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Sample records for adult alpine swifts

  1. Den site activity patterns of adult male and female swift foxes, Vulpes velox, in Northwestern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemons, P.R.; Ballard, W.B.; Sullivan, R.M.; Sovada, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Activity of Swift Foxes (Vulpes velox) at den sites was studied in northwestern Texas during pup rearing seasons in 2000 and 2001 to determine role of males in parental care. Twenty-four percent of radio-collared females with a potential to breed successfully raised pups to eight weeks of age. We intensively monitored presence and absence of male and female Swift Foxes at two den sites each year. Females were present >2.6 times more at den sites than males during the pup rearing season. Female and male Swift Foxes largely stayed at dens during diurnal hours and were active away from dens during nocturnal and crepuscular hours. Females and males spent 12.4% and 3.0% more time at dens before pups emerged, than after pups emerged, respectively. Following depredation of one male parent, the female spent 29% less time at the den site. Decrease in time spent at the den by the female following loss of her mate suggested that loss of one parent might severely impact recruitment of Swift Foxes. Our observations indicated that intense Coyote (Canis latrans) depredation may severely impact pup-rearing success as well as the parental care within Swift Fox family groups.

  2. Inescapable Bodies, Disquieting Perception: Why Adults Seek to Tame and Harness Swift's Excremental Satire in "Gulliver's Travels"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallcup, Jackie E.

    2004-01-01

    Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" is a complex, uninhibited, savage satire that concludes with the narrator's descent into madness--hardly a likely candidate for children's reading. In the nearly three hundred years since it was first published, however, "Gulliver's Travels" has become associated with children's literature, though it is…

  3. Molecular identification of adult and juvenile linyphiid and theridiid spiders in Alpine glacier foreland communities.

    PubMed

    Raso, Lorna; Sint, Daniela; Rief, Alexander; Kaufmann, Rüdiger; Traugott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In glacier forelands spiders constitute a large proportion of the invertebrate community. Therefore, it is important to be able to determine the species that can be found in these areas. Linyphiid and theridiid spider identification is currently not possible in juvenile specimens using traditional morphological based methods, however, a large proportion of the population in these areas are usually juveniles. Molecular methods permit identification of species at different life stages, making juvenile identification possible. In this study we tested a molecular tool to identify the 10 most common species of Linyphiidae and Theridiidae found in three glacier foreland communities of the Austrian Alps. Two multiplex PCR systems were developed and over 90% of the 753 field-collected spiders were identified successfully. The species targeted were found to be common in all three valleys during the summer of 2010. A comparison between the molecular and morphological data showed that although there was a slight difference in the results, the overall outcome was the same independently of the identification method used. We believe the quick and reliable identification of the spiders via the multiplex PCR assays developed here will aid the study of these families in Alpine habitats.

  4. Molecular Identification of Adult and Juvenile Linyphiid and Theridiid Spiders in Alpine Glacier Foreland Communities

    PubMed Central

    Raso, Lorna; Sint, Daniela; Rief, Alexander; Kaufmann, Rüdiger; Traugott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In glacier forelands spiders constitute a large proportion of the invertebrate community. Therefore, it is important to be able to determine the species that can be found in these areas. Linyphiid and theridiid spider identification is currently not possible in juvenile specimens using traditional morphological based methods, however, a large proportion of the population in these areas are usually juveniles. Molecular methods permit identification of species at different life stages, making juvenile identification possible. In this study we tested a molecular tool to identify the 10 most common species of Linyphiidae and Theridiidae found in three glacier foreland communities of the Austrian Alps. Two multiplex PCR systems were developed and over 90% of the 753 field-collected spiders were identified successfully. The species targeted were found to be common in all three valleys during the summer of 2010. A comparison between the molecular and morphological data showed that although there was a slight difference in the results, the overall outcome was the same independently of the identification method used. We believe the quick and reliable identification of the spiders via the multiplex PCR assays developed here will aid the study of these families in Alpine habitats. PMID:25050841

  5. Negative Associations Between Seedlings and Adult Plants In Two Alpine Plant Communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant species’ requirements at seed and seedling stages are critical in determining their distributions. Proximity to adult plants, as well as the presence of litter or rocks on the soil surface can influence seedling success. By comparing the microsite characteristics of points occupied by naturall...

  6. Using SWIFT Data

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl E.; Clarke, Steven A.; Murphy, Michael J.

    2012-07-11

    SWIFT has been shown to be a promising new diagnostic tool with many applications. SWIFT diagnostics coupled with PDV and other tools represent an exciting new source of data. SIAS is the name for the methodology we use to couple our SWIFT data to calculations for maximum utilization. SIAS, formerly Schlieren Inverse Analysis Software -- now SWIFT Inverse Analysis Software, uses SWIFT data and a hydro code calculation repeated in a genetic algorithm loop to reconstruct pressure history of shock transducer material interface.

  7. Experimental evidence that adult antipredator behaviour is heritable and not influenced by behavioural copying in a wild bird.

    PubMed

    Bize, Pierre; Diaz, Claris; Lindström, Jan

    2012-04-01

    Knowledge of the relative importance of genetics and behavioural copying is crucial to appraise the evolvability of behavioural consistencies. Yet, genetic and non-genetic factors are often deeply intertwined, and experiments are required to address this issue. We investigated the sources of variation of adult antipredator behaviour in the Alpine swift (Apus melba) by making use of long-term behavioural observations on parents and cross-fostered offspring. By applying an 'animal model' approach to observational data, we show that antipredator behaviour of adult Alpine swifts was significantly repeatable over lifetime (r = 0.273) and heritable (h(2) = 0.146). Regression models also show that antipredator behaviours differed between colonies and sexes (females were more tame), and varied with the hour and year of capture. By applying a parent-offspring regression approach to 59 offspring that were exchanged as eggs or hatchlings between pairs of nests, we demonstrate that offspring behaved like their biological parents rather than like their foster parents when they were adults themselves. Those findings provide strong evidence that antipredator behaviour of adult Alpine swifts is shaped by genetics and/or pre-hatching maternal effects taking place at conception but not by behavioural copying.

  8. Multi-Band-SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curtis A.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A useful extension to SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) utilizing sidebands of the excitation pulse is introduced. This MRI method, called Multi-Band-SWIFT, achieves much higher bandwidth than standard SWIFT by using multiple segmented excitations (bands) of the field of view. A description of the general idea and variants of the pulse sequence are presented. From simulations and semi-phenomenological theory, estimations of power deposition and signal-to-noise ratio are made. MB-SWIFT and ZTE (zero-TE) sequences are compared based on images of a phantom and human mandible. Multi-Band-SWIFT provides a bridge between SWIFT and ZTE sequences and allows greatly increased excitation and acquisition bandwidths relative to standard SWIFT for the same hardware switching parameters and requires less peak amplitude of the radiofrequency field (or greater flip angle at same peak amplitude) as compared to ZTE. Multi-Band-SWIFT appears to be an attractive extension of SWIFT for certain musculoskeletal and other medical imaging applications, as well as for imaging materials.

  9. Gap Cycling for SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Corum, Curtis A.; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Snyder, Carl J.; Garwood, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) is a non-Cartesian MRI method with unique features and capabilities. In SWIFT, radiofrequency (RF) excitation and reception are performed nearly simultaneously, by rapidly switching between transmit and receive during a frequency-swept RF pulse. Because both the transmitted pulse and data acquisition are simultaneously amplitude-modulated in SWIFT (in contrast to continuous RF excitation and uninterrupted data acquisition in more familiar MRI sequences), crosstalk between different frequency bands occurs in the data. This crosstalk leads to a “bulls-eye” artifact in SWIFT images. We present a method to cancel this inter-band crosstalk by cycling the pulse and receive gap positions relative to the un-gapped pulse shape. We call this strategy “gap cycling.” Methods We carry out theoretical analysis, simulation and experiments to characterize the signal chain, resulting artifacts, and their elimination for SWIFT. Results Theoretical analysis reveals the mechanism for gap-cycling’s effectiveness in canceling inter-band crosstalk in the received data. We show phantom and in-vivo results demonstrating bulls-eye artifact free images. Conclusion Gap cycling is an effective method to remove bulls-eye artifact resulting from inter-band crosstalk in SWIFT data. PMID:24604286

  10. The Swift Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Burrows, David N.

    2011-01-01

    The study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remains highly dependent on the capabilities of the observatories that carry out the measurements. The large detector size of BATSE produced an impressively large sample of GRBs for duration and sky distribution studies. The burst localization and repointing capabilities of BeppoSAX led to breakthroughs in host and progenitor understanding. The next phase in our understanding of GRBs is being provided by the Swift mission. In this chapter we discuss the capabilities and findings of the Swift mission and their relevance to our understanding of GRBs. We also examine what is being learned about star formation, supernovae and the early Universe from the new results. In each section of the chapter, we close with a discussion of the new questions and issues raised by the Swift findings.

  11. GRB Discoveries with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This brief presentation presents Swift Observatory recordings of gamma ray burst (GRB) activity. Long and short GRBs and afterglows are highlighted. Recordings of GRB emission, afterglow, optical/IR brightness, and flux density are presented. The time structure and current status of short GRB structures is also included.

  12. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  13. SWIFT Observations AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    I will present results from the x-ray and optical follow-up observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) survey. I will discuss the nature of obscuration in these objects, the relationship to optical properties and the change of properties with luminosity and galaxy type.

  14. Swift Science Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, F. E.; Swift Team Team

    2003-05-01

    Swift is an autonomous, multiwavelength observatory selected by NASA to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows. Its Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is a large coded mask instrument that will image GRBs in the 15 to 150 keV band. The X-ray Telescope (XRT) focuses X-rays in the 0.2 to 10 keV band onto CCDs, and the co-aligned Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) has filters and grisms for low-resolution spectroscopy. The Swift team is developing mission-specific tools for processing the telemetry into FITS files and for calibrating and selecting the data for further analysis with such mission-independent tools as XIMAGE and XSPEC. The FTOOLS-based suite of tools will be released to the community before launch with additional updates after launch. Documentation for the tools and standard receipes for their use will be available on the Swift Science Center (SSC) Web site (http://swiftsc.gsfc.nasa.gov), and the SSC will provide user assistance with an e-mail help desk. After the verification phase of the mission, all data will be available to the community as soon as it is processed in the Swift Data Center (SDC). Once all the data for an observation is available, the data will be transferred to the HEASARC and data centers in England and Italy. The data can then be searched and accessed using standard tools such as Browse. Before this transfer the quick-look data will be available on an ftp site at the SDC. The SSC will also provide documentation and simulation tools in support of the Swift Guest Investigator program.

  15. Causes and rates of mortality of swift foxes in western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sovada, M.A.; Roy, C.C.; Bright, J.B.; Gillis, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of mortality factors is important for developing strategies to conserve the swift fox (Vulpes velox), a species being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act, but available information about swift fox mortality is inadequate. We used radiotelemetry techniques to examine the magnitude and causes of mortality of swift fox populations in 2 study areas in western Kansas. One study area was predominantly cropland, the other rangeland. Mortality rates, calculated using Kaplan-Meier estimation techniques in a staggered entry design, were 0.55 ?? 0.08 (5 ?? SE) for adult and 0.67 ?? 0.08 for juvenile swift foxes. We did not detect differences between study areas in mortality rates for adults or juveniles. Predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) was the major cause of mortality for adult and juvenile swift foxes in both study areas, and vehicle collision was an important mortality factor for juveniles in the cropland study area. No mortality was attributed to starvation or disease.

  16. Plants in alpine environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germino, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Alpine and subalpine plant species are of special interest in ecology and ecophysiology because they represent life at the climate limit and changes in their relative abundances can be a bellwether for climate-change impacts. Perennial life forms dominate alpine plant communities, and their form and function reflect various avoidance, tolerance, or resistance strategies to interactions of cold temperature, radiation, wind, and desiccation stresses that prevail in the short growing seasons common (but not ubiquitous) in alpine areas. Plant microclimate is typically uncoupled from the harsh climate of the alpine, often leading to substantially warmer plant temperatures than air temperatures recorded by weather stations. Low atmospheric pressure is the most pervasive, fundamental, and unifying factor for alpine environments, but the resulting decrease in partial pressure of CO2 does not significantly limit carbon gain by alpine plants. Factors such as tree islands and topographic features create strong heterogeneous mosaics of microclimate and snow cover that are reflected in plant community composition. Factors affecting tree establishment and growth and formation of treeline are key to understanding alpine ecology. Carbohydrate and other carbon storage, rapid development in a short growing season, and physiological function at low temperature are prevailing attributes of alpine plants. A major contemporary research theme asks whether chilling at alpine-treeline affects the ability of trees to assimilate the growth resources and particularly carbon needed for growth or whether the growth itself is limited by the alpine environment. Alpine areas tend to be among the best conserved, globally, yet they are increasingly showing response to a range of anthropogenic impacts, such as atmospheric deposition.

  17. Swift fox survival and production in southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, T.L.; Lindzey, F.G.

    2002-01-01

    We estimated annual survival rates of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) and documented number of young per pair in a transition zone between shortgrass prairie and sagebrush steppe plant communities in southeastern Wyoming during 1996-2000. Annual adult survival ranged from 40% to 69%, with predation by coyotes (Canis latrans) the primary cause of deaths. Two foxes died of canine distemper virus. Annual survival rates did not differ among years (P>0.12). Nineteen of 24 (79%) swift fox pairs were observed with young over 3 years. Mean minimum litter size was 4.6 based on these 19 litters and 6 others not associated with our radiocollared foxes. Adult survival was similar and litter size slightly larger than observed elsewhere in the species range, suggesting that viable swift fox populations can be supported by sagebrush steppe and shortgrass prairie transition habitat.

  18. Swift's 500th Gamma Ray Burst

    NASA Video Gallery

    On April 13, 2010, NASA's Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer satellite discovered its 500th burst. Swift's main job is to quickly localize each gamma-ray burst (GRB), report its position so that others...

  19. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  20. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, Ann

    2004-01-01

    At this workshop, I intend to show the broader community the many Swift program. Since all of the Swift GRB data will be made immediately available to the entire astrophysics community, collaborations can form through the analysis of Swift data or through the operation of ground-based telescope systems to do follow-up measurements of GRB afterglow emission.

  1. Hazards of alpine sport.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M

    1991-07-01

    Alpine sports in Australia include downhill skiing, cross country skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling and tobogganing. Despite a popular impression that the sport is risky the injury rate is low and there has been a large decrease in injuries relative to increased participation in the past 20 years. Nevertheless, more young skiers are sustaining injuries, many of which could be avoided.

  2. SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Jonathan Charles

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the software development practice areas and processes which contribute to the ability of SWiFT software developers to provide quality software. These processes are designed to satisfy the requirements set forth by the Sandia Software Quality Assurance Program (SSQAP). APPROVALS SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan (SAND2016-0765) approved by: Department Manager SWiFT Site Lead Dave Minster (6121) Date Jonathan White (6121) Date SWiFT Controls Engineer Jonathan Berg (6121) Date CHANGE HISTORY Issue Date Originator(s) Description A 2016/01/27 Jon Berg (06121) Initial release of the SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan

  3. Swift observations of HD 305560

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, A.; Page, K. L.; Krimm, H. A.; Oates, S. R.

    2014-10-01

    At 04:44:43 on 2014 October 02, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) triggered on what appears to be the Be star HD 305560 (GCN Circ. #16874). Using the data set from T-239 to T+963 sec from the recent telemetry downlink, we report further analysis of the BAT data.

  4. Swift M31 Video Tour

    NASA Video Gallery

    Between May 25 and July 26, 2008, Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) acquired 330 images of M31 at wavelengths of 192.8, 224.6, and 260 nanometers. This video will take you on a tour of s...

  5. Origin and migration of the Alpine Iceman.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wolfgang; Fricke, Henry; Halliday, Alex N; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Wartho, Jo-Anne

    2003-10-31

    The Alpine Iceman provides a unique window into the Neolithic-Copper Age of Europe. We compared the radiogenic (strontium and lead) and stable (oxygen and carbon) isotope composition of the Iceman's teeth and bones, as well as 40Ar/39Ar mica ages from his intestine, to local geology and hydrology, and we inferred his habitat and range from childhood to adult life. The Iceman's origin can be restricted to a few valleys within approximately 60 kilometers south(east) of the discovery site. His migration during adulthood is indicated by contrasting isotopic compositions of enamel, bones, and intestinal content. This demonstrates that the Alpine valleys of central Europe were permanently inhabited during the terminal Neolithic.

  6. RESEARCH PAPER: Comparison between Swift and pre-Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Qing

    2009-06-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission Swift has made a much deeper GRB survey than any previous one. I present a systematical comparison between GRB samples detected with pre-Swift missions and those from Swift, in order to investigate whether they show any statistical difference. Our Swift GRB sample includes the bursts detected by Swift/BAT before 2007 September. With both flux-limited surveys and redshift-known GRB samples, I show that, apparently, the observed distributions of the redshifts, T90, and log N - log P are significantly different, but not for the spectral hardness ratio, fluence and Eiso. The redshifts of the Swift GRB sample are statistically larger than those of pre-Swift GRBs, with a mean of 1.95±0.17 compared to ~ 1 for pre-Swift GRBs. The cosmological effect on the observables is thus considerable. This effect on the spectral hardness ratio, fluence and Eiso is cancelled out, and the distributions of these quantities indeed do not show significant differences between the Swift and pre-Swift GRBs. Taking this effect into account, I found that the corrected distributions of T90 for long GRBs and log N - log P observed with Swift/BAT are also consistent with those observed with CGRO/BATSE. These results indicate that the Swift and pre-Swift GRBs are from the same population.

  7. Swift Observations of Proxima Cen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargelin, Bradford J.; Saar, Steven H.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Kashyap, Vinay

    2014-08-01

    Swift observed Proxima Cen (dM5.5e) for more than 40 segments (roughly 100 separate exposures) from 2009 to 2012, including several UV grism observations. We present analyses of variability in the optical, UV, and X-ray bands on time scales covering individual flares to a possible multiyear stellar cycle, and show moderate-resolution spectra covering 2300-6000 Angstroms.

  8. Age-specific survival of reintroduced swift fox in Badlands National Park and surrounding lands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasmal, Indrani; Klaver, Robert W.; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Schroeder, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    In 2003, a reintroduction program was initiated at Badlands National Park (BNP), South Dakota, USA, with swift foxes (Vulpes velox) translocated from Colorado and Wyoming, USA, as part of a restoration effort to recover declining swift fox populations throughout its historical range. Estimates of age-specific survival are necessary to evaluate the potential for population growth of reintroduced populations. We used 7 years (2003–2009) of capture–recapture data of 243 pups, 29 yearlings, and 69 adult swift foxes at BNP and the surrounding area to construct Cormack–Jolly–Seber model estimates of apparent survival within a capture–mark–recapture framework using Program MARK. The best model for estimating recapture probabilities included no differences among age classes, greater recapture probabilities during early years of the monitoring effort than later years, and variation among spring, winter, and summer. Our top ranked survival model indicated pup survival differed from that of yearlings and adults and varied by month and year. The apparent annual survival probability of pups (0.47, SE = 0.10) in our study area was greater than the apparent annual survival probability of yearlings and adults (0.27, SE = 0.08). Our results indicate low survival probabilities for a reintroduced population of swift foxes in the BNP and surrounding areas. Management of reintroduced populations and future reintroductions of swift foxes should consider the effects of relative low annual survival on population demography.

  9. SWIFT BAT Survey of AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, J.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Gehrels, N.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Winter, L. M.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results1 of the analysis of the first 9 months of data of the Swift BAT survey of AGN in the 14-195 keV band. Using archival X-ray data or follow-up Swift XRT observations, we have identified 129 (103 AGN) of 130 objects detected at [b] > 15deg and with significance > 4.8-delta. One source remains unidentified. These same X-ray data have allowed measurement of the X-ray properties of the objects. We fit a power law to the logN - log S distribution, and find the slope to be 1.42+/-0.14. Characterizing the differential luminosity function data as a broken power law, we find a break luminosity logL*(ergs/s)= 43.85+/-0.26. We obtain a mean photon index 1.98 in the 14-195 keV band, with an rms spread of 0.27. Integration of our luminosity function gives a local volume density of AGN above 10(exp 41) erg/s of 2.4x10(exp -3) Mpc(sup -3), which is about 10% of the total luminous local galaxy density above M* = -19.75. We have obtained X-ray spectra from the literature and from Swift XRT follow-up observations. These show that the distribution of log nH is essentially flat from nH = 10(exp 20)/sq cm to 10(exp 24)/sq cm, with 50% of the objects having column densities of less than 10(exp 22)/sq cm. BAT Seyfert galaxies have a median redshift of 0.03, a maximum log luminosity of 45.1, and approximately half have log nH > 22.

  10. SWIFT for High Explosive Initiation Research

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Carl E.; Murphy, Michael J.; Clarke, Steven A.

    2012-08-03

    SWIFT diagnostics coupled with PDV and other tools represent an exciting new source of data with many possible applications - Basic HE and detonator characterization. SIAS is the name for the methodology we use to couple our SWIFT data to calculations for maximum utilization - Each experiment design requires a new load curve/table and associated ALE3D input file.

  11. An End to Writing about Swift?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fricke, Donna G.

    1982-01-01

    Provides a rationale for current scholarly studies of Jonathan Swift. Reviews the two distinct directions taken by modern authors writing about Swift: the traditional historical branch and the rhetorical and literary criticism branch. Considers evidence of and reasons for a revived interest in satire and anticipates areas of future study. (DMM)

  12. The first ten years of Swift supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.; Roming, Peter W. A.; Milne, Peter A.

    2015-09-01

    The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer has proven to be an incredible platform for studying the multiwavelength properties of supernova explosions. In its first ten years, Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae. The ultraviolet observations reveal a complex diversity of behavior across supernova types and classes. Even amongst the standard candle type Ia supernovae, ultraviolet observations reveal distinct groups. When the UVOT data is combined with higher redshift optical data, the relative populations of these groups appear to change with redshift. Among core-collapse supernovae, Swift discovered the shock breakout of two supernovae and the Swift data show a diversity in the cooling phase of the shock breakout of supernovae discovered from the ground and promptly followed up with Swift. Swift observations have resulted in an incredible dataset of UV and X-ray data for comparison with high-redshift supernova observations and theoretical models. Swift's supernova program has the potential to dramatically improve our understanding of stellar life and death as well as the history of our universe.

  13. Swift Heavy Ions in Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothard, Hermann; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-12-01

    The present volume contains the proceedings of the Ninth International Symposium on Swift Heavy Ions in Matter (SHIM). This conference was held in Darmstadt, from 18 to 21 May 2015. SHIM is a triennial series, which started about 25 years ago by a joint initiative of CIRIL - Caen and GSI - Darmstadt, with the aim of promoting fundamental and applied interdisciplinary research in the field of high-energy, heavy-ion interaction processes with matter. SHIM was successively organized in Caen (1989), Bensheim (1992), Caen (1995), Berlin (1998), Catania (2002), Aschaffenburg (2005), Lyon (2008), and Kyoto (2012). The conference attracts scientists from many different fields using high-energy heavy ions delivered by large accelerator facilities and characterized by strong and short electronic excitations.

  14. Swift and Hubble Probe an Asteroid Crash

    NASA Video Gallery

    In late 2010, images from the University of Arizona's Catalina Sky Survey, a project of NASA's Near Earth Object Observations Program, revealed an outburst from asteroid Scheila. Swift and Hubble t...

  15. Swift Captures Asteroid 2005 YU55 Flyby

    NASA Video Gallery

    Asteroid 2005 YU55 whisks through the field of view of Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on Nov. 9, just hours after the space rock made its closest approach to Earth. The video plays on...

  16. Design of alpine skis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordt, Alison Audrey

    Models were developed to calculate the mechanical properties and the turning characteristics of alpine skis. The skis considered are constructed of layers of materials which may include wood, foam, metal, plastics, and fiber reinforced composites. The ski may be manufactured with or without camber and sidecut. The first model, and the corresponding SKI-MECH computer code, yields the mass, the bending and torsional stiffness distributions along the length, the flex, the twist, the natural frequencies, and the pressure distribution along the base of the ski. The second model, and the corresponding SKI-TURN code, simulates the motion of a skier of given height, weight, and skill level going down a smooth slope while executing a constant radius turn. The computer code provides the time it requires the skier to complete the turn. Both the SKI-MECH and SKI-TURN codes were verified by comparing the outputs of these codes to laboratory data and to data generated by skiers executing turns on a hill. The results of the model and the data are in good agreement lending confidence to the models and the computer codes. Numerical results are also presented which illustrate the usefulness of the computer codes for assessing the performance of skis and shed light on the role sidecut plays in affecting an efficient turn.

  17. Swiftly searching the sky: the first three years of the Swift gamma-ray burst explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Nousek, John; Varela, Karen; Quijandria, Fernando

    2009-04-30

    The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer has revolutionized the study of these remarkable high-energy explosions. We summarize the technical developments which lead to the creation of the Swift mission, and outline the highlights of the first three years, and the prospects ahead.

  18. NASA's Swift Education and Public Outreach Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plait, P.; Silva, S.; Graves, T.; Simonnet, A.; Cominsky, L.

    2003-05-01

    Few astronomical objects excite students more than big explosions and black holes. Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are both: powerful explosions that signal the births of black holes. NASA's Swift satellite mission, set for launch in December 2003, will detect hundreds of black holes over its two-year nominal mission timeline. The NASA Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) group at Sonoma State University is leading the Swift E/PO effort, using the Swift mission to engage students in science and math learning. We have partnered with the Lawrence Hall of Science to create a "Great Explorations in Math and Science" guide entitled "Invisible Universe: from Radio Waves to Gamma Rays," which uses GRBs to introduce students to the electromagnetic spectrum and the scale of energies in the Universe. Three to four segments about Swift are being broadcast each year to millions of middle-school children as part of "What's In The News," an educational television series based at Penn State University. We are also creating new standards-based activities for grades 9-12 using GRBs: one activity puts the students in the place of astronomers 20 years ago, trying to sort out various types of stellar explosions that create high-energy radiation. Another mimics the use of the Interplanetary Network to let students figure out the direction to a GRB. Post-launch materials will include magazine articles about Swift and GRBs, more formal educational activities, and additions to the Swift E/PO website (http://swift.sonoma.edu) that will excite and inspire students to learn more about space science.

  19. Reflections on Swift from the early years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The provenance of Swift lies with earlier discoveries of Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) phenomena, starting with the serendipitous discovery of GRBs by the Vela nuclear-test-ban-treaty monitoring satellites, through the first all sky GRB mapping by the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) to the discovery of X-ray afterglows by BeppoSAX. Building on these foundations, Swift has provided the astrophysics community with a new tool for studying GRBs; a rapid reaction spacecraft hosting a unique combination of newly available instrument technologies able to detect, locate and follow the life cycle of bursts across their energy spectrum from gamma-ray, through X-ray, to optical/UV. The Swift science team has shaped the scientific priorities for the mission and ensured access to world class observatories for rapid follow-up observations. Since launch, on 2004 November 20, Swift has been detecting GRBs at a rate of about 100 per year. Many of these have led to major breakthroughs in understanding GRB phenomena and are referenced here alongside comments on some of the events that at times threatened early demise of the Swift mission - happily averted through prompt action by the scientists and engineers of the mission operations team.

  20. Alpine Skiing in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez-Gimenez, Antonio; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Many students settle indoors in the winter. However, this does not mean that winter should be a period of time with no physical activity. Several snow activities could be practiced during those months, such as ice-skating, ice-hockey, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, alpine skiing, or snowboarding. In order to counteract the tendency for…

  1. Chernobyl fallout on Alpine glaciers

    SciTech Connect

    Ambach, W.; Rehwald, W.; Blumthaler, M.; Eisner, H.; Brunner, P.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of the gross beta activity of snow samples from four Alpine glaciers contaminated by radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident and a gamma-spectrum analysis of selected samples are reported. The results are discussed with respect to possible risks to the population from using meltwater from these glaciers as drinking water.

  2. Provenance management in Swift with implementation details.

    SciTech Connect

    Gadelha, L. M. R; Clifford, B.; Mattoso, M.; Wilde, M.; Foster, I.

    2011-04-01

    The Swift parallel scripting language allows for the specification, execution and analysis of large-scale computations in parallel and distributed environments. It incorporates a data model for recording and querying provenance information. In this article we describe these capabilities and evaluate interoperability with other systems through the use of the Open Provenance Model. We describe Swift's provenance data model and compare it to the Open Provenance Model. We also describe and evaluate activities performed within the Third Provenance Challenge, which consisted of implementing a specific scientific workflow, capturing and recording provenance information of its execution, performing provenance queries, and exchanging provenance information with other systems. Finally, we propose improvements to both the Open Provenance Model and Swift's provenance system.

  3. The Swift Monitoring Campaign of Sagittarius A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, Nathalie; Miller, J. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Wijnands, R.; Gehrels, N.

    2013-04-01

    Starting in 2006, the center of our Galaxy has been monitored on a nearly daily basis with the X-ray telescope on-board the Swift satellite. The short pointed observations have offered a unique view of the long-term X-ray behavior of Sgr A*, in particular of its X-ray flaring properties. The Swift campaign also provides an excellent setup to closely monitor the interaction of the supermassive black hole with the dense cold gas cloud (G2) that is on a collision course with Sgr A* and is projected to make a close encounter in the fall of 2013. I will present the results of 7 years of Swift X-ray monitoring of Sgr A*, and give an outlook of how this program can be used to study the X-ray emission as G2 breaks up and feeds gas to the supermassive black hole.

  4. Main elevation of 33123314 Alpine St., SW. This house was ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Main elevation of 3312-3314 Alpine St., SW. This house was built for use by workers from nearby Merrimack Mill (now demolished) - 3312-3314 Alpine Street, Southwest (House), 3312-3314 Alpine Street, Southwest, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. The Faulkes Telescope Optical Spectrographs and Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul

    The Faulkes Telescope project funded primarily by the Dill Faulkes Educational Trust is currently constructing two 2-m robotic telescopes to be located in Hawaii and Australia. These will be the largest and most powerful telescopes ever built dedicated for use by schools and colleges. We have been awarded funding to build two optical spectrographs to be permanently mounted on these telescopes by the end of 2003. At this time an astronomical satellite called Swift will be launched by NASA. Swift is dedicated to the study of gamma-ray bursts the most powerful explosive events in the Universe. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester has provided the X-ray camera for Swift and is a partner in the Faulkes Telescopes project. To enhance both projects we intend to use the Faulkes Telescope optical spectrographs to study the gamma-ray bursts identified by Swift. These data will also be made available to schools thereby raising the profile of physics and astronomy in the educational community.

  6. Methanogenic activities in alpine soils.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andreas O; Hofmann, Katrin; Prem, Eva; Illmer, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Uncontrolled microbial methane production is playing an important role in global warming. In the present study, we showed that water content and incubation temperature increase the potential for methane formation in the two alpine soils under investigation. Beside these factors, the grazing of cows and thus the amendment of methanogenic microorganisms by cattle dung is the most important factor determining the potential of methane production in those soils.

  7. Water, Weeds and Autumn Leaves: Learning to Be Drier in the Alpine Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Annette; Grace, Lauri

    2009-01-01

    Our paper explores how and what adults living and working in the Alpine region of Victoria understand and are learning about the changes to water availability, in a time when the response to water availability is subject to extensive debate and policy attention. Interviews for this study were conducted in the towns of Bright and Mount Beauty, with…

  8. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danae Griffin, Rhiannon; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.; Nugent, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    The Swift active galactic nucleus (AGN) and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift X-ray Telescope serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding X-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4 × 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here, we present the first two papers in a series of publications for SACS. In the first paper, we introduce our method and catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources. We examine the number counts of the AGN and galaxy cluster populations. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. The depth and areal coverage of SACS is well suited for galaxy cluster surveys outside the local universe, reaching z ˜ 1 for massive clusters. In the second paper, we use Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 data to study the 203 extended SACS sources that are located within the SDSS footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in 3-D space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift galaxy cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a > 3σ over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, X-ray luminosity and red sequences. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≤ 0.3 and 80% complete for z ≤ 0.4, consistent with the survey depth of SDSS. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 2 and 1 matches in optical, X-ray and SZ catalogs, respectively, so the majority of these

  9. Gamma-ray burst theory after Swift.

    PubMed

    Piran, Tsvi; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2007-05-15

    Afterglow observations in the pre-Swift era confirmed to a large extend the relativistic blast wave model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Together with the observations of properties of host galaxies and the association with (type Ic) SNe, this has led to the generally accepted collapsar origin of long GRBs. However, most of the afterglow data was collected hours after the burst. The X-ray telescope and the UV/optical telescope onboard Swift are able to slew to the direction of a burst in real time and record the early broadband afterglow light curves. These observations, and in particular the X-ray observations, resulted in many surprises. While we have anticipated a smooth transition from the prompt emission to the afterglow, many observed that early light curves are drastically different. We review here how these observations are changing our understanding of GRBs.

  10. Alpine 1/Federal: Executive summary final report

    SciTech Connect

    Witcher, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    This summary report overviews a State of Arizona and US Department of Energy funded drilling project to determine if near-term hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential exists in the eastern portion of the White Mountains region of Arizona. A 4,505 feet deep slim-hole exploratory well, Alpine1/Federal, was drilled within the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest at Alpine Divide near the Alpine Divide camp ground about 5 miles north of Alpine, Arizona in Apache County (Figure 1). A comprehensive technical report, in two parts, details the results of the project. Part 1, Alpin1/Federal, Drilling Report discusses the drilling operations, logging program, permitting and site selection for the hole. Part 2, Temperature Gradients, Geothermal Potential, and Geology, summarizes the temperature gradients, heat flow, geothermal potential, and subsurface geology.

  11. Recent Progress on GRBs with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground have new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and supernova physics.

  12. GRACE Collaboration in the Swift Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, C.

    2004-01-01

    I will describe the structure and major discoveries of the Gamma-Ray Afterglow Collaboration at ESO, formed by several European Countries to perform GRB follow up observations using the European Southern Observatory (ESO) ground-based facilities in Chile. I represent the USA-UK node of GRACE. I will also describe a newly funded effort through the Swift GO program aiming at forming a Joint Afterglow NETwork (JANET) using members of the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO).

  13. Recent Progress on GRBs with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful explosions, visible to high red shift, and thought to be the signature of black hole formation. The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type. II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>S and one at z=9.4 giving metallicity measurements and other data on galaxies at previously inaccessible distances. The talk will present the latest results from Swift in GRB astronomy .

  14. Biomolecular Emission by Swift Heavy Ion Bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, Yoshinobu; Yamada, Hideaki; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Matsuo, Jiro; Jones, Brian N.; Webb, Roger; Seki, Toshio; Aoki, Takaaki

    2011-01-07

    Secondary Ion Mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been generally used in the field of material sciences. In recent years, it has also been applied for molecular imaging of biological samples. Nevertheless, molecular ions derived from the large molecules (more than 1 kDa) were detected with very low sensitivity. Plasma desorption mass spectrometry (PDMS) is known as mass spectrometry for large organic molecule. In PDMS, fission fragments bombard samples and the impact induces molecular ionization by electronic excitation. Large organic molecules are detected by using swift heavy ions in SIMS. In this work, 6 MeV Cu{sup 4+} we irradiated angiotensin II, a class of peptides. The intact molecular ions generated by swift heavy ion irradiation were analyzed by time-of-flight (TOF) measurement. The yields are compared with some other probe ions, bismuth or flurane. Swift heavy ion bombardment ionized large organic molecules more effectively than other probes. Therefore, high energy ion can be applied in high resolution molecular imaging.

  15. How Swift is redefining time domain astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2015-09-01

    NASA's Swift satellite has completed ten years of amazing discoveries in time domain astronomy. Its primary mission is to chase gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), but due to its scheduling flexibility it has subsequently become a prime discovery machine for new types of behavior. The list of major discoveries in GRBs and other transients includes the long-lived X-ray afterglows and flares from GRBs, the first accurate localization of short GRBs, the discovery of GRBs at high redshift (z > 8), supernova shock break-out from SN Ib, a jetted tidal disruption event, an ultra-long class of GRBs, high energy emission from flare stars, novae and supernovae with unusual characteristics, magnetars with glitches in their spin periods, and a short GRB with evidence of an accompanying kilonova. Swift has developed a dynamic synergism with ground based observatories. In a few years gravitational wave observatories will come on-line and provide exciting new transient sources for Swift to study.

  16. Mitochondrial genome sequence of Egyptian swift Rock Pigeon (Columba livia breed Egyptian swift).

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Hong; Shi, Wei; Shi, Wan-Yu

    2015-06-01

    The Egyptian swift Rock Pigeon is a breed of fancy pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding. In this work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Egyptian swift Rock Pigeon. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,239 bp and its overall base composition was estimated to be 30.2% for A, 24.0% for T, 31.9% for C and 13.9% for G, indicating an A-T (54.2%)-rich feature in the mitogenome. It contained the typical structure of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Egyptian swift Rock Pigeon would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  17. Bear feeding activity at alpine insect aggregation sites in the Yellowstone ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mattson, David J.; Gillin, Colin M.; Benson, Scott A.; Knight, Richard R.

    1991-01-01

    Bears (Ursidae) were observed from fixed-wing aircraft on or near alpine talus in the Shoshone National Forest between 15 June and 15 September in 1981–1989. Bears fed on insect aggregations at 6 known and 12 suspected alpine talus sites, disproportionately more at elevations > 3350 m, on slopes > 30°, and on south- and west-facing aspects. While at these sites, bears almost exclusively ate invertebrates, typically army cutworm moths (Euxoa auxiliaris). Subadult grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) appeared to be underrepresented at the sites, and proportionate representation of adult females with young appeared to decrease between 15 June and 15 September. Overall, observations of bears at these sites increased between 1981 and 1989. We suggest that alpine insect aggregations are an important food source for bears in the Shoshone National Forest, especially in the absence of high-quality foraging alternatives in July and August of most years.

  18. Alpine cloud climatology: regional effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, Martina; Kriebel, Karl T.

    1996-12-01

    The present understanding of moist atmospheric processes and the role of clouds in the hydrologic cycle shows severe gaps of knowledge. Water vapor plays an essential part in atmospheric dynamics. For example, the release of large amounts of latent heat, due to the condensation in convective clouds, plays an important role in the general circulation. Knowledge of the distribution of clouds and its transport is essential to understand atmospheric dynamics. Clouds can have a positive as well as a negative contribution to the greenhouse effect. A cloud cover climatology in a 15 km grid resolution has been retrieved by means of the APOLLO algorithm using the 5 calibrated AVHRR channels. The monthly means of total cloud cover are about 15 percent too high compared to conventional data, the standard deviation is +/- 12 percent. The high resolution cloud cover maps show topometeorological features like 'Fohn' on single days but not in monthly means, because these events are too rare. But increased cloud cover in the luff regions are detected in monthly means as well as some cloud sparse regions like Lake Garda, Ticino or the Swiss Rhone valley. The different annual cycles of cloud cover show the different climatic regions, which are temperate, Alpine, and Mediterranean climate. This is indicated, for example, by the remarkably smaller cloud cover in the Alpine region in winter as compared to the northern and southern forelands.

  19. Seed dormancy in alpine species

    PubMed Central

    Schwienbacher, Erich; Navarro-Cano, Jose Antonio; Neuner, Gilbert; Erschbamer, Brigitta

    2011-01-01

    In alpine species the classification of the various mechanisms underlying seed dormancy has been rather questionable and controversial. Thus, we investigated 28 alpine species to evaluate the prevailing types of dormancy. Embryo type and water impermeability of seed coats gave an indication of the potential seed dormancy class. To ascertain the actual dormancy class and level, we performed germination experiments comparing the behavior of seeds without storage, after cold-dry storage, after cold-wet storage, and scarification. We also tested the light requirement for germination in some species. Germination behavior was characterized using the final germination percentage and the mean germination time. Considering the effects of the pretreatments, a refined classification of the prevailing dormancy types was constructed based on the results of our pretreatments. Only two out of the 28 species that we evaluated had predominantly non-dormant seeds. Physiological dormancy was prevalent in 20 species, with deep physiological dormancy being the most abundant, followed by non-deep and intermediate physiological dormancy. Seeds of four species with underdeveloped embryos were assigned to the morphophysiologial dormancy class. An impermeable seed coat was identified in two species, with no additional physiological germination block. We defined these species as having physical dormancy. Light promoted the germination of seeds without storage in all but one species with physiological dormancy. In species with physical dormancy, light responses were of minor importance. We discuss our new classification in the context of former germination studies and draw implications for the timing of germination in the field. PMID:24415831

  20. Gamma Ray Bursts and recent Swift Results .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chincarini, G.

    Due to the large activity we had during these last months with the Swift satellite I started the writing of the presentation I gave at the SAIt Catania meeting only in the middle of September. The Swift satellite, however, never rested. Since then and in addition to the results I showed at the meeting in relation to the early and steep light curves observed with the XRT telescope in the 0.2 - 10 keV band, we had fundamental discoveries among which the detection and localization of short bursts and the detection of the largest redshift ever. It obviously would be improper to discuss here the most recent results but it would also be silly in such a fast evolving topics where the day by day observations show excellent results and the observer is far ahead of the theoretician, to write an article that, from the observational point of view, would be completely obsolete. The best approach here seems to be a brief description of what was presented during the meeting briefly mentioning also some of the most recent results. We remind the reader, however, that a copious literature written, and in preparation, exists so that we urge the reader to refer to the specialized articles. This brief article will touch on the basic characteristics of the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the Introduction (section 1) and illustrate the basic characteristics of the Swift mission in section 2. Preliminary science results will be discussed in section 3 and finally we will mention one, among many, of the main goal we plan to achieve in Cosmology via the observations of very distant GRBs.

  1. Erosion by an Alpine glacier.

    PubMed

    Herman, Frédéric; Beyssac, Olivier; Brughelli, Mattia; Lane, Stuart N; Leprince, Sébastien; Adatte, Thierry; Lin, Jiao Y Y; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Cox, Simon C

    2015-10-01

    Assessing the impact of glaciation on Earth's surface requires understanding glacial erosion processes. Developing erosion theories is challenging because of the complex nature of the erosion processes and the difficulty of examining the ice/bedrock interface of contemporary glaciers. We demonstrate that the glacial erosion rate is proportional to the ice-sliding velocity squared, by quantifying spatial variations in ice-sliding velocity and the erosion rate of a fast-flowing Alpine glacier. The nonlinear behavior implies a high erosion sensitivity to small variations in topographic slope and precipitation. A nonlinear rate law suggests that abrasion may dominate over other erosion processes in fast-flowing glaciers. It may also explain the wide range of observed glacial erosion rates and, in part, the impact of glaciation on mountainous landscapes during the past few million years.

  2. Erosion by an Alpine glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric; Beyssac, Olivier; Brughelli, Mattia; Lane, Stuart N.; Leprince, Sébastien; Adatte, Thierry; Lin, Jiao Y. Y.; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Cox, Simon C.

    2015-10-01

    Assessing the impact of glaciation on Earth’s surface requires understanding glacial erosion processes. Developing erosion theories is challenging because of the complex nature of the erosion processes and the difficulty of examining the ice/bedrock interface of contemporary glaciers. We demonstrate that the glacial erosion rate is proportional to the ice-sliding velocity squared, by quantifying spatial variations in ice-sliding velocity and the erosion rate of a fast-flowing Alpine glacier. The nonlinear behavior implies a high erosion sensitivity to small variations in topographic slope and precipitation. A nonlinear rate law suggests that abrasion may dominate over other erosion processes in fast-flowing glaciers. It may also explain the wide range of observed glacial erosion rates and, in part, the impact of glaciation on mountainous landscapes during the past few million years.

  3. Prompt Emission Observations of Swift BAT Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We review the prompt emission properties of Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We present the global properties of BAT GRBs based on their spectral and temporal characteristics. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 80 and 20 s, respectively. The peak energy (Epeak) of about 60% of BAT GRBs is very likely to be less than 1.00 keV. We also present the BAT characteristics of GRBs with soft spectra, so called Xray flashes (XRFs). We will compare the BAT GRBs and XRFs parameter distribution to the other missions.

  4. Prompt Emission Properties of Swift GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S.; Baumgartner, W.; Cummings, J.; Fenimore, E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Palmer, D.; Parsons, A.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results from the second Swift BAT catalog of 476 gamma-ray bursts, which contains bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. In addition to the spectral and temporal parameters extracted from the first BAT GRB catalog, 3324 time-resolved spectra have been extracted and analyzed. We show and discuss 1) the duration distribution, 2) the hardness of short GRBs, 3) Epeak distribution, 4) the line of death problem and 5) an additional power-law component in the prompt emission spectrum.

  5. XMM Observations of 'New' Swift BAT Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    Because the E> 15 keV band is unaffected by absorption this band offers the best hope of obtaining an unbiased sample of AGN. The Swift BAT survey has produced the first large sample of hard x-ray bright AGN in the local universe providing the data necessary to determine the true characteristics of the AGN population. However to use this data one needs to obtain the x-ray spectral properties of these objects.We will present the complete sample of x-ray spectra of the BAT objects and the implications of these data.

  6. GLAST Prospects for Swift-Era Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, L.J.; Meszaros, P.; /Penn State U.

    2011-11-23

    We calculate the GeV spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows produced by inverse Compton scattering of these objects sub-MeV emission. We improve on earlier treatments by using refined afterglow parameters and new model developments motivated by recent Swift observations. We present time-dependent GeV spectra for standard, constant-parameter models, as well as for models with energy injection and with time-varying parameters, for a range of burst parameters. We evaluate the limiting redshift to which such afterglows can be detected by the GLAST Large Area Telescope, as well as by AGILE.

  7. Swift and GRB's: Unveiling the Relativistic Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Francis E.

    2006-01-01

    We report Swift observations of GRB 051109A, a bright, long burst detected with BAT. A bright afterglow was quickly detected with the X-Ray Telescope and Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope, and observations continued for more than 10 days. The X-ray light is complex with a rapid initial decay followed by a more gradual decay. There is evidence for a jet break with an indicated opening angle of a few degrees. UVOT observations with the V filter are consistent with a power-law day for the first 10 ks. We discuss the observations in light of current models.

  8. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  9. Gliding Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration—similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  10. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Outstanding Problems in the Swift Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2008-01-01

    The study of gamma-ray bursts has entered a new era since the successful launch of NASA's dedicated mission Swift. I discuss several new outstanding problems raised in the Swift era, including GRB classification schemes, diverse manifestations of the delayed GRB central engine activity, as well as mysterious temporal breaks in the multi-wavelength afterglows.

  11. GRBs in the Era of Swift and Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing both Swift and Fermi to study GRBs provides us with a unique broad spectral and temporal window into both prompt emission and afterglow studies. Swift has provided key information from GRB follow-up of LAT detected bursts) that has led to ground-based redshift measurements and afterglow broadband light curves and SEDs. We study the X-ray and optical afterglows of Fermi-LAT detected bursts in the context of the hundreds of GRBs discovered by Swift over the last 7 years) in order to better understand the origin of the high-energy gamma-rays. We also briefly describe the efforts to best facilitate joint Swift-Fermi observations. These initial results demonstrate the synergy between Swift and Fermi) and hint at the many interesting discoveries to come.

  12. Swift/BAT Calibration and Spectral Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) aboard NASA#s Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer is a large coded aperture gamma-ray telescope consisting of a 2.4 m (8#) x 1.2 m (4#) coded aperture mask supported 1 meter above a 5200 square cm area detector plane containing 32,768 individual 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm CZT detectors. The BAT is now completely assembled and integrated with the Swift spacecraft in anticipation of an October 2004 launch. Extensive ground calibration measurements using a variety of radioactive sources have resulted in a moderately high fidelity model for the BAT spectral and photometric response. This paper describes these ground calibration measurements as well as related computer simulations used to study the efficiency and individual detector properties of the BAT detector array. The creation of a single spectral response model representative of the fully integrated BAT posed an interesting challenge and is at the heart of the public analysis tool #batdrmgen# which computes a response matrix for any given sky position within the BAT FOV. This paper will describe the batdrmgen response generator tool and conclude with a description of the on-orbit calibration plans as well as plans for the future improvements needed to produce the more detailed spectral response model that is required for the construction of an all-sky hard x-ray survey.

  13. SWiFT site atmospheric characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Christopher Lee; Ennis, Brandon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Historical meteorological tall tower data are analyzed from the Texas Tech University 200 m tower to characterize the atmospheric trends of the Scaled Wind Farm Technologies (SWiFT) site. In this report the data are analyzed to reveal bulk atmospheric trends, temporal trends and correlations of atmospheric variables. Through this analysis for the SWiFT turbines the site International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) classification is determined to be class III-C. Averages and distributions of atmospheric variables are shown, revealing large fluctuations and the importance of understanding the actual site trends as opposed to simply using averages. The site is significantly directional with the average wind speed from the south, and particularly so in summer and fall. Site temporal trends are analyzed from both seasonal (time of the year) to daily (hour of the day) perspectives. Atmospheric stability is seen to vary most with time of day and less with time of year. Turbulence intensity is highly correlated with stability, and typical daytime unstable conditions see double the level of turbulence intensity versus that experienced during the average stable night. Shear, veer and atmospheric stability correlations are shown, where shear and veer are both highest for stable atmospheric conditions. An analysis of the Texas Tech University tower anemometer measurements is performed which reveals the extent of the tower shadow effects and sonic tilt misalignment.

  14. GRB Catalog: Bursts from Vela to Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, L.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma ray burst (GRB) astronomy started when the first event was recorded on July 2, 1967 by Vela 4a and 4b. Since then many missions have flown experiments capable of detecting GRBs. The events collected by these older experiments are mostly available in paper copy, each containing a few ten to a few hundred bursts. No systematic effort in cataloging of these bursts has been available. In some cases the information is unpublished and in others difficult to retrieve. The first major GRB catalog was obtained by GRO with the BATSE experiment. It contains more than 2000 bursts and includes homogeneous information for each of the bursts. With the launch of Swift, the first Gamma-ray/X-ray mission dedicated to the study of GRBs and their afterglows, a wealth of information is collected by the Swift instrument as well as from ground-based telescopes. This talk will describe the efforts to create a comprehensive GRBCAT and its current status and future prospective.

  15. Understanding Supernovae With A Swift Ultraviolet Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are one of the primary tools to study the expansion history of the universe. Their usefulness as precision standard candles is limited by several systematic uncertainties and the possibility that the progenitor systems and explosion details have changed over the history of the universe. Optical observations of high- redshift SNe probe rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths, requiring space based observations of nearby SNe against which to compare. The Swift satellite has already observed more supernovae than all other UV observatories combined. We propose to create and make publicly available a value-added archive of the images and photometry of the 200+ SNe observed in the UV by Swift's Ultra- Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). We will use this data to study the effects of environment and extinction on the SN Ia light curves. We will also compare this local sample of UV light curves with high redshift SNe observed in the optical. The Swift SN Archive will include final photometry as well as the final images appropriate for others to use to produce their own photometry of the SNe, other transient objects in the fields, or the host galaxies. For each epoch of photometry we will also compute the spectrum-dependent corrections for extinction and redshift. These data will be used to measure the UV contribution to the bolometric light curve and look for any time dependence to the extinction. With the larger sample available we will look for correlations with host galaxy properties. We will also create absolute magnitude light curves of SNe of all types for comparison with existing high redshift observations. These will also be used to make predictions for the detectability and classification of high redshift SNe in the rest-frame UV by future ground and space-based telescopes. The Swift UV observations fill a critical niche in our understanding of SNe Ia, and this program will enhance the scientific use of this important dataset. The work done

  16. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is a ship-born weather radar system operating in X-band developed by the DHI Group to detect precipitation in urban areas. To date more than thirty units are installed in different settings around the world. A LAWR was also deployed in the Alps, at 3883 m a.s.l. on the Kl. Matterhorn (Valais, Switzerland). This was the highest LAWR of the world and it led to the development of an Alpine LAWR system that, besides featuring important technological improvements needed to withstand the severe Alpine conditions, required the development of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which is the main focus of this contribution. The LAWR system is equipped with the original FURUNO fan-beam slotted antenna and the original logarithmic receiver, which limits the radar observations to the video signal (L) withour providing the reflectivity (Z). The beam is 0.95 deg wide and 20 deg high. It can detect precipitation to a max range of 60 km. In order to account for the limited availability of raw signal and information and the specific mountain set-up, the conversion model had to be developed differently from the state-of-the-art radar conversion technique used for this class of radars. In particular, the ARCOM is based on a model used to simulate a spatial dependent factor, hereafter called ACF, which is in turn function of parameters that take in account climatological conditions, also used in other conversion methods, but additionally accounting for local radar beam features and for orographic forcings such as the effective sampling power (sP), which is modelled by means of antenna pattern, geometric ground clutter and their interaction. The result is a conversion factor formulated to account for a range correction that is based on the increase of the sampling volume, partial beam blocking and local climatological conditions. The importance of the latter in this study is double with respect to the standard conversion technique for this

  17. Frost resistance in alpine woody plants.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of key findings related to frost resistance in alpine woody plant species, summarizes data on their frost resistance, highlights the importance of freeze avoidance mechanisms, and indicates areas of future research. Freezing temperatures are possible throughout the whole growing period in the alpine life zone. Frost severity, comprised of both intensity and duration, becomes greater with increasing elevation and, there is also a greater probability, that small statured woody plants, may be insulated by snow cover. Several frost survival mechanisms have evolved in woody alpine plants in response to these environmental conditions. Examples of tolerance to extracellular freezing and freeze dehydration, life cycles that allow species to escape frost, and freeze avoidance mechanisms can all be found. Despite their specific adaption to the alpine environment, frost damage can occur in spring, while all alpine woody plants have a low risk of frost damage in winter. Experimental evidence indicates that premature deacclimation in Pinus cembra in the spring, and a limited ability of many species of alpine woody shrubs to rapidly reacclimate when they lose snow cover, resulting in reduced levels of frost resistance in the spring, may be particularly critical under the projected changes in climate. In this review, frost resistance and specific frost survival mechanisms of different organs (leaves, stems, vegetative and reproductive over-wintering buds, flowers, and fruits) and tissues are compared. The seasonal dynamics of frost resistance of leaves of trees, as opposed to woody shrubs, is also discussed. The ability of some tissues and organs to avoid freezing by supercooling, as visualized by high resolution infrared thermography, are also provided. Collectively, the report provides a review of the complex and diverse ways that woody plants survive in the frost dominated environment of the alpine life zone.

  18. Frost resistance in alpine woody plants

    PubMed Central

    Neuner, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a brief review of key findings related to frost resistance in alpine woody plant species, summarizes data on their frost resistance, highlights the importance of freeze avoidance mechanisms, and indicates areas of future research. Freezing temperatures are possible throughout the whole growing period in the alpine life zone. Frost severity, comprised of both intensity and duration, becomes greater with increasing elevation and, there is also a greater probability, that small statured woody plants, may be insulated by snow cover. Several frost survival mechanisms have evolved in woody alpine plants in response to these environmental conditions. Examples of tolerance to extracellular freezing and freeze dehydration, life cycles that allow species to escape frost, and freeze avoidance mechanisms can all be found. Despite their specific adaption to the alpine environment, frost damage can occur in spring, while all alpine woody plants have a low risk of frost damage in winter. Experimental evidence indicates that premature deacclimation in Pinus cembra in the spring, and a limited ability of many species of alpine woody shrubs to rapidly reacclimate when they lose snow cover, resulting in reduced levels of frost resistance in the spring, may be particularly critical under the projected changes in climate. In this review, frost resistance and specific frost survival mechanisms of different organs (leaves, stems, vegetative and reproductive over-wintering buds, flowers, and fruits) and tissues are compared. The seasonal dynamics of frost resistance of leaves of trees, as opposed to woody shrubs, is also discussed. The ability of some tissues and organs to avoid freezing by supercooling, as visualized by high resolution infrared thermography, are also provided. Collectively, the report provides a review of the complex and diverse ways that woody plants survive in the frost dominated environment of the alpine life zone. PMID:25520725

  19. Erosion by an Alpine glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric; Beyssac, Olivier; Lane, Stuart; Brughelli, Mattia; Leprince, Sebastien; Brun, Fanny

    2015-04-01

    Most mountain ranges on Earth owe their morphology to the action of glaciers and icecaps over the last few million years. Our current understanding of how glaciers have modified mountainous landforms has mainly been driven through landscape evolution models. These have included an array of erosion laws and mainly progressed through the implementation of various levels of sophistication regarding ice dynamics, subglacial hydrology or thermodynamics of water flow. However, the complex nature of the erosion processes involved and the difficulty of directly examining the ice-bedrock interface of contemporary glaciers has precluded the establishment of a prevailing erosion theory. Here we quantify the spatial variations in ice sliding velocity and erosion rate of a fast-flowing Alpine glacier in New Zealand during a 5-month period. By combining high resolution 3D measurements of surface velocity from optical satellite imagery with the quantification of both the production and provenance of sediments by the glacier, we show that erosion rates are proportional to sliding velocity raised to a power of about two. This result is consistent with abrasion theory. Given that the ice sliding velocity is a nonlinear function of ice thickness and ice surface slope, the response of glacial erosion to precipitation changes is highly nonlinear. Finally, our ability to constrain the glacial abrasion law present opportunities to further examine the interaction between glaciation and mountain evolution.

  20. 75 FR 74681 - Alpine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... will be held in Alpine County at the Alpine Early Learning Center, 100 Foothill Road, Markleeville, CA... Forest Service Issues of interest to the public (2) Public Comment. The meeting is open to the...

  1. Elevation of house built at 3315 Alpine St., SW for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation of house built at 3315 Alpine St., SW for Merrimack Mill workers. Originally a duplex, this structure has been converted into a single family house - 3315 Alpine Street, Southwest (House), Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Evaluation of Swift Start TCP in Long-Delay Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawas-Grodek, Frances J.; Tran, Diepchi T.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the test results of the Swift Start algorithm in single-flow and multiple-flow testbeds under the effects of high propagation delays, various slow bottlenecks, and small queue sizes. Although this algorithm estimates capacity and implements packet pacing, the findings were that in a heavily congested link, the Swift Start algorithm will not be applicable. The reason is that the bottleneck estimation is falsely influenced by timeouts induced by retransmissions and the expiration of delayed acknowledgment (ACK) timers, thus causing the modified Swift Start code to fall back to regular transmission control protocol (TCP).

  3. Swift Observations of SN 2007bb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.

    2007-04-01

    Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) started observing the type IIn SN 2007bb (CBET #912, CBET #916) on 2007-04-10.0 UT. A second observation started on 2007-04-13.0 UT and was truncated due to a GRB, leading to UVOT data in the B, U, and UVW1 filters only. The following UVOT magnitudes were measured for these two epochs: V = 17.5, (308 s exposure times), B = 17.9, 17.9 (308 s, 80 s), U = 17.2, 17.7 (308 s, 80 s), UVW1 [181-321nm] = 18.3, 18.7 (613 s, 896 s), UVM2 [166-268 nm] = 19.5, (843 s), and UVW2 [112-264 nm] = 19.4, (1231 s, 161 s).

  4. The Swift Burst and Transient Telescope (BAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The Swift Burst and Transient telescope (BAT) has surveyed the entire sky for the last 3.5 years obtaining the first sensitive all sky survey of the 14-195 kev sky. At high galactic latitudes the vast majority of the detected sources are AGN. Since hard x-rays penetrate all but Compton thick obscuring material (Column densities of 1.6324 atms/sq cm) this survey is unbiased with respect to obscuration, host galaxy type, optical , radio or IR properties. We will present results on the broad band x-ray properties, the nature of the host galaxies, the luminosity function and will discuss a few of the optical, IR and x-ray results in detail.

  5. Getting to know classical novae with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Julian P.

    2015-09-01

    Novae have been reported as transients for more than two thousand years. Their bright optical outbursts are the result of explosive nuclear burning of gas accreted from a binary companion onto a white dwarf. Novae containing a white dwarf close to the Chandrasekhar mass limit and accreting at a high rate are potentially the unknown progenitors of the type Ia supernovae used to measure the acceleration of the Universe. Swift X-ray observations have radically transformed our view of novae by providing dense monitoring throughout the outburst, revealing new phenomena in the super-soft X-rays from the still-burning white dwarf such as early extreme variability and half- to one-minute timescale quasi-periodic oscillations. The distinct evolution of this emission from the harder X-ray emission due to ejecta shocks has been clearly delineated. Soft X-ray observations allow the mass of the white dwarf, the mass burned and the mass ejected to be estimated. In combination with observations at other wavelengths, including the high spectral resolution observations of the large X-ray observatories, high resolution optical and radio imaging, radio monitoring, optical spectroscopy, and the detection of GeV gamma-ray emission from recent novae, models of the explosion have been tested and developed. I review nine novae for which Swift has made a significant impact; these have shown the signature of the components in the interacting binary system in addition to the white dwarf: the re-formed accretion disk, the companion star and its stellar wind.

  6. Aerodynamics of gliding flight in common swifts.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, P; Hedenström, A

    2011-02-01

    Gliding flight performance and wake topology of a common swift (Apus apus L.) were examined in a wind tunnel at speeds between 7 and 11 m s(-1). The tunnel was tilted to simulate descending flight at different sink speeds. The swift varied its wingspan, wing area and tail span over the speed range. Wingspan decreased linearly with speed, whereas tail span decreased in a nonlinear manner. For each airspeed, the minimum glide angle was found. The corresponding sink speeds showed a curvilinear relationship with airspeed, with a minimum sink speed at 8.1 m s(-1) and a speed of best glide at 9.4 m s(-1). Lift-to-drag ratio was calculated for each airspeed and tilt angle combinations and the maximum for each speed showed a curvilinear relationship with airspeed, with a maximum of 12.5 at an airspeed of 9.5 m s(-1). Wake was sampled in the transverse plane using stereo digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The main structures of the wake were a pair of trailing wingtip vortices and a pair of trailing tail vortices. Circulation of these was measured and a model was constructed that showed good weight support. Parasite drag was estimated from the wake defect measured in the wake behind the body. Parasite drag coefficient ranged from 0.30 to 0.22 over the range of airspeeds. Induced drag was calculated and used to estimate profile drag coefficient, which was found to be in the same range as that previously measured on a Harris' hawk. PMID:21228197

  7. Aerodynamics of gliding flight in common swifts.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, P; Hedenström, A

    2011-02-01

    Gliding flight performance and wake topology of a common swift (Apus apus L.) were examined in a wind tunnel at speeds between 7 and 11 m s(-1). The tunnel was tilted to simulate descending flight at different sink speeds. The swift varied its wingspan, wing area and tail span over the speed range. Wingspan decreased linearly with speed, whereas tail span decreased in a nonlinear manner. For each airspeed, the minimum glide angle was found. The corresponding sink speeds showed a curvilinear relationship with airspeed, with a minimum sink speed at 8.1 m s(-1) and a speed of best glide at 9.4 m s(-1). Lift-to-drag ratio was calculated for each airspeed and tilt angle combinations and the maximum for each speed showed a curvilinear relationship with airspeed, with a maximum of 12.5 at an airspeed of 9.5 m s(-1). Wake was sampled in the transverse plane using stereo digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). The main structures of the wake were a pair of trailing wingtip vortices and a pair of trailing tail vortices. Circulation of these was measured and a model was constructed that showed good weight support. Parasite drag was estimated from the wake defect measured in the wake behind the body. Parasite drag coefficient ranged from 0.30 to 0.22 over the range of airspeeds. Induced drag was calculated and used to estimate profile drag coefficient, which was found to be in the same range as that previously measured on a Harris' hawk.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Definitive Swift/XRT LC of Swift J164449.3+573451 (Mangano+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, V.; Burrows, D. N.; Sbarufatti, B.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2016-04-01

    Swift J164449.3+573451 triggered the Swift/BAT twice on 2011 March 28th, resulting in automated observations by Swift/XRT. The whole Swift follow-up and monitoring campaign of Swift J1644+57 from discovery up to three years later consists of ~700 sequences and four different trigger numbers: 450158 (seq. 0-7, from 2011 March 28 to 30), 31955 (seq. 2-255, from 2011 March 31 to December 06), 32200 (seq. 1-237, from 2011 December 07 to 2012 August 15), and 32526 (seq. 1-200, from 2012 August 16 to 2014 March 28). The total XRT exposure in the data set is 2Ms in Photon Counting (PC) mode and 320ks in Windowed Timing (WT) mode. We also re-analyze the 24.7ks Chandra-ACIS ToO observation (PI: Tanvir), performed on 2012 November 26, and present analysis results for a second ACIS observation of 27.7ks exposure performed by Chandra on 2015 February 17 (PI: Levan). We present the definitive Swift/XRT light curve for Swift J1644+57, which spans ~800days. (3 data files).

  9. View looking down alley behind Alpine St, SW at a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View looking down alley behind Alpine St, SW at a typical row of privies. Each section contained a latrine and a shower for the adjacent mill worker housing - 3703 Alpine Street, Southwest (Outbuilding), 3703 Alpine Street, Southwest, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  10. RANAVIRUS CAUSES MASS DIE-OFFS OF ALPINE AMPHIBIANS IN THE SOUTHWESTERN ALPS, FRANCE.

    PubMed

    Miaud, Claude; Pozet, Françoise; Gaudin, Nadine Curt Grand; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Labrut, Sophie

    2016-04-28

    Pathogenic fungi and viruses cause mortality outbreaks in wild amphibians worldwide. In the summer of 2012, dead tadpoles and adults of the European common frog Rana temporaria were reported in alpine lakes in the southwestern Alps (Mercantour National Park, France). A preliminary investigation using molecular diagnostic techniques identified a Ranavirus as the potential pathogenic agent. Three mortality events were recorded in the park, and samples were collected. The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis was not detected in any of the dead adult and juvenile frogs sampled (n=16) whereas all specimens were positive for a Ranavirus. The genome sequence of this Ranavirus was identical to previously published sequences of the common midwife toad virus (CMTV), a Ranavirus that has been associated with amphibian mortalities throughout Europe. We cultured virus from the organs of the dead common frogs and infecting adult male common frogs collected in another alpine region where no frog mortality had been observed. The experimentally infected frogs suffered 100% mortality (n=10). The alpine die-off is the first CMTV outbreak associated with mass mortality in wild amphibians in France. We describe the lesions observed and summarize amphibian populations affected by Ranaviruses in Europe. In addition, we discuss the ecologic specificities of mountain amphibians that may contribute to increasing their risk of exposure to and transmission of Ranaviruses.

  11. RANAVIRUS CAUSES MASS DIE-OFFS OF ALPINE AMPHIBIANS IN THE SOUTHWESTERN ALPS, FRANCE.

    PubMed

    Miaud, Claude; Pozet, Françoise; Gaudin, Nadine Curt Grand; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Labrut, Sophie

    2016-04-28

    Pathogenic fungi and viruses cause mortality outbreaks in wild amphibians worldwide. In the summer of 2012, dead tadpoles and adults of the European common frog Rana temporaria were reported in alpine lakes in the southwestern Alps (Mercantour National Park, France). A preliminary investigation using molecular diagnostic techniques identified a Ranavirus as the potential pathogenic agent. Three mortality events were recorded in the park, and samples were collected. The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis was not detected in any of the dead adult and juvenile frogs sampled (n=16) whereas all specimens were positive for a Ranavirus. The genome sequence of this Ranavirus was identical to previously published sequences of the common midwife toad virus (CMTV), a Ranavirus that has been associated with amphibian mortalities throughout Europe. We cultured virus from the organs of the dead common frogs and infecting adult male common frogs collected in another alpine region where no frog mortality had been observed. The experimentally infected frogs suffered 100% mortality (n=10). The alpine die-off is the first CMTV outbreak associated with mass mortality in wild amphibians in France. We describe the lesions observed and summarize amphibian populations affected by Ranaviruses in Europe. In addition, we discuss the ecologic specificities of mountain amphibians that may contribute to increasing their risk of exposure to and transmission of Ranaviruses. PMID:26967128

  12. NASA/GSFC Onboard Autonomy For The Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, John

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work that NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is currently doing and has been involved in in developing onboard autonomy and automation. Emphasis is given to the work being done for the Swift observatory

  13. Swift Sees Changes in the Milky Way 2006 - 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    This sequence from the X-ray Telescope aboard NASA's Swift shows changes in the central region of the Milky Way galaxy from 2006 through 2013. Watch for flares from binary systems containing a neut...

  14. Preliminary investigations of HE performance characterization using SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. J.; Johnson, C. E.

    2014-05-01

    Preliminary experiments are performed to assess the utility of using the shock wave image framing technique (SWIFT) to characterize high explosive (HE) performance on detonator length and time scales. Columns of XTX 8004, an extrudable RDX-based high explosive, are cured directly within polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) dynamic witness plates, and SWIFT is employed to directly visualize shock waves driven into PMMA through detonation interaction. Current experiments investigate two-dimensional, axisymmetric test geometries that resemble historic aquarium tests, but on millimeter length scales, and the SWIFT system records 16-frame, time-resolved image sequences at 190 ns inter-framing. Detonation wave velocities are accurately calculated from the time-resolved images, and standard aquarium-test analysis is evaluated to investigate calculated shock pressures at the HE/PMMA interface. Experimental SWIFT results are discussed where the charge diameter of XTX 8004 is varied from 2.0 mm to 6.5 mm.

  15. Correlative Analysis of GRBs Detected by Swift and Suzaku- WAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, H.A.; Sakamoto, T.; Yamaoka, K.; Sugita, S.; Ohno, M.; Sato, G.; Hara, R.; Ohmori, N.; Tanaka, H.; Yamauchi, M.; Onda, K.; Tashiro, M.

    2009-01-01

    It is now well known that a complete understanding of the energetics of the prompt phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) requires full knowledge of the spectrum, extending at least as high as the peak energy (Epeak) of the vF(v) spectrum. Since most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have Epeak above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, a full understanding of the prompt emission from Swift GRBs requires spectral fits over as broad an energy range as possible. This can be completed for bursts which are simultaneously detected by Swift BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50-5000 keV. Between the launch of Suzaku in July 2005 and the end of 2008, there were 44 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which triggered both Swift and WAM and an additional 41 bursts which triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger. A joint BAT-WAM team has cross-calibrated the two instruments using GRBs, and we are now able to perform joint fits on these bursts to determine spectral parameters including Epeak. The results of broad spectral fits allows us to understand the distribution of Epeak for Swift bursts and to calibrate Epeak estimators when Epeak is within the BAT energy range. For those bursts with spectroscopic redshifts, we can calculate the isotropic energy and study various correlations between Epeak and other global burst parameters. Here we present the results of joint Swift/BAT-Suzaku/WAM spectral fits for 77 of the bursts jointly detected by the two instruments. We show that the distribution of spectral fit parameters is consistent with distributions from earlier missions and confirm that Swift bursts are consistent with earlier reported relationships between Epeak and isotropic energy. We show through time-resolved spectroscopy that individual burst pulses are also consistent with this relationship.

  16. The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chincarini, G.; Giommi, P.; Mason, K. O.; Nousek, J. A.; Wells, A. A.; White, N. E.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift mission: scheduled for launch in early 2004: is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy. It is the first-of-its-kind autonomous rapid-slewing satellite for transient astronomy and pioneers the way for future rapid-reaction and multiwavelength missions. It will be far more powerful than any previous GRB mission, observing more than 100 bursts per year and performing detailed X-ray and UV/optical afterglow observations spanning timescales from 1 minute to several days after the burst. The objectives are to: 1) determine the origin of GFU3s; 2) classify GRBs and search for new types; 3) study the interaction of the ultra-relativistic outflows of GRBs with their surrounding medium; and 4) use GRBs to study the early universe out to z greater than 10. The mission is being developed by a NASA-led international collaboration. It will carry three instruments: a new-generation wide-field gamma-ray (15-150 keV) detector that will detect bursts, calculate 1-4 arcmin positions: and trigger autonomous spacecraft slews; a narrow-field X-ray telescope that will give 5 arcsec positions and perform spectroscopy in the 0.2 to 10 keV band; and a narrow-field UV/optical telescope that will operate in the 170-600 nm band and provide 0.3 arcsec positions and optical finding charts. Redshift determinations will be made for most bursts. In addition to the primary GRB science, the mission will perform a hard X-ray survey to a sensitivity of approx. 1 mCrab (approx. 2 x l0(exp -11) erg/sq cm s in the 15-150 keV band), more than an order of magnitude better than HEAO A-4. A flexible data and operations system will allow rapid follow-up observations of all types of high-energy transients. with rapid data downlink and uplink available through the NASA TDRSS system. Swift transient data will be rapidly distributed to the astronomical community and all interested observers are encouraged to participate in follow-up measurements. A Guest Investigator program

  17. Swift J1822.3-1606: Enhanced Swift-XRT position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagani, C.; Beardmore, A. P.; Kennea, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    Using 1046 s of XRT Photon Counting mode data and 1 UVOT image for Swift J1822.3-1606, we find an astrometrically corrected X-ray position (using the XRT-UVOT alignment and matching UVOT field sources to the USNO-B1 catalogue) of RA, Dec = 275.57500, -16.07412 which is equivalent to: RA (J2000): 18h 22m 18.00s Dec (J2000): -16d 04' 26.8" with an uncertainty of 1.8 arcsec (radius, 90% confidence).

  18. Afterglows, Redshifts, and Properties of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, E.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, D. B.; Soderberg, A. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Nakar, E.; Kelson, D. D.; Gladders, M. D.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Oemler, A.; Dressler, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Price, P. A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Frail, D. A.; Morrell, N.; Gonzalez, S.; Krzeminski, W.; Sari, R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Moon, D.-S.; Penprase, B. E.; Jayawardhana, R.; Scholz, A.; Rich, J.; Peterson, B. A.; Anderson, G.; McNaught, R.; Minezaki, T.; Yoshii, Y.; Cowie, L. L.; Pimbblet, K.

    2005-11-01

    We present optical, near-IR, and radio follow-up of 16 Swift bursts, including our discovery of nine afterglows and a redshift determination for three. These observations, supplemented by data from the literature, provide an afterglow recovery rate of 52% in the optical/near-IR, much higher than in previous missions (BeppoSAX, HETE-2, INTEGRAL, and IPN). The optical/near-IR afterglows of Swift events are on average 1.8 mag fainter at t=12 hr than those of previous missions. The X-ray afterglows are similarly fainter than those of pre-Swift bursts. In the radio the limiting factor is the VLA threshold, and the detection rate for Swift bursts is similar to that for past missions. The redshift distribution of pre-Swift bursts peaked at z~1, whereas the six Swift bursts with measured redshifts are distributed evenly between 0.7 and 3.2. From these results we conclude that (1) the pre-Swift distributions were biased in favor of bright events and low-redshift events, (2) the higher sensitivity and accurate positions of Swift result in a better representation of the true burst redshift and brightness distributions (which are higher and dimmer, respectively), and (3) ~10% of the bursts are optically dark, as a result of a high redshift and/or dust extinction. We remark that the apparent lack of low-redshift, low-luminosity Swift bursts and the lower event rate than prelaunch estimates (90 vs. 150 per year) are the result of a threshold that is similar to that of BATSE. In view of these inferences, afterglow observers may find it advisable to make significant changes in follow-up strategies of Swift events. The faintness of the afterglows means that large telescopes should be employed as soon as the burst is localized. Sensitive observations in RIz and near-IR bands will be needed to discriminate between a typical z~2 burst with modest extinction and a high-redshift event. Radio observations will be profitable for a small fraction (~10%) of events. Finally, we suggest that

  19. Swift heavy ion irradiation of polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanzat, E.; Bouffard, S.; Bousquerel, A.; Devy, J.; Gaté, Chr.

    1996-08-01

    We have studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy the chemical modifications induced by swift heavy ions in polystyrene. The overall destruction yield becomes very significant at high electronic stopping power ( {dE }/{dx }) e and the radiation sensitivity of this aromatic polymer merges typical values of equivalent aliphatic polymers as polyethylene. So, the radiation resistance conferred, at low ( {dE }/{dx }) e, to polystyrene by the phenyl side group is lost at high ( {dE }/{dx }) e. The creation of different unsaturated groups is also observed. They correspond to the vibration frequencies of alkyne, allene, vinylidene, vinyl and trans-vinylene groups. Moreover, the emergence of a wide band without any structure around 1600 cm -1 reveals the presence of double bonds with different degrees of conjugation. By comparison with the modifications induced in polyethylene, we discuss the role played by the phenyl side group and we consider the multiple ionisation of the aromatic ring as one possible way to induce the observed modifications.

  20. Setting the Triggering Thresholds on Swift

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, Kassandra M.; Fenimore, E.E.; Palmer, David; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Parsons, A.

    2004-09-28

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift has two main types of 'rate' triggers: short and long. Short trigger time scales range from 4ms to 64ms, while long triggers are 64ms to {approx_equal} 16 seconds. While both short and long trigger have criteria with one background sample (traditional 'one-sided' triggers), the long triggers can also have criteria with two background samples ('bracketed' triggers) which remove trends in the background. Both long and short triggers can select energy ranges of 15-25, 15-50, 25-100 and 50-350 KeV. There are more than 180 short triggering criteria and approximately 500 long triggering criteria used to detect gamma ray bursts. To fully utilize these criteria, the thresholds must be set correctly. The optimum thresholds are determined by a tradeoff between avoiding false triggers and capturing as many bursts as possible. We use realistic simulated orbital variations, which are the prime cause of false triggers.

  1. Engineered swift equilibration of a Brownian particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Ignacio A.; Petrosyan, Artyom; Guéry-Odelin, David; Trizac, Emmanuel; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2016-09-01

    A fundamental and intrinsic property of any device or natural system is its relaxation time τrelax, which is the time it takes to return to equilibrium after the sudden change of a control parameter. Reducing τrelax is frequently necessary, and is often obtained by a complex feedback process. To overcome the limitations of such an approach, alternative methods based on suitable driving protocols have been recently demonstrated, for isolated quantum and classical systems. Their extension to open systems in contact with a thermostat is a stumbling block for applications. Here, we design a protocol, named Engineered Swift Equilibration (ESE), that shortcuts time-consuming relaxations, and we apply it to a Brownian particle trapped in an optical potential whose properties can be controlled in time. We implement the process experimentally, showing that it allows the system to reach equilibrium 100 times faster than the natural equilibration rate. We also estimate the increase of the dissipated energy needed to get such a time reduction. The method paves the way for applications in micro- and nano-devices, where the reduction of operation time represents as substantial a challenge as miniaturization.

  2. The Swift Mission and the REM Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Chincarini, G.; Giommi, P.; Mason, K. O.; Nousek, J. A.; Wells, A. A.; White, N. E.; Barthelemy, S. D.; Burrow, D. N.; Hurley, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    Following a description of the science drive which originated the Swift Mission, this is US NASA MIDEX Mission with the collaboration of Italy and the UK, we will describe the status of the hardware and the observing strategy. The telemetry is carried out via the TDRSS satellite for those communications that need immediate response. The data transfer and the scheduled uploading of routine commands will be done through the ASI Malindi station in Kenia. Both in the US and in Europe a large effort will be done to follow the bursts with the maximum of efficiency and as soon as possible after the alert. We will describe how the ESO VLT telescopes are able to respond to the alert. To address the problematic of the dark bursts and to immediately follow up all of the bursts also in the Near Infrared we designed and built a 60 cm NIR Robotic telescope, REM, to be located on the ESO ground at Cerro La Silla. The instrumentation includes also a low dispersion spectrograph with the capability of multi wavelength optical photometry.

  3. Controlling the Swift XRT CCD Temperature via Passive Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennea, Jamie A.; Burrows, D. N.; Wells, A.; Pagani, C.; Hill, J. E.; Racusin, J. L.; Morris, D.; Hunsberger, S.; Abbey, A. F.; Beardmore, A.; Campana, S.; Chester, M.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.; Godet, O.; Mineo, T.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Moretti, A.; Nousek, J.; Osborne, J.; Page, K.; Perri, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tamburelli, F.

    2005-01-01

    The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) is a CCD based X-ray telescope designed for localization, spectroscopy and long term light curve monitoring of Gamma-Ray Bursts and their X-ray afterglows. Shortly after launch there was a failure of the thermo-electric cooler on the XRT CCD. Due to this the Swift XRT Team had the unexpected challenge of ensuring that the CCD temperature stayed below -50C utilizing only passive cooling through a radiator mounted on the side of the Swift. Here we show that the temperature of the XRT CCD is correlated with the average elevation of the Earth above the XRT radiator, which is in turn related to the targets that Swift observes in an orbit. In order to maximize passive cooling of the XRT CCD, the XRT team devised several novel methods for ensuring that the XRT radiator's exposure to the Earth was minimized to ensure efficient cooling. These methods include: picking targets on the sky for Swift to point at which are known to put the spacecraft into a good orientation for maximizing XRT cooling; biasing the spacecraft roll angle to point the XRT radiator away from the Earth as much as possible; utilizing time in the SAA, in which all of the instruments on-board Swift are non-operational, to point at "cold targets" and restricting observing time on "warm" targets to only the periods at which the spacecraft is in a favorable orientation for cooling. By doing this at the observation planning stage we have been able to minimize the heating of the CCD and maintain the XRT as a fully operational scientific instrument, without compromising the science goals of the Swift mission.

  4. Controlling the Swift XRT CCD temperature via passive cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennea, Jamie A.; Burrows, D. N.; Wells, A.; Pagani, C.; Hill, J. E.; Racusin, J. L.; Morris, D.; Hunsberger, S.; Abbey, A. F.; Beardmore, A.; Campana, S.; Chester, M.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.; Godet, O.; Mineo, T.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Moretti, A.; Nousek, J.; Osborne, J.; Page, K.; Perri, M.; Tagliaferri, G.; Tamburelli, F.

    2005-08-01

    The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) is a CCD based X-ray telescope designed for localization, spectroscopy and long term light curve monitoring of Gamma-Ray Bursts and their X-ray afterglows. Shortly after launch there was a failure of the thermo-electric cooler on the XRT CCD. Due to this the Swift XRT Team had the unexpected challenge of ensuring that the CCD temperature stayed below -50C utilizing only passive cooling through a radiator mounted on the side of the Swift. Here we show that the temperature of the XRT CCD is correlated with the average elevation of the Earth above the XRT radiator, which is in turn related to the targets that Swift observes in an orbit. In order to maximize passive cooling of the XRT CCD, the XRT team devised several novel methods for ensuring that the XRT radiator's exposure to the Earth was minimized to ensure efficient cooling. These methods include: picking targets on the sky for Swift to point at which are known to put the spacecraft into a good orientation for maximizing XRT cooling; biasing the spacecraft roll angle to point the XRT radiator away from the Earth as much as possible; utilizing time in the SAA, in which all of the instruments on-board Swift are non-operational, to point at "cold targets" and restricting observing time on "warm" targets to only the periods at which the spacecraft is in a favorable orientation for cooling. By doing this at the observation planning stage we have been able to minimize the heating of the CCD and maintain the XRT as a fully operational scientific instrument, without compromising the science goals of the Swift mission.

  5. Swift Publication Statistics and the Comparison with Other Major Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaglio, S.; Grothkopf, U.

    2015-04-01

    Swift is a satellite aimed at detecting gamma-ray bursts (GRB), the most energetic explosions in the universe. Launched at the end of 2004 and funded until 2016, it is equipped with γ-ray, X-ray, and optical-UV instrumentation and discovers, localizes, and collects data for more than a hundred GRBs per year. We studied the bibliometrics produced with Swift data and found that it is one of the most successful medium-size missions ever. The production in 2005 was 24 papers, and has steadily increased to 328 in the year 2013, surpassing the Keck telescope. If this trend continues, Swift may soon be approaching the publication numbers of the other two high-energy satellites XMM-Newton and Chandra. Also, the number of citations shows a great success for Swift. The Swift user community publishes mostly in ApJS (almost 50% of the papers) as well as A&A and MNRAS (approx. a quarter each). In the years 2005-2013, 47 papers (2.7%) were published in the high-impact journals Nature and Science.

  6. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Hullinger, D.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. In this talk, we describe the BAT instrument response as determined to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies. We will also discuss the public data analysis tools developed to calculate the BAT response to sources at different energies and locations in the FOV. The level of accuracy required for the BAT instrument response used for the hard x-ray survey is significantly higher because this response must be used in the iterative clean algorithm for finding fainter sources. Because the bright sources add a lot of coding noise to the BAT sky image, fainter sources can be seen only after the counts due to the bright sources are removed. The better we know the BAT response, the lower the noise in the cleaned spectrum and thus the more sensitive the survey. Since the BAT detector plane consists of 32768 individual, 4 mm square CZT gamma-ray detectors, the most accurate BAT response would include 32768 individual detector response functions to separate mask modulation effects from differences in detector efficiencies! We describe OUT continuing work to improve the accuracy of the BAT instrument response and will present the current results of Monte Carlo simulations as well as BAT ground calibration data.

  7. The new magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Ng, C.-Y.; Livingstone, M. A.; Kaspi, V. M.; Cumming, A.; Archibald, R.

    2013-03-01

    On 2011 July 14, a transient X-ray source, Swift J1822.3-1606, was detected by Swift BAT via its burst activities. It was subsequently identified as a new magnetar upon the detection of a pulse period of 8.4 s. Using follow-up RXTE, Swift, and Chandra observations, we have determined a spin-down rate of Ṗ ~ 3 × 10-13, implying a dipole magnetic field of ~ 5 × 1013 G, second lowest among known magnetars, although our timing solution is contaminated by timing noise. The post-outburst flux evolution is well modelled by surface cooling resulting from heat injection in the outer crust, although we cannot rule out other models. We measure an absorption column density similar to that of the open cluster M17 at 10' away, arguing for a comparable distance of ~1.6 kpc. If confirmed, this could be the nearest known magnetar.

  8. Post-Launch Analysis of Swift's Gamma-Ray Burst Detection Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The dependence of Swift#s detection sensitivity on a burst#s temporal and spectral properties shapes the detected burst population. Using s implified models of the detector hardware and the burst trigger syste m I find that Swift is more sensitive to long, soft bursts than CGRO# s BATSE, a reference mission because of its large burst database. Thu s Swift has increased sensitivity in the parameter space region into which time dilation and spectral redshifting shift high redshift burs ts.

  9. Swift Publication Statistics: A Comparison With Other Major Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaglio, S.; Grothkopf, U.

    2013-03-01

    Swift is a satellite equipped with γ-ray, X-ray, and optical-UV instruments aimed at discovering, localizing, and collecting data from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Launched at the end of 2004, this small-size mission finds about a hundred GRBs per year, totaling more than 700 events as of 2012. In addition to GRBs, Swift observes other energetic events, such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs), novae, and supernovae. Here we look at its success using bibliometric tools; that is, the number of papers using Swift data and their impact (i.e., number of citations to those papers). We derived these from the publication years 2005 to 2011, and compared them with the same numbers for other major observatories. Swift provided data for 1101 papers in the interval 2005-2011, with 24 in the first year, to 287 in the last year. In 2011, Swift had more than double the number of publications as Subaru, it overcame Gemini by a large fraction, and reached Keck. It is getting closer to the ~400 publications of the successful high-energy missions XMM-Newton and Chandra, but is still far from the most productive telescopes, VLT (over 500) and HST (almost 800). The overall average number of citations per paper, as of 2012 November, is 28.3, which is comparable to the others, but lower than Keck (41.8). The science topics covered by Swift publications have changed from the first year, when over 80% of the papers were about GRBs, falling to less than 30% in 2011.

  10. Accelerating Medical Research using the Swift Workflow System

    PubMed Central

    STEF-PRAUN, Tiberiu; CLIFFORD, Benjamin; FOSTER, Ian; HASSON, Uri; HATEGAN, Mihael; SMALL, Steven L.; WILDE, Michael; ZHAO, Yong

    2009-01-01

    Both medical research and clinical practice are starting to involve large quantities of data and to require large-scale computation, as a result of the digitization of many areas of medicine. For example, in brain research – the domain that we consider here – a single research study may require the repeated processing, using computationally demanding and complex applications, of thousands of files corresponding to hundreds of functional MRI studies. Execution efficiency demands the use of parallel or distributed computing, but few medical researchers have the time or expertise to write the necessary parallel programs. The Swift system addresses these concerns. A simple scripting language, SwiftScript, provides for the concise high-level specification of workflows that invoke various application programs on potentially large quantities of data. The Swift engine provides for the efficient execution of these workflows on sequential computers, parallel computers, and/or distributed grids that federate the computing resources of many sites. Last but not least, the Swift provenance catalog keeps track of all actions performed, addressing vital bookkeeping functions that so often cause difficulties in large computations. To illustrate the use of Swift for medical research, we describe its use for the analysis of functional MRI data as part of a research project examining the neurological mechanisms of recovery from aphasia after stroke. We show how SwiftScript is used to encode an application workflow, and present performance results that demonstrate our ability to achieve significant speedups on both a local parallel computing cluster and multiple parallel clusters at distributed sites. PMID:17476063

  11. Contexts for change in alpine tundra

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malanson, George P.; Rose, Jonathan P.; Schroeder, P. Jason; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2011-01-01

    Because alpine tundra is responding to climate change, a need exists to understand the meaning of observed changes. To provide context for such interpretation, the relevance of niche and neutral theories of biogeography and the continuum and classification approaches to biogeographic description are assessed. Two extensive studies of alpine tundra, from the Indian Peaks area, Colorado and Glacier National Park, Montana, are combined. The data are ordinated to describe relations. The pattern that emerges is one of a continuum of vegetation, but with the distinctions one might expect from distant sites. The relationships of the similarity of vegetation on all possible pairs of sites to the environmental differences and geographic distances are analyzed using Mantel correlations. Because distance and environmental differences in climate between the two sites are correlated, partial correlations are weak but still significant. More advanced analyses are suggested for this environment prior to interpretation of monitoring efforts such as GLORIA.

  12. Recent climate extremes alter alpine lake ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Brian R.; Vinebrooke, Rolf D.; Schindler, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we show that alpine lake ecosystems are responsive to interannual variation in climate, based on long-term limnological and meteorological data from the Canadian Rockies. In the 2000s, in years with colder winter temperatures, higher winter snowfall, later snowmelt, shorter ice-free seasons, and dryer summers, relative to the 1990s, alpine lakes became clearer, warmer, and mixed to deeper depths. Further, lakes became more dilute and nutrient-poor, the latter leading to significant declines in total phytoplankton biomass. However, increased concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in lake water stimulated the appearance of small mixotrophic algal species, partially offsetting the decline in autotrophic phytoplankton biomass and increasing algal species richness. The climate regime in the 2000s altered the physical, chemical, and biological character and the function of high-elevation aquatic ecosystems. Forecasts of increased climatic variability in the future pose serious ramifications for both the biodiversity and ecosystem function of high-elevation lakes. PMID:18725641

  13. Power Performance Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

  14. Follow-up of PTF10bzf with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.

    2010-03-01

    We triggered our Swift Target Of Opportunity program ("Unveiling New Classes of Transients with Palomar Transient Factory", PI S. R. Kulkarni) for PTF10bzf (see ATEL#2470). Thus far, we have obtained two epochs. Our first 5ks epoch was on UT 2010 Mar 4.029 and second 2.5ks epoch was on Mar 8.303. We do not detect PTF10bzf with Swift/XRT down to a 3-sigma limiting count rate (assuming an 18" radius) of 3.7e-4 cps and 7.7e-4 cps respectively in the two epochs.

  15. Time-Domain Astronomy with Swift, Fermi and Lobster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-04-01

    The dynamic transient gamma-ray sky is revealing many interesting results, largely due to findings by Fermi and Swift. The list includes new twists on gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), a GeV flare from a symbiotic star, GeV flares from the Crab Nebula, high-energy emission from novae and supernovae, and, within the last year, a new type of object discovered by Swift-a jetted tidal disruption event. In this review we present highlights of these exciting discoveries. A new mission concept called Lobster is also described; it would monitor the X-ray sky at order-of-magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions can.

  16. X-ray Observations of Novae with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Kim

    2016-07-01

    The rapid response capabilities of the Swift satellite, together with the daily planning of its observing schedule, make it an ideal mission for following novae in the X-ray and UV bands, particularly during their early phases of rapid evolution. A number of both classical and recurrent novae have been extensively monitored by Swift throughout their super-soft phase and later decline. We report results from these observations, including the high-amplitude flux variation often see at the start of the super-soft emission, the differing relationships between the X-ray and UV variability, and the spectral evolution seen in the X-ray band.

  17. Swift/XRT confirms the new outburst of Aql X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, A.; Riggio, A.; Pintore, F.; Altamirano, D.; Burderi, L.; Di Salvo, T.

    2016-08-01

    Triggered by the X-ray enhancement observed by Swift/BAT on 2016 July 29 at a position compatible with the low mass X-ray binary Aql X-1 (Atel #9287), a 500 s observation with Swift/XRT was promptly carried out. Swift/XRT operating in Photon Counting mode detected a single bright X-ray source.

  18. ALPINE LAKES WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gualtieri, J.L.; Thurber, H.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Alpine Lakes Wilderness study area, located in the central part of the Cascade Mountains of Washington was examined for its mineral-resource potential. On the basis of that study the area was found to contain deposits of copper, other base metals, and gold and silver. Probable or substantiated mineral-resource potential exists for these commodities in the southwest-central, northwest, and southeast-central parts of the area. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuel resources.

  19. Working toward integrated models of alpine plant distribution

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Bradley Z.; Randin, Christophe F.; Boulangeat, Isabelle; Lavergne, Sébastien; Thuiller, Wilfried; Choler, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Species distribution models (SDMs) have been frequently employed to forecast the response of alpine plants to global changes. Efforts to model alpine plant distribution have thus far been primarily based on a correlative approach, in which ecological processes are implicitly addressed through a statistical relationship between observed species occurrences and environmental predictors. Recent evidence, however, highlights the shortcomings of correlative SDMs, especially in alpine landscapes where plant species tend to be decoupled from atmospheric conditions in micro-topographic habitats and are particularly exposed to geomorphic disturbances. While alpine plants respond to the same limiting factors as plants found at lower elevations, alpine environments impose a particular set of scale-dependent and hierarchical drivers that shape the realized niche of species and that require explicit consideration in a modelling context. Several recent studies in the European Alps have successfully integrated both correlative and process-based elements into distribution models of alpine plants, but for the time being a single integrative modelling framework that includes all key drivers remains elusive. As a first step in working toward a comprehensive integrated model applicable to alpine plant communities, we propose a conceptual framework that structures the primary mechanisms affecting alpine plant distributions. We group processes into four categories, including multi-scalar abiotic drivers, gradient dependent species interactions, dispersal and spatial–temporal plant responses to disturbance. Finally, we propose a methodological framework aimed at developing an integrated model to better predict alpine plant distribution. PMID:24790594

  20. Soil Fauna Affects Dissolved Carbon and Nitrogen in Foliar Litter in Alpine Forest and Alpine Meadow

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shu; Yang, Wanqin; Tan, Yu; Peng, Yan; Li, Jun; Tan, Bo; Wu, Fuzhong

    2015-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) are generally considered important active biogeochemical pools of total carbon and nitrogen. Many studies have documented the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition, but the effects of the soil fauna on labile substances (i.e., DOC and TDN) in litter during early decomposition are not completely clear. Therefore, a field litterbag experiment was carried out from 13th November 2013 to 23rd October 2014 in an alpine forest and an alpine meadow located on the eastern Tibetan Plateau. Litterbags with different mesh sizes were used to provide access to or prohibit the access of the soil fauna, and the concentrations of DOC and TDN in the foliar litter were measured during the winter (the onset of freezing, deep freezing and thawing stage) and the growing season (early and late). After one year of field incubation, the concentration of DOC in the litter significantly decreased, whereas the TDN concentration in the litter increased. Similar dynamic patterns were detected under the effects of the soil fauna on both DOC and TDN in the litter between the alpine forest and the alpine meadow. The soil fauna showed greater positive effects on decreasing DOC concentration in the litter in the winter than in the growing season. In contrast, the dynamics of TND in the litter were related to seasonal changes in environmental factors, rather than the soil fauna. In addition, the soil fauna promoted a decrease in litter DOC/TDN ratio in both the alpine forest and the alpine meadow throughout the first year of decomposition, except for in the late growing season. These results suggest that the soil fauna can promote decreases in DOC and TDN concentrations in litter, contributing to early litter decomposition in these cold biomes. PMID:26406249

  1. Ecosystem Carbon Storage in Alpine Grassland on the Qinghai Plateau.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuli; Zhang, Fawei; Du, Yangong; Guo, Xiaowei; Lin, Li; Li, Yikang; Li, Qian; Cao, Guangmin

    2016-01-01

    The alpine grassland ecosystem can sequester a large quantity of carbon, yet its significance remains controversial owing to large uncertainties in the relative contributions of climate factors and grazing intensity. In this study we surveyed 115 sites to measure ecosystem carbon storage (both biomass and soil) in alpine grassland over the Qinghai Plateau during the peak growing season in 2011 and 2012. Our results revealed three key findings. (1) Total biomass carbon density ranged from 0.04 for alpine steppe to 2.80 kg C m-2 for alpine meadow. Median soil organic carbon (SOC) density was estimated to be 16.43 kg C m-2 in alpine grassland. Total ecosystem carbon density varied across sites and grassland types, from 1.95 to 28.56 kg C m-2. (2) Based on the median estimate, the total carbon storage of alpine grassland on the Qinghai Plateau was 5.14 Pg, of which 94% (4.85 Pg) was soil organic carbon. (3) Overall, we found that ecosystem carbon density was affected by both climate and grazing, but to different extents. Temperature and precipitation interaction significantly affected AGB carbon density in winter pasture, BGB carbon density in alpine meadow, and SOC density in alpine steppe. On the other hand, grazing intensity affected AGB carbon density in summer pasture, SOC density in alpine meadow and ecosystem carbon density in alpine grassland. Our results indicate that grazing intensity was the primary contributing factor controlling carbon storage at the sites tested and should be the primary consideration when accurately estimating the carbon storage in alpine grassland. PMID:27494253

  2. Ecosystem Carbon Storage in Alpine Grassland on the Qinghai Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuli; Zhang, Fawei; Du, Yangong; Guo, Xiaowei; Lin, Li; Li, Yikang; Li, Qian; Cao, Guangmin

    2016-01-01

    The alpine grassland ecosystem can sequester a large quantity of carbon, yet its significance remains controversial owing to large uncertainties in the relative contributions of climate factors and grazing intensity. In this study we surveyed 115 sites to measure ecosystem carbon storage (both biomass and soil) in alpine grassland over the Qinghai Plateau during the peak growing season in 2011 and 2012. Our results revealed three key findings. (1) Total biomass carbon density ranged from 0.04 for alpine steppe to 2.80 kg C m-2 for alpine meadow. Median soil organic carbon (SOC) density was estimated to be 16.43 kg C m-2 in alpine grassland. Total ecosystem carbon density varied across sites and grassland types, from 1.95 to 28.56 kg C m-2. (2) Based on the median estimate, the total carbon storage of alpine grassland on the Qinghai Plateau was 5.14 Pg, of which 94% (4.85 Pg) was soil organic carbon. (3) Overall, we found that ecosystem carbon density was affected by both climate and grazing, but to different extents. Temperature and precipitation interaction significantly affected AGB carbon density in winter pasture, BGB carbon density in alpine meadow, and SOC density in alpine steppe. On the other hand, grazing intensity affected AGB carbon density in summer pasture, SOC density in alpine meadow and ecosystem carbon density in alpine grassland. Our results indicate that grazing intensity was the primary contributing factor controlling carbon storage at the sites tested and should be the primary consideration when accurately estimating the carbon storage in alpine grassland. PMID:27494253

  3. Growth and reproduction of the alpine grasshopper Miramella alpina feeding on CO2-enriched dwarf shrubs at treeline.

    PubMed

    Asshoff, Roman; Hättenschwiler, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The consequences for plant-insect interactions of atmospheric changes in alpine ecosystems are not well understood. Here, we tested the effects of elevated CO(2) on leaf quality in two dwarf shrub species (Vaccinium myrtillus and V. uliginosum) and the response of the alpine grasshopper (Miramella alpina) feeding on these plants in a field experiment at the alpine treeline (2,180 m a.s.l.) in Davos, Switzerland. Relative growth rates (RGR) of M. alpina nymphs were lower when they were feeding on V. myrtillus compared to V. uliginosum, and were affected by elevated CO(2) depending on plant species and nymph developmental stage. Changes in RGR correlated with CO(2)-induced changes in leaf water, nitrogen, and starch concentrations. Elevated CO(2) resulted in reduced female adult weight irrespective of plant species, and prolonged development time on V. uliginosum only, but there were no significant differences in nymphal mortality. Newly molted adults of M. alpina produced lighter eggs and less secretion (serving as egg protection) under elevated CO(2). When grasshoppers had a choice among four different plant species grown either under ambient or elevated CO(2), V. myrtillus and V. uliginosum consumption increased under elevated CO(2) in females while it decreased in males compared to ambient CO(2)-grown leaves. Our findings suggest that rising atmospheric CO(2) distinctly affects leaf chemistry in two important dwarf shrub species at the alpine treeline, leading to changes in feeding behavior, growth, and reproduction of the most important insect herbivore in this system. Changes in plant-grasshopper interactions might have significant long-term impacts on herbivore pressure, community dynamics and ecosystem stability in the alpine treeline ecotone. PMID:15480804

  4. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2008-01-01

    With 3 years of on-orbit operations (launched in Nov 2004), Swift has detected over 300 gammaray bursts (GRBs). The unique combination of quick and accurate position determinations by the BAT instrument, fast autonomous spacecraft slewing, and multi-band instrumentation (XRT and UVOT) has allowed Swift to accumulate a long list of discoveries about GRBs. These positions are also available to the ground follow-up community (via TDRSS and GCN) within 15-30 sec. A summary of these discoveries will be given (e.g. long and short GRB host associations, SN associations, flaring and on-going activity in the central engine). The Swift spacecraft and instruments are in fine working order with no signs of performance degradation. With an expected orbital lifetime well past 2020, the overlap with GLAST (launch in mid-2008) will yield greater than 30 GRBs/year with observations by both missions. This will provide an unprecedented wavelength coverage from optical to 100 GeV. The coordination of pointing Swift with GLAST will be described.

  5. Swift follow-up of SPIRITS16tn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, S. M.; Jencson, J. E.; Kasliwal, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report Swift UVOT observations of SPIRITS16tn, a possible supernova in M108 (Jencson et al. ATel #9434). No source is detected in V, B, and U images taken on 2016-08-29.08 UT (14.0 days since SST discovery images) with exposure times of 540, 580, and 540s respectively.

  6. REDSHIFT CATALOG FOR SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Limin; Schaefer, Bradley E.

    2011-04-20

    We present a catalog of the redshifts for most long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by Swift from 2004 December 20 to 2008 July 23 (258 bursts in total). All available information is collected, including spectroscopic redshifts, photometric redshift limits, and redshifts calculated from various luminosity relations. Error bars for the redshifts derived from the luminosity relations are asymmetric, with tails extended to the high-redshift end, and this effect is evaluated by looking at the 30% of Swift bursts with spectroscopic redshifts. A simulation is performed to eliminate this asymmetric effect, and the resultant redshift distribution is deconvolved. We test and confirm this simulation on the sample of bursts with known spectroscopic redshifts and then apply it to the 70% of Swift bursts that do not have spectroscopic measures. A final intrinsic redshift distribution is then made for almost all Swift bursts, and the efficiency of the spectroscopic detections is evaluated. The efficiency of spectroscopic redshifts varies from near unity at low redshift to 0.5 at z = 1, to near 0.3 at z = 4, and to 0.1 at z = 6. We also find that the fraction of GRBs with z>5 is {approx}10%, and this fraction is compared with simulations from a cosmological model.

  7. SMC X-3 in outburst: Swift XRT Timing and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennea, J. A.; Coe, M. J.; Evans, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    As a result of the detection of SMC X-3 having entered outburst by S-CUBED (Kennea et al., ATEL #9362) and MAXI (Negoro et al., ATEL #9362), at 22:10UT on August 10, 2016, Swift began a 5ks Target of Opportunity observation.

  8. Swift and Smart Decision Making: Heuristics that Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Wayne K.; Tarter, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to examine the research literature on decision making and identify and develop a set of heuristics that work for school decision makers. Design/methodology/approach: This analysis is a synthesis of the research on decision-making heuristics that work. Findings: A set of nine rules for swift and smart decision…

  9. Swift follow up of IceCube-160731A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Keivani, A.; Fox, D. B.; Tesic, G.; Cowen, D. F.; Osborne, J. P.; Smith, M. W. E.; Marshall, F. E.

    2016-08-01

    Swift has observed the field of the IceCube HESE event IceCube-160731A, "AMON ICECUBE HESE 128290 6888376" (revision 0), utilising the on-board 19-point tiling pattern to cover a region centred on RA,Dec (J2000) = (215.109, -0.458), with a radius of approximately 0.8 & deg;.

  10. Continued Swift/XRT monitoring observations of the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Gehrels, N.; Haggard, D.; Ponti, G.; Burrows, D. N.

    2014-02-01

    We report on continued X-ray monitoring observations of the Galactic center with the Swift/XRT (Atel #5847). Between 2014 February 2 and 6 the XRT count rate at the position of Sgr A* and the nearby transient magnetar SGR J1745-29 varied between ~1E-2 and 3E-2 counts s-1.

  11. Swift Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2007-10-01

    Swift is a NASA MIDEX mission with primary objective to study GRBs and use them to study the Universe. The mission was launched on 20 November 2004 and is detecting ~100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) each year. For almost every burst there is a prompt (within ~90 s) spacecraft repointing to give X-ray and UV/optical observations of the afterglow. Swift has already collected an impressive database including prompt emission to higher sensitivities than BATSE, uniform monitoring of afterglows, and rapid follow-up by other observatories notified through the GCN. In addition to providing extensive information on the traditional long GRBs, Swift has provided the first precise localizations of short GRBs, and has also demonstrated that supernova GRBs may comprise a yet third subset in a Venn diagram of isotropic energy versus intrinsic burst duration. The energies of these SN/GRBs are comensurate with short GRBs, while their durations are significantly longer. The acquisition of more short GRBS and of SN/GRBs over the coming years of the Swift mission will further enhance and delineate the statistical relationships among the different GRB types.

  12. SWIFT Intensive Technical Assistance Process. Technical Assistance Brief #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sailor, Wayne; McCart, Amy; McSheehan, Michael; Mitchiner, Melinda; Quirk, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The national center on Schoolwide Integrated Framework for Transformation (SWIFT Center) is now approaching the halfway point in its first full year of providing intensive technical assistance (TA) to 68 schools in 20 local educational agencies across five states. The purpose of this brief is to provide a thumbnail sketch of how this TA process…

  13. Preliminary Investigations of HE Performance Characterization Using SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael; Johnson, Carl

    2013-06-01

    Initial pseudo-aquarium experimentation is underway to assess the utility of using the shock wave image framing technique (SWIFT) to characterize HE performance on detonator length and time scales. SWIFT is employed to directly visualize shock waves driven into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) samples through detonation interaction in pseudo-aquarium test geometries. Columns of XTX 8004, an extrudable RDX-based high explosive, are either cured directly within PMMA dynamic witness plates or within confinement tubes of different materials with varying shock impedances that are then embedded within PMMA. For current experiments, the SWIFT system records 16-frame image sequences using 175 ns inter-frame delays to directly visualize the evolution of lead shock-front geometries as they are driven radially into PMMA by the detonating XTX column. Standard aquarium-test analysis is employed to calculate shock pressure evolution within PMMA, and detonation wave velocities are accurately calculated from the time-resolved images as well. The SWIFT system and numerous pseudo-aquarium experimental results will be presented and discussed.

  14. SWIFT: A Dynamical Model of Saccade Generation during Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engbert, Ralf; Nuthmann, Antje; Richter, Eike M.; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical models have become an important tool for understanding the control of eye movements during reading. Main goals of the development of the SWIFT model (R. Engbert, A. Longtin, & R. Kliegl, 2002) were to investigate the possibility of spatially distributed processing and to implement a general mechanism for all types of eye movements…

  15. The Swift-BAT Hard X-ray Transient Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, Hans; Markwardt, C. B.; Sanwal, D.; Tueller, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift satellite is a large field of view instrument that continually monitors the sky to provide the gamma-ray burst trigger for Swift. An average of more than 70% of the sky is observed on a daily basis. The survey mode data is processed on two sets on time scales: from one minute to one day as part of the transient monitor program, and from one spacecraft pointing (approx.20 minutes) to the full mission duration for the hard X-ray survey program. The transient monitor has recently become public through the web site http:// swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/swift/results/transients/. Sky images are processed to detect astrophysical sources in the 15-50 keV energy band and the detected flux or upper limit is calculated for >100 sources on time scales up to one day. Light curves are updated each time that new BAT data becomes available (approx.10 times daily). In addition, the monitor is sensitive to an outburst from a new or unknown source. Sensitivity as a function of time scale for catalog and unknown sources will be presented. The daily exposure for a typical source is approx.1500-3000 seconds, with a 1-sigma sensitivity of approx.4 mCrab. 90% of the sources are sampled at least every 16 days, but many sources are sampled daily. It is expected that the Swift-BAT transient monitor will become an important resource for the high energy astrophysics community.

  16. Modeling the Swift BAT Trigger Algorithm with Machine Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Philip B.; Lien, Amy Y.; Baker, John G.; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    To draw inferences about gamma-ray burst (GRB) source populations based on Swift observations, it is essential to understand the detection efficiency of the Swift burst alert telescope (BAT). This study considers the problem of modeling the Swift BAT triggering algorithm for long GRBs, a computationally expensive procedure, and models it using machine learning algorithms. A large sample of simulated GRBs from Lien et al. (2014) is used to train various models: random forests, boosted decision trees (with AdaBoost), support vector machines, and artificial neural networks. The best models have accuracies of approximately greater than 97% (approximately less than 3% error), which is a significant improvement on a cut in GRB flux which has an accuracy of 89:6% (10:4% error). These models are then used to measure the detection efficiency of Swift as a function of redshift z, which is used to perform Bayesian parameter estimation on the GRB rate distribution. We find a local GRB rate density of eta(sub 0) approximately 0.48(+0.41/-0.23) Gpc(exp -3) yr(exp -1) with power-law indices of eta(sub 1) approximately 1.7(+0.6/-0.5) and eta(sub 2) approximately -5.9(+5.7/-0.1) for GRBs above and below a break point of z(sub 1) approximately 6.8(+2.8/-3.2). This methodology is able to improve upon earlier studies by more accurately modeling Swift detection and using this for fully Bayesian model fitting. The code used in this is analysis is publicly available online.

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts: Selected Results From The Swift Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkett, Cheryl

    2008-12-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are short, energetic events that mark the most violent explosions in the Universe. Current hypotheses associate them with the births of stellar-sized black holes or rapidly spinning, highly magnetized stars. The introduction to this work places GRBs in their historical and theoretical context and provides a description of the current models describing them. This study makes use of data from the Swift satellite. Chapter two is a multi-wavelength study of the high redshift GRB 050505, which indicates that this burst has properties consistent with the general lower z GRB sample. Furthermore there is evidence for a 'jet-break' in the X-ray light curve; a phenomena rarely seen in Swift era bursts. The next two chapters investigate the presence of X-ray emission lines in GRB spectra. Chapter three provides a discussion of the pre-Swift observations and a comparison of three methods already extant in the literature for assessing the significance of such s! pectral features. The detection limits for each method were determined for emission line strengths in bursts with spectral parameters typical of the Swift era sample. Chapter four applies these methods to a sampel of 40 Swift bursts; no strong evidence was found for emission lines in early time X-ray spectra once host galaxy absorption was accurately modelled. Chapter five investigates the phenomena of 'precursors' and 'quiescent intervals', indicating a common origin for events normally ascribed to 'prompt emission' and 'flares', in line with previous studies, and extending it to cover 'precursor' emission. Evidence was also found to reinforce (anti-)correlations seen between pulse temporal and energetic properties also seen in previous studies. The final chapter summarises the important results for each section and proposes future studies that could be conducted in each field.

  18. The First Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope GRB Afterglow Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roming, P. W. A.; Koch, T. S.; Oates, S. R.; Porterfield, B. L.; Vanden Berk, D. E.; Boyd, P. T.; Holland, S. T.; Hoversten, E. A.; Immler, S.; Marshall, F. E.; Page, M. J.; Racusin, J. L.; Schneider, D. P.; Breeveld, A. A.; Brown, P. J.; Chester, M. M.; Cucchiara, A.; DePasquale, M.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S. D.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Landsman, W. B.; Schady, P.; Still, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the first Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow catalog. The catalog contains data from over 64,000 independent UVOT image observations of 229 GRBs first detected by Swift, the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The catalog covers GRBs occurring during the period from 2005 January 17 to 2007 June 16 and includes ~86% of the bursts detected by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). The catalog provides detailed burst positional, temporal, and photometric information extracted from each of the UVOT images. Positions for bursts detected at the 3σ level are provided with a nominal accuracy, relative to the USNO-B1 catalog, of ~0farcs25. Photometry for each burst is given in three UV bands, three optical bands, and a "white" or open filter. Upper limits for magnitudes are reported for sources detected below 3σ. General properties of the burst sample and light curves, including the filter-dependent temporal slopes, are also provided. The majority of the UVOT light curves, for bursts detected at the 3σ level, can be fit by a single power-law, with a median temporal slope (α) of 0.96, beginning several hundred seconds after the burst trigger and ending at ~1 × 105 s. The median UVOT v-band (~5500 Å) magnitude at 2000 s for a sample of "well"-detected bursts is 18.02. The UVOT flux interpolated to 2000 s after the burst, shows relatively strong correlations with both the prompt Swift BAT fluence, and the Swift X-ray flux at 11 hr after the trigger.

  19. Alpine and pre-Alpine magmatism in the root-zone of the western Central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, R. L.; Schärer, U.; Steck, Albrecht

    1996-03-01

    The highest grade of metamorphism and associated structural elements in orogenic belts may be inherited from earlier orogenic events. We illustrate this point using magmatic and metamorphic rocks from the southern steep belt of the Lepontine Gneiss Dome (Central Alps). The U-Pb zircon ages from an anatectic granite at Verampio and migmatites at Corcapolo and Lavertezzo yield 280 290 Ma, i.e., Hercynian ages. These ages indicate that the highest grade of metamorphism in several crystalline nappes of the Lepontine Gneiss Dome is pre-Alpine. Alpine metamorphism reached sufficiently high grade to reset the Rb-Sr and K-Ar systematics of mica and amphibole, but generally did not result in crustal melting, except in the steep belt to the north of the Insubric Line, where numerous 29 to 26 Ma old pegmatites and aplites had intruded syn- and post-kinematically into gneisses of the ductile Simplon Shear Zone. The emplacement age of these pegmatites gives a minimum estimate for the age of the Alpine metamorphic peak in the Monte Rosa nappe. The U-Pb titanite ages of 33 to 31 Ma from felsic porphyritic veins represent a minimum-age estimate for Alpine metamorphism in the Sesia Zone. A porphyric vein emplaced at 448±5 Ma (U-Pb monazite) demonstrates that there existed a consolidated Caledonian basement in the Sesia Zone.

  20. 75 FR 16069 - Alpine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... Alpine County at the Alpine Early Learning Center, 100 Foothill Road, Markleeville, CA 96120. FOR FURTHER... District, 1536 S. Carson Street, Carson City, NV 89701 (775) 352-1240; E-MAIL mbonesteel@fs.fed.us.... Genny E. Wilson, Designated Federal Officer. BILLING CODE 3410-11-M...

  1. Water resources: Research network to track alpine water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water cycle in alpine environments worldwide supplies fresh water to vast downstream areas inhabited by more than half of humanity. The International Network for Alpine Research Catchment Hydrology (INARCH) was launched this year by the Global Energy and Water Exchanges project of the World Clim...

  2. 75 FR 30366 - Alpine County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Alpine County at the Alpine Early Learning Center, 100 Foothill Road, Markleeville, CA 96120. FOR FURTHER... meeting is open to the public. Public input opportunity will be provided and individuals will have the opportunity to address the Committee at that time. Dated: May 21, 2010. Genny E. Wilson, Designated...

  3. Characterizing streamflow generation in Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiogna, Gabriele; Cano Paoli, Karina; Bellin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Developing effective hydrological models for streamflow generation in Alpine catchments is challenging due to the inherent complexity of the intertwined processes controlling water transfer from hillslopes to streams and along the river network. With water discharge as the sole observational variable it is impossible to differentiate between different streamflow sources, and modelling activity is often limited to simplified phenomenological rainfall-runoff models. This study focuses on quantifying streamflow sources at different temporal scales and the associated uncertainty by using natural tracer data (electrical conductivity, oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopes ratios) as observational variables supplementing streamflow measurements. We determine the spatial and temporal hydrological behavior and the mean residence time of water in the Vermigliana catchment, North-Eastern Italy and we separate contributions to streamflow originating from Presena and Presanella glaciers, both exerting a strong control on the hydrologic budget of the study site. Furthermore, we identify a seasonal control on the effect of storm events. The catchment responded rapidly to precipitation events in early autumn, it was unaffected by precipitation events in early spring, while runoff generation was enhanced by snow melting in late autumn. Air temperature is identified as the main controlling parameter, in addition to precipitation. Two-component mixing analysis showed that the relative contribution of new water, which can contribute up to 75% of total streamflow, is very rapid. Only two hours time-lag was observed between the beginning of the precipitation event and the emergence of a significant contribution of new water. These results evidence the relevance of mixing between pre-event and event water in the Vermigliana catchment, and in similar high elevation Alpine catchments. This study provides new insights on the dynamics of streamflow generation in Alpine catchments and a

  4. 3D cartography of the Alpine Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vouillamoz, N.; Sue, C.; Champagnac, J. D.; Calcagno, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present a 3D cartography of the alpine arc, a highly non-cylindrical mountain belt, built using the 3D GeoModeller of the BRGM (French geological survey). The model allows to handle the large-scale 3D structure of seventeen major crustal units of the belt (from the lower crust to the sedimentary cover nappes), and two main discontinuities (the Insubric line and the Crustal Penninic Front). It provides a unique document to better understand their structural relationships and to produce new sections. The study area comprises the western alpine arc, from the Jura to the Northwest, up to the Bergell granite intrusion and the Lepontine Dome to the East, and is limited to the South by the Ligurian basin. The model is limited vertically 10 km above sea level at the top, and the moho interface at the bottom. We discarded the structural relationships between the Alps sensus stricto and the surrounding geodynamic systems such as the Rhine graben or the connection with the Apennines. The 3D-model is based on the global integration of various data such as the DEM of the Alps, the moho isobaths, the simplified geological and tectonic maps of the belt, the crustal cross-sections ECORS-CROP and NFP-20, and complementary cross-sections specifically built to precise local complexities. The database has first been integrated in a GIS-project to prepare their implementation in the GeoModeller, by homogenizing the different spatial referencing systems. The global model is finally interpolated from all these data, using the potential field method. The final document is a new tri-dimentional cartography that would be used as input for further alpine studies.

  5. Metabolic Profiling of Alpine and Ecuadorian Lichens.

    PubMed

    Mittermeier, Verena K; Schmitt, Nicola; Volk, Lukas P M; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Beck, Andreas; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Non-targeted ¹H-NMR methods were used to determine metabolite profiles from crude extracts of Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens collected from their natural habitats. In control experiments, the robustness of metabolite detection and quantification was estimated using replicate measurements of Stereocaulon alpinum extracts. The deviations in the overall metabolite fingerprints were low when analyzing S. alpinum collections from different locations or during different annual and seasonal periods. In contrast, metabolite profiles observed from extracts of different Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens clearly revealed genus- and species-specific profiles. The discriminating functions determining cluster formation in principle component analysis (PCA) were due to differences in the amounts of genus-specific compounds such as sticticin from the Sticta species, but also in the amounts of ubiquitous metabolites, such as sugar alcohols or trehalose. However, varying concentrations of these metabolites from the same lichen species e.g., due to different environmental conditions appeared of minor relevance for the overall cluster formation in PCA. The metabolic clusters matched phylogenetic analyses using nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of lichen mycobionts, as exemplified for the genus Sticta. It can be concluded that NMR-based non-targeted metabolic profiling is a useful tool in the chemo-taxonomy of lichens. The same approach could also facilitate the discovery of novel lichen metabolites on a rapid and systematical basis.

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Fox, D. B.

    2010-01-01

    With its rapid-response capability and multiwavelength complement of instruments, the Swift satellite has transformed our physical understanding of gamma-ray bursts. Providing high-quality observations of hundreds of bursts, and facilitating a wide range of follow-up observations within seconds of each event, Swift has revealed an unforeseen richness in observed burst properties, shed light on the nature of short-duration bursts, and helped realize the promise of gamma-ray bursts as probes of the processes and environments of star formation out to the earliest cosmic epochs. These advances have opened new perspectives on the nature and properties of burst central engines, interactions with the burst environment from microparsec to gigaparsec scales, and the possibilities for non-photonic signatures. Our understanding of these extreme cosmic sources has thus advanced substantially; yet more than forty years after their discovery, gamma-ray bursts continue to present major challenges on both observational and theoretical fronts.

  7. Magnetar Observations in the Swift-Fermi/GBM Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2008; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. Since then, and against all odds, GBM recorded over 600 bursts from 4 SGRs. Of these four sources, only one was an old magnetar: SGR J1806+20. SGR J0501+4516, was discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with GBM. A source originally classified as AXP 1E1547.0-5408 exhibited SGR-like bursting behavior and we reclassified it as SGR J1550-5418. Finally, GBM discovered SGR J0418+5729 on 2009 June. Finally, on March 2010, a third new magnetar was discovered with Swift, SGR J1833-0832. I report below on the current status of the field and on several results combining multi-satellite and ground-based data

  8. Analysis of the Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts duration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, I.; Veres, P.; Balazs, L. G.; Kelemen, J.; Bagoly, Z.

    2008-10-22

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts have been identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by durations shorter and longer than about 2 seconds. There are, however, some indications for the existence of a third type of burst. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for gamma-ray bursts. Therefore it is worth to reanalyze the durations and their distribution and also the classification of GRBs. Using The First BAT Catalog the maximum likelihood estimation was used to analyzed the duration distribution of GRBs. The three log-normal fit is significantly (99.54% probability) better than the two for the duration distribution. Monte-Carlo simulations also confirm this probability (99.2%)

  9. Two dimensional classification of the Swift/BAT GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, E. B.; Zhang, Z. B.; Jiang, X. X.

    2016-08-01

    Using Gaussian Mixture Model and Expectation Maximization algorithm, we have performed a density estimation in the framework of T_{90} versus hardness ratio for 296 Swift/BAT GRBs with known redshift. Here, Bayesian Information Criterion has been taken to compare different models. Our investigations show that two instead of three or more Gaussian components are favoured in both the observer and rest frames. Our key findings are consistent with some previous results.

  10. The Swift XRT: Observations of Early X-ray Afterglows

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, David N.; Kennea, J. A.; Nousek, J. A.; Osborne, J. P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Chincarini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Giommi, P.; Zhang, B.

    2006-05-19

    During the first year of operations of the Swift observatory, the X-ray Telescope has made a number of discoveries concerning the nature of X-ray afterglows of both long and short GRBs. We highlight the key findings, which include rapid declines at early times, a standard template of afterglow light curve shapes, common flaring, and the discovery of the first short GRB afterglow.

  11. Immobilization of swift foxes with ketamine hydrochloride-xylazine hydrochloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Telesco, R.L.; Sovada, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop field immobilization techniques that allow researchers to handle safely swift foxes (Vulpes velox) with minimal risk of stress or injury. We immobilized captive swift foxes to determine the safety and effectiveness of ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride at different dosages. We attempted to determine appropriate dosages to immobilize swift foxes for an adequate field-handling period based on three anesthesia intervals (induction period, immobilization period, and recovery period) and physiologic responses (rectal temperature, respiration rate, and heart rate). Between October 1998-July 1999, we conducted four trials, evaluating three different dosage ratios of ketamine and xylazine (2.27:1.2, 5.68:1.2, and 11.4:1.2 mg/kg ketamine:mg/kg xylazine, respectively), followed by a fourth trial with a higher dosage at the median ratio (11.4 mg/kg ketamine:2.4 mg/kg xylazine). We found little difference in induction and recovery periods among trials 1-3, but immobilization time increased with increasing dosage (P<0.08). Both the immobilization period and recovery period increased in trial 4 compared with trials 1-3 (P???0.03). There was a high variation in responses of individual foxes across trials, making it difficult to identify an appropriate dosage for field handling. Heart rate and respiration rates were depressed but all physiologic measures remained within normal parameters established for domestic canids. We recommend a dosage ratio of 10 mg/kg ketamine to 1 mg/kg xylazine to immobilize swift foxes for field handling.

  12. Evaluation of the new EMAC-SWIFT chemistry climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, Janice; Langematz, Ulrike; Wohltmann, Ingo; Rex, Markus

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that the representation of atmospheric ozone chemistry in weather and climate models is essential for a realistic simulation of the atmospheric state. Including atmospheric ozone chemistry into climate simulations is usually done by prescribing a climatological ozone field, by including a fast linear ozone scheme into the model or by using a climate model with complex interactive chemistry. While prescribed climatological ozone fields are often not aligned with the modelled dynamics, a linear ozone scheme may not be applicable for a wide range of climatological conditions. Although interactive chemistry provides a realistic representation of atmospheric chemistry such model simulations are computationally very expensive and hence not suitable for ensemble simulations or simulations with multiple climate change scenarios. A new approach to represent atmospheric chemistry in climate models which can cope with non-linearities in ozone chemistry and is applicable to a wide range of climatic states is the Semi-empirical Weighted Iterative Fit Technique (SWIFT) that is driven by reanalysis data and has been validated against observational satellite data and runs of a full Chemistry and Transport Model. SWIFT has recently been implemented into the ECHAM/MESSy (EMAC) chemistry climate model that uses a modular approach to climate modelling where individual model components can be switched on and off. Here, we show first results of EMAC-SWIFT simulations and validate these against EMAC simulations using the complex interactive chemistry scheme MECCA, and against observations.

  13. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most fascinating occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole formation. The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 bursts per year for 4 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from approximately 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=6.7 giving metallicity measurements and other data on galaxies at previously inaccessible distances. The talk will present the latest results from Swift in GRB astronomy.

  14. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most fascinating occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole formation. The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 bursts per year for 3 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from - 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type I1 and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=6.3 giving metallicity measurements and other data on galaxies at previously inaccessible distances. The talk will present the latest results from Swift in GRB astronomy.

  15. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries with the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most fascinating occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole formation. The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 bursts per year for 3 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from approximately 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z greater than 5 and one at z=6.3 giving metallicity measurements and other data on galaxies at previously inaccessible distances. The talk will present the latest results from Swift in GRB astronomy.

  16. Gamma Ray Burst Discoveries by the Swift Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most fascinating occurrences in the cosmos. They are thought to be the birth cries of black holes throughout the universe. The NASA Swift mission is an innovative new multiwavelength observatory designed to determine the origin of bursts and use them to probe the early Universe. Swift is now in orbit after a beautiful launch on November 20, 2004. A new-technology wide-field gamma-ray camera detects more than a hundred bursts per year. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes, built in collaboration with UK and Italian partners, are pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions are determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Information is also rapidly sent to the ground to a team of more than 50 observers at telescopes around the world. The first year of findings from the mission will be presented. The long-standing mystery of short GRBs has been solved, and the answer is the most interesting possible scenario. High redshift bursts have been detected leading to a better understanding of star formation rates and distant galaxy environments. GRBs have been found with giant X-ray flares occurring in their afterglow. These, and other topics, will be discussed.

  17. SWIFT MODELLER: a Java based GUI for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Abhinav; Shankaracharya; Vidyarthi, Ambarish S

    2011-10-01

    MODELLER is command line argument based software which requires tedious formatting of inputs and writing of Python scripts which most people are not comfortable with. Also the visualization of output becomes cumbersome due to verbose files. This makes the whole software protocol very complex and requires extensive study of MODELLER manuals and tutorials. Here we describe SWIFT MODELLER, a GUI that automates formatting, scripting and data extraction processes and present it in an interactive way making MODELLER much easier to use than before. The screens in SWIFT MODELLER are designed keeping homology modeling in mind and their flow is a depiction of its steps. It eliminates the formatting of inputs, scripting processes and analysis of verbose output files through automation and makes pasting of the target sequence as the only prerequisite. Jmol (3D structure visualization tool) has been integrated into the GUI which opens and demonstrates the protein data bank files created by the MODELLER software. All files required and created by the software are saved in a folder named after the work instance's date and time of execution. SWIFT MODELLER lowers the skill level required for the software through automation of many of the steps in the original software protocol, thus saving an enormous amount of time per instance and making MODELLER very easy to work with.

  18. Testing the blast wave model with Swift GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, P. A.; Starling, R. L. C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; de Pasquale, M.; Page, M.

    2011-04-01

    The complex structure of the light curves of Swift GRBs (e.g. superimposed flares and shallow decay) has made their interpretation and that of the blast wave caused by the burst, more difficult than in the pre-Swift era. We aim to constrain the blast wave parameters: electron energy distribution, p, density profile of the circumburst medium, k, and the continued energy injection index, q. We do so by comparing the observed multi-wavelength light curves and X-ray spectra of a Swift sample to the predictions of the blast wave model.We can successfully interpret all of the bursts in our multi-wavelength sample of 10, except two, within the framework of the blast wave model, and we can estimate with confidence the electron energy distribution index for 6 of the sample. Furthermore we identify jet breaks in almost half of the bursts. The values of k suggest that the circumburst density profiles are not drawn from only one of the constant density or wind-like media populations. A statistical analysis of the distribution of p reveals that, even in the most conservative case of least scatter, the values are not consistent with a single, universal value. This is in agreement with our results for a larger sample of X-ray only afterglows which we summarise here.

  19. How swifts control their glide performance with morphing wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, D; Müller, U K; Stamhuis, E J; de Kat, R; van Gestel, W; Veldhuis, L L M; Henningsson, P; Hedenström, A; Videler, J J; van Leeuwen, J L

    2007-04-26

    Gliding birds continually change the shape and size of their wings, presumably to exploit the profound effect of wing morphology on aerodynamic performance. That birds should adjust wing sweep to suit glide speed has been predicted qualitatively by analytical glide models, which extrapolated the wing's performance envelope from aerodynamic theory. Here we describe the aerodynamic and structural performance of actual swift wings, as measured in a wind tunnel, and on this basis build a semi-empirical glide model. By measuring inside and outside swifts' behavioural envelope, we show that choosing the most suitable sweep can halve sink speed or triple turning rate. Extended wings are superior for slow glides and turns; swept wings are superior for fast glides and turns. This superiority is due to better aerodynamic performance-with the exception of fast turns. Swept wings are less effective at generating lift while turning at high speeds, but can bear the extreme loads. Finally, our glide model predicts that cost-effective gliding occurs at speeds of 8-10 m s(-1), whereas agility-related figures of merit peak at 15-25 m s(-1). In fact, swifts spend the night ('roost') in flight at 8-10 m s(-1) (ref. 11), thus our model can explain this choice for a resting behaviour. Morphing not only adjusts birds' wing performance to the task at hand, but could also control the flight of future aircraft.

  20. Manipulation of subalpine and alpine microclimate in the Alpine Treeline Warming Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, L. M.; Moyes, A. B.; Ferrenberg, S. M.; Christianson, D. S.; Castanha, C.; Germino, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    To experimentally test model projections of subalpine tree species' uphill migration with climate change, we have established the Alpine Treeline Warming Experiment at Niwot Ridge, CO. Common gardens subject to full factorial warming and watering experiments are replicated across three sites: near the lower limit of subalpine forest, within the alpine-treeline ecotone, and in the alpine tundra, beyond the current elevation ranges of the species. In 2010, differences in ambient climate among the three sites included 5.1° C greater growing-season air temperature and 0.5 kPa greater vapor pressure deficit in the lowest compared to the upper two sites. The lower subalpine site also experienced lower soil moisture compared to the upper two sites. Snowmelt date varied substantially between sites, with the longest snow-free period in the lower subalpine site and the shortest in the treeline site. In all sites, we observed advances in the timing of snowmelt in heated relative to control plots. The warming treatment also raised 5 cm soil temperatures by 3° C at the lower subalpine site, and by 1° C in the upper two sites, averaged over the growing season. More substantial wind in the alpine diminished the heating effect through sensible heat loss. Seasonal average volumetric soil moisture at 5-10 cm did not vary strongly among treatments even though seedling survival and gas exchange data suggest that water additions alleviated drought stress in some plots. These preliminary findings for identical warming and watering treatments across our three high mountain sites suggest that microclimate responses vary with radiation environment, patterns of snow accumulation, and wind speed. Some of these differences are realistic for a future warmer world, while others are artifacts of the experimental approach. Microclimate differences in 2011 reflect modified heating methods and a different spring hydroclimate (later snow accumulation and melt), highlighting the importance of

  1. On the Intermediate Subgroup of the Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Database

    SciTech Connect

    Huja, David; Meszaros, Attila

    2008-12-24

    A sample of 286 gamma-ray bursts, detected by Swift satellite, is studied statistically by the {chi}{sup 2} test and the Student t-test, respectively. The short and long subgroups are well detected in the Swift data. But no intermediate subgroup is seen. The non-detection of this subgroup in the Swift database can be explained, once it is assumed that in the BATSE database the short and the intermediate subgroups form a common subclass.

  2. ATCA radio observations of Swift J1756.9-2508 in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, V.; Tzioumis, A.; Patruno, A.; Linares, M.; Soleri, P.; Russell, D.

    2009-07-01

    Swift J1756.9-2508 was discovered by the X-ray satellite Swift during an outburst in 2007 (ATEL #1105) and recognized immediately as an accretion-driven millisecond X-ray pulsar (ATEL #1108). No radio pulsations (ATEL #1129) and no continuum radio emission (ATEL #1128) were detected then. While the radio pulsation search was performed during the outburst, the continuum observations were carried out when the X-ray flux levels already decreased below the detection limit of Swift.

  3. Early Results from Swift AGN and Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu; Griffin, Rhiannon; Nugent, Jenna; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-04-01

    The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift X-ray Telescope serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding gamma-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4 × 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here, we present the first two papers in a series of publications for SACS. In the first paper, we introduce our method and catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN and cluster number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. The depth and areal coverage of SACS is well suited for galaxy cluster surveys outside the local universe, reaching z > 1 for massive clusters. In the second paper, we use SDSS DR8 data to study the 203 extended SACS sources that are located within the SDSS footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in 3-D space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift galaxy cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a > 3σ over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, X-ray luminosity and red sequences. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≤ 0.3 and 80% complete for z ≤ 0.4, consistent with the survey depth of SDSS. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm presented in our first paper has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further studying cluster evolution and cosmology. In the end, we will discuss our ongoing optical identification of z>0.5 cluster

  4. Swift J1822.3-1606: refined X-ray timing and spectral parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, N.; Esposito, P.; Israel, G. L.; Tiengo, A.; Zan, S.

    2011-07-01

    Between 2011 July 15-19 Swift-XRT continued its monitoring of the new SGR discovered by Swift-BAT, namely Swift J1822.3-1606 (Cummings et al. Atel #3488). Using the first four available Swift-XRT observations we find a best period of 8.437716(5)s. No evidence for a period derivative has been observed in the first days of monitoring, yielding a Pdot limit of about a few 10-10 s/s, still consistent with the SGR nature of this new transient.

  5. The Alpine ?Iceman? and Holocene Climatic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroni, Carlo; Orombelli, Giuseppe

    1996-07-01

    The finding of a prehistoric mummified corpse at the upper edge of the accumulation area of an alpine glacier, together with its unique set of artifacts, provided new information on glacier dimensions during the little-known phases of major glacier shrinkage that characterized the warmest parts of the Holocene. The sudden burial of the corpse in a permanent snow cover occurred 5300-5050 cal yr B.P., indicating a significant climatic change that induced glacier expansion at the beginning of Neoglaciation. New geomorphologic data and two AMS 14C ages from buried soils suggest that the present glacier size, following over 100 yr of shrinkage, is comparable to that immediately preceding Neoglaciation. Therefore, we can deduce that the current global climatic warming may have interrupted the environmental conditions prevailing in the Alps during Neoglacial time, restoring characteristics similar to those prevailing during the climatic optimumthat were never achieved during the second half of the Holocene.

  6. Spatial energy budgets in alpine tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenland, D.

    1993-12-01

    Modelling and Geographic Information System (GIS) technology are employed in order to extend spatially, estimated and observed growing season values of the components of the surface heat energy budget for an area of alpine tundra in the Colorado Front Range. A surface equilibrium temperature model is calibrated for one sub-class of vegetation surface and is used to model surface heat energy budget component values for other sub-classes of vegetation. The model values compare favorably with values independently estimated or observed. The data are spatially displayed using the Idrisi GIS. At the microclimatic scale the presence of different sub-classes of vegetation plays a large role in controlling the actual values of the surface heat budget components. This is in contrast to the larger scale at which climatic variables such as air temperature control the overall vegetation type found in the area.

  7. Sustainable use of alpine and pre-alpine grassland soils in a changing climate (SUSALPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zistl-Schlingmann, Marcus; Beck, Robert; Brandhuber, Robert; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Garcia Franco, Noelia; von Gillhaußen, Phillip; Jentsch, Anke; Kiese, Ralf; Krämer, Alexander; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Köllner, Thomas; Poppenborg, Patrick; Schloter, Michael; Schulz, Stefanie; Wiesmeier, Martin; Wolf, Benjamin; Dannenmann, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The development of ecologically as well as economically sustainable management options for the carbon- and nitrogen rich alpine and pre-alpine grassland soils in a changing climate poses a grand scientific and socio- economical challenge. The transdisciplinary SUSALPS project starting in 2016 aims to essentially improve the knowledge on the functionality of alpine and pre-alpine grassland soils using both natural-scientific/ technical and socio economical approaches. The project is building on existing infrastructure of German grassland-ecosystem-research like the pre-alpine TERENO (Terrestrial ecosystem observation network observatory) observatory sites, the EVENT and SIGNAL sites as well as long term LfL (Bayerische Landesanstalt für Landwirtschaft) sites, plus a new additional high elevation (1400m a.s.l) site in the Bavarian Alps. The site setup along the elevational gradient on the edge of the Alps (1400 m to 300 m) is used for space-for-time climate change experiments which are combined with extensive and intensive management treatments. A key focus of SUSALPS will be the characterization of combined climate change/management effects on carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry. Hence, we will evaluate the influence of different management options and current and future climate changes on the soil microbiome and associated biogeochemical processes in the plant-soil-system, on nitrogen use efficiency, on biosphere-atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases as well as on leaching of environmentally relevant compounds. For this purpose, we simulate the predicted climate change in the region by translocation of large lysimeters (1m2, 1.4m depth; TERENO lysimeters, translocated in 2011) for measurements of biosphere-atmosphere hydrosphere exchange of environmentally relevant C and N compounds as well as by newly transferred smaller plant-soil-mesocosms used for destructive biogeochemical process studies. By closely linking this experimental work with biogeochemical and

  8. Physical and economic vulnerability considering alpine hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totschnig, Reinhold; Keiler, Margreth; Glade, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The obvious increase in natural disasters in the last decades, evoked by different circumstances, emphasises the necessity of dealing with these natural hazards and correlated risks. Independent of the scientific discipline, vulnerability assessment is thereby seen as a central part within risk assessment. However, the ways in which vulnerability is understood, are manifold. Based on a theoretical framework developed within the MOVE-project (Methods for the Improvement of Vulnerability Assessment in Europe), vulnerability comprises of three factors: exposure, susceptibility or fragility, and lack of resilience. To follow a multidisciplinary approach, different dimensions of susceptibility and fragility such as the physical, the social and the ecological dimensions (among others) should be considered in vulnerability assessment. Comprehensive methods and corresponding indicators (qualitative as well as quantitative) have not yet been fully developed. The aim of the MOVE-project is to close this gap, dealing with a wide range of natural hazards. The individual partner institutions within this project work in different scientific fields, dealing with different natural hazards and different vulnerability factors. The present study has its focus on alpine hazards, using data from several test sites in South Tyrol, Italy. Alpine hazards such as avalanches, landslides as well as permafrost hazards are covered. Different methods and indicators related to exposure and the physical and economic dimensions of susceptibility were studied and enhanced. Applied GIS data were improved through field studies and tools such as simulation models and data mining methods. The aim of this study was to develop vulnerability curves on a local scale and vulnerability maps on a regional scale with a high utility value for possible end users. First results, methods and indicators as well as their application will critically be discussed.

  9. Seismic monitoring of an Alpine mountain river

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, J.; Ruíz, M.; Crescentini, L.; Amoruso, A.; Gallart, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Canfranc underground laboratory (LSC), excavated under the Central Pyrenees, is mainly devoted to the study of phenomena which needs "cosmic silence." It also hosts a geodynamical facility, named Geodyn, which holds an accelerometer, a broadband seismometer, and two high-resolution laser strainmeters. During the routine processing of the seismic data, we detected an unusual spectral signature in the 2-10 Hz frequency band, which does not correspond to the typical sources of seismic noise and which can also be recognized in the strain records. After checking against meteorological and hydrological data, we can relate those signals to variations in the discharge by the Aragon River, an Alpine-style river in the southern Pyrenees, located about 400 m from the LSC Geodyn facility. Four main episodes have been identified since early 2011, each lasting 1-2 to 6-8 days. Additionally, a limited number of shorter episodes have also been detected. Three types of river-generated seismic events have been identified, related respectively to moderate rainfall, snowmelt, and flooding events associated to severe storms. Each of those types has distinctive characteristics which allow monitoring the hydrological events from the analysis of seismic and deformation data. A few previous studies have already described the seismic noise close to rivers with larger discharge or in small-scale experimental settings, and we are showing here that the so-called "fluvial seismology" can be useful to study the hydrological evolution of Alpine style streams and may have a potential interest for the civil authorities in charge of the management of hydrological basins.

  10. Arctic and Alpine Vegetations: Similarities, Differences, and Susceptibility to Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, W. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses environmental and biological aspects of arctic and alpine vegetations in the New World between the equator and the Arctic Ocean, considering their similarities, differences, and susceptibility to disturbance by man. (JR)

  11. The onset of alpine pastoral systems in the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oeggl, Klaus; Festi, Daniela; Putzer, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Since the discovery of the Neolithic glacier mummy "Ötzi" in the nival belt of the main Alpine ridge, the onset of alpine pasture is matter of a highly controversial debate both in archaeology and in palaeo-ecology of the Eastern Alps. The implication is that his sojourn in the high-altitudes of the Alps is considered to be connected with pastoral nomadism. Regrettably any archaeological evidence for the existence of such Neolithic alpine pastoral systems is missing up to now and the assumption is based on palynological data only. However, also the palynological record is ambiguous, because pasture indicators in the alpine regions react positive on grazing as well as on fertilization induced by a higher runoff of precipitation. Thus alpine pasture indicators reflect both grazing pressure and climatic change. Anyhow, alpine pastoral systems are a common practice in Alpine animal husbandry, but from an economic point of view such a seasonal vertical transhumance is costly. There are three main reasons for its practice: i) climatic, ii) economic (mainly in connection with population pressure or mining activities), and iii) cultural ideology. In this study we tested the above mentioned reasons in an interdisciplinary study on the beginning of pastoral activities in high altitudes in the central part of the Eastern Alps. This is conducted by palynological analyses of peat deposits situated in the vicinity of the timberline (1600 - 2400 m a.s.l.) combined with archaeological surveys. The investigated sites are located in traditional Alpine transhumance regions and aligned on a transect through the central part of the Eastern Alps. The studies reveal that grazing pressure is reflected since the Bronze Age, which is corroborated by archaeological findings in the vicinity of the investigated sites.

  12. Sensitivity of Alpine Snow and Streamflow Regimes to Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, K.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Marks, D. G.; Bernhardt, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the sensitivity of hydrological processes to climate change in alpine areas with snow dominated regimes is of paramount importance as alpine basins show both high runoff efficiency associated with the melt of the seasonal snowpack and great sensitivity of snow processes to temperature change. In this study, meteorological data measured in a selection of alpine headwaters basins including Reynolds Mountain East, Idaho, USA, Wolf Creek, Yukon in Canada, and Zugspitze Mountain, Germany with climates ranging from arctic to continental temperate were used to study the snow and streamflow sensitivity to climate change. All research sites have detailed multi-decadal meteorological and snow measurements. The Cold Regions Hydrological Modelling platform (CRHM) was used to create a model representing a typical alpine headwater basin discretized into hydrological response units with physically based representations of snow redistribution by wind, complex terrain snowmelt energetics and runoff processes in alpine tundra. The sensitivity of snow hydrology to climate change was investigated by changing air temperature and precipitation using weather generating methods based on the change factors obtained from different climate model projections for future and current periods. The basin mean and spatial variability of peak snow water equivalent, sublimation loss, duration of snow season, snowmelt rates, streamflow peak, and basin discharge were assessed under varying climate scenarios and the most sensitive hydrological mechanisms to the changes in the different alpine climates were detected. The results show that snow hydrology in colder alpine climates is more resilient to warming than that in warmer climates, but that compensatory factors to warming such as reduced blowing snow sublimation loss and reduced melt rate should also be assessed when considering climate change impacts on alpine hydrology.

  13. An improved method for determining the distribution of swift fox in Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roy, Christiane C.; Sovada, Marsha A.; Sargeant, Glen A.; Roy, Christiane C.

    1999-01-01

    During 1997 and 1998 we tested a new method for determining the distribution of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in Kansas. From a sampling frame of 30 counties in western Kansas, we selected a systematic sample of alternate townships in a checkerboard pattern. During September and October 1997 and August 1998, experienced observers delineated suitable swift fox habitat within each sample township and searched it for evidence of occupancy (tracks, dens, and the animals themselves) by swift fox and other furbearers. Each township was searched for a minimum of 30 minutes, with searches continuing until swift foxes were either detected or for 120 minutes. Of the 288 townships selected in 1997, 271 (94.1%) were searched effectively with swift fox detected in 40.5% of the townships. Adverse weather conditions prevented surveys in two northwestern counties of our sample frame. In 1998, 245 township were searched effectively. Swift fox were detected in 27 counties searched to date. We did not detect swift fox in Seward, Meade and Ford counties, where the species is thought to be uncommon or absent. Tracks were difficult to discern in areas with hard or sandy soils and were sometimes obliterated by adverse weather, vehicle traffic, and agricultural activities. To determine how frequently we failed to detect swift foxes that were present, we plan to repeat searches in 1999 in townships where swift foxes were not detected previously. Nevertheless, preliminary results suggest our method to be a practical means for conducting landscape-scale presence/absence surveys of swift fox. Restricting searches to habitat judged best for swift foxes and most favorable for track detection helped control costs and achieve high detection rates.

  14. Swift: A Widefield Imaging Fabry Perot for Sofia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, Gordon J.

    1999-01-01

    Contract was to pursue feasibility studies of the SOFIA Widefield Imaging Fabry-Perot (SWIFT). SWIFT was proposed as a two color 18 to 40 microns imaging Fabry-Perot that utilized two Rockwell/Boeing 256 x 256 pixel Si:Sb BIBs as detective devices. The colors were to be split between 26 and 30 microns using a MgO dichroic. The resolution achieving devices were to be a pair of cryogenic fully tunable scanning Fabry-Perot interferometers (FPIs), two in each band. For high resolving powers, a third, fixed FPI is inserted into the beam. The FPI mirrors were to be made of free standing metal mesh. We also proposed to look into a long wavelength (40 to 210 microns) band during the feasibility study period. We produced a proposal to USRA, submitted in July 1997 that substantially refined our ideas. We decided the long wavelength science was compelling, so the baseline wavelength coverage for SWIFT was widened to 17 to 205 microns. Under typical operations, we proposed to simultaneously image in two bands: 22 to 38 microns, and 50 to 205 microns. The bands were to be split by a cold CaF2 dichroic. The short wavelength (SW) band was to employ a 256 x 256 pixel Boeing/Rockwell Si:Sb BIB array, and the long wavelength (LW) band was to employ a Goddard 6 x 32 (upgradable to 32 x 32) element array of monolithic silicon "pop-up" bolometers as detective devices. The two color capability doubled the data taking efficiency, and ensured "perfect" registration between the images obtained in each band. For the SW band, the beam was to be fully sampled (0.7" pixels, 1.4 in. beam) at 17 microns, and over sampled at longer wavelengths. Even so, SWIFT has a very large (3 ft x 3 ft) field of view. To match the SW and LW fields of view (initially in one dimension only, but in 2-dimensions with 32 x 32 upgrade), SWIFT was to under sample at 63 microns (5.6 in pixels, 5.2 in beam) resulting in a 0.56 x 3 in (upgrade to 3 in x 3 in) field of view. Each band has both Lo-Res (R triple bond

  15. Early establishment of trees at the alpine treeline: idiosyncratic species responses to temperature-moisture interactions

    PubMed Central

    Loranger, Hannah; Zotz, Gerhard; Bader, Maaike Y.

    2016-01-01

    On a global scale, temperature is the main determinant of arctic and alpine treeline position. However on a local scale, treeline form and position vary considerably due to other climatic factors, tree species ecology and life-stage-dependent responses. For treelines to advance poleward or uphill, the first steps are germination and seedling establishment. These earliest life stages may be major bottlenecks for treeline tree populations and will depend differently on climatic conditions than adult trees. We investigated the effect of soil temperature and moisture on germination and early seedling survival in a field experiment in the French Alps near the local treeline (2100 m a.s.l.) using passive temperature manipulations and two watering regimes. Five European treeline tree species were studied: Larix decidua, Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus uncinata and Sorbus aucuparia. In addition, we monitored the germination response of three of these species to low temperatures under controlled conditions in growth chambers. The early establishment of these trees at the alpine treeline was limited either by temperature or by moisture, the sensitivity to one factor often depending on the intensity of the other. The results showed that the relative importance of the two factors and the direction of the effects are highly species-specific, while both factors tend to have consistent effects on both germination and early seedling survival within each species. We show that temperature and water availability are both important contributors to establishment patterns of treeline trees and hence to species-specific forms and positions of alpine treelines. The observed idiosyncratic species responses highlight the need for studies including several species and life-stages to create predictive power concerning future treeline dynamics. PMID:27402618

  16. Early establishment of trees at the alpine treeline: idiosyncratic species responses to temperature-moisture interactions.

    PubMed

    Loranger, Hannah; Zotz, Gerhard; Bader, Maaike Y

    2016-01-01

    On a global scale, temperature is the main determinant of arctic and alpine treeline position. However on a local scale, treeline form and position vary considerably due to other climatic factors, tree species ecology and life-stage-dependent responses. For treelines to advance poleward or uphill, the first steps are germination and seedling establishment. These earliest life stages may be major bottlenecks for treeline tree populations and will depend differently on climatic conditions than adult trees. We investigated the effect of soil temperature and moisture on germination and early seedling survival in a field experiment in the French Alps near the local treeline (2100 m a.s.l.) using passive temperature manipulations and two watering regimes. Five European treeline tree species were studied: Larix decidua, Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus uncinata and Sorbus aucuparia In addition, we monitored the germination response of three of these species to low temperatures under controlled conditions in growth chambers. The early establishment of these trees at the alpine treeline was limited either by temperature or by moisture, the sensitivity to one factor often depending on the intensity of the other. The results showed that the relative importance of the two factors and the direction of the effects are highly species-specific, while both factors tend to have consistent effects on both germination and early seedling survival within each species. We show that temperature and water availability are both important contributors to establishment patterns of treeline trees and hence to species-specific forms and positions of alpine treelines. The observed idiosyncratic species responses highlight the need for studies including several species and life-stages to create predictive power concerning future treeline dynamics. PMID:27402618

  17. Climate-induced range contraction of a rare alpine aquatic invertebrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giersch, Jonathan J.; Jordan, Steve; Luikart, Gordon; Jones, Leslie A.; Hauer, F. Richard; Muhlfeld, Clint C.

    2015-01-01

    Climate warming poses a serious threat to alpine-restricted species worldwide, yet few studies have empirically documented climate-induced changes in distributions. The rare stonefly, Zapada glacier (Baumann and Gaufin), endemic to alpine streams of Glacier National Park (GNP), Montana, was recently petitioned for listing under the US Endangered Species Act because of climate-change-induced glacier loss, yet little was known about its current status and distribution. We resampled streams throughout the historical distribution of Z. glacier to investigate trends in occurrence associated with changes in temperature and glacial extent. The current geographic distribution of the species was assessed using morphological characteristics of adults and DNA barcoding of nymphs. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of mtDNA data revealed 8 distinct clades of the genus corresponding with 7 known species from GNP, and one potentially cryptic species. Climate model simulations indicate that average summer air temperature increased (0.67–1.00°C) during the study period (1960–2012), and glacial surface area decreased by ∼35% from 1966 to 2005. We detected Z. glacier in only 1 of the 6 historically occupied streams and at 2 new locations in GNP. These results suggest that an extremely restricted historical distribution of Z. glacierin GNP has been further reduced over the past several decades by an upstream retreat to higher, cooler sites as water temperatures increased and glacial masses decreased. More research is urgently needed to determine the status, distribution, and vulnerability of Z. glacier and other alpine stream invertebrates threatened by climate change in mountainous ecosystems.

  18. `Hearing' alpine plants growing after snowmelt: ultrasonic snow sensors provide long-term series of alpine plant phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitasse, Yann; Rebetez, Martine; Filippa, Gianluca; Cremonese, Edoardo; Klein, Geoffrey; Rixen, Christian

    2016-08-01

    In alpine environments, the growing season is severely constrained by low temperature and snow. Here, we aim at determining the climatic factors that best explain the interannual variation in spring growth onset of alpine plants, and at examining whether photoperiod might limit their phenological response during exceptionally warm springs and early snowmelts. We analysed 17 years of data (1998-2014) from 35 automatic weather stations located in subalpine and alpine zones ranging from 1560 to 2450 m asl in the Swiss Alps. These stations are equipped with ultrasonic sensors for snow depth measurements that are also able to detect plant growth in spring and summer, giving a unique opportunity to analyse snow and climate effects on alpine plant phenology. Our analysis showed high phenological variation among years, with one exceptionally early and late spring, namely 2011 and 2013. Overall, the timing of snowmelt and the beginning of plant growth were tightly linked irrespective of the elevation of the station. Snowmelt date was the best predictor of plant growth onset with air temperature after snowmelt modulating the plants' development rate. This multiple series of alpine plant phenology suggests that currently alpine plants are directly tracking climate change with no major photoperiod limitation.

  19. Simulation Study Of Early Afterglows Observed With Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Hededal, C.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-09-01

    A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell code has been used to simulate the dynamics of forward and reverse shocks with thin and thick shells within the parameter constraints provided by present Swift observations and the present models of GRB emission. Our 3-D RPIC simulations have provided the dynamics of collisionless shocks in electron-ion and electron-positron plasmas with and without initial ambient magnetic fields and revealed the importance of ``jitter radiation'' with prompt and afterglow spectra due to the inhomogeneous magnetic fields generated by the Weibel instability. It is different from synchrotron radiation, which is usually assumed to be the dominant radiation process. We have investigated gamma-ray burst emissions from prompt, early, and late afterglows considering microscopic processes. Based on our previous investigation of the Weibel instability for each stage of evolution of ejecta propagating in the ISM, we have incorporated the plasma conditions (relativistic jets) with the density and composition of the plasmas, the magnetic field strength ($\\sigma$-values (the ratio of the electromagnetic energy flux to the particle energy flux)) and its direction, and the Lorentz factor for the different stages in prompt and afterglows. Systematic simulation studies of the relativistic collisionless shocks, associated particle acceleration, magnetic field generation and self-consistent radiation provide insight into undetermined issues in prompt and afterglows observed by Swift. Self-consistently calculated lightcurves, spectra, spectral evolutions, and polarization as function of viewing angle will be done to light a shed on recent new observations by Swift, in particular, X-ray flares, early steep decay, and shallow decay.

  20. Competitive SWIFT cluster templates enhance detection of aging changes

    PubMed Central

    Rebhahn, Jonathan A.; Roumanes, David R.; Qi, Yilin; Khan, Atif; Thakar, Juilee; Rosenberg, Alex; Lee, F. Eun‐Hyung; Quataert, Sally A.; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clustering‐based algorithms for automated analysis of flow cytometry datasets have achieved more efficient and objective analysis than manual processing. Clustering organizes flow cytometry data into subpopulations with substantially homogenous characteristics but does not directly address the important problem of identifying the salient differences in subpopulations between subjects and groups. Here, we address this problem by augmenting SWIFT—a mixture model based clustering algorithm reported previously. First, we show that SWIFT clustering using a “template” mixture model, in which all subpopulations are represented, identifies small differences in cell numbers per subpopulation between samples. Second, we demonstrate that resolution of inter‐sample differences is increased by “competition” wherein a joint model is formed by combining the mixture model templates obtained from different groups. In the joint model, clusters from individual groups compete for the assignment of cells, sharpening differences between samples, particularly differences representing subpopulation shifts that are masked under clustering with a single template model. The benefit of competition was demonstrated first with a semisynthetic dataset obtained by deliberately shifting a known subpopulation within an actual flow cytometry sample. Single templates correctly identified changes in the number of cells in the subpopulation, but only the competition method detected small changes in median fluorescence. In further validation studies, competition identified a larger number of significantly altered subpopulations between young and elderly subjects. This enrichment was specific, because competition between templates from consensus male and female samples did not improve the detection of age‐related differences. Several changes between the young and elderly identified by SWIFT template competition were consistent with known alterations in the elderly, and additional

  1. Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.; Norris, Jay P.

    2007-01-01

    GRB research has undergone a revolution in the last two years. The launch of Swift, with its rapid slewing capability, has greatly increased the number and quality of GRB localizations and X-ray and optical afterglow lightcurves. Over 160 GRBs have been detected, and nearly all that have been followed up with the on-board narrow field telescopes. Advances in our understanding of short GRBs have been spectacular. The detection of X-ray afterglows has led to accurate localizations from ground based observatories, which have given host identifications and redshifts. Theoretical models for short GRB progenitors have, for the first time, been placed on a sound foundation. The hosts for the short GRBs differ in a fundamental way from the long GRB hosts: short GRBs tend to occur in non-star forming galaxies or regions, whereas long GRBs are strongly concentrated within star forming regions. Observations are consistent with a binary neutron star merger model, but other models involving old stellar populations are also viable. Swift has greatly increased the redshift range of GRB detection. The highest redshift GRBs, at zeta approx. 5-6, are approaching the era of reionization. Ground-based deep optical spectroscopy of high redshift bursts is giving metallicity measurements and other information on the source environment to much greater distance than other techniques. The localization of GRB 060218 to a nearby galaxy, and association with SN 2006aj, added a valuable member to the class of GRBs with detected supernova. The prospects for future progress are excellent given the >10 year orbital lifetime of the Swift satellite.

  2. Searching for supergiant fast X-ray transients with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.; Bozzo, E.; Esposito, P.; Sbarufatti, B.; Haberl, F.; Ponti, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; Ducci, L.; Segreto, A.; Jin, C.; Masetti, N.; Del Santo, M.; Campana, S.; Mangano, V.

    2016-09-01

    Supergiant fast X-ray transients (SFXTs) are high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) hosting a neutron star and an OB supergiant companion. We examine the available Swift data, as well as other new or archival/serendipitous data, on three sources: IGR J17407-2808, 2XMM J185114.3-000004, and IGR J18175-2419, whose X-ray characteristics qualify them as candidate SFXT, to explore their properties and test whether they are consistent with an SFXT nature. Since IGR J17407-2808 and 2XMM J185114.3-000004 triggered the Burst Alert Telescope on board Swift, the Swift data enable us to provide their first arcsecond localisations, leading to an unequivocal identification of the source CXOU J174042.0-280724 as the soft X-ray counterpart of IGR J17407-2808, as well as their first broadband spectra, which can be fit with models generally describing accreting neutron stars in HMXBs. While still lacking optical spectroscopy to assess the spectral type of the companion, we propose 2XMM J185114.3-000004 as a very strong SFXT candidate. The nature of IGR J17407-2808 remains, instead, more uncertain. Its broadband properties cannot exclude the fact that the emission originates from either an HMXB (and in that case, an SFXT) or, more likely, a low-mass X-ray binary. Finally, based on the deep non-detection in our XRT monitoring campaign and a careful reanalysis of the original INTEGRAL data in which the discovery of the source was first reported, we show that IGR J18175-2419 is likely a spurious detection.

  3. Freeze fitness in alpine Tiger moth caterpillars and their parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Hawes, T C; Wharton, D A

    2011-09-01

    The adaptive fitness of a freeze-tolerant insect may be mediated by both endogenous and exogenous interactions. The aim of the study presented here was to characterize the freeze tolerance of alpine Tiger moth caterpillars (Metacrias huttoni) and highlight two poorly explored indices of the potential attrition of fitness: (1) downstream development and reproduction; (2) parasitism. Caterpillars survived temperatures as low as -16°C and demonstrated >90% 72-h survival after exposures to -10°C. Two-week acclimations at 5, 10, and 20°C had no effect on body water content, haemolymph osmolality or survival of equilibrium freezing, but there was a significant elevation of the temperature of crystallization (T (c)) in those caterpillars acclimated to 5°C. Cell viability of fat body tissue was resilient to freezing (-10 to -16°C), but midgut and tracheal cells showed significant degradation. Pupation and eclosion were unaffected by freezing at -5 or -10°C. Likewise, there were no significant differences in egg production or the proportion of eggs that hatched between control and frozen insects. By contrast, the ability of tachinid larvae to survive freezing within their hosts means that parasitism plays an important role in regulating population size. Mean parasitism of caterpillars by tachinids was 33.3 ± 7.2%. Pupation and imago emergence of tachinids after host 'endo-nucleation' was >75%. Eclosed adult tachinids showed a non-significant increase in the incidence of wing abnormalities in relation to low temperature exposure.

  4. WOMBAT: sWift Objects for Mhd BAsed on Tvd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendygral, Peter; Porter, David; Edmon, Paul; Delgado, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    WOMBAT (sWift Objects for Mhd BAsed on Tvd) is an astrophysical fluid code that is an implementation of a non-relativistic MHD TVD scheme; an extension for relativistic MHD has been added. The code operates on 1, 2, and 3D Eulerian meshes (cartesian and cylindrical coordinates) with magnetic field divergence restriction controlled by a constrained transport (CT) scheme. The user can tune code performance to a given processor based on chip cache sizes. Proper settings yield significant speed-ups due to efficient cache reuse.

  5. Gamma Ray Bursts in the Swift-Fermi Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Razzaque, Soebur

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most violent occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole birth. They are highly luminous events and provide excellent probes of the distant universe. GRB research has greatly advanced over the past 10 years with the results from Swift, Fermi and an active follow-up community. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  6. ANTARES neutrino detection: CAHA photometry & spectroscopy of the Swift source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Hoyos, F.; Guijarro, A.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Fernández, M.; Tello, J. C.; Jeong, S.; Maíz-Apellániz, J.

    2015-09-01

    Following the detection of a possible counterpart to the neutrino ANTARES source by Swift (Dornic et al. GCNC 18231, ATel #7987), we conducted optical monitoring and spectroscopic observations with the 2.2m (+BUSCA) and 3.5m (+TWIN) telescopes at the German-Spanish Calar Alto Observatory (Spain), under non-optimal conditions (airmass 3), starting on Sep 3 at 20:07 UT (2.52 days post ANTARES detection) of the R=12.6 star USNO-B1.0 0626-0501169 (probably a G/K-type star, Smartt et al. ATel #7992).

  7. Uncovering the nature of UV sources observed with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Lopes, de Oliveira, R.; Nuñez, R. N. E.; Montané, B.

    2016-08-01

    We present an ongoing project aiming to reveal the nature and study the variability of UV sources. The project explores emitters in a sample of more than 60 fields covering around symbiotic stars which were observed with the ultraviolet/optical telescope onboard the Swift satellite. Here we detail the procedures developed in order to search for variability in their flux, and the first results from the three fields already investigated. The UV sources identified are likely associated with cataclysmic variables, white dwarfs, and active stars.

  8. Swift/XRT monitoring observations of SN2011dh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Burrows, D. N.

    2011-06-01

    SN 2011dh (Silverman et al. 2001, Atel #3398; Reiland et al. 2011, CBET #2736) has been monitored by Swift with 14 observations up to now. Here we report on the first 6 observations, spanning the June 3-6, 2011 interval, with 21.2 ks effective exposure time. An X-ray source was positively detected at the location of SN 2011dh with a high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N~8). This source was not present in deep observations taken in 2007, and we tentatively associate it with SN 2001dh, in agreement with Margutti & Soderberg (2011, ATel #3400) results.

  9. Where have all the females gone? Male biased sex-ratio in Arctodiaptomus alpinus (Imhof, 1885) in alpine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žibrat, U.; Brancelj, A.

    2009-04-01

    In populations with both males and females sex-ratio is one of the driving forces of population dynamics. It influences fecundity, inbreeding and social interactions. Sex-ratio is affected by several biotic and abiotic factors, either by selective killing of one sex or by inducing migrations. In alpine lakes of Triglav National Park, Slovenia, an extremely male biased sex-ratio in Arctodiaptomus alpinus (Imhof, 1885) was regularly observed since 1992. We analysed population dynamics and sex-ratio of A. alpinus in three alpine lakes (Jezero v Ledvicah, Rjavo jezero and Zgornje Kriško jezero) from Triglav National Park in Slovenia. In addition to seasonal dynamics we also researched long-term changes in sex-ratio (in a period of 11 years from autumn samples) as a result of increased air-temperature, and zooplankton diurnal vertical migrations. Adults of both sexes were found to appear at the same time in the water collumn with males prevailing throughout the season. A similar trend was found in copepodites CV. The percent of adult females began increasing in late summer, when there were no more copepodites and recrutation from copepodites CV to adults stopped, while male mortality increased. All cohorts of A. alpinus were found to perform diurnal vertical migrations. Both adult and CV females remained close to the bottom during the day and migrated vertically during the night. Results of the long-term study show no changes in sex-ratio in autumn.

  10. From Adam Swift to Adam Smith: How the "Invisible Hand" Overcomes Middle Class Hypocrisy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooley, James

    2007-01-01

    This paper challenges Richard Pring's suggestion that parents using private education may be undermining the desire for social justice and equality, using recent arguments of Adam Swift as a springboard. Swift's position on the banning of private schools, which uses a Rawlsian "veil of ignorance" argument, is explored, and it is suggested that, if…

  11. Swift detection of an X-ray outburst from the SMC transient SXP 202A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, M. J.; Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Udalski, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the results from the Swift SMC Survey (S-CUBED), a wide area/short exposure survey of the SMC in X-rays performed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT); see ATel #9299 for programme details.

  12. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): effect on tendon properties.

    PubMed

    Kösters, A; Rieder, F; Wiesinger, H-P; Dorn, U; Hofstaedter, T; Fink, C; Müller, E; Seynnes, O R

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of alpine skiing on patellar tendon properties in patients with total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Thirty-one adults (70.4 ± 4.7 years) with unilateral TKA were recruited 2.7 ± 0.9 years after surgery and assigned to an intervention (IG) or a control group (CG). The IG underwent a 12-week guided skiing program. Tendon stiffness, Young's modulus, and cross-sectional area (CSA) were measured before and after the intervention. In both groups, mean tendon CSA was 28% (P < 0.001) larger in the operated (OP) than in the non-operated (NOP) leg at baseline, without any difference in other tendon properties. After training, stiffness increased in the IG by 5.8% and 15.8%, respectively, in the OP and NOP legs. Likewise, mean CSA increased in the IG by 2.9% in the OP and 3.8% in the NOP leg, whereas no significant changes were found for the Young's modulus. None of the tendon parameters changed in the CG. Results indicate that patellar tendon structure and/or loading pattern are altered following TKA, but this tissue seems to retain its adaptation capacity. Further, alpine skiing appears to offer a suitable rehabilitation strategy for TKA patients. PMID:26083704

  13. Differential exposure of alpine ospreys to mercury: melting glaciers, hydrology or deposition patterns?

    PubMed

    Guigueno, Mélanie F; Elliott, Kyle H; Levac, Joshua; Wayland, Mark; Elliott, John E

    2012-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global contaminant impacting even remote environments. In alpine watersheds, glacial meltwater is a source of Hg, which accumulated in glaciers during the 1960-1980 cooling cycle. The considerable variation observed for Hg exposure of alpine animals in proximal watersheds could result from differences among those watersheds in Hg loading from glacial meltwater. Alternatively, variation may be the result of hydrology, atmospheric Hg deposition patterns, or food web characteristics. To examine those possibilities, we measured Hg in ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), apex predators in 15 watersheds in western Canada. Mercury levels in feathers of nestlings increased with increasing modeled atmospheric deposition rates and decreased with lake size. In eggs mercury decreased with δ(13)C, an indicator of food web structure, and with pH and elevation. Thus, Hg levels in chicks were strongly associated with local patterns relevant when the chicks were growing (e.g. the period post-snow melt: Hg deposition, lake size) while Hg levels in eggs were weakly associated with local patterns relevant during the snow melt (elevation, δ(13)C), with the remainder of the Hg variation in eggs determined by other factors such as possible Hg accumulation by the adult elsewhere. Modeled atmospheric deposition from prevailing upwind locations including Asia, followed by runoff into small lakes, were related to Hg patterns in osprey, with little apparent role for recent melting of glaciers. Our study highlights the importance of physical patterns to the environmental chemistry of top predators. PMID:22280924

  14. Differential exposure of alpine ospreys to mercury: melting glaciers, hydrology or deposition patterns?

    PubMed

    Guigueno, Mélanie F; Elliott, Kyle H; Levac, Joshua; Wayland, Mark; Elliott, John E

    2012-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global contaminant impacting even remote environments. In alpine watersheds, glacial meltwater is a source of Hg, which accumulated in glaciers during the 1960-1980 cooling cycle. The considerable variation observed for Hg exposure of alpine animals in proximal watersheds could result from differences among those watersheds in Hg loading from glacial meltwater. Alternatively, variation may be the result of hydrology, atmospheric Hg deposition patterns, or food web characteristics. To examine those possibilities, we measured Hg in ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), apex predators in 15 watersheds in western Canada. Mercury levels in feathers of nestlings increased with increasing modeled atmospheric deposition rates and decreased with lake size. In eggs mercury decreased with δ(13)C, an indicator of food web structure, and with pH and elevation. Thus, Hg levels in chicks were strongly associated with local patterns relevant when the chicks were growing (e.g. the period post-snow melt: Hg deposition, lake size) while Hg levels in eggs were weakly associated with local patterns relevant during the snow melt (elevation, δ(13)C), with the remainder of the Hg variation in eggs determined by other factors such as possible Hg accumulation by the adult elsewhere. Modeled atmospheric deposition from prevailing upwind locations including Asia, followed by runoff into small lakes, were related to Hg patterns in osprey, with little apparent role for recent melting of glaciers. Our study highlights the importance of physical patterns to the environmental chemistry of top predators.

  15. Swift Observations of Supernovae during and after Shock Breakout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immler, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Over the past few years, space-based observatories have allowed detailed studies of energetic supernova explosions in previously unexplored time domains and wavelength regimes. NASA's Swift observatory is playing an important role in probing the early emission of SNe during and after shock breakout due to its fast response, flexible scheduling capabilities, and large wavelength band coverage, ranging from the optical, W, and X-ray to the Gamma-ray bands. By studying the outgoing SN shocks with material in its surroundings, the explosion physics and nature of progenitor stars can be studied. Furthermore, monitoring the X-ray emission of SNe with space-based X-ray observatories is being used to map the density structure in SN environments out to large radii from the sites of the explosions (>E20 cm), the transition of a SN into an old supernova remnant can be studied, and the mass-loss rates of the progenitor stars are being probed over significant timescales (>E4 years) in the stellar wind history. In combination, these observations give unprecedented insights into the nature of energetic explosions and their environments. During this talk, I will present highlights from recent observations, among them the first observation of a SN DURING the actual explosion with Swift, and I will discuss the "naked eye" burst at a redshift of -1, which was the most distant object humans could ever see with their own eyes.

  16. VERITAS Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected by Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Finnegan, G.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Hughes, G.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Jackson, D. J.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Newbold, M. D.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ruppel, J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Şentürk, G. D.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wood, M.

    2011-12-01

    We present the results of 16 Swift-triggered Gamma-ray burst (GRB) follow-up observations taken with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) telescope array from 2007 January to 2009 June. The median energy threshold and response time of these observations were 260 GeV and 320 s, respectively. Observations had an average duration of 90 minutes. Each burst is analyzed independently in two modes: over the whole duration of the observations and again over a shorter timescale determined by the maximum VERITAS sensitivity to a burst with a t -1.5 time profile. This temporal model is characteristic of GRB afterglows with high-energy, long-lived emission that have been detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite. No significant very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission was detected and upper limits above the VERITAS threshold energy are calculated. The VERITAS upper limits are corrected for gamma-ray extinction by the extragalactic background light and interpreted in the context of the keV emission detected by Swift. For some bursts the VHE emission must have less power than the keV emission, placing constraints on inverse Compton models of VHE emission.

  17. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  18. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, Clarissa; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, T. R.

    2015-05-14

    We have examined microstructural evolution in irradiated ceria (CeO2) using swift heavy ion irradiation, electron microscopy, and atomistic simulation. CeO2, a UO2 fuel surrogate, was irradiated with gold ions at an energy of 1 GeV to fluences up to 1x1014 ions/cm2. Transmission electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showed that the ion tracks were of similar size at all fluences, and that there was no chemical change in the ion track core. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at the lower energy and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  19. The Search for Gravitational Wave EM Counterparts with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennea, Jamie; Evans, Phil; Swift GW follow-up Team

    2016-04-01

    We present the plan to search for electromagnetic counterparts of Gravitational Waves (GWs) discovered during the current and upcoming runs of the LIGO and Virgo detectors. As we enter a period where the sensitivity of the current generation of GW detectors approaches a high probability of the first detection of a real GW signal, confirmation of the reality of these triggers will be greatly improved if an EM counterpart can be found. Swift’s ability to rapidly respond to high priority target-of-opportunity observations, it’s multi-wavelength capabilities and low overhead observing make it a seemingly ideal follow-up facility. However comparing the size of the expected GW error regions with the fields of view of the Swift XRT and UVOT telescopes, we find that covering the large GW error regions would require a unreasonably large number of pointings. We present our method of meeting this challenge, by both reducing the problem using Galaxy targeting, and by operating Swift in an entirely new way in order to cover the still large number of fields needed to chase down the EM counterpart before it disappears.

  20. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; de Pasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; Roming, P.; Sakamoto, T.; Swenson, C.; Virgili, F.; Wanderman, D.; Zhang, B.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi-LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift-BAT is only beginning to be explored by multiwavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi-GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  1. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith I.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi-LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift-BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi-GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  2. Fermi and Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow Population Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; Schady, P.; Burrows, D. N.; dePasquale, M.; Donato, D.; Gehrels, N.; Koch, S.; McEnery, J.; Piran, T.; Roming, P.; Sakamoto, T.; Swenson, C.; Troja, E.; Vasileiou, V.; Virgili, F.; Wanderman, D.; Zhang, B.

    2011-01-01

    The new and extreme population of GRBs detected by Fermi -LAT shows several new features in high energy gamma-rays that are providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 6 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust dataset of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into components of GRB emission structure. The relationship between the LAT detected GRBs and the well studied, fainter, less energetic GRBs detected by Swift -BAT is only beginning to be explored by multi-wavelength studies. We explore the large sample of GRBs detected by BAT only, BAT and Fermi -GBM, and GBM and LAT, focusing on these samples separately in order to search for statistically significant differences between the populations, using only those GRBs with measured redshifts in order to physically characterize these objects. We disentangle which differences are instrumental selection effects versus intrinsic properties, in order to better understand the nature of the special characteristics of the LAT bursts.

  3. A high flux source of swift oxygen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, M.; Kohl, D. A.; Keto, J. W.; Antoniewicz, P.

    1987-01-01

    A source of swift oxygen atoms is described which has several unique features. A high current ion beam is produced by a microwave discharge, accelerated to 10 keV and the mass selected by a modified Du Pont 21-110 mass spectrometer. The O(+) beam exciting the mass spectrometer is focused into a rectangular shape with an energy spread of less than 1 eV. The next section of the machine decelerates the ion beam into a counterpropagating electron beam in order to minimize space charge effects. After deceleration, the ion beam intersects at 90 deg, a neutral oxygen atom beam, which via resonant charge exchange produces a mixture of O(+) and O. Any remaining O(+) are swept out of the beam by an electric field and differentially pumped away while the desired O beam, collimated by slits, impinges on the target. In situ monitoring of the target surface is done by X-ray photoelectron or Auger spectroscopy. Faraday cups provide flux measurements in the ion sections while the neutral flux is determined by a special torsion balance or by a quadrupole mass spectrometer specially adapted for swift atoms. While the vacuum from the source through the mass spectrometer is maintained by diffusion pumps, the rest of the machine is UHV.

  4. Mini-Survey of SDSS OIII AGN with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelina, Lorella; George, Ian

    2007-01-01

    There is a common wisdom that every massive galaxy has a massive block hole. However, most of these objects either are not radiating or until recently have been very difficult to detect. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data, based on the [OIII] line indicate that perhaps up to 20% of all galaxies may be classified as AGN a surprising result that must be checked with independent data. X-ray surveys have revealed that hard X-ray selected AGN show a strong luminosity dependent evolution and their luminosity function (LF) shows a dramatic break towards low Lx (at all z). This is seen for all types of AGN, but is stronger for the broad-line objects. In sharp contrast, the local LF of (optically-selected samples) shows no such break and no differences between narrow and broad-line objects. Assuming both hard X-ray and [OIII] emission are fair indicators of AGN activity, it is important to understand this discrepancy. We present here the results of a mini-survey done with Swift on a selected sample of SDSS selected AGN. The objects have been sampled at different L([OIII]) to check the relation with the Lx observed with Swift.

  5. Mini-Survey on SDSS OIII AGN with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelini, Lorella

    2008-01-01

    The number of AGN and their luminosity distribution are crucial parameters for our understanding of the AGN phenomenon. There is a common wisdom that every massive galaxy has a massive black hole. However, most of these objects either are not radiating or until recently have been very difficult to detect. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data, based on the [OIII] line indicate that perhaps up to 20% of all galaxies may be classified as AGN a surprising result that must be checked with independent data. X-ray surveys have revealed that hard X-ray selected AGN show a strong luminosity dependent evolution and their luminosity function (LF) shows a dramatic break towards low $L_X$ (at all $z$). This is seen for all types of AGN, but is stronger for the broad-line objects. In sharp contrast, the local LF of {it optically-selected samples} shows no such break and no differences between narrow and broad-line objects. Assuming both hard X-ray and [O{\\sc iii}] emission are fair indicators of AGN activity, it is important to understand this discrepancy. We present here the results of a min-survey done with Swift on a selected sample of SDSS selected AGN. The objects have been sampled at different L([O{\\sc iii}]) to check the relation with the $L_X$ observed with Swift.

  6. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    DOE PAGES

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolatedmore » point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Furthermore, inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.« less

  7. Recent Results from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst MIDEX mission has detected more than 125 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nearly all of which have been followed up by the narrow-field instruments on Swift through automatic repointing, and by ground and other satellite telescopes after rapid notification. Within seconds of a trigger the BAT produces and relays to the ground a position good to three arc minutes and a four channel light curve. An overview of the properties of BAT bursts and BAT'S performance as a burst monitor will be presented in this talk. BAT is a coded aperture imaging system with a wide (approx.2 sr) field of view consisting of a large coded mask located 1 m above a 5200 sq cm array of 32.768 CdZnTe detectors. All electronics and other hardware systems on the BAT have been operating well since commissioning and there is no sign of any degradation on orbit. The flight and ground software have proven similarly robust and allow the real time localization of all bursts and the rapid derivation of burst light curves, spectra and spectral fits on the ground.

  8. Ectoparasites of the swift fox in northwestern Texas.

    PubMed

    Pence, Danny B; Kamler, Jan F; Ballard, Warren B

    2004-07-01

    Ectoparasites were collected from chemically immobilized swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in the Texas Panhandle (USA). Three species of fleas (Pulex irritans, Dactylopsylla percernis, and Euhoplopsyllus affinis) and one species of tick (Ixodes sculptus) were found. Pulex irritans was the only abundant ectoparasite; it occurred on all 23 foxes brushed in 1999-2000 and all but one of 34 hosts examined in 2000-01. Otherwise, this swift fox population had a depauperate ectoparasite fauna; the remainder of the ectoparasites only occurred on a few (< or =5%) of the hosts. Because of previous taxonomic confusion between P. irritans and the closely related P. simulans, the zoogeographic distribution of these two species in many areas of western North America needs to be verified. Apparently, only the human flea P. irritans occurs on wild canids in the Texas Panhandle. However, there are previous records of P. simulans on other carnivores in western and central Texas. Some of these specimens were reexamined, and their identifications were reconfirmed. Also, the recent literature on the controversial taxonomic status of these two flea species is reviewed. The male terminal aedeagal sexual apparatus is the only means currently available to separate P. irritans and P. simulans.

  9. The Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients outburst factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Patrizia; Kennea, Jamie; Barthelmy, Scott Douglas; Bozzo, Enrico; Burrows, David N.; Ducci, Lorenzo; Esposito, Paolo; Evans, Phil; Gehrels, Neil; Krimm, Hans A.; Vercellone, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We present the Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients project, which has been exploiting Swift's capabilities in a systematic study of SFXTs and classical supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) since 2007. We performed an efficient long-term monitoring of 16 sources including both SFXTs and classical SGXBs and followed source activity across more than 4 orders of magnitude in X-ray luminosity, sampling the light curves on timescales spanning from few hundred seconds to years. We use our measurements of dynamic ranges, duty cycles as a function of luminosity, and luminosity distributions to highlight systematic differences that help discriminate between different theoretical models proposed to explain the differences between the wind accretion processes in SFXTs and classical SGXBs. Our follow-ups of the SFXT outbursts provide a steady advancement in the comprehension of the mechanisms triggering the high X-ray level emission of these sources. In particular, the recent observations of the outburst of the SFXT prototype IGR J17544-2619 on 2014 October 10, when the source reached a peak luminosity of 3x1038 erg s-1, challenged, for the first time, the maximum theoretical luminosity achievable by a wind-fed neutron star high mass X-ray binary. We propose that this giant outburst was due to the formation of a transient accretion disc around the compact object.

  10. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DETECTED BY SWIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Christiansen, J. L.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.; Falcone, A.; and others

    2011-12-10

    We present the results of 16 Swift-triggered Gamma-ray burst (GRB) follow-up observations taken with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) telescope array from 2007 January to 2009 June. The median energy threshold and response time of these observations were 260 GeV and 320 s, respectively. Observations had an average duration of 90 minutes. Each burst is analyzed independently in two modes: over the whole duration of the observations and again over a shorter timescale determined by the maximum VERITAS sensitivity to a burst with a t{sup -1.5} time profile. This temporal model is characteristic of GRB afterglows with high-energy, long-lived emission that have been detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite. No significant very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission was detected and upper limits above the VERITAS threshold energy are calculated. The VERITAS upper limits are corrected for gamma-ray extinction by the extragalactic background light and interpreted in the context of the keV emission detected by Swift. For some bursts the VHE emission must have less power than the keV emission, placing constraints on inverse Compton models of VHE emission.

  11. Characterization of swift heavy ion irradiation damage in ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Yablinsky, Clarissa A.; Devanathan, Ram; Pakarinen, Janne; Gan, Jian; Severin, Daniel; Trautmann, Christina; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-03-04

    Swift heavy ion induced radiation damage is investigated for ceria (CeO2), which serves as a UO2 fuel surrogate. Microstructural changes resulting from an irradiation with 940 MeV gold ions of 42 keV/nm electronic energy loss are investigated by means of electron microscopy accompanied by electron energy loss spectroscopy showing that there exists a small density reduction in the ion track core. While chemical changes in the ion track are not precluded, evidence of them was not observed. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of thermal spikes in CeO2 with an energy deposition of 12 and 36 keV/nm show damage consisting of isolated point defects at 12 keV/nm, and defect clusters at 36 keV/nm, with no amorphization at either energy. Furthermore, inferences are drawn from modeling about density changes in the ion track and the formation of interstitial loops that shed light on features observed by electron microscopy of swift heavy ion irradiated ceria.

  12. Observations from TEM Analysis of Swift Creek Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Samples analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) from suspended sediments in Swift Creek have unique characteristics compared to other naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) sites across the country. Our first introduction to the uniqueness of the Swift Creek site came about when we analyzed soil sediments by polarized light microscopy (PLM) and found relatively low or nonexistent levels of chrysotile asbestos. Upon submission of these samples for TEM analysis, we found that the samples were literally filled with small chrysotile fibers and bundles. We also notice a high number of dark, rounded particles which were not asbestiform. Out of curiosity, we viewed the surface features of one of these particles using scanning electron microscopy to find compacted chrysotile fibers bundled inside these particles. These particles contained the vast majority of chrysotile in the sample. This finding began our approach to provide more advanced TEM/SEM methods for identifying and characterizing complex arrangements of asbestos from NOA sites. We will present some of our experiences and methods for characterizing these types of particles common to NOA sites.

  13. The First Swift BAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Barbier, L.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Zhang, B.

    2007-01-01

    We present the first Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), which contains bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2007 June 16. This catalog (hereafter BAT1 catalog) contains burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, and time averaged spectral parameters for each of 237 GRBs, as measured by the BAT. The BAT-determined position reported here is within 1.75' of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)-determined position for 90% of these GRBs. The BAT T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) durations peak at 80 and 20 seconds, respectively. From the fluence-fluence correlation, we conclude that about 60% of the observed peak energies, E(sup obs)(sub peak) of BAT GRBs could be less than 100 keV. We confirm that GRB fluence to hardness and GRB peak flux to hardness are correlated for BAT bursts in analogous ways to previous missions' results. The correlation between the photon index in a simple power-law model and E(sup obs)(sub peak) is also confirmed. We also report the current status for the on-orbit BAT calibrations based on observations of the Crab Nebula.

  14. Fungal Biodiversity in the Alpine Tarfala Valley

    PubMed Central

    Coleine, Claudia; Selbmann, Laura; Ventura, Stefano; D’Acqui, Luigi Paolo; Onofri, Silvano; Zucconi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are distributed worldwide in all semiarid and arid lands, where they play a determinant role in element cycling and soil development. Although much work has concentrated on BSC microbial communities, free-living fungi have been hitherto largely overlooked. The aim of this study was to examine the fungal biodiversity, by cultural-dependent and cultural-independent approaches, in thirteen samples of Arctic BSCs collected at different sites in the Alpine Tarfala Valley, located on the slopes of Kebnekaise, the highest mountain in northern Scandinavia. Isolated fungi were identified by both microscopic observation and molecular approaches. Data revealed that the fungal assemblage composition was homogeneous among the BSCs analyzed, with low biodiversity and the presence of a few dominant species; the majority of fungi isolated belonged to the Ascomycota, and Cryptococcus gilvescens and Pezoloma ericae were the most frequently-recorded species. Ecological considerations for the species involved and the implication of our findings for future fungal research in BSCs are put forward. PMID:27682108

  15. Fungal Biodiversity in the Alpine Tarfala Valley

    PubMed Central

    Coleine, Claudia; Selbmann, Laura; Ventura, Stefano; D’Acqui, Luigi Paolo; Onofri, Silvano; Zucconi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are distributed worldwide in all semiarid and arid lands, where they play a determinant role in element cycling and soil development. Although much work has concentrated on BSC microbial communities, free-living fungi have been hitherto largely overlooked. The aim of this study was to examine the fungal biodiversity, by cultural-dependent and cultural-independent approaches, in thirteen samples of Arctic BSCs collected at different sites in the Alpine Tarfala Valley, located on the slopes of Kebnekaise, the highest mountain in northern Scandinavia. Isolated fungi were identified by both microscopic observation and molecular approaches. Data revealed that the fungal assemblage composition was homogeneous among the BSCs analyzed, with low biodiversity and the presence of a few dominant species; the majority of fungi isolated belonged to the Ascomycota, and Cryptococcus gilvescens and Pezoloma ericae were the most frequently-recorded species. Ecological considerations for the species involved and the implication of our findings for future fungal research in BSCs are put forward.

  16. Environmental controls on alpine cirque size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmas, Magali; Gunnell, Yanni; Calvet, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Pleistocene alpine cirques are emblematic landforms of mountain scenery, yet their deceptively simple template conceals complex controlling variables. This comparative study presents a new database of 1071 cirques, the largest of its kind, located in the French eastern Pyrenees. It is embedded in a review of previous work on cirque morphometry and thus provides a perspective on a global scale. First-order cirque attributes of length, width, and amplitude were measured; and their power as predictors of climatic and lithological variables and as proxies for the duration of glacier activity was tested using ANOVA, simple and multiple linear regression, and their various post-hoc tests. Conventional variables such as cirque aspect, floor elevation, and exposure with respect to regional precipitation-bearing weather systems are shown to present some consistency in spatial patterns determined by solar radiation, the morning-afternoon effect, and wind-blown snow accumulation in the lee of ridgetops. This confirms in greater detail the previously encountered links between landforms and climate. A special focus on the influence of bedrock lithology, a previously neglected nonclimatic variable, highlights the potential for spurious relations in the use of cirque size as a proxy of past environmental conditions. Cirques are showcased as complex landforms resulting from the combination of many climatic and nonclimatic variables that remain difficult to rank by order of importance. Apart from a few statistically weak trends, several combinations of different factors in different proportions are shown to produce similar morphometric outcomes, suggesting a case of equifinality in landform development.

  17. Annual variability of ozone along alpine hillsides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putz, Erich; Kosmus, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Over a period of more than two years (March 1989 till June 1991) ozone and nitrogen dioxide have been monitored along twelve alpine hillsides in the Austrian alps. The profiles had a height-resolution of 100 m and cover a range between 400 m and 1800 m asl, that is 100 m to 1100 m above the bottom of the valleys. They were situated in remote rural areas as well as in the vicinity of polluted urban and industrial areas. Both trace gases were monitored by means of integral chemical (SAM-surface active monitor) methods with a measuring cycle of two weeks. The concentration of ozone exhibits a substantial annual variation over the entire height range. In summer, highest ozone levels are observed near the ground and at the top of the mountains, whereas in winter the maxima are found mainly in the crest regions. The overall ozone burden shows a relative maximum near the temperature inversion layer in the valleys and an absolute maximum at the crest.

  18. Immune responses to Mycoplasma conjunctivae in alpine ibex, alpine chamois, and domestic sheep in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Degiorgis, M P; Abdo, E M; Nicolet, J; Frey, J; Mayer, D; Giacometti, M

    2000-04-01

    The humoral immune response of three alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra rupicapra), two alpine ibex (Capra ibex ibex) and three domestic sheep naturally affected with infectious keratoconjunctivitis (IKC), and four ibex and two sheep experimentally infected with Mycoplasma conjunctivae was analysed. In addition, the local immune response to M. conjunctivae was analysed using conjunctival washes from chamois and sheep. Immunoblot analysis of sera using whole cell antigens of M. conjunctivae revealed the major immunogenic proteins which had molecular masses of 175, 83, 68, 60, 50, 42, 36, and 33 kDa. Major antigens were found at 83, 68, 60, and 42 kDa in both sera and conjunctival washes from naturally infected animals of all three Caprinae species. In experimentally infected animals, antibodies to the 68 and 60 kDa antigens were dominant. Naturally infected animals showed much stronger immune reactions than those experimentally infected, and specific antibodies appeared 2 to 4 wk after experimental infection. To evaluate possible cross-reactions, whole cell antigen of M. conjunctivae was analysed by immunoblot against hyperimmune sera of closely related Mycoplasma spp. Antibodies to the 175, 73, 68, 60, and 33 kDa antigens appeared to be specific to M. conjunctivae. Cross-reactions mainly with 83, 50, and 42 kDa antigens were detected, in particular with M. ovipneumoniae and M. bovoculi hyperimmune sera, but also with antisera against M. capricolum capricolum and M. putrefaciens.

  19. [Impacts of Ochotona pallasi disturbance on alpine grassland community characteristics].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-qin; Li, Guang-yong; Ma, Wen-hu; Zhao, Dian-zhi; Li, Xiao-yan

    2013-08-01

    Plateau pika is the main fossorial mammal in the alpine grassland in Qinghai Lake Watershed of Northwest China. Based on the field investigation data from 18 alpine grassland quadrats in the Watershed, and by using redundancy analysis (RDA) and the surface fitting offered by 'R-Vegan' , the disturbance intensity of plateau pika (Ochotona pallasi) was classified as four levels. In order to explore the impacts of plateau pika disturbance on the alpine grassland ecosystem and its grazing quality, the community characteristics under different disturbance intensities by plateau pika were analyzed, and a conceptual model about the alpine grassland community succession was proposed. The results showed that with the increase of the disturbance intensity, the dominant species changed from Juncus roemerianus to Poa pratensis and Laux maritima. When the disturbance was small, the community had high quantitative values of coverage, aboveground biomass, biodiversity, and species richness, but the proportion of weeds was also high. When the disturbance was large, the quantitative values were the lowest, while the proportion of weeds was the highest. When the disturbance was moderate, the community had relatively high quantitative values, and the proportion of grasses and sedges was the highest. It was concluded that the community' s characteristic values under low plateau pika disturbance intensity were high but the grazing quality was low, while high disturbance intensity resulted in the grassland degradation. Therefore, the disturbance intensity in the threshold could maintain the stability of alpine grassland ecosystem and improve its grazing quality.

  20. Professionalisation in General Adult Education in Germany--An Attempt to Cut a Path through a Jungle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dausien, Bettina; Schwendowius, Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    The article summarizes the findings of a study on adult learning professions in Europe (ALPINE) commissioned by DG Education and Culture. It explores the current professional and social situation of staff in non-vocational adult education in Germany. It describes the structures and organisations of general adult education in Germany and…

  1. Exploiting the richest patch has a fitness pay-off for the migratory swift parrot.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Dejan; Terauds, Aleks; Westgate, Martin J; Webb, Matthew H; Roshier, David A; Heinsohn, Robert

    2015-09-01

    1. Unlike philopatric migrants, the ecology of nomadic migrants is less well understood. This life-history strategy reflects responses to spatiotemporal variation in resource availability and the need to find resource rich patches to initiate breeding. The fitness consequences of movements between regions of patchily distributed resources can provide insight into ecology of all migrants and their responses to global change. 2. We link broad-scale data on spatiotemporal fluctuation in food availability to data on settlement patterns and fitness outcomes for a nomadic migrant, the endangered swift parrot Lathamus discolor. We test several predictions to determine whether facultative movements are adaptive for individual swift parrots in an environment where resources are patchily distributed over time and space. 3. Variation in the availability of swift parrot food resources across our study period was dramatic. As a consequence, swift parrots moved to breed wherever food was most abundant and did not resettle nesting regions in successive years when food availability declined. By moving, swift parrots exploited a variable food resource and reproduced successfully. 4. Exploiting the richest patches allowed swift parrots to maintain stable fitness outcomes between discrete breeding events at different locations. Unlike sedentary species that often produce few or lower quality offspring when food is scarce, nomadic migration buffered swift parrots against extreme environmental variation. 5. We provide the first detailed evidence that facultative movements and nomadic migration are adaptive for individuals in unpredictable environments. Our data support the widely held assumption that nomadic migration allows animals to escape resource limitation.

  2. Exploiting the richest patch has a fitness pay-off for the migratory swift parrot.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Dejan; Terauds, Aleks; Westgate, Martin J; Webb, Matthew H; Roshier, David A; Heinsohn, Robert

    2015-09-01

    1. Unlike philopatric migrants, the ecology of nomadic migrants is less well understood. This life-history strategy reflects responses to spatiotemporal variation in resource availability and the need to find resource rich patches to initiate breeding. The fitness consequences of movements between regions of patchily distributed resources can provide insight into ecology of all migrants and their responses to global change. 2. We link broad-scale data on spatiotemporal fluctuation in food availability to data on settlement patterns and fitness outcomes for a nomadic migrant, the endangered swift parrot Lathamus discolor. We test several predictions to determine whether facultative movements are adaptive for individual swift parrots in an environment where resources are patchily distributed over time and space. 3. Variation in the availability of swift parrot food resources across our study period was dramatic. As a consequence, swift parrots moved to breed wherever food was most abundant and did not resettle nesting regions in successive years when food availability declined. By moving, swift parrots exploited a variable food resource and reproduced successfully. 4. Exploiting the richest patches allowed swift parrots to maintain stable fitness outcomes between discrete breeding events at different locations. Unlike sedentary species that often produce few or lower quality offspring when food is scarce, nomadic migration buffered swift parrots against extreme environmental variation. 5. We provide the first detailed evidence that facultative movements and nomadic migration are adaptive for individuals in unpredictable environments. Our data support the widely held assumption that nomadic migration allows animals to escape resource limitation. PMID:25973857

  3. Diets of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in continuous and fragmented prairie in Northwestern Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kamler, J.F.; Ballard, W.B.; Wallace, M.C.; Gipson, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    Distribution of the swift fox (Vulpes velox) has declined dramatically since the 1800s, and suggested causes of this decline are habitat fragmentation and transformation due to agricultural expansion. However, impacts of fragmentation and human-altered habitats on swift foxes still are not well understood. To better understand what effects these factors have on diets of swift foxes, scats were collected in northwestern Texas at two study sites, one of continuous native prairie and one representing fragmented native prairie interspersed with agricultural and fields in the Conservation Reserve Program. Leporids, a potential food source, were surveyed seasonally on both sites. Diets of swift foxes differed between sites; insects were consumed more on continuous prairie, whereas mammals, birds, and crops were consumed more on fragmented prairie. Size of populations of leporids were 2-3 times higher on fragmented prairie, and swift foxes responded by consuming more leporids on fragmented (11.1% frequency occurrence) than continuous (3.8%) prairie. Dietary diversity was greater on fragmented prairie during both years of the study. Differences in diets between sites suggested that the swift fox is an adaptable and opportunistic feeder, able to exploit a variety of food resources, probably in relation to availability of food. We suggest that compared to continuous native prairie, fragmented prairie can offer swift foxes a more diverse prey base, at least within the mosaic of native prairie, agricultural, and fields that are in the Conservation Reserve Program.

  4. Local Area Weather Radar in Alpine Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savina, M.

    2012-04-01

    Space-time variability of precipitation in orographically complex regions is a challenging research topic. The difficult accessibility of remote regions and the high elevations make difficult the operation of conventional raingauges and reduce the visibility of large scale radars. A solution to this limitation might be the use of a number of cost-effective short-range X-band radars as complement to raingauges and conventional, large and expensive weather radars. This paper presents the results of a pilot experiment, which aimed at i) developing and assessing the performance of a cost-effective X-band Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) located in the orographically complex Alpine region and ii) testing whether it could lead to better understanding of the nature of the precipitation process, e.g. identifying any possible dependence between precipitation and topography. The LAWR was deployed between August 2007 and October 2011 on the summit of the Kl. Matterhorn, located in the Swiss Alps at 3883 m a.s.l. (Valais, Switzerland). This was the first time that a cost-effective X-band radar was installed at such elevation and could be tested in operation-like conditions. Beside the technological improvements that were necessary for a reliable functioning of the LAWR hardware, much effort went into the development of a set of radar corrections and into the design of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which includes the algorithms necessary to convert radar received echoes into precipitation rates, specifically accounting for the presence of the pronounced topography. The ARCOM was developed and tested on the basis of a set of precipitation events for which precipitation was measured also by 43 automatic raingauges located within 60 km range from the radar antenna. Conversely to the state-of-the-art conversion models, ARCOM accounts not only for the seasonal climatological condition but also of geometric and orographic forcings such as partial beam filling and beam

  5. Alkali content of alpine ultramafic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, W.; Mountjoy, W.

    1965-01-01

    The lower limit of abundance of sodium and potassium in ultramafic rocks is less than the threshold amount detectable by conventional analytical methods. By a dilutionaddition modification of the flame-spectrophotometric method, sodium and potassium have been determined in 40 specimens of alpine ultramafic rocks. Samples represent six regions in the United States and one in Australia, and include dunite, peridotite, pyroxenite, and their variably serpentinized and metamorphosed derivatives. The median value found for Na2O is 0.004 per cent, and the range of Na2O is 0.001-0.19. The median value for K2O is 0.0034 per cent and the range is 0.001-0.031 per cent. Alkali concentrations are below 0.01 per cent Na2O in 28 samples and below 0.01 per cent K2O in 35. Derivation of basalt magma from upper-mantle material similar to such ultramafic rocks, as has been postulated, is precluded by the relative amounts of sodium and potassium, which are from 200 to 600 times more abundant in basalt than in the ultramafic rocks. Similar factors apply to a number of other elements. No reasonable process could produce such concentrations in, for example, tens of thousands of cubic miles of uniform tholeiitic basalt. The ultramafic rocks might have originated either as magmatic crystal precipitates or as mantle residues left after fusion and removal of basaltic magma. Injection of ultramafic rocks to exposed positions is tectonic rather than magmatic. ?? 1965.

  6. Horn growth patterns in Alpine chamois.

    PubMed

    Corlatti, Luca; Gugiatti, Alessandro; Imperio, Simona

    2015-06-01

    The analysis of horn growth may provide important information about the allocation of metabolic resources to secondary sexual traits. Depending on the selective advantages offered by horn size during intra- and inter-specific interactions, ungulates may show different investment in horn development, and growth variations within species may be influenced by several parameters, such as sex, age, or resource availability. We investigated the horn growth patterns in two hunted populations of Alpine chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra) in the Central Italian Alps. We tested the role of individual heterogeneity on the growth pattern and explored the variation in annulus length as a function of different factors (sex, age, hunting location, cohort). We then investigated the mechanisms underlying horn growth trajectories to test for the occurrence of compensatory or recovery growth and their potential differences between sexes and populations. Annulus length varied as a function of sex, age of individuals and, marginally, hunting location; no effect of cohort or individual heterogeneity was detected. Male and female chamois showed compensatory horn growth within the first 5½ years of life, though the partial convergence of horn trajectories in chamois suggests that this mechanisms would best be described as 'recovery growth'. Compensation rates were greater in males than in females, while only compensatory growth rates up to 2½ years of age were different in the two populations. Besides confirming the sex- and age-dependent pattern of horn development, our study suggests that the mechanism of recovery growth supports the hypothesis of horn size as a weakly selected sexual trait in male and female chamois. Furthermore, the greater compensation rates in horn growth shown by male chamois possibly suggest selective effects of hunting on age at first reproduction, while different compensation rates between populations may suggest the occurrence of some plasticity in resource

  7. Tagliamento, the king of Alpine rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbriani, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    The Tagliamento river is usually described as the king of the Alpine rivers because it is an extraordinary example of braided gravel-bed river in Europe. It flows in Friuli Venezia Giulia, a region in north-eastern Italy. It has preserved its original ecosystem which has never been changed significantly by irresponsible human interference. Therefore, vegetated islands and braid bars, due to the typical network of channels the river creates, have always been an uncontaminated natural habitat for a wide variety of species of flora and fauna. The Pinzano Bridge, near San Daniele del Friuli, collapsed on 4th November 1966 because of an overflow of water from Tagliamento. From that time, lowlands territorial authorities would like to build retention basins to prevent the river from floodings. A study about the bio-geological survey carried out from a Manzini High School project, chiefly aims to study this ecosystem, which combines the dynamic nature of the Tagliamento with the biodiversity of the whole area where it flows. In the previous years, some classes were involved in this school project. After visiting the river area and taking several photographs of it, the students had the opportunity to reflect upon the devastating environmental impact which the construction of retention basins would cause. They illustrated and analyzed both the solutions offered by some local governors and the objections raised by the World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). In the near future, other students will continue studying the Tagliamento river so as to be able to appreciate one of the local rarities nature offers, in the hope that the unique geomorphological features of this site of undoubted scientific interest could be kept intact for a very long time.

  8. Swift J1112.2-8238: a candidate relativistic tidal disruption flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, G. C.; Levan, A. J.; Stanway, E. R.; Tanvir, N. R.; Cenko, S. B.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Cucchiaria, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present observations of Swift J1112.2-8238, and identify it as a candidate relativistic tidal disruption flare. The outburst was first detected by Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) in 2011 June as an unknown, long-lived (order of days) gamma-ray transient source. We show that its position is consistent with the nucleus of a faint galaxy for which we establish a likely redshift of z = 0.89 based on a single emission line that we interpret as the blended [O II] λ3727 doublet. At this redshift, the peak X-ray/gamma-ray luminosity exceeded 1047 erg s-1, while a spatially coincident optical transient source had i' ˜ 22 (Mg ˜ -21.4 at z = 0.89) during early observations, ˜20 d after the Swift trigger. These properties place Swift J1112.2-8238 in a very similar region of parameter space to the two previously identified members of this class, Swift J1644+57 and Swift J2058+0516. As with those events the high-energy emission shows evidence for variability over the first few days, while late-time observations, almost 3 yr post-outburst, demonstrate that it has now switched off. Swift J1112.2-8238 brings the total number of such events observed by Swift to three, interestingly all detected by Swift over a ˜3 month period (<3 per cent of its total lifetime as of 2015 March). While this suggests the possibility that further examples may be uncovered by detailed searches of the BAT archives, the lack of any prime candidates in the years since 2011 means these events are undoubtedly rare.

  9. An intensive Alpine climbing expedition and its influence on some anthropometric measurements.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of an intensive 4 week Alpine climbing expedition on percentage body fat, absolute body fat and lean body mass was investigated in 14 adult male students. Anthropometric measures were taken on two occasions during the training period prior to the expedition, twice during the expedition and finally eight weeks after the expedition had returned home. There was a 3% reduction in percentage body fat between the first testing occasion and the fourth taken towards the end of the expedition. Over the same interval there was a mean reduction of 2.6 kg in absolute body fat and a reduction in lean body mass of 2.47 kg. All three criterion mean values on the final testing session returned to or exceeded those taken on session one. Images p126-a Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7407450

  10. The ASDC Multi Mission Interactive Archive: on line analysis of the Swift/XRT data

    SciTech Connect

    Stratta, G.; Capalbi, M.; Perri, M.; Giommi, P.

    2010-10-15

    We present the Swift/XRT Interactive Archive and the On-line Analysis tool developed at the ASI Science Data Center (ASDC) as part of the Multi Mission Interactive Archive. The On-line Analysis enables to run the Swift/XRT software task ''xrtpipeline'' on any desired XRT observation present in the Swift data archive maintained at ASDC, directly on the web. On-line imaging (with XIMAGE), spectral (with XSPEC) and timing data analysis (with LCURVE) can be performed. At the same time, spectra, light curves, effective area, exposure map and response matrix are promptly available for download to the user for any off-line analysis.

  11. Swift/BAT and MAXI/GSC broadband transient monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Oda, Ryoma; Mihara, Tatehiro; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Arimoto, Makoto; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Krimm, Hans A.; Nakahira, Satoshi; Serino, Motoko

    2016-06-01

    We present a newly developed broadband transient monitor using the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the MAXI Gas Slit Camera (GSC) data. Our broadband transient monitor keeps vigil for high-energy transient sources from 2 keV to 200 keV in seven energy bands by combining the BAT (15-200 keV) and the GSC (2-20 keV) data. Currently, daily and 90-minute (one orbit) averaged light curves are available for 106 high-energy transient sources. This transient monitor is available to the public through our web server, http://yoshidalab.mydns.jp/bat_gsc_trans_mon/, for wider use by the community. We discuss a daily sensitivity of our monitor and possible future improvements on our pipeline.

  12. Chandra and Swift Observations of Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Davide; Cheung, T.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the last year we targeted some of the unidentified Fermi-LAT objects (UFOs) at high Galactic latitude with Chandra and Swift in order to determine the basic properties (positions, fluxes, hardness ratios) of all X-ray sources within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. These satellites enable us to detect the X-ray conterparts with a flux limit that is at least an order of magnitude lower than achieved in extant RASS data and to further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources. Here we present the results obtained with 5 Chandra pointings of high Galactic latitude UFOs in the Fermi-LAT 3-months bright source list. The association of detected X-ray sources within the improved 11-months Fermi-LAT localization circles with available optical and radio observations is discussed.

  13. Swift/BAT detects an outburst from UX Ari

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimm, H. A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Lien, A. Y.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D.; Sakamoto, T.; Stamatikos, M.; Ukwatta, T.

    2014-02-01

    The RS Canum Venaticorum type variable star UX Ari is currently in outburst as detected in the Swift/BAT hard X-ray transient monitor in the 15-50 keV band. The current outburst began on 2014 February 14 (MJD 56702) when it had a count rate of 0.004 +/- 0.002 ct/s/cm^2 (~20 mCrab). It continued to brighten, reaching a rate of 0.013 +/- 0.003 ct/s/cm^2 (~60 mCrab) on 2014 February 17. It has since faded somewhat, with a rate of 0.005 +/- 0.002 ct/s/cm^2 (~20 mCrab) on 2014 February 19.

  14. A Swift/UVOT Study of Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaPorte, Samuel; Siegel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Star clusters, due to being coeval populations of similar stars, provide a convenient snapshot of a stellar population to study and compare to theoretical models of stellar evolution. They also serve as the empirical baseline for studies of distant unresolved stellar populations. However, few studies have been performed of detailed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of young open clusters in the near ultraviolet. We present a sample of 92 open clusters compiled using Swift's Ultra-Violet and Optical Telescope (UVOT). We construct CMDs and perform isochrone fitting for the most luminous clusters to determine how well the theoretical models reproduce the salient features of the CMDs. We find that the isochrones provide excellent fits to the primary color-magnitude loci, lending confidence to models of unresolved stellar populations and providing, in the future, an opportunity to use open clusters to probe the UV properties of foreground dust.

  15. A sample of Swift/SDSS faint blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Bernardo; Giommi, Paolo; Turriziani, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We aim here to provide a complete sample of faint (fr ≳ 1 mJy, fx ≳ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1) blazars and blazar candidates serendipitously discovered in deep Swift images centered on Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By stacking all available images, we obtain exposures ranging from 104 to more than a million seconds. Since GRBs are thought to explode randomly across the sky, this set of deep fields can be considered as an unbiased survey of ≈ 12 square degrees of extragalactic sky, with sensitivities reaching a few 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. We then derive the x-ray Log N Log S and show that, considering that our sample may be contaminated by sources other than blazars, we are in agreement with previous estimations based on data and simulations.

  16. The Swift-XRT imaging Performances and Serendipitous Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, A.; Perri, M.; Capalbi, M.; Abbey, A.F.; Angelini, L.; Beardmore, A.; Burrows, D.N.; Campana, S.; Chincaini, G.; Citterio, O.; Cusumano, G.; Evans, P.A.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Guidorzi, C.; Grupe, D.; Hill, J.E.; Kennea, J.A.; La Parola, V.; Mangano, V.; Mineo, T.; Morris, D.C.; Nousek, J.A.; Osborne, J.P.; Page, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    We are exploiting thc Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) deepest GR.B follow-up observations to study the cosmic X-Ray Background (XRB) population in the 0.2-10 keV energy band. We present some preliminary results of a serendipitous survey performed on 221 fields observed with exposure longer than 10 ks. We show that the XRT is a profitable instrument for surveys and that it is particularly suitable for the search and observation of ext,ended objects like clusters of galaxies. We used the brightest serendipitous sources and the longest observations to test. the XRT optics performance and the background characteristics all over the field of view, in different energy bands during the first 2.5 years of fully operational missions.

  17. BAT2 GRB Catalog - Prompt Emission Properties of Swift GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Parsons, A.; Tueller, J.; Baumgartner, W.; Cummings, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Ukwatta, T.

    2010-10-15

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. The BAT T{sub 90} duration peaks at 70 s. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT short-duration GRBs are generally harder than those of the long-duration GRBs. The observed durations of the BAT high redshift GRBs are not systematically longer than those of the moderate redshift GRBs. Furthermore, the observed spectra of the BAT high redshift GRBs are similar to or harder than the moderate redshift GRBs.

  18. Hygrochastic capsule dehiscence supports safe site strategies in New Zealand alpine Veronica (Plantaginaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Pufal, Gesine; Garnock-Jones, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Hygrochasy is a capsule-opening mechanism predominantly associated with plants in arid habitats, where it facilitates spatially and temporally restricted dispersal. Recently, hygrochastic capsules were described in detail for the first time in alpine Veronica in New Zealand. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether hygrochastic capsules are an adaptation of alpine Veronica to achieve directed dispersal to safe sites. We expect that by limiting dispersal to rainfall events, distances travelled by seeds are short and confine them to small habitat patches where both seedlings and adults have a greater chance of survival. Methods Dispersal distances of five hygrochastic Veronica were measured under laboratory and field conditions and the seed shadow was analysed. Habitat patch size of hygrochastic Veronica and related non-hygrochastic species were estimated and compared. Key Results Dispersal distances achieved by dispersal with raindrops did not exceed 1 m but weather conditions could influence the even distribution of seeds around the parent plant. Compared with related Veronica species, hygrochastic Veronica mostly grow in small, restricted habitat patches surrounded by distinctly different habitats. These habitat patches provide safe sites for seeds due to their microtopography and occurrence of adult cushion plants. Non-hygrochastic Veronica can be predominantly found in large habitats without clearly defined borders and can be spread over long distances along rivers. Conclusions The results suggest that hygrochasy is a very effective mechanism of restricting seed dispersal to rainfall events and ensuring short-distance dispersal within a small habitat patch. It appears that it is an adaptation for directed dispersal to safe sites that only exist within the parent habitat. PMID:20587583

  19. Swift Ultraviolet Detections of Four Novae in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, S.; Pietsch, W.; Kruse, W.; Freyberg, M.; Henze, M.; Stiele, H.

    2008-08-01

    The Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift satellite started observing the central region of M31 in three ultraviolet filters on 2008-05-26.76 UT. The following UVOT magnitudes and 3-sigma upper limits are measured for novae (Henze et al., 2008, ATel #1602) that are within the UVOT field in the uvw1 (181-321nm, 1284 s exposure time), uvm2 (166-268nm, 1400 s), and uvw2 (112-264 nm, 1649 s) filter observations: Nova uvw1 uvm2 uvw2 M31N2008-03b 18.5±0.2 19.2±0.2 19.4±0.3 M31N2008-05a 17.8±0.1 18.2±0.1 17.9±0.1 M31N2008-05b 16.8±0.1 17.5±0.1 17.2±0.1 M31N2008-05c 19.9±0.2 20.4±0.5 20.3±0.4 M31N2008-06a >19.7 >20.6 >20.3 M31N2008-06b > 19.7 >20.6 >20.3 None of the novae is detected in earlier > 13.0 ks Swift UVOT uvw2 observations obtained on 2007-06-02, down to a (3- sigma) limiting magnitude of around 21.5.

  20. SWIFT Code Assessment for Two Similar Transonic Compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2009-01-01

    One goal of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program is the assessment of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes used for the design and analysis of many aerospace systems. This paper describes the assessment of the SWIFT turbomachinery analysis code for two similar transonic compressors, NASA rotor 37 and stage 35. The two rotors have identical blade profiles on the front, transonic half of the blade but rotor 37 has more camber aft of the shock. Thus the two rotors have the same shock structure and choking flow but rotor 37 produces a higher pressure ratio. The two compressors and experimental data are described here briefly. Rotor 37 was also used for test cases organized by ASME, IGTI, and AGARD in 1994-1998. Most of the participating codes over predicted pressure and temperature ratios, and failed to predict certain features of the downstream flowfield. Since then the AUSM+ upwind scheme and the k- turbulence model have been added to SWIFT. In this work the new capabilities were assessed for the two compressors. Comparisons were made with overall performance maps and spanwise profiles of several aerodynamic parameters. The results for rotor 37 were in much better agreement with the experimental data than the original blind test case results although there were still some discrepancies. The results for stage 35 were in very good agreement with the data. The results for rotor 37 were very sensitive to turbulence model parameters but the results for stage 35 were not. Comparison of the rotor solutions showed that the main difference between the two rotors was not blade camber as expected, but shock/boundary layer interaction on the casing.

  1. Seeking Counterparts to Advanced LIGO/Virgo Transients with Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanner, Jonah; Camp, Jordan; Racusin, Judith; Gehrels, Neil; White, Darren

    2012-01-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are among the most promising astrophysical sources of gravitational wave emission for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, expected to be operational in 2015 . Finding electromagnetic counterparts to these signals will be essential to placing them in an astronomical context. The Swift satellite carries a sensitive X-ray telescope (XRT), and can respond to target-of-opportunity requests within 1-2 hours, and so is uniquely poised to find the X-ray counterparts to LIGO / Virgo triggers. Assuming NS mergers are the progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), some percentage of LIGO/Virgo triggers will be accompanied by X-ray band afterglows that are brighter than 10(exp -12) ergs/s/sq cm in the XRT band one day after the trigger time. We find that a soft X-ray transient of this flux is bright enough to be extremely rare, and so could be confidently associated with even a moderately localized GW signal. We examine two possible search strategies with the Swift XRT to find bright transients in LIGO/Virgo error boxes. In the first strategy, XRT could search a volume of space with a approx.100 Mpc radius by observing approx 30 galaxies over the course of a day, with sufficient depth to observe the expected X-ray afterglow. For an extended LIGO / Virgo horizon distance, the XRT could employ very short 100 s exposures to cover an area of approx 35 square degrees in about a day, and still be sensitive enough to image GW discovered GRB afterglows. These strategies demonstrate that the high X-ray luminosity of short GRBs and the relatively low X-ray transient background combine to make high confidence discoveries of X-ray band counterparts to GW triggers possible, though challenging, with current satellite facilities.

  2. SEEKING COUNTERPARTS TO ADVANCED LIGO/Virgo TRANSIENTS WITH SWIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Kanner, Jonah; Camp, Jordan; Racusin, Judith; Gehrels, Neil; White, Darren

    2012-11-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are among the most promising astrophysical sources of gravitational wave (GW) emission for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, expected to be operational in 2015. Finding electromagnetic counterparts to these signals will be essential to placing them in an astronomical context. The Swift satellite carries a sensitive X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and can respond to target-of-opportunity requests within one to two hours, and so is uniquely poised to find the X-ray counterparts to LIGO/Virgo triggers. Assuming that NS mergers are the progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), some percentage of LIGO/Virgo triggers will be accompanied by X-ray band afterglows that are brighter than 10{sup -12} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in the XRT band one day after the trigger time. We find that a soft X-ray transient of this flux is bright enough to be extremely rare, and so could be confidently associated with even a moderately localized GW signal. We examine two possible search strategies with the Swift XRT to find bright transients in LIGO/Virgo error boxes. In the first strategy, XRT could search a volume of space with a {approx}100 Mpc radius by observing {approx}30 galaxies over the course of a day, with sufficient depth to observe the expected X-ray afterglow. For an extended LIGO/Virgo horizon distance, the XRT could employ 100 s exposures to cover an area of {approx}35 deg{sup 2} in about a day and remain sensitive enough to image GW-discovered GRB afterglows. These strategies demonstrate that discovery of X-ray band counterparts to GW triggers will be possible, though challenging, with current facilities.

  3. Swift Observations of the X-Ray-Bright GRB 050315

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, S.; Goad, M. R.; Beardmore, A. P.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cannizzo, J. K.; Capalbi, M.; Chincarini, G.; Cummings, J. R.; Cusumano, G.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Hill, J. E.; Kobayashi, S.; Kumar, P.; La Parola, V.; Levan, A.; Mangano, V.; Mészáros, P.; Moretti, A.; Morris, D. C.; Nousek, J. A.; Pagani, C.; Palmer, D. M.; Racusin, J. L.; Romano, P.; Tagliaferri, G.; Zhang, B.; Gehrels, N.

    2006-02-01

    This paper discusses Swift observations of the γ-ray burst GRB 050315 (z=1.949) from 80 s to 10 days after the onset of the burst. The X-ray light curve displayed a steep early decay (t-5) for ~200 s and several breaks. However, both the prompt hard X-ray/γ-ray emission (observed by the BAT) and the first ~300 s of X-ray emission (observed by the XRT) can be explained by exponential decays, with similar decay constants. Extrapolating the BAT light curve into the XRT band suggests that the rapidly decaying, early X-ray emission was simply a continuation of the fading prompt emission; this strong similarity between the prompt γ-ray and early X-ray emission may be related to the simple temporal and spectral character of this X-ray-rich GRB. The prompt (BAT) spectrum was steep down to ~15 keV and appeared to continue through the XRT bandpass, implying a low peak energy, inconsistent with the Amati relation. Following the initial steep decline, the X-ray afterglow did not fade for ~1.2×104 s, after which time it decayed with a temporal index of α~0.7, followed by a second break at ~2.5×105 s to a slope of α~2. The apparent ``plateau'' in the X-ray light curve, after the early rapid decay, makes this one of the most extreme examples of the steep-flat-steep X-ray light curves revealed by Swift. If the second afterglow break is identified with a jet break, then the jet opening angle was θ0~5deg, implying Eγ>~1050 ergs.

  4. The SWIFT Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Wells, A.; Chincarini, G.; Abbey, A. F.; Angelini, L.; Beardmore, A.; Brauninger, H. W.; Chang, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer is designed to make prompt multi-wavelength observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts and GRB afterglows. The X-ray Telescope enables Swift to determine GRB positions with a few arcseconds accuracy within 100 seconds of the burst onset. The XRT utilizes a mirror set built for JET-X and an XMM-Newton/ EPIC MOS CCD detector to provide a sensitive broad-band (0.2-10 keV) X-ray imager with an effective area of more than 120 sq cm at 1.5 keV, a field of view of 23.6 x 23.6 arcminutes, and an angular resolution of 18 arcseconds (HPD). The detection sensitivity is 2x10(exp 14) erg/sq cm/s in 10(exp 4) seconds. The instrument provides automated source detection and position reporting within 5 seconds of target acquisition. It can also measure the redshifts of GRBs with Iron line emission or other spectral features. The XRT operates in an auto-exposure mode, adjusting the CCD readout mode automatically to optimize the science return as the source intensity fades. The XRT measures spectra and lightcurves of the GRB afterglow beginning about a minute after the burst and follows each burst for days or weeks. We provide an overview of the X-ray Telescope scientific background from which the systems engineering requirements were derived, with specific emphasis on the design and qualification aspects from conception through to launch. We describe the impact on cleanliness and vacuum requirements for the instrument low energy response and to maintain the high sensitivity to the fading signal of the Gamma-ray Bursts.

  5. Seeking Counterparts to Advanced LIGO/Virgo Transients with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanner, Jonah; Camp, Jordan; Racusin, Judith; Gehrels, Neil; White, Darren

    2012-11-01

    Binary neutron star (NS) mergers are among the most promising astrophysical sources of gravitational wave (GW) emission for Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, expected to be operational in 2015. Finding electromagnetic counterparts to these signals will be essential to placing them in an astronomical context. The Swift satellite carries a sensitive X-Ray Telescope (XRT), and can respond to target-of-opportunity requests within one to two hours, and so is uniquely poised to find the X-ray counterparts to LIGO/Virgo triggers. Assuming that NS mergers are the progenitors of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), some percentage of LIGO/Virgo triggers will be accompanied by X-ray band afterglows that are brighter than 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 in the XRT band one day after the trigger time. We find that a soft X-ray transient of this flux is bright enough to be extremely rare, and so could be confidently associated with even a moderately localized GW signal. We examine two possible search strategies with the Swift XRT to find bright transients in LIGO/Virgo error boxes. In the first strategy, XRT could search a volume of space with a ~100 Mpc radius by observing ~30 galaxies over the course of a day, with sufficient depth to observe the expected X-ray afterglow. For an extended LIGO/Virgo horizon distance, the XRT could employ 100 s exposures to cover an area of ~35 deg2 in about a day and remain sensitive enough to image GW-discovered GRB afterglows. These strategies demonstrate that discovery of X-ray band counterparts to GW triggers will be possible, though challenging, with current facilities.

  6. Swift/XRT detects renewed activity of the Galactic center X-ray transient Swift J174535.5-285921

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Kennea, J. A.

    2016-07-01

    Our daily Swift/XRT monitoring observations of the Galactic center (Degenaar et al. 2015) have revealed activity of a transient X-ray source located ~1.4' to the north-east of Sgr A*. An excess of photons was first seen during a 0.9-ks PC mode observation performed on 2016 July 7. The object remains to be detected in subsequent observations performed on July 8,9, and 10. To obtain a position for the newly active X-ray source, we use the four PC-mode observations obtained between July 7 and 10 (amounting to 3.5 ks of exposure time) and utilize the online XRT data products tool (Evans et al. 2007, 2009).

  7. Reflections on the Professionalisation of Adult Educators in the Framework of Public Policies in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimaraes, Paula

    2009-01-01

    The discussion in this article is based on recent research carried out by the author recently on adult education public policies and her participation in the Adult Learning Practitioners in Europe (ALPINE) project coordinated by Research voor Beleid (The Netherlands) and funded by the European Commission. The analysis presented here stresses the…

  8. Inverse distributed hydrological modelling of alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Krause, J.; Mayr, S.

    2005-12-01

    Even in physically based distributed hydrological models, various remaining parameters must be estimated for each sub-catchment. This can involve tremendous effort, especially when the number of sub-catchments is large and the applied hydrological model is computationally expensive. Automatic parameter estimation tools can significantly facilitate the calibration process. Hence, we combined the nonlinear parameter estimation tool PEST with the distributed hydrological model WaSiM. PEST is based on the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method, a gradient-based nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. WaSiM is a fully distributed hydrological model using physically based algorithms for most of the process descriptions. WaSiM was applied to the alpine/prealpine Ammer River catchment (southern Germany, 710 km2) in a 100×100 m2 horizontal resolution. The catchment is heterogeneous in terms of geology, pedology and land use and shows a complex orography (the difference of elevation is around 1600 m). Using the developed PEST-WaSiM interface, the hydrological model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed runoff at eight gauges for the hydrologic year 1997 and validated for the hydrologic year 1993. For each sub-catchment four parameters had to be calibrated: the recession constants of direct runoff and interflow, the drainage density, and the hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost aquifer. Additionally, five snowmelt specific parameters were adjusted for the entire catchment. Altogether, 37 parameters had to be calibrated. Additional a priori information (e.g. from flood hydrograph analysis) narrowed the parameter space of the solutions and improved the non-uniqueness of the fitted values. A reasonable quality of fit was achieved. Discrepancies between modelled and observed runoff were also due to the small number of meteorological stations and corresponding interpolation artefacts in the orographically complex terrain. A detailed covariance analysis was performed

  9. Inverse distributed hydrological modelling of Alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstmann, H.; Krause, J.; Mayr, S.

    2006-06-01

    Even in physically based distributed hydrological models, various remaining parameters must be estimated for each sub-catchment. This can involve tremendous effort, especially when the number of sub-catchments is large and the applied hydrological model is computationally expensive. Automatic parameter estimation tools can significantly facilitate the calibration process. Hence, we combined the nonlinear parameter estimation tool PEST with the distributed hydrological model WaSiM. PEST is based on the Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg method, a gradient-based nonlinear parameter estimation algorithm. WaSiM is a fully distributed hydrological model using physically based algorithms for most of the process descriptions. WaSiM was applied to the alpine/prealpine Ammer River catchment (southern Germany, 710 km2 in a 100×100 m2 horizontal resolution. The catchment is heterogeneous in terms of geology, pedology and land use and shows a complex orography (the difference of elevation is around 1600 m). Using the developed PEST-WaSiM interface, the hydrological model was calibrated by comparing simulated and observed runoff at eight gauges for the hydrologic year 1997 and validated for the hydrologic year 1993. For each sub-catchment four parameters had to be calibrated: the recession constants of direct runoff and interflow, the drainage density, and the hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost aquifer. Additionally, five snowmelt specific parameters were adjusted for the entire catchment. Altogether, 37 parameters had to be calibrated. Additional a priori information (e.g. from flood hydrograph analysis) narrowed the parameter space of the solutions and improved the non-uniqueness of the fitted values. A reasonable quality of fit was achieved. Discrepancies between modelled and observed runoff were also due to the small number of meteorological stations and corresponding interpolation artefacts in the orographically complex terrain. Application of a 2-dimensional numerical

  10. Permafrost aggradation in recently deglaciated alpine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leopold, Matthias; Dusik, Jana; Stocker-Waldhuber, Martin; Völkel, Jörg; Becht, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost degradation is of major interest in the present discussion about alpine climate change and natural hazard prevention. Glacial retreat since the Little Ice Age (LIA) is followed by destabilisation of the surrounding mountains due to melting permafrost in bedrock and sediments. Glacial retreat also exposes huge areas of lateral and ground moraines. Areas of formerly temperate glaciers experience colder temperatures only since their ice cover has melted and basal meltwater no longer heats the ground. With a huge pore volume in the sediment body, water supply during the melt season and large daily temperature variations in high mountains, distinct freeze and thaw processes start and generate periglacial forms like patterned ground in the direct glacier forefield. Those geomorphic features are precursors for possible permafrost aggradation in proglacial areas. The work presented is part of the joint project PROSA (High-resolution measurements of morphodynamics in rapidly changing PROglacial Systems of the Alps) that aims in the quantification of a sediment budget for the upper Kaunertal valley, Austrian Central Alps. In this sense and to find out about erosion causing prerequisites and processes, permafrost and ground ice occurrence, as well as sediment thickness is measured by i.a. application of geophysical measurements, multitemporal airborne and terrestrial LiDAR, as well as aerial photographs. In this case study we examine the spatial and temporal settings for permafrost aggradation in a recently deglaciated cirque, belonging to the catchment area of the Gepatschferner glacier using electric resistivity tomography (ERT) and basal temperature of the winterly snowcover (BTS) measurements to detect the state of the permafrost, multitemporal aerial photographs dating back to 1953 to reproduce recent deglaciation of the cirque and multitemporal airborne LiDAR data to gain information about surface elevation changes. The northeast facing cirque is situated in

  11. Alpine Skiing: Special Olympics Sports Skills Instructional Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    The first of five guides in the Sports Skills Instructional Program focuses on teaching alpine skiing to mentally retarded students. Each unit contains the following elements: overview, long-term goal, short-term objectives, modifications and adaptations, sports skill assessment, teaching skill, skill sequence, task analysis, teaching suggestions,…

  12. Identification of odorant receptors from the Alpine marmot (Marmota marmota).

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, V; Tirard, A; Renucci, M; Botto, J M; Bel, M C; Claverie, J M; Belaïch, A; Clement, J L

    2000-11-01

    Alpine Marmots (Marmota marmota) are a good model to study intraspecific chemical communication among mammals. This species has been subjected to several behavioural and biochemical studies regarding both their scent-marking behaviour by cheek-rubbing, and the chemical composition of their glandular secretions. However, no molecular study has been undertaken until today on proteins from the olfactory epithelium possibly implicated in chemical perception. In this study, we identified, to our knowledge for the first time, some olfatory receptors from this wild rodent. Starting with olfactory epithelium of an Alpine Marmot, and by mean of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction technique (RT-PCR), we isolated fourteen partial sequences that exhibited a high degree of homology (45-92%) with olfactory receptors from other vertebrates. Conserved identities and structural features clearly defined these Alpine Marmot sequences as members of the seven transmembrane domain olfactory receptors. All sequences were observed as belonging to known olfactory receptor families and were classified into ten subfamilies of the tetrapods OR class. Finally, Northern blot analysis revealed specific expression of these sequences in the Alpine Marmot olfactory epithelium tissue.

  13. Identifying key conservation threats to Alpine birds through expert knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Dan E; Pedrini, Paolo; Brambilla, Mattia; Rolando, Antonio; Girardello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Alpine biodiversity is subject to a range of increasing threats, but the scarcity of data for many taxa means that it is difficult to assess the level and likely future impact of a given threat. Expert opinion can be a useful tool to address knowledge gaps in the absence of adequate data. Experts with experience in Alpine ecology were approached to rank threat levels for 69 Alpine bird species over the next 50 years for the whole European Alps in relation to ten categories: land abandonment, climate change, renewable energy, fire, forestry practices, grazing practices, hunting, leisure, mining and urbanization. There was a high degree of concordance in ranking of perceived threats among experts for most threat categories. The major overall perceived threats to Alpine birds identified through expert knowledge were land abandonment, urbanization, leisure and forestry, although other perceived threats were ranked highly for particular species groups (renewable energy and hunting for raptors, hunting for gamebirds). For groups of species defined according to their breeding habitat, open habitat species and treeline species were perceived as the most threatened. A spatial risk assessment tool based on summed scores for the whole community showed threat levels were highest for bird communities of the northern and western Alps. Development of the approaches given in this paper, including addressing biases in the selection of experts and adopting a more detailed ranking procedure, could prove useful in the future in identifying future threats, and in carrying out risk assessments based on levels of threat to the whole bird community.

  14. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 ELEVATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 ELEVATIONS - Shaker Church Family Barns, East of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, south edge of church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  15. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 FRONT ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 FRONT ELEVATION - Shaker Church Family Washhouse, East of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, centrally located in church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  16. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 ELEVATIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 ELEVATIONS - Shaker Church Family Barns, East of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, south edge of church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 FRONT ELEVATION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 FRONT ELEVATION, DETAIL OF FENCE - Shaker Ministry's Shop, West of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, Northwest edge of church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  18. 18. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 DETAIL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 DETAIL OF ENTRANCE - Sabbathday Lake Shaker Community Meetinghouse, West of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, northwest edge of church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  19. Spin and Flux Evolution of the New Magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Stephen C.-Y.; Kaspi, Victoria; Cumming, Andrew; Livingstone, Margaret; Scholz, Paul; Archibald, Robert

    2012-07-01

    On 2011 July 14, a transient X-ray source, Swift J1822.3-1606, was first detected by Swift BAT via its burst activities. It was subsequently identified as a new magnetar upon the detection of a pulse period of 8.4s. Using follow-up RXTE, Swift, and Chandra observations, we determined a spin-down rate of ~1.6e-13, giving a dipole magnetic field of ~3.8e13G, second lowest among known magnetars. The post-outburst flux evolution can be model by a double exponential decay with timescales of 11 and 58 days. We found an absorption column density similar to that of the open cluster M17 at 16' away, arguing a comparable distance of ~1.6kpc for Swift J1823.3-1606. If confirmed, this will be the nearest magnetar observed. We also discuss the possibility that the magnetar progenitor was born in M17.

  20. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 FRONT ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 FRONT ELEVATION - Shaker Church Family Boys' Shop, East of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, centrally located in church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  1. 49. OVERALL VIEW OF COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT SHOWING SWIFT AND COMPANY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. OVERALL VIEW OF COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT SHOWING SWIFT AND COMPANY MEAT PROCESSING PLANT IN CENTER FOREGROUND AND FARLEY AND LOETSCHER MANUFACTURING COMPANY WAREHOUSE ANNEX IN CENTRAL BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Dubuque Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  2. The Simpsons: Public Choice in the Tradition of Swift and Orwell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Considine, John

    2006-01-01

    The author disagrees with Homer Simpson who claims that "...cartoons don't have any deep meaning. They're just stupid drawings that give you a cheap laugh." He argues that The Simpsons have a deep meaning in the same way as the works of Jonathan Swift and George Orwell. The message in The Simpsons, Swift, and Orwell is that those in charge do not…

  3. VVV near-infrared observations of the Swift J174540.2-290037 field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masetti, N.; Saito, R. K.; Rojas, A. F.; Minniti, D.; Contreras, R.

    2016-06-01

    We explored the archival images of the near-infrared (NIR) VVV survey (vvvsurvey.org; Minniti et al. 2010, New Astron., 15, 433) of the Galactic Bulge and inner disk, obtained with the 4.1m VISTA telescope at Cerro Paranal (Chile), containing the soft X-ray error box the transient Swift J174540.2-290037 (ATel #9109) that was recently detected with Swift (see also GCN Circs.

  4. The Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer: Early views into Black-hole Creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Joe

    2006-01-01

    Swift has exceeded every pre-launch predicted advance in GRB science. It has discovered the farthest GRB ever seen and identified new GRBs at a rate of 100/year. It has also explored a brand new time interval in GRB light curves by revealing unpredicted phenomena of GRB flares and rapid x-ray afterglow declines. Swift has conducted 20,00o successful slews to sources and is predicted to stay in orbit until 2022.

  5. OJ 287: Discovery of an X-ray and UV flare with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, Dirk; Komossa, S.; Gomez, J. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report on a very high X-ray and UV flux state in the candidate binary black hole blazar OJ 287 discovered by Swift on October 12. We have monitored OJ 287 before it became sun-constraint for Swift in June 2016 and found its X-ray 0.3-10 keV flux to be of the order of 6e-15 W/m2.

  6. Swift follow-up of the gamma-ray flaring blazar PKS 0235-618

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Sokolovsky, K. V.; Cutini, S.; Vetere, L.

    2010-06-01

    Following the gamma-ray flare of PKS 0235-618 detected by Fermi LAT on June 10, 2010 (ATel #2669, Cutini 2010), we performed a Swift target of opportunity observation on June 11. Swift/XRT observations started on 2010-06-11 at 21:48:35 UT and ended on 2010-06-12 at 04:51:24 UT. Data were taken in Photon Counting mode for a total exposure of 6 ksec.

  7. Stable isotopes in alpine precipitation as tracers of atmospheric deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiuta, V. L.; Lafreniere, M. J.; Kyser, T. K.; Norman, A. L.; Mayer, B.; Wieser, M.

    2010-12-01

    Alpine ecosystems, which are generally nutrient poor and exist under extreme climatic conditions, are particularly sensitive to environmental and climatic stressors. Studies in the USA Rocky Mountains and European Alps have shown that alpine terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are particularly sensitive to enhanced deposition of reactive nitrogen and can show ecologically destructive responses at relatively low levels of nitrogen deposition. However, there is no base line for atmospheric deposition of natural and anthropogenic contaminants in the Canadian alpine. Preliminary results of isotopic and chemical analyses of precipitation from an elevational transect on a glaciated alpine site in the Canadian Rockies are presented. Precipitation accumulating from early autumn through to spring (2008/2009 and 2009/2010) was sampled by means of seasonal snow cover on alpine glaciers. Summer precipitation was sampled through July and August 2010 using bulk collectors installed at the sites of winter sampling. The isotope ratios of dissolved sulphate (δ34S, δ18O), nitrogen (δ15N, δ18O), as well as precipitation (δ2H, δ18O) are utilized in addition to major ion concentrations and trace metal concentrations. Results from 2008/2009 snowpack samples indicate a strong seasonal trend in sulphate (SO42-) and nitrogen (NO3-) deposition which is consistent across the altitudinal transect. Snow horizons representing early autumn and spring precipitation show higher SO42- and NO3- concentrations in contrast to lower concentrations in winter horizons. The aforementioned suite of isotopic and chemical analyses are used to investigate the variability in dominant geographic source regions for atmospheric SO42- and NO3- (local, regional, or long range transported contaminants), as well as to identify contributions from the major biogeochemical source types (e.g. hydrocarbon combustion, lithogenic dust, agricultural emissions).

  8. Confronting the winds: orientation and flight behaviour of roosting swifts, Apus apus.

    PubMed

    Bäckman, J; Alerstam, T

    2001-05-22

    Swifts, Apus apus, spend the night aloft and this offers an opportunity to test the degree of adaptability of bird orientation and flight to different ecological situations. We predicted the swifts' behaviour by assuming that they are adapted to minimize energy expenditure during the nocturnal flight and during a compensatory homing flight if they become displaced by wind. We tested the predictions by recording the swifts' altitudes, speeds and directions under different wind conditions with tracking radar; we found an agreement between predictions and observations for orientation behaviour, but not for altitude and speed regulation. The swifts orientated consistently into the head wind, with angular concentration increasing with increasing wind speed. However, contrary to our predictions, they did not select altitudes with slow or moderate winds, nor did they increase their airspeed distinctly when flying into strong head winds. A possible explanation is that their head-wind orientation is sufficient to keep nocturnal displacement from their home area within tolerable limits, leaving flight altitude to be determined by other factors (correlated with temperature), and airspeed to show only a marginal increase in strong winds. The swifts were often moving "backwards", heading straight into the wind but being overpowered by wind speeds exceeding their airspeed. The regular occurrence of such flights is probably uniquely associated with the swifts' remarkable habit of roosting on the wing.

  9. Local formation of nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond by swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Aloni, S.; Ogletree, D. F.; Tomut, M.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Trautmann, C.; Rangelow, I. W.; Schenkel, T.

    2014-12-07

    We exposed nitrogen-implanted diamonds to beams of swift heavy ions (∼1 GeV, ∼4 MeV/u) and find that these irradiations lead directly to the formation of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers, without thermal annealing. We compare the photoluminescence intensities of swift heavy ion activated NV{sup −} centers to those formed by irradiation with low-energy electrons and by thermal annealing. NV{sup −} yields from irradiations with swift heavy ions are 0.1 of yields from low energy electrons and 0.02 of yields from thermal annealing. We discuss possible mechanisms of NV center formation by swift heavy ions such as electronic excitations and thermal spikes. While forming NV centers with low efficiency, swift heavy ions could enable the formation of three dimensional NV{sup −} assemblies over relatively large distances of tens of micrometers. Further, our results show that NV center formation is a local probe of (partial) lattice damage relaxation induced by electronic excitations from swift heavy ions in diamond.

  10. Detection of Calcifications In Vivo and Ex Vivo After Brain Injury in Rat Using SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Sierra, Alejandra; Corum, Curtis Andrew; Zhang, Jinjin; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Pitkänen, Asla; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli

    2012-01-01

    Calcifications represent one component of pathology in many brain diseases. With MRI, they are most often detected by exploiting negative contrast in magnitude images. Calcifications are more diamagnetic than tissue, leading to a magnetic field disturbance that can be seen in phase MR images. Most phase imaging studies use gradient recalled echo based pulse sequences. Here, the phase component of SWIFT, a virtually zero acquisition delay sequence, was used to detect calcifications ex vivo and in vivo in rat models of status epilepticus and traumatic brain injury. Calcifications were detected in phase and imaginary SWIFT images based on their dipole like magnetic field disturbances. In magnitude SWIFT images, calcifications were distinguished as hypointense and hyperintense. Hypointense calcifications showed large crystallized granules with few surrounding inflammatory cells, while hyperintense calcifications contained small granules with the presence of more inflammatory cells. The size of the calcifications in SWIFT magnitude images correlated with that in Alizarin stained histological sections. Our data indicate that SWIFT is likely to better preserve signal in the proximity of a calcification or other field perturber in comparison to gradient echo due to its short acquisition delay and broad excitation bandwidth. Furthermore, a quantitative description for the phase contrast near dipole magnetic field inhomogeneities for the SWIFT pulse sequence is given. In vivo detection of calcifications provides a tool to probe the progression of pathology in neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, it appears to provide a surrogate marker for inflammatory cells around the calcifications after brain injury. PMID:22425671

  11. Habitat selection by female swift foxes (Vulpes velox) during the pup-rearing season

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasmal, Indrani; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Grovenburg, Troy W.; Datta, Shubham; Schroeder, Greg M.; Klaver, Robert W.; Honness, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    The swift fox (Vulpes velox) was historically distributed in western South Dakota including the region surrounding Badlands National Park (BNP). The species declined during the mid-1800s, largely due to habitat loss and poisoning targeted at wolves (Canis lupis) and coyotes (C. latrans). Only a small population of swift foxes near Ardmore, South Dakota persisted. In 2003, an introduction program was initiated at BNP with swift foxes translocated from Colorado and Wyoming. We report on habitat use by female swift foxes during the pup-rearing season (May–July) in 2009. Analyses of location data from 13 radiomarked female foxes indicated disproportional use (P Ŷ = 1.01), sparse vegetation (Ŷ = 1.43) and prairie dog towns (Ŷ = 1.18) in proportion to their availability, whereas they were less likely to use woodland (Ŷ = 0.00), shrubland (Ŷ = 0.14), pasture/agricultural-land (Ŷ = 0.25) and development (Ŷ = 0.16) relative to availability. Swift foxes typically are located in habitats that provide greater visibility, such as shortgrass prairie and areas with sparse vegetation; which allow detection of approaching coyotes (e.g., primary predator of swift foxes).

  12. Reviewing E(sub peak) Relations with Swift and Suzaku Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, Hans A.; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Sakamoto, Takanori; Sato, Goro; Sugita, Satoshi; Tashiro, Makoto; Hara, R.; Tanaka, H.; Ohmori, M.; Yamauchi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years several authors have derived correlations between gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectral peak energy (E(sub peak)) and either isotropic-equivalent radiated energy (E(sub iso)) or peak luminosity (L(sub iso)). Since these relationships are controversial, but could provide redshift estimators, it is important to determine whether bursts detected by Swift exhibit the same correlations. Swift has greatly added to the number of GRBs for which redshifts are known and hence E(sub iso) and L(sub iso) could be calculated. However, for most bursts it is not possible to adequately constrain E(sub peak) with Swift data alone since most GRBs have E(sub peak) above the energy range (15-50 keV) of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT). Therefore we have analyzed the spectra of 78 bursts (31 with redshift) which were detected by both Swift/BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range 50-5000 keV. For most bursts in this sample we can precisely determine E(sub peak) and for bursts with known redshift we can compare how the E(sub peak) relations for the Swift/Suzaku sample compare to earlier published results. Keywords: gamma rays: bursts

  13. Noise Strength Estimates of Three SGRs: Swift J1822.3-1606, SGR J1833-0832 and Swift J1834.9-0846

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serim, M. M.; Inam, S. Ç.; Baykal, A.

    2012-12-01

    We studied timing solutions of the three magnetars SWIFT J1822.3-1606, SGR J1833-0832 and Swift J1834.9-0846. We extracted the residuals of pulse arrival times with respect to the constant pulse frequency derivative. Using polynomial estimator techniques, we estimated the noise strengths of the sources. Our results showed that the noise strength and spin-down rate are strongly correlated, indicating that increase in spin-down rate leads to more torque noise on the magnetars. We are in progress of extending our analysis to the other magnetars.

  14. Vacant niche in alpine habitat: the case of an introduced population of the butterfly Erebia epiphron in the Krkonoše Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizek, Oldrich; Bakesová, Andrea; Kuras, Tomas; Benes, Jiri; Konvicka, Martin

    2003-04-01

    A vacant niche in alpine habitats of the Krkonoše Mts. (Western Sudetes, Czech Republic) was colonised by a non-native butterfly Erebia epiphron (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Satyrinae) as a result of artificial introduction of 50 females in 1932 and 1933. The species established a large population occupying an entire area above the timberline on one of parallel ridges (East) of the mountains, but it has not yet colonised the parallel Western ridge, which is almost identical in area, altitude and vegetation. We compared altitudinal distribution and adult habitats of the alien species and of its native congener, E. euryale. Distribution of both species was significantly affected by altitude, but habitat type predicted butterfly numbers better than altitude in regression models. The introduced species was sympatric with the native one near the timberline, but its altitudinal optimum was higher, within tundra grasslands, where the native E. euryale did not occur. Peak adult emergence of E. euryale was later than in E. epiphron and followed identical pattern in allopatry. The failure of E. epiphron to colonise the Western ridge is attributable to its incapability to disperse across wooded areas. The Krkonoše alpine communities are unsaturated with species, which is striking in comparison with native butterfly fauna of lower Hrubý Jeseník Mts. We interpret this by a past encroachment of alpine grasslands in the Krkonoše Mts. by the dwarf pine Pinus mugo.

  15. MicroRNAs of the mesothorax in Qinlingacris elaeodes, an alpine grasshopper showing a wing polymorphism with unilateral wing form.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Jiang, G F; Ren, Q P; Wang, Y T; Zhou, X M; Zhou, C F; Qin, D Z

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are now recognized as key post-transcriptional regulators in regulation of phenotypic diversity. Qinlingacris elaeodes is a species of the alpine grasshopper, which is endemic to China. Adult individuals have three wing forms: wingless, unilateral-winged and short-winged. This is an ideal species to investigate the phenotypic plasticity, development and evolution of insect wings because of its case of unilateral wing form in both the sexes. We sequenced a small RNA library prepared from mesothoraxes of the adult grasshoppers using the Illumina deep sequencing technology. Approximately 12,792,458 raw reads were generated, of which the 854,580 high-quality reads were used only for miRNA identification. In this study, we identified 49 conserved miRNAs belonging to 41 families and 69 species-specific miRNAs. Moreover, seven miRNA*s were detected both for conserved miRNAs and species-specific miRNAs, which were supported by hairpin forming precursors based on polymerase chain reaction. This is the first description of miRNAs in alpine grasshoppers. The results provide a useful resource for further studies on molecular regulation and evolution of miRNAs in grasshoppers. These findings not only enrich the miRNAs for insects but also lay the groundwork for the study of post-transcriptional regulation of wing forms. PMID:26693589

  16. Dynamics and seismotectonics of the West-Alpine arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglia, G.; Capponi, G.; Crispini, L.; Piazza, M.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper we present a comparative review of structural, seismic and focal mechanism data from the West-Alpine arc. In the Western Alps, seismic activity is concentrated along an external belt, corresponding to the Penninic front, and an internal belt, corresponding to the Austro-Alpine front and its southern extension. These seismic belts are connected in the NE by a seismic lineament, corresponding to the Simplon and Centovalli Line and in the south by the E-W-trending seismic Stura "couloir", located between the Argentera and Dora Maira massifs. The SimplondashCentovalli-Tonale system and the Stura "couloir" are dextral and sinistral strike-slip systems respectively; this implies a westward translation of the West-Alpine arc and the Po Plain. Based on these observations, a seismotectonic model is proposed in which the frontal Penninic thrust and the basal surface of the accretionary wedge corresponding to the Penninic sole thrust are reactivated. Activity along the frontal thrust increases the arcuate shape of the Western Alps and disengages them from the Central and the Ligurian Alps along the tear faults of the SimplondashCentovalli-Tonale system and the Stura "couloir" respectively. In the wider framework of northern Italy, the sector of the eastern Alps north of the Gailtal Line, is moving in an orogendashparallel direction towards the east. Areas with lateral escape in opposite directions, towards the west for the Po Plain and towards the east for the Eastern Alps, north of the Gailtal Line, are separated by the South Alpine Atesine indenter. A model postulating a double lateral escape and a central indenter matches most of the features of the models of "poinçonnement". The seismic features of northern Italy agree with the seismicity of the stable sector of northern Europe up to the North Sea. This area is fragmented into blocks bounded by seismic bands, some of which probably reactivate pre-existing structures. The overall stress field of Cratonic

  17. The Swift-BAT Hard X-Ray Transient Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, H. A.; Holland, S. T.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Pearlman, A. B.; Romano, P.; Kennea, J. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Gehrels, N.; Lien, A. Y.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Sakamoto, T.; Stamatikos, M.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2013-01-01

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray transient monitor provides near real-time coverage of the X-ray sky in the energy range 15-50 keV. The BAT observes 88% of the sky each day with a detection sensitivity of 5.3 mCrab for a full-day observation and a time resolution as fine as 64 s. The three main purposes of the monitor are (1) the discovery of new transient X-ray sources, (2) the detection of outbursts or other changes in the flux of known X-ray sources, and (3) the generation of light curves of more than 900 sources spanning over eight years. The primary interface for the BAT transient monitor is a public Web site. Between 2005 February 12 and 2013 April 30, 245 sources have been detected in the monitor, 146 of them persistent and 99 detected only in outburst. Among these sources, 17 were previously unknown and were discovered in the transient monitor. In this paper, we discuss the methodology and the data processing and filtering for the BAT transient monitor and review its sensitivity and exposure.We provide a summary of the source detections and classify them according to the variability of their light curves. Finally, we review all new BAT monitor discoveries. For the new sources that are previously unpublished, we present basic data analysis and interpretations.

  18. The Swift/BAT Hard X-ray Transient Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, H. A.; Holland, S. T.; Corbet, R.H.D.; Pearlman, A. B.; Romano, P.; Kennea, J. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Gehrels, N.; Lien, A. Y.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Sakamoto, T.; Stamatikos, M.; Ukwatta, N.

    2013-01-01

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray transient monitor provides near real-time coverage of the X-ray sky in the energy range 15-50 keV. The BAT observes 88% of the sky each day with a detection sensitivity of 5.3 mCrab for a full-day observation and a time resolution as ne as 64 seconds. The three main purposes of the monitor are (1) the discovery of new transient X-ray sources, (2) the detection of outbursts or other changes in the ux of known X-ray sources, and (3) the generation of light curves of more than 900 sources spanning over eight years. The primary interface for the BAT transient monitor is a public web page. Since 2005 February, 242 sources have been detected in the monitor, 149 of them persistent and 93 detected only in outburst. Among these sources, 16 were previously unknown and discovered in the transient monitor. In this paper, we discuss the methodology and the data processing and ltering for the BAT transient monitor and review its sensitivity and exposure. We provide a summary of the source detections and classify them according to the variability of their light curves. Finally, we review all new BAT monitor discoveries and present basic data analysis and interpretations for those sources with previously unpublished results.

  19. Swift Observations of SN 2008bo in NGC 6643

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, S.; Brown, P. J.; Milne, P.

    2008-04-01

    The Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on board the Swift satellite observed the supernova (SN) 2008bo in NGC 6643 (CBET #1324, #1325) on 2008-04-04.71 UT and 2008-04-06.31 UT. The following UVOT magnitudes were measured for the two epochs: v = 15.9±0.1 (157 s exposure time), 16.0±0.1 (258 s), b = 16.7±0.1 (157 s), 16.6±0.1 (258 s), u = 16.6±0.1 (157 s), 16.6±0.1 (258 s), uvw1 [181-321nm] = 17.1±0.1 (314 s), 17.2±0.1 (518 s), uvm2 [166-268nm] = 17.3±0.1 (491 s), 17.4±0.1 (796 s), and uvw2 [112-264 nm] = 17.3±0.1 (629 s), 17.3±0.1 (1,038 s).

  20. THE SWIFT/BAT HARD X-RAY TRANSIENT MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Krimm, H. A.; Holland, S. T.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Pearlman, A. B.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Romano, P.; Kennea, J. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Lien, A. Y.; Markwardt, C. B.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Palmer, D. M.; Sakamoto, T.; Stamatikos, M.

    2013-11-01

    The Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray transient monitor provides near real-time coverage of the X-ray sky in the energy range 15-50 keV. The BAT observes 88% of the sky each day with a detection sensitivity of 5.3 mCrab for a full-day observation and a time resolution as fine as 64 s. The three main purposes of the monitor are (1) the discovery of new transient X-ray sources, (2) the detection of outbursts or other changes in the flux of known X-ray sources, and (3) the generation of light curves of more than 900 sources spanning over eight years. The primary interface for the BAT transient monitor is a public Web site. Between 2005 February 12 and 2013 April 30, 245 sources have been detected in the monitor, 146 of them persistent and 99 detected only in outburst. Among these sources, 17 were previously unknown and were discovered in the transient monitor. In this paper, we discuss the methodology and the data processing and filtering for the BAT transient monitor and review its sensitivity and exposure. We provide a summary of the source detections and classify them according to the variability of their light curves. Finally, we review all new BAT monitor discoveries. For the new sources that are previously unpublished, we present basic data analysis and interpretations.

  1. Double ionization of water molecules induced by swift protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, A. C.; Luna, H.; Wolff, W.; Montenegro, E. C.

    2015-09-01

    Experimental cross sections for single and double ionization of H2O by swift H+ with energy ranging from 0.3 to 2.0 MeV are reported. In this energy range the ionization is the dominant collision process and charge transfer reactions can be disregarded. A multihit coincidence technique is used to measure the H++OH+ and H++O+ fragmentation channels. Single- and double-hit differential measurements together with a semiempirical calculation allow separating quantitatively the prompt and Auger-like decay contributions to fragmentation following a vacancy in the 2 a1 molecular orbital. Concerning the double-ionization channel, it is found that for lower energies the mechanism of a sequential double-electron removal, known as TS2, dominates. For energies above above 750 keV/u ionization resulting from a single vacancy followed by an Auger like deexcitation takes over the TS2, becoming the main contribution to the double-ionization cross section. Our results are compared to the electron-impact data within the same velocity range and also with theoretical calculations available in the literature.

  2. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A.; Holland, Stephen T.; Breeveld, Alice A.; Brown, Peter J. E-mail: blp14@psu.edu E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  3. The Swift/BAT Hard X-ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tueller, Jack; Markwardt, C. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, A.; Skinner, G. K.; Falcone, A.; Kennea, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    The BAT instrument on Swift is a wide field (70 deg. '100 deg.) coded aperture instrument with a CdZnTe detector array sensitive to energies of 14-200 keV. Each day, the BAT survey typically covers 60% of the sky to a detection limit of 30 millicrab. BAT makes hard X-ray light curves of similar sensitivity and coverage to the X-ray light curves from XTE/ASM, but in an energy range where sources show remarkably different behavior. Integrating the BAT data produces an all sky map with a source detection limit at 15 months of a few 10(exp -11) ergs per square centimeter per second, depending on the exposure. This is the first uniform all-sky survey at energies high enough to be unaffected by absorption since HEAO 1 in 1977-8. BAT has detected greater than 200 AGN and greater than 180 galactic sources. At high galactic latitudes, the BAT sources are usually easy to identify, but many are heavily absorbed and there are a few quite surprising identifications. The BAT selected galaxies can be used to calculate LogN/LogS and the luminosity function for AGN which are complete and free from common systematics. Several crucial parameters for understanding the cosmic hard x-ray background are now determined.

  4. Swift/BAT and MAXI/GSC broadband transient monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Takanori; Oda, Ryoma; Mihara, Tatehiro; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Arimoto, Makoto; Barthelmy, Scott Douglas; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Krimm, Hans A.; Nakahira, Satoshi; Serino, Motoko

    2016-04-01

    "Time-domain astronomy" is one of the frontier field of astronomy for the next decade. Since the most of the transient sources show the temporal variation in a broad spectral range, it would be ideal to have the real time transient monitor which covers a wide energy band. We present the newly developed broadband transient monitor using the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the MAXI Gas Slit Camera (GSC) data. Our broadband transient monitor monitors high-energy transient sources from 2 keV to 200 keV in seven energy bands by combining the BAT (15-200keV) and the GSC (2-20keV) data. Currently, daily and 90-minute (one orbit) averaged light curves are available for 106 high-energy transient sources. Our broadband transient monitor is available to the public through our web server, http://yoshidalab.mydns.jp/bat_gsc_trans_mon/, for wider use by the community. We discuss the daily sensitivity of our monitor and possible future improvements to our pipeline.

  5. The duration distribution of Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, I.; Tóth, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    Decades ago two classes of gamma-ray bursts were identified and delineated as having durations shorter and longer than about 2 s. Subsequently indications also supported the existence of a third class. Using maximum likelihood estimation we analyze the duration distribution of 888 Swift BAT bursts observed before October 2015. Fitting three log-normal functions to the duration distribution of the bursts provides a better fit than two log-normal distributions, with 99.9999% significance. Similarly to earlier results, we found that a fourth component is not needed. The relative frequencies of the distribution of the groups are 8% for short, 35% for intermediate and 57% for long bursts which correspond to our previous results. We analyse the redshift distribution for the 269 GRBs of the 888 GRBs with known redshift. We find no evidence for the previously suggested difference between the long and intermediate GRBs' redshift distribution. The observed redshift distribution of the 20 short GRBs differs with high significance from the distributions of the other groups.

  6. Swift Electrofluorochromism of Donor-Acceptor Conjugated Polytriphenylamines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingwei; Liang, Ziqi

    2016-07-20

    Electrofluorochromic (EFC) materials, which exhibit electrochemically controllable fluorescence, hold great promise in optoelectronic devices and biological analysis. Here we design such donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated polymers-P(TPACO) and P(TCEC)-that contain the same electron-rich and oxidizable polytriphenylamine (PTPA) as π-backbone, yet with different electron-deficient ketone and cyano units as pendant groups, respectively. They both exhibit solvatochromic effects due to intrinsic characteristics of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT). Compared to P(TPACO), P(TCEC) shows stronger ICT, which leads to higher electrochemical oxidation potential and lower ion diffusion coefficient. Moreover, both polymers present simultaneous electrochromic (EC) and EFC behaviors with multistate display and remarkably rapid fluorescence response. The response time of P(TPACO) is as short as 0.19 s, nearly 4-fold faster than that of P(TCEC) (0.92 s). Such rapid response is found to be determined by the ion diffusion coefficient which is associated with the ICT nature. Finally, the EFC display device based on P(TPACO) is successfully demonstrated, which shows green fluorescence ON/OFF switching upon applied potentials. This work has successfully demonstrated that swift EFCs can be achieved by rational modulation of the ICT effect in such D-A conjugated polymers. PMID:27347724

  7. Multiwavelength observations of Swift J1753.5–0127

    SciTech Connect

    Froning, Cynthia S.; France, Kevin; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Winter, Lisa; Robinson, Edward L.; Hynes, Robert I.; Lewis, Fraser E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu E-mail: lwinter@aer.com E-mail: rih@phys.lsu.edu

    2014-01-01

    We present contemporaneous X-ray, ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared observations of the black hole binary system Swift J1753.5–0127 acquired in 2012 October. The UV observations, obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, are the first UV spectra of this system. The dereddened UV spectrum is characterized by a smooth, blue continuum and broad emission lines of C IV and He II. The system was stable in the UV to <10% during our observations. We estimated the interstellar reddening by fitting the 2175 Å absorption feature and fit the interstellar absorption profile of Lyα to directly measure the neutral hydrogen column density along the line of sight. By comparing the UV continuum flux to steady-state thin accretion disk models, we determined upper limits on the distance to the system as a function of black hole mass. The continuum is well fit with disk models dominated by viscous heating rather than irradiation. The broadband spectral energy distribution shows the system has declined at all wavelengths since previous broadband observations in 2005 and 2007. If we assume that the UV emission is dominated by the accretion disk, the inner radius of the disk must be truncated at radii above the innermost stable circular orbit to be consistent with the X-ray flux, requiring significant mass loss from outflows and/or energy loss via advection into the black hole to maintain energy balance.

  8. Multiwavelength Observations of Swift J1753.5-0127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Cynthia S.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; France, Kevin; Winter, Lisa; Robinson, Edward L.; Hynes, Robert I.; Lewis, Fraser

    2014-01-01

    We present contemporaneous X-ray, ultraviolet (UV), optical, and near-infrared observations of the black hole binary system Swift J1753.5-0127 acquired in 2012 October. The UV observations, obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, are the first UV spectra of this system. The dereddened UV spectrum is characterized by a smooth, blue continuum and broad emission lines of C IV and He II. The system was stable in the UV to <10% during our observations. We estimated the interstellar reddening by fitting the 2175 Å absorption feature and fit the interstellar absorption profile of Lyα to directly measure the neutral hydrogen column density along the line of sight. By comparing the UV continuum flux to steady-state thin accretion disk models, we determined upper limits on the distance to the system as a function of black hole mass. The continuum is well fit with disk models dominated by viscous heating rather than irradiation. The broadband spectral energy distribution shows the system has declined at all wavelengths since previous broadband observations in 2005 and 2007. If we assume that the UV emission is dominated by the accretion disk, the inner radius of the disk must be truncated at radii above the innermost stable circular orbit to be consistent with the X-ray flux, requiring significant mass loss from outflows and/or energy loss via advection into the black hole to maintain energy balance.

  9. Self-aligned nanostructures created by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, Hans-Gregor; Nix, Anne-Katrin; Hofsaess, Hans; Krauser, Johann; Trautmann, Christina; Weidinger, Alois

    2010-05-15

    In tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) swift heavy ions create conducting tracks of about 8 nm in diameter. To apply these nanowires and implement them into nanodevices, they have to be contacted and gated. In the present work, we demonstrate the fabrication of conducting vertical nanostructures in ta-C together with self-aligned gate electrodes. A multilayer assembly is irradiated with GeV heavy ions and subsequently exposed to several selective etching processes. The samples consist of a Si wafer as substrate covered by a thin ta-C layer. On top is deposited a SiN{sub x} film for insulation, a Cr layer as electrode, and finally a polycarbonate film as ion track template. Chemical track etching opens nanochannels in the polymer which are self-aligned with the conducting tracks in ta-C because they are produced by the same ions. Through the pores in the polymer template, the Cr and SiN{sub x} layers are opened by ion beam sputtering and plasma etching, respectively. The resulting structure consists of nanowires embedded in the insulating carbon matrix with a built in gate electrode and has potential application as gated field emission cathode.

  10. Stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT) ion excitation in trapped-ion mass spectometry: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shenheng; Marshall, Alan G.

    1996-12-01

    Stored waveform excitation produced by inverse Fourier transformation of a specified magnitude/phase excitation spectrum offers the most general and versatile means for broadband mass-selective excitation and ejection in Penning (FT-ICR) and Paul (quadrupole) ion trap mass spectrometry. Since the last comprehensive review of SWIFT excitation in 1987, the technique has been adopted, modified, and extended widely in both the ICR and quadrupole ion trap communities. Here, we review the principles, variations, algorithms, hardware implementation, and some applications of SWIFT for both ICR and quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. We show that the most desirable SWIFT waveform is that optimized to reduce both the time-domain SWIFT maximum amplitude and the amplitude near the start and end of the SWIFT waveform. We examine the "true" magnitude excitation spectrum, obtained by zero-filling and forward Fourier transforming the SWIFT time-domain waveform, in order to evaluate the trade-off between spectral magnitude uniformity and frequency (mass) selectivity. Apodization of the SWIFT waveform is optimally conducted by smoothing the excitation magnitude spectrum prior to generation of the SWIFT waveform by inverse FT. When (as for broadband ejection in a quadrupole ion trap) it is important that ions be excited near-simultaneously over a wide mass range, the phase spectrum (before inverse FT to generate the SWIFT waveform) may be overmodulated or randomly modulated ("filtered noise field"), with the recognition that very substantial non-uniformity in the "true" excitation magnitude spectrum will result.

  11. A New GLORIA (Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments Site in Southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, M. E.; Warden, J. E.; Apple, C. J.; Pullman, T. Y.; Gallagher, J. H.

    2008-12-01

    Global climate change is predicted to have a major impact on the alpine environments and plants of western North America. Alpine plant species and treelines may migrate upwards due to warmer temperatures. Species composition, vegetation cover, and the phenology of photosynthesis, flowering, pollination, and seed dispersal may change. The Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA) is a network of alpine sites established with the goal of understanding the interactions between climate change and alpine plants. The Continental Divide traverses Southwestern Montana, where the flora contains representative species from both sides of the divide. In the summer of 2008, we established a GLORIA site in southwestern Montana east of the Continental Divide with the objective of determining whether the temperature changes at the site, and if so, how temperature changes influence alpine plants. We are monitoring soil temperature along with species composition and percent cover of alpine plants at four sub-summits along an ascending altitudinal gradient. We placed the treeline, lower alpine, and upper alpine sites on Mt. Fleecer (45°49'36.06"N, 112°48'08.18"W, 2886.2 m (9469 ft)) and the highest sub-summit on Keokirk Mountain, (45°35'37.94"N, 112°57'03.89"W, 2987.3 m (9801 ft)) in the Pioneer Range. Interesting species on these mountains include Lewisia pygmaea, the Pygmy Bitterroot, Silene acaulis, the Moss Campion, Eritrichium nanum, the Alpine Forget-Me-Not, Lloydia serotina, the Alpine Lily, and Pinus albicaulis, the Whitebark Pine. This new site will remain in place indefinitely. Baseline and subsequent data from this site will be linked with the global network of GLORIA sites with which we will assess changes in alpine flora.

  12. Identifying key conservation threats to Alpine birds through expert knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Paolo; Brambilla, Mattia; Rolando, Antonio; Girardello, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Alpine biodiversity is subject to a range of increasing threats, but the scarcity of data for many taxa means that it is difficult to assess the level and likely future impact of a given threat. Expert opinion can be a useful tool to address knowledge gaps in the absence of adequate data. Experts with experience in Alpine ecology were approached to rank threat levels for 69 Alpine bird species over the next 50 years for the whole European Alps in relation to ten categories: land abandonment, climate change, renewable energy, fire, forestry practices, grazing practices, hunting, leisure, mining and urbanization. There was a high degree of concordance in ranking of perceived threats among experts for most threat categories. The major overall perceived threats to Alpine birds identified through expert knowledge were land abandonment, urbanization, leisure and forestry, although other perceived threats were ranked highly for particular species groups (renewable energy and hunting for raptors, hunting for gamebirds). For groups of species defined according to their breeding habitat, open habitat species and treeline species were perceived as the most threatened. A spatial risk assessment tool based on summed scores for the whole community showed threat levels were highest for bird communities of the northern and western Alps. Development of the approaches given in this paper, including addressing biases in the selection of experts and adopting a more detailed ranking procedure, could prove useful in the future in identifying future threats, and in carrying out risk assessments based on levels of threat to the whole bird community. PMID:26966659

  13. Comparison modeling for alpine vegetation distribution in an arid area.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihua; Lai, Liming; Guan, Tianyu; Cai, Wetao; Gao, Nannan; Zhang, Xiaolong; Yang, Dawen; Cong, Zhentao; Zheng, Yuanrun

    2016-07-01

    Mapping and modeling vegetation distribution are fundamental topics in vegetation ecology. With the rise of powerful new statistical techniques and GIS tools, the development of predictive vegetation distribution models has increased rapidly. However, modeling alpine vegetation with high accuracy in arid areas is still a challenge because of the complexity and heterogeneity of the environment. Here, we used a set of 70 variables from ASTER GDEM, WorldClim, and Landsat-8 OLI (land surface albedo and spectral vegetation indices) data with decision tree (DT), maximum likelihood classification (MLC), and random forest (RF) models to discriminate the eight vegetation groups and 19 vegetation formations in the upper reaches of the Heihe River Basin in the Qilian Mountains, northwest China. The combination of variables clearly discriminated vegetation groups but failed to discriminate vegetation formations. Different variable combinations performed differently in each type of model, but the most consistently important parameter in alpine vegetation modeling was elevation. The best RF model was more accurate for vegetation modeling compared with the DT and MLC models for this alpine region, with an overall accuracy of 75 % and a kappa coefficient of 0.64 verified against field point data and an overall accuracy of 65 % and a kappa of 0.52 verified against vegetation map data. The accuracy of regional vegetation modeling differed depending on the variable combinations and models, resulting in different classifications for specific vegetation groups. PMID:27307276

  14. Numerical simulation of a turning alpine ski during recreational skiing.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Tada, N

    1996-09-01

    While downhill snow skiing, recreational alpine skiers enjoy making turning motions with their skis. These motions are mainly induced by skidding, while turning by alpine ski racers is made by carving a trace in the snow. In the present study we treat the turning motions by recreational alpine skiers. This "skidding" turning motion is made possible by centripetal forces acting on the ski and skier dynamic motion systems, with these forces arising due to the skier placing the ski's longitudinal axis at an angle that is inclined away from the velocity vector and edging the ski into the snow. When snow is soft, the edged ski creates a snow impacting force, whereas a snow cutting force occurs when it is hard. Here, we calculate the former force using a three-dimensional water jet analogy, while the latter one using conventional metal cutting theory, after which the corresponding equations of motion for each system are derived and numerically solved. This methodology enables simulating the curvilinear and rotational motion of the ski and skier systems. Resultant simulations quantitatively show for the first time that the resultant radius of curvature of a ski track while downhill skiing is strongly dependent on the location of the ski boot on the ski's longitudinal axis and also on its side-cut (midlength taper). PMID:8883012

  15. Effects of eccentric cycle ergometry in alpine skiers.

    PubMed

    Gross, M; Lüthy, F; Kroell, J; Müller, E; Hoppeler, H; Vogt, M

    2010-08-01

    Eccentric cycling, where the goal is to resist the pedals, which are driven by a motor, increases muscle strength and size in untrained subjects. We hypothesized that it could also be beneficial for athletes, particularly in alpine skiing, which involves predominantly eccentric contractions at longer muscle lengths. We investigated the effects of replacing part of regular weight training with eccentric cycling in junior male alpine skiers using a matched-pair design. Control subjects ( N=7) executed 1-h weight sessions 3 times per week, which included 4-5 sets of 4 leg exercises. The eccentric group ( N=8) performed only 3 sets, followed by continuous sessions on the eccentric ergometer for the remaining 20 min. After 6 weeks, lean thigh mass increased significantly only in the eccentric group. There was a groupxtime effect on squat-jump height favouring the eccentric group, which also experienced a 6.5% improvement in countermovement-jump height. The ability to finely modulate muscle force during variable eccentric cycling improved 50% (p=0.004) only in the eccentric group. Although eccentric cycling did not significantly enhance isometric leg strength, we believe it is beneficial for alpine skiers because it provides an efficient means for hypertrophy while closely mimicking the type of muscle actions encountered while skiing.

  16. Drought occurrence in the Alpine Region, 1864-2050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calanca, P.; Spörri, M.

    2010-09-01

    Drought is one of the major threats to agricultural production worldwide. It occasionally affects agriculture in the Alpine region, although more intermittently than in other areas of Europe, notably the Mediterranean. Things may change, though, in the future if climate projections developed for the Alpine region in the context of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report or the PRUDENCE project come true, with enhanced drought risk calling for adaptation. The focus of this contribution is on the characterization of drought occurrence in the Alpine region during 1864-2050. The analysis relies on historical weather records from Switzerland covering the period 1864-2010 and projections from the ENSEMBLES project for 2010-2050. Drought is quantified in terms of the standardized precipitation index (SPI), the modified moisture index (MMI) and the seasonal mean soil moisture availability. We show that the last decades were less prone to drought than the second half of the 19th century or the mid 20th century. We further examine these results using time series analysis and discuss regional differences. We then illustrate that according to the ENSEMBLES scenarios shifts in the drought regime until 2050 are likely to be less pronounced than previously thought, despite a marked warming and a moderate but significant increase in the length of dry spells. This suggests that further studies are needed to better understand changes in the hydrological cycle and their implications for drought risk.

  17. Tourism and Water: Themes of the Alpine Convention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhof, R.

    2012-04-01

    1) The contribution reflects the personal opinion of the author and does not necessarily reflect the point of view of the Permanent Secretariat. The Alpine Convention is a multilateral framework treaty signed in 1991 by the eight states of the Alpine bow as well as the European Community. Its main objectives are the sustainable development of the Alpine territory and the safeguarding of the interests of the people living within it, embracing the environmental, social and economic dimensions in the broadest sense. In order to achieve its objectives, over the years the Framework Convention has been equipped with a large number of thematic protocols, e.g. on tourism. The overall objective of the Protocol on Tourism, which first came into force in 2002, is to contribute to sustainable development in the Alpine region within the existing institutional framework, by encouraging environmentally-friendly tourism through specific measures and recommendations which take the interests of both the local population and tourists into account. The provisions of the Protocol on Tourism primarily concern tourism management and controlling tourist flows, structural developments such as ski lifts and ski slopes, accommodation and the balanced development of economically weak areas. Guidelines, development plans, sectoral plans have to be adopted at the appropriate territorial level in order to enable to assess the impact of tourism development on, inter alia, water. This extends also to ski slopes developments. For example the production of artificial snow production may be authorized only if the location's hydrological, climatic and ecological conditions allow. Water is listed among the twelve themes in relation to which the Contracting Parties are supposed to take measures and coordinate their policies (Article 2 of the Framework Convention). The Alpine Convention aims to preserve and re-establish healthy water systems, especially keeping waters clean and protecting the natural

  18. Numerical simulation of a turning alpine ski during recreational skiing.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Y; Tada, N

    1996-09-01

    While downhill snow skiing, recreational alpine skiers enjoy making turning motions with their skis. These motions are mainly induced by skidding, while turning by alpine ski racers is made by carving a trace in the snow. In the present study we treat the turning motions by recreational alpine skiers. This "skidding" turning motion is made possible by centripetal forces acting on the ski and skier dynamic motion systems, with these forces arising due to the skier placing the ski's longitudinal axis at an angle that is inclined away from the velocity vector and edging the ski into the snow. When snow is soft, the edged ski creates a snow impacting force, whereas a snow cutting force occurs when it is hard. Here, we calculate the former force using a three-dimensional water jet analogy, while the latter one using conventional metal cutting theory, after which the corresponding equations of motion for each system are derived and numerically solved. This methodology enables simulating the curvilinear and rotational motion of the ski and skier systems. Resultant simulations quantitatively show for the first time that the resultant radius of curvature of a ski track while downhill skiing is strongly dependent on the location of the ski boot on the ski's longitudinal axis and also on its side-cut (midlength taper).

  19. Abiotic and biotic controls of spatial pattern at alpine treeline

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malanson, George P.; Xiao, Ningchuan; Alftine, K.J.; Bekker, Mathew; Butler, David R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Cairns, David M.; Fagre, Daniel; Walsh, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    At alpine treeline, trees and krummholz forms affect the environment in ways that increase their growth and reproduction. We assess the way in which these positive feedbacks combine in spatial patterns to alter the environment in the neighborhood of existing plants. The research is significant because areas of alpine tundra are susceptible to encroachment by woody species as climate changes. Moreover, understanding the general processes of plant invasion is important. The importance of spatial pattern has been recognized, but the spatial pattern of positive feedbacks per se has not been explored in depth. We present a linked set of models of vegetation change at an alpine forest-tundra ecotone. Our aim is to create models that are as simple as possible in order to test specific hypotheses. We present results from a model of the resource averaging hypothesis and the positive feedback switch hypothesis of treelines. We compare the patterns generated by the models to patterns observed in fine scale remotely sensed data.

  20. Comparison modeling for alpine vegetation distribution in an arid area.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jihua; Lai, Liming; Guan, Tianyu; Cai, Wetao; Gao, Nannan; Zhang, Xiaolong; Yang, Dawen; Cong, Zhentao; Zheng, Yuanrun

    2016-07-01

    Mapping and modeling vegetation distribution are fundamental topics in vegetation ecology. With the rise of powerful new statistical techniques and GIS tools, the development of predictive vegetation distribution models has increased rapidly. However, modeling alpine vegetation with high accuracy in arid areas is still a challenge because of the complexity and heterogeneity of the environment. Here, we used a set of 70 variables from ASTER GDEM, WorldClim, and Landsat-8 OLI (land surface albedo and spectral vegetation indices) data with decision tree (DT), maximum likelihood classification (MLC), and random forest (RF) models to discriminate the eight vegetation groups and 19 vegetation formations in the upper reaches of the Heihe River Basin in the Qilian Mountains, northwest China. The combination of variables clearly discriminated vegetation groups but failed to discriminate vegetation formations. Different variable combinations performed differently in each type of model, but the most consistently important parameter in alpine vegetation modeling was elevation. The best RF model was more accurate for vegetation modeling compared with the DT and MLC models for this alpine region, with an overall accuracy of 75 % and a kappa coefficient of 0.64 verified against field point data and an overall accuracy of 65 % and a kappa of 0.52 verified against vegetation map data. The accuracy of regional vegetation modeling differed depending on the variable combinations and models, resulting in different classifications for specific vegetation groups.

  1. Slip localization on the southern Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, N. C.; Boulton, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Batt, G. E.; Toy, V. G.

    2013-06-01

    of a detailed field study of the southern onshore portion of New Zealand's Alpine Fault reveal that for 75 km along-strike, dextral-normal slip on this long-lived structure is highly localized in phyllosilicate-rich fault core gouges and along their contact with more competent rocks. At three localities (Martyr River, McKenzie Creek, and Hokuri Creek), we document complete cross sections through the fault. New 40Ar/39Ar dates on mylonites, combined with microstructural and mechanical data on phyllosilicate-rich fault core gouges show that modern slip is localized onto a single, steeply dipping 1 to 12 m-thick fault core composed of impermeable (k = 10-20 to 10-22 m2), frictionally weak (μs = 0.12-0.37), velocity-strengthening, illite-chlorite, and saponite-chlorite-lizardite fault gouges. Fault core materials are (1) comparable to those of other major weak-cored faults (e.g., San Andreas Fault) and (2) most compatible with fault creep, despite paleoseismic evidence of quasiperiodic large magnitude earthquakes (Mw > 7) on this portion of the Alpine Fault. We conclude that frictional properties of gouges at the surface do not characterize the overall seismogenic behavior of the southern Alpine Fault.

  2. Alpine biodiversity and assisted migration: The case of the American pika (Ochotona princeps)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkening, Jennifer L.; Ray, Chris; Ramsay, Nathan G.; Klingler, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Alpine mammals are predicted to be among the species most threatened by climate change, due to the projected loss and further fragmentation of alpine habitats. As temperature or precipitation regimes change, alpine mammals may also be faced with insurmountable barriers to dispersal. The slow rate or inability to adjust to rapidly shifting environmental conditions may cause isolated alpine species to become locally extirpated, resulting in reduced biodiversity. One proposed method for mitigating the impacts of alpine species loss is assisted migration. This method, which involves translocating a species to an area with more favourable climate and habitat characteristics, has become the subject of debate and controversy in the conservation community. The uncertainty associated with climate change projections, coupled with the thermal sensitivity of many alpine mammals, makes it difficult to a priori assess the efficacy of this technique as a conservation management tool. Here we present the American pika (Ochotona princeps) as a case study. American pikas inhabit rocky areas throughout the western US, and populations in some mountainous areas have become locally extirpated in recent years. We review known climatic and habitat requirements for this species, and also propose protocols designed to reliably identify favourable relocation areas. We present data related to the physiological constraints of this species and outline specific requirements which must be addressed for translocation of viable populations, including wildlife disease and genetic considerations. Finally, we discuss potential impacts on other alpine species and alpine communities, and overall implications for conserving alpine biodiversity in a changing climate.

  3. Historical pesticide applications coincided with an altered diet of aerially foraging insectivorous chimney swifts

    PubMed Central

    Nocera, Joseph J.; Blais, Jules M.; Beresford, David V.; Finity, Leah K.; Grooms, Christopher; Kimpe, Lynda E.; Kyser, Kurt; Michelutti, Neal; Reudink, Matthew W.; Smol, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous environmental pressures have precipitated long-term population reductions of many insect species. Population declines in aerially foraging insectivorous birds have also been detected, but the cause remains unknown partly because of a dearth of long-term monitoring data on avian diets. Chimney swifts (Chaetura pelagica) are a model aerial insectivore to fill such information gaps because their roosting behaviour makes them easy to sample in large numbers over long time periods. We report a 48-year-long (1944–1992) dietary record for the chimney swift, determined from a well-preserved deposit of guano and egested insect remains in Ontario (Canada). This unique archive of palaeo-environmental data reflecting past chimney swift diets revealed a steep rise in dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and metabolites, which were correlated with a decrease in Coleoptera remains and an increase in Hemiptera remains, indicating a significant change in chimney swift prey. We argue that DDT applications decimated Coleoptera populations and dramatically altered insect community structure by the 1960s, triggering nutritional consequences for swifts and other aerial insectivores. PMID:22513860

  4. THE 70 MONTH SWIFT-BAT ALL-SKY HARD X-RAY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, W. H.; Tueller, J.; Markwardt, C. B.; Skinner, G. K.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Evans, P. A.

    2013-08-15

    We present the catalog of sources detected in 70 months of observations with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) hard X-ray detector on the Swift gamma-ray burst observatory. The Swift-BAT 70 month survey has detected 1171 hard X-ray sources (more than twice as many sources as the previous 22 month survey) in the 14-195 keV band down to a significance level of 4.8{sigma}, associated with 1210 counterparts. The 70 month Swift-BAT survey is the most sensitive and uniform hard X-ray all-sky survey and reaches a flux level of 1.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 50% of the sky and 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} over 90% of the sky. The majority of new sources in the 70 month survey continue to be active galactic nuclei, with over 700 in the catalog. As part of this new edition of the Swift-BAT catalog, we also make available eight-channel spectra and monthly sampled light curves for each object detected in the survey in the online journal and at the Swift-BAT 70 month Web site.

  5. Swift J045106.8-694803: A Highly Magnetised Neutron Star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klus, H.; Bartlett, E. S.; Bird, A. J.; Coe, M.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Udalski, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the analysis of a highly magnetised neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The high mass X-ray binary pulsar Swift J045106.8-694803 has been observed with Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) in 2008, The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 2011 and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission - Newton (XMM-Newton) in 2012. The change in spin period over these four years indicates a spin-up rate of 5.010.06 s/yr, amongst the highest observed for an accreting pulsar. This spin-up rate can be accounted for using Ghosh and Lambs (1979) accretion theory assuming it has a magnetic field of (1.2 +/= 0.20/0.7) x 10(exp 14) Gauss. This is over the quantum critical field value. There are very few accreting pulsars with such high surface magnetic fields and this is the first of which to be discovered in the LMC. The large spin-up rate is consistent with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations which show that Swift J045106.8-694803 has had a consistently high X-ray luminosity for at least five years. Optical spectra have been used to classify the optical counterpart of Swift J045106.8-694803 as a B0-1 III-V star and a possible orbital period of 21.631 +/- 0.005 days has been found from MACHO optical photometry.

  6. The All-Sky Swift - INTEGRAL X-Ray Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter

    All-sky surveys at hard X-ray energies (above 15 keV) have proven to be a powerful technique in detecting Galactic and extragalactic source populations. Most of the radiation at hard X-ray energies originates in non-thermal processes. These processes take place in extreme conditions of gravitational fields, of electromagnetic field, and also in explosive events. Such extreme conditions can be found in the Milk Way in the vicinity of neutron stars, black holes, and supernovae. Also extragalactic sources are known to be hard X-ray emitters like Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), blazars, and Clusters of Galaxies. Currently the most sensitive flying hard X-ray detectors are the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board the NASA mission Swift and the INTEGRAL Soft-Gamma Ray Imager (IBIS/ISGRI) on board the ESA mission INTEGRAL. BAT and IBIS/ISGRI are coded- mask telescopes that shed continuously light on the Galactic and the extragalactic source populations. However, coded-mask telescopes suffer from heavy systematic effects (errors) preventing them from reaching their theoretical limiting sensitivity. Furthermore, by design, they block ~50% of the incident photons causing and increase of statistical noise. As a consequence BAT and IBIS/ISGRI are not sensitive enough to detect faint objects. In addition it has been proven that the Galactic survey of these instruments is limited by systematic uncertainties. Therefore, further observations on the Galactic plane will not improve the sensitivity of the survey of BAT and IBIS/ISGRI. In this project we show that it is possible to overcome the limits of BAT and of IBIS/ISGRI by combining their observations in the 18 55 keV energy range. We call it the SIX survey that stands for Swift - INTEGRAL X-ray survey. Two major advantages are obtained by merging the observations of BAT and IBIS/ISGRI: 1) the exposure is greatly enhanced (sum of BAT and IBIS/ISGRI) and therefore the sensitivity is improved; 2) the systematic errors of both

  7. Diversification of the Alpine Chipmunk, Tamias alpinus, an alpine endemic of the Sierra Nevada, California

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The glaciation cycles that occurred throughout the Pleistocene in western North America caused frequent shifts in species’ ranges with important implications for models of species divergence. For example, long periods of allopatry during species’ range contractions allowed for the accumulation of differences between separated populations promoting lineage divergence. In contrast, range expansions during interglacial periods may have had homogenizing effects via increased gene flow following secondary contact. These range dynamics are particularly pronounced in the Sierra Nevada, California, given the complex topography and climatic history of the area, thus providing a natural laboratory to examine evolutionary processes that have led to the diversity patterns observed today. Results Here we examined the role of late Pleistocene climate fluctuations on the divergence of the Sierra Nevada endemic Alpine Chipmunk (Tamias alpinus) from its sister taxon, western populations of the Least Chipmunk (T. minimus) from the Great Basin. We used one mitochondrial gene (cytochrome b) and 14 microsatellite loci to examine the evolutionary relationship between these species. Mitochondrial sequence data revealed that T. alpinus and T. minimus populations share mitochondrial haplotypes with no overall geneaological separation, and that diversity at this locus is better explained by geography than by species’ boundaries. In contrast, the microsatellite analysis showed that populations of the same species are more similar to each other than they are to members of the other species. Similarly, a morphological analysis of voucher specimens confirmed known differences in morphological characters between species providing no evidence of recent hybridization. Coalescent analysis of the divergence history indicated a late Pleistocene splitting time (~450 ka) and subsequent, though limited, gene flow between the two lineages. Conclusions Our results suggest that the two

  8. Fermi LAT Stacking Analysis of Swift Localized GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; von Kienlin, A.; Werner, M.; Wood, K. S.

    2016-05-01

    We perform a comprehensive stacking analysis of data collected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) of γ-ray bursts (GRBs) localized by the Swift spacecraft, which were not detected by the LAT but which fell within the instrument’s field of view at the time of trigger. We examine a total of 79 GRBs by comparing the observed counts over a range of time intervals to that expected from designated background orbits, as well as by using a joint likelihood technique to model the expected distribution of stacked counts. We find strong evidence for subthreshold emission at MeV to GeV energies using both techniques. This observed excess is detected during intervals that include and exceed the durations typically characterizing the prompt emission observed at keV energies and lasts at least 2700 s after the co-aligned burst trigger. By utilizing a novel cumulative likelihood analysis, we find that although a burst’s prompt γ-ray and afterglow X-ray flux both correlate with the strength of the subthreshold emission, the X-ray afterglow flux measured by Swift’s X-ray Telescope at 11 hr post trigger correlates far more significantly. Overall, the extended nature of the subthreshold emission and its connection to the burst’s afterglow brightness lend further support to the external forward shock origin of the late-time emission detected by the LAT. These results suggest that the extended high-energy emission observed by the LAT may be a relatively common feature but remains undetected in a majority of bursts owing to instrumental threshold effects.

  9. Elevation, Substrate, & Climate effects on Alpine & Sub-Alpine Plant Distribution in California & Nevada's High Mountains: Preliminary Data from the California and Nevada GLORIA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, A.; Millar, C.

    2014-12-01

    Documenting plant response to global climate change in sensitive zones, such as the alpine, is a major goal for global change biology. Basic information on alpine plant distribution by elevation and substrate provides a basis for anticipating which species may decline in a warming climate. The Global Observation Research Initiative in Alpine Environments (GLORIA) is a worldwide effort to document vegetation changes over time in alpine settings using permanent multi-summit plots. The California/Nevada group currently monitors seven permanent GLORIA target regions, composed of 29 summits in alpine and subalpine zones. Summits range in elevations from 2918m to 4325m on substrates including dolomite, granite, quartzite, and volcanics. High-resolution plant occurrence and cover data from the upper 10 meters of each summit are presented. Plants from our target regions can be divided into three groups: summit specialists found only on the highest peaks, alpine species found predominantly within the alpine zone, and broadly distributed species found in the alpine zone and below. Rock substrate and microsite soil development have a strong influence on plant communities and species richness. We present the first set of five-year resurvey and temperature data from 18 summits. We have documented some annual variation in species presence/absence at almost all sites, but no dramatic changes in total diversity. Consistent with the expectation of rising global temperatures, our soil temperature loggers have documented temperature increases at most of our sites. These data are a baseline for assessing bioclimatic shifts and future plant composition in California and Nevada's alpine zone.

  10. Seven years with the Swift Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, P.

    2015-09-01

    Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXTs) are HMXBs with OB supergiant companions. I review the results of the Swift SFXT project, which since 2007 has been exploiting Swift's capabilities in a systematic study of SFXTs and supergiant X-ray binaries (SGXBs) by combining follow-ups of outbursts, when detailed broad-band spectroscopy is possible, with long-term monitoring campaigns, when the out-of-outburst fainter states can be observed. This strategy has led us to measure their duty cycles as a function of luminosity, to extract their differential luminosity distributions in the soft X-ray domain, and to compare, with unprecedented detail, the X-ray variability in these different classes of sources. I also discuss the "seventh year crisis", the challenges that the recent Swift observations are making to the prevailing models attempting to explain the SFXT behavior.

  11. VERITAS Observations of the Unusual Extragalactic Transient Swift J164449.3+573451

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Böttcher, M.; Bouvier, A.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Errando, M.; Falcone, A.; Finley, J. P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Griffin, S.; Grube, J.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Huan, H.; Hughes, G.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Madhavan, A. S.; Maier, G.; Majumdar, P.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Orr, M.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Perkins, J. S.; Pichel, A.; Pohl, M.; Prokoph, H.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reyes, L. C.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Ruppel, J.; Saxon, D. B.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Skole, C.; Smith, A. W.; Staszak, D.; Tešić, G.; Theiling, M.; Thibadeau, S.; Tsurusaki, K.; Tyler, J.; Varlotta, A.; Vincent, S.; Vivier, M.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    We report on very high energy (>100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of Swift J164449.3+573451, an unusual transient object first detected by the Swift Observatory and later detected by multiple radio, optical, and X-ray observatories. A total exposure of 28 hr was obtained on Swift J164449.3+573451 with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) during 2011 March 28-April 15. We do not detect the source and place a differential upper limit on the emission at 500 GeV during these observations of 1.4 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 (99% confidence level). We also present time-resolved upper limits and use a flux limit averaged over the X-ray flaring period to constrain various emission scenarios that can accommodate both the radio-through-X-ray emission detected from the source and the lack of detection by VERITAS.

  12. Continued X-ray Monitoring of Magnetar Candidate SWIFT J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Livingstone, M. A.; Kaspi, V. M.

    2011-08-01

    We report on Swift/XRT and RXTE/PCA observations of the new 8.4-s Galactic magnetar candidate SWIFT J1822.3-1606, also referred to as SGR J1822.3-1606 (ATELs #3488, #3489, #3490, #3493, #3495, #3496, #3501, #3503, #3543). The persistent X-ray flux from the source continues to fade in ongoing XRT monitoring observations. For data in the MJD range 55757 to 55781, the best-fit power-law index, alpha, for the decay of the absorbed 1-10 keV flux is -0.47 ± 0.02, assuming a decay of functional form F(t) = F0 + F0*(t-T)^alpha, where T is the epoch of the Swift/BAT trigger (ATEL #3488).

  13. X-RAY AFTERGLOW OF SWIFT J1644+57: A COMPTON ECHO?

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K. S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Ko, C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Swift, Chandra, and XMM have found a weak but nearly constant X-ray component from Swift J1644+57 that appeared at ∼500 days and was visible at least until ∼1400 days after the stellar capture, which cannot be explained by standard tidal disruption theories. We suggest that this X-ray afterglow component may result from the Thomson scattering between the primary X-rays and its surrounding plasma, i.e., a Compton echo effect. Similar phenomena have also been observed from molecular clouds in our Galactic Center, which were caused by the past activity of Srg A*. If this interpretation of Swift J1644+57 afterglow is correct, this is the first Compton Echo effect observed in the cosmological distances.

  14. Swift, INTEGRAL, RXTE, and Spitzer Reveal IGR J16283-4838

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, V.; Gehrels, N.; Markwardt, C.; Barthelmy S.; Soldi, S.; Paizis, A.; Mowlavi, N.; Kennca, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Chester, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the first combined study of the recently discovered source IGR J16283-4838 with Swift, INTEGRAL, and RXTE. The source, discovered by INTEGRAL on April 7, 2005, shows a highly absorbed (variable N(sub H) = 0.4-1.7 x 10(exp 23) /sq cm) and flat (Gamma approx. 1) spectrum in the Swift/XRT and RXTE/PCA data. No optical counterpart is detectable (V > 20 mag), but a possible infrared counterpart within the Swift/XRT error radius is detected in the 2MASS and Spitzer/GLIMPSE survey. The observations suggest that IGR J16283-4838 is a high mass X-ray binary containing a neutron star embedded in Compton thick material. This makes IGR J16283-4838 a member of the class of highly absorbed HMXBs, discovered by INTEGRAL.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of swift heavy ion induced defect recovery in SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Backman, Marie; Toulemonde, Marcel; Pakarinen, Olli H; Juslin, Niklas; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Debelle, Aurelien; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.Swift heavy ions induce a high density of electronic excitations that can cause the formation of amorphous ion tracks in insulators. No ion tracks have been observed in the semiconductor SiC, but recent experimental work suggests that irradiation damaged SiC can undergo defect recovery under swift heavy ion irradiation. It is believed that local heating of the lattice due to the electronic energy deposition can anneal, and thereby recover, some of the disordered structure. We simulate the local heating due to the ions by the inelastic thermal spike model and perform molecular dynamics simulations of dierent model damage states to study the defect recovery on an atomistic level. We find significant recovery of point defects and a disordered layer, as well as recrystallization at the amorphous-to-crystalline interface of an amorphous layer. The simulation results support the swift heavy ion annealing hypothesis.

  16. The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey. II. Cluster Confirmation with SDSS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-01-01

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ˜85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev-Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  17. On the Redshift Distribution of Gamma-ray Bursts in the SWIFT ERA: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Vedant; Le, Truong V.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are brief flashes of gamma-rays occurring at an average rate of a few per day throughout the universe, and it is generally assumed that GRB follows star formation rate. The ultimate energy source of a GRB is believed to be associated with an exploding star that is in a process of forming a black hole, and a high amount of energy is expected to be released during this process. Evidence of jetted GRBs (jet opening-angle) can also be observed from radio and optical observations of achromatic breaks in the afterglow light curves. Two different redshift (z) distributions were observed from different space observatories, the Swift and preSwift missions, however, the jet opening-angle distribution was determined only by the pre-Swift satellites prior to 2007. Le & Dermer (2007) developed a flat GRB spectrum model for long-duration GRBs to fit the redshift (z) and the jet openingangle distributions measured with earlier GRB missions, and showed that GRBs do not follow star formation rate. However, their fitted results were obtained without using the opening-angle distribution from the Swift sample. In this study we revisited the calculation done by Le & Dermer by refitting the redshift and the jet openingangle distribution measured from both pre-Swift and Swift satellites. We further explored how the broken power-law GRB spectrum affect the overall fitting of the redshift and the jet opening-angle distributions, and the results will be presented in this paper.

  18. Historical range, current distribution, and conservation status of the Swift Fox, Vulpes velox, in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sovada, Marsha A.; Woodward, Robert O.; Igl, Lawrence D.

    2009-01-01

    The Swift Fox (Vulpes velox) was once common in the shortgrass and mixed-grass prairies of the Great Plains of North America. The species' abundance declined and its distribution retracted following European settlement of the plains. By the late 1800s, the species had been largely extirpated from the northern portion of its historical range, and its populations were acutely depleted elsewhere. Swift Fox populations have naturally recovered somewhat since the 1950s, but overall abundance and distribution remain below historical levels. In a 1995 assessment of the species' status under the US Endangered Species Act, the US Fish and Wildlife Service concluded that a designation of threatened or endangered was warranted, but the species was "precluded from listing by higher listing priorities." A major revelation of the 1995 assessment was the recognition that information useful for determining population status was limited. Fundamental information was missing, including an accurate estimate of the species' distribution before European settlement and an estimate of the species' current distribution and trends. The objectives of this paper are to fill those gaps in knowledge. Historical records were compiled and, in combination with knowledge of the habitat requirements of the species, the historical range of the Swift Fox is estimated to be approximately 1.5 million km2. Using data collected between 2001 and 2006, the species' current distribution is estimated to be about 44% of its historical range in the United States and 3% in Canada. Under current land use, approximately 39% of the species' historical range contains grassland habitats with very good potential for Swift Fox occupation and another 10% supports grasslands with characteristics that are less preferred (e.g., a sparse shrub component or taller stature) but still suitable. Additionally, land use on at least 25% of the historical range supports dryland farming, which can be suitable for Swift Fox

  19. Historical range, current distribution, and conservation status of the Swift Fox, Vulpes velox, in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sovada, M.A.; Woodward, R.O.; Igl, L.D.

    2009-01-01

    The Swift Fox (Vulpes velox) was once common in the shortgrass and mixed-grass prairies of the Great Plains of NorthAmerica. The species' abundance declined and its distribution retracted following European settlement of the plains. By the late 1800s, the species had been largely extirpated from the northern portion of its historical range, and its populations were acutely depleted elsewhere. Swift Fox populations have naturally recovered somewhat since the 1950s, but overall abundance and distribution remain below historical levels. In a 1995 assessment of the species' status under the US Endangered Species Act, the US Fish and Wildlife Service concluded that a designation of threatened or endangered was warranted, but the species was "precluded from listing by higher listing priorities." A major revelation of the 1995 assessment was the recognition that information useful for determining population status was limited. Fundamental information was missing, including an accurate estimate of the species' distribution before European settlement and an estimate of the species' current distribution and trends. The objectives of this paper are to fill those gaps in knowledge. Historical records were compiled and, in combination with knowledge of the habitat requirements of the species, the historical range of the Swift Fox is estimated to be approximately 1.5 million km2. Using data collected between 2001 and 2006, the species' current distribution is estimated to be about 44% of its historical range in the United States and 3% in Canada. Under current land use, approximately 39% of the species' historical range contains grassland habitats with very good potential for Swift Fox occupation and another 10% supports grasslands with characteristics that are less preferred (e.g., a sparse shrub component or taller stature) but still suitable. Additionally, land use on at least 25% of the historical range supports dryland farming, which can be suitable for Swift Fox occupation

  20. RXTE Detection of the Spin Period of Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogus, Ersin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Strohmayer, Tod

    2011-07-01

    RXTE/PCA observed the new source, Swift J1822.3-1606 (Cummings et al. GCN Circ. 12159) on 2011 July 16, for 6.7 ks. We performed a timing analysis on the barycentered data and detected a coherent pulsation at 0.1185149(2) Hz corresponding to 8.4377585 s. Pulsations are clearly visible in the PCA light curve. The peak-to-peak pulsed amplitude in the 2-10 keV band is 0.41. This pulsed fraction is highly unlikely from an SGR source, and very reminiscent of the outburst onset of Swift J1626.6-5156 (Palmer et al.

  1. Swift J1822.3-1606: A Probable New SGR in Ground Analysis of BAT Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, J. R.; Burrows, D.; Campana, S.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Palmer, D. M.; Sakamoto, T.; Zan, S.

    2011-07-01

    At 2011-07-14 at 12:47:47.1 UTC, Swift-BAT triggered (#457261) on a previously unknown source, Swift J1822.3-1606. This was at the same time as Fermi-GBM trigger #332340476. Only a subthreshold source was detected onboard. There were two subsequent rate increases of similar size, probably from the same source at about T+26 sec and T+308 sec, the latter also causing a rate trigger with no significant source found onboard (#457263).

  2. The swift fox in rangeland and cropland in western Kansas: Relative abundance, mortality, and body size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matlack, R.S.; Gipson, P.S.; Kaufman, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    We assessed suitability of cropland and shortgrass rangeland for swift foxes (Vulpes velox) in western Kansas. Relative abundance and survival were similar for foxes in rangeland and cropland. Mortality resulting from non-traumatic causes, coyotes, and motor vehicles differed significantly between habitats. Predation by coyotes, motor vehicles, and non-traumatic causes were responsible for 45%, 36%, and 18%, respectively, of 11 deaths in rangeland and 20%, 10%, and 70%, respectively, of 10 deaths in cropland. Swift foxes in rangeland were larger and in better condition than those in cropland. Males were larger than females based on mass, standardized mass (mass/body length), body length, hindfoot length, and ear length.

  3. Acoustic Noise Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine in Boulder, CO

    SciTech Connect

    Roadman, J.; Huskey, A.

    2013-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of an acoustic noise test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 11: Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques, IEC 61400-11 Ed.2.1, 2006-11. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine, as defined by IEC, NREL used 10-second averages instead of 60-second averages and utilized binning by wind speed instead of regression analysis.

  4. Swift J055137.6-381713: a probable new X-ray transient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Osborne, J. P.; Kennea, J. A.; Page, K. L.

    2016-03-01

    In Swift-XRT observations beginning at 18:30:15UT on 2016 March 22, a previously uncatalogued X-ray source was serendipitously detected. The source, designated Swift J055137.6-381713, is located at: RA (J2000) = 05h 51m 37.63s = 87.9068 deg Dec (J2000) = -38d 17' 13.7" = 38.2871 deg with an uncertainty of 4.1 arcsec (radius, 90% confidence) No X-ray source near this position is found in the X-ray Master catalogue provided by HEASARC.

  5. SWIFT J195509.6+261406 / GRB 070610: A Potential Galactic Transient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, C. B.; Pagani, C.; Evans, P.; Gavriil, F. P.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Landsman, W.; Marshall, F. E.

    2007-06-01

    On 06 June 2007 20:52:26 UTC, the Swift BAT instrument detected a transient outburst of gamma-rays (originally designated GRB 070610; Pagani et al. GCN #6489), which may in fact be a galactic X-ray transient. The source, now also designated SWIFT J195509.6+261406, has the potential to be similar to the supergiant fast X-ray transient V4641 Sgr. The gamma-ray light curve had a single "FRED"-like profile, lasting about 8 seconds total, which is common for gamma-ray bursts.

  6. Possible Detection of SN 2007pk in X-Rays with Swift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immler, S.; Pooley, D.; Brown, P. J.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2007-11-01

    Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observed the type-IIn SN 2007pk (CBET #1129, ATel #1271) on 2007-11-13.09, 2007-11-14.04, 2007-11-15.44, and 2007-11-16.04 UT. A bright X-ray source is detected at the position of the SN within a 10 image pixel (23.5-arcsec) aperture centered on the SN, which includes the nucleus of the host galaxy NGC 579 (8-arcsec offset from the SN) in the merged 7.3 ks Swift XRT observations.

  7. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-01

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and 60Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and 60Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  8. Damage correlations in semiconductor devices exposed to gamma and high energy swift heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2015-05-15

    NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs are irradiated by different high energy swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad to 100 Mrad. The damage created by different heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma radiation in NPN rf power transistors and N-channel depletion MOSFETs have been correlated and studied in the same dose range. The recoveries in the electrical characteristics of different swift heavy ions and {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated devices have been studied after annihilation.

  9. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Timing analysis can be a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and, more in general, to investigate the dominant variability timescales in astrophysical sources. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties involved, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature thus far. Aims: We aim at characterising the individual PDS of GRBs to describe their variability in terms of a stochastic process, to explore their variety, and to carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between PDS properties and other GRB observables. Methods: We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study the individual PDS of 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope in the 15-150 keV band from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Results: Two classes of GRBs emerge: with or without a unique dominant timescale. A comparison with active galactic nuclei (AGNs) reveals similar distributions of PDS slopes. Unexpectedly, GRBs with subsecond-dominant timescales and duration longer than a few tens of seconds in the source frame appear to be either very rare or altogether absent. Three GRBs are found with possible evidence for a periodic signal at 3.0-3.2σ (Gaussian) significance, corresponding to a multi-trial chance probability of ~1%. Thus, we found no compelling evidence for periodic signal in GRBs. Conclusions: The analogy between the PDS of GRBs and of AGNs could tentatively indicate similar stochastic processes that rule BH accretion across different BH mass scales and objects

  10. Monitoring of RU Peg requested for Swift observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2012-06-01

    Dr. Koji Mukai (Universities Space Research Association/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) has requested AAVSO observers' assistance in monitoring the SS Cyg-type dwarf nova RU Peg in support of target-of-opportunity observations with the NASA Swift satellite during an outburst. His observations will be targeted during the rise to outburst and during late decline from outburst. Thus, your prompt notification to AAVSO Headquarters of activity in RU Peg will be crucial to the success of this campaign. Dr. Mukai writes: "In the famous AAVSO/EUVE/RXTE campaign on SS Cyg (Mattei et al. 2000JAVSO..28..160M), the hard X-ray flux went up (with a delay) during the rise, then suddenly dropped; there was a corresponding flux enhancement episode during the decline. We know that, during the peak of the outburst, many dwarf novae are hard X-ray fainter than in quiescence (with a few exceptions, like U Gem). However, the hard X-ray enhancement episodes seen in SS Cyg have never been obs! erved in other dwarf novae. We have proposed a hypothesis that this is related to the mass of the accreting white dwarf; only dwarf novae with a relatively massive white dwarf show the hard X-ray enhancement. If that's true, we may well see similar enhancement in RU Peg, which is thought to have a massive white dwarf. Even if this hypothesis is completely wrong, RU Peg is a good target for an SS Cyg-like campaign, since it's X-ray bright during quiescence." Visual and CCD observations (filtered preferred to unfiltered) are appropriate for this campaign. Observers are requested to monitor RU Peg duning minimum, throughout the next outburst, and after return to minimym, and report their observations in a timely manner. If RU Peg appears to be brightening from minimum, please report your observations immediately to the AAVSO. If it is brighter than magnitude 12.3, please also send an email report to Elizabeth Waagen (eowaagen@aavso.org) and Matthew Templeton (matthewt@aavso.org). Please be aware that

  11. 78 FR 50087 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Alpine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... the Alpine Satellite Development Plan for the Proposed Greater Mooses Tooth Unit Development Project... being prepared for the limited purpose of supplementing the Alpine Satellite Development Plan (ASDP) Final EIS, dated September 2004, regarding the establishment of satellite oil production pads...

  12. SGR 1822-1606 (Swift J1822.3-1606): X-ray spectrum and refined spin period from Swift XRT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, P.; Rea, N.; Israel, G. L.

    2011-07-01

    We have analysed 1.6 ks s of Photon Counting (PC) XRT data of the new SGR/magnetar candidate Swift J1822.3-1606 (Cummings et al. GCN #12159), including the first 0.6 ks on which Pagani et al. reported in GCN #12163. We found that the source spectrum is well described by a power-law plus blackbody model, modified for the interstellar absorption (reduced chi-squared = 1.04 for 97 degrees of freedom).

  13. Alpine Snow Cover - Water Resources in Arid Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czyzowska, E. H.; Van Leeuwen, W. J.; Hirschboeck, K. K.; Wisniewski, W. T.; Marsh, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    There is an undisputed need to increase accuracy of snow cover estimation in regions of complex terrain, especially in areas dependent on winter snow accumulation for a substantial portion of their water supply, such as the Western United States, Central Asia, and the Andes. Presently, the most pertinent monitoring and research needs related to alpine snow cover extent (SCE) are: (1) to improve SCE monitoring by providing detailed fractional snow cover (FSC) products which perform well in temporal/spatial heterogeneous forested and/or alpine terrains; (2) to provide accurate measurements of FSC at the watershed scale for use in snow water equivalent (SWE) estimation for regional water management; (3) to provide detailed distributions of FSC in mountainous regions to investigate the temporal/spatial distribution of SCE/SWE in relation to recent climate changes; (4) to use FSC products as input for climate models at multiple scales; and (5) to estimate SCE and SWE for use in ecological studies (e.g., vegetation cover, water stress, primary production, fire, insect outbreaks, and pulses in tree demography). To address the above our approach is based on Landsat/MODIS Fractional Snow Cover (LandsatFSC, ModisFSC), as a measure of the temporal/spatial distribution of alpine SCE. We used a fusion methodology between remotely sensed multispectral data from Landsat TM/ETM+/MODIS and Ikonos utilized at their highest respective spatial resolutions. Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are used to capture the multi-scale information structure of the data by means of the ANN training process, followed by the ANN extracting FSC from all available information in the Landsat images. The LandsatFSC/ModisFSC algorithms were validated (RMSE ~ 0.09; mean error ~ 0.001-0.01 FSC) in watersheds characterized by diverse environmental factors such as: terrain, slope, exposition, vegetation cover, and wide-ranging snow cover conditions.

  14. A molecular phylogeny of Alpine subterranean Trechini (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Alpine region harbours one of the most diverse subterranean faunas in the world, with many species showing extreme morphological modifications. The ground beetles of tribe Trechini (Coleoptera, Carabidae) are among the best studied and widespread groups with abundance of troglobionts, but their origin and evolution is largely unknown. Results We sequenced 3.4 Kb of mitochondrial (cox1, rrnL, trnL, nad1) and nuclear (SSU, LSU) genes of 207 specimens of 173 mostly Alpine species, including examples of all subterranean genera but two plus a representation of epigean taxa. We applied Bayesian methods and maximum likelihood to reconstruct the topology and to estimate divergence times using a priori rates obtained for a related ground beetle genus. We found three main clades of late Eocene-early Oligocene origin: (1) the genus Doderotrechus and relatives; (2) the genus Trechus sensu lato, with most anisotopic subterranean genera, including the Pyrenean lineage and taxa from the Dinaric Alps; and (3) the genus Duvalius sensu lato, diversifying during the late Miocene and including all subterranean isotopic taxa. Most of the subterranean genera had an independent origin and were related to epigean taxa of the same geographical area, but there were three large monophyletic clades of exclusively subterranean species: the Pyrenean lineage, a lineage including subterranean taxa from the eastern Alps and the Dinarides, and the genus Anophthalmus from the northeastern Alps. Many lineages have developed similar phenotypes independently, showing extensive morphological convergence or parallelism. Conclusions The Alpine Trechini do not form a homogeneous fauna, in contrast with the Pyrenees, and show a complex scenario of multiple colonisations of the subterranean environment at different geological periods and through different processes. Examples go from populations of an epigean widespread species going underground with little morphological modifications to

  15. Microbial biodiversity in Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radax, C.; Wieland, H.; Pfaffenhuemer, M.; Leuko, S.; Rittmann, S.; Weidler, G.; Gruber, C.; Stan-Lotter, H.

    2003-04-01

    Alpine Permo-Triassic rock salt (age 200-250 million years) was shown several times to contain living extremely halophilic Archaea. These organisms might stem from ancient populations that became entrapped and persisted in the rock salt since then. For this reason, rock salt is considered a promising model system for the search for bacterial extraterrestrial life. In our studies on biodiversity in Alpine rock salt, we employed both culture-dependent and culture-independent, PCR-based methods. The latter approach indicated the presence of at least 12 distinct sequence types (phylotypes) in our samples, all of which belonged to the extremely halophilic Archaea. None of the recovered sequences was identical to sequences from databases, suggesting the avoidance of contaminants during experimental procedures. Two phylotypes could be assigned to taxonomically described members of this family; the remaining ten phylotypes appeared only remotely related to known genera of the extremely halophilic Archaea. In contrast, attempts to isolate organisms from the same sample on 15 different growth media so far yielded only two groups of isolates that could be differentiated based on their 16S rRNA genes. One group was very similar to Halococcus strains that we frequently isolated from Alpine rock salt; the other group was closely correlated to one of our novel phylotypes. Analyses of whole cell protein patterns allowed to further differentiate the latter group into two different subgroups that could not be distinguished at the molecular level. These results show that both culture-dependent and culture-independent strategies have to be applied in order to obtain a more complete view of microbial biodiversity in Permo-Triassic rock salt: culture-independent methods yield information on the gross microbial diversity in rock salt, whereas subtle differences can currently only be registered between cultivated strains.

  16. Warming Contracts Flowering Phenology in an Alpine Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabis, M. D.; Winkler, D. E.; Kueppers, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    In alpine ecosystems where temperature increases associated with anthropogenic climate change are likely to be amplified, the flowering phenology of plants may be particularly sensitive to changes in environmental signals. For example, earlier snowmelt and higher temperature have been found to be important factors driving plant emergence and onset of flowering. However, few studies have examined the interactive role of soil moisture in response to warming. Using infrared heating to actively warm plots crossed with manual watering over the growing season in a moist alpine meadow at Niwot Ridge, Colorado, our preliminary results indicate that community-level phenology (length of flowering time across all species) was contracted with heating but was unaffected by watering. At the species level, additional water extended the length of the flowering season by one week for almost half (43%) of species. Heating, which raised plant and surface soil temperatures (+1.5 C) advanced snowmelt by ~7.6 days days and reduced soil moisture by ~2%, advanced flowering phenology for 86% of species. The response of flowering phenology to combined heating and watering was predominantly a heating effect. However, watering did appear to mitigate advances in end of flowering for 22% of species. The length of flowering season, for some species, appears to be tied, in part, to moisture availability as alleviating ambient soil moisture stress delayed phenology in unheated plots. Therefore, we conclude that both temperature and moisture appear to be important factors driving flowering phenology in this alpine ecosystem. The relationship between flowering phenology and species- or community-level productivity is not well established, but heating advanced community peak productivity by 5.4 days, and also reduced peak productivity unless additional water was provided, indicating some consistency between drivers of productivity and drivers of flowering phenology.

  17. 3D cartographic modeling of the Alpine arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vouillamoz, Naomi; Sue, Christian; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Calcagno, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    We built a 3D cartography of the Alpine arc, a highly non-cylindrical mountain belt, using the 3D GeoModeller of the BRGM (French geological survey). The model allows to handle the large-scale 3D structure of seventeen major crustal units of the belt (from the lower crust to the sedimentary cover nappes), and two main discontinuities (the Insubric Line and the Crustal Penninic Front). It provides a unique document to better understand their structural relationships and to produce new sections. The study area comprises the western Alpine arc, from the Jura to the Northwest, up to the Bergell granite intrusion and the Lepontine Dome to the East, and is limited to the South by the Ligurian basin. The model is limited vertically 10 km above sea level at the top, and the moho interface at the bottom. We discarded the structural relationships between the Alps sensus stricto and the surrounding geodynamic systems such as the Rhine graben or the connection with the Apennines. The 3D-model is based on the global integration of various data such as the DEM of the Alps, the moho isobaths, the simplified geological and tectonic maps of the belt, the crustal cross-sections ECORS-CROP and NFP-20, and complementary cross-sections specifically built to precise local complexities. The database has first been integrated in a GIS-project to prepare their implementation in the GeoModeller, by homogenizing the different spatial referencing systems. The global model is finally interpolated from all these data, using the potential field method. The final document is a new tri-dimensional cartography that would be used as input for further alpine studies.

  18. Protection of large alpine infrastructures against natural hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Scheikl, Manfred; Hergarten, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Large infrastructures in alpine domains are threatened by a variety of natural hazards like debris flows, rock falls and snow avalanches. Especially linear infrastructure including roads, railway lines, pipe lines and power lines passes through the entire mountain range and the impact of natural hazards can be expected along a distance over hundreds of kilometers. New infrastructure projects like storage power plants or ski resorts including access roads are often located in remote alpine domains without any historical record of hazardous events. Mitigation strategies against natural hazards require a detailed analysis on the exposure of the infrastructure to natural hazards. Following conventional concepts extensive mapping and documentation of surface processes over hundreds to several thousand km² of steep alpine domain is essential but can be hardly performed. We present a case study from the Austrian Alps to demonstrate the ability of a multi-level concept to describe the impact of natural hazards on infrastructure by an iterative process. This includes new state of the art numerical models, modern field work and GIS-analysis with an increasing level of refinement at each stage. A set of new numerical models for rock falls, debris flows and snow avalanches was designed to operate with information from field in different qualities and spatial resolutions. Our analysis starts with simple and fast cellular automata for rockfalls and debrisflows to show the exposure of the infrastructure to natural hazards in huge domains and detects "high risk areas" that are investigated in more detail in field in the next refinement level. Finally, sophisticated 2D- depth averaged fluid dynamic models for all kinds of rapid mass movements are applied to support the development of protection structures.

  19. Dynamics and structure of the Alpine Fold Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahle, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    The structure and present-day dynamics of the Alps interms of geodesy and gravimetry are discusssed. A strong correlation of precise leveling and isostatic gravity along the central Alpine chain, especially in Canton Graubunden, East Switzerland are shown. It is assumed that the uplift is partly controlled by isostatic rebound effects. Field observations indicate that these phenomena are still active in the Alps. The study of the uplift processes by applying a number of geodetic and gravimetric measuring techniques, such as the determination of nonperiodic secular variations of gravity, of the deflections of the vertical and tilt changes monitored by hydrostatic leveling is proposed.

  20. Rethinking Equality of Opportunity: Comment on Adam Swift's "How Not to Be a Hypocrite"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Adam Swift objects to private schools on the grounds of equal opportunity and efficiency, and to both private and selective public schools on the grounds of solidarity and improving the academic achievement of less advantaged students. I argue that private schools are not inefficient, and that a meritocratic ideal of equality of opportunity in…

  1. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 FRONT ELEVATION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 FRONT ELEVATION, DETAIL OF FENCE AND BELL - Shaker Ministry's Shop, West of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, Northwest edge of church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  2. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 REAR AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 REAR AND SIDE ELEVATIONS, MEETINGHOUSE ON RIGHT - Shaker Ministry's Shop, West of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, Northwest edge of church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  3. 17. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 REAR ELEVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 REAR ELEVATION AND SIDE ELEVATION WITH STAIR TOWER - Sabbathday Lake Shaker Community Meetinghouse, West of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, northwest edge of church family area, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  4. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on swifts (Apodiformes: Apodidae) in Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tolesano-Pascoli, Graziela; Garcia, Frederico Innecco; Gomes, Carla Raphaela Gonzaga; Diniz, Kátia Cristina; Onofrio, Valeria Castilho; Venzal, José Manuel; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan

    2014-10-01

    Brazil harbors five species of Cypseloidinae swifts. Those from Streptoprocne and Cypseloides genera have a very distinct ecology. They shelter at night and build nests in moist cliffs by waterfalls. Information about tick infestation of these birds is virtually non-existent and restricted to the description of a new species, Ixodes paranaensis, in Streptoprocne biscutata in Paraná State and another record of this species in Streptoprocne zonaris in Minas Gerais State. We herein report tick infestation of swifts at eight waterfalls in the Cerrado biome of Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil. Swifts were captured during six campaigns from November 2008 to April 2013. Overall, 584 swifts were captured (527 C. senex, four C. fumigatus and 53 S. zonaris). Four birds were tick infested (prevalence of 0.7 %). Three individuals of C. senex hosted one tick each; a nymph of I. paranaensis, a female of I. paranaensis and a nymph of Amblyomma cajennense. One S. zonaris hosted an I. paranaensis nymph and an Ornithodoros sp. larva (Argasidae). PMID:24696361

  5. Intensity Distribution and Luminosity Function of the Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu

    2009-05-01

    Using the sample of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by Swift-BAT before 2007 June, we measure the cumulative distribution of the peak photon fluxes (log N-log P) of the Swift bursts. Compared with the BATSE sample, we find that the two distributions are consistent after correcting the bandpass difference, suggesting that the two instruments sample the same population of bursts. We also compare the log N-log P distributions for subsamples of the Swift bursts and find evidence for a deficit (99.75% confident) of dark bursts without optical counterparts at high peak flux levels, suggesting different redshift or γ-ray luminosity distributions for these bursts. The consistency between the log N-log P distributions for the optically detected bursts with and without redshift measurements indicates that the current sample of the Swift bursts with redshift measurements, although selected heterogeneously, represents a fair sample of the nondark bursts. We calculate the luminosity functions of this sample in two redshift bins (z < 1 and z >= 1), and find that a broken power law is needed to fit the low-redshift bin, where dN/dL vprop L -1.27±0.06 for high luminosities (L peak > 5 × 1048 ergs-1) and dN/dL vprop L -2.3±0.3 for low luminosities, confirming the results of several studies for a population of low-luminosity GRBs.

  6. Swift detection of a SGR burst from PSR 1119-6127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennea, J. A.; Lien, A. Y.; Marshall, F. E.; Palmer, D. M.; Roegiers, T. G. R.; Sbarufatti, B.

    2016-07-01

    We are cross posting this from GCN Circular #19735 as it may be of interest to the broader community. At 01:27:51 UT, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) triggered and located PSR J1119-6127 (trigger=706396).

  7. SWIFT/BAT possible detection of a new outburst from Aql X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, A.; Riggio, A.; Pintore, F.; Altamirano, D.; Burderi, L.; Di Salvo, T.

    2016-07-01

    The Swift/BAT X-ray monitor observed significant X-ray activity from the direction of the accreting millisecond X-ray pulsar Aql X-1 starting on 2016 July 29 (MJD 57598), with a count rate of 0.0011 +/- 0.003 counts/s/cm^2.

  8. Early On-Orbit Operation of the Loop Heat Pipe System on the Swift BAT Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; Ku, Jentung; Choi, Mike; Feenan, Dave

    2005-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is one of three instruments on the Swift satellite. Two Loop Heat Pipes (LHP's), one at either side of the BAT's Detector Array Plate (DAP), transfer heat to a common radiator for rejection to space. This viewgraph presentation provides information on LHP design for the BAT, and the performance of the LHPs in orbit.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Swift GRBs individual power density spectra (Guidorzi+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidorzi, C.; Dichiara, S.; Amati, L.

    2016-03-01

    Time intervals, redshifts, best-fit parameters of the power density spectra (PDS) for 215 bright long GRBs observed with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) from January 2005 to May 2015. Parameters refer to two alternative PDS models: either a power-law (PL) or a bent power-law (BPL) plus a constant background. (5 data files).

  10. Determination of the true nature of Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2010-09-01

    Swift J1822.3-1606 was detected with the BAT during a ground search of the data; it also triggered the Fermi/GBM when it emitted a series of ~5 Soft Gamma Repeater like X-ray bursts, each one lasting ~ 5 ms. We observed the persistent emission of the source with the RXTE/PCA and confirmed the pulse period of 8.4377585 s. Moreover, we determined a very high pulsed fraction of the signal of at least 41%. This pulsed fraction is highly unlikely for an SGR. The source could well be another Swift J1626.6-5156 (most likely a Be-X-ray binary) or alternatively, another rotation powered pulsar like PSR J1846-0258, which was detected to emit SGR-like bursts. The latter option was the first of its kind linking high B-field pulsars to SGRs. We are seeking CXO/HRC observations of Swift J1822.3-1606 to determine the most accurate source location, which will enable us to identify the source counterpart in this congested region. The current positional accuracy with Swift XRT is 3.5".

  11. Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) on swifts (Apodiformes: Apodidae) in Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tolesano-Pascoli, Graziela; Garcia, Frederico Innecco; Gomes, Carla Raphaela Gonzaga; Diniz, Kátia Cristina; Onofrio, Valeria Castilho; Venzal, José Manuel; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan

    2014-10-01

    Brazil harbors five species of Cypseloidinae swifts. Those from Streptoprocne and Cypseloides genera have a very distinct ecology. They shelter at night and build nests in moist cliffs by waterfalls. Information about tick infestation of these birds is virtually non-existent and restricted to the description of a new species, Ixodes paranaensis, in Streptoprocne biscutata in Paraná State and another record of this species in Streptoprocne zonaris in Minas Gerais State. We herein report tick infestation of swifts at eight waterfalls in the Cerrado biome of Minas Gerais State, southeastern Brazil. Swifts were captured during six campaigns from November 2008 to April 2013. Overall, 584 swifts were captured (527 C. senex, four C. fumigatus and 53 S. zonaris). Four birds were tick infested (prevalence of 0.7 %). Three individuals of C. senex hosted one tick each; a nymph of I. paranaensis, a female of I. paranaensis and a nymph of Amblyomma cajennense. One S. zonaris hosted an I. paranaensis nymph and an Ornithodoros sp. larva (Argasidae).

  12. Negotiating an ecological barrier: crossing the Sahara in relation to winds by common swifts.

    PubMed

    Åkesson, Susanne; Bianco, Giuseppe; Hedenström, Anders

    2016-09-26

    The Sahara Desert is one of the largest land-based barriers on the Earth, crossed twice each year by billions of birds on migration. Here we investigate how common swifts migrating between breeding sites in Sweden and wintering areas in sub-Saharan Africa perform the desert crossing with respect to route choice, winds, timing and speed of migration by analysing 72 geolocator tracks recording migration. The swifts cross western Sahara on a broad front in autumn, while in spring they seem to use three alternative routes across the Sahara, a western, a central and an eastern route across the Arabian Peninsula, with most birds using the western route. The swifts show slower migration and travel speeds, and make longer detours with more stops in autumn compared with spring. In spring, the stopover period in West Africa coincided with mostly favourable winds, but birds remained in the area, suggesting fuelling. The western route provided more tailwind assistance compared with the central route for our tracked swifts in spring, but not in autumn. The ultimate explanation for the evolution of a preferred western route is presumably a combination of matching rich foraging conditions (swarming insects) and favourable winds enabling fast spring migration.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'.

  13. Seasonal food habits of swift fox (Vulpes velox) in cropland and rangeland landscapes in western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sovada, M.A.; Roy, C.C.; Telesco, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Food habits of swift foxes (Vulpes velox) occupying two distinct landscapes (dominated by cropland versus rangeland) in western Kansas were determined by analysis of scats collected in 1993 and 1996. Frequencies of occurrence of prey items in scats were compared between cropland and rangeland areas by season. Overall, the most frequently occurring foods of swift foxes were mammals (92% of all scats) and arthropods (87%), followed by birds (24%), carrion (23%), plants (15%) and reptiles (4%). No differences were detected between landscapes for occurrence of mammals, arthropods or carrion in any season (P ??? 0.100). Plants, specifically commercial sunflower seeds, were consumed more frequently in cropland than in rangeland in spring (P = 0.004) and fall (P = 0.001). Birds were more common in the swift fox diet in cropland than in rangeland during the fall (P = 0.008), whereas reptiles occurred more frequently in the diet in rangeland than in cropland during spring (P = 0.042). Variation in the diet of the swift fox between areas was most likely due to its opportunistic foraging behavior, resulting in a diet that closely links prey use with availability.

  14. Language and memory disorder in the case of Jonathan Swift: considerations on retrospective diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Marjorie

    2006-11-01

    The cause of behavioural changes described by Alzheimer for his original case, Auguste D., has been recently reconfirmed by histological examination. However, there has been active speculation regarding the cause of behavioural changes exhibited by the political satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) during the final three years of his life for over 250 years. Swift's symptoms of cognitive changes, memory impairment, personality alterations, language disorder and facial paralysis have all been apportioned differing levels of significance in various attempts at retrospective diagnosis. The various medical arguments put forward from the 18th through 20th centuries will be critically examined. The diagnoses considered refer to evolving theories of insanity, phrenology, localization of cortical function, hydrocephalus, psychoanalysis, aphasia, dementia and depression in ageing. Re-consideration of the attempts to re-diagnose Swift's final mental state by the leading neurological thinkers of the day, including Wilde (The Closing Years of Dean Swift's Life. Dublin: Hodges and Smith, 1849), Bucknill (1882), Osler [Osler's textbook Principles and Practice of Medicine (1892); published in St Thomas's Hospital Gazette (London) 1902; 12: 59-60), Brain (Irish Med J 1952: 320-1 and 337-346) and Boller and Forbes (J Neurol Sci 1998; 158: 125-133) reveal the changing attitudes regarding the significance of behavioural symptoms to neurological diagnosis from the 18th century to the present day.

  15. Negotiating an ecological barrier: crossing the Sahara in relation to winds by common swifts.

    PubMed

    Åkesson, Susanne; Bianco, Giuseppe; Hedenström, Anders

    2016-09-26

    The Sahara Desert is one of the largest land-based barriers on the Earth, crossed twice each year by billions of birds on migration. Here we investigate how common swifts migrating between breeding sites in Sweden and wintering areas in sub-Saharan Africa perform the desert crossing with respect to route choice, winds, timing and speed of migration by analysing 72 geolocator tracks recording migration. The swifts cross western Sahara on a broad front in autumn, while in spring they seem to use three alternative routes across the Sahara, a western, a central and an eastern route across the Arabian Peninsula, with most birds using the western route. The swifts show slower migration and travel speeds, and make longer detours with more stops in autumn compared with spring. In spring, the stopover period in West Africa coincided with mostly favourable winds, but birds remained in the area, suggesting fuelling. The western route provided more tailwind assistance compared with the central route for our tracked swifts in spring, but not in autumn. The ultimate explanation for the evolution of a preferred western route is presumably a combination of matching rich foraging conditions (swarming insects) and favourable winds enabling fast spring migration.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'. PMID:27528783

  16. Swift detection of a likely new SGR: SGR 0755-2933

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; D'Elia, V.; Gehrels, N.; Izzo, L.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Palmer, D. M.; Siegel, M. H.; Ukwatta, T. N.

    2016-03-01

    We cross post this from GCN #19204, as we believe it will be of interest to the wider astronomical community. At 22:41:24 UT, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) triggered and located a burst from an apparent new Soft Gamma Repeater, SGR 0755-2933 (trigger=679432).

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Swift/UVOT Serendipitous Source Catalog (Yershov, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yershov, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    The first version of the Swift UVOT serendipitous source catalogue (UVOTSSC) provides positions and magnitudes, as well as errors and upper limits of confirmed sources for observations taken from start of operations in 2005 until October 1st of 2010. The first version of the Swift UVOT Serendipitous Source Catalogue (UVOTSSC) has been produced by processing the image data obtained from the Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) from the beginning of the mission (2005) until 1st of October of 2010. The data processing was performed at the Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL, University College London, U.K.) using Swift FTOOLS from NASA's High Energy Astrophysics Software (HEASoft-6.11), with some customising of the UVOT packages in order to get more complete source detection and properly apply quality flags to those sources that were detected within the UVOT image artefacts. The total number of observations with 17'x17' images used for version 1 of the catalogue is 23,059, giving 6,200,016 sources in total, of which 2,027,265 have multiple entries in the source table because they have been detected in more than one observation. Some sources were only observed in one filter. The total number of entries in the source table is 13,860,568. The S/N ratio for all sources exceeds 5 for at least one UVOT filter, the rest of the filters having a S/N greater than 3. (3 data files).

  18. Formation of swift heavy ion tracks on a rutile TiO2 (001) surface1

    PubMed Central

    Karlušić, Marko; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Siketić, Zdravko; Šantić, Branko; Bogdanović-Radović, Ivančica; Jakšić, Milko; Schleberger, Marika; Buljan, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructuring of surfaces and two-dimensional materials using swift heavy ions offers some unique possibilities owing to the deposition of a large amount of energy localized within a nanoscale volume surrounding the ion trajectory. To fully exploit this feature, the morphology of nanostructures formed after ion impact has to be known in detail. In the present work the response of a rutile TiO2 (001) surface to grazing-incidence swift heavy ion irradiation is investigated. Surface ion tracks with the well known intermittent inner structure were successfully produced using 23 MeV I ions. Samples irradiated with different ion fluences were investigated using atomic force microscopy and grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering. With these two complementary approaches, a detailed description of the swift heavy ion impact sites, i.e. the ion tracks on the surface, can be obtained even for the case of multiple ion track overlap. In addition to the structural investigation of surface ion tracks, the change in stoichiometry of the rutile TiO2 (001) surface during swift heavy ion irradiation was monitored using in situ time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis, and a preferential loss of oxygen was found. PMID:27738417

  19. Language and memory disorder in the case of Jonathan Swift: considerations on retrospective diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Marjorie

    2006-11-01

    The cause of behavioural changes described by Alzheimer for his original case, Auguste D., has been recently reconfirmed by histological examination. However, there has been active speculation regarding the cause of behavioural changes exhibited by the political satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) during the final three years of his life for over 250 years. Swift's symptoms of cognitive changes, memory impairment, personality alterations, language disorder and facial paralysis have all been apportioned differing levels of significance in various attempts at retrospective diagnosis. The various medical arguments put forward from the 18th through 20th centuries will be critically examined. The diagnoses considered refer to evolving theories of insanity, phrenology, localization of cortical function, hydrocephalus, psychoanalysis, aphasia, dementia and depression in ageing. Re-consideration of the attempts to re-diagnose Swift's final mental state by the leading neurological thinkers of the day, including Wilde (The Closing Years of Dean Swift's Life. Dublin: Hodges and Smith, 1849), Bucknill (1882), Osler [Osler's textbook Principles and Practice of Medicine (1892); published in St Thomas's Hospital Gazette (London) 1902; 12: 59-60), Brain (Irish Med J 1952: 320-1 and 337-346) and Boller and Forbes (J Neurol Sci 1998; 158: 125-133) reveal the changing attitudes regarding the significance of behavioural symptoms to neurological diagnosis from the 18th century to the present day. PMID:17028310

  20. Mindless reading revisited: an analysis based on the SWIFT model of eye-movement control.

    PubMed

    Nuthmann, Antje; Engbert, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    In this article, we revisit the mindless reading paradigm from the perspective of computational modeling. In the standard version of the paradigm, participants read sentences in both their normal version as well as the transformed (or mindless) version where each letter is replaced with a z. z-String scanning shares the oculomotor requirements with reading but none of the higher-level lexical and semantic processes. Here we use the z-string scanning task to validate the SWIFT model of saccade generation [Engbert, R., Nuthmann, A., Richter, E., & Kliegl, R. (2005). SWIFT: A dynamical model of saccade generation during reading. Psychological Review, 112(4), 777-813] as an example for an advanced theory of eye-movement control in reading. We test the central assumption of spatially distributed processing across an attentional gradient proposed by the SWIFT model. Key experimental results like prolonged average fixation durations in z-string scanning compared to normal reading and the existence of a string-length effect on fixation durations and probabilities were reproduced by the model, which lends support to the model's assumptions on visual processing. Moreover, simulation results for patterns of regressive saccades in z-string scanning confirm SWIFT's concept of activation field dynamics for the selection of saccade targets.

  1. GRB 150101B/ Swift J123205.1-105602: Second epoch Chandra observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Hjorth, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2015-02-01

    We obtained a second epoch of observations of the very short GRB 150101B/ Swift J123205.1-105602 (Cummings et al. GCN 17267) with Chandra. Observations began on 10 Feb 2015, 39 days after the burst, and 32 days after the first epoch of observations.

  2. Recovering Swift-XRT Energy Resolution through CCD Charge Trap Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagani, C.; Beardmore, A. P.; Abbey, A. F.; Mountford, C.; Osborne, J. P.; Capalbi, M.; Perri, M.; Angelini, L.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cusaumano, G.; Evans, P. A.; Kennea, A.; Moretti, A.; Page, K. L.; Starling, R. L. C.

    2012-01-01

    The X-ray telescope on board the Swift satellite for gamma-ray burst astronomy has been exposed to the radiation of the space environment since launch in November 2004. Radiation causes damage to the detector, with the generation of dark current and charge trapping sites that result in the degradation of the spectral resolution and an increase of the instrumental background. The Swift team has a dedicated calibration program with the goal of recovering a significant proportion of the lost spectroscopic performance. Calibration observations of supernova remnants with strong emission lines are analysed to map the detector charge traps and to derive position-dependent corrections to the measured photon energies. We have achieved a substantial recovery in the XRT resolution by implementing these corrections in an updated version of the Swift XRT gain file and in corresponding improvements to the Swift XRT HEAsoft software. We provide illustrations of the impact of the enhanced energy resolution, and show that we have recovered most of the spectral resolution lost since launch

  3. Swift monitoring observations of 1H 1743-322 and its evolution towards a state transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhen; Lin, Jie; Yu, Wenfei; Zhang, Wenda; Zhang, Hui; Mao, Dongming

    2016-03-01

    Following the report of the new outburst of black hole X-ray binary H1743-322 (ATel #8751), we requested a series of Swift ToO observations to monitor the X-ray temporal and spectral evolution and potential jet contribution to the UV flux during the outburst.

  4. Swift confirms flare in BL Lacertae in the Optical/UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, Dirk; Lackey-Stewart, Aaron

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the most recent Swift observation of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) and confirm the flare seen in the NIR as reported by Carrasco et al. (ATEL 8311). The flare already started around 2015-October-13 (MJD 57308; target ID 30720, segment 189).

  5. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Miller/Swift, Photographers 1970 VIEW OF STREET, SHOWING HERB HOUSE, BOYS' SHOP, AND OFFICE WOODSHED - Shaker Church Family Community, West of State Route 26, South of North Raymond Road, Sabbathday Lake Village, Cumberland County, ME

  6. Recent advances in the development of SWIFTS for broadband millimeter spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudou, N.; Monfardini, A.; Hoffmann, C.

    2012-09-01

    We present latest developments of the millimetric Stationary Waves Integrated Fourier Transform Spectrometer (SWIFTS) that uses the Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID) technology. SWIFTs are on-chip autocorrelator spectrometers where the incoming signal forms an interferogram by reflection in a short-circuited coplanar wave-guide. By collecting electromagnetic (EM) energy along the guide, one can retrieve this interference pattern. A subsequent offline Fourier transform gives spectral information with a moderate resolution (~500-1000). SWIFTS concept has already been proven to work in the optical and microwave (<20 GHz) bands. It will be useful in any application where integrated and broadband spectral analysis is needed, as an example it will be a practical alternative to Martin-Pupplet interferometer. In practice, fabrication of such a device is very challenging mostly because the set of detectors has to collect energy without destroying the interference pattern. As a consequence, design of the coupling parts is a crucial problem that has to be tackled with the help of EM simulation tools. We present here the SWIFTS principle of operation, details of fabrication, and the latest simulations results.

  7. SwiftLase: a new technology for char-free ablation in rectal surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, David A.

    1995-05-01

    We describe layer-by-layer char-free ablation of hemorrhoids and other rectal lesions at very low CO2 laser power levels with a miniature `SwiftLaser' optomechanical flashscanner. Increased speed with excellent control, very shallow thermal damage, and less postoperative pain are the main advantages of the flashscan technology in rectal surgery.

  8. SGR J1745-29: Swift Discovery and Monitoring of a New SGR Near Sgr A*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennea, Jamie A.; Burrows, David N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Palmer, David; Kaneko, Yuki; Evans, Phil; Degenaar, Nathalie; Reynolds, Mark; Miller, Jon M.; Wijnands, Rudy; Mori, Kaya; Gehrels, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Starting in 2013 February, Swift has been performing short daily monitoring observations of the G2 gas cloud near Sgr A* with the X-Ray Telescope to determine whether the cloud interaction leads to an increase in the flux from the Galactic center. On 2013 April 24 Swift detected an order of magnitude rise in the X-ray flux from the region near Sgr A*. Initially thought to be a flare from Sgr A*, detection of a short hard X-ray burst from the same region by the Burst Alert Telescope suggested that the flare was from an unresolved new Soft Gamma Repeater, SGR J1745-29. Here we present the discovery of SGR J1745-29 by Swift, including analysis of data before, during, and after the burst. We cover the entire light-curve of the SGR outburst so far, from discovery through to the source entering a Swift Sun constraint in November 2013. Thanks to the interest in G2 and its location near the Galactic Center, SGR J1745-29 has become one of the best monitoring SGRs in outburst yet seen.

  9. Litter sex composition influences dominance status of Alpine marmots (Marmota marmota).

    PubMed

    Dupont, Pierre; Pradel, Roger; Lardy, Sophie; Allainé, Dominique; Cohas, Aurélie

    2015-11-01

    In social species, the hierarchical status of an individual has important consequences for its fitness. While many studies have focused on individual condition to explain access to dominance, very few have investigated the influence of the social environment, especially during early life. Yet it is known that environmental conditions early in life may influence several traits at adulthood. Here, we examine the influence of early social environment on accession to dominance by investigating the influence of litter size and sex composition on survival and the probability of ascending to dominance later in life using a 20-year dataset from a wild population of Alpine marmots (Marmota marmota). Although litter size had no effect on the fate of individuals, litter sex composition affected male juvenile survival and both male and female probabilities of reaching dominant status when adult. Male juveniles incur lower survival when the number of male juveniles in the litter increases, and individuals of both sexes from male-biased litters are more likely to become dominant than individuals from female-biased litters. However, the absolute number of sisters in the litter, rather than the sex ratio, seems to be an important predictor of the probability of acquiring dominant status: pups having more sisters are less likely to become dominant. Several potential mechanisms to explain these results are discussed.

  10. Alpine Skiing With total knee ArthroPlasty (ASWAP): effects on gait asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Pötzelsberger, B; Lindinger, S J; Stöggl, T; Buchecker, M; Müller, E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a 12-week recreational skiing intervention on functional gait performance in people with unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-three older adults (71 ± 5 years) were assigned to the intervention (IG) or control group (CG). Test time and ground reaction forces (GRF) were recorded at pre- and post-intervention and in the retention phase during functional gait tests. Ground contact was recorded bilaterally and divided into the weight acceptance and push-off phases. In IG, a faster stair descent time (16%) was observed at post-test with no further change at the retention test. The asymmetry indices for all analyzed variables were decreased in stair descent and during weight acceptance in stair ascent and level walking without further changes between post- and retention test. The reduced asymmetries occurred mainly because of increased loading of the operated leg. Most variables were unchanged in CG. Similar to the force data, the asymmetry index for temporal stride characteristics was reduced in all stair descent variables. These results demonstrate that alpine skiing as a leisure-time activity has a beneficial effect on gait performance and leads to a more balanced load distribution between the legs during daily activities.

  11. Litter sex composition influences dominance status of Alpine marmots (Marmota marmota).

    PubMed

    Dupont, Pierre; Pradel, Roger; Lardy, Sophie; Allainé, Dominique; Cohas, Aurélie

    2015-11-01

    In social species, the hierarchical status of an individual has important consequences for its fitness. While many studies have focused on individual condition to explain access to dominance, very few have investigated the influence of the social environment, especially during early life. Yet it is known that environmental conditions early in life may influence several traits at adulthood. Here, we examine the influence of early social environment on accession to dominance by investigating the influence of litter size and sex composition on survival and the probability of ascending to dominance later in life using a 20-year dataset from a wild population of Alpine marmots (Marmota marmota). Although litter size had no effect on the fate of individuals, litter sex composition affected male juvenile survival and both male and female probabilities of reaching dominant status when adult. Male juveniles incur lower survival when the number of male juveniles in the litter increases, and individuals of both sexes from male-biased litters are more likely to become dominant than individuals from female-biased litters. However, the absolute number of sisters in the litter, rather than the sex ratio, seems to be an important predictor of the probability of acquiring dominant status: pups having more sisters are less likely to become dominant. Several potential mechanisms to explain these results are discussed. PMID:26169393

  12. Air pollution, climate and pollen comparisons in urban, rural and alpine regions in Switzerland (SAPALDIA study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monn, Christian; Alean-Kirkpatrick, Pamela; Künzli, Nino; Defila, Claudio; Peeters, Annie; Ackermann-Liebrich, Ursula; Leuenberger, Philippe; Sapaldia Team

    The aim of this paper is to show spatial differences and correlations in long- term air pollution measurements in the eight SAPALDIA sites (Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung Diseases in Adults, SAPALDIA). In addition, a comparison with climatic parameters and pollen counts are presented in a descriptive way. SAPALDIA investigated health effects from air pollutants and climate in a cross-sectional study (1991) and in a follow-up longitudinal study (1992-1993). Over the period 1991-1993, urban-rural-Alpine concentration gradients were found for SO 2, NO 2, PM 10 and HNO 3. For O 3, average levels were higher in the Alps but peak levels were higher at sites on the Swiss Plateau. Levels of sulphuric acid were negligibly small; acidity was mainly determined by the content of HNO 3. A statistical analysis of long-term data for SO 2, NO 2, TSP, PM 10, HNO 3 and size-fractions of suspended particulate matter (SPM) indicated strong correlations.

  13. The Second Swift BAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Zhang, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parametert:; measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs. The time-averaged spectra of the BAT S GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the L-GRBs. Whereas, the spectra of the initial short spikes of the S-GRBs with E.E. are similar to those of the S-GRBs. We show that the BAT GRB samples are significantly softer than the BATSE bright GRBs, and that the time-averaged E obs/peak of the BAT GRBs peaks at 80 keV which is significantly lower energy than those of the BATSE sample which peak at 320 keV. The time-averaged spectral properties of the BAT GRB sample are similar to those of the HETE-2 GRB samples. By time-resolved spectral analysis, we find that 10% of the BAT observed photon indices are outside the allowed region of the synchrotron shock model. The observed durations of the BAT high redshift GRBs are not systematically longer than those of the moderate

  14. A New Low Magnetic Field Magnetar: The 2011 Outburst of Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, N.; Israel, G.L.; Esposito, P.; Pons, J. A.; Camero-Arramz, A.; Mignani, R. P.; Turolla, R.; Zane, S..; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Campana, T.; Enoto, T.; Gehrels, N.; Gogus, E.; Gotz, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Makishma, K.; Mereghetti, S.; Oates, S. R.; Palmer, D. M.; Perna, R.; Stella, L.; Tiengo, A.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the long-term X-ray monitoring with Swift, RXTE, Suzaku, Chandra, and XMM-Newton of the outburst of the newly discovered magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606 (SGR 1822-1606), from the first observations soon after the detection of the short X-ray bursts which led to its discovery, through the first stages of its outburst decay (covering the time span from 2011 July until the end of 2012 April).We also report on archival ROSAT observations which detected the source during its likely quiescent state, and on upper limits on Swift J1822.3-1606's radio-pulsed and optical emission during outburst, with the Green Bank Telescope and the Gran Telescopio Canarias, respectively. Our X-ray timing analysis finds the source rotating with a period of P = 8.43772016(2) s and a period derivative P-dot = 8.3(2)×10(exp -14) s/ s, which implies an inferred dipolar surface magnetic field of B approx. = 2.7×10(exp 13) G at the equator. This measurement makes Swift J1822.3-1606 the second lowest magnetic field magnetar (after SGR 0418+5729). Following the flux and spectral evolution from the beginning of the outburst, we find that the flux decreased by about an order of magnitude, with a subtle softening of the spectrum, both typical of the outburst decay of magnetars. By modeling the secular thermal evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606, we find that the observed timing properties of the source, as well as its quiescent X-ray luminosity, can be reproduced if it was born with a poloidal and crustal toroidal fields of B(sup p) approx.. 1.5×10(exp 14) G and B(sub tor) approx.. 7×10(exp 14) G, respectively, and if its current age is approx. 550 kyr.

  15. The Definitive X-Ray Light Curve of Swift J164449.3+573451

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, V.; Burrows, D. N.; Sbarufatti, B.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2016-02-01

    On 2011 March 28, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope triggered on an object that had no analog in over six years of Swift operations. Follow-up observations by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) found a new, bright X-ray source covering three orders of magnitude in flux over the first few days, that was much more persistent (and variable) than gamma-ray burst afterglows. Ground-based spectroscopy found a redshift of 0.35, implying extremely high luminosity, with integrated isotropic-equivalent energy output in the X-ray band alone exceeding 1053 erg in the first two weeks after discovery. Strong evidence for a collimated outflow or beamed emission was found. The observational properties of this object are unlike anything ever before observed. We interpret these unique properties as the result of emission from a relativistic jet produced in the aftermath of the tidal disruption of a main sequence star by a massive black hole (BH) in the center of the host galaxy. The source decayed slowly as the stellar remnants were accreted onto the BH, before abruptly shutting off. Here we present the definitive XRT team light curve for Swift J164449.3+573451 and discuss its implications. We show that the unabsorbed flux decayed roughly as a {t}-1.5 power law up to 2012 August 17. The steep turnoff of an order of magnitude in 24 hr seems to be consistent with the shutdown of the jet as the accretion disk transitioned from a thick disk to a thin disk. Swift continues to monitor this source in case the jet reactivates.

  16. A New Low Magnetic Field Magnetar: The 2011 Outburst of Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, N.; Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Pons, J. A.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Mignani, R. P.; Turolla, R.; Zane, S.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Campana, S.; Enoto, T.; Gehrels, N.; Göǧüş, E.; Götz, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Makishima, K.; Mereghetti, S.; Oates, S. R.; Palmer, D. M.; Perna, R.; Stella, L.; Tiengo, A.

    2012-07-01

    We report on the long-term X-ray monitoring with Swift, RXTE, Suzaku, Chandra, and XMM-Newton of the outburst of the newly discovered magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606 (SGR 1822-1606), from the first observations soon after the detection of the short X-ray bursts which led to its discovery, through the first stages of its outburst decay (covering the time span from 2011 July until the end of 2012 April). We also report on archival ROSAT observations which detected the source during its likely quiescent state, and on upper limits on Swift J1822.3-1606's radio-pulsed and optical emission during outburst, with the Green Bank Telescope and the Gran Telescopio Canarias, respectively. Our X-ray timing analysis finds the source rotating with a period of P = 8.43772016(2) s and a period derivative \\dot{P}=8.3(2)\\times 10^{-14} s s-1, which implies an inferred dipolar surface magnetic field of B ~= 2.7 × 1013 G at the equator. This measurement makes Swift J1822.3-1606 the second lowest magnetic field magnetar (after SGR 0418+5729). Following the flux and spectral evolution from the beginning of the outburst, we find that the flux decreased by about an order of magnitude, with a subtle softening of the spectrum, both typical of the outburst decay of magnetars. By modeling the secular thermal evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606, we find that the observed timing properties of the source, as well as its quiescent X-ray luminosity, can be reproduced if it was born with a poloidal and crustal toroidal fields of Bp ~ 1.5 × 1014 G and B tor ~ 7 × 1014 G, respectively, and if its current age is ~550 kyr.

  17. THE X-RAY FLARING PROPERTIES OF Sgr A* DURING SIX YEARS OF MONITORING WITH SWIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Miller, J. M.; Reynolds, M. T.; Kennea, J.; Gehrels, N.; Wijnands, R.

    2013-06-01

    Starting in 2006, Swift has been targeting a region of {approx_equal} 21' Multiplication-Sign 21' around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) with the onboard X-Ray Telescope. The short, quasi-daily observations offer a unique view of the long-term X-ray behavior of the supermassive black hole. We report on the data obtained between 2006 February and 2011 October, which encompasses 715 observations with a total accumulated exposure time of {approx_equal}0.8 Ms. A total of six X-ray flares were detected with Swift, which all had an average 2-10 keV luminosity of L{sub X} {approx_equal} (1 - 3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} (assuming a distance of 8 kpc). This more than doubles the number of such bright X-ray flares observed from Sgr A*. One of the Swift-detected flares may have been softer than the other five, which would indicate that flares of similar intensity can have different spectral properties. The Swift campaign allows us to constrain the occurrence rate of bright (L{sub X} {approx}> 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}) X-ray flares to be {approx_equal}0.1-0.2 day{sup -1}, which is in line with previous estimates. This analysis of the occurrence rate and properties of the X-ray flares seen with Swift offers an important calibration point to assess whether the flaring behavior of Sgr A* changes as a result of its interaction with the gas cloud that is projected to make a close passage in 2013.

  18. X-Ray Observations of the New Unusual Magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Pavlov, George G.; Göǧüş, Ersin; Lin, Lin; Wachter, Stefanie; Griffith, Roger L.; Kaneko, Yuki; Younes, George

    2012-03-01

    We present X-ray observations of the new transient magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846, discovered with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope on 2011 August 7. The data were obtained with Swift, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), CXO, and XMM-Newton both before and after the outburst. Timing analysis reveals single peak pulsations with a period of 2.4823 s and an unusually high pulsed fraction, 85% ± 10%. Using the RXTE and CXO data, we estimated the period derivative, \\dot{P}=8\\times 10^{-12} s s-1, and confirmed the high magnetic field of the source, B = 1.4 × 1014 G. The decay of the persistent X-ray flux, spanning 48 days, is consistent with a power law, Fvpropt -0.5. In the CXO/Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer image, we find that the highly absorbed point source is surrounded by extended emission, which most likely is a dust scattering halo. Swift J1834.9-0846 is located near the center of the radio supernova remnant W41 and TeV source HESS J1834-087. An association with W41 would imply a source distance of about 4 kpc; however, any relation to the HESS source remains unclear, given the presence of several other candidate counterparts for the latter source in the field. Our search for an IR counterpart of Swift J1834.9-0846 revealed no source down to Ks ~ 19.5 within the 0farcs6 CXO error circle.

  19. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE NEW UNUSUAL MAGNETAR SWIFT J1834.9-0846

    SciTech Connect

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Younes, George; Goegues, Ersin; Lin, Lin; Kaneko, Yuki; Wachter, Stefanie; Griffith, Roger L.

    2012-03-20

    We present X-ray observations of the new transient magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846, discovered with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope on 2011 August 7. The data were obtained with Swift, Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), CXO, and XMM-Newton both before and after the outburst. Timing analysis reveals single peak pulsations with a period of 2.4823 s and an unusually high pulsed fraction, 85% {+-} 10%. Using the RXTE and CXO data, we estimated the period derivative, P-dot =8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} s s{sup -1}, and confirmed the high magnetic field of the source, B = 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G. The decay of the persistent X-ray flux, spanning 48 days, is consistent with a power law, F{proportional_to}t{sup -0.5}. In the CXO/Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer image, we find that the highly absorbed point source is surrounded by extended emission, which most likely is a dust scattering halo. Swift J1834.9-0846 is located near the center of the radio supernova remnant W41 and TeV source HESS J1834-087. An association with W41 would imply a source distance of about 4 kpc; however, any relation to the HESS source remains unclear, given the presence of several other candidate counterparts for the latter source in the field. Our search for an IR counterpart of Swift J1834.9-0846 revealed no source down to K{sub s} {approx} 19.5 within the 0.''6 CXO error circle.

  20. [Soil faunal diversity under typical alpine vegetations in West Sichuan].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Wen, Wei-Quan; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Wan-Qin; Liu, Yang; Yan, Bang-Guo; Huang, Yu-Mei

    2010-01-01

    In order to understand the variations of soil faunal diversity under different natural alpine vegetations in West Sichuan, an investigation was made on the soil faunal communities under alpine coniferous forest, shrub, and meadow from August 2008 to June 2009. A total of 48343 individuals were collected, belonging to 7 phyla, 16 classes, 31 orders and 117 families. There was a great difference in the dominant groups of soil macro-fauna, and a significant difference (P < 0.05) in the number of soil faunal groups under different vegetations. Both the individual density and the group number of soil fauna decreased obviously with increasing soil depth, and were significantly higher (P < 0.01) in moss layer than in litter layer in coniferous forest. Significant difference (P < 0.01) was also observed in the density-group index among the three vegetations. The maximum biomass of soil macro-fauna was found in June. Jacard indices indicated that disturbed meadow had the lowest similarity of soil faunal community with the other vegetations. It was suggested that vegetation type had significant effects on the community structure of soil fauna, while aspect, altitude, and disturbance also had definite effects.

  1. Estimation of Alpine Skier Posture Using Machine Learning Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nemec, Bojan; Petrič, Tadej; Babič, Jan; Supej, Matej

    2014-01-01

    High precision Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements are becoming more and more popular in alpine skiing due to the relatively undemanding setup and excellent performance. However, GNSS provides only single-point measurements that are defined with the antenna placed typically behind the skier's neck. A key issue is how to estimate other more relevant parameters of the skier's body, like the center of mass (COM) and ski trajectories. Previously, these parameters were estimated by modeling the skier's body with an inverted-pendulum model that oversimplified the skier's body. In this study, we propose two machine learning methods that overcome this shortcoming and estimate COM and skis trajectories based on a more faithful approximation of the skier's body with nine degrees-of-freedom. The first method utilizes a well-established approach of artificial neural networks, while the second method is based on a state-of-the-art statistical generalization method. Both methods were evaluated using the reference measurements obtained on a typical giant slalom course and compared with the inverted-pendulum method. Our results outperform the results of commonly used inverted-pendulum methods and demonstrate the applicability of machine learning techniques in biomechanical measurements of alpine skiing. PMID:25313492

  2. In Review (Geology): Alpine Landscape Evolution Dominated by Cirque Retreat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oskin, Michael; Burbank, Doug

    2005-01-01

    Despite the abundance in alpine terrain of glacially dissected landscapes, the magnitude and geometry of glacial erosion can rarely be defined. In the eastern Kyrgyz Range, a widespread unconformity exhumed as a geomorphic surface provides a regional datum with which to calibrate erosion. As tectonically driven surface uplift has progressively pushed this surface into the zone of ice accumulation, glacial erosion has overprinted the landscape. With as little as 500 m of incision into rocks underlying the unconformity, distinctive glacial valleys display their deepest incision adjacent to cirque headwalls. The expansion of north-facing glacial cirques at the expense of south-facing valleys has driven the drainage divide southwards at rates up to 2 to 3 times the rate of valley incision. Existing ice-flux-based glacial erosion rules incompletely model expansion of glacial valleys via cirque retreat into the low-gradient unconformity remnants. Local processes that either directly sap cirque headwalls or inhibit erosion down-glacier appear to control, at least initially, alpine landscape evolution.

  3. Project SHARE Sustainable Hydropower in Alpine Rivers Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammoliti Mochet, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    SHARE - Sustainable Hydropower in Alpine Rivers Ecosystems is a running project early approved and co funded by the European regional development fund in the context of the European Territorial Cooperation Alpine Space programme 2007 - 2013: the project is formally ongoing from August 2009 and it will end July 2012. Hydropower is the most important renewable resource for electricity production in alpine areas: it has advantages for the global CO2 balance but creates serious environmental impacts. RES-e Directives require renewable electricity enhance but, at the same time, the Water Framework Directive obliges member States to reach or maintain a water bodies "good" ecological status, intrinsically limiting the hydropower exploitation. Administrators daily face an increasing demand of water abstraction but lack reliable tools to rigorously evaluate their effects on mountain rivers and the social and economical outputs on longer time scale. The project intends to develop, test and promote a decision support system to merge on an unprejudiced base, river ecosystems and hydropower requirements. This approach will be led using existing scientific tools, adjustable to transnational, national and local normative and carried on by permanent panel of administrators and stakeholders. Scientific knowledge related to HP & river management will be "translated" by the communication tools and spent as a concrete added value to build a decision support system. In particular, the Multicriteria Analysis (MCA) will be applied to assess different management alternatives where a single-criterion approach (such as cost-benefit analysis) falls short, especially where environmental, technical, economic and social criteria can't be quantified by monetary values. All the existing monitoring databases will be used and harmonized with new information collected during the Pilot case studies. At the same time, all information collected will be available to end users and actors of related

  4. Structure and dynamics of an Alpine potential-vorticity banner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schär, Christoph; Sprenger, Michael; Lüthi, Daniel; Jiang, Qingfang; Smith, Ronald B.; Benoit, Robert

    2003-01-01

    A detailed analysis is undertaken of the primary Alpine shear zone that occurred on 1 October 1999 during the Mesoscale Alpine Programme. This shear zone emanates from the south-western Alpine tip in north-westerly flow conditions, develops in response to the Alpine-scale flow splitting, and separates the northerly mistral wind to the south-west of the Alps from the quasi-stagnant air within the Alpine wake. The study is based on in situ flightlevel and dropsonde data from two research aircraft. The data are used for the construction of an objective analysis in a cross-section perpendicular to the shear zone, and for diagnostic computations of the potential-vorticity (PV) flux between vertically stacked flight legs. The observed flow structure is compared with simulation results of the Swiss Model and the non-hydrostatic Canadian Mesoscale Compressible Community Model (MC2), operating at horizontal resolutions of 14 and 3 km, respectively. Immediately downstream of the topography, the observed shear zone has a surprisingly quasi-steady structure that becomes evident provided a slow westward migration is accounted for. Further downstream, the shear zone shows increased signs of transience. Near the surface, it has an overall width of ~150 km, but narrows to about 25 km near the top of the mistral inversion at a height of ~2 km. Detailed analysis shows that the shear zone has a complex substructure consisting of at least three positive and three negative PV filaments. These shear lines are characterized by a pronounced vertical coherence in the mixed layer and throughout most of the inversion layer. One of the banners is also evident in low-level tracer constituents. Diagnostic computations of the PV flux along the banners using the generalized Bernoulli theorem reveal that most of the associated PV flux is due to vertically oriented vorticity within the inversion layer. Within the shear zone, there is a spanwise circulation of appreciable strength. It consists of a

  5. Building a Parallel Cloud Storage System using OpenStack’s Swift Object Store and Transformative Parallel I/O

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Andrew J.; Lora, Kaleb D.; Martinez, Esteban; Shorter, Martel L.

    2012-07-30

    Our project consists of bleeding-edge research into replacing the traditional storage archives with a parallel, cloud-based storage solution. It used OpenStack's Swift Object Store cloud software. It's Benchmarked Swift for write speed and scalability. Our project is unique because Swift is typically used for reads and we are mostly concerned with write speeds. Cloud Storage is a viable archive solution because: (1) Container management for larger parallel archives might ease the migration workload; (2) Many tools that are written for cloud storage could be utilized for local archive; and (3) Current large cloud storage practices in industry could be utilized to manage a scalable archive solution.

  6. Focal Mechanism Characterization of Microseismicity Near the Alpine Fault, Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawles, C.; Thurber, C. H.; Roecker, S. W.; Feenstra, J. P.; Townend, J.; Bannister, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Focal mechanisms are determined for earthquakes in the vicinity of the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand using the P-wave first motion method of Hardebeck and Shearer [2002] and the probabilistic (Bayesian) algorithm of Walsh et al. [2009]. Our results are obtained using data collected from about 40 temporary and permanent stations deployed in a region spanning over a 100 km along-strike portion of the Alpine Fault, roughly centered on the Deep Faulting Drilling Project DFDP-2 drill site near Whataroa. Focal mechanisms and the distribution of seismic activity enable us to address key hypotheses pertaining to the geometry and kinematics of the central Alpine Fault including: 1) the Alpine Fault dip remains close to 50° to the base of the seismogenic zone; 2) the complex surface fault trace, with alternating strike-slip and thrust segments, does not reflect a simpler oblique fault geometry at depth; and 3) the depth to the base of the seismogenic zone is shallower (<15 km) in the Whataroa region than to the northeast. Our focal mechanism results will also provide valuable inputs to stress inversion calculations to be used in determining the principal stress orientations adjacent to the Alpine Fault, which has important ramifications regarding the strength of the Alpine Fault. Such information has obvious implications for understanding the current mechanical state of the Alpine Fault and thereby further characterizing the hazard posed by future large earthquakes.

  7. Differences in UV transparency and thermal structure between alpine and subalpine lakes: implications for organisms†

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kevin C.; Williamson, Craig E.; Saros, Jasmine E.; Sommaruga, Ruben; Fischer, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a globally important abiotic factor influencing ecosystem structure and function in multiple ways. While UV radiation can be damaging to most organisms, several factors act to reduce UV exposure of organisms in aquatic ecosystems, the most important of which is dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In alpine lakes, very low concentrations of DOC and a thinner atmosphere lead to unusually high UV exposure levels. These high UV levels combine with low temperatures to provide a fundamentally different vertical structure to alpine lake ecosystems in comparison to most lowland lakes. Here, we discuss the importance of water temperature and UV transparency in structuring alpine lake ecosystems and the consequences for aquatic organisms that inhabit them. We present transparency data on a global data set of alpine lakes and nearby analogous subalpine lakes for comparison. We also present seasonal transparency data on a suite of alpine and subalpine lakes that demonstrate important differences in UV and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400–700 nm) transparency patterns even within a single region. These data are used to explore factors regulating transparency in alpine lakes, to discuss implications of future environmental change on the structure and function of alpine lakes, and ways in which the UV transparency of these lakes can be used as a sentinel of environmental change. PMID:19707613

  8. Alpine biogeography of Parnassian butterflies during Quaternary climate cycles in North America.

    PubMed

    Schoville, Sean D; Roderick, George K

    2009-08-01

    Growth of alpine glaciers during the Pleistocene had profound effects on montane landscapes in North America and the organisms now inhabiting alpine ecosystems. Biogeography of this region has often been viewed as a system of sky islands despite the fact that species richness patterns deviate from a strict island biogeographic model. One explanation is that alpine species are not in equilibrium because of late Quaternary geographic range shifts. Genetic data can provide evidence of nonequilibrium dynamics and the distributional shifts that occur during glaciation events in alpine landscapes. Using mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data, we examine the evolutionary history of butterflies in the Parnassius phoebus complex. We test explicit, alternative models of the biogeographic history of Parnassius smintheus and Parnassius behrii, including an equilibrium island model, ancestral radiation and fragmentation, an expanding alpine archipelago and an alpine archipelago refuge model. Our results support the alpine archipelago refuge model, in which alpine butterflies undergo population contraction during glacial climates followed by population expansion during interglacial phases. While butterflies can disperse between distant mountain ranges during glacial periods, gene flow is rare. We find evidence of recent connectivity between California and Colorado, population expansion events following deglaciation approximately 20,000 years B.P., and small population sizes during the last glacial period. An analysis of lineage splitting suggests that morphological differences in P. smintheus and P. behrii are the result of late Pleistocene divergence (approximately 48,000 years B.P.) with limited gene flow. Our results demonstrate that spatially complex and nonequilibrium population dynamics influence alpine diversity patterns.

  9. Evolutionary diversification of cryophilic Grylloblatta species (Grylloblattodea: Grylloblattidae) in alpine habitats of California

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Climate in alpine habitats has undergone extreme variation during Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs, resulting in repeated expansion and contraction of alpine glaciers. Many cold-adapted alpine species have responded to these climatic changes with long-distance range shifts. These species typically exhibit shallow genetic differentiation over a large geographical area. In contrast, poorly dispersing organisms often form species complexes within mountain ranges, such as the California endemic ice-crawlers (Grylloblattodea: Grylloblattidae: Grylloblatta). The diversification pattern of poorly dispersing species might provide more information on the localized effects of historical climate change, the importance of particular climatic events, as well as the history of dispersal. Here we use multi-locus genetic data to examine the phylogenetic relationships and geographic pattern of diversification in California Grylloblatta. Results Our analysis reveals a pattern of deep genetic subdivision among geographically isolated populations of Grylloblatta in California. Alpine populations diverged from low elevation populations and subsequently diversified. Using a Bayesian relaxed clock model and both uncalibrated and calibrated measurements of time to most recent common ancestor, we reconstruct the temporal diversification of alpine Grylloblatta populations. Based on calibrated relaxed clock estimates, evolutionary diversification of Grylloblatta occurred during the Pliocene-Pleistocene epochs, with an initial dispersal into California during the Pliocene and species diversification in alpine clades during the middle Pleistocene epoch. Conclusions Grylloblatta species exhibit a high degree of genetic subdivision in California with well defined geographic structure. Distinct glacial refugia can be inferred within the Sierra Nevada, corresponding to major, glaciated drainage basins. Low elevation populations are sister to alpine populations, suggesting alpine

  10. Adult Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Considers the differences between young adult and adult books and maintains that teachers must be familiar with young adults' tastes for both. Suggests that traffic between these publishing divisions is a two-way street, with young adults reading adult books and adults reading young adult books. (TB)

  11. Recent Relationships of Tree Establishment and Climate in Alpine Treelines of the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germino, M. J.; Graumlich, L. J.; Maher, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    Changes in the forest structure of alpine-forest or treeline boundaries may be a significant climate response of mountainous regions in the near future. A particularly important point of climate sensitivity for treelines is the initial survival and establishment of tree seedlings - a demographic bottleneck that may be particularly suited to early detection of treeline responses to climate change. However, concise information on climate sensitivity of seedling establishment has come primarily from direct observations of seedlings over short time periods encompassing a few years. Dendrochronological approaches have revealed tree establishment patterns at more extensive time scales of decades to millenia, but at coarser temporal resolutions. Climate variations that most directly affect initial tree seedling establishment occur at annual or smaller time scales, and climate for seedlings is modulated by landscape factors such as neighboring plant cover. Our objective was to assess climate sensitivity of tree establishment at treeline at these finer temporal and spatial scales, with consideration of treeline features that alter the climate for seedlings. Our approach combined direct observations of seedling emergence and survival with dendrochronology of older seedlings and saplings that were still small and young enough (less than 25 years and 20 cm height) to allow detecting the year of establishment and associated factors. Surveys for subject seedlings and saplings were performed for 2 years across the gradient from forest into treeline alpine in the Beartooth, Teton, and Medicine Bow mountains of Wyoming USA. No seedlings or saplings were detected above the highest elevation adult trees or krummholz, but there were up to 0.3 seedlings per square meter in subalpine meadows close to forest (within the timberline zone) where changes in tree abundance appear possible in future decades. Correlations of establishment and summer temperature ranged from weak in whitebark

  12. Crossing thresholds: Analysis of hazardous tipping points in alpine catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutzmann, Silke; Sass, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Steep mountain channels or torrents in small alpine catchments are characterized by high geomorphic activity with sediment dynamics being inherently nonlinear and threshold-mediated. Localized, high intensity rainstorms can drive torrential systems past a tipping point resulting in a sudden onset of hazardous events like (flash-) flooding, heavy bedload transport or debris flows. Such responses exhibit an abrupt switch in the fluvial system's mode (e.g. transport / supply limited). Changes in functional connectivity may persist beyond the tipping point. Torrential hazards cause costly damage in the densely populated Alpine Region. Thus, there is a rising interest in potential effects of climate change on torrential sediment dynamics. Understanding critical conditions close to tipping points is important to reduce uncertainty in predicting sediment fluxes. In this study we aim at (i) establishing threshold precipitation characteristics for the Eastern Alps of Austria. Precipitation is hypothesized to be the main forcing factor of torrential events. (ii) How do thresholds vary in space and time? (iii) The effect of external triggers is strongly mediated by the internal disposition of catchments to respond. Which internal conditions are critical for susceptibility? (iv) Is there a change in magnitude or frequency in the recent past and what can be expected for the future? The 71 km2 catchment of the river Schöttlbach in the East Alpine Region of Styria (Austria) is monitored since a heavy precipitation event resulted in a catastrophic flood in July 2011. Sediment mobilization from slopes as well as within-channel storage and bedload transport are regularly measured using photogrammetric methods and sediment impact sensors. Thus, detailed knowledge exists on magnitude and spatial propagation of sediment waves through the catchment. The associated hydro-meteorological (pre-) conditions can be inferred from a dense station network. Changing bedload transport rates and

  13. Swift J1822.3-1606: Optical spectroscopy of the counterpart candidates from the 10.4m GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Munoz-Darias, T.

    2011-07-01

    We have performed optical spectroscopy of the two objects (S1 and S2; ATEL #3496, #3502) present within the Swift/XRT error circle of the Soft Gamma-ray Repeater (SGR) candidate, Swift J1822.3-1606 (ATEL #3488, #3489, #3490, #3491, #3493, #3501, #3503). Observations were performed on July 20, 2011 using the OSIRIS spectrograph at the 10.4m Gran Telescopio de Canarias (GTC) telescope in La Palma, Spain.

  14. Swift Follow up observation of the transient source Fermi J1654-1055 (PMN J1632-1052)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajello, M.; Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.; Buehler, R.; Giomi, M.

    2016-02-01

    On February 25, 2016, Swift carried out a 2ks target of opportunity observation of the transient Fermi J1654-1055 (see ATel #8721). Only one source is clearly detected, within the LAT error circle, by the Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) at RA, Dec= 16h 32m 49.9s, -10d 52' 30.1" (J2000) with a 90 % uncertainty radius of 6.3 arcsec.

  15. Testing the E(sub peak)-E(sub iso) Relation for GRBs Detected by Swift and Suzaku-WAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, H. A.; Yamaoka, K.; Sugita, S.; Ohno, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Hara, R.; Onda, K.; Sato, G.; Tanaka, H.; Tashiro, M.; Yamauchi, M.; Norris, J. P.; Ohmori, N.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most prominent, yet controversial associations derived from the ensemble of prompt-phase observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is the apparent correlation in the source frame between the peak energy (E(sub peak)) of the nuF(nu) spectrum and the isotropic radiated energy, E(sub iso). Since most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have E(sub peak) above the energy range (15-150 keV) of the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on Swift, determining accurate E(sub peak) values for large numbers of Swift bursts has been difficult. However, by combining data from Swift/BAT and the Suzaku Wide-band All-Sky Monitor (WAM), which covers the energy range from 50-5000 keV, for bursts which are simultaneously detected ; one can accurately fit E(sub peak) and E(sub iso) and test the relationship between them for the Swift sample. Between the launch of Suzaku in July 2005 and the end of March 2009, there were 45 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) which triggered both Swift/BAT and WAM and an additional 47 bursts which triggered Swift and were detected by WAM, but did not trigger. A BAT-WAM team has cross-calibrated the two instruments using GRBs, and we are now able to perform joint fits on these bursts to determine spectral parameters. For those bursts with spectroscopic redshifts.. we can also calculate the isotropic energy. Here we present the results of joint Swift/BAT-Suzaku/WAM spectral fits for 86 of the bursts detected by the two instruments. We show that the distribution of spectral fit parameters is consistent with distributions from earlier missions and confirm that Swift, bursts are consistent with earlier reported relationships between Epeak and isotropic energy. We show through time-resolved spectroscopy that individual burst pulses are also consistent with this relationship.

  16. Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infection in two free-ranging Alpine ibex.

    PubMed

    Ferroglio, E; Nebbia, P; Robino, P; Rossi, L; Rosati, S

    2000-12-01

    The authors report two cases of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infection in free-ranging Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) from two different herds in the Western Alps, Italy. One ibex, found dead in October 1998, was in poor condition. The second animal died due to trauma following capture with a dart gun. The only gross lesions observed were the enlargement of the mesenteric and iliac lymph nodes. Samples from both ibex tested positive to polymerase chain reaction for a primer set specific for the M. paratuberculosis insertion sequence IS900 and one ibex also tested positive to the Zielh-Nielsen stain. Isolation by bacterial culture was not successful. The infected ibex originated from herds in which seroreactors to M. paratuberculosis had been found previously. Seroreactors to M. paratuberculosis were also detected in sympatric cattle.

  17. Facilitative plant interactions and climate simultaneously drive alpine plant diversity.

    PubMed

    Cavieres, Lohengrin A; Brooker, Rob W; Butterfield, Bradley J; Cook, Bradley J; Kikvidze, Zaal; Lortie, Christopher J; Michalet, Richard; Pugnaire, Francisco I; Schöb, Christian; Xiao, Sa; Anthelme, Fabien; Björk, Robert G; Dickinson, Katharine J M; Cranston, Brittany H; Gavilán, Rosario; Gutiérrez-Girón, Alba; Kanka, Robert; Maalouf, Jean-Paul; Mark, Alan F; Noroozi, Jalil; Parajuli, Rabindra; Phoenix, Gareth K; Reid, Anya M; Ridenour, Wendy M; Rixen, Christian; Wipf, Sonja; Zhao, Liang; Escudero, Adrián; Zaitchik, Benjamin F; Lingua, Emanuele; Aschehoug, Erik T; Callaway, Ragan M

    2014-02-01

    Interactions among species determine local-scale diversity, but local interactions are thought to have minor effects at larger scales. However, quantitative comparisons of the importance of biotic interactions relative to other drivers are rarely made at larger scales. Using a data set spanning 78 sites and five continents, we assessed the relative importance of biotic interactions and climate in determining plant diversity in alpine ecosystems dominated by nurse-plant cushion species. Climate variables related with water balance showed the highest correlation with richness at the global scale. Strikingly, although the effect of cushion species on diversity was lower than that of climate, its contribution was still substantial. In particular, cushion species enhanced species richness more in systems with inherently impoverished local diversity. Nurse species appear to act as a 'safety net' sustaining diversity under harsh conditions, demonstrating that climate and species interactions should be integrated when predicting future biodiversity effects of climate change.

  18. Canalization of freeze tolerance in an alpine grasshopper.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Timothy C

    2015-10-01

    In the Rock and Pillar Range, New Zealand, the alpine grasshopper, Sigaus australis Hutton, survives equilibrium freezing (EF) all-year round. A comparison of freeze tolerance (FT) in grasshoppers over four austral seasons for a 1 year period finds that: (a) the majority (>70%) of the sample population of grasshoppers survive single freeze-stress throughout the year; (b) exposure to increased freeze stress (multiple freeze-stress events) does not lead to a loss of freeze tolerance; and (c) responses to increased freeze stress reveal seasonal tuning of the FT adaptation to environmental temperatures. The Rock and Pillar sample population provides a clear example of the canalization of the FT adaptation. Seasonal variability in the extent of tolerance of multiple freezing events indicates that physiology is modulated to environmental temperatures by phenotypic plasticity - i.e. the FT adaptation is permanent and adjustable. PMID:26210007

  19. Thermochronometry reveals headward propagation of erosion in an alpine landscape.

    PubMed

    Shuster, David L; Cuffey, Kurt M; Sanders, Johnny W; Balco, Greg

    2011-04-01

    Glacial erosion of mountain ranges produces spectacular alpine landscapes and, by linking climate with tectonics, influences a broad array of geophysical phenomena. Although the resultant landforms are easily identified, the timing and spatial pattern of topographic adjustment to Pleistocene glaciations remain poorly known. We investigated topographic evolution in the archetypal glacial landscape of Fiordland, New Zealand, using (U-Th)/He thermochronometry. We find that erosion during the past 2 million years removed the entire pre-Pleistocene landscape and fundamentally reshaped the topography. Erosion focused on steep valley segments and propagated from trunk valleys toward the heads of drainage basins, a behavior expected if subglacial erosion rate depends on ice sliding velocity. The Fiordland landscape illustrates complex effects of climate on Earth's surface morphology. PMID:21454785

  20. Agriculture causes nitrate fertilization of remote alpine lakes.

    PubMed

    Hundey, E J; Russell, S D; Longstaffe, F J; Moser, K A

    2016-01-01

    Humans have altered Earth's nitrogen cycle so dramatically that reactive nitrogen (Nr) has doubled. This has increased Nr in aquatic ecosystems, which can lead to reduced water quality and ecosystem health. Apportioning sources of Nr to specific ecosystems, however, continues to be challenging, despite this knowledge being critical for mitigation and protection of water resources. Here we use Δ(17)O, δ(18)O and δ(15)N from Uinta Mountain (Utah, USA) snow, inflow and lake nitrate in combination with a Bayesian-based stable isotope mixing model, to show that at least 70% of nitrates in aquatic systems are anthropogenic and arrive via the atmosphere. Moreover, agricultural activities, specifically nitrate- and ammonium-based fertilizer use, are contributing most (∼60%) Nr, and data from other North American alpine lakes suggest this is a widespread phenomenon. Our findings offer a pathway towards more effective mitigation, but point to challenges in balancing food production with protection of important water resources. PMID:26853267

  1. Thermochronometry reveals headward propagation of erosion in an alpine landscape.

    PubMed

    Shuster, David L; Cuffey, Kurt M; Sanders, Johnny W; Balco, Greg

    2011-04-01

    Glacial erosion of mountain ranges produces spectacular alpine landscapes and, by linking climate with tectonics, influences a broad array of geophysical phenomena. Although the resultant landforms are easily identified, the timing and spatial pattern of topographic adjustment to Pleistocene glaciations remain poorly known. We investigated topographic evolution in the archetypal glacial landscape of Fiordland, New Zealand, using (U-Th)/He thermochronometry. We find that erosion during the past 2 million years removed the entire pre-Pleistocene landscape and fundamentally reshaped the topography. Erosion focused on steep valley segments and propagated from trunk valleys toward the heads of drainage basins, a behavior expected if subglacial erosion rate depends on ice sliding velocity. The Fiordland landscape illustrates complex effects of climate on Earth's surface morphology.

  2. Organochlorine compounds in ice melt water from Italian Alpine rivers.

    PubMed

    Villa, Sara; Negrelli, Christian; Finizio, Antonio; Flora, Onelio; Vighi, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Organochlorine chemicals (OCs) (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes, hexachlorocyclohexanes, and hexachlorobenzene) were measured in ice melt water from five glaciers in the Italian Alps. Even though the data collected may not be sufficient for a precise description of persistent organic pollutant release patterns from glacier melting, they have, however, highlighted the potential for surface water contamination. Concentrations were of the same order of magnitude in all glacial streams, indicating comparable contamination levels in different glaciers of the alpine region. OC levels in nonglacial springs sampled in the same areas are usually lower. Even if differences during the melting season (from spring to autumn) have been identified, a regular seasonal pattern in OC concentrations was not observed. Risk for the aquatic environment is excluded through direct water exposure, but it is likely to occur through biomagnification and secondary poisoning exposure.

  3. Agriculture causes nitrate fertilization of remote alpine lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundey, E. J.; Russell, S. D.; Longstaffe, F. J.; Moser, K. A.

    2016-02-01

    Humans have altered Earth's nitrogen cycle so dramatically that reactive nitrogen (Nr) has doubled. This has increased Nr in aquatic ecosystems, which can lead to reduced water quality and ecosystem health. Apportioning sources of Nr to specific ecosystems, however, continues to be challenging, despite this knowledge being critical for mitigation and protection of water resources. Here we use Δ17O, δ18O and δ15N from Uinta Mountain (Utah, USA) snow, inflow and lake nitrate in combination with a Bayesian-based stable isotope mixing model, to show that at least 70% of nitrates in aquatic systems are anthropogenic and arrive via the atmosphere. Moreover, agricultural activities, specifically nitrate- and ammonium-based fertilizer use, are contributing most (~60%) Nr, and data from other North American alpine lakes suggest this is a widespread phenomenon. Our findings offer a pathway towards more effective mitigation, but point to challenges in balancing food production with protection of important water resources.

  4. Agriculture causes nitrate fertilization of remote alpine lakes

    PubMed Central

    Hundey, E. J.; Russell, S. D.; Longstaffe, F. J.; Moser, K. A.

    2016-01-01

    Humans have altered Earth's nitrogen cycle so dramatically that reactive nitrogen (Nr) has doubled. This has increased Nr in aquatic ecosystems, which can lead to reduced water quality and ecosystem health. Apportioning sources of Nr to specific ecosystems, however, continues to be challenging, despite this knowledge being critical for mitigation and protection of water resources. Here we use Δ17O, δ18O and δ15N from Uinta Mountain (Utah, USA) snow, inflow and lake nitrate in combination with a Bayesian-based stable isotope mixing model, to show that at least 70% of nitrates in aquatic systems are anthropogenic and arrive via the atmosphere. Moreover, agricultural activities, specifically nitrate- and ammonium-based fertilizer use, are contributing most (∼60%) Nr, and data from other North American alpine lakes suggest this is a widespread phenomenon. Our findings offer a pathway towards more effective mitigation, but point to challenges in balancing food production with protection of important water resources. PMID:26853267

  5. Afro-alpine forest cover change on Mt. Guna (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birhanu, Adugnaw; Frankl, Amaury; Jacob, Miro; Lanckriet, Sil; Hendrickx, Hanne; Nyssen, Jan

    2016-04-01

    High mountain forests, such as the afro-alpine Erica arborea L. forests in Ethiopia, are very important for the livelihood of local communities, in relation to their impacts on the water balance of mountain ecosystems and surrounding agricultural areas. On volcanoes, the dominance of volcanic tuffs on the slopes, as well as that of gelifracts near the top further enhances infiltration, making it recharge areas. Earlier forest cover change studies in the Ethiopian highlands mainly deal with the lower vegetation belts. In this study, 3.37 km² on the western slopes of Mount Guna (one of the dozens of Miocene shield volcanoes that exist on top of the Ethiopian plateau) was mapped. The slope has an elevation between 3200 at its base and 4113 m a.s.l. at the peak. The present forest cover was recorded from high-resolution georeferenced satellite imagery from Google Maps and field data (2015), while historical forest cover was studied from georeferenced aerial photographs of 1982. In addition, key informant interviews were conducted to identify the trend of forest cover change and management practices. Whereas burning of the Erica forest for sake of land clearance (a typical practice on all Ethiopian mountains until the 1980s) most strikingly took place for three consecutive days in 1975, large-scale deforestation resulting from agricultural expansion and livestock pressure continued thereafter. However, between 2000 and 2014, due to active involvement of local and governmental institutions there was a slight regeneration of the vegetation and the Erica forest. Protection and regeneration of the forest was particularly efficient after it was given into custody of an orthodox church established in 1999 at the lower side of the forest. Overall, the study revealed that human and livestock pressures are the strongest drivers of deforestation. Furthermore, the study indicated that integrating the actions of local and governmental institutions is key for the protection of the

  6. Close-Range Sensing Techniques in Alpine Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutzinger, M.; Höfle, B.; Lindenbergh, R.; Oude Elberink, S.; Pirotti, F.; Sailer, R.; Scaioni, M.; Stötter, J.; Wujanz, D.

    2016-06-01

    Early career researchers such as PhD students are a main driving force of scientific research and are for a large part responsible for research innovation. They work on specialized topics within focused research groups that have a limited number of members, but might also have limited capacity in terms of lab equipment. This poses a serious challenge for educating such students as it is difficult to group a sufficient number of them to enable efficient knowledge transfer. To overcome this problem, the Innsbruck Summer School of Alpine Research 2015 on close-range sensing techniques in Alpine terrain was organized in Obergurgl, Austria, by an international team from several universities and research centres. Of the applicants a group of 40 early career researchers were selected with interest in about ten types of specialized surveying tools, i.e. laser scanners, a remotely piloted aircraft system, a thermal camera, a backpack mobile mapping system and different grade photogrammetric equipment. During the one-week summer school, students were grouped according to their personal preference to work with one such type of equipment under guidance of an expert lecturer. All students were required to capture and process field data on a mountain-related theme like landslides or rock glaciers. The work on the assignments lasted the whole week but was interspersed with lectures on selected topics by invited experts. The final task of the summer school participants was to present and defend their results to their peers, lecturers and other colleagues in a symposium-like setting. Here we present the framework and content of this summer school which brought together scientists from close-range sensing and environmental and geosciences.

  7. Flood Change Assessment and Attribution in Austrian alpine Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claps, Pierluigi; Allamano, Paola; Como, Anastasia; Viglione, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The present paper aims to investigate the sensitivity of flood peaks to global warming in the Austrian alpine basins. A group of 97 Austrian watersheds, with areas ranging from 14 to 6000 km2 and with average elevation ranging from 1000 to 2900 m a.s.l. have been considered. Annual maximum floods are available for the basins from 1890 to 2007 with two densities of observation. In a first period, until 1950, an average of 42 records of flood peaks are available. From 1951 to 2007 the density of observation increases to an average amount of contemporary peaks of 85. This information is very important with reference to the statistical tools used for the empirical assessment of change over time, that is linear quantile regressions. Application of this tool to the data set unveils trends in extreme events, confirmed by statistical testing, for the 0.75 and 0.95 empirical quantiles. All applications are made with specific (discharges/area) values . Similarly of what done in a previous approach, multiple quantile regressions have also been applied, confirming the presence of trends even when the possible interference of the specific discharge and morphoclimatic parameters (i.e. mean elevation and catchment area). Application of a geomorphoclimatic model by Allamano et al (2009) can allow to mimic to which extent the empirically available increase in air temperature and annual rainfall can justify the attribution of change derived by the empirical statistical tools. An comparison with data from Swiss alpine basins treated in a previous paper is finally undertaken.

  8. [Spatiotemporal pattern of alpine grassland productivity in Qiangtang Plateau].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Sheng; Zhang, Xian-Zhou; Zhao, Yu-Ping; Qin, Si-Guo; Wu, Jian-Shuang

    2010-06-01

    Based on the meteorological data and remote sensing data, and by using vegetation-climate comprehensive model and CASA model, this paper analyzed the climate change trend and the spatiotemporal pattern of alpine grassland potential and actual net primary productivity (NPP) in Qiantang Plateau. In 1955-2004, the mean annual temperature and annual cumulated precipitation in the Plateau increased by 1.37 degrees C and 63 mm, respectively. The climate in the central and eastern parts of the Plateau became warmer and wetter, whereas it was warmer and dryer in the western part. However, the regional climate change did not yet result in grassland degradation. The mean potential NPP of alpine grassland was in the order of eastern part > central part > western part. From 1982 to 2004, the potential NPP in the central part had the largest increment (0.55 t x hm(-2) x a(-1)), followed by in the eastern part (0.51 t x hm(-2) x a(-1)) and western part (0.21 t x hm(-2) x a(-1)), which was consequent with the spatiotemporal pattern of climate change in the study area. In contrast, the actual NPP in the eastern, central, and western parts in the past two decades was -0.19, -0.03, and 0.20 t x hm(-2) x a(-1), respectively. Overgrazing was the main reason of grassland degradation in the central and eastern parts, and the central part was the key layout area for the implement of 'grazing withdrawal and management of grassland' project. PMID:20873612

  9. Land use and surface process domains on alpine hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Caviezel, Chatrina; Hunziker, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Shrubs and trees are generally considered to protect hillslopes from erosion. As a consequence, shrub encroachment on mountain pastures after abandoning grazing is not considered a threat to soils. However, the abandonment of mown or grazed grasslands causes a shift in vegetation composition and thus a change in landscape ecology and geomorphology. On many alpine slopes, current changes in land use and vegetation cover are accompanied by climate change, potentially generating a new geomorphic regime. Most of the debate focuses on the effect of land abandonment on water erosion rates. Generally, an established perennial vegetation cover improves the mechanical anchoring of the soil and the regulation of the soil water budget, including runoff generation and erosion. However, changing vegetation composition affects many other above- and below-ground properties like root density, -diversity and -geometry, soil structure, pore volume and acidity. Each combination of these properties can lead to a distinct scenario of dominating surface processes, often not reflected by common erosion risk assessment procedures. The study of soil properties along a chronosequence of green alder (alnusviridis) encroachment on the Unteralptal in central Switzerland reveals that shrub encroachment changes soil and vegetation properties towards an increase of resistance to run-off related erosion processes, but a decrease of slope stability against shallow landslides. The latter are a particular threat because of the currently increasing frequency of slide-triggering high magnitude rainfalls. The potential change of process domain on alpine pastures highlights the need for a careful use of erosion models when assessing future land use and climate scenarios. In mountains, but also other intensively managed agricultural landscapes, risk assessment without the appropriate reflection on the shifting relevance of surface processes carries the risk of missing future threats to environmental

  10. Statistical Downscaling Of Local Climate In The Alpine Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Severin; Philipp, Andreas; Jacobeit, Jucundus

    2016-04-01

    The impact of climate change on the alpine region was disproportional strong in the past decades compared to the surrounding areas, which becomes manifest in a higher increase in surface air temperature. Beside the thermal changes also implications for the hydrological cycle may be expected, acting as a very important factor not only for the ecosystem but also for mankind, in the form of water security or considering economical aspects like winter tourism etc. Therefore, in climate impact studies, it is necessary to focus on variables with high influence on the hydrological cycle, for example temperature, precipitation, wind, humidity and radiation. The aim of this study is to build statistical downscaling models which are able to reproduce temperature and precipitation at the mountainous alpine weather stations Zugspitze and Sonnblick and to further project these models into the future to identify possible changes in the behavior of these climate variables and with that in the hydrological cycle. Beside facing a in general very complex terrain in this high elevated regions, we have the advantage of a more direct atmospheric influence on the meteorology of the exposed weather stations from the large scale circulation. Two nonlinear statistical methods are developed to model the station-data series on a daily basis: On the one hand a conditional classification approach was used and on the other hand a model based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) was built. The latter is in focus of this presentation. One of the important steps of developing a new model approach is to find a reliable predictor setup with e.g. informative predictor variables or adequate location and size of the spatial domain. The question is: Can we include synoptic background knowledge to identify an optimal domain for an ANN approach? The yet developed ANN setups and configurations show promising results in downscaling both, temperature (up to 80 % of explained variance) and precipitation (up

  11. Functional traits and root morphology of alpine plants

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Mandy; Stroude, Raphaël; Buttler, Alexandre; Rixen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Vegetation has long been recognized to protect the soil from erosion. Understanding species differences in root morphology and functional traits is an important step to assess which species and species mixtures may provide erosion control. Furthermore, extending classification of plant functional types towards root traits may be a useful procedure in understanding important root functions. Methods In this study, pioneer data on traits of alpine plant species, i.e. plant height and shoot biomass, root depth, horizontal root spreading, root length, diameter, tensile strength, plant age and root biomass, from a disturbed site in the Swiss Alps are presented. The applicability of three classifications of plant functional types (PFTs), i.e. life form, growth form and root type, was examined for above- and below-ground plant traits. Key Results Plant traits differed considerably among species even of the same life form, e.g. in the case of total root length by more than two orders of magnitude. Within the same root diameter, species differed significantly in tensile strength: some species (Geum reptans and Luzula spicata) had roots more than twice as strong as those of other species. Species of different life forms provided different root functions (e.g. root depth and horizontal root spreading) that may be important for soil physical processes. All classifications of PFTs were helpful to categorize plant traits; however, the PFTs according to root type explained total root length far better than the other PFTs. Conclusions The results of the study illustrate the remarkable differences between root traits of alpine plants, some of which cannot be assessed from simple morphological inspection, e.g. tensile strength. PFT classification based on root traits seems useful to categorize plant traits, even though some patterns are better explained at the individual species level. PMID:21795278

  12. Mapping Alpine Vegetation Location Properties by Dense Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederheiser, Robert; Rutzinger, Martin; Lamprecht, Andrea; Steinbauer, Klaus; Winkler, Manuela; Pauli, Harald

    2016-06-01

    Highly accurate 3D micro topographic mapping in mountain research demands for light equipment and low cost solutions. Recent developments in structure from motion and dense matching techniques provide promising tools for such applications. In the following, the feasibility of terrestrial photogrammetry for mapping topographic location properties of sparsely vegetated areas in selected European mountain regions is investigated. Changes in species composition at alpine vegetation locations are indicators of climate change consequences, such as the pronounced rise of average temperatures in mountains compared to the global average. Better understanding of climate change effects on plants demand for investigations on a micro-topographic scale. We use professional and consumer grade digital single-lens reflex cameras mapping 288 plots each 3 x 3 m on 18 summits in the Alps and Mediterranean Mountains within the GLORIA (GLobal Observation Research Initiative in Alpine environments) network. Image matching tests result in accuracies that are in the order of millimetres in the XY-plane and below 0.5 mm in Z-direction at the second image pyramid level. Reconstructing vegetation proves to be a challenge due to its fine and small structured architecture and its permanent movement by wind during image acquisition, which is omnipresent on mountain summits. The produced 3D point clouds are gridded to 6 mm resolution from which topographic parameters such as slope, aspect and roughness are derived. At a later project stage these parameters will be statistically linked to botanical reference data in order to conclude on relations between specific location properties and species compositions.

  13. Mass balance investigation of alpine glaciers through LANDSAT TM data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayr, Klaus J.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) data of the Pasterze Glacier and the Kleines Fleisskees in the Austrian Alps was undertaken and compared with meteorological data of nearby weather stations. Alpine or valley glaciers can be used to study regional and worldwide climate changes. Alpine glaciers respond relatively fast to a warming or cooling trend in temperature through an advance or a retreat of the terminus. In addition, the mass balance of the glacier is being affected. Last year two TM scenes of the Pasterze Glacier of Aug. 1984 and Aug. 1986 were used to study the difference in reflectance. This year, in addition to the scenes from last year, one MSS scene of Aug. 1976 and a TM scene from 1988 were examined for both the Pasterze Glacier and the Kleines Fleisskees. During the overpass of the LANDSAT on 6 Aug. 1988 ground truthing on the Pasterze Glacier was undertaken. The results indicate that there was considerable more reflectance in 1976 and 1984 than in 1986 and 1988. The climatological data of the weather stations Sonnblick and Rudolfshuette were examined and compared with the results found through the LANDSAT data. There were relations between the meteorological and LANDSAT data: the average temperature over the last 100 years showed an increase of .4 C, the snowfall was declining during the same time period but the overall precipitation did not reveal any significant change over the same period. With the use of an interactive image analysis computer, the LANDSAT scenes were studied. The terminus of the Pasterze Glacier retreated 348 m and the terminus of the Kleines Fleisskees 121 m since 1965. This approach using LANDSAT MSS and TM digital data in conjunction with meteorological data can be effectively used to monitor regional and worldwide climate changes.

  14. Subglacial extensional fracture development and implications for Alpine Valley evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2014-01-01

    stresses induced through exhumation and tectonic processes play a key role in the topographic evolution of alpine valleys. Using a finite difference model combining the effects of tectonics, erosion, and long-term bedrock strength, we assess the development of near-surface in situ stresses and predict bedrock behavior in response to glacial erosion in an Alpine Valley (the Matter Valley, southern Switzerland). Initial stresses are derived from the regional tectonic history, which is characterized by ongoing transtensional or extensional strain throughout exhumation of the brittle crust. We find that bedrock stresses beneath glacial ice in an initial V-shaped topography are sufficient to induce localized extensional fracturing in a zone extending laterally 600 m from the valley axis. The limit of this zone is reflected in the landscape today by a valley "shoulder," separating linear upper mountain slopes from the deep U-shaped inner valley. We propose that this extensional fracture development enhanced glacial quarrying between the valley shoulder and axis and identify a positive feedback where enhanced quarrying promoted valley incision, which in turn increased in situ stress concentrations near the valley floor, assisting erosion and further driving rapid U-shaped valley development. During interglacial periods, these stresses were relieved through brittle strain or topographic modification, and without significant erosion to reach more highly stressed bedrock, subsequent glaciation caused a reduction in differential stress and suppressed extensional fracturing. A combination of stress relief during interglacial periods, and increased ice accumulation rates in highly incised valleys, will reduce the likelihood of repeat enhanced erosion events.

  15. 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging of rat lung ARDS using gradient-modulated SWIFT with retrospective respiratory gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Lei, Jianxun; Utecht, Lynn; Garwood, Michael; Ingbar, David H.; Bhargava, Maneesh

    2015-03-01

    SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (SWIFT) with gradient modulation and DC navigator retrospective gating is introduced as a 3D cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for the lung. In anesthetized normal rats, the quasi-simultaneous excitation and acquisition in SWIFT enabled extremely high sensitivity to the fast-decaying parenchymal signals (TE=~4 μs), which are invisible with conventional MRI techniques. Respiratory motion information was extracted from DC navigator signals and the SWIFT data were reconstructed to 3D cine images with 16 respiratory phases. To test this technique's capabilities, rats exposed to > 95% O2 for 60 hours for induction of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), were imaged and compared with normal rat lungs (N=7 and 5 for ARDS and normal groups, respectively). SWIFT images showed lung tissue density differences along the gravity direction. In the cine SWIFT images, a parenchymal signal drop at the inhalation phase was consistently observed for both normal and ARDS rats due to lung inflation (i.e. decrease of the proton density), but the drop was less for ARDS rats. Depending on the respiratory phase and lung region, the lungs from the ARDS rats showed 1-24% higher parenchymal signal intensities relative to the normal rat lungs, likely due to accumulated extravascular water (EVLW). Those results demonstrate that SWIFT has high enough sensitivity for detecting the lung proton density changes due to gravity, different phases of respiration and accumulation of EVLW in the rat ARDS lungs.

  16. Molecular genetics and diversity of primary biogenic aerosol particles in urban, rural, and high-alpine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Després, V.; Nowoisky, J.; Klose, M.; Conrad, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2007-02-01

    This study explores the applicability of molecular methods for the characterization of primary biogenic aerosol (PBA) particles in the atmosphere. Samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and total suspended particulates (TSP) have been collected on different types of filter materials at urban, rural, and high-alpine locations along an altitude transect in the south of Germany (Munich, Hohenpeissenberg, Mt. Zugspitze). From filter aliquots loaded with about one milligram of air particulate matter, DNA could be extracted and DNA sequences could be determined for bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. Sequence analyses were used to determine the identity of biological organisms, and terminal restriction length polymorphism analyses (T-RFLP) were applied to estimate diversities and relative abundances of bacteria. Investigations of blank and background samples showed that filter materials have to be decontaminated prior to use, and that the sampling and handling procedures have to be carefully controlled to avoid artifacts in the analyses. Mass fractions of DNA in PM2.5 were found to be around 0.05% in urban, rural, and high alpine aerosols. The average concentration of DNA determined for urban air was on the order of ~7 ng m-3, indicating that human adults may inhale about one microgram of DNA per day (corresponding to ~105 haploid human genomes). Most of the bacterial sequences found in PM2.5 were from Proteobacteria (42) and some from Actinobacteria (10) and Firmicutes (1). The fungal sequences were characteristic for Ascomycota (3) and Basidiomycetes (1), which are known to actively discharge spores into the atmosphere. The plant sequences could be attributed to green plants (2) and moss spores (2), while animal DNA was found only for one unicellular eukaryote (protist). Over 80% of the 53 bacterial sequences could be matched with about 40% of the 19 T-RF peaks (58 to 494 base pair length) found in the investigated PM2.5 samples. The results demonstrate that the T

  17. [Adaptation mechanisms of alpine plants photosynthetic apparatus against adverse stress: a review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Gao, Hui-Hui; Liu, Yue-Shan; Mu, Ping; Yu, Xiao-Jun; An, Li-Zhe; Zhang, Feng

    2013-07-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the vital physiological processes easily affected by environmental changes. As a plant group growing in specific low temperature and strong irradiance environment, the photosynthetic apparatus of alpine plants have developed special morphologically and physiologically mechanisms in adapting to this extreme adverse environment. However, due to the high heterogeneity of habitats, there exist great differences in the photo-protection and adaptation mechanisms among different alpine plants. This paper reviewed the recent researches about the morphology and ultramicro-anatomical structure of the chloroplasts in photosynthetic apparatus of alpine plants and the photo-protection and adaptation mechanisms of the plants, and proposed the further research directions on the physiological adaptation of the photosynthesis of alpine plants.

  18. SEA in local land use planning - first experience in the Alpine States

    SciTech Connect

    Jiricka, Alexandra Proebstl, Ulrike

    2008-05-15

    In the Alpine area, planning decisions can result in far-reaching consequences because of the high sensitivity of the Alpine ecosystems. This article is based on two hypotheses: (1) The Alpine states/regions were aware of their sensitive environment and therefore recognized the necessity of introducing a comparable instrument to assess local land use planning. (2) By introducing this differentiated assessment tool, namely SEA, an increase in costs may be the consequence. However, better and more transparent planning can contribute to the enhancement of planning standards. To reveal the validity of these assumptions the legal implementation in the Alpine countries Austria, Germany, Italy and France was examined as well as first practical experience resulting from the determined procedures. The results of the implementation process in the four states were compared and discussed on the basis of selected process steps of SEA.

  19. [Effects of seasonal snow cover on soil nitrogen transformation in alpine ecosystem: a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Wu, Yan; He, Yi-xin; Wu, Ning; Sun, Geng; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Jun-jun

    2011-08-01

    Seasonal snow cover has pronounced effects on the soil nitrogen concentration and transformation in alpine ecosystem. Snowfall is an important form of nitrogen deposition, which directly affects the content of soil available nitrogen. Different depths and different duration of snow cover caused by snowfall may lead the heterogeneity of abiotic factors (soil temperature and moisture) and biotic factors (soil microbes, alpine plants, and alpine animals), and further, produce complicated effects on the mineralization and immobilization of soil nitrogen. This paper introduced in emphasis the inherent mechanisms of soil nitrogen mineralization and leaching under the effects of frequent freeze-thaw events during the durative melting of snow cover, and summarized the main research results of field in situ experiments about the effects of seasonal snow cover on soil nitrogen in alpine ecosystem based on the possible changes in snow cover in the future. Some suggestions with regard to the effects of seasonal snow cover on soil nitrogen were put forward.

  20. [Effects of seasonal snow cover on soil nitrogen transformation in alpine ecosystem: a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Wu, Yan; He, Yi-xin; Wu, Ning; Sun, Geng; Zhang, Lin; Xu, Jun-jun

    2011-08-01

    Seasonal snow cover has pronounced effects on the soil nitrogen concentration and transformation in alpine ecosystem. Snowfall is an important form of nitrogen deposition, which directly affects the content of soil available nitrogen. Different depths and different duration of snow cover caused by snowfall may lead the heterogeneity of abiotic factors (soil temperature and moisture) and biotic factors (soil microbes, alpine plants, and alpine animals), and further, produce complicated effects on the mineralization and immobilization of soil nitrogen. This paper introduced in emphasis the inherent mechanisms of soil nitrogen mineralization and leaching under the effects of frequent freeze-thaw events during the durative melting of snow cover, and summarized the main research results of field in situ experiments about the effects of seasonal snow cover on soil nitrogen in alpine ecosystem based on the possible changes in snow cover in the future. Some suggestions with regard to the effects of seasonal snow cover on soil nitrogen were put forward. PMID:22097387

  1. Interior of PumpGenerating Plant, showing two VoestAlpine pumpgenerators at south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior of Pump-Generating Plant, showing two Voest-Alpine pump-generators at south end of plant, looking southwest. - Columbia Basin Project, Grand Coulee Pump-Generating Plant, Grand Coulee, Grant County, WA

  2. Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Bursts and Insight from Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.

    2011-01-01

    A new revolution in GRB observation and theory has begun over the last 3 years since the launch of the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. The new window into high energy gamma-rays opened by the Fermi-LAT is providing insight into prompt emission mechanisms and possibly also afterglow physics. The LAT detected GRBs appear to be a new unique subset of extremely energetic and bright bursts. In this talk I will discuss the context and recent discoveries from these LAT GRBs and the large database of broadband observations collected by Swift over the last 7 years and how through comparisons between the Swift, GBM, and LAT GRB samples, we can learn about the unique characteristics and relationships between each population.

  3. The Swift Supergiant Fast X-Ray Transients Project:. [A Review, New Results and Future Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Ducci, L.; Esposito, P.; Vercellone, S.; Bocchino, F.; Burrows, D. N.; Kennea, J. A.; Krimm, H. A.; Gehrels, N.; Farinelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a review of the Supergiant Fast X-ray Transients (SFXT) Project, a systematic investigation of the properties of SFXTs with a strategy that combines Swift monitoring programs with outburst follow-up observations. This strategy has quickly tripled the available sets of broad-band data of SFXT outbursts, and gathered a wealth of out-of-outburst data, which have led us to a broad-band spectral characterization, an assessment of the fraction of the time these sources spend in each phase, and their duty cycle of inactivity. We present some new observational results obtained through our outburst follow-ups, as fitting examples of the exceptional capabilities of Swift in catching bright flares and monitor them panchromatically.

  4. Swift-XRT detected a new outburst of Cir X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanna, A.; Motta, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the MAXI transient alert on 2016-09-16 16:56:22 UT, we requested a Swift-XRT observation. Swift performed a pointed ~1ks observation on 2016-09-18T13:50:57 in the direction of the neutron star binary system Cir X-1, detecting X-ray activity at a source position RA=230.1695 deg, DEC=-57.16703 deg (Enhanced position with 2.2'' radius uncertainty at 90% confidence level) compatible within errors with Cir X-1.The unabsorbed X-ray flux in the range 0.3-10 keV of (3+/-1)E-11 erg/cm2/s revealed week activity of the source.

  5. SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE MONITORING OF FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES OF INTEREST

    SciTech Connect

    Stroh, Michael C.; Falcone, Abe D.

    2013-08-15

    We describe a long-term Swift monitoring program of Fermi gamma-ray sources, particularly the 23 gamma-ray ''sources of interest''.We present a systematic analysis of the Swift X-Ray Telescope light curves and hardness ratios of these sources, and we calculate excess variability. We present data for the time interval of 2004 December 22 through 2012 August 31. We describe the analysis methods used to produce these data products, and we discuss the availability of these data in an online repository, which continues to grow from more data on these sources and from a growing list of additional sources. This database should be of use to the broad astronomical community for long-term studies of the variability of these objects and for inclusion in multiwavelength studies.

  6. Analysis of the observed and intrinsic durations of Swift/BAT gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnopolski, Mariusz

    2016-07-01

    The duration distribution of 947 GRBs observed by Swift/BAT, as well as its subsample of 347 events with measured redshift, allowing to examine the durations in both the observer and rest frames, are examined. Using a maximum log-likelihood method, mixtures of two and three standard Gaussians are fitted to each sample, and the adequate model is chosen based on the value of the difference in the log-likelihoods, Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion. It is found that a two-Gaussian is a better description than a three-Gaussian, and that the presumed intermediate-duration class is unlikely to be present in the Swift duration data.

  7. What is the Magnetic Field of Magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspi, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the mean magnetic field of known magnetars has been lowered by discoveries of sources with magnetic fields < 1x10^14 G. In particular, Swift J1822.3-1606 and SGR 0418+5729 appear to have fields that are ~1x10^13 G. This begs the question of how low the true magnetic field distribution of magnetars stretches and whether it is in fact distinct from that of the main pulsar population. Here we propose to perform phase-coherent timing of Swift J1822.3-1606 with Chandra. With our proposed timing campaign we will be able to distinguish between ambiguous measurements now present in the literature and determine the true spin-inferred magnetic field of this interesting object.

  8. Search for an IR counterpart to the newly discovered transient Swift J11822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, R. M.; Lucas, P. W.; Maccarone, T.

    2011-07-01

    We have searched for potential near-infrared counterparts to the new Galactic Center X-ray transient, Swift J1822.3-1606 (ATEL #3488, #3489, #3490, #3491, #3493, #3495, #3496, #3501) using the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) Catalog (Lucas et al., 2008, MNRAS, 391, 136). Within the enhanced Swift-XRT error circle (1.8" radius) centered at RA 18:22:18.00, Dec -16:04:26.8 (ATel #3493), there are two infrared stellar sources in the UKIDSS GPS catalog: RA Dec J H K star 1 18:22:17.9 -16:04:25.9 13.90 12.37 11.65 star 2 18:22:18:0 -16:04:28.2 16.50 15.44 14.97 These are the same as "S1" and "S2" identified by Gorosabel et al.

  9. XMM-Newton and Swift observations of the Type IIb supernova 2011dh in Messier 51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Sergio; Immler, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    The Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh exploded in the nearby galaxy M51 (the Whirlpool galaxy) and provides us with one of the best laboratories to study early high-energy emission from SNe. We give here a comprehensive view of the X-ray properties of SN 2011dh from the analyses of two pointed XMM-Newton early observations as well as the full Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) data set (163 ks). Due to the high XMM-Newton throughput, we were able to satisfactorily fit the X-ray spectrum with two hot diffuse gas components including an additional absorption component to our Galaxy. A power-law model provided a worse description of the data. In addition, the early Swift XRT light curve hints of a flux excess at early times (≲3 d), consistent with the adiabatic cooling of stellar's photosphere a few days after the shock breakout.

  10. The Swift Project Contamination Control Program: A Case Study of Balancing Cost, Schedule and Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Day, Diane T.; Secunda, Mark S.; Rosecrans, Glenn P.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Observatory will be launched in early 2004 to examine the dynamic process of gamma ray burst (GRB) events. The multi-wavelength Observatory will study the GRB afterglow characteristics, which will help to answer fundamental questions about both the structure and the evolution of the universe. The Swift Observatory Contamination Control Program has been developed to aid in ensuring the success of the on-orbit performance of two of the primary instruments: the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT). During the design phase of the Observatory, the contamination control program evolved and trade studies were performed to assess the risk of contaminating the sensitive UVOT and XRT optics during both pre-launch testing and on-orbit operations, within the constraints of the overall program cost and schedule.

  11. Swift follow-up of the gravitational wave source GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. A.; Kennea, J. A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Beardmore, A. P.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Cenko, S. B.; Gehrels, N.; Giommi, P.; Gronwall, C.; Marshall, F. E.; Malesani, D.; Markwardt, C. B.; Mingo, B.; Nousek, J. A.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Pagani, C.; Page, K. L.; Palmer, D. M.; Perri, M.; Racusin, J. L.; Siegel, M. H.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-07-01

    The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (ALIGO) observatory recently reported the first direct detection of gravitational waves (GW) which triggered ALIGO on 2015 September 14. We report on observations taken with the Swift satellite two days after the trigger. No new X-ray, optical, UV or hard X-ray sources were detected in our observations, which were focused on nearby galaxies in the GW error region and covered 4.7 deg2 (˜2 per cent of the probability in the rapidly available GW error region; 0.3 per cent of the probability from the final GW error region, which was produced several months after the trigger). We describe the rapid Swift response and automated analysis of the X-ray telescope and UV/Optical telescope data, and note the importance to electromagnetic follow-up of early notification of the progenitor details inferred from GW analysis.

  12. Preliminary assessment report for Camp Swift Military Reservation, Installation 48070, Bastrop County, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard property in Bastrop County, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Camp Swift property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program (IRP). The review of both historical and current practices at the property indicated that the activities at Camp Swift include no operations considered to have an adverse impact to the environment. The recommendation, therefore, is that no further IRP action is necessary at this property.

  13. Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM observations of SGR J1935+2154 bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin

    2016-07-01

    SGR J1935+2154 is a new member of the magnetar family. It was discovered from a short burst which triggered Swift/BAT on 2014 July 5. In 2015 February, the source was detected in the burst active episode again which lasted for about 11 days. We searched for magnetar burst using Bayesian Blocks method through Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM observations, and totally found 27 events including 3 in 2014 and 24 in 2015. In this talk we will present the result of our detailed analysis of the temporal and spectral properties of these short bursts, and briefly discuss the connection between burst activity and the persistent emission of the source.

  14. The Successful Synergy of Swift and Fermi/GBM in Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2011-01-01

    The magnetar rate of discovery has increased dramatically in the last decade. Five sources were discovered in the last three years alone as a result of the very efficient synergy among three X- and .gamma-ray instruments on NASA satellites: the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the Fermi/Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer; RXTE/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). To date, there are approx. 25 magnetar candidates, of which two are (one each) in the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud and the rest reside on the Galactic plane of our Milky Way. I will discuss here the main properties of the Magnetar Population and the common projects that can be achieved with the synergy of Swift and GBM.

  15. The Swift Project Contamination Control Program: A Case study of Balancing Cost, Schedule and Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Patricia A.; Day, Diane; Secunda, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The Swift Observatory will be launched in early 2004 to examine the dynamic process of gamma ray burst (GRB) events. The multi-wavelength Observatory will study the GRB afterglow characteristics, which will help to answer fundamental questions about both the structure and the evolution of the universe. The Swift Observatory Contamination Control Program has been developed to aid in ensuring the success of the on-orbit performance of two of the primary instruments: the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the X-Ray Telescope (XRT). During the design phase of the Observatory, the contamination control program evolved and trade studies were performed to assess the risk of contaminating the sensitive UVOT and XRT optics during both pre-launch testing and on-orbit operations, within the constraints of the overall program cost and schedule.

  16. Response of CdZnTe Detectors on the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Tashiro, M.

    Swift (Gehrels, 2000) is the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) explorer, that is scheduled for launch in 2004. The Swift's major instrument Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) detector array sits Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe, CZT) semiconductor devices under a coded mask. The array has 32,768 individual Cd0.9Zn0.1Te1.0 detectors (4 × 4 mm^2 large, 2mm thick) that have a total detector area of 5240 cm^2. CdZnTe materials are able to operate at room temperature for its large band gap, and also have a high average atomic number which makes them sensitive to hard X-rays (15 ˜ 150 keV). We investigate energy response of the BAT detector for which to dedicate spectroscopy and imaging in observations of GRBs.

  17. Effect of Swift Heavy Ion Irradiation on Lithium Zinc Silicate Glasses: A Photoluminescence Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jogad, M. S.; Jogad, R. M.; Sudarsan, V.; Krishna, P. S. R.; Kothiyal, G. P.

    2011-07-15

    Lithium zinc silicate glasses with and without copper were prepared by melt-quench method and their luminescence characteristics after swift heavy ion irradiation has been investigated. Based on these studies it is established that both these glasses contain colour centres and the luminescence from such centres get significantly quenched once these samples get irradiated with 100 MeV swift heavy Ag{sup +} ions with a fluence of 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. Trapping of the charge carriers by the increased defect concentration brought about by irradiation is responsible for the decrease in the luminescence intensity from the irradiated samples. Copper in these glasses mainly exists as Cu{sup +} ions as revealed by the broad emission around 500 nm.

  18. Seeds of alpine plants are short lived: implications for long-term conservation

    PubMed Central

    Mondoni, Andrea; Probert, Robin J.; Rossi, Graziano; Vegini, Emanuele; Hay, Fiona R.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Alpine plants are considered one of the groups of species most sensitive to the direct and indirect threats to ecosystems caused by land use and climate change. Collecting and banking seeds of plant species is recognized as an effective tool for providing propagating material to re-establish wild plant populations and for habitat repair. However, seeds from cold wet environments have been shown to be relatively short lived in storage, and therefore successful long-term seed conservation for alpine plants may be difficult. Here, the life spans of 69 seed lots representing 63 related species from alpine and lowland locations from northern Italy are compared. Methods Seeds were placed into experimental storage at 45 °C and 60 % relative humidity (RH) and regularly sampled for germination. The time taken in storage for viability to fall to 50 % (p50) was determined using probit analysis and used as a measure of relative seed longevity between seed lots. Key Results Across species, p50 at 45 °C and 60 % RH varied from 4·7 to 95·5 d. Seed lots from alpine populations/species had significantly lower p50 values compared with those from lowland populations/species; the lowland seed lots showed a slower rate of loss of germinability, higher initial seed viability, or both. Seeds were progressively longer lived with increased temperature and decreased rainfall at the collecting site. Conclusions Seeds of alpine plants are short lived in storage compared with those from lowland populations/related taxa. The lower resistance to ageing in seeds of alpine plants may arise from low selection pressure for seed resistance to ageing and/or damage incurred during seed development due to the cool wet conditions of the alpine climate. Long-term seed conservation of several alpine species using conventional seed banking methods will be problematic. PMID:21081585

  19. Age of amphibolites associated with alpine peridotites in the Dinaride ophiolite zone, Yugoslavia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Coleman, R.G.; Karamata, S.; Pamic, J.

    1975-01-01

    Amphibolites associated with alpine peridotites in the Central Ophiolite zone in Yugoslavia have K-Ar ages of 160-170 m.y. These amphibolites and associated peridotites underwent deep-seated metamorphism prior to tectonic emplacement into the sedimentary-volcanic assemblage of the Dinarides. The alpine peridotites and associated local rocks of the ophiolite suite are interpreted as Jurassic oceanic crust and upper mantle. ?? 1975.

  20. Obscuring Torus Geometry from the NuSTAR Survey of Swift/BAT AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balokovic, Mislav; Harrison, Fiona; NuSTAR

    2016-06-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) has enabled studies of the local active galactic nuclei (AGN) to extend into the spectral window above 10 keV with unprecedented spatial resolution and two orders of magnitude better sensitivity than any other instrument operating in that energy range. As a part of its long-term extragalactic program NuSTAR is surveying the nearby population of AGN detected at hard X-ray energies by the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (Swift/BAT). I will present spectroscopic results based on NuSTAR and Swift observations of ~150 Swift/BAT AGN surveyed in the first three years of NuSTAR operation. This sample forms an atlas of the highest quality hard X-ray spectra available to date for a large number of AGN, providing unprecedented insight into the variety AGN spectra in the hard X-ray band. In addition to phenomenology, which is an essential ingredient of Cosmic X-ray Background studies, it is possible to use new fitting models to directly probe the geometry of the toroidal obscurer (torus). Its main spectral features lie within the NuSTAR bandpass, making it possible to test the common assumption that a similar Compton-thick torus exists around essentially every Seyfert-type AGN. I will discuss torus geometry constraints based on the X-ray spectra in relation to those from other wavelengths, the effects on interpretation of high-redshift AGN observations, and the limitations of the current results.

  1. AGN in the Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL Hard X-ray Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckmann, Volker; Tueller, Jack; Baumgartner, Wayne; Markwardt, Craig; Mushotzky, Richard; Skinner, Gerry

    2008-01-01

    Two hard X-ray surveys are in progress at this time. They provide a unique new window on compact objects and black holes. I will discuss how these two surveys complement each other and the potential for improved coordination that could yield significant near term results in both sensitivity and time coverage. I will pay particular attention to the discovery of faint sources including new results from the 36 month survey from Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT).

  2. Swift/UVOT Observations of the Type II Supernova PTF10gva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenko, S. B.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Nugent, P. E.; Fox, D. B.

    2010-05-01

    We triggered our Swift program ("Unveiling New Classes of Transients with the Palomar Transient Factory; PI Kulkarni) to obtain target of opportunity observations of the type II supernova PTF10gva (ATEL #2603). Observations were obtained with the on-board Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope in the V, B, U, UW1, UM2, and UW2 filters beginning at May 7.19 2010 UT. PTF10gva is clearly detected in all filters.

  3. A new low-B magnetar: Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camero-Arranz, A.; Rea, N.; Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Pons, J. A.; Mignani, R. P.; Turolla, R.; Zane, S.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Campana, S.; Enoto, T.; Gehrels, N.; Göğüş, E.; Götz, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Makishima, K.; Mereghetti, S.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the long term X-ray monitoring with Swift, RXTE, Suzaku, Chandra, and XMM-Newton of the outburst of the newly discovered magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606 (SGR 1822-1606), from the first observations soon after the detection of the short X-ray bursts which led to its discovery (July 2011), through the first stages of its outburst decay (April 2012). Our X-ray timing analysis finds the source rotating with a period of P = 8.43772016(2) s and a period derivative Ṗ = 8.3(2) × 10-14 ss-1, which entails an inferred dipolar surface magnetic field of B ≃ 2.7 × 1013 G at the equator. This measurement makes Swift J1822.3-1606 the second lowest magnetic field magnetar (after SGR 0418+5729; Rea et al. 2010). Following the flux and spectral evolution from the beginning of the outburst, we find that the flux decreased by about an order of magnitude, with a subtle softening of the spectrum, both typical of the outburst decay of magnetars. By modeling the secular thermal evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606, we find that the observed timing properties of the source, as well as its quiescent X-ray luminosity, can be reproduced if it was born with a poloidal and crustal toroidal fields of Bp ~ 1.5 × 1014 G and Btor ~ 7 × 1014 G, respectively, and if its current age is ~550 kyr (Rea et al. 2012).

  4. Efficiency of lift production in flapping and gliding flight of swifts.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Per; Hedenström, Anders; Bomphrey, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Many flying animals use both flapping and gliding flight as part of their routine behaviour. These two kinematic patterns impose conflicting requirements on wing design for aerodynamic efficiency and, in the absence of extreme morphing, wings cannot be optimised for both flight modes. In gliding flight, the wing experiences uniform incident flow and the optimal shape is a high aspect ratio wing with an elliptical planform. In flapping flight, on the other hand, the wing tip travels faster than the root, creating a spanwise velocity gradient. To compensate, the optimal wing shape should taper towards the tip (reducing the local chord) and/or twist from root to tip (reducing local angle of attack). We hypothesised that, if a bird is limited in its ability to morph its wings and adapt its wing shape to suit both flight modes, then a preference towards flapping flight optimization will be expected since this is the most energetically demanding flight mode. We tested this by studying a well-known flap-gliding species, the common swift, by measuring the wakes generated by two birds, one in gliding and one in flapping flight in a wind tunnel. We calculated span efficiency, the efficiency of lift production, and found that the flapping swift had consistently higher span efficiency than the gliding swift. This supports our hypothesis and suggests that even though swifts have been shown previously to increase their lift-to-drag ratio substantially when gliding, the wing morphology is tuned to be more aerodynamically efficient in generating lift during flapping. Since body drag can be assumed to be similar for both flapping and gliding, it follows that the higher total drag in flapping flight compared with gliding flight is primarily a consequence of an increase in wing profile drag due to the flapping motion, exceeding the reduction in induced drag. PMID:24587260

  5. Feather roughness reduces flow separation during low Reynolds number glides of swifts.

    PubMed

    van Bokhorst, Evelien; de Kat, Roeland; Elsinga, Gerrit E; Lentink, David

    2015-10-01

    Swifts are aerodynamically sophisticated birds with a small arm and large hand wing that provides them with exquisite control over their glide performance. However, their hand wings have a seemingly unsophisticated surface roughness that is poised to disturb flow. This roughness of about 2% chord length is formed by the valleys and ridges of overlapping primary feathers with thick protruding rachides, which make the wing stiffer. An earlier flow study of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition over prepared swift wings suggested that swifts can attain laminar flow at a low angle of attack. In contrast, aerodynamic design theory suggests that airfoils must be extremely smooth to attain such laminar flow. In hummingbirds, which have similarly rough wings, flow measurements on a 3D printed model suggest that the flow separates at the leading edge and becomes turbulent well above the rachis bumps in a detached shear layer. The aerodynamic function of wing roughness in small birds is, therefore, not fully understood. Here, we performed particle image velocimetry and force measurements to compare smooth versus rough 3D-printed models of the swift hand wing. The high-resolution boundary layer measurements show that the flow over rough wings is indeed laminar at a low angle of attack and a low Reynolds number, but becomes turbulent at higher values. In contrast, the boundary layer over the smooth wing forms open laminar separation bubbles that extend beyond the trailing edge. The boundary layer dynamics of the smooth surface varies non-linearly as a function of angle of attack and Reynolds number, whereas the rough surface boasts more consistent turbulent boundary layer dynamics. Comparison of the corresponding drag values, lift values and glide ratios suggests, however, that glide performance is equivalent. The increased structural performance, boundary layer robustness and equivalent aerodynamic performance of rough wings might have provided small (proto) birds with

  6. Feather roughness reduces flow separation during low Reynolds number glides of swifts.

    PubMed

    van Bokhorst, Evelien; de Kat, Roeland; Elsinga, Gerrit E; Lentink, David

    2015-10-01

    Swifts are aerodynamically sophisticated birds with a small arm and large hand wing that provides them with exquisite control over their glide performance. However, their hand wings have a seemingly unsophisticated surface roughness that is poised to disturb flow. This roughness of about 2% chord length is formed by the valleys and ridges of overlapping primary feathers with thick protruding rachides, which make the wing stiffer. An earlier flow study of laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition over prepared swift wings suggested that swifts can attain laminar flow at a low angle of attack. In contrast, aerodynamic design theory suggests that airfoils must be extremely smooth to attain such laminar flow. In hummingbirds, which have similarly rough wings, flow measurements on a 3D printed model suggest that the flow separates at the leading edge and becomes turbulent well above the rachis bumps in a detached shear layer. The aerodynamic function of wing roughness in small birds is, therefore, not fully understood. Here, we performed particle image velocimetry and force measurements to compare smooth versus rough 3D-printed models of the swift hand wing. The high-resolution boundary layer measurements show that the flow over rough wings is indeed laminar at a low angle of attack and a low Reynolds number, but becomes turbulent at higher values. In contrast, the boundary layer over the smooth wing forms open laminar separation bubbles that extend beyond the trailing edge. The boundary layer dynamics of the smooth surface varies non-linearly as a function of angle of attack and Reynolds number, whereas the rough surface boasts more consistent turbulent boundary layer dynamics. Comparison of the corresponding drag values, lift values and glide ratios suggests, however, that glide performance is equivalent. The increased structural performance, boundary layer robustness and equivalent aerodynamic performance of rough wings might have provided small (proto) birds with

  7. Nonvariational real Swift-Hohenberg equation for biological, chemical, and optical systems.

    PubMed

    Kozyreff, G; Tlidi, M

    2007-09-01

    We derive asymptotically an order parameter equation in the limit where nascent bistability and long-wavelength modulation instabilities coalesce. This equation is a variant of the Swift-Hohenberg equation that generally contains nonvariational terms of the form psinabla(2)psi and /nablapsi/(2). We briefly review some of the properties already derived for this equation and derive it on three examples taken from chemical, biological, and optical contexts. Finally, we derive the equation on a general class of partial differential systems.

  8. Flight Calibration and Operations of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, D.N.; Hill, J.E.; Nousek, J.A.; Wells, A.A.; Osborne, J.P.; Mukerjee, K.; Chincarini, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Campana, S.

    2004-09-28

    We present the current on-orbit calibration and operational plans for the Swift XRT. The XRT is a largely autonomous instrument and requires very little manual commanding for normal operations. A detailed calibration plan is being developed to verify the instrumental performance on-orbit, including effective area, point spread function, vignetting, spectroscopic performance, and timing accuracy. Operational plans include regular calibration measurements using on-board calibration sources as well as periodic calibration observations using celestial targets.

  9. Efficiency of Lift Production in Flapping and Gliding Flight of Swifts

    PubMed Central

    Henningsson, Per; Hedenström, Anders; Bomphrey, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Many flying animals use both flapping and gliding flight as part of their routine behaviour. These two kinematic patterns impose conflicting requirements on wing design for aerodynamic efficiency and, in the absence of extreme morphing, wings cannot be optimised for both flight modes. In gliding flight, the wing experiences uniform incident flow and the optimal shape is a high aspect ratio wing with an elliptical planform. In flapping flight, on the other hand, the wing tip travels faster than the root, creating a spanwise velocity gradient. To compensate, the optimal wing shape should taper towards the tip (reducing the local chord) and/or twist from root to tip (reducing local angle of attack). We hypothesised that, if a bird is limited in its ability to morph its wings and adapt its wing shape to suit both flight modes, then a preference towards flapping flight optimization will be expected since this is the most energetically demanding flight mode. We tested this by studying a well-known flap-gliding species, the common swift, by measuring the wakes generated by two birds, one in gliding and one in flapping flight in a wind tunnel. We calculated span efficiency, the efficiency of lift production, and found that the flapping swift had consistently higher span efficiency than the gliding swift. This supports our hypothesis and suggests that even though swifts have been shown previously to increase their lift-to-drag ratio substantially when gliding, the wing morphology is tuned to be more aerodynamically efficient in generating lift during flapping. Since body drag can be assumed to be similar for both flapping and gliding, it follows that the higher total drag in flapping flight compared with gliding flight is primarily a consequence of an increase in wing profile drag due to the flapping motion, exceeding the reduction in induced drag. PMID:24587260

  10. XMM-Newton and Swift observations of WZ Sagittae: spectral and timing analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucita, A. A.; Kuulkers, E.; De Paolis, F.; Mukai, K.; Ingrosso, G.; Maiolo, B. M. T.

    2014-06-01

    Context. WZ Sagittae is the prototype object of a subclass of dwarf novae with rare and long (super)outbursts, in which a white dwarf primary accretes matter from a low mass companion. High-energy observations offer the possibility of a better understanding of the disk-accretion mechanism in WZ Sge-like binaries. Aims: We used archival XMM-Newton and Swift data to characterize the X-ray spectral and temporal properties of WZ Sge in quiescence. Methods: We performed a detailed timing analysis of the simultaneous X-ray and UV light curves obtained with the EPIC and OM instruments on board XMM-Newton in 2003. We employed several techniques in this study, including a correlation study between the two curves. We also performed an X-ray spectral analysis using the EPIC data and Swift/XRT data obtained in 2011. Results: We find that the X-ray intensity is clearly modulated at a period of ≃28.96 s, confirming previously published preliminary results. We find that the X-ray spectral shape of WZ Sge remains practically unchanged between the XMM-Newton and Swift observations. However, after correcting for interstellar absorption, the intrinsic luminosity is estimated to be LXUna = (2.65 ± 0.06) × 1030 erg s-1 and LXUna = (1.57 ± 0.03) × 1030 erg s-1 in 2003 and 2011, respectively. During the Swift/XRT observation, the observed flux is a factor ≃2 lower than that observed by XMM-Newton but is similar to the quiescent levels that are observed various times before the 2001 outburst.

  11. SWIFT X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF CLASSICAL NOVAE. II. THE SUPER SOFT SOURCE SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Greg J.; Ness, Jan-Uwe; Osborne, J. P.; Page, K. L.; Evans, P. A.; Beardmore, A. P.; Walter, Frederick M.; Andrew Helton, L.; Woodward, Charles E.; Bode, Mike; Starrfield, Sumner; Drake, Jeremy J.

    2011-12-01

    The Swift gamma-ray burst satellite is an excellent facility for studying novae. Its rapid response time and sensitive X-ray detector provides an unparalleled opportunity to investigate the previously poorly sampled evolution of novae in the X-ray regime. This paper presents Swift observations of 52 Galactic/Magellanic Cloud novae. We included the X-Ray Telescope (0.3-10 keV) instrument count rates and the UltraViolet and Optical Telescope (1700-8000 A) filter photometry. Also included in the analysis are the publicly available pointed observations of 10 additional novae the X-ray archives. This is the largest X-ray sample of Galactic/Magellanic Cloud novae yet assembled and consists of 26 novae with Super Soft X-ray emission, 19 from Swift observations. The data set shows that the faster novae have an early hard X-ray phase that is usually missing in slower novae. The Super Soft X-ray phase occurs earlier and does not last as long in fast novae compared to slower novae. All the Swift novae with sufficient observations show that novae are highly variable with rapid variability and different periodicities. In the majority of cases, nuclear burning ceases less than three years after the outburst begins. Previous relationships, such as the nuclear burning duration versus t{sub 2} or the expansion velocity of the eject and nuclear burning duration versus the orbital period, are shown to be poorly correlated with the full sample indicating that additional factors beyond the white dwarf mass and binary separation play important roles in the evolution of a nova outburst. Finally, we confirm two optical phenomena that are correlated with strong, soft X-ray emission which can be used to further increase the efficiency of X-ray campaigns.

  12. Swift J174540.7-290015: a new accreting binary in the Galactic Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Jin, C.; De Marco, B.; Rea, N.; Rau, A.; Haberl, F.; Coti Zelati, F.; Bozzo, E.; Ferrigno, C.; Bower, G. C.; Demorest, P.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the identification of the new Galactic Centre (GC) transient Swift J174540.7-290015 as a likely low-mass X-ray binary located at only 16 arcsec from Sgr A⋆. This transient was detected on 2016 February 6, during the Swift GC monitoring, and it showed long-term spectral variations compatible with a hard- to soft-state transition. We observed the field with XMM-Newton on February 26 for 35 ks, detecting the source in the soft state, characterized by a low level of variability and a soft X-ray thermal spectrum with a high energy tail (detected by INTEGRAL up to ˜50 keV), typical of either accreting neutron stars or black holes. We observed: (i) a high column density of neutral absorbing material, suggesting that Swift J174540.7-290015 is located near or beyond the GC and; (ii) a sub-Solar iron abundance, therefore we argue that iron is depleted into dust grains. The lack of detection of Fe K absorption lines, eclipses or dipping suggests that the accretion disc is observed at a low inclination angle. Radio (Very Large Array) observations did not detect any radio counterpart to Swift J174540.7-290015. No evidence for X-ray or radio periodicity is found. The location of the transient was observed also in the near-infrared (near-IR) with gamma-ray burst optical near-IR detector at MPG/European Southern Observatory La Silla 2.2 m telescope and VLT/NaCo pre- and post-outburst. Within the Chandra error region, we find multiple objects that display no significant variations.

  13. Chasing short duration gamma-ray bursts with Swift and Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troja, Eleonora; Lien, A. Y.; Connaughton, V.; Gehrels, N.; Pelassa, V.; Troja, E.

    2014-01-01

    Short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are intense flashes of gamma-rays lasting less than two seconds. The common notion that short bursts originate from coalescing compact binaries, either neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) or neutron star-black hole (NS-BH) mergers, makes them the most promising tool to aid in the direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs) by forthcoming facilities, such as advanced LIGO/Virgo. The Fermi and Swift satellites offer unique, and complementary capabilities for the study of short GRBs. Thanks to its wide field of view, broad energy bandpass, and sophisticated trigger algorithms, the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi is currently the most prolific detector of short GRBs. The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on-board Swift detects only a few short bursts/year, but provides accurate localizations required for follow-up observations. We present a correlative analysis of the Fermi/GBM and the Swift/BAT data aimed at increasing the sensitivity to short-hard bursts, their rate of detection, and our chance of localization. By comparing the two populations of bursts we characterize the biases introduced by the trigger algorithms, and how they shape the observed population of short bursts. This allows us to calculate a more realistic number for the expected rate of Fermi/GBM events within the ALIGO horizon, and estimate the timescale over which robust constraints to the merger model can be placed by future Fermi/ALIGO searches. We discuss how the current Swift and Fermi strategies could be optimized to increase the number of well-localized short bursts.

  14. The HEASARC Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Archive: The Pipeline and the Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donato, Davide; Angelini, Lorella; Padgett, C.A.; Reichard, T.; Gehrels, Neil; Marshall, Francis E.; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Since its launch in late 2004, the Swift satellite triggered or observed an average of one gamma-ray burst (GRB) every 3 days, for a total of 771 GRBs by 2012 January. Here, we report the development of a pipeline that semi automatically performs the data-reduction and data-analysis processes for the three instruments on board Swift (BAT, XRT, UVOT). The pipeline is written in Perl, and it uses only HEAsoft tools and can be used to perform the analysis of a majority of the point-like objects (e.g., GRBs, active galactic nuclei, pulsars) observed by Swift. We run the pipeline on the GRBs, and we present a database containing the screened data, the output products, and the results of our ongoing analysis. Furthermore, we created a catalog summarizing some GRB information, collected either by running the pipeline or from the literature. The Perl script, the database, and the catalog are available for downloading and querying at the HEASARC Web site.

  15. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms.

  16. Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Bursts and Insights from Swift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    A new revolution in Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) observations and theory has begun over the last two years since the launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The new window into high energy gamma-rays opened by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) is providing insight into prompt emission mechanisms and possibly also afterglow physics. The LAT detected GRBs appear to be a new unique subset of extremely energetic and bright bursts compared to the large sample detected by Swift over the last 6 years. In this talk, I will discuss the context and recent discoveries from these LAT GRBs and the large database of broadband observations collected by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) and UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Through comparisons between the GRBs detected by Swift-BAT, G8M, and LAT, we can learn about the unique characteristics, physical differences, and the relationships between each population. These population characteristics provide insight into the different physical parameters that contribute to the diversity of observational GRB properties.

  17. User's manual for the Sandia Waste-Isolation Flow and Transport model (SWIFT).

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Mark; Cranwell, Robert M.

    1981-11-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional finite-difference model (SWIFT) which is used to simulate flow and transport processes in geologic media. The model was developed for use by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the analysis of deep geologic nuclear waste-disposal facilities. This document, as indicated by the title, is a user's manual and is intended to facilitate the use of the SWIFT simulator. Mathematical equations, submodels, application notes, and a description of the program itself are given herein. In addition, a complete input data guide is given along with several appendices which are helpful in setting up a data-input deck. Computer code SWIFT (Sandia Waste Isolation, Flow and Transport Model) is a fully transient, three-dimensional model which solves the coupled equations for transport in geologic media. The processes considered are: (1) fluid flow; (2) heat transport; (3) dominant-species miscible displacement; and (4) trace-species miscible displacement. The first three processes are coupled via fluid density and viscosity. Together they provide the velocity field on which the fourth process depends.

  18. Swift heavy ions induced irradiation effects in monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, J.; Yao, H. J.; Zhang, S. X.; Zhai, P. F.; Duan, J. L.; Sun, Y. M.; Li, G. P.; Liu, J.

    2014-07-01

    Monolayer graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) were irradiated by swift heavy ions (209Bi and 112Sn) with the fluence between 1011 and 1014 ions/cm2. Both pristine and irradiated samples were investigated by Raman spectroscopy. It was found that D and D‧ peaks appear after irradiation, which indicated the ion irradiation introduced damage both in the graphene and graphite lattice. Due to the special single atomic layer structure of graphene, the irradiation fluence threshold Φth of the D band of graphene is significantly lower (<1 × 1011 ions/cm2) than that (2.5 × 1012 ions/cm2) of HOPG. The larger defect density in graphene than in HOPG indicates that the monolayer graphene is much easier to be damaged than bulk graphite by swift heavy ions. Moreover, different defect types in graphene and HOPG were detected by the different values of ID/ID‧. For the irradiation with the same electronic energy loss, the velocity effect was found in HOPG. However, in this experiment, the velocity effect was not observed in graphene samples irradiated by swift heavy ions.

  19. Characterization and Evolution of the Swift X-ray Telescope Instrumental Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Joanne; Pagani, C.; Morris, D. C.; Racusin, J.; Grupe, D.; Vetere, L.; Stroh, M.; Falcone, A.; Kennea, J.; Burrows, D. N.; Nousek, J. A.; Abbey, A. F.; Angelini, L.; Beardmore, A. P.; Campana, S.; Capalbi, M.; Chincarini, G.; Citterio O.; Cusumano, G.; Giommi, P.; Godet, O.; Hill, J. E.; LaParola, V.; Mangano, V.; Mineo, T.

    2007-01-01

    The X-ray telescope (XRT) on board the Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer has successfully operated since the spacecraft launch on 20 November 2004, automatically locating GRB afterglows, measuring their spectra and lightcurves and performing observations of high-energy sources. In this work we investigate the properties of the instrumental background, focusing on its dynamic behavior on both long and short timescales. The operational temperature of the CCD is the main factor that influences the XRT background level. After the failure of the Swift active on-board temperature control system, the XRT detector now operates at a temperature range between -75C and -45C thanks to a passive cooling Heat Rejection System. We report on the long-term effects on the background caused by radiation, consisting mainly of proton irradiation in Swift's low Earth orbit and on the short-term effects of transits through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), which expose the detector to periods of intense proton flux. We have determined the fraction of the detector background that is due to the internal, instrumental background and the part that is due to unresolved astrophysical sources (the cosmic X-ray background) by investigating the degree of vignetting of the measured background and comparing it to the expected value from calibration data.

  20. X-Ray Enhancement and Long-term Evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benli, Onur; Çalışkan, Ş.; Ertan, Ü.; Alpar, M. A.; Trümper, J. E.; Kylafis, N. D.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the X-ray enhancement and the long-term evolution of the recently discovered second "low-B magnetar" Swift J1822.3-1606 in the frame of the fallback disk model. During a soft gamma burst episode, the inner disk matter is pushed back to larger radii, forming a density gradient at the inner disk. Subsequent relaxation of the inner disk could account for the observed X-ray enhancement light curve of Swift J1822.3-1606. We obtain model fits to the X-ray data with basic disk parameters similar to those employed to explain the X-ray outburst light curves of other anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters. The long period (8.4 s) of the neutron star can be reached by the effect of the disk torques in the long-term accretion phase ((1-3) × 105 yr). The currently ongoing X-ray enhancement could be due to a transient accretion epoch, or the source could still be in the accretion phase in quiescence. Considering these different possibilities, we determine the model curves that could represent the long-term rotational and the X-ray luminosity evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606, which constrain the strength of the magnetic dipole field to the range of (1-2) × 1012 G on the surface of the neutron star.

  1. Flight speeds of swifts (Apus apus): seasonal differences smaller than expected.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, P; Karlsson, H; Bäckman, J; Alerstam, T; Hedenström, A

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the nocturnal flight behaviour of the common swift (Apus apus L.), by the use of a tracking radar. Birds were tracked from Lund University in southern Sweden during spring migration, summer roosting flights and autumn migration. Flight speeds were compared with predictions from flight mechanical and optimal migration theories. During spring, flight speeds were predicted to be higher than during both summer and autumn due to time restriction. In such cases, birds fly at a flight speed that maximizes the overall speed of migration. For summer roosting flights, speeds were predicted to be lower than during both spring and autumn since the predicted flight speed is the minimum power speed that involves the lowest energy consumption per unit time. During autumn, we expected flight speeds to be higher than during summer but lower than during spring since the expected flight speed is the maximum range speed, which involves the lowest energy consumption per unit distance. Flight speeds during spring were indeed higher than during both summer and autumn, which indicates time-selected spring migration. Speeds during autumn migration were very similar to those recorded during summer roosting flights. The general result shows that swifts change their flight speed between different flight behaviours to a smaller extent than expected. Furthermore, the difference between flight speeds during migration and roosting among swifts was found to be less pronounced than previously recorded.

  2. Afterglow Population Studies from Swift Follow-Up Observations of Fermi LAT GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judith L.; Oates, S. R.; McEnery, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-01-01

    The small population of Fermi LAT detected GRBs discovered over the last year has been providing interesting and unexpected clues into GRB prompt and afterglow emission mechanisms. Over the last 5 years, it has been Swift that has provided the robust data set of UV/optical and X-ray afterglow observations that opened many windows into other components of GRB emission structure. We explore the new ability to utilize both of these observatories to study the same GRBs over 10 orders of magnitude in energy, although not always concurrently. Almost all LAT GRBs that have been followed-up by Swift within 1-day have been clearly detected and carefully observed. We will present the context of the lower-energy afterglows of this special subset of GRBs that has > 100 MeV emission compared to the hundreds in the Swift database that may or may not have been observed by LAT, and theorize upon the relationship between these properties and the origin of the high energy gamma-ray emission.

  3. [Jonathan Swift's asylum in Dublin--Ireland's introduction to institutional psychiatry 250 years ago].

    PubMed

    Reuber, M

    1995-09-01

    250 years ago, the satirical writer and clergyman Jonathan Swift from Dublin (1667-1745) founded the first Irish lunatic asylum. Rejecting the theories put forward by the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes and the doctor Thomas Willis, he was influenced by the ideas of the Scottish doctor and the "enlightened" thinker John Locke. Swift's St. Patrick's Hospital did not, however, realise a new philosophical concept: architecture and therapeutic approach of the new institution were clearly modelled on the much older Hospital of St. Mary of Bethlehem ( = Bedlam). Despite its conservative conceptual basis, the first institution dedicated to the mentally ill and intellectually subnormal in Ireland became a starting point for the apparantly unstoppable expansion of the, at one time, most comprehensive asylum system in the world. After Swift's Hospital had been enlarged twice at the tax-payers' expense (1778, 1793), the administration decided to relieve the institution by erecting the Richmond Asylum (1810), the first public asylum in Ireland. When this establishment also became overcrowded, in 1817, legislation was passed which led to the establishment of the oldest system of public asylums in Europe.

  4. Yost-Swift Gamma-ray Burst Science and Capabilities Needed to EXIST

    SciTech Connect

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-19

    The exhilerating results from Swift in its first year of operations have opened a new era of exploration of the high energy universe. The surge to higher redshifts of the Gamma-ray bursts now imaged with increased sensitivity establishes them as viable cosmic probes of the early universe. Wide-field coded aperture imaging with solid-state pixel detectors (Cd-Zn-Te) has been also established as the optimum approach for GRB discovery and location as well as to conduct sensitive full-sky hard X-ray sky surveys. I outline the current and future major science questions likely to dominate the post-Swift era for GRBs and several related disciplines and the mission requirements to tackle these. The EXIST mission, under study for NASA's Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP) in the Beyond Einstein Program, could achieve these objectives as the Next Generation GRB Mission with 'ultimate' sensitivity and wide-field survey capability. Analysis tools for processing Swift/BAT slew data are under development at CfA and will both test EXIST scanning imaging and provide new data on GRBs and transients.

  5. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF THE UNUSUAL EXTRAGALACTIC TRANSIENT SWIFT J164449.3+573451

    SciTech Connect

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bouvier, A.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Benbow, W.; Boettcher, M.; Bradbury, S. M.; Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E.; Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Finley, J. P.; Falcone, A. E-mail: boettchm@ohio.edu

    2011-09-10

    We report on very high energy (>100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of Swift J164449.3+573451, an unusual transient object first detected by the Swift Observatory and later detected by multiple radio, optical, and X-ray observatories. A total exposure of 28 hr was obtained on Swift J164449.3+573451 with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) during 2011 March 28-April 15. We do not detect the source and place a differential upper limit on the emission at 500 GeV during these observations of 1.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (99% confidence level). We also present time-resolved upper limits and use a flux limit averaged over the X-ray flaring period to constrain various emission scenarios that can accommodate both the radio-through-X-ray emission detected from the source and the lack of detection by VERITAS.

  6. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-01

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. PMID:21900733

  7. Yost-Swift Gamma-ray Burst Science and Capabilities Needed to EXIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-01

    The exhilerating results from Swift in its first year of operations have opened a new era of exploration of the high energy universe. The surge to higher redshifts of the Gamma-ray bursts now imaged with increased sensitivity establishes them as viable cosmic probes of the early universe. Wide-field coded aperture imaging with solid-state pixel detectors (Cd-Zn-Te) has been also established as the optimum approach for GRB discovery and location as well as to conduct sensitive full-sky hard X-ray sky surveys. I outline the current and future major science questions likely to dominate the post-Swift era for GRBs and several related disciplines and the mission requirements to tackle these. The EXIST mission, under study for NASA's Black Hole Finder Probe (BHFP) in the Beyond Einstein Program, could achieve these objectives as the Next Generation GRB Mission with `ultimate' sensitivity and wide-field survey capability. Analysis tools for processing Swift/BAT slew data are under development at CfA and will both test EXIST scanning imaging and provide new data on GRBs and transients.

  8. Probing the Nature of Short Swift Bursts via Deep INTEGRAL Monitoring of GRB 050925

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in approximately 5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H(sub II), regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of 1=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.

  9. Is grazing exclusion effective in restoring vegetation in degraded alpine grasslands in Tibet, China?

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Lu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Overgrazing is considered one of the key disturbance factors that results in alpine grassland degradation in Tibet. Grazing exclusion by fencing has been widely used as an approach to restore degraded grasslands in Tibet since 2004. Is the grazing exclusion management strategy effective for the vegetation restoration of degraded alpine grasslands? Three alpine grassland types were selected in Tibet to investigate the effect of grazing exclusion on plant community structure and biomass. Our results showed that species biodiversity indicators, including the Pielou evenness index, the Shannon-Wiener diversity index, and the Simpson dominance index, did not significantly change under grazing exclusion conditions. In contrast, the total vegetation cover, the mean vegetation height of the community, and the aboveground biomass were significantly higher in the grazing exclusion grasslands than in the free grazed grasslands. These results indicated that grazing exclusion is an effective measure for maintaining community stability and improving aboveground vegetation growth in alpine grasslands. However, the statistical analysis showed that the growing season precipitation (GSP) plays a more important role than grazing exclusion in which influence on vegetation in alpine grasslands. In addition, because the results of the present study come from short term (6-8 years) grazing exclusion, it is still uncertain whether these improvements will be continuable if grazing exclusion is continuously implemented. Therefore, the assessments of the ecological effects of the grazing exclusion management strategy on degraded alpine grasslands in Tibet still need long term continued research. PMID:26157607

  10. Ecological stability during the LGM and the mid-Holocene in the Alpine Steppes of Tibet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miehe, Georg; Miehe, Sabine; Bach, Kerstin; Kluge, Jürgen; Wesche, Karsten; Yongping, Yang; Jianquan, Liu

    2011-09-01

    Arid and Alpine ecosystems are known for extreme environmental changes during the Late Quaternary. We hypothesize that the world's largest Alpine arid ecosystem however, the Alpine Steppes of the Tibetan highlands, remained ecologically stable during the LGM and the mid-Holocene. This hypothesis is tested by distributional range of plant species, plant life forms and rate of endemism. The set of character species has a precipitation gradient between 50 and 350 mm/a, testifying for resilience to precipitation changes. 83% of the species have a wider vertical range than 1000 m used as a proxy for resilience to temperature changes. 30% of the species are endemic with 10 endemic genera, including plate-shaped cushions as a unique plant life form. These findings are in line with palaeo-ecological proxies (δ 18O, pollen) allowing the assumption that Alpine Steppes persisted during the LGM with 3 to 4 K lower summer temperatures. During the mid-Holocene, forests could have replaced Alpine Steppes in the upper catchments of the Huang He, Yangtze, Mekong, Salween and Yarlung Zhangbo, but not in the interior basins of the north-western highlands, because the basins were then flooded, suppressing forests and supporting the environmental stability of this arid Alpine grassland biome.

  11. Monitoring alpine plants for climate change: The North American GLORIA Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millar, C.; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2007-01-01

    Globally, alpine environments are hotspots of biodiversity, often harboring higher diversity of plant species than corresponding areas at lower elevations. These regions are also likely to experience more severe and rapid change in climate than lowlands under conditions of anthropogenic warming (Theurillat & Guisan 2001; Halloy & Mark 2003; Pickering & Armstrong 2003). Such climatic effects are already being documented by instrumental monitoring in the few places in western North America where long-term climate stations are available at high elevations. New sites are being planned (see GCOS article, pg 15). Climate Change is augmenting concern for alpine vegetation because available habitat diminishes at increasingly higher elevations. This creates an “elevational squeeze,” whereby the geometry of mountain peaks means that escape routes to cooler environments uphill are dead ends for migrating alpine species. While monitoring and modeling efforts have begun to elucidate climate of alpine environments in North America, very little is known about corresponding responses of alpine plant species to changing climate. Indeed, for many mountain regions in the West, little information exists even about alpine plant distribution and abundance.

  12. Is grazing exclusion effective in restoring vegetation in degraded alpine grasslands in Tibet, China?

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Overgrazing is considered one of the key disturbance factors that results in alpine grassland degradation in Tibet. Grazing exclusion by fencing has been widely used as an approach to restore degraded grasslands in Tibet since 2004. Is the grazing exclusion management strategy effective for the vegetation restoration of degraded alpine grasslands? Three alpine grassland types were selected in Tibet to investigate the effect of grazing exclusion on plant community structure and biomass. Our results showed that species biodiversity indicators, including the Pielou evenness index, the Shannon–Wiener diversity index, and the Simpson dominance index, did not significantly change under grazing exclusion conditions. In contrast, the total vegetation cover, the mean vegetation height of the community, and the aboveground biomass were significantly higher in the grazing exclusion grasslands than in the free grazed grasslands. These results indicated that grazing exclusion is an effective measure for maintaining community stability and improving aboveground vegetation growth in alpine grasslands. However, the statistical analysis showed that the growing season precipitation (GSP) plays a more important role than grazing exclusion in which influence on vegetation in alpine grasslands. In addition, because the results of the present study come from short term (6–8 years) grazing exclusion, it is still uncertain whether these improvements will be continuable if grazing exclusion is continuously implemented. Therefore, the assessments of the ecological effects of the grazing exclusion management strategy on degraded alpine grasslands in Tibet still need long term continued research. PMID:26157607

  13. [Vegetation biomass distribution characteristics of alpine tundra ecosystem in Changbai Mountains].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Wu, Gang; Deng, Hongbing

    2004-11-01

    Climate change is one of the hotspots in global environment concerns, while alpine tundra ecosystem is most sensitive to global climate change. Because of the relatively small area of tundra, researches on alpine tundra ecosystem were much less. Based on the measurement of species biomass, dominant species organ biomass and vegetation biomass, this paper discussed the biomass spatial variation in alpine tundra ecosystem of Changbai Mountains. The results showed that among 43 species investigated, the first five species in biomass were Rhododendron chrysanthum (159.01 kg x hm(-2)), Vaccinium uliginosum var. alpinum (137.52 kg x hm(-2)), Vaccinium uliginosum (134.7 kg x hm(-2)), Dryas octopetala var. asiatica (131.5 kg x hm(-2)) and Salix rotundifolia (128.4 kg x hm(-2)), which were the dominant species in the alpine tundra ecosystem of Changbai Mountains. Along with increasing altitude, the ratio of below-/above-ground biomass and below-ground/total biomass gradually increased, while the vegetation biomass gradually decreased. The vegetation biomass showed a significant correlation with altitude in typical alpine tundra ecosystem of Changbai Mountains, and the average vegetation biomass was 2.21 t x hm(-2). Alpine tundra ecosystem is very important for microclimate regulation, soil improvement, water-holding, soil conservation, nutrient cycling, carbon fixation and oxygen production, and currently, it is the CO2 sink of Changbai Mountains.

  14. Is grazing exclusion effective in restoring vegetation in degraded alpine grasslands in Tibet, China?

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Lu, Xuyang

    2015-01-01

    Overgrazing is considered one of the key disturbance factors that results in alpine grassland degradation in Tibet. Grazing exclusion by fencing has been widely used as an approach to restore degraded grasslands in Tibet since 2004. Is the grazing exclusion management strategy effective for the vegetation restoration of degraded alpine grasslands? Three alpine grassland types were selected in Tibet to investigate the effect of grazing exclusion on plant community structure and biomass. Our results showed that species biodiversity indicators, including the Pielou evenness index, the Shannon-Wiener diversity index, and the Simpson dominance index, did not significantly change under grazing exclusion conditions. In contrast, the total vegetation cover, the mean vegetation height of the community, and the aboveground biomass were significantly higher in the grazing exclusion grasslands than in the free grazed grasslands. These results indicated that grazing exclusion is an effective measure for maintaining community stability and improving aboveground vegetation growth in alpine grasslands. However, the statistical analysis showed that the growing season precipitation (GSP) plays a more important role than grazing exclusion in which influence on vegetation in alpine grasslands. In addition, because the results of the present study come from short term (6-8 years) grazing exclusion, it is still uncertain whether these improvements will be continuable if grazing exclusion is continuously implemented. Therefore, the assessments of the ecological effects of the grazing exclusion management strategy on degraded alpine grasslands in Tibet still need long term continued research.

  15. The Swift serendipitous survey in deep XRT GRB fields (SwiftFT). I. The X-ray catalog and number counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puccetti, S.; Capalbi, M.; Giommi, P.; Perri, M.; Stratta, G.; Angelini, L.; Burrows, D. N.; Campana, S.; Chincarini, G.; Cusumano, G.; Gehrels, N.; Moretti, A.; Nousek, J.; Osborne, J. P.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: An accurate census of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a key step in investigating the nature of the correlation between the growth and evolution of super massive black holes and galaxy evolution. X-ray surveys provide one of the most efficient ways of selecting AGN. Methods: We searched for X-ray serendipitous sources in over 370 Swift-XRT fields centered on gamma ray bursts detected between 2004 and 2008 and observed with total exposures ranging from 10 ks to over 1 Ms. This defines the Swift Serendipitous Survey in deep XRT GRB fields, which is quite broad compared to existing surveys (~33 square degrees) and medium depth, with a faintest flux limit of 7.2 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5 to 2 keV energy range (4.8 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 at 50% completeness). The survey has a high degree of uniformity thanks to the stable point spread function and small vignetting correction factors of the XRT, moreover is completely random on the sky as GRBs explode in totally unrelated parts of the sky. Results: In this paper we present the sample and the X-ray number counts of the high Galactic-latitude sample, estimated with high statistics over a wide flux range (i.e., 7.2 × 10-16 ÷ ~ 5 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band and 3.4 × 10-15 ÷ ~ 6 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 2-10 keV band). We detect 9387 point-like sources with a detection Poisson probability threshold of ≤ 2 × 10-5, in at least one of the three energy bands considered (i.e. 0.3-3 keV, 2-10 keV, and 0.3-10 keV), for the total sample, while 7071 point-like sources are found at high Galactic-latitudes (i.e. |b| ≥ 20 deg). The large number of detected sources resulting from the combination of large area and deep flux limits make this survey a new important tool for investigating the evolution of AGN. In particular, the large area permits finding rare high-luminosity objects like QSO2, which are poorly sampled by other surveys, adding precious information for the luminosity function

  16. High-redshift blazar identification for Swift J1656.3-3302

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masetti, N.; Mason, E.; Landi, R.; Giommi, P.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Bird, A. J.; Bazzano, A.; Dean, A. J.; Gehrels, N.; Palazzi, E.; Ubertini, P.

    2008-03-01

    We report on the high-redshift blazar identification of a new gamma-ray source, Swift J1656.3-3302, detected with the BAT imager onboard the Swift satellite and the IBIS instrument on the INTEGRAL satellite. Follow-up optical spectroscopy has allowed us to identify the counterpart as an R˜ 19 mag source that shows broad Lyman-α, Si iv, He ii, C iv, and C iii] emission lines at redshift z = 2.40 ± 0.01. Spectral evolution is observed in X-rays when the INTEGRAL/IBIS data are compared to the Swift/BAT results, with the spectrum steepening when the source gets fainter. The 0.7-200 keV X-ray continuum, observed with Swift/XRT and INTEGRAL/IBIS, shows the power law shape typical of radio loud (broad emission line) active galactic nuclei (with a photon index Γ ˜ 1.6) and a hint of spectral curvature below ~2 keV, possibly due to intrinsic absorption (NH ˜ 7× 10 22 cm-2) local to the source. Alternatively, a slope change (Δ Γ ˜ 1) around 2.7 keV can describe the X-ray spectrum equally well. At this redshift, the observed 20-100 keV luminosity of the source is ~1048 erg s-1 (assuming isotropic emission), making Swift J1656.3-3302 one of the most X-ray luminous blazars. This source is yet another example of a distant gamma-ray loud quasar discovered above 20 keV. It is also the farthest object, among the previously unidentified INTEGRAL sources, whose nature has been determined a posteriori through optical spectroscopy. Partly based on X-ray observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data centre funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), Czech Republic and Poland, and with the participation of Russia and the USA, and on optical observations collected at ESO (La Silla, Chile) under programme 079.A-0171(A).

  17. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548. VII. Swift study of obscuration and broadband continuum variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipour, M.; Kaastra, J. S.; Kriss, G. A.; Cappi, M.; Petrucci, P.-O.; De Marco, B.; Ponti, G.; Steenbrugge, K. C.; Behar, E.; Bianchi, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Costantini, E.; Ebrero, J.; Di Gesu, L.; Matt, G.; Paltani, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Ursini, F.; Whewell, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present our investigation into the long-term variability of the X-ray obscuration and optical-UV-X-ray continuum in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548. In 2013 and 2014, the Swift observatory monitored NGC 5548 on average every day or two, with archival observations reaching back to 2005, totalling about 670 ks of observing time. Both broadband spectral modelling and temporal rms variability analysis are applied to the Swift data. We disentangle the variability caused by absorption, due to an obscuring weakly-ionised outflow near the disk, from variability of the intrinsic continuum components (the soft X-ray excess and the power law) originating in the disk and its associated coronae. The spectral model that we apply to this extensive Swift data is the global model that we derived for NGC 5548 from analysis of the stacked spectra from our multi-satellite campaign of 2013 (including XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and HST). The results of our Swift study show that changes in the covering fraction of the obscurer is the primary and dominant cause of variability in the soft X-ray band on timescales of 10 days to ~5 months. The obscuring covering fraction of the X-ray source is found to range between 0.7 and nearly 1.0. The contribution of the soft excess component to the X-ray variability is often much less than that of the obscurer, but it becomes comparable when the optical-UV continuum flares up. We find that the soft excess is consistent with being the high-energy tail of the optical-UV continuum and can be explained by warm Comptonisation: up-scattering of the disk seed photons in a warm, optically thick corona as part of the inner disk. To this date, the Swift monitoring of NGC 5548 shows that the obscurer has been continuously present in our line of sight for at least 4 years (since at least February 2012).

  18. A NEW LOW MAGNETIC FIELD MAGNETAR: THE 2011 OUTBURST OF SWIFT J1822.3-1606

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, N.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Israel, G. L.; Esposito, P.; Burgay, M.; Possenti, A.; Pons, J. A.; Mignani, R. P.; Turolla, R.; Zane, S.; Oates, S. R.; Campana, S.; Enoto, T.; Goegues, E.; Goetz, D.; Makishima, K.; Mereghetti, S.; Palmer, D. M.; and others

    2012-07-20

    We report on the long-term X-ray monitoring with Swift, RXTE, Suzaku, Chandra, and XMM-Newton of the outburst of the newly discovered magnetar Swift J1822.3-1606 (SGR 1822-1606), from the first observations soon after the detection of the short X-ray bursts which led to its discovery, through the first stages of its outburst decay (covering the time span from 2011 July until the end of 2012 April). We also report on archival ROSAT observations which detected the source during its likely quiescent state, and on upper limits on Swift J1822.3-1606's radio-pulsed and optical emission during outburst, with the Green Bank Telescope and the Gran Telescopio Canarias, respectively. Our X-ray timing analysis finds the source rotating with a period of P = 8.43772016(2) s and a period derivative P-dot =8.3(2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} s s{sup -1}, which implies an inferred dipolar surface magnetic field of B {approx_equal} 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G at the equator. This measurement makes Swift J1822.3-1606 the second lowest magnetic field magnetar (after SGR 0418+5729). Following the flux and spectral evolution from the beginning of the outburst, we find that the flux decreased by about an order of magnitude, with a subtle softening of the spectrum, both typical of the outburst decay of magnetars. By modeling the secular thermal evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606, we find that the observed timing properties of the source, as well as its quiescent X-ray luminosity, can be reproduced if it was born with a poloidal and crustal toroidal fields of B{sub p} {approx} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G and B{sub tor} {approx} 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} G, respectively, and if its current age is {approx}550 kyr.

  19. A time domain experiment with Swift: monitoring of seven nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoni, I.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Branchesi, M.; Bernardini, M. G.; Della Valle, M.; Mannucci, F.; Melandri, A.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Focused on the study of transient sources, time domain astronomy today is one of the most active and growing areas of research in astronomy. Most of the present and planned surveys aimed at carrying out time domain studies work in the optical band and founded their searching strategies on fixed cadences. Although nothing similar currently exists in the X-ray and ultraviolet (UV) bands, the Swift satellite is certainly the most appropriate available instrument to carry out such surveys. Aims: We aimed to detect a supernova (SN) shock breakout (SBO) in nearby galaxies. The SBO marks the first escape of radiation from the blast wave that breaks through the photosphere of the star and launches the SN ejecta. The detection of an SBO is a diagnostic for the radius of the progenitor star and the ratio of explosion energy to ejecta mass. It also allows us to determine the onset of the explosion with an accuracy of a few hours to a few seconds. Methods: Using the XRT and UVOT instruments onboard the Swift satellite, we carried out a weekly cadenced, six-month monitoring of seven nearby galaxies: NGC 1084, NGC 2207/IC 2163, NGC 2770, NGC 4303/M 61, NGC 3147, NGC 3690, and NGC 6754. We searched for variable or transient sources in the collected data. These galaxies were selected because they are close (distance ≤50 Mpc), small enough to fit in the Swift/UVOT field of view, and are hosts of at least three SNe in the past 20 yr. Results: We found no evidence for an SN SBO event. Five objects located within the light of the sample galaxies were found to be variable in the X-ray and/or in the UV. These include mainly background active galactic nucleus and unresolved ULX in NGC 3690. In addition to these objects, we found two variable Galactic sources: the known nova CP Draconis (which experienced an outburst during our monitoring) and an uncatalogued eclipsing binary. Conclusions: Despite the lack of SBO detections, the results of our explorative study encourage the

  20. SWIFT OBSERVATIONS OF MAXI J1659-152: A COMPACT BINARY WITH A BLACK HOLE ACCRETOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kennea, J. A.; Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Beardmore, A. P.; Evans, P. A.; Curran, P. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Yamaoka, K.

    2011-07-20

    We report on the detection and follow-up high-cadence monitoring observations of MAXI J1659-152, a bright Galactic X-ray binary transient with a likely black hole accretor, by Swift over a 27 day period after its initial outburst detection. MAXI J1659-152 was discovered almost simultaneously by Swift and the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image on 2010 September 25, and was monitored intensively from the early stages of the outburst through the rise to a brightness of {approx}0.5 Crab by the Swift X-ray, UV/Optical, and the hard X-ray Burst Alert Telescopes. We present temporal and spectral analysis of the Swift observations. The broadband light curves show variability characteristic of black hole candidate transients. We present the evolution of thermal and non-thermal components of the 0.5-150 keV combined X-ray spectra during the outburst. MAXI J1659-152 displays accretion state changes typically associated with black hole binaries, transitioning from its initial detection in the hard state, to the steep power-law state, followed by a slow evolution toward the thermal state, signified by an increasingly dominant thermal component associated with the accretion disk, although this state change did not complete before Swift observations ended. We observe an anti-correlation between the increasing temperature and decreasing radius of the inner edge of the accretion disk, suggesting that the inner edge of the accretion disk infalls toward the black hole as the disk temperature increases. We observed significant evolution in the absorption column during the initial rise of the outburst, with the absorption almost doubling, suggestive of the presence of an evolving wind from the accretion disk. We detect quasi-periodic oscillations that evolve with the outburst, as well as irregular shaped dips that recur with a period of 2.42 {+-} 0.09 hr, strongly suggesting an orbital period that would make MAXI J1659-152 the shortest period black hole binary yet known.

  1. Fishery-induced selection on an Alpine whitefish: quantifying genetic and environmental effects on individual growth rate

    PubMed Central

    Nusslé, Sébastien; Bornand, Christophe N; Wedekind, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Size-selective fishing, environmental changes and reproductive strategies are expected to affect life-history traits such as the individual growth rate. The relative contribution of these factors is not clear, particularly whether size-selective fishing can have a substantial impact on the genetics and hence on the evolution of individual growth rates in wild populations. We analysed a 25-year monitoring survey of an isolated population of the Alpine whitefish Coregonus palaea. We determined the selection differentials on growth rate, the actual change of growth rate over time and indicators of reproductive strategies that may potentially change over time. The selection differential can be reliably estimated in our study population because almost all the fish are harvested within their first years of life, i.e. few fish escape fishing mortality. We found a marked decline in average adult growth rate over the 25 years and a significant selection differential for adult growth, but no evidence for any linear change in reproductive strategies over time. Assuming that the heritability of growth in this whitefish corresponds to what was found in other salmonids, about a third of the observed decline in growth rate would be linked to fishery-induced evolution. Size-selective fishing seems to affect substantially the genetics of individual growth in our study population. PMID:25567861

  2. Lungworms in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) in the eastern Alps, Italy: An ecological approach.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Rudi; Párraga, Maria A; Signorini, Manuela; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Sturaro, Enrico; Rossi, Luca; Ramanzin, Maurizio

    2015-11-30

    Host-parasite relationships have been frequently investigated in mountain dwelling ungulates, though mostly focusing on gastrointestinal nematodes. On the contrary, very few studies were conducted on broncopulmonary nematodes, which may result in severe parenchymal lesions and act as predisposing factor for multifactorial pneumonia. The epidemiological and ecological features of lungworms infecting an Alpine ibex population in the Eastern Alps, Italy, were non-invasively investigated by means of a modified Baermann technique with an original quantitative methodology. Out of a total of 269 samples collected monthly from July to November 2013 and from July to October 2014, 212 (78.8%) were positive for Muellerius and 26 (9.7%) for Protostrongylus, whereas Neostrongylus and Cystocaulus were less prevalent (4.1% and 0.7%, respectively). None of the investigated samples tested positive for dictyocaulids. The genus Muellerius showed the highest larval output intensity (134.2 L1/g), followed by Protostrongylus with 33.8 L1/g. A contrasting age-related pattern of Muellerius and Protostrongylus was revealed, with the former significantly more prevalent and abundant in adult animals, while the latter in kids. Due to the limited accessibility of the study area during winter and spring, it was difficult to describe clear seasonal trends in larval output, although Muellerius showed a minimum in the late summer and a rise in the autumn. The newly developed diagnostic method showed a fair repeatability, thus representing an interesting tool to investigate the ecology of lungworms in protected species, such as the A. ibex. Based on results, ibex in the Marmolada massif seem to have an ecologically stable relationship with their lungworm community.

  3. The response of vegetation dynamics of the different alpine grassland types to temperature and precipitation on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Qin, Xiaojing; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The spatiotemporal variability of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) of three vegetation types (alpine steppe, alpine meadow, and alpine desert steppe) across the Tibetan Plateau was analyzed from 1982 to 2013. In addition, the annual mean temperature (MAT) and annual mean precipitation (MAP) trends were quantified to define the spatiotemporal climate patterns. Meanwhile, the relationships between climate factors and NDVI were analyzed in order to understand the impact of climate change on vegetation dynamics. The results indicate that the maximum of NDVI increased by 0.3 and 0.2 % per 10 years in the entire regions of alpine steppe and alpine meadow, respectively. However, no significant change in the NDVI of the alpine desert steppe has been observed since 1982. A negative relationship between NDVI and MAT was found in all these alpine grassland types, while MAP positively impacted the vegetation dynamics of all grasslands. Also, the effects of temperature and precipitation on different vegetation types differed, and the correlation coefficient for MAP and NDVI in alpine meadow is larger than that for other vegetation types. We also explored the percentages of precipitation and temperature influence on NDVI variation, using redundancy analysis at the observation point scale. The results show that precipitation is a primary limiting factor for alpine vegetation dynamic, rather than temperature. Most importantly, the results can serve as a tool for grassland ecosystem management.

  4. Alpine Fault, New Zealand, SRTM Shaded Relief and Colored Height

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Alpine fault runs parallel to, and just inland of, much of the west coast of New Zealand's South Island. This view was created from the near-global digital elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and is almost 500 kilometers (just over 300 miles) wide. Northwest is toward the top. The fault is extremely distinct in the topographic pattern, nearly slicing this scene in half lengthwise.

    In a regional context, the Alpine fault is part of a system of faults that connects a west dipping subduction zone to the northeast with an east dipping subduction zone to the southwest, both of which occur along the juncture of the Indo-Australian and Pacific tectonic plates. Thus, the fault itself constitutes the major surface manifestation of the plate boundary here. Offsets of streams and ridges evident in the field, and in this view of SRTM data, indicate right-lateral fault motion. But convergence also occurs across the fault, and this causes the continued uplift of the Southern Alps, New Zealand's largest mountain range, along the southeast side of the fault.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast (image top to bottom) direction, so that northwest slopes appear bright and southeast slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and tan, to white at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image were acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect

  5. Drones application on snow and ice surveys in alpine areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rocca, Leonardo; Bonetti, Luigi; Fioletti, Matteo; Peretti, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    First results from Climate change are now clear in Europe, and in Italy in particular, with the natural disasters that damaged irreparably the territory and the habitat due to extreme meteorological events. The Directive 2007/60/EC highlight that an "effective natural hazards prevention and mitigation that requires coordination between Member States above all on natural hazards prevention" is necessary. A climate change adaptation strategy is identified on the basis of the guidelines of the European Community program 2007-2013. Following the directives provided in the financial instrument for civil protection "Union Civil Protection Mechanism" under Decision No. 1313/2013 / EU of the European Parliament and Council, a cross-cutting approach that takes into account a large number of implementation tools of EU policies is proposed as climate change adaptation strategy. In last 7 years a network of trans-Alpine area's authorities was created between Italy and Switzerland to define an adaptive strategy on climate change effects on natural enviroment based on non structural remedies. The Interreg IT - CH STRADA Project (STRategie di ADAttamento al cambiamento climatico) was born to join all the non structural remedies to climate change effects caused by snow and avalanches, on mountain sources, extreme hydrological events and to manage all transnational hydrological resources, involving all stakeholders from Italy and Switzerland. The STRADA project involved all civil protection authorities and all research centers in charge of snow, hydrology end civil protection. The Snow - meteorological center of the Regional Agency for Environment Protection (CNM of ARPA Lombardia) and the Civil Protection of Lombardy Region created a research team to develop tools for avalanche prediction and to observe and predict snow cover on Alpine area. With this aim a lot of aerial photo using Drone as been performed in unusual landscape. Results of all surveys were really interesting on a

  6. Geomorphic controls on Pleistocene knickpoint migration in Alpine valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leith, Kerry; Fox, Matt; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Brosda, Julian; Krautblatter, Michael; Loew, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Recent insights into sub-glacial bedrock stress conditions suggest that the erosional efficiency of glaciers may reduce markedly following a major erosional cycle [Leith et al., 2013]. This implies that the formation of large glacial valleys within the Alps is likely to have occurred shortly after the onset of 100 ky glacial-interglacial cycles (at the mid-Pleistocene Revolution (MPR)). The majority of landscape change since this time may have therefore been driven by sub-aerial processes. This hypothesis is supported by observations of hillslope and channel morphology within Canton Valais (Switzerland), where major tributary valleys display a common morphology along their length, hinting at a shared geomorphic history. Glaciers currently occupy the headwaters of many catchments, while the upper reaches of rivers flow across extensive alluvial planes before abruptly transitioning to steep channels consisting of mixed bedrock and talus fan deposits. The rivers then converge to flow out over the alluvial plane of the Rhone Valley. Characteristically rough topographies within the region are suggested to mark the progressive transition from a glacial to fluvially-dominated landscape, and correlate well with steepened river channel sections determined from a 2.5 m resolution LiDAR DEM. We envisage a landscape in which ongoing tectonic uplift drives the emergence of Alpine bedrock through massive sedimentary valley infills (currently concentrated in the Rhone Valley), whose elevation is fixed by the consistent fluvial baselevel at Lake Geneva. As fluvial incision ceases at the onset of glaciation, continued uplift causes the formation of knickpoints at the former transition from bedrock to sedimentary infill. These knickpoints will then propagate upstream during subsequent interglacial periods. By investigating channel morphologies using an approach based on the steady-state form of the stream power equation, we can correlate steepened channel reaches (degraded

  7. Lateral groundwater inflows into alluvial aquifers of main alpine valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    In alpine regions the topography is mainly characterised by deep incised valleys, mountain slopes and ridges. Usually the main valleys contain aquifers in alluvial soft rock. Lateral these aquifers are confined by mountainous hard rock slopes covered by heterogeneous sediments with different thickness. The slopes can be incised by lateral valleys. Numerical models for the main alluvial aquifers ask for lateral hydrogeological boundaries. Usually no flow boundaries or Constant head Boundaries are used, even if the lateral inflows to the main aquifers are rarely known. In this example a data set for a detailed investigated and monitored area is studied to give an answer on the location and the quantification of these lateral subsurface inflows. The study area is a typical main alpine valley with a thick alluvial aquifer (appr. 120m thick), lateral confined by granite, covered at the base of the steep slopes by quaternary sediments (Burger at al. 2012). The study consists of several steps 1.) Analytical calculation of the inflows on the base of investigated and monitored 2d profiles along fault zones (Perello et al 2013) which pinch out in the main valley 2.) Analytical models along typical W-dipping slopes with monitored slope springs 3.) Evaluating temperature and electrical conductivity profiles measured in approx. 30 groundwater wells in the alluvial aquifers and along the slopes to locate main lateral subsurface inflows 4.) Output of a regional model used for the hydrogeological back analyses of the excavation of a tunnel (Baietto et al. 2014) 5.) Output of a local numerical model calibrated with a monitoring dataset and results of a pumping test of big scale (450l/s for 10days) Results of these analyses are shown to locate and quantify the lateral groundwater inflows in the main alluvial aquifer. References Baietto A., Burger U., Perello P. (2014): Hydrogeological modelling applications in tunnel excavations: examples from tunnel excavations in granitic rocks

  8. Introgression from domestic goat generated variation at the major histocompatibility complex of Alpine ibex.

    PubMed

    Grossen, Christine; Keller, Lukas; Biebach, Iris; Croll, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a crucial component of the vertebrate immune system and shows extremely high levels of genetic polymorphism. The extraordinary genetic variation is thought to be ancient polymorphisms maintained by balancing selection. However, introgression from related species was recently proposed as an additional mechanism. Here we provide evidence for introgression at the MHC in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex ibex). At a usually very polymorphic MHC exon involved in pathogen recognition (DRB exon 2), Alpine ibex carried only two alleles. We found that one of these DRB alleles is identical to a DRB allele of domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). We sequenced 2489 bp of the coding and non-coding regions of the DRB gene and found that Alpine ibex homozygous for the goat-type DRB exon 2 allele showed nearly identical sequences (99.8%) to a breed of domestic goats. Using Sanger and RAD sequencing, microsatellite and SNP chip data, we show that the chromosomal region containing the goat-type DRB allele has a signature of recent introgression in Alpine ibex. A region of approximately 750 kb including the DRB locus showed high rates of heterozygosity in individuals carrying one copy of the goat-type DRB allele. These individuals shared SNP alleles both with domestic goats and other Alpine ibex. In a survey of four Alpine ibex populations, we found that the region surrounding the DRB allele shows strong linkage disequilibria, strong sequence clustering and low diversity among haplotypes carrying the goat-type allele. Introgression at the MHC is likely adaptive and introgression critically increased MHC DRB diversity in the genetically impoverished Alpine ibex. Our finding contradicts the long-standing view that genetic variability at the MHC is solely a consequence of ancient trans-species polymorphism. Introgression is likely an underappreciated source of genetic diversity at the MHC and other loci under balancing selection.

  9. Introgression from Domestic Goat Generated Variation at the Major Histocompatibility Complex of Alpine Ibex

    PubMed Central

    Grossen, Christine; Keller, Lukas; Biebach, Iris; Croll, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a crucial component of the vertebrate immune system and shows extremely high levels of genetic polymorphism. The extraordinary genetic variation is thought to be ancient polymorphisms maintained by balancing selection. However, introgression from related species was recently proposed as an additional mechanism. Here we provide evidence for introgression at the MHC in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex ibex). At a usually very polymorphic MHC exon involved in pathogen recognition (DRB exon 2), Alpine ibex carried only two alleles. We found that one of these DRB alleles is identical to a DRB allele of domestic goats (Capra aegagrus hircus). We sequenced 2489 bp of the coding and non-coding regions of the DRB gene and found that Alpine ibex homozygous for the goat-type DRB exon 2 allele showed nearly identical sequences (99.8%) to a breed of domestic goats. Using Sanger and RAD sequencing, microsatellite and SNP chip data, we show that the chromosomal region containing the goat-type DRB allele has a signature of recent introgression in Alpine ibex. A region of approximately 750 kb including the DRB locus showed high rates of heterozygosity in individuals carrying one copy of the goat-type DRB allele. These individuals shared SNP alleles both with domestic goats and other Alpine ibex. In a survey of four Alpine ibex populations, we found that the region surrounding the DRB allele shows strong linkage disequilibria, strong sequence clustering and low diversity among haplotypes carrying the goat-type allele. Introgression at the MHC is likely adaptive and introgression critically increased MHC DRB diversity in the genetically impoverished Alpine ibex. Our finding contradicts the long-standing view that genetic variability at the MHC is solely a consequence of ancient trans-species polymorphism. Introgression is likely an underappreciated source of genetic diversity at the MHC and other loci under balancing selection. PMID:24945814

  10. Differences in Sensation Seeking Between Alpine Skiers, Snowboarders and Ski Tourers

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Martin; Wolf, Mirjam; Ruedl, Gerhard; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Despite different injury rates and injury patterns previous personality related research in the field of downhill winter sports did not subdivide between different alpine slope users. In this study, we tried to find out whether the personality trait sensation seeking differs between skiers, snowboarders and ski tourers. In a cross-sectional survey 1185 persons (726 alpine skiers, 321 snowboarders and 138 ski tourers comparable in age and sex) were electronically questioned with the sensation seeking scale (SSS-V) comprising the four factors thrill and adventure seeking, experiences seeking, disinhibition and boredom susceptibility. Kruskal-Wallis Tests revealed a significantly higher total score of the SSS-V for snowboarders in comparison to alpine skiers and ski tourers (H(2) = 41.5, p < 0.001). Ski tourers and snowboarders scored significantly higher in the dimensions “thrill- and adventure-seeking” and “experience-seeking” than alpine skiers. Furthermore, snowboarders showed higher scores in “disinhibition” related to alpine skiers and ski tourers and “boredom susceptibility” compared to alpine skiers. Data show differences in the personality trait sensation seeking in people practising different winter sports. As snowboarders showed higher SS-scores compared to alpine skiers and ski tourers prevention and information programs might benefit from a selective approach focusing on special characteristics of the respective group. Key points It is the very first research trying to identify differences between different types of winter sport slope users Obtained results show higher sensation seeking scores in snowboarders These results might stimulate new approaches in educational campaigns to reduce accident rates in winter sports PMID:26957921

  11. Intraspecific variation in the water relations of Salix arctica, an arctic-alpine dwarf willow.

    PubMed

    Dawson, T E; Bliss, L C

    1989-05-01

    The seasonal and diurnal water relations were investigated within arctic and alpine populations of the dwarf willow Salix arctica. Marked differences that were habitat dependent (e.g. xeric vs. mesic) occured both within and between the populations. The environmental variables that most affected plant water balance and the bulk tissue water relations were soil water potential (Ψsoil) and the leafto-air water vapor pressure gradient (Δw), however, low soil temperature (<4.0° C) also had a marked effect in the wet to mesic habitats. The effects of declining Ψsoil and increased ‡w were most pronounced in the plants growing in xiric habitats in both populations. Stomatal response to increased ‡w was two-fold greater in alpine versus arctic plants and is hypothesized to have arisen in response to more frequent exposure to the higher evaporative conditions of alpine existance. Seasonal fluctuations in the osmotic potential closely followed changes in Ψsoil, suggesting that these were active rather that passive changes. Additionally, plants from xeric habiats had a lower bulk tissue elastic modulus (more elastic tissues) in both arctic and alpine populations. The osmotic and elastic properties enhanced turgor maintenance over a broad range of leaf water potentials and during periods when ‡w was high. Turgor maintenance also correlated to continued transpiration despite fluctuations in soil and atmospherically induced water deficits. Arctic habitats have a shorter growing season, lower soil temperatures due to the presence of permafrost, but higher soil water potentials and lower leaf-to-air vapor pressure gradients than alpine habitats. The observed variation in patterns of stomatal conductance and in values of tissue water relations characteristics between arctic and alpine populations of S. arctica is hypothesized to have arisen in response to these different environmental regimes which represent different selective regimes that occur along the arctic-alpine

  12. Soil warming increases plant species richness but decreases germination from the alpine soil seed bank.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, Gemma L; Venn, Susanna E; Steadman, Kathryn J; Good, Roger B; McAuliffe, Edward J; Williams, Emlyn R; Nicotra, Adrienne B

    2013-05-01

    Global warming is occurring more rapidly above the treeline than at lower elevations and alpine areas are predicted to experience above average warming in the future. Temperature is a primary factor in stimulating seed germination and regulating changes in seed dormancy status. Thus, plant regeneration from seed will be crucial to the persistence, migration and post disturbance recruitment of alpine plants in future climates. Here, we present the first assessment of the impact of soil warming on germination from the persistent alpine soil seed bank. Contrary to expectations, soil warming lead to reduced overall germination from the soil seed bank. However, germination response to soil temperature was species specific such that total species richness actually increased by nine with soil warming. We further explored the system by assessing the prevalence of seed dormancy and germination response to soil disturbance, the frequency of which is predicted to increase under climate change. Seeds of a significant proportion of species demonstrated physiological dormancy mechanisms and germination of several species appeared to be intrinsically linked to soil disturbance. In addition, we found no evidence of subalpine species and little evidence of exotic weed species in the soil, suggesting that the soil seed bank will not facilitate their invasion of the alpine zone. In conclusion, changes in recruitment via the alpine soil seed bank can be expected under climate change, as a result of altered dormancy alleviation and germination cues. Furthermore, the alpine soil seed bank, and the species richness therein, has the potential to help maintain local species diversity, support species range shift and moderate species dominance. Implications for alpine management and areas for further study are also discussed.

  13. Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments: A New GLORIA Site in Southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apple, M. E.; Pullman, T. Y.; Mitman, G. G.

    2007-12-01

    Global climate change is expected to have pronounced effects on the alpine environments and thus the alpine plants of western North America. Predicted responses include an upward migration of treelines, altered species compositions, changes in the percentage of land covered by vegetation, and a change in the phenology of alpine plants. To determine the effects of climate change on the alpine flora of southwestern Montana, we are installing a GLORIA (Global Research Initiative in Alpine Environments) site in order to monitor temperature, species composition, and percent cover of vascular plants, lichens, and mosses along an ascending altitudinal gradient. We are including lichens and mosses because of their importance as ecological indicator species. The abundance and spatial distribution of lichens and mosses provides essential baseline data for long-term monitoring of local and global impacts on the environment. Mt. Fleecer (9250 ft.), which is west of the continental divide and semi-isolated from other peaks in the Anaconda-Pintlar Range, is currently the most likely location for the southwestern Montana GLORIA site. Mt. Fleecer is accessible because it does not have the steep and hazardous glaciated talus cirques that characterize many of the neighboring, higher peaks. However, if an accessible and suitable higher summit is found, then it will be included as the highest summit in the GLORIA site. Interesting species at Mt. Fleecer include the whitebark pine, Pinus albicaulis, which is a keystone species in high mountain ecosystems of the western United States and Canada, the green gentian, Frasera speciosa, and the shooting star, Dodecatheon pulchellum. Data from this site will become part of a global network of GLORIA sites with which we will assess changes in alpine flora. Information gained from this GLORIA site can also be used as a link between studies of alpine climate change and related investigations on the timing of snowmelt and its influence on

  14. Differences in Sensation Seeking Between Alpine Skiers, Snowboarders and Ski Tourers.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Martin; Wolf, Mirjam; Ruedl, Gerhard; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Despite different injury rates and injury patterns previous personality related research in the field of downhill winter sports did not subdivide between different alpine slope users. In this study, we tried to find out whether the personality trait sensation seeking differs between skiers, snowboarders and ski tourers. In a cross-sectional survey 1185 persons (726 alpine skiers, 321 snowboarders and 138 ski tourers comparable in age and sex) were electronically questioned with the sensation seeking scale (SSS-V) comprising the four factors thrill and adventure seeking, experiences seeking, disinhibition and boredom susceptibility. Kruskal-Wallis Tests revealed a significantly higher total score of the SSS-V for snowboarders in comparison to alpine skiers and ski tourers (H(2) = 41.5, p < 0.001). Ski tourers and snowboarders scored significantly higher in the dimensions "thrill- and adventure-seeking" and "experience-seeking" than alpine skiers. Furthermore, snowboarders showed higher scores in "disinhibition" related to alpine skiers and ski tourers and "boredom susceptibility" compared to alpine skiers. Data show differences in the personality trait sensation seeking in people practising different winter sports. As snowboarders showed higher SS-scores compared to alpine skiers and ski tourers prevention and information programs might benefit from a selective approach focusing on special characteristics of the respective group. Key pointsIt is the very first research trying to identify differences between different types of winter sport slope usersObtained results show higher sensation seeking scores in snowboardersThese results might stimulate new approaches in educational campaigns to reduce accident rates in winter sports.

  15. Influences of Mating Group Composition on the Behavioral Time-Budget of Male and Female Alpine Ibex (Capra ibex) during the Rut

    PubMed Central

    Tettamanti, Federico; Viblanc, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    During the rut, polygynous ungulates gather in mixed groups of individuals of different sex and age. Group social composition, which may vary on a daily basis, is likely to have strong influences on individual’s time-budget, with emerging properties at the group-level. To date, few studies have considered the influence of group composition on male and female behavioral time budget in mating groups. Focusing on a wild population of Alpine ibex, we investigated the influence of group composition (adult sex ratio, the proportion of dominant to subordinate males, and group size) on three behavioral axes obtained by Principal Components Analysis, describing male and female group time-budget. For both sexes, the first behavioral axis discerned a trade-off between grazing and standing/vigilance behavior. In females, group vigilance behavior increased with increasingly male-biased sex ratio, whereas in males, the effect of adult sex ratio on standing/vigilance behavior depended on the relative proportion of dominant males in the mating group. The second axis characterized courtship and male-male agonistic behavior in males, and moving and male-directed agonistic behavior in females. Mating group composition did not substantially influence this axis in males. However, moving and male-directed agonistic behavior increased at highly biased sex ratios (quadratic effect) in females. Finally, the third axis highlighted a trade-off between moving and lying behavior in males, and distinguished moving and female-female agonistic behavior from lying behavior in females. For males, those behaviors were influenced by a complex interaction between group size and adult sex ratio, whereas in females, moving and female-female agonistic behaviors increased in a quadratic fashion at highly biased sex ratios, and also increased with increasing group size. Our results reveal complex behavioral trade-offs depending on group composition in the Alpine ibex, and emphasize the importance of

  16. DISCOVERY AND EVOLUTION OF THE NEW BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE SWIFT J1539.2-6227 DURING ITS 2008 OUTBURST

    SciTech Connect

    Krimm, H. A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Brocksopp, C.; Grise, F.; Kaaret, P.; Romano, P.

    2011-07-10

    We report on the discovery by the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer of the black hole (BH) candidate Swift J1539.2-6227 and the subsequent course of an outburst beginning in 2008 November and lasting at least seven months. The source was discovered during normal observations with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope on 2008 November 25. An extended observing campaign with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer and Swift provided near-daily coverage over 176 days, giving us a good opportunity to track the evolution of spectral and timing parameters with fine temporal resolution through a series of spectral states. The source was first detected in a hard state during which strong low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) were detected. The QPOs persisted for about 35 days and a signature of the transition from the hard- to soft-intermediate states was seen in the timing data. The source entered a short-lived thermal state about 40 days after the start of the outburst. There were variations in spectral hardness as the source flux declined and returned to a hard state at the end of the outburst. The progression of spectral states and the nature of the timing features provide strong evidence that Swift J1539.2-6227 is a candidate BH in a low-mass X-ray binary system.

  17. Discovery and Evolution of the New Black Hole Candidate Swift J1539.2-6227 During Its 2008 Outburst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimm, H. A.; Tomsick, J. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Brocksopp, C.; Grise, F.; Kaaret, P.; Romano, P.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the discovery by the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer of the black hole candidate Swift J1539.2-6227 and the subsequent course of an outburst beginning in November 2008 and lasting at least seven months. The source was discovered during normal observations with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on 2008 November 25. An extended observing campaign with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and Swift provided near-daily coverage over 176 days, giving us a rare opportunity to track the evolution of spectral and timing parameters with fine temporal resolution through a series of spectral states. The source was first detected in a hard state during which strong low-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (QPOs) were detected. The QPOs persisted for about 35 days and a signature of the transition from the hard to soft intermediate states was seen in the timing data. The source entered a short-lived thermal state about 40 days after the start of the outburst. There were variations in spectral hardness as the source flux declined and returned to a hard state at the end of the outburst. The progression of spectral states and the nature of the timing features provide strong evidence that Swift J1539.2-6227 is a candidate black hole in a low-mass X-ray binary system.

  18. A Study of the X-ray Periodicities in the Remarkable Transient Source Swift J1644+57

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher; Falcone, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    Swift J1644+57 was discovered when it exhibited bright X-ray activity that was believed to be triggered from the infall of a tidally disrupted star near a massive black hole. The observation of a tidal disruption event (TDE) can provide clues to the geometry and physics near the black hole. If a jet forms, as we think happened with Swift J1644+57, it can provide data to study jet creation and the density of matter in a possible accretion disc. We have analyzed Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) observations of Swift J1644+57 from initial onset to 502 days after TDE onset. We used a Z-transform Discrete Correlation Function (ZDCF) to search for periodicities in the Swift X-ray light curve. We analyzed the X-ray light curve in five time regions, including 0 to 4.5 days after TDE onset, 4.5 to 55 days after TDE onset, 55 to 104 days after TDE onset, 104 to 145 days after TDE onset, and 145 to 502 days after TDE onset. After implementing red and white noise reduction modeling to our ZDCF analysis, we found plausible detections of periodicities. We briefly discuss implications of these periods on the geometry and feeding of the tidal disruption event.

  19. Optical Studies of 13 Hard X-Ray Selected Cataclysmic Binaries from the Swift-BAT Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    2015-12-01

    From a set of 13 cataclysmic binaries that were discovered in the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey, we conducted time-resolved optical spectroscopy and/or time-series photometry of 11, with the goal of measuring their orbital periods and searching for spin periods. Seven of the objects in this study are new optical identifications. Orbital periods are found for seven targets, ranging from 81 minutes to 20.4 hr. PBC J0706.7+0327 is an AM Herculis star (polar) based on its emission-line variations and large amplitude photometric modulation on the same period. Swift J2341.0+7645 may be a polar, although the evidence here is less secure. Coherent pulsations are detected from two objects, Swift J0503.7‑2819 (975 s) and Swift J0614.0+1709 (1412 s and 1530 s, spin and beat periods, respectively), indicating that they are probable intermediate polars (DQ Herculis stars). For two other stars, longer spin periods are tentatively suggested. We also present the discovery of a 2.00 hr X-ray modulation from RX J2015.6+3711, possibly a contributor to Swift J2015.9+3715, and likely a polar. Based on observations obtained at the MDM Observatory, operated by Dartmouth College, Columbia University, Ohio State University, Ohio University, and the University of Michigan.

  20. OPTICAL STUDIES OF 13 HARD X-RAY SELECTED CATACLYSMIC BINARIES FROM THE SWIFT-BAT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, Jules P.; Thorstensen, John R.

    2015-12-15

    From a set of 13 cataclysmic binaries that were discovered in the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) survey, we conducted time-resolved optical spectroscopy and/or time-series photometry of 11, with the goal of measuring their orbital periods and searching for spin periods. Seven of the objects in this study are new optical identifications. Orbital periods are found for seven targets, ranging from 81 minutes to 20.4 hr. PBC J0706.7+0327 is an AM Herculis star (polar) based on its emission-line variations and large amplitude photometric modulation on the same period. Swift J2341.0+7645 may be a polar, although the evidence here is less secure. Coherent pulsations are detected from two objects, Swift J0503.7−2819 (975 s) and Swift J0614.0+1709 (1412 s and 1530 s, spin and beat periods, respectively), indicating that they are probable intermediate polars (DQ Herculis stars). For two other stars, longer spin periods are tentatively suggested. We also present the discovery of a 2.00 hr X-ray modulation from RX J2015.6+3711, possibly a contributor to Swift J2015.9+3715, and likely a polar.