.21 microM. Near-sorption equilibrium was attained within 48 h. beta-TH showed maximum adsorption at low pH (3.8) and a 70% drop in adsorption from pH 6.2 to 8.8. The Langmuir type adsorption isotherm at pH 5.5 approached a maximum adsorption of 220 micromol/g (= 6.2 micromol/m(2)), which is more than twice the amount of phosphate adsorbed under similar conditions. The affinity of beta-TH for goethite is low as compared with organic ligands such as citrate, oxalate, and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate. The adsorption data and FTIR analyses indicate that beta-TH is most likely adsorbed as monodentate mononuclear surface complexes at the surface of goethite. Hydrophobic adsorption is thought to contribute to the adsorption, in particular at low pH. The strong adsorption of beta-TH to goethite suggests low mobility in most soil environments, the risk of contamination increasing in soils with high pH (calcareous material), low contents of iron and aluminum oxides, phyllosilicates, and organic matter.

  9. Preparation of Fiber Based Binder Materials to Enhance the Gas Adsorption Efficiency of Carbon Air Filter.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Hwan; Choi, Jeong Rak; Lim, Dae Young; Lee, So Hee; Yeo, Sang Young

    2015-10-01

    Fiber binder adapted carbon air filter is prepared to increase gas adsorption efficiency and environmental stability. The filter prevents harmful gases, as well as particle dusts in the air from entering the body when a human inhales. The basic structure of carbon air filter is composed of spunbond/meltblown/activated carbon/bottom substrate. Activated carbons and meltblown layer are adapted to increase gas adsorption and dust filtration efficiency, respectively. Liquid type adhesive is used in the conventional carbon air filter as a binder material between activated carbons and other layers. However, it is thought that the liquid binder is not an ideal material with respect to its bonding strength and liquid flow behavior that reduce gas adsorption efficiency. To overcome these disadvantages, fiber type binder is introduced in our study. It is confirmed that fiber type binder adapted air filter media show higher strip strength, and their gas adsorption efficiencies are measured over 42% during 60 sec. These values are higher than those of conventional filter. Although the differential pressure of fiber binder adapted air filter is relatively high compared to the conventional one, short fibers have a good potential as a binder materials of activated carbon based air filter.

  10. Adsorption and pressure swing desorption of NOx in Na-Y zeolite: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Brilhac, J F; Sultana, A; Gilot, P; Martens, J A

    2002-03-01

    Pressure swing NOx adsorption-desorption cycles were performed in the temperature range 200-350 degrees C using a fixed adsorbent bed of compressed Na-Y pellets and using a honeycomb coated with Na-Y powder. The experiments were performed using a synthetic gas mixture mimicking exhaust from a lean burn internal combustion engine. Na-Y zeolite coadsorbs NO and NO2 as N2O3, which in the regeneration were displaced by competitively adsorbed water molecules from a hydrated air stream. The performance of the fixed bed in these NOx adsorption and displacement desorption processes were modeled with a one-dimensional model. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters from the fixed bed model were implemented in a model for the operation of the monolith. The experimental adsorption and desorption NOx concentration profiles in the monolith were reasonably well reproduced by the model. The water content of the flushing stream and the stripping gas flow rate are key process parameters. Technically, both parameters can be optimized in a valveless system with rotating honeycomb adsorbent comprising a NOx adsorption, a water injection and a NOx evacuation section.

  11. Hydrocarbon removal from bilgewater by a combination of air-stripping and photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Cazoir, D; Fine, L; Ferronato, C; Chovelon, J-M

    2012-10-15

    In order to prevent hydrocarbon discharge at sea from the bilge of ships, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) enacted the MARPOL 73/78 convention in which effluents are now limited to those with maximum oil content of 15 ppmv. Thus, photocatalysis and air-stripping were combined for the hydrocarbon removal from a real oily bilgewater sample and an original monitoring of both aqueous and gaseous phases was performed by GC/MS to better understand the process. Our results show that the hydrocarbon oil index [HC] can be reduced to its maximum permissible value of 15 ppmv (MARPOL) in only 8.5h when photocatalysis and air-stripping are used together in a synergistic way, as against 17 h when photocatalysis is used alone. However, this air-assisted photocatalytic process emits a large quantity of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and, within the first four hours, ca. 10% of the hydrocarbon removal in the aqueous phase is actually just transferred into the gaseous one. Finally, we highlight that the n-alkanes with a number of carbon atoms higher than 15 (N(C)>15) are those which most decrease the rate of [HC] removal.

  12. A microfluidic device for open loop stripping of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Benjamin Z; Dittrich, Petra S

    2013-03-01

    The detection of volatile organic compounds is of great importance for assessing the quality of water. In this contribution, we describe a miniaturized stripping device that allows fast online detection of organic solvents in water. The core component is a glass microfluidic chip that facilitates the creation of an annular-flowing stream of water and nitrogen gas. Volatile compounds are transferred efficiently from the water into the gas phase along the microfluidic pathway at room temperature within less than 5 s. Before exiting the microchip, the liquid phase is separated from the enriched gas phase by incorporating side capillaries through which the hydrophilic water phase is withdrawn. The gas phase is conveniently collected at the outlet reservoir by tubing. Finally, a semiconductor gas sensor analyzes the concentration of (volatile) organic compounds in the nitrogen gas. The operation and use of the stripping device is demonstrated for the organic solvents THF, 1-propanol, toluene, ethylbenzene, benzaldehyde, and methanol. The mobile, inexpensive, and continuously operating system with liquid flow rates in the low range of microliters per minute can be connected to other detectors or implemented in chemical production line for process control.

  13. Reduction of COD in refinery wastewater through adsorption on date-pit activated carbon.

    PubMed

    El-Naas, Muftah H; Al-Zuhair, Sulaiman; Abu Alhaija, Manal

    2010-01-15

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate the batch adsorption of COD from petroleum refinery wastewater on a locally prepared date-pit activated carbon (DP-AC), and its adsorption effectiveness was compared to that of commercially available BDH activated carbon (BDH-AC). Adsorption equilibrium and kinetic data were determined for both adsorbents and fitted to several adsorption isotherm and kinetics models, respectively. The Langmuir monolayer isotherm fitted well the equilibrium data of COD on both adsorbents; whereas, the kinetics data were best fitted by the pseudo-second order model. Modeling of the controlling mechanisms indicated that both intrinsic kinetics and mass transfer contributed to controlling the adsorption process. Mass transfer seemed to be the dominant mechanism at low COD content, while intrinsic kinetics dominates at high concentrations. In general, the adsorption effectiveness of locally prepared DP-AC was proven to be comparable to that of BDH-AC. Therefore, DP-AC can be utilized as an effective and less expensive adsorbent for the reduction of COD in refinery wastewater.

  14. Equilibrium and kinetic analysis of CO2-N2 adsorption separation by concentration pulse chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiyuan; Tezel, F Handan

    2007-09-01

    CO2 and N(2) adsorption kinetics and equilibrium behaviours have been studied with silicalite, NaY and 13X by using concentration pulse chromatography for the separation of these gases in the present study. Adsorption Henry's Law constants, the heat of adsorption values, micropore diffusion coefficients and corresponding activation energies are determined experimentally and the three different mass transfer mechanisms are discussed. From the equilibrium data, the corresponding separation factors are obtained for the adsorption separation processes. The heat of adsorption values as well as the Henry's Law adsorption equilibrium constants of CO(2) are much higher than those of N(2) for all the adsorbents studied. 13X, NaY and silicalite all have good separation factors for CO(2)/N(2) system based on equilibrium processes. The order of the equilibrium separation factors is 13X (Ceca)>13X (Zeochem)>NaY (UOP)>silicalite (UOP). Equilibrium selectivity favours CO(2) over N(2). Micropore diffusion resistance is the definite dominant mass transfer mechanism for CO(2) with silicalite and NaY.

  15. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    PubMed

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  16. Adsorption of Organics from Domestic Water Supplies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; Suffet, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    This article discusses the current state of the art of organics removal by adsorption. Various theoretical explanations of the adsorption process are given, along with practical results from laboratory, pilot-scale, and full-scale applications. (CS)

  17. CONTAMINANT ADSORPTION AND OXIDATION VIA FENTON REACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A ground water treatment process is proposed involving two cgemical processes: adsorption and oxidation. Adsorption of an organic compound onto granulated activated carbon (GAC) containing iron conveniently results in immobilizing and concentrating contaminants from the ground w...

  18. Phosphorus Removal From Milkhouse Wastewater and Barnyard Runoff With Fly ash Amendments in Vegetative Filter Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, S.; Richards, B. K.; Geohring, L. D.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2005-12-01

    Vegetative filter strips (VFS) are commonly used to reduce agricultural pollutants such as phosphorus (P) present in milkhouse wastewater and barnyard runoff. Although VFS can sometimes efficiently remove P, water flow and P sorption in a VFS used for treating milkhouse wastewater and barnyard runoff were found to be erratic due to preferential flow and reduced soil infiltration capacity. Several possible amendments were tested for P immobilization potential in the laboratory, including wollastonite (calcium metasilicate) and fly ash from a coal-fired power plant. Fly ash demonstrated superior P immobilization potential, with a Langmuir adsorption isotherm capacity of 10 mg g.-1. Fly ash was placed in the wastewater holding tank and in flow channels of an actual VFS, resulting in reduction of test well water ortho-P to ug L-1 (ppb) levels. Fly ash was shown to act in three ways: P adsorption, precipitation of P as Apatite, and co-precipitation of P during hydrolysis of Fe and Al. However, during summer P concentrations in observation wells was observed to be much higher than the influent wastewater in the VFS, particularly near the preferential flow path. Measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), iron and total phosphorus indicate enhanced microbial activities during summer. As a result, anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter plays a great role in releasing P, Fe and Mn from adsorbed sites. It is believed that certain components of DOC (such as hydrophilic, hydrophobic and neutrals) are formed during anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter present in water and the VFS. These DOC components may interact with iron, aluminum, manganese, calcium etc. present in soil resulting in the concomitant release of elements together with adsorbed P. A practical management approach to reducing P during summer may involve relocating the preferred wastewater flowpaths in the VFS, as well as fresh applications of fly ash to the new flowpaths in order to avoid the

  19. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for a successful technology transfer program and what such a program would look like are discussed. In particular, the issues associated with technology transfer in general, and within the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) environment specifically are addressed. The section on background sets the stage, identifies the barriers to successful technology transfer, and suggests actions to address the barriers either generally or specifically. The section on technology transfer presents a process with its supporting management plan that is required to ensure a smooth transfer process. Viewgraphs are also included.

  20. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips skewed to the flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.; Steuber, G. D.; Yeh, F. C.

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multi-pass, heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. Trip strips, skewed at 45 deg to the flow direction, were machined on the leading and trailing surfaces of the radial coolant passages. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature, rotation number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. The first three of these four parameters were varied over ranges which are typical of advanced gas turbine engine operating conditions. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from similar stationary and rotating models with smooth walls and with trip strips normal to the flow direction. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat transfer decreased with rotation and buoyancy, decreased to as low as 40 percent of the value without rotation. However, the maximum values of the heat transfer coefficients with high rotation were only slightly above the highest levels previously obtained with the smooth wall models. It was concluded that (1) both Coriolis and buoyancy effects must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips, (2) the effects of rotation are markedly different depending upon the flow direction, and (3) the heat transfer with skewed trip strips is less sensitive to buoyancy than the heat transfer in models with either smooth or normal trips. Therefore, skewed trip strips rather than normal trip strips are recommended and geometry-specific tests are required for accurate design information.