Science.gov

Sample records for adult aml patients

  1. The predictive value of hierarchical cytogenetic classification in older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): analysis of 1065 patients entered into the United Kingdom Medical Research Council AML11 trial.

    PubMed

    Grimwade, D; Walker, H; Harrison, G; Oliver, F; Chatters, S; Harrison, C J; Wheatley, K; Burnett, A K; Goldstone, A H

    2001-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older adults carries a poor prognosis, and the optimum treatment remains to be determined. In younger patients, treatment stratification is frequently based upon diagnostic karyotype, which was the most important prognostic factor in the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) AML10 trial. Considered here is whether karyotype is also predictive in older adults; this is done by studying 1065 cases from MRC AML11 (median age, 66 years). Three prognostic groups were distinguished on the basis of response to induction therapy and overall survival (OS). Those with t(15;17), t(8;21), or inv(16) composed the favorable risk group. Overall, these abnormalities predicted a superior complete remission (CR) rate (72%), reflecting relatively low levels of resistant disease (RD) (8%), and lower relapse risk (RR) (56%) associated with superior OS (34% at 5 years). Normal karyotype (CR, 63%; RD, 17%; RR, 78%; OS, 15%) and other noncomplex abnormalities (CR, 53%; RD, 32%; RR, 85%; OS, 10%) composed the intermediate group; while complex karyotype predicted an extremely poor prognosis (CR, 26%; RD, 56%; RR, 91%; OS, 2%). Combining MRC AML10 and AML11 (n = 2677) revealed that the most favorable changes were rarer in older patients (younger than 55 years, 24%; 55 years or older, 7%), while complex abnormalities were more common (6% vs 13%). This study suggests that hierarchical cytogenetic classification identifies biologically distinct subsets of AML that are represented in all age groups. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of karyotype as a critical independent determinant of outcome in older patients with AML, providing a potential framework for stratified treatment approaches.

  2. Treatment of older patients with AML.

    PubMed

    Büchner, Thomas; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Wörmann, Bernhard; Schoch, Claudia; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne; Kern, Wolfgang; Aul, Carlo; Lengfelder, Eva; Schumacher, Andrea; Reichle, Albrecht; Staib, Peter; Balleisen, Leopold; Eimermacher, Hartmut; Grüneisen, Andreas; Rasche, Herbert; Sauerland, Maria Cristina; Heinecke, Achim; Mesters, Rolf M; Serve, Hubert L; Kienast, Joachim; Hiddemann, Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    Undertreatment of the older patients with AML can explain, in part, their inferior outcome when compared with that in younger patients. In analogy to the benefit of patients under the age of 60 years from high-dose AraC there are dosage related therapeutic effects in the patients over 60 years in particular for daunorubicin in the induction treatment, and for maintenance versus no maintenance in the post-remission treatment. Utilizing these effects can partly overcome the mostly unfavorable disease biology in older age AML, whereas the role of risk factors involved is not completely understood and the concept of dose-response needs to be requestioned. We recommend an adequate dosage of 60 mg/(m2day) daunorubicin for 3 days in a combination with standard dose AraC and 6-thioguanine given for induction and consolidation and followed by a prolonged monthly maintenance chemotherapy. Further improvements in supportive care may help delivering additional anti-leukemic cytotoxicity. As a novel approach, reduced toxicity preparative regimens may open up allogeneic transplantation for older patients with AML. Other new options like MDR modulators, antibody targeted therapies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are under clinical investigation. A questionnaire study in patients with AML showed that according to patients' self-assessment intensive and prolonged treatment did not result in decreasing quality of life. This finding did not vary by age under or above 60 years. Given the actual median age in this disease being more than 60 years the adequate management of older age AML remains as the major challenge.

  3. Sex disparity in childhood and young adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: Evidence from US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li

    2015-12-01

    Sex variation has been persistently investigated in studies concerning acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival outcomes but has not been fully explored among pediatric and young adult AML patients. We detected sex difference in the survival of AML patients diagnosed at ages 0-24 years and explored distinct effects of sex across subgroups of age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity and AML subtypes utilizing the United States Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population based dataset of 4865 patients diagnosed with AML between 1973 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier survival function, propensity scores and stratified Cox proportional hazards regression were used for data analyses. After controlling for other prognostic factors, females showed a significant survival advantage over their male counterparts, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.00-1.18). Compared to females, male patients had substantially increased risk of mortality in the following subgroups of: ages 20-24 years at diagnosis (aHR1.30), Caucasian (1.14), acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (1.35), acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) (1.39), AML with inv(16)(p13.1q22) (2.57), AML with minimum differentiation (1.47); and had substantially decreased aHR in AML t(9;11)(p22;q23) (0.57) and AML with maturation (0.82). Overall, females demonstrated increased survival over males and this disparity was considerably large in patients ages 20-24 years at diagnosis, Caucasians, and in AML subtypes of AML inv(16), APL and AEL. In contrast, males with AML t(9;11)(p22;q23), AML with maturation and age at diagnosis of 10-14 years showed survival benefit. Further investigations are needed to detect the biological processes influencing the mechanisms of these interactions.

  4. Expression Profiling of Ribosome Biogenesis Factors Reveals Nucleolin as a Novel Potential Marker to Predict Outcome in AML Patients.

    PubMed

    Marcel, Virginie; Catez, Frédéric; Berger, Caroline M; Perrial, Emeline; Plesa, Adriana; Thomas, Xavier; Mattei, Eve; Hayette, Sandrine; Saintigny, Pierre; Bouvet, Philippe; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Dumontet, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Prognosis is mainly influenced by patient age at diagnosis and cytogenetic alterations, two of the main factors currently used in AML patient risk stratification. However, additional criteria are required to improve the current risk classification and better adapt patient care. In neoplastic cells, ribosome biogenesis is increased to sustain the high proliferation rate and ribosome composition is altered to modulate specific gene expression driving tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the usage of ribosome biogenesis factors as clinical markers in adult patients with AML. We showed that nucleoli, the nucleus compartments where ribosome production takes place, are modified in AML by analyzing a panel of AML and healthy donor cells using immunofluorescence staining. Using four AML series, including the TCGA dataset, altogether representing a total of about 270 samples, we showed that not all factors involved in ribosome biogenesis have clinical values although ribosome biogenesis is increased in AML. Interestingly, we identified the regulator of ribosome production nucleolin (NCL) as over-expressed in AML blasts. Moreover, we found in two series that high NCL mRNA expression level was associated with a poor overall survival, particular in elderly patients. Multivariate analyses taking into account age and cytogenetic risk indicated that NCL expression in blast cells is an independent marker of reduced survival. Our study identifies NCL as a potential novel prognostic factor in AML. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome biogenesis pathway may be of interest as clinical markers in AML.

  5. Expression Profiling of Ribosome Biogenesis Factors Reveals Nucleolin as a Novel Potential Marker to Predict Outcome in AML Patients

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Caroline M.; Perrial, Emeline; Plesa, Adriana; Thomas, Xavier; Mattei, Eve; Hayette, Sandrine; Saintigny, Pierre; Bouvet, Philippe; Diaz, Jean-Jacques; Dumontet, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease. Prognosis is mainly influenced by patient age at diagnosis and cytogenetic alterations, two of the main factors currently used in AML patient risk stratification. However, additional criteria are required to improve the current risk classification and better adapt patient care. In neoplastic cells, ribosome biogenesis is increased to sustain the high proliferation rate and ribosome composition is altered to modulate specific gene expression driving tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the usage of ribosome biogenesis factors as clinical markers in adult patients with AML. We showed that nucleoli, the nucleus compartments where ribosome production takes place, are modified in AML by analyzing a panel of AML and healthy donor cells using immunofluorescence staining. Using four AML series, including the TCGA dataset, altogether representing a total of about 270 samples, we showed that not all factors involved in ribosome biogenesis have clinical values although ribosome biogenesis is increased in AML. Interestingly, we identified the regulator of ribosome production nucleolin (NCL) as over-expressed in AML blasts. Moreover, we found in two series that high NCL mRNA expression level was associated with a poor overall survival, particular in elderly patients. Multivariate analyses taking into account age and cytogenetic risk indicated that NCL expression in blast cells is an independent marker of reduced survival. Our study identifies NCL as a potential novel prognostic factor in AML. Altogether, our results suggest that the ribosome biogenesis pathway may be of interest as clinical markers in AML. PMID:28103300

  6. Diagnosis and management of AML in adults: 2017 ELN recommendations from an international expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Estey, Elihu; Grimwade, David; Amadori, Sergio; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Büchner, Thomas; Dombret, Hervé; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Fenaux, Pierre; Larson, Richard A.; Levine, Ross L.; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Naoe, Tomoki; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Sanz, Miguel; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S.; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Wei, Andrew H.; Löwenberg, Bob; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2017-01-01

    The first edition of the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) recommendations for diagnosis and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults, published in 2010, has found broad acceptance by physicians and investigators caring for patients with AML. Recent advances, for example, in the discovery of the genomic landscape of the disease, in the development of assays for genetic testing and for detecting minimal residual disease (MRD), as well as in the development of novel antileukemic agents, prompted an international panel to provide updated evidence- and expert opinion-based recommendations. The recommendations include a revised version of the ELN genetic categories, a proposal for a response category based on MRD status, and criteria for progressive disease. PMID:27895058

  7. Diagnosis and management of AML in adults: 2017 ELN recommendations from an international expert panel.

    PubMed

    Döhner, Hartmut; Estey, Elihu; Grimwade, David; Amadori, Sergio; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Büchner, Thomas; Dombret, Hervé; Ebert, Benjamin L; Fenaux, Pierre; Larson, Richard A; Levine, Ross L; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Naoe, Tomoki; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Sanz, Miguel; Sierra, Jorge; Tallman, Martin S; Tien, Hwei-Fang; Wei, Andrew H; Löwenberg, Bob; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2017-01-26

    The first edition of the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) recommendations for diagnosis and management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults, published in 2010, has found broad acceptance by physicians and investigators caring for patients with AML. Recent advances, for example, in the discovery of the genomic landscape of the disease, in the development of assays for genetic testing and for detecting minimal residual disease (MRD), as well as in the development of novel antileukemic agents, prompted an international panel to provide updated evidence- and expert opinion-based recommendations. The recommendations include a revised version of the ELN genetic categories, a proposal for a response category based on MRD status, and criteria for progressive disease.

  8. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy S; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E; Klepin, Heidi D

    2014-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥ 4 versus ≤ 1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18-84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06-0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15-3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML.

  9. The prognostic importance of polypharmacy in older adults treated for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Kathleen; Tooze, Janet A.; Geller, Rachel; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ritchie, Ellen; Kennedy, LeAnne; Callahan, Kathryn E.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of polypharmacy and inappropriate medication use among 150 patients >60 years of age receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). After adjustment for age and comorbidity, increased number of medications at diagnosis (≥4 vs. ≤1) was associated with increased 30-day mortality (OR=9.98, 95% CI=1.18–84.13), lower odds of complete remission status (OR=0.20, 95% CI=0.06–0.65), and higher overall mortality (HR=2.13, 95% CI=1.15–3.92). Inappropriate medication use (classified according to Beers criteria) was not significantly associated with clinical outcomes. Polypharmacy warrants further study as a modifiable marker of vulnerability among older adults with AML. PMID:25127690

  10. Comorbidity, age and mortality among adults treated intensively for acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Bernard; Pardee, Timothy; Isom, Scott; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Winter, Allison; Lawrence, Julia; Powell, Bayard L.; Klepin, Heidi D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to characterize comorbidities among adults receiving intensive therapy for AML, and investigate their association with outcomes. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 277 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed AML treated intensively at the Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University from 2002–2009. Pretreatment comorbidities were identified by ICD-9 codes and chart review. Comorbidity burden (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index [CCI]) and specific conditions were analyzed individually. Outcomes were overall survival (OS), remission, and 30-day mortality. Covariates included age, gender, cytogenetic characteristics, hemoglobin, white cell count, lactate dehydrogenase, body mass index, and insurance type. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate OS; logistic regression was used for remission and 30-day mortality. Results In this series, 144 patients were ≥60 years old (median age 70 years, median survival 8.7 months) and 133 were <60 years (median age 47 years, median survival 23.1 months). Older patients had a higher comorbidity burden (CCI≥1 58% versus 26%, p<0.001). Prevalent comorbid conditions differed by age (diabetes 19.2% versus 7.5%; cardiovascular disease 12.5% versus 4.5%, for older versus younger patients, respectively). The CCI was not independently associated with OS or 30-day mortality in either age group. Among older patients, diabetes was associated with higher 30-day mortality (33.3% vs. 12.0% in diabetic vs. non diabetic patients, p =0.006). Controlling for age, cytogenetic characteristics and other comorbidities, the presence of diabetes increased the odds of 30-day mortality by 4.9 (CI 1.6–15.2) times. Discussion Diabetes is adversely associated with 30-day survival in older AML patients receiving intensive therapy. PMID:26527394

  11. Differential diagnosis between AML infiltration, lymphoma and tuberculosis in a patient presenting with fever and mediastinal lymphadenopathy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, NA; YANG, JUN-JIE; ZHANG, GUANG-SEN

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculosis in immunocompromised hosts is often difficult as the hosts have atypical tuberculosis symptoms. The current study presents a case of scrofula and pulmonary tuberculosis with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML). As the disease became aggravated, the patient presented with fever, hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow, lymphadenopathy of the supraclavicular fossa, and mediastinal and nodular shadow in the chest by computed tomography. The symptoms presented successively or were coexistent, which made differentiation between tuberculosis, lymphoma, AML infiltration or other infections challenging. The diagnosis of tuberculosis was based on clinical and radiographic observations, morphological observation of the biopsies and the positive effect of antituberculosis drugs, while Ziehl-Neelsen stainings for acid fast bacilli were negative. The patient was treated with antituberculosis drugs, while receiving chemotherapy for AML. It is important to distinguish tuberculosis in adults with AML from other causes of fever, mediastinal masses in radiographic observations and hemophagocytosis in the bone marrow. PMID:24527075

  12. RIC versus MAC UCBT in adults with AML: A report from Eurocord, the ALWP and the CTIWP of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Beohou, Eric; Labopin, Myriam; Sanz, Guillermo; Milpied, Noel; Michallet, Mauricette; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Blaise, Didier; Sierra, Jorge; Socié, Gérard; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Schmid, Christoph; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Savani, Bipin N.; Mohty, Mohamad; Gluckman, Eliane; Nagler, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) is the first cause of treatment failure after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) following myeloablative conditioning (MAC). In the last decade, reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have been developed with the aim of reducing NRM and allowing older patients and those with medical comorbidities to benefit from UCBT. The aim of the current retrospective study was to compare transplantation outcomes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients given UCBT after either RIC or MAC. Data from 894 adults with AML receiving a single or double UCBT as first allograft from 2004 to 2013 at EBMT centers were included in this study. 415 patients were given UCBT after RIC while 479 patients following a MAC. In comparison to MAC recipients, RIC recipients had a similar incidence of neutrophil engraftment and of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, RIC recipients had a higher incidence of disease relapse and a lower NRM, translating to comparable leukemia-free (LFS), GVHD-free, relapse-free survival (GRFS) and overall survival (OS). These observations remained qualitatively similar after adjusting for differences between groups in multivariate analyses. In conclusion, these data suggest that LFS and OS are similar with RIC or with MAC in adults AML patients transplanted with UCBT. These observations could serve as basis for a future prospective randomized study. PMID:27250025

  13. AML1/Runx1 as a versatile regulator of hematopoiesis: regulation of its function and a role in adult hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Mineo

    2006-08-01

    AML1/Runx1, originally identified as a gene located at the breakpoint of the t(8;21) translocation, encodes a transcription factor that is widely expressed in multiple hematopoietic lineages and that regulates the expression of a variety of hematopoietic genes. Numerous studies have shown that AML1 is a critical regulator of hematopoietic development. In addition, AML1 is a frequent target for chromosomal translocation in human leukemia. The activity of AML1 can be modulated by various types of posttranslational modification, including phosphorylation and acetylation. Phosphorylation by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is one of the mechanisms that dictate whether AML1 acts as either a transcriptional repressor or an activator of gene expression. Recently, a physiological role for AML1 in adult hematopoiesis was revealed by conditional gene targeting in mice. Remarkably, adult hematopoietic progenitors are maintained even in the absence of AML1, in stark contrast to the total disruption of definitive hematopoiesis during embryogenesis. AML1 is, however, critical for megakaryopoiesis and plays an important role in T-cell and B-cell development in adult mice. Recent analyses engineered to recreate hematopoiesis in vitro revealed that the transcriptional activity of AML1 is closely related with the potential of AML1 to generate hematopoietic cells and support thymocyte development.

  14. Spontaneous Remission in an Older Patient with Relapsed FLT3 ITD Mutant AML

    PubMed Central

    Mendler, Jason H.; Evans, Andrew; Deeb, George; Starostik, Petr; Wallace, Paul K.; Wang, Eunice S.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous remission (SR) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a very rare phenomenon. AML characterized by FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3 ITD) is typically associated with an aggressive clinical course with rapid progression, relapse, and short overall survival in the absence of transplantation. We report here the first case of SR of FLT3 ITD mutant AML in the literature. Our patient was an elderly woman with relapsed NPM1 and FLT3 ITD mutant AML whose disease underwent SR for a brief duration without precipitating cause. We review the potential immune mechanisms underlying SR in AML and discuss the implications for novel immunotherapeutic approaches for FLT3 mutant AML. PMID:28127477

  15. Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes and therapeutic outcomes of AML patients from SWOG clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kuptsova, Nataliya; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Godwin, John; Anderson, Jeanne; Hoque, Ashraful; Willman, Cheryl L; Slovak, Marilyn L; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2007-05-01

    Repair of damage to DNA resulting from chemotherapy may influence drug toxicity and survival in response to treatment. We evaluated the role of polymorphisms in DNA repair genes APE1, XRCC1, ERCC1, XPD, and XRCC3 in predicting therapeutic outcomes of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from 2 Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) clinical trials. All patients received standard chemotherapy induction regimens. Using logistic and proportional hazards regression models, relationships between genotypes, haplotypes, and toxicities, response to induction therapy, and overall survival were evaluated. Patients with XPD Gln751C/Asp312G ('D') haplotype were more likely to have complete response (OR = 3.06; 95% CI, 1.44-6.70) and less likely to have resistant disease (OR = 0.32; 95%CI, 0.14-0.72) than patients with other haplotypes. ERCC1 polymorphisms were significantly associated with lung (P = .037) and metabolic (P = .041) toxicities, and patients with the XRCC3 241Met variant had reduced risk of liver toxicity (OR = 0.32; 95%CI, 0.11-0.95). Significant associations with other toxicities were also found for variant XPD genotypes/haplotypes. These data from clinical trials of older patients treated for AML indicate that variants in DNA repair pathways may have an impact on both outcomes of patients and toxicities associated with treatments. With validation of results in larger samples, these findings could lead to optimizing individual chemotherapy options.

  16. Cellular Reprogramming Allows Generation of Autologous Hematopoietic Progenitors From AML Patients That Are Devoid of Patient-Specific Genomic Aberrations.

    PubMed

    Salci, Kyle R; Lee, Jong-Hee; Laronde, Sarah; Dingwall, Steve; Kushwah, Rahul; Fiebig-Comyn, Aline; Leber, Brian; Foley, Ronan; Dal Cin, Arianna; Bhatia, Mickie

    2015-06-01

    Current treatments that use hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients substantially reduce the risk of relapse, but are limited by the availability of immune compatible healthy HPCs. Although cellular reprogramming has the potential to provide a novel autologous source of HPCs for transplantation, the applicability of this technology toward the derivation of healthy autologous hematopoietic cells devoid of patient-specific leukemic aberrations from AML patients must first be evaluated. Here, we report the generation of human AML patient-specific hematopoietic progenitors that are capable of normal in vitro differentiation to myeloid lineages and are devoid of leukemia-associated aberration found in matched patient bone marrow. Skin fibroblasts were obtained from AML patients whose leukemic cells possessed a distinct, leukemia-associated aberration, and used to create AML patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Through hematopoietic differentiation of AML patient iPSCs, coupled with cytogenetic interrogation, we reveal that AML patient-specific HPCs possess normal progenitor capacity and are devoid of leukemia-associated mutations. Importantly, in rare patient skin samples that give rise to mosaic fibroblast cultures that continue to carry leukemia-associated mutations; healthy hematopoietic progenitors can also be generated via reprogramming selection. Our findings provide the proof of principle that cellular reprogramming can be applied on a personalized basis to generate healthy HPCs from AML patients, and should further motivate advances toward creating transplantable hematopoietic stem cells for autologous AML therapy.

  17. DNMT3A mutation is a poor prognosis biomarker in AML: results of a meta-analysis of 4500 AML patients.

    PubMed

    Shivarov, Velizar; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Stoimenov, Angel; Tiu, Ramon

    2013-11-01

    Somatic DNA methyl transferase 3A (DNMT3A) mutations have been recognized recently as recurrent molecular aberrations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The precise role of these mutations in leukemogenesis remains elusive but a number of studies have already been conducted to study their potential prognostic value in AML patients with variable results. We performed a meta-analysis on published data from over 4500 AML patients to provide robust evidence supporting DNMT3A mutation testing in clinical setting for AML patients. Our meta-analysis showed that DNMT3A mutations were associated with M4 and M5 AML subtypes. Those mutations conferred significantly worse prognosis with both shorter OS (p=0.0004) and shorter RFS (p=0.002). Notably, DNMT3A mutations appeared to be an independent adverse prognostic factor also in younger patients with normal cytogenetics AML (OS (p=0.01) and RFS (p=0.0005)) and also in the subgroup of patients with high risk genotypes defined according to the criteria of the European Leukemia Net (ELN) (OS (p=0.002)). Therefore, DNMT3A mutational status can improve the risk stratification of AML patients in the setting of integrated mutational profiling.

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with AML not achieving remission: potentially curative therapy.

    PubMed

    Gyurkocza, B; Lazarus, H M; Giralt, S

    2017-02-27

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who fail to achieve complete remission (CR) have a dismal prognosis. Although data suggest that durable remissions can be achieved in approximately 30% of patients with refractory or relapsed AML after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), only a small fraction of those patients are offered this therapeutic option. Importantly, patients with primary refractory AML have distinctly better outcomes following allogeneic HCT than those with refractory relapse. Access to suitable donors could be one of the main barriers in these situations. However, with recent developments in the field of allogeneic HCT, such as alternative donor sources, high-resolution HLA-typing, reduced intensity conditioning regimens and improvements in supportive care, this approach has the potential to offer long-term survival for patients with refractory and relapsed AML and should be considered as early after diagnosis as possible. Incorporating novel agents into the conditioning regimen or as post-transplant maintenance therapy could further improve outcomes and render older or medically infirm patients with refractory or relapsed AML eligible for allogeneic HCT. In this review, we summarize existing data on allogeneic HCT in patients with refractory or relapsed AML and explore novel approaches with the potential to improve outcomes in this patient population.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/bmt.2017.8.

  19. Peripheral blood T cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients at diagnosis have abnormal phenotype and genotype and form defective immune synapses with AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Taussig, David C; Ramsay, Alan G; Mitter, Richard; Miraki-Moud, Faridah; Fatah, Rewas; Lee, Abigail M; Lister, T Andrew; Gribben, John G

    2009-10-29

    Understanding how the immune system in patients with cancer interacts with malignant cells is critical for the development of successful immunotherapeutic strategies. We studied peripheral blood from newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to assess the impact of this disease on the patients' T cells. The absolute number of peripheral blood T cells is increased in AML compared with healthy controls. An increase in the absolute number of CD3+56+ cells was also noted. Gene expression profiling on T cells from AML patients compared with healthy donors demonstrated global differences in transcription suggesting aberrant T-cell activation patterns. These gene expression changes differ from those observed in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), indicating the heterogeneous means by which different tumors evade the host immune response. However, in common with CLL, differentially regulated genes involved in actin cytoskeletal formation were identified, and therefore the ability of T cells from AML patients to form immunologic synapses was assessed. Although AML T cells could form conjugates with autologous blasts, their ability to form immune synapses and recruit phosphotyrosine signaling molecules to the synapse was significantly impaired. These findings identify T-cell dysfunction in AML that may contribute to the failure of a host immune response against leukemic blasts.

  20. Evaluation of DNMT3A genetic polymorphisms as outcome predictors in AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Yu; Yan, Han; Yang, Yong-Long; Zhu, Ke-Wei; Chen, Yan-Hong; Li, Xi; Yin, Ji-Ye; Li, Xiao-Lin; Zeng, Hui; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    DNMT3A mutation is known as a recurrent event in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. However, association between DNMT3A genetic polymorphisms and AML patients' outcomes is unknown. DNMT3A 11 SNPs (rs11695471, rs2289195, rs734693, rs2276598, rs1465825, rs7590760, rs13401241, rs7581217, rs749131, rs41284843 and rs7560488) were genotyped in 344 diagnostic non-FAB-M3 AML patients from southern China. Patients underwent combined chemotherapy with cytarabine and anthracyclines. DNMT3A mRNA expression was analyzed in PBMCs from randomly selected AML patients. Multivariate analysis and combined genotype analysis showed that rs2276598 was associated with increased while rs11695471 and rs734693 were associated with decreased chemosensitivity (P<0.05), while rs11695471 (worse for OS), rs2289195 (favorable for OS and DFS) and rs2276598 (favorable for DFS) were significantly associated with disease prognosis (P<0.05). In conclusion, DNMT3A polymorphisms may be potential predictive markers for AML patients' outcomes, which might improve prognostic stratification of AML. PMID:27528035

  1. Evaluation of DNMT3A genetic polymorphisms as outcome predictors in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Dao-Yu; Yan, Han; Yang, Yong-Long; Zhu, Ke-Wei; Chen, Yan-Hong; Li, Xi; Yin, Ji-Ye; Li, Xiao-Lin; Zeng, Hui; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-09-13

    DNMT3A mutation is known as a recurrent event in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. However, association between DNMT3A genetic polymorphisms and AML patients' outcomes is unknown. DNMT3A 11 SNPs (rs11695471, rs2289195, rs734693, rs2276598, rs1465825, rs7590760, rs13401241, rs7581217, rs749131, rs41284843 and rs7560488) were genotyped in 344 diagnostic non-FAB-M3 AML patients from southern China. Patients underwent combined chemotherapy with cytarabine and anthracyclines. DNMT3A mRNA expression was analyzed in PBMCs from randomly selected AML patients. Multivariate analysis and combined genotype analysis showed that rs2276598 was associated with increased while rs11695471 and rs734693 were associated with decreased chemosensitivity (P<0.05), while rs11695471 (worse for OS), rs2289195 (favorable for OS and DFS) and rs2276598 (favorable for DFS) were significantly associated with disease prognosis (P<0.05). In conclusion, DNMT3A polymorphisms may be potential predictive markers for AML patients' outcomes, which might improve prognostic stratification of AML.

  2. Repression of GSK3 restores NK cell cytotoxicity in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Reshmi; Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Moreton, Stephen A; Xia, Zhiqiang; Hou, Yongchun; Lee, Dean A; Gupta, Kalpana; deLima, Marcos; Beck, Rose C; Wald, David N

    2016-04-04

    Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukaemia patients (AML-NK) show a dramatic impairment in cytotoxic activity. The exact reasons for this dysfunction are not fully understood. Here we show that the glycogen synthase kinase beta (GSK3β) expression is elevated in AML-NK cells. Interestingly, GSK3 overexpression in normal NK cells impairs their ability to kill AML cells, while genetic or pharmacological GSK3 inactivation enhances their cytotoxic activity. Mechanistic studies reveal that the increased cytotoxic activity correlates with an increase in AML-NK cell conjugates. GSK3 inhibition promotes the conjugate formation by upregulating LFA expression on NK cells and by inducing ICAM-1 expression on AML cells. The latter is mediated by increased NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α production by NK cells. Finally, GSK3-inhibited NK cells show significant efficacy in human AML mouse models. Overall, our work provides mechanistic insights into the AML-NK dysfunction and a potential NK cell therapy strategy.

  3. Tailored strategy for AML patients receiving allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Kim, Jong Gwang; Kim, Dong Hwan

    2006-10-01

    Considering the heterogeneity of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), along with the pros and cons of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), a tailored strategy is needed to minimize the transplant-related mortality and maximize the transplant outcomes in AML patients exhibiting certain factors that have an impact on the post-transplant quality of life and outcomes. The factors that need to be considered when tailoring a strategy in an allogeneic PBSCT setting include the recipient's performance status and co-morbid disease include AML risk stratification, disease status, expected severity of graft-versus-host disease, and the necessity of a graft-versus-leukemia effect. Accordingly, this review article describes a possible tailoring strategy for AML patients receiving allogeneic PBSCT based on certain factors influencing the transplant outcome.

  4. Consolidation with autologous stem cell transplantation in first remission is safe and effective in AML patients above 65 years.

    PubMed

    Heini, Alexander D; Berger, Martin D; Seipel, Katja; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri; Baerlocher, Gabriela M; Leibundgut, Kurt; Banz, Yara; Novak, Urban; Pabst, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of AML patients ≥65 years remains disappointing. Current post-induction strategies for elderly AML patients fit for intensive treatment involve additional cycles of chemotherapy or allogeneic transplantation. Consolidation with autologous transplantation (ASCT) is poorly studied in these patients. In this single-center retrospective analysis, we determined survival rates of AML patients ≥65 years undergoing busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning before ASCT in first remission between 2007 and 2015. We found elderly AML patients with ASCT to have longer progression-free survival (PFS; 16.3 vs. 5.1 months, P=0.0166) and overall survival (OS; n.r. vs. 8.2 months; P=0.0255) than elderly AML patients without ASCT consolidation. In addition, elderly AML patients undergoing ASCT had comparable PFS (P=0.9462) and OS (P=0.7867) as AML patients below 65 years receiving ASCT consolidation in CR1. Our data suggest that ASCT is an option in elderly fit AML patients who appear to benefit from autologous consolidation similarly to younger AML patients.

  5. Parallel targeted next generation sequencing of childhood and adult acute myeloid leukemia patients reveals uniform genomic profile of the disease.

    PubMed

    Marjanovic, Irena; Kostic, Jelena; Stanic, Bojana; Pejanovic, Nadja; Lucic, Bojana; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Janic, Dragana; Dokmanovic, Lidija; Jankovic, Srdja; Vukovic, Nada Suvajdzic; Tomin, Dragica; Perisic, Ognjen; Rakocevic, Goran; Popovic, Milos; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tosic, Natasa

    2016-10-01

    The age-specific differences in the genetic mechanisms of myeloid leukemogenesis have been observed and studied previously. However, NGS technology has provided a possibility to obtain a large amount of mutation data. We analyzed DNA samples from 20 childhood (cAML) and 20 adult AML (aAML) patients, using NGS targeted sequencing. The average coverage of high-quality sequences was 2981 × per amplicon. A total of 412 (207 cAML, 205 aAML) variants in the coding regions were detected; out of which, only 122 (62 cAML and 60 aAML) were potentially protein-changing. Our results confirmed that AML contains small number of genetic alterations (median 3 mutations/patient in both groups). The prevalence of the most frequent single gene AML associated mutations differed in cAML and aAML patient cohorts: IDH1 (0 % cAML, 5 % aAML), IDH2 (0 % cAML, 10 % aAML), NPM1 (10 % cAML, 35 % aAML). Additionally, potentially protein-changing variants were found in tyrosine kinase genes or genes encoding tyrosine kinase associated proteins (JAK3, ABL1, GNAQ, and EGFR) in cAML, while among aAML, the prevalence is directed towards variants in the methylation and histone modifying genes (IDH1, IDH2, and SMARCB1). Besides uniform genomic profile of AML, specific genetic characteristic was exclusively detected in cAML and aAML.

  6. MicroRNA-mRNA Pairs Associated with Outcome in AML: From In Vitro Cell-Based Studies to AML Patients.

    PubMed

    Bhise, Neha S; Chauhan, Lata; Shin, Miyoung; Cao, Xueyuan; Pounds, Stanley; Lamba, Vishal; Lamba, Jatinder K

    2015-01-01

    Cytarabine is the primary chemotherapeutic agent used for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Disease relapse after initial remission remains one of the most pressing therapeutic challenges in the treatment of AML. Relapsed disease is often resistant to cytarabine and subsequent salvage therapy is ineffective. Recent studies have shown that some microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with prognosis, but have not yet explored the role of miRNAs in cellular response to cytarabine. We identified 20 miRNAs that associate with the in vitro cytarabine chemo-sensitivity or apoptotic response of eight AML cell lines. Out of the 20 miRNAs, data on 18 miRNAs was available in AML patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Our stepwise-integrated analyses (step 1 - miRNA-target mRNA that were significantly correlated in AML patients; step 2 - mRNAs from step 1 with significant association with overall survival (OS)) identified 23 unique miRNA-mRNA pairs predictive of OS in AML patients. As expected HOX genes (HOXA9, HOXB7, and HOXA10) were identified to be regulated by miRs as well as predictive of worse OS. Additionally, miR107-Myb, miR-378-granzyme B involved in granzyme signaling and miR10a-MAP4K4 were identified to be predictive of outcome through integrated analysis. Although additional functional validations to establish clinical/pharmacologic importance of miRNA-mRNA pairs are needed, our results from RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed binding of miR-10a, miR-378, and miR-107 with their target genes GALNT1, GZMB, and MYB, respectively. Integration of pathogenic and pharmacologically significant miRNAs and miRNA-mRNA relationships identified in our study opens up opportunities for development of targeted/miRNA-directed therapies.

  7. Improved outcome of pediatric patients with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in the AML-BFM 04 trial.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Jana; Zimmermann, Martin; Rasche, Mareike; von Neuhoff, Christine; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of children with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) using intensified treatment protocols, clear prognostic indicators, and treatment recommendations for this acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroup are yet to be defined. Here, we report the outcome of 97 pediatric patients with de novo AMKL (excluding Down syndrome [DS]) enrolled in the prospective multicenter studies AML-BFM 98 and AML-BFM 04 (1998-2014). AMKL occurred in 7.4 % of pediatric AML cases, at younger age (median 1.44 years) and with lower white blood cell count (mean 16.5 × 10(9)/L) as compared to other AML subgroups. With 60 ± 5 %, children with AMKL had a lower 5-year overall survival (5-year OS; vs. 68 ± 1 %, P log rank = 0.038). Yet, we achieved an improved 5-year OS in AML-BFM 04 compared to AML-BFM 98 (70 ± 6 % vs. 45 ± 8 %, P log rank = 0.041). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission did not provide a significant survival benefit (5-year OS 70 ± 11 % vs. 63 ± 6 %; P Mantel-Byar = 0.85). Cytogenetic data were available for n = 78 patients. AMKL patients with gain of chromosome 21 had a superior 5-year OS (80 ± 9 %, P log rank = 0.034), whereas translocation t(1;22)(p13;q13) was associated with an inferior 5-year event-free survival (38 ± 17 %, P log rank = 0.04). However, multivariate analysis showed that treatment response (bone marrow morphology on day 15 and 28) was the only independent prognostic marker (RR = 4.39; 95 % CI, 1.97-9.78). Interestingly, GATA1-mutations were detected in six patients (11 %) without previously known trisomy 21. Thus, AMKL (excluding DS) remains an AML subgroup with inferior outcome. Nevertheless, with intensive therapy regimens, a steep increase in the survival rates was achieved.

  8. Histological and immunohistochemical features of gingival enlargement in a patient with AML.

    PubMed

    Sonoi, Norihiro; Soga, Yoshihiko; Maeda, Hiroshi; Ichimura, Koichi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Aoyama, Kazutoshi; Fujii, Nobuharu; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Logan, Richard; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Takashiba, Shogo

    2012-07-01

    Here, we discuss the pathophysiology of leukemia-associated gingival enlargement based on a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML-M4) with typical gingival enlargement. Uniquely, this patient was well enough to allow full periodontal examination and incisional gingival biopsy to be performed both before and after chemotherapy. The patient was a 39-year-old Japanese woman with AML-M4 showing gingival enlargement. Histological and immunohistochemical features of gingiva and bacterial counts in the periodontal pockets were examined before and after chemotherapy. The results were as follows: (1) infiltration of myelomonocytic blasts in enlarged gingiva; (2) resolution of gingival enlargement with complete remission of AML by anticancer chemotherapy; and (3) the numbers of bacteria in the periodontal pockets were not high and were not altered before or after chemotherapy. In patients with AML-M4, remarkable mucosal enlargement is not generally observed in the body except in the gingiva. We hypothesized that antigens derived from periodontal bacteria, even if they are not present in large numbers, could act as chemoattractants for myelomonocytic leukemic cells.

  9. Outcome of myeloablative allogeneic peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for refractory/relapsed AML patients in NR status.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Ning, Hong-Mei; Hu, Liang-Ding; Jiang, Min; Xu, Chen; Hu, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Jun; Li, Yu-Hang; Li, Bo-Tao; Lou, Xiao; Yang, Fan; Chen, Jian-Lin; Su, Yong-Feng; Li, Meng; Wang, Hong-Ye; Ren, Jing; Feng, Yue-Qian; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dan-Hong; Chen, Hu

    2015-12-01

    To further find effective method to improve the long term survival of refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for 133 consecutive patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) therapy related AML(t-AML) in not remission status. The overall 3-year OS and DFS were 40.9% and 35.6% respectively. The variables associated with improved long term DFS were a bone marrow blast cell count less than 20% and an intensified conditioning regimen. In addition, the t-AML group had higher rates of relapse and III-IV acute GVHD than the primary AML group. The unrelated donor group had similar OS and DFS with sibling groups. Our study suggested that decreasing bone marrow blast cell counts before HSCT and strengthening the conditioning regimen may improve long-term DFS for refractory/relapsed AML patients, and unrelated donor group can get similar effect when compared to the sibling group.

  10. Cytarabine and clofarabine after high-dose cytarabine in relapsed or refractory AML patients.

    PubMed

    Scappini, Barbara; Gianfaldoni, Giacomo; Caracciolo, Francesco; Mannelli, Francesco; Biagiotti, Caterina; Romani, Claudio; Pogliani, Enrico M; Simonetti, Federico; Borin, Lorenza; Fanci, Rosa; Cutini, Ilaria; Longo, Giovanni; Susini, Maria Chiara; Angelucci, Emanuele; Bosi, Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Clofarabine has been shown to be effective in AML patients, either as single agent or, mainly, in association with intermediate dose cytarabine. Based on these reports, we conducted a preliminary study combining clofarabine and intermediate dose cytarabine in AML patients who relapsed or failed to respond to at least two induction therapies. We treated 47 patients affected by relapsed/refractory AML with a regimen including clofarabine at 22.5 mg/m(2) daily on days 1-5, followed after 3 hr by cytarabine at 1 g/m(2) daily on days 1-5. Ten patients received a further consolidation cycle with clofarabine at 22.5 mg/m(2) and cytarabine at 1 g/m(2) day 1-4. Among the 47 patients, 24/47 (51%) achieved a complete remission, 5/47 (10.5%) a partial response, 10/47 (21%) had a resistant disease, and 6/47 (13%) died of complications during the aplastic phase. The most frequent nonhematologic adverse events were vomiting, diarrhea, transient liver toxicity, febrile neutropenia, and infections microbiologically documented. Among the 24 patients who obtained a CR 13 underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In 14 patients, complete remission duration was shorter than 12 months, whereas 10 patients experienced longer complete remission duration. These very preliminary results suggest that clofarabine-cytarabine regimen is effective in this particularly poor prognosis category of patients, representing a potential "bridge" toward bone marrow transplant procedures. Safety data were consistent with previously reported salvage therapies. Further studies and a longer follow up are warranted.

  11. Clofarabine versus fludarabine-based reduced-intensity conditioning regimen prior to allogeneic transplantation in adults with AML/MDS.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Patrice; Labopin, Myriam; de La Tour, Regis Peffault; Lioure, Bruno; Bulabois, Claude-Eric; Huynh, Anne; Blaise, Didier; Turlure, Pascal; Daguindau, Etienne; Maillard, Natacha; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Guillerm, Gaelle; Delage, Jeremy; Contentin, Nathalie; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Beckerich, Florence; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Detrait, Marie; Vigouroux, Stéphane; François, Sylvie; Legrand, Faezeh; Guillaume, Thierry; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    We have retrospectively compared survivals between acute myeloid leukemia (AML)/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients who received either a clofarabine/busulfan (CloB2A2) or a fludarabine/busulfan (FB2A2) RIC regimen for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Between 2009 and 2014, 355 allotransplanted cases were identified from the SFGM-TC registry as having received either the FB2A2 (n = 316, 56% males, median age: 59.2 years, AML 78.5%, first complete remission [CR1] 72%, median follow-up: 20 months) or the CloB2A2 (n = 39, 62% males, median age: 60.8 years, AML 62%, CR1 69%, median follow-up: 22.4 months) RIC regimen. In multivariate analysis, FB2A2 was associated with significant lower overall survival (OS, HR: 2.14; 95%CI: 1.05-4.35, P = 0.04) and higher relapse incidence (RI, HR: 2.17; 95%CI: 1.02-4.61, P = 0.04) and a trend for lower leukemia-free survival (LFS, HR: 1.75; 95%CI: 0.94-3.26, P = 0.08). These results were confirmed using a propensity score-matching strategy. However, when considering AML and MDS patients separately, the benefit of the CLOB2A2 regimen was restricted to AML patients (2-year OS FB2A2: 38% [14.5-61.6] vs. CloB2A2: 79.2% [62.9-95.4], P = 0.01; 2-year LFS FB2A2: 38% [16-59.9] vs. CloB2A2: 70.8% [52.6-89], P = 0.03). The better survivals were due to the lower risk of relapse in this CloB2A2 AML subgroup (2-year RI FB2A2: 41.2% [19-62.4] vs. CloB2A2: 16.7% [5-34.2], P = 0.05). This retrospective comparison suggests that the CloB2A2 RIC regimen can likely provide longer survival than that awarded by a FB2A2 RIC regimen and may become a new standard of care RIC regimen for allotransplanted AML patients. A prospective phase 3 randomized study is warranted.

  12. Monitoring Response and Resistance to the Novel Arsenical Darinaparsin in an AML Patient

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Torsten H.; Johnson, Nathalie; Garnier, Nicolas; Kwan, Stanley; Yao, Lu; Cocolakis, Eftihia; Hébert, Josée; Morgan, Robert A.; Paquet, Éric; Callahan, Kevin P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Assouline, Sarit; Miller, Wilson H.; Mann, Koren K.

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with inversion of chromosome 3 is characterized by overexpression of EVI1 and carries a dismal prognosis. Arsenic-containing compounds have been described to be efficacious in malignancies overexpressing EVI1. Here, we describe a case of AML with inv(3)(q21q26.2) treated with the organic arsenical darinaparsin. Using a “personalized medicine approach,” two different arsenicals were screened for anti-leukemic effect against the patient’s cells ex vivo. The most promising compound, darinaparsin, was selected for in vivo treatment. Clinical effect was almost immediate, with a normalization of temperature, a stabilization of white blood cell (WBC) counts and an increased quality of life. Longitudinal monitoring of patient response and resistance incorporating significant correlative studies on patient-derived blood samples over the two cycles of darinaparsin given to this patient allowed us to evaluate potential mechanisms of response and resistance. The anti-leukemic effects of darinaparsin correlated with inhibition of the alternative NF-κB pathway and production of the inflammatory cytokine IL-8. Emergence of resistance was suspected during treatment cycle 2 and supported by xenograft studies in nude mice. Darinaparsin resistance correlated with an attenuation of the effect of treatment on the alternative NF-κB pathway. The results from this patient indicate that darinaparsin may be a good treatment option for inv(3) AML and that inhibition of the alternative NF-κB pathway may be predictive of response. Longitudinal monitoring of disease response as well as several correlative parameters allowed for the generation of novel correlations and predictors of response to experimental therapy in a heavily pretreated patient. PMID:23408639

  13. Treatment of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML): a Canadian consensus

    PubMed Central

    Brandwein, Joseph M; Geddes, Michelle; Kassis, Jeannine; Kew, Andrea K; Leber, Brian; Nevill, Thomas; Sabloff, Mitchell; Sandhu, Irwindeep; Schuh, Andre C; Storring, John M; Ashkenas, John

    2013-01-01

    Patients over age 60 comprise the majority of those diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but treatment approaches in this population are variable, with many uncertainties and controversies. Our group conducted a literature review to summarize the latest information and to develop a consensus document with practical treatment recommendations. We addressed five key questions: selection criteria for patients to receive intensive induction chemotherapy; optimal induction and post-remission regimens; allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); treatment of patients not suitable for induction chemotherapy; and treatment of patients with prior hematological disorders or therapy-related AML. Relevant literature was identified through a PubMed search of publications from 1991 to 2012. Key findings included the recognition that cytogenetics and molecular markers are major biologic determinants of treatment outcomes in the older population, both during induction therapy and following HSCT. Although disease-specific and patient-specific risk factors for poor outcomes are more common in the older population, age is not in itself sufficient grounds for withholding established treatments, including induction and consolidation chemotherapy. The role of HSCT and use of hypomethylating agents are discussed. Finally, suggested treatment algorithms are outlined, based on these recommendations. PMID:23675565

  14. AML in 2016: Where we are now?

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2016-12-01

    A high relapse rate for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still a major barrier to the long-term survival of these patients. Nevertheless, considerable progress has been made both in the biology and therapy of the disease. Specifically, progress has been made in the areas of integrated genomic analysis for prognosis, the widening application of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring in clinical practice, the development of new agents, and the increasing use of drugs, such as IDH and FLT3 inhibitors, as a bridge to transplant. Continued progress and inquiry into these and other areas are essential to improve the survival outcome for adult patients with AML.

  15. Efficacy of the Hypomethylating Agents as Frontline, Salvage or Consolidation Therapy in Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Bernard; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Lyerly, Susan; Klepin, Heidi D.; Lawrence, Julia; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R.; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L.; Pardee, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Background The hypomethylating agents (HA), azacitidine and decitabine, have emerged as an alternative to initial and salvage therapy in patients with AML. Little is known about how AML responds to hypomethylating agents after standard therapy and the activity of these agents in a real world setting is not well studied. Methods We retrospectively examined data for 75 consecutive AML patients at Wake Forest from 2002–2011 treated with HAs either as 1st line (n=34), salvage (n=28) or consolidation (n=13). We collected data on age, gender, race, Charlson Comorbidity index (CCI), cytogenetics, type of treatment, Complete Remission (CR), Complete Remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and survival. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and cox proportional hazards models. Results Frontline response rate (CR+CRi) was 26.5%, median overall survival (OS) was 3.4 (95% CI 1.3–7.4) months, with 18% alive at one year. In the salvage cohort, the response rate was significantly lower compared to frontline (3.6% versus 26.5%, p=0.017). Despite the reduced response, OS from time of HA treatment was longer than frontline at 8.2 (CI 4.8–10.3) months. In the consolidation cohort OS was 13.8 (CI 8.0 – 21.6) months with one patient in remission more than 30 months from diagnosis. Conclusion These data suggest prior cytotoxic therapy decrease marrow response rates to HAs but not survival. Furthermore, use of hypomethylating agents for consolidation resulted in a median overall survival over one year in a cohort of older patients. This suggests that hypomethylating agents have activity in all phases of AML treatment. PMID:24149914

  16. Efficacy of the hypomethylating agents as frontline, salvage, or consolidation therapy in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Bernard; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Lyerly, Susan; Klepin, Heidi D; Lawrence, Julia; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The hypomethylating agents (HAs), azacitidine and decitabine, have emerged as an alternative to initial and salvage therapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Little is known about how AML responds to hypomethylating agents after standard therapy, and the activity of these agents in a real-world setting is not well studied. We retrospectively examined data for 75 consecutive AML patients at Wake Forest from 2002 to 2011 treated with HAs either as first-line (n = 34), salvage (n = 28), or consolidation (n = 13) therapy. We collected data on age, gender, race, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), cytogenetics, type of treatment, complete remission (CR), complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and survival. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards models. Frontline response rate (CR + CRi) was 26.5 %, and median overall survival (OS) was 3.4 months (95 % CI 1.3-7.4), with 18 % alive at 1 year. In the salvage cohort, the response rate was significantly lower compared to frontline (3.6 versus 26.5 %, p = 0.017). Despite the reduced response, OS from time of HA treatment was longer than frontline at 8.2 months (CI 4.8-10.3). In the consolidation cohort, OS was 13.8 months (CI 8.0-21.6) with one patient in remission more than 30 months from diagnosis. These data suggest that prior cytotoxic therapy decreases marrow response rates to HAs but not survival. Furthermore, use of hypomethylating agents for consolidation resulted in a median overall survival over 1 year in a cohort of older patients. This suggests that hypomethylating agents have activity in all phases of AML treatment.

  17. Specific scoring systems to predict survival of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after intensive antileukemic treatment based on results of the EORTC-GIMEMA AML-10 and intergroup CRIANT studies.

    PubMed

    Oosterveld, Margriet; Suciu, Stefan; Muus, Petra; Germing, Ulrich; Delforge, Michel; Belhabri, Amin; Aul, Carlo; Selleslag, Dominik; Ferrant, Augustin; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Amadori, Sergio; Jehn, Ulrich; Mandelli, Franco; Hess, Uwe; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cakmak-Wollgast, Songuel; Vignetti, Marco; Labar, Boris; Willemze, Roel; de Witte, Theo

    2015-01-01

    High-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients have usually a less favorable outcome after intensive treatment compared with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. This may reflect different disease-related and patient-related factors. The purpose of this analysis is to identify disease-specific prognostic factors and to develop prognostic scores for both patient groups. A total of 692 patients in the EORTC/GIMEMA AML-10 study and 289 patients in the CRIANT study received identical remission-induction and consolidation treatment. Estimated 5-year survival rate was 34 % in the AML-10 versus 27 % in the CRIANT study, and estimated disease-free survival was 40 % versus 28 %, respectively. In multivariate analysis, cytogenetic characteristics, white blood count, and age appeared prognostic for survival in both studies. French-American-British (FAB) subtype and performance status were prognostic in the AML-10 study only, whereas number of cytopenias and duration of antecedent hematologic disorder >6 months were prognostic in the CRIANT study only. The prognostic scores distinguish three groups with a 5-year survival rate of 54, 38, and 19 % in the AML-10 study versus 69, 37, and 5 % in the CRIANT study. The prognostic value of these scores has been validated on two external series. The new scoring systems form a practical tool to predict the outcome of individual MDS and AML patients treated with intensive antileukemic therapy.

  18. DNMT3A R882 Mutations Predict a Poor Prognosis in AML: A Meta-Analysis From 4474 Patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Qing; Peng, Li; Zeng, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Bin-Yuan; Li, Guan-Cheng; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-05-01

    DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (DNMT3A) mutations were widely believed to be independently associated with inferior prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. As dominant missense alterations in DNMT3A mutations, R882 mutations cause the focal hypomethylation phenotype. However, there remains debate on the influence of R882 mutations on AML prognosis. Thus, this meta-analysis aimed at further illustrating the prognostic power of DNMT3A R882 mutations in AML patients.Eligible studies were identified from 5 databases containing PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Clinical Trials, and the Cochrane Library (up to October 25, 2015). Effects (hazard ratios [HRs] with 95% confidence interval [CI]) of relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were pooled to estimate the prognostic power of mutant DNMT3A R882 in overall patients and subgroups of AML patients.Eight competent studies with 4474 AML patients including 694 with DNMT3A R882 mutations were included. AML patients with DNMT3A R882 mutations showed significant shorter RFS (HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.24-1.59, P < 0.001) and OS (HR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.17-1.86, P = 0.001) in the overall population. DNMT3A R882 mutations predicted worse RFS and OS among the subgroups of patients under age 60 (RFS: HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.25-1.66, P < 0.001; OS: HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.15-1.90, P = 0.002), over age 60 (RFS: HR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.40-2.93, P < 0.001; OS: HR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.36-2.53, P < 0.001), cytogenetically normal (CN)-AML (RFS: HR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.26-1.83, P < 0.001; OS: HR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.16-2.41, P = 0.006), and non-CN-AML (RFS: HR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.20-3.21, P = 0.006; OS: HR = 2.51, 95% CI = 1.52-4.15, P = 0.0038).DNMT3A R882 mutations possessed significant unfavorable prognostic influence on RFS and OS in AML patients.

  19. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  20. AML with gain of chromosome 8 as the sole chromosomal abnormality (+8sole) is associated with a specific molecular mutation pattern including ASXL1 mutations in 46.8% of the patients.

    PubMed

    Alpermann, Tamara; Haferlach, Claudia; Eder, Christiane; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Meggendorfer, Manja; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne

    2015-03-01

    Trisomy 8 is the most frequent cytogenetically gained aberration in AML. We compared 79 adult de novo AML with trisomy 8 as the sole cytogenetic abnormality (+8sole) to 511 normal karyotype AML patients (NK). +8sole patients were older (p=0.013), presented lower WBC counts (p=0.010), harbored more often ASXL1 mutations (p<0.001) and RUNX1 mutations (p=0.009), but less frequent FLT3-ITD (p=0.038), NPM1 mutations (p<0.001) and double-mutated CEBPA (p=0.038) than NK patients. No prognostic difference was found between +8sole and NK. With respect to genetic stability we found +8sole was instable, and molecular markers were either stable or gained in number and diversity.

  1. Survival of AML patients relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a CIBMTR study

    PubMed Central

    Bejanyan, Nelli; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Logan, Brent R.; Wang, Hai-Lin; Devine, Steven M.; de Lima, Marcos; Bunjes, Donald W.; Zhang, Mei-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) remains a major therapeutic challenge. We studied outcomes of 1788 AML patients relapsing after alloHCT (1990–2010) during first or second complete remission (CR) to identify factors associated with longer post-relapse survival. Median time of post HCT relapse was 7 months (mo; range, 1–177). At relapse, 1231 patients (69%) received intensive therapy, including chemotherapy (CT) alone (n=660), donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI)±CT (n=202; %), or 2nd alloHCT±CT ±DLI (n=369), with subsequent CR rates of 29%. Median follow-up after relapse was 39 mo (range, <1–193). Survival for all patients was 23% at 1 year post-relapse; however, 3-yr overall survival correlated with time from HCT to relapse (4% for relapse during 1–6 mo period, 12% during 6 mo-2 yr, 26% during 2–3 yr, and 38% for ≥3 yr). In multivariable analysis, lower mortality was significantly associated with longer time from alloHCT to relapse (RR 0.55 for 6 mo-2 yr, RR 0.39 for 2–3 yr, and RR 0.28 for ≥3 yr; p<0.0001) and a 1st HCT using reduced-intensity conditioning (RR=0.77; 95% CI 0.66–0.88, p=0.0002). In contrast, inferior survival was associated with age >40 yr (RR=1.42, 95% CI 1.24–1.64; p<0.0001), active GVHD at relapse (RR=1.25, 95% CI 1.13–1.39; p<0.0001), adverse cytogenetics (RR=1.37, 95% CI 1.09–1.71; p=0.0062), mismatched URD (RR=1.61, 95% CI 1.22–2.13; p=0.0008), and use of cord blood for 1st HCT (RR=1.23, 95% CI 1.06–1.42; p=0.0078). AML relapse after alloHCT predicted poor survival; however, patients who relapsed ≥6 mo after their initial alloHCT had better survival and may benefit from intensive therapy such as 2nd alloHCT±DLI. PMID:25460355

  2. Treosulfan, Fludarabine and 2 Gy Total Body Irradiation Followed by Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with MDS and AML

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Gutman, Jonathan; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Bar, Merav; Milano, Filippo; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Scott, Bart; Fang, Min; Wood, Brent; Pagel, John M.; Baumgart, Joachim; Delaney, Colleen; Maziarz, Richard T.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Estey, Elihu H.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storer, Barry E.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers curative therapy for many patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, post-HCT relapse remains a major problem, particularly in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. In this prospective phase II trial we assessed the efficacy and toxicity of treosulfan, fludarabine and 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) as conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML. Ninety-six patients with MDS (n=36; 15 RMCD; 10 RAEB-1; 10 RAEB-2; 1 CMML-1) or AML (n=60; 35 CR1; 18 CR2; 3 advanced CR; 4 refractory relapse) were enrolled; median age was 51 (range: 1–60) years. Twelve patients had undergone a prior HCT with high intensity conditioning. Patients received intravenous (IV) treosulfan, 14 g/m2/day on days −6 to −4, IV fludarabine, 30 mg/m2/day on days −6 to −2, and 2 Gy TBI on day 0, followed by infusion of hematopoietic cells from related (n=27) or unrelated (n=69) donors. Graft-vs.-host disease prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus and methotrexate. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 2-year overall survival (OS), relapse incidence and non-relapse mortality were 73%, 27% and 8%, respectively. The incidences of grades II–IV (III–IV) acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 59% (10%) and 47%, respectively. Two-year OS was not significantly different between MDS patients with poor risk and good/intermediate risk cytogenetics (69% and 85%, respectively), or between AML patients with unfavorable and favorable/intermediate risk cytogenetics (64% and 76%, respectively). In AML patients, minimal residual disease (MRD; n=10) at the time of HCT predicted higher relapse incidence (70% vs. 18%) and lower OS (41% vs. 79%) at 2 years, when compared to patients without MRD. In conclusion, treosulfan, fludarabine and low-dose TBI provided effective conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML, and resulted in low relapse incidence, regardless

  3. Prevalence and Prognostic Value of IDH1 R132 Mutation in Newly Diagnosed AML Egyptian Patients with Normal Karyotype.

    PubMed

    Salem, Dalia; El-Aziz, Sherin Abd; El-Menshawy, Nadia; Abouzeid, Tarek; Ebrahim, Mohamed

    2017-03-01

    Mutation in IDH1 gene was suggested to be associated with bad prognosis in cytogenetically normal AML (CN-AML). However, there are conflicting data about its prognostic impact. Besides, its prevalence and prognostic significance in Egyptian patients still not fully stated. We aimed to assess the prevalence of IDH1(R132) mutation in Egyptian CN-AML patients, its correlation with FAB subtypes, and clinical outcome of those patients. Sequencing of amplified IDH1 gene exon four from 50 patients was performed to detect codon R132 point mutation. High prevalence of IDH1 mutation was detected in our patients (9/50, 18 %). Mutated IDH1(R132) was associated with older age and higher platelets count (p = 0.04 and 0.01 respectively). The most common FAB subtype associated with mutated IDH1(R132) was AML-M2 followed by M4. In multivariate analysis, IDH1(R132) mutation was found as independent prognostic variable. It was significantly associated with lower CR and shorter OS (p = 0.06 and 0.009 respectively).

  4. A new model to predict remission status in AML patients based on day 14 bone marrow biopsy.

    PubMed

    Norkin, Maxim; Chang, Myron; An, Qi; Leather, Helen; Katragadda, Lakshmikanth; Li, Ying; Moreb, Jan S; May, W Stratford; Brown, Randy A; Hsu, Jack W; Hiemenz, John W; Wingard, John R; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    Although bone marrow evaluation on day 14 after initiation of induction chemotherapy (D14 BM) is a widely accepted practice in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it has suboptimal predictive value for predicting complete remission. We retrospectively analyzed pretreatment characteristics and post-induction response in a cohort of AML patients to determine if adding clinical and laboratory characteristics can improve the predictive value of the D14 BM evaluation. Among 297 patients treated for AML at the single institution 183 patients (61%) had leukemia-positive D14 BM. Of those, 94 were given reinduction chemotherapy and 89 were not. Of the 89 patients who did not receive reinduction, 32 (36%) subsequently achieved complete remission (CR) or complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and 57 (64%) had persistent disease. Persistent disease after positive D14 BM was more likely associated with higher percentage of D14 myeloblasts, a history of relapsed disease before induction, and higher risk disease compared to patients who subsequently achieved CR. Age, diagnostic white blood cell count, and the D14 BM cellularity did not influence the subsequent likelihood of achieving remission in patients with a positive D14 BM. A new mathematical equation was created and resulted in a positive predictive value of 83%, negative predictive value 90% and accuracy 88% for correctly identifying remission status after positive D14 BM in AML. The accuracy of predicting response using these additional parameters was significantly higher than without (0.88 vs. 0.80, P=0.002). Our new model provides better accuracy for predicting the likelihood of achieving remission and if validated in future studies may be useful for managing AML patients.

  5. Calreticulin exposure by malignant blasts correlates with robust anticancer immunity and improved clinical outcome in AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Fucikova, Jitka; Truxova, Iva; Hensler, Michal; Becht, Etienne; Kasikova, Lenka; Moserova, Irena; Vosahlikova, Sarka; Klouckova, Jana; Church, Sarah E.; Cremer, Isabelle; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Salek, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell death can be perceived as immunogenic by the host only when malignant cells emit immunostimulatory signals (so-called “damage-associated molecular patterns,” DAMPs), as they die in the context of failing adaptive responses to stress. Accumulating preclinical and clinical evidence indicates that the capacity of immunogenic cell death to (re-)activate an anticancer immune response is key to the success of various chemo- and radiotherapeutic regimens. Malignant blasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) exposed multiple DAMPs, including calreticulin (CRT), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70), and HSP90 on their plasma membrane irrespective of treatment. In these patients, high levels of surface-exposed CRT correlated with an increased proportion of natural killer cells and effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the periphery. Moreover, CRT exposure on the plasma membrane of malignant blasts positively correlated with the frequency of circulating T cells specific for leukemia-associated antigens, indicating that ecto-CRT favors the initiation of anticancer immunity in patients with AML. Finally, although the levels of ecto-HSP70, ecto-HSP90, and ecto-CRT were all associated with improved relapse-free survival, only CRT exposure significantly correlated with superior overall survival. Thus, CRT exposure represents a novel powerful prognostic biomarker for patients with AML, reflecting the activation of a clinically relevant AML-specific immune response. PMID:27802968

  6. Whole genome and transcriptome analysis of a novel AML cell line with a normal karyotype.

    PubMed

    Gosse, Géraldine; Celton, Magalie; Lamontagne, Vikie; Forest, Audrey; Wilhelm, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) occurs when hematopoietic progenitor cells acquire genetic defects blocking the regulation of normal growth and differentiation. Although recurrent translocations have been identified in AML, almost half of adult AML patients present with a normal karyotype (NK-AML). While cell line models exist to study AML, they frequently have abnormal/unstable karyotypes, while primary cells from NK-AML patients are difficult to maintain in vitro. Here we provide a thorough molecular characterization of a recently established cell line, CG-SH, which has normal cytogenetics, representing a useful new model for NK-AML. Using high-throughput DNA sequencing, we first defined the genetic background of this cell line. In addition to identifying potentially deleterious SNVs in genes relevant to AML, we also found insertions in both GATA2 and EZH2, two genes previously linked to AML. We further characterized the growth of this model system in vitro with a cytokine mix that promotes faster cell growth. We assessed gene expression changes after the addition of cytokines to the culture media and found differential expression in genes implicated in proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. Our results provide a detailed molecular characterization of genetic defects in this cell line derived from an NK-AML patient.

  7. The rarity of ALDH(+) cells is the key to separation of normal versus leukemia stem cells by ALDH activity in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Van T; Buss, Eike C; Wang, Wenwen; Hoffmann, Isabel; Raffel, Simon; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; Baran, Natalia; Wuchter, Patrick; Eckstein, Volker; Trumpp, Andreas; Jauch, Anna; Ho, Anthony D; Lutz, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    To understand the precise disease driving mechanisms in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), comparison of patient matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and leukemia stem cells (LSC) is essential. In this analysis, we have examined the value of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in combination with CD34 expression for the separation of HSC from LSC in 104 patients with de novo AML. The majority of AML patients (80 out of 104) had low percentages of cells with high ALDH activity (ALDH(+) cells; <1.9%; ALDH-rare AML), whereas 24 patients had relatively numerous ALDH(+) cells (≥1.9%; ALDH-numerous AML). In patients with ALDH-rare AML, normal HSC could be separated by their CD34(+) ALDH(+) phenotype, whereas LSC were exclusively detected among CD34(+) ALDH(-) cells. For patients with ALDH-numerous AML, the CD34(+) ALDH(+) subset consisted mainly of LSC and separation from HSC was not feasible. Functional analyses further showed that ALDH(+) cells from ALDH-numerous AML were quiescent, refractory to ARA-C treatment and capable of leukemic engraftment in a xenogenic mouse transplantation model. Clinically, resistance to chemotherapy and poor long-term outcome were also characteristic for patients with ALDH-numerous AML providing an additional risk-stratification tool. The difference in spectrum and relevance of ALDH activity in the putative LSC populations demonstrates, in addition to phenotypic and genetic, also functional heterogeneity of leukemic cells and suggests divergent roles for ALDH activity in normal HSC versus LSC. By acknowledging these differences our study provides a new and useful tool for prospective identification of AML cases in which separation of HSC from LSC is possible.

  8. Attempts to improve treatment outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older patients: the results of the United Kingdom Medical Research Council AML11 trial.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, A H; Burnett, A K; Wheatley, K; Smith, A G; Hutchinson, R M; Clark, R E

    2001-09-01

    In an attempt to improve induction chemotherapy for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML),1314 patients were randomized to 1 of 3 induction treatments for 2 courses of DAT (daunorubicin, cytarabine, and thioguanine) 3 + 10, ADE (daunorubicin, cytarabine, and etoposide) 10 + 3 + 5, or MAC (mitoxantrone-cytarabine). The remission rate in the DAT arm was significantly better than ADE (62% vs 50%; P =.002) or MAC (62% vs 55%; P =.04). This benefit was seen in patients younger and older than 70 years. There were no differences between the induction schedules with respect to overall survival at 5 years (12% vs 8% vs 10%). A total of 226 patients were randomized to receive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or placebo as supportive care from day 8 after the end of treatment course 1. The remission rate or survival were not improved by G-CSF, although the median number of days to recover neutrophils to 1.0 x 10(9)/L was reduced by 5 days. Patients who entered remission (n = 371) were randomized to stop after a third course (DAT 2 + 7) or after 6 courses, ie, a subsequent COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, and prednisolone), DAT 2 + 5, and COAP. The relapse risk (81% vs 73%), disease-free survival (16% vs 23%), and overall survival at 5 years (23% vs 22%) did not differ between the 3-course or 6-course arms. In addition to a treatment duration randomization, 362 patients were randomized to receive 12-month maintenance treatment with low-dose interferon, but no benefit was seen with respect to relapse risk, disease-free survival, or overall survival.

  9. [Clinical curative efficacy of inducing remission for the newly diagnosed aged AML patients by chemotherapy with IA and DA regimens].

    PubMed

    Tian, Dong-Hua; Gan, Si-Lin; Xing, Hai-Zhou; Liu, Yan-Fang; Xie, Xin-Sheng; Sun, Hui

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to explore the clinical efficacy and toxicity of idarubicin (IA regimen) and daunoru-bicin combined with cytarabine (DA regimen) for treating aged patients with AML as induction chemotherapy. The clinical data of 60 newly diagnosed AML aged patients treated with IA or DA regimen were analyzed retrospectively. IA regimen group included 22 patients (8 male and 14 females with median age of 66 yrs), while the DA regimen group included 38 patients (20 males and 18 females with median age of 64 yrs). The complete remission rate, total effective rate and adverse effects after one chemotherapy course were compared. The results showed that the CR rate in IA regimen group was 63.63%, which was significantly higer than that in DA regimen group (31.58%) (P < 0.05). The total effective rate was 63.63% and 36.84% respectively in IA and DA regimen groups, there was significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.05). Both the hematological and non-hematological adverse effects were observed and no difference was found in the two regimen groups, neither in myelosupression (P > 0.05), the major hematological adverse effects, nor in non-hematological adverse effects (P > 0.05). It is concluded that for aged AML patients, IA regimen can achieve a higher CR rate and higher total effective rate than that in DA regimen without increase of adverse effects after one induction chemotherapy course.

  10. Graft Immune Cell Composition Associates with Clinical Outcome of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with AML.

    PubMed

    Impola, Ulla; Larjo, Antti; Salmenniemi, Urpu; Putkonen, Mervi; Itälä-Remes, Maija; Partanen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have been attributed to immune cells transferred into the patient with the graft. However, a detailed immune cell composition of the graft is usually not evaluated. In the present study, we determined the level of variation in the composition of immune cells between clinical HSCT grafts and whether this variation is associated with clinical outcome. Sizes of major immune cell populations in 50 clinical grafts from a single HSCT Centre were analyzed using flow cytometry. A statistical comparison between cell levels and clinical outcomes of HSCT was performed. Overall survival, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), and relapse were used as the primary endpoints. Individual HSCT grafts showed considerable variation in their numbers of immune cell populations, including CD123(+) dendritic cells and CD34(+) cells, which may play a role in GVHD. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who developed aGVHD were transplanted with higher levels of effector CD3(+) T, CD19(+) B, and CD123(+) dendritic cells than AML patients without aGVHD, whereas grafts with a high CD34(+) content protected against aGVHD. AML patients with cGVHD had received grafts with a lower level of monocytes and a higher level of CD34(+) cells than those without cGVHD. There is considerable variation in the levels of immune cell populations between HSCT grafts, and this variation is associated with outcomes of HSCT in AML patients. A detailed analysis of the immune cell content of the graft can be used in risk assessment of HSCT.

  11. [Early detection of MRD in peripheral blood after induction chemotherapy of newly diagnosed patients with AML and its correlation with curative effects].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xu-Shu; Lan, Fei; Cui, Xu; Jiang, Neng-Gang; Zhu, Huan-Ling; Jia, Yong-Qian

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the minimal residual disease (MRD) in peripheral blood of newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) on day 8 of induction chemotherapy and analyze the correlation between day 8 MRD (D8RD) and therapeutic effectiveness. 29 adult patients (13 males and 16 females, aged 16 - 75 years, median 41 years) with AML diagnosed and treated in West China Hospital from September 2009 to June 2010 were analyzed and followed up in the study. The leukemia-associated aberrant immunophenotype (LAIP) of all the patients were detected by multiparameter flow cytometry (FCM) before therapy. The level of MRD in the peripheral blood at day 8 of induction chemotherapy was detected by FCM based on the LAIP. The overall survival curve was drawn by calculation using Kaplan-Meier method using, and the comparison between different groups was carried out by Log-rank test. The results indicated that after first course therapy, the levels of peripheral D8RD in 7 out of 29 AML cases were lower than 0.01% (negative group), and that in another 22 cases were higher than 0.01% (0.08% - 55%, positive group). The sex, age, WBC, LDH, percentage of bone marrow blasts at diagnosis in these groups were not statistically different. 6 cases achieved CR (86%) in D8RD negative group, and also 6 cases achieved CR (27%) in D8RD positive group, CR rate in D8RD negative group was higher than in D8RD positive group (86% vs 27%, P < 0.05). The median follow-up of 29 cases lasted for 15 months; the 1-year overall survival rate of D8RD negative and D8RD positive groups was 100% and 39.4%, respectively (P < 0.01). It is concluded that MRD level in peripheral blood at day 8 of induction chemotherapy is an early index to predict clinical efficacy of induction therapy in AML.

  12. Clofarabine, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine (CIA) as Frontline Therapy for Patients ≤60 Years with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Nazha, Aziz; Ravandi, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop; Huang, Xuelin; Choi, Sangbum; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Andreeff, Michael; Du, Min; Brandt, Mark; Faderl, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore the combination of clofarabine, cytarabine, and idarubicin (CIA) in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) Patients and Methods Patients ≥18-60 years with AML and adequate organ functions were candidates. Induction therapy consisted of clofarabine (C) 22.5 mg/m2 IV daily (days 1-5), idarubicin (I) 6 mg/m2 IV daily (days 1-3), and cytarabine (A) 0.75 g/m2 IV daily (days 1-5). Patients in remission received up to 6 consolidation cycles (C 22.5 mg/m2 × 3, I 6 mg/m2 × 2, and A 0.75 g/m2 × 3). Results Fifty-seven patients were evaluable. The overall response rate was 79%. With a median follow up of 10.9 months (range, 1.6 - 23.1), the median overall survival (OS) was not reached, the median event-free survival (EFS) was 13.5 months, and the median relapse free survival was not reached. Most toxicities were ≤ grade 2. Four week mortality was 2%. In subgroup analysis, patients ≤ 40 years had better OS (P = 0.04) and EFS (P = 0.04) compared to patients > 40 years. Compared to historical patients treated with IA combination, the OS and EFS were significantly higher (P = 0.005, 0.0001, respectively) for CIA treated patients. In multivariate analysis, CIA retained its superior impact on OS and EFS compared to IA. Conclusion CIA is an effective combination for patients AML. Patients ≤ 40 years had better OS and EFS. CIA achieved longer OS and EFS compared to IA alone. PMID:23877926

  13. Feasibility of the AML profiler (Skyline™ Array) for patient risk stratification in a multicentre trial: a preliminary comparison with the conventional approach.

    PubMed

    Nomdedéu, Josep F; Puigdecanet, Eulalia; Bussaglia, Elena; Hernández, Juan José; Carricondo, Maite; Estivill, Camino; Martí-Tutusaus, Josep Maria; Tormo, Mar; Zamora, Lurdes; Serrano, Elena; Perea, Granada; de Llano, Maria Paz Queipo; García, Antoni; Sánchez-Ortega, Isabel; Ribera, Josep Maria; Nonell, Lara; Aventin, Anna; Solé, Francesc; Brunet, Maria Salut; Sierra, Jorge

    2016-05-03

    Deoxyribonucleic acid microarrays allow researchers to measure mRNA levels of thousands of genes in a single experiment and could be useful for diagnostic purposes in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We assessed the feasibility of the AML profiler (Skyline™ Array) in genetic stratification of patients with de novo AML and compared the results with those obtained using the standard cytogenetic and molecular approach. Diagnostic bone marrow from 31 consecutive de novo AML cases was used to test MLL-PTD, FLT3-ITD and TKD, NPM1 and CEBPAdm mutations. Purified RNA was used to assess RUNX1-RUNX1T1, PML-RARα and CBFβ-MYH11 rearrangements. RNA remnants underwent gene expression profiling analysis using the AML profiler, which detects chromosomal aberrations: t(8;21), t(15;17), inv(16), mutations (CEBPAdm, ABD-NPM1) and BAALC and EVI1 expression. Thirty cases were successfully analysed with both methods. Five cases had FLT3-ITD. In one case, a t(8;21) was correctly detected by both methods. Four cases had inv(16); in one, the RNA quality was unsatisfactory and it was not hybridized, and in the other three, the AML profiler detected the genetic lesion - this being a rare type I translocation in one case. Two cases with acute promyelocytic leukaemia were diagnosed by both methods. Results for NPM1 mutations were concordant in all but two cases (2/11, non-ABD mutations). Analysis of costs and turnaround times showed that the AML profiler was no more expensive than the conventional molecular approach. These results suggest that the AML profiler could be useful in multicentre trials to rapidly identify patients with AML with a good prognosis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Controversies in treatment of AML: case-based discussion.

    PubMed

    Stock, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in older adults remains a tremendous challenge. Standard approaches to treatment have resulted in progression-free survival in only a small minority of patients with AML over the age of 60. Elucidation of the molecular genetic events that contribute to the pathogenesis of AML in older patients are providing insights into mechanisms of resistance. This knowledge is also providing new opportunities to begin to refine and direct novel therapies for these heterogeneous diseases. In this case-based review, prognostic factors for treatment outcome in older adults will be covered along with discussion of a risk-based approach to potential therapeutic options, ranging from palliative care to novel therapies and reduced-intensity allogenic transplant.

  15. Azacitidine for treatment of imminent relapse in MDS or AML patients after allogeneic HSCT: results of the RELAZA trial.

    PubMed

    Platzbecker, U; Wermke, M; Radke, J; Oelschlaegel, U; Seltmann, F; Kiani, A; Klut, I-M; Knoth, H; Röllig, C; Schetelig, J; Mohr, B; Graehlert, X; Ehninger, G; Bornhäuser, M; Thiede, C

    2012-03-01

    This study evaluated azacitidine as treatment of minimal residual disease (MRD) determined by a sensitive donor chimerism analysis of CD34(+) blood cells to pre-empt relapse in patients with CD34(+) myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At a median of 169 days after HSCT, 20/59 prospectively screened patients experienced a decrease of CD34(+) donor chimerism to <80% and received four azacitidine cycles (75 mg/m(2)/day for 7 days) while in complete hematologic remission. A total of 16 patients (80%) responded with either increasing CD34(+) donor chimerism to ≥80% (n=10; 50%) or stabilization (n=6; 30%) in the absence of relapse. Stabilized patients and those with a later drop of CD34(+) donor chimerism to <80% after initial response were eligible for subsequent azacitidine cycles. A total of 11 patients (55%) received a median of 4 (range, 1-11) additional cycles. Eventually, hematologic relapse occurred in 13 patients (65%), but was delayed until a median of 231 days (range, 56-558) after initial decrease of CD34(+) donor chimerism to <80%. In conclusion, pre-emptive azacitidine treatment has an acceptable safety profile and can substantially prevent or delay hematologic relapse in patients with MDS or AML and MRD after allogeneic HSCT.

  16. Azacitidine for treatment of imminent relapse in MDS or AML patients after allogeneic HSCT: results of the RELAZA trial

    PubMed Central

    Platzbecker, U; Wermke, M; Radke, J; Oelschlaegel, U; Seltmann, F; Kiani, A; Klut, I-M; Knoth, H; Röllig, C; Schetelig, J; Mohr, B; Graehlert, X; Ehninger, G; Bornhäuser, M; Thiede, C

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated azacitidine as treatment of minimal residual disease (MRD) determined by a sensitive donor chimerism analysis of CD34+ blood cells to pre-empt relapse in patients with CD34+ myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). At a median of 169 days after HSCT, 20/59 prospectively screened patients experienced a decrease of CD34+ donor chimerism to <80% and received four azacitidine cycles (75 mg/m2/day for 7 days) while in complete hematologic remission. A total of 16 patients (80%) responded with either increasing CD34+ donor chimerism to ⩾80% (n=10; 50%) or stabilization (n=6; 30%) in the absence of relapse. Stabilized patients and those with a later drop of CD34+ donor chimerism to <80% after initial response were eligible for subsequent azacitidine cycles. A total of 11 patients (55%) received a median of 4 (range, 1–11) additional cycles. Eventually, hematologic relapse occurred in 13 patients (65%), but was delayed until a median of 231 days (range, 56–558) after initial decrease of CD34+ donor chimerism to <80%. In conclusion, pre-emptive azacitidine treatment has an acceptable safety profile and can substantially prevent or delay hematologic relapse in patients with MDS or AML and MRD after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:21886171

  17. International phase 3 study of azacitidine vs conventional care regimens in older patients with newly diagnosed AML with >30% blasts

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, John F.; Butrym, Aleksandra; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka; Selleslag, Dominik; Jang, Jun Ho; Kumar, Rajat; Cavenagh, James; Schuh, Andre C.; Candoni, Anna; Récher, Christian; Sandhu, Irwindeep; Bernal del Castillo, Teresa; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin; Martinelli, Giovanni; Falantes, Jose; Noppeney, Richard; Stone, Richard M.; Minden, Mark D.; McIntyre, Heidi; Songer, Steve; Lucy, Lela M.; Beach, C. L.; Döhner, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase 3 trial evaluated azacitidine efficacy and safety vs conventional care regimens (CCRs) in 488 patients age ≥65 years with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with >30% bone marrow blasts. Before randomization, a CCR (standard induction chemotherapy, low-dose ara-c, or supportive care only) was preselected for each patient. Patients then were assigned 1:1 to azacitidine (n = 241) or CCR (n = 247). Patients assigned to CCR received their preselected treatment. Median overall survival (OS) was increased with azacitidine vs CCR: 10.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.0-12.7 months) vs 6.5 months (95% CI, 5.0-8.6 months), respectively (hazard ratio [HR] was 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69-1.03; stratified log-rank P = .1009). One-year survival rates with azacitidine and CCR were 46.5% and 34.2%, respectively (difference, 12.3%; 95% CI, 3.5%-21.0%). A prespecified analysis censoring patients who received AML treatment after discontinuing study drug showed median OS with azacitidine vs CCR was 12.1 months (95% CI, 9.2-14.2 months) vs 6.9 months (95% CI, 5.1-9.6 months; HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.60-0.96; stratified log-rank P = .0190). Univariate analysis showed favorable trends for azacitidine compared with CCR across all subgroups defined by baseline demographic and disease features. Adverse events were consistent with the well-established safety profile of azacitidine. Azacitidine may be an important treatment option for this difficult-to-treat AML population. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01074047. PMID:25987659

  18. Distribution of mutations in DNMT3A gene and the suitability of mutations in R882 codon for MRD monitoring in patients with AML.

    PubMed

    Jeziskova, Ivana; Musilova, Milena; Culen, Martin; Foltankova, Veronika; Dvorakova, Dana; Mayer, Jiri; Racil, Zdenek

    2015-11-01

    The DNA methyl-transferase 3A gene (DNMT3A) is the third most frequently mutated gene in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients (20-30 %), who belong to a group of patients with intermediate risk. About 60 % of mutations in this gene have been identified in the arginine codon R882. To date, there is no consensus on whether these mutations can be used as biomarkers for monitoring of minimal residual disease and management of preemptive AML therapy. We studied the occurrence of mutations in the DNMT3A gene in our cohort of patients and their persistence during AML treatment. Using next-generation sequencing, we identified four mutations in 11/25 of our analyzed patients--frequent R882C and R882H mutations, rare Y735S mutation, and a novel L347P mutation. Mutation R882C was detected in 5/11, R882H in 4/11 patients, and Y735S and L347P in one patient each. In 4/7 patients initially carrying mutations in the R882 codon, we found the persistence of mutations also during complete remission with, however, no correlation to AML kinetics. Our findings suggest that mutations in the DNMT3A gene can only be used as a biomarker for those AML patients in whom DNMT3A mutation is lost after therapy.

  19. NK cell expression of natural cytotoxicity receptors may determine relapse risk in older AML patients undergoing immunotherapy for remission maintenance.

    PubMed

    Martner, Anna; Rydström, Anna; Riise, Rebecca E; Aurelius, Johan; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B

    2015-12-15

    In a phase IV trial, eighty-four patients (age 18-79) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) received cycles of immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) to prevent relapse in the post-consolidation phase. Aspects of natural killer (NK) cell biology were analyzed before and during immunotherapy with focus on outcome in older patients. In younger (<60 years old, n = 37) and older patients (>60 years old, n = 47), treatment with HDC/IL-2 resulted in an expansion of CD56(bright) and CD16+ NK cells in blood along with an increased NK cell expression of the natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCR) NKp30 and NKp46. In older patients, a high expression of NKp30 or NKp46 on CD16+ NK cells before and during therapy predicted leukemia-free and overall survival. These results suggest that NK cell functions determine relapse risk and survival in older AML patients and point to biomarkers of efficacy in protocols for remission maintenance.

  20. Fractionated gemtuzumab ozogamicin combined with intermediate-dose cytarabine and daunorubicin as salvage therapy in very high-risk AML patients: a bridge to reduced intensity conditioning transplant?

    PubMed

    Paubelle, Etienne; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, Sophie; Labussière-Wallet, Hélène; Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Barraco, Fiorenza; Plesa, Adriana; Salles, Gilles; Wattel, Eric; Thomas, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Outcome of patients with primary refractory/relapsed (R/R) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains dismal. Herein, we present a retrospective monocentric study of 24 very high-risk AML patients who received a combination of fractionated gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) with intermediate-dose cytarabine and daunorubicin as salvage therapy. Median age was 55.3 years. Diagnostic was secondary AML for 33% of them. Seven patients had favorable risk, 8 had intermediate-1 or intermediate-2, and 6 had unfavorable risk of AML according to the European LeukemiaNet prognostic index. Complete remission was achieved in 50% of cases (46% in refractory and 55% in relapsed AML) without excessive toxicity. Thirteen patients could be referred for transplant. Only allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation provided a benefit in this patient cohort with a 1-year overall survival of 50.7 versus 18.1% in the absence of transplantation. Patients treated with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) showed a longer survival as compared to those undergoing myeloablative conditioning regimen mainly because of decreased toxicity.Our data suggest that salvage therapy with fractionated GO combined with intermediate-dose cytarabine and daunorubicin in very high-risk patients may serve as a potential bridge therapy to RIC transplant.

  1. Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome, in Adults; AML (Adult) With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; AML (Adult) With Del(5q); AML (Adult) With Inv(16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(16;16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary AML (Adult); Untreated AML (Adult)

  2. Phase 2 trial of CPX-351, a fixed 5:1 molar ratio of cytarabine/daunorubicin, vs cytarabine/daunorubicin in older adults with untreated AML.

    PubMed

    Lancet, Jeffrey E; Cortes, Jorge E; Hogge, Donna E; Tallman, Martin S; Kovacsovics, Tibor J; Damon, Lloyd E; Komrokji, Rami; Solomon, Scott R; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Cooper, Maureen; Yeager, Andrew M; Louie, Arthur C; Feldman, Eric J

    2014-05-22

    CPX-351 is a liposomal formulation of cytarabine:daunorubicin designed to deliver synergistic drug ratios to leukemia cells. In this phase 2 study, newly diagnosed older acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients were randomized 2:1 to first-line CPX-351 or 7+3 treatment. The goal was to determine efficacy and identify patient subgroups that may benefit from CPX-351 treatment. Response rate (complete remission + incomplete remission) was the primary end point, with event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) as secondary end points. The 126 patients entered were balanced for disease and patient-specific risk factors. Overall, CPX-351 produced higher response rates (66.7% vs 51.2%, P = .07), meeting predefined criteria for success (P < .1). Differences in EFS and OS were not statistically significant. A planned analysis of the secondary AML subgroup demonstrated an improved response rate (57.6% vs 31.6%, P = .06), and prolongation of EFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.59, P = .08) and OS (HR = 0.46, P = .01). Recovery from cytopenias was slower after CPX-351 (median days to absolute neutrophil count ≥1000: 36 vs 32; platelets >100 000: 37 vs 28) with more grade 3-4 infections but without increase in infection-related deaths (3.5% vs 7.3%) or 60-day mortality (4.7% vs 14.6%), indicating acceptable safety. These results suggest a clinical benefit with CPX-351, particularly among patients with secondary AML, and provide the rationale for a phase 3 trial currently underway in newly diagnosed secondary AML patients. This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00788892.

  3. Recovery of ovarian function and pregnancy in a patient with AML after myeloablative busulphan-based conditioning regimen.

    PubMed

    Balashov, Dmitry N; Papusha, Ludmila I; Nazarenko, Tatiana A; Trakhtman, Pavel E; Revishvili, Nino A; Maschan, Alexei A; Persiantseva, Marina I; Andriutsa, Anna V; Skorobogatova, Elena V; Skvortsova, Yulia V; Rumiantsev, Alexander G

    2011-05-01

    We report a rare case of ovarian function recovery and pregnancy after hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) in the acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) patient in third complete remission received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with busulphan-based conditioning regimen. Successful engraftment of the donor cells and full donor's chimerism was achieved without the signs of leukemia. One year after HSCT the patient received a course of HRT as a treatment of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. After 12 months of HRT the recovery of ovarian function was confirmed. Eight years after the HSCT spontaneous pregnancy occurred; heartbeat of the fetus was registered on week 7. Three weeks later a nonsevere vaginal bleeding occurred and the ultrasound examination showed a nondeveloping pregnancy. Genetic examination of the abortion material showed a full triploid genotype (69 XXX). To our knowledge this is a first case of ovarian function restoration and spontaneous pregnancy in a AML patient after multiple courses of high-dose chemotherapy and busulphan-based myeloablative conditioning for HSCT.

  4. Duration of first remission, hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index and patient age predict survival of patients with AML transplanted in second CR.

    PubMed

    Michelis, F V; Atenafu, E G; Gupta, V; Kim, D D; Kuruvilla, J; Lambie, A; Lipton, J H; Loach, D; Messner, H A

    2013-11-01

    Allo-SCT is potentially curative for patients with AML. Patients transplanted in CR2 tend to experience inferior survival compared with those in CR1. We retrospectively investigated the impact of pretransplant variables on the outcome of patients transplanted with AML in CR2. Ninety-four patients with AML in CR2 received a transplant between 1999 and 2011 with myeloablative (MA, n=65) or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens (RIC, n=29). Variables investigated included cytogenetic risk at diagnosis (SWOG), hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI), CMV status, duration of CR1 and age. Median age of all patients was 47 years (range 18-70). Multivariable analysis for OS identified three prognostically significant categories: a favorable risk group included patients with duration of CR1 ≥6 months, age <55 years and HCT-CI score 0-3, an intermediate risk group with duration of CR1 ≥6 months, age <55 years and HCT-CI score 4-5 and a high-risk group with duration of CR1 <6 months or age ≥55 years (P=0.0001) with 5-year survivals of 53%, 31% and 6%, respectively. Acute and chronic GVHD did not influence this risk stratification. The stated risk factors discriminate patients with different OS and may assist in decision making for allo-SCT.

  5. Comprehensive genetic analysis of cytarabine sensitivity in a cell-based model identifies polymorphisms associated with outcome in AML patients.

    PubMed

    Gamazon, Eric R; Lamba, Jatinder K; Pounds, Stanley; Stark, Amy L; Wheeler, Heather E; Cao, Xueyuan; Im, Hae K; Mitra, Amit K; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Ribeiro, Raul C; Raimondi, Susana; Campana, Dario; Crews, Kristine R; Wong, Shan S; Welsh, Marleen; Hulur, Imge; Gorsic, Lidija; Hartford, Christine M; Zhang, Wei; Cox, Nancy J; Dolan, M Eileen

    2013-05-23

    A whole-genome approach was used to investigate the genetic determinants of cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies involving 523 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from individuals of European, African, Asian, and African American ancestry. Several of the highest-ranked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were within the mutated in colorectal cancers (MCC) gene. MCC expression was induced by cytarabine treatment from 1.7- to 26.6-fold in LCLs. A total of 33 SNPs ranked at the top of the meta-analysis (P < 10(-5)) were successfully tested in a clinical trial of patients randomized to receive low-dose or high-dose cytarabine plus daunorubicin and etoposide; of these, 18 showed association (P < .05) with either cytarabine 50% inhibitory concentration in leukemia cells or clinical response parameters (minimal residual disease, overall survival (OS), and treatment-related mortality). This count (n = 18) was significantly greater than expected by chance (P = .016). For rs1203633, LCLs with AA genotype were more sensitive to cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity (P = 1.31 × 10(-6)) and AA (vs GA or GG) genotype was associated with poorer OS (P = .015), likely as a result of greater treatment-related mortality (P = .0037) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This multicenter AML02 study trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00136084.

  6. Comprehensive genetic analysis of cytarabine sensitivity in a cell-based model identifies polymorphisms associated with outcome in AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Gamazon, Eric R.; Lamba, Jatinder K.; Pounds, Stanley; Stark, Amy L.; Wheeler, Heather E.; Cao, Xueyuan; Im, Hae K.; Mitra, Amit K.; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Raimondi, Susana; Campana, Dario; Crews, Kristine R.; Wong, Shan S.; Welsh, Marleen; Hulur, Imge; Gorsic, Lidija; Hartford, Christine M.; Zhang, Wei; Cox, Nancy J.; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2013-01-01

    A whole-genome approach was used to investigate the genetic determinants of cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies involving 523 lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from individuals of European, African, Asian, and African American ancestry. Several of the highest-ranked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were within the mutated in colorectal cancers (MCC) gene. MCC expression was induced by cytarabine treatment from 1.7- to 26.6-fold in LCLs. A total of 33 SNPs ranked at the top of the meta-analysis (P < 10−5) were successfully tested in a clinical trial of patients randomized to receive low-dose or high-dose cytarabine plus daunorubicin and etoposide; of these, 18 showed association (P < .05) with either cytarabine 50% inhibitory concentration in leukemia cells or clinical response parameters (minimal residual disease, overall survival (OS), and treatment-related mortality). This count (n = 18) was significantly greater than expected by chance (P = .016). For rs1203633, LCLs with AA genotype were more sensitive to cytarabine-induced cytotoxicity (P = 1.31 × 10−6) and AA (vs GA or GG) genotype was associated with poorer OS (P = .015), likely as a result of greater treatment-related mortality (P = .0037) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This multicenter AML02 study trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00136084. PMID:23538338

  7. [Research advances of IDH gene mutation and AML].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming-Dong; Zheng, Yong-Qin

    2014-10-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation has been recently found, which may be involved in the occurrence of leukemia. The incidence of IDH gene mutation in the patients with adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is high, especially in the AML patients with normal karyotype. Different subtype and molecular biology of IDH display a different effect on the AML prognosis. This gene mutation is related with treatment response, residual, recurrence of leukemia, and it could be a sign of test and a monitoring tool of minimal residual disease (MRD). The IDH gene mutation may be an index for predicting prognosis and guiding therapy. In this article, the research progress of IDH gene mutation and its correlation with acute myeloid leukemia, especially with the clinical characteristics,are reviewed.

  8. Vorinostat, Azacitidine, and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for Older Patients With Relapsed or Refractory AML

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-22

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory AML and MDS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  10. MRD assessed by WT1 and NPM1 transcript levels identifies distinct outcomes in AML patients and is influenced by gemtuzumab ozogamicin.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Juliette; Lambert, Jérôme; Nibourel, Olivier; Pautas, Cécile; Hayette, Sandrine; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Terré, Christine; Rousselot, Philippe; Dombret, Hervé; Chevret, Sylvie; Preudhomme, Claude; Castaigne, Sylvie; Renneville, Aline

    2014-08-15

    We analysed the prognostic significance of minimal residual disease (MRD) level in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated in the randomized gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) ALFA-0701 trial. Levels of WT1 and NPM1 gene transcripts were assessed using cDNA-based real-time quantitative PCR in 183 patients with WT1 overexpression and in 77 patients with NMP1 mutation (NPM1mut) at diagnosis. Positive WT1 MRD (defined as > 0.5% in the peripheral blood) after induction and at the end of treatment were both significantly associated with a higher risk of relapse and a shorter overall survival (OS). Positive NPM1mut MRD (defined as > 0.1% in the bone marrow) after induction and at the end of treatment also predicted a higher risk of relapse, but did not influence OS. Interestingly, the achievement of a negative NPM1mut MRD was significantly more frequent in patients treated in the GO arm compared to those treated in control arm (39 % versus 7% (p=0.006) after induction and 91% versus 61% (p=0.028) at the end of treatment). However, GO did not influence WT1 MRD levels. Our study supports the prognostic significance of MRD assessed by WT1 and NPM1mut transcript levels and show that NPM1 MRD is decreased by GO treatment.

  11. Elevated fetal haemoglobin is a predictor of better outcome in MDS/AML patients receiving 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine).

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Michael; Ihorst, Gabriele; Sander, Philipp N; Bogatyreva, Ljudmila; Becker, Heiko; Wijermans, Pierre W; Suciu, Stefan; Bissé, Emmanuel; Claus, Rainer

    2017-02-01

    Although azanucleoside DNA-hypomethylating agents (HMAs) are routinely used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukaemia (MDS/AML), very few outcome predictors have been established. Expression of the β-like globin gene locus is tightly regulated by DNA methylation, is HMA-sensitive in vitro, and fetal haemoglobin (HbF) expression is under study as a potential biomarker for response of MDS patients to azacitidine. We determined HbF expression in 16 MDS and 36 AML patients receiving decitabine (DAC). Pre-treatment HbF was already elevated (>1·0% of total haemoglobin) in 7/16 and 12/36 patients, and HbF was induced by DAC in 81%/54% of MDS/AML patients, respectively. Elevated pre-treatment HbF was associated with longer median overall survival (OS): 26·6 vs. 8·6 months for MDS (hazard ratio [HR] 8·56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1·74-42·49, P = 0·008, with similarly longer progression-free and AML-free survival), and 10·0 vs. 2·9 months OS for AML (HR 3·01, 95% CI 1·26-7·22, P = 0·014). In a multivariate analysis, the prognostic value of HbF was retained. Time-dependent Cox models revealed that the prognostic value of treatment-induced HbF induction was inferior to that of pre-treatment HbF. In conclusion, we provide first evidence for in vivo HbF induction by DAC in MDS/AML, and demonstrate prognostic value of elevated pre-treatment HbF, warranting prospective, randomized studies.

  12. Non-intensive treatment with low-dose 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) prior to allogeneic blood SCT of older MDS/AML patients.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, M; Bertz, H; Rüter, B; Marks, R; Claus, R; Wäsch, R; Finke, J

    2009-11-01

    Novel, non-intensive treatment options in older MDS/AML patients planned for allografting, with the goal of down-staging the underlying disease and bridging time to transplantation, are presently being developed. 5-azacytidine and decitabine (DAC) are of particular interest, as they can be given repetitively, with very limited non-hematologic toxicity and result in responses both in MDS and AML even at low doses. We describe 15 consecutive patients (median age 69 years, range 60-75 years) with MDS (n=10) or AML (n=5) who all received first-line treatment with DAC and subsequent allografting (from sibling donor in four patients, unrelated donor in 11) after reduced-intensity conditioning with the FBM regimen. Successful engraftment was attained in 14/15 patients, all of whom achieved a CR, with a median duration of 5 months (range 1+ to 51+). Six of these 14 patients are alive (4 with complete donor chimerism), 8 have died either from relapse (n=4) or treatment-related complications while in CR (n=4). We conclude that allografting after low-dose DAC and subsequent conditioning with FBM is feasible, with no unexpected toxicities and appears as a valid alternative to standard chemotherapy ('InDACtion instead of induction') in elderly patients with MDS/AML.

  13. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia harboring trisomy 8.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takaaki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Yamashita, Takuya; Uchida, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kanamori, Heiwa; Eto, Tetsuya; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Kohno, Akio; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi; Yano, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is one of the most common cytogenetic abnormalities in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in adult patients with AML harboring +8 remains unclear. To evaluate, the outcome and prognostic factors in patients with AML harboring +8 as the only chromosomal abnormality or in association with other abnormalities, we retrospectively analyzed the Japanese registration data of 631 adult patients with AML harboring +8 treated with allogeneic HSCT between 1990 and 2013. In total, 388 (61%) patients were not in remission at the time of HSCT. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, the probability of overall survival and the cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years were 40 and 34%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, two or more additional cytogenetic abnormalities and not being in remission at the time of HSCT were significantly associated with a higher overall mortality and relapse. Nevertheless, no significant impact on the outcome was observed in cases with one cytogenetic abnormality in addition to +8. Although more than 60% of the patients received HSCT when not in remission, allogeneic HSCT offered a curative option for adult patients with AML harboring +8.

  14. Clinical effectiveness of itraconazole as antifungal prophylaxis in AML patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Keighley, C L; Manii, P; Larsen, S R; van Hal, S

    2017-02-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis regimens vary between centres, informed by local epidemiology and antifungal stewardship practices. The advantages of itraconazole over posaconazole prophylaxis include maintaining the utility of azole therapy for suspected breakthrough invasive fungal infection (bIFI). We examined the effectiveness and tolerability of itraconazole as prophylaxis in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients. We sought to determine the rate of probable and proven bIFI in the context of itraconazole prophylaxis in a real-life setting. Eighty-four patients corresponded to 175 episodes of primary antifungal prophylaxis with itraconazole solution (200 mg twice daily) as prophylaxis supported by a dedicated clinical pharmacist during induction, re-induction and consolidation chemotherapy for AML between January 2010 and January 2014. Assessment of clinical course included blinded review of all radiology scans. Episodes of bIFI were categorised according to consensus criteria. A low rate of bIFI (6/175, 3.4 %) occurred with the use of itraconazole. Tolerance was excellent with adverse events consisting predominantly of deranged liver function tests reported in 7/175 (4 %). Therapeutic drug monitoring performed at clinicians' discretion demonstrated appropriate levels in 12/14 (86 %). Persisting fever and suspicion of invasive fungal infection (IFI) led to empiric antifungal therapy with voriconazole or caspofungin in 33/175 episodes (19 %), ceased after a median of 5 days following investigation in 16/175 (9 %). In this setting, itraconazole is effective and well-tolerated as prophylaxis. An additional benefit was seen in empiric therapy of suspected bIFI with amphotericin formulations kept in reserve. Local epidemiology is vital in guiding prophylaxis strategy.

  15. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with del(7)(q22) in a patient with de novo AML.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang Gyun; Cho, Sun Young; Park, Tae Sung; Oh, Seung Hwan; Yoon, Hwi-Joong

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old Korean woman was initially diagnosed with acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML). After induction chemotherapy was performed using cytarabine, idarubicin, and G-CSF, complete remission (CR) was subsequently achieved following reinduction chemotherapy using the same chemotherapeutic agents. Thirty-six months after the initial CR, an increase in immature cells (up to 12.0%) was observed in the patient's bone marrow. Because chromosome analysis revealed a karyotype of 46,XX,del(7)(q22) in all of the analyzed cells, the patient was diagnosed with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS). Although the patient subsequently received chemotherapy and G-CSF for neutropenia, t-MDS rapidly progressed after 3 months to therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Although very rare, de novo AML can progress to a secondary MDS/AML with del(7q) after chemotherapy with cytarabine, idarubicin, and G-CSF. Further investigation into the role of genes located in 7q22 may provide more information about the mechanisms of leukemogenesis.

  16. Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... chemical exposure. Exposure to certain chemicals, such as benzene, is linked to greater risk of AML. Smoking. AML is linked to cigarette smoke, which contains benzene and other known cancer-causing chemicals. Other blood ...

  17. Outcome in 146 patients with paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia treated according to the AML99 protocol in the period 2003-06 from the Japan Association of Childhood Leukaemia Study.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Toshihiko; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Kanai, Rie; Shimada, Akira; Terui, Kiminori; Osugi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Tawa, Akio; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Hori, Hiroki; Horibe, Keizo; Oda, Megumi; Adachi, Souichi

    2012-10-01

    The acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) 99 trial conducted previously in Japan for the treatment of de novo paediatric AML showed excellent results, with a 5-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) of 75·6% and 61·6%, respectively. To examine reproducibility of these results in another cohort, the outcome of 146 newly diagnosed AML paediatric patients prospectively registered in the Japan Association of Childhood Leukaemia Study (JACLS) from 2003 to 2006 was compared to that of 240 patients in the original AML 99 clinical trial. The 5-year EFS and OS achieved in the new cohort was 66·7 ± 4·0% and 77·7 ± 8·0% respectively, which were comparable to those obtained in the original AML 99 clinical trial, although less frequent core-binding factor (CBF) AML (29·5% vs. 37%) and an almost equal frequency of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) during first complete remission (16·5% vs. 19%) were observed. The 5-year EFS in patients with a normal karyotype (NK) (n = 35, 54·9 ± 15·1%) was inferior in the present cohort when compared to the original AML99 trial. This study confirmed the excellent outcome of the original AML99 protocol.

  18. Clofarabine plus Low-Dose Cytarabine Followed by Clofarabine plus Low-Dose Cytarabine Alternating with Decitabine in AML Frontline Therapy of Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; Ravandi, Farhad; Huang, Xuelin; Wang, Xuemei; Jabbour, Elias; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kadia, Tapan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Konopleva, Marina; Borthakur, Gautam; Burger, Jan; Feliu, Jennie; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Standard therapy for older patients with AML has a poor outcome. We have designed a combination of clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine followed by a prolonged consolidation alternating with decitabine. Methods Sixty patients with a median age of 70 years (range 60-81) with newly diagnosed AML were included. They received clofarabine 20mg/m2 intravenously daily × 5 days plus cytarabine 20mg subcutaneously twice daily × 10 days. Responding patients continued for up to 17 courses of consolidation therapy including decitabine. Results Forty of 59 evaluable patients responded (66%). Complete remission rate was 58%. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 14.1 (95% CI: 6.9-not estimable) and median overall survival (OS) 12.7 months (95% CI: 8.8-not estimable). Median OS of responding patients (CR/CRp) was 24.2 months (95% CI: 17-not estimable). Compared to a historical group of patients who received clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine with a shorter consolidation, RFS was not statistically different. Induction mortality was low (7% at 8 weeks) and toxicities manageable. Conclusions Clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine alternating with decitabine in consolidation is active in older patients with newly diagnosed AML. The benefits of a prolonged consolidation remain unproven. PMID:22282348

  19. Randomized comparison of double induction and timed-sequential induction to a "3 + 7" induction in adults with AML: long-term analysis of the Acute Leukemia French Association (ALFA) 9000 study.

    PubMed

    Castaigne, Sylvie; Chevret, Sylvie; Archimbaud, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Bordessoule, Dominique; Tilly, Hervé; de Revel, Thierry; Simon, Marc; Dupriez, Brigitte; Renoux, Michel; Janvier, Maud; Micléa, Jean-Michel; Thomas, Xavier; Bastard, Christian; Preudhomme, Claude; Bauters, Francis; Degos, Laurent; Dombret, Hervé

    2004-10-15

    Between 1990 and 1996, we conducted a randomized trial in adults with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in order to compare relapse-free interval (RFI) after double induction (arm B), timed-sequential induction (arm C), or control "3 + 7" induction (arm A). Patients achieving complete remission (CR) after induction +/- salvage received the same consolidation chemotherapy, which included a dosage stratification according to patient's age (younger or older than 50 years). This long-term analysis was performed in 592 patients (arm A/B/C, 197/198/197 patients). Overall CR rate was 76% without differences between the 3 arms, even if a salvage course was less frequently needed in arm B. Treatment-related mortality, either during the induction or the postremission phase, was not significantly higher in arms B and C than in arm A. Among the 449 CR patients, 250 relapsed (arm A/B/C, 90/87/73 patients) without significant differences in RFI in arms B and C versus arm A (P = .39 and .15, by the Gray test). However, when analyzing the 345 patients younger than 50, RFI was significantly improved in younger patients receiving timed-sequential induction (P = .038 by the Gray test), while not in those receiving double induction. Event-free survival and overall survival were similar in the 3 randomization arms.

  20. Fludarabine with pharmacokinetically guided IV busulfan is superior to fixed-dose delivery in pretransplant conditioning of AML/MDS patients.

    PubMed

    Andersson, B S; Thall, P F; Valdez, B C; Milton, D R; Al-Atrash, G; Chen, J; Gulbis, A; Chu, D; Martinez, C; Parmar, S; Popat, U; Nieto, Y; Kebriaei, P; Alousi, A; de Lima, M; Rondon, G; Meng, Q H; Myers, A; Kawedia, J; Worth, L L; Fernandez-Vina, M; Madden, T; Shpall, E J; Jones, R B; Champlin, R E

    2017-04-01

    We hypothesized that IV busulfan (Bu) dosing could be safely intensified through pharmacokinetic (PK-) dose guidance to minimize the inter-patient variability in systemic exposure (SE) associated with body-sized dosing, and that this should improve outcome of AML/MDS patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. To test this hypothesis, we treated 218 patients (median age 50.7 years, male/female 50/50%) with fludarabine 40 mg/m(2) once daily x4, each dose followed by IV Bu, randomized to 130 mg/m(2) (N=107) or PK-guided to average daily SE, AUC of 6000 μM min (N=111), stratified for remission status and allo-grafting from HLA-matched donors. Toxicity and GvHD rates in the groups were similar; the risk of relapse or treatment-related mortality remained higher in the fixed-dose group throughout the 80-month observation period. Further, PK-guidance yielded safer disease control, leading to improved overall and PFS, most prominently in MDS patients and in AML patients not in remission at allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We conclude that AML/MDS patients receiving pretransplant conditioning treatment with our 4-day regimen may benefit significantly from PK-guided Bu dosing. This could be considered an alternative to fixed-dose delivery since it provides the benefit of precise dose delivery to a predetermined SE without increasing risk(s) of serious toxicity and/or GvHD.

  1. [Progress of study on drug therapy in adults patients with acute myeloid leukemia (non APL) after remission].

    PubMed

    Lan, Feng-Mei; Li, Hui-Min

    2014-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (non APL) is a group of highly heterogeneous hematologic malignancy.In recent years, after the standard "3+7" regimen, the complete remission rate of adult patients with AML (non-APL) can be as high as 70%-80%. However, due to the existence of minimal residual disease after remission, the recurrence of the disease still inevitable, only approximately 20% to 30% of the patients enjoy longterm disease-free survival. Currently only allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is one of the most effective treatment ways for AML. The number of transplant patients is limited, because of various reasons, such as the physical condition of patients, donor sources or economic reason. After transplantation, patients also have the possibility of recurrence, therefore, drug treatment is still important after AML remission. At present, NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network) recommended high-dose cytarabine as first-line postremission therapy for patients of good prognosis group and as second-line therapy for intermediate risk group. In recent years, researchers have explored other drugs, such as the nucleoside analogues, methyltransferase inhibitors and protease inhibitors or other drugs for the treatment of adult AML patients who is in remission.In this article, the treatment of conventional medicine for the treatment of AML after complete remission is summarized.

  2. Azacitidine for Front-Line Therapy of Patients with AML: Reproducible Efficacy Established by Direct Comparison of International Phase 3 Trial Data with Registry Data from the Austrian Azacitidine Registry of the AGMT Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Pleyer, Lisa; Döhner, Hartmut; Dombret, Hervé; Seymour, John F.; Schuh, Andre C.; Beach, CL; Swern, Arlene S.; Burgstaller, Sonja; Stauder, Reinhard; Girschikofsky, Michael; Sill, Heinz; Schlick, Konstantin; Thaler, Josef; Halter, Britta; Machherndl Spandl, Sigrid; Zebisch, Armin; Pichler, Angelika; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Autzinger, Eva M.; Lang, Alois; Geissler, Klaus; Voskova, Daniela; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Hojas, Sabine; Rogulj, Inga M.; Andel, Johannes; Greil, Richard

    2017-01-01

    We recently published a clinically-meaningful improvement in median overall survival (OS) for patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), >30% bone marrow (BM) blasts and white blood cell (WBC) count ≤15 G/L, treated with front-line azacitidine versus conventional care regimens within a phase 3 clinical trial (AZA-AML-001; NCT01074047; registered: February 2010). As results obtained in clinical trials are facing increased pressure to be confirmed by real-world data, we aimed to test whether data obtained in the AZA-AML-001 trial accurately represent observations made in routine clinical practice by analysing additional AML patients treated with azacitidine front-line within the Austrian Azacitidine Registry (AAR; NCT01595295; registered: May 2012) and directly comparing patient-level data of both cohorts. We assessed the efficacy of front-line azacitidine in a total of 407 patients with newly-diagnosed AML. Firstly, we compared data from AML patients with WBC ≤ 15 G/L and >30% BM blasts included within the AZA-AML-001 trial treated with azacitidine (“AML-001” cohort; n = 214) with AAR patients meeting the same inclusion criteria (“AAR (001-like)” cohort; n = 95). The current analysis thus represents a new sub-analysis of the AML-001 trial, which is directly compared with a new sub-analysis of the AAR. Baseline characteristics, azacitidine application, response rates and OS were comparable between all patient cohorts within the trial or registry setting. Median OS was 9.9 versus 10.8 months (p = 0.616) for “AML-001” versus “AAR (001-like)” cohorts, respectively. Secondly, we pooled data from both cohorts (n = 309) and assessed the outcome. Median OS of the pooled cohorts was 10.3 (95% confidence interval: 8.7, 12.6) months, and the one-year survival rate was 45.8%. Thirdly, we compared data from AAR patients meeting AZA-AML-001 trial inclusion criteria (n = 95) versus all AAR patients with World Health Organization (WHO)-defined AML (“AAR (WHO-AML

  3. Azacitidine for Front-Line Therapy of Patients with AML: Reproducible Efficacy Established by Direct Comparison of International Phase 3 Trial Data with Registry Data from the Austrian Azacitidine Registry of the AGMT Study Group.

    PubMed

    Pleyer, Lisa; Döhner, Hartmut; Dombret, Hervé; Seymour, John F; Schuh, Andre C; Beach, C L; Swern, Arlene S; Burgstaller, Sonja; Stauder, Reinhard; Girschikofsky, Michael; Sill, Heinz; Schlick, Konstantin; Thaler, Josef; Halter, Britta; Machherndl Spandl, Sigrid; Zebisch, Armin; Pichler, Angelika; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Autzinger, Eva M; Lang, Alois; Geissler, Klaus; Voskova, Daniela; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Hojas, Sabine; Rogulj, Inga M; Andel, Johannes; Greil, Richard

    2017-02-15

    We recently published a clinically-meaningful improvement in median overall survival (OS) for patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), >30% bone marrow (BM) blasts and white blood cell (WBC) count ≤15 G/L, treated with front-line azacitidine versus conventional care regimens within a phase 3 clinical trial (AZA-AML-001; NCT01074047; registered: February 2010). As results obtained in clinical trials are facing increased pressure to be confirmed by real-world data, we aimed to test whether data obtained in the AZA-AML-001 trial accurately represent observations made in routine clinical practice by analysing additional AML patients treated with azacitidine front-line within the Austrian Azacitidine Registry (AAR; NCT01595295; registered: May 2012) and directly comparing patient-level data of both cohorts. We assessed the efficacy of front-line azacitidine in a total of 407 patients with newly-diagnosed AML. Firstly, we compared data from AML patients with WBC ≤ 15 G/L and >30% BM blasts included within the AZA-AML-001 trial treated with azacitidine ("AML-001" cohort; n = 214) with AAR patients meeting the same inclusion criteria ("AAR (001-like)" cohort; n = 95). The current analysis thus represents a new sub-analysis of the AML-001 trial, which is directly compared with a new sub-analysis of the AAR. Baseline characteristics, azacitidine application, response rates and OS were comparable between all patient cohorts within the trial or registry setting. Median OS was 9.9 versus 10.8 months (p = 0.616) for "AML-001" versus "AAR (001-like)" cohorts, respectively. Secondly, we pooled data from both cohorts (n = 309) and assessed the outcome. Median OS of the pooled cohorts was 10.3 (95% confidence interval: 8.7, 12.6) months, and the one-year survival rate was 45.8%. Thirdly, we compared data from AAR patients meeting AZA-AML-001 trial inclusion criteria (n = 95) versus all AAR patients with World Health Organization (WHO)-defined AML ("AAR (WHO-AML)" cohort; n

  4. Assessment of circulating biochemical markers and antioxidative status in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Mahmood; Farooq, Shahzad; Malik, Arif; Shaukat, Aysha; Manan, Abdul; Asif, Muhammad; Sani, Suleman; Qazi, Mahmood Husain; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Iqbal, Zafar; Hussain, Abrar

    2015-01-01

    Various circulating biochemical markers are indicators of pathological state in leukemia and its subtypes. Increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant factors portray clear image associated with malignancies during subtypes of leukemia. In this research work we investigated the inter-relationship among the subtypes of leukemia with circulating biochemical markers and oxidative stress in the Pakistani population. This research work was conducted on a total number of 70 subjects in which 20 were control participants and 50 were suffering from leukemia and divided into two subtypes (ALL and AML). Various circulating biomarkers were investigated including hematological, hepatic and renal profiles as well as oxidative stress markers, electrolytes and vitamins C and E. Results show that vitamin E was found to be decreased in diseased sub-types (P < 0.05). Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were very high in disease sub-types (ALL-B = 8.69 ± 1.59; ALL-T = 8.78 ± 0.97; AML = 8.50 ± 1.29) compared to controls (1.22 ± 0.10; P < 0.05) while the levels of antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT)], platelets, as well as electrolytes (Ca and Mg) were reduced in patients suffering from leukemia (sub-types). Enhanced levels of oxidative stress (MDA) and decreased levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants reflect the pathological state and impaired cell control in patients suffering from leukemia (subtypes) and show a strong correlation with oxidative stress, indicating that patients' biological systems are under oxidative stress.

  5. The applicability of the WHO classification in paediatric AML. A NOPHO-AML study.

    PubMed

    Sandahl, Julie D; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Heldrup, Jesper; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik

    2015-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid leukaemia was revised in 2008. It incorporates newly recognized entities and emphasizes the pivotal role of cytogenetic abnormalities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of the WHO classification when applied to a large population-based paediatric acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cohort. We included children diagnosed with de novo AML, 0-18 years of age from the Nordic countries and Hong Kong from 1993 to 2012. Data were retrieved from the Nordic Society for Paediatric Haematology and Oncology AML database and patients classified according to the WHO 2008 classification. A successful karyotype was available in 97% of the cases. AML with recurrent genetic abnormalities were present in 262 (41%) and 94 (15%) were classified as AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (AML-MDS). WHO classifies patients with monosomy 7 and del(7q) into one group. We found that -7 (n = 14) had significantly poorer outcome than del(7q) (n = 11); 5-year event-free survival 26% vs. 67%, (P = 0·02), and 5-year overall survival 51% vs. 90%, (P = 0·04). The largest group was the highly heterogeneous AML not otherwise specified (NOS) (n = 280) (44%). In conclusion, the WHO classification allocated 15% to AML-MDS, 44% to NOS and grouped together entities with clearly different outcome, therefore limiting the applicability of the current WHO classification in children with AML.

  6. Acute Hemolysis with Renal Failure due to Clostridium Bacteremia in a Patient with AML

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Juarez, R. M.; Sotello, D.; D'Cuhna, L.; Payne, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of acute hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and Clostridium perfringens bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The high fatality of C. perfringens bacteremia requires that clinicians recognize and rapidly treat patients at risk for this infection. Although other hemolytic processes are in the differential diagnosis of these events, the presence of high fever, chills, and rapidly positive blood cultures may help narrow the diagnosis. Most cases of C. perfringens bacteremia have a concomitant coinfection, which makes broad spectrum empiric therapy essential. There is a high mortality rate of C. perfringens infections associated with leukemia. PMID:27774325

  7. Resistance Prediction in AML: Analysis of 4,601 Patients from MRC/NCRI, HOVON/SAKK, SWOG, and MD Anderson Cancer Center

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Roland B.; Othus, Megan; Burnett, Alan K.; Löwenberg, Bob; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Hills, Robert K.; Ravandi, Farhad; Pabst, Thomas; Evans, Anna; Pierce, Sherry R.; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Estey, Elihu H.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance remains the principal problem in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We used area under receiver operator characteristic curves (AUC) to quantify our ability to predict therapeutic resistance in individual patients where AUC=1.0 denotes perfect prediction and AUC=0.5 denotes a coin flip, using data from 4,601 patients with newly diagnosed AML given induction therapy with 3+7 or more intense standard regimens in MRC/NCRI, HOVON, SWOG, and MD Anderson Cancer Center studies. Age, performance status, white blood cell count, secondary disease, cytogenetic risk, and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 mutation status were each independently associated with failure to achieve complete remission despite no early death (“primary refractoriness”). However, the AUC of a bootstrap-corrected multivariable model predicting this outcome was only 0.78, indicating only fair predictive ability. Removal of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 information only slightly decreased the AUC (0.76). Prediction of resistance, defined as primary refractoriness or short relapse-free survival (RFS), was even more difficult. Our ability to forecast resistance based on routinely available pre-treatment covariates provides a rationale for continued randomization between standard and new therapies and supports further examination of genetic and post-treatment data to optimize resistance prediction in AML. PMID:25113226

  8. Resistance prediction in AML: analysis of 4601 patients from MRC/NCRI, HOVON/SAKK, SWOG and MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Othus, M; Burnett, A K; Löwenberg, B; Kantarjian, H M; Ossenkoppele, G J; Hills, R K; Ravandi, F; Pabst, T; Evans, A; Pierce, S R; Vekemans, M-C; Appelbaum, F R; Estey, E H

    2015-02-01

    Therapeutic resistance remains the principal problem in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We used area under receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUCs) to quantify our ability to predict therapeutic resistance in individual patients, where AUC=1.0 denotes perfect prediction and AUC=0.5 denotes a coin flip, using data from 4601 patients with newly diagnosed AML given induction therapy with 3+7 or more intense standard regimens in UK Medical Research Council/National Cancer Research Institute, Dutch-Belgian Cooperative Trial Group for Hematology/Oncology/Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research, US cooperative group SWOG and MD Anderson Cancer Center studies. Age, performance status, white blood cell count, secondary disease, cytogenetic risk and FLT3-ITD/NPM1 mutation status were each independently associated with failure to achieve complete remission despite no early death ('primary refractoriness'). However, the AUC of a bootstrap-corrected multivariable model predicting this outcome was only 0.78, indicating only fair predictive ability. Removal of FLT3-ITD and NPM1 information only slightly decreased the AUC (0.76). Prediction of resistance, defined as primary refractoriness or short relapse-free survival, was even more difficult. Our limited ability to forecast resistance based on routinely available pretreatment covariates provides a rationale for continued randomization between standard and new therapies and supports further examination of genetic and posttreatment data to optimize resistance prediction in AML.

  9. Treatment cost of invasive fungal disease (Ifd) in patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (Aml) or myelodysplastic syndrome (Mds) in German hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rieger, C T; Cornely, O A; Hoppe-Tichy, T; Kiehl, M; Knoth, H; Thalheimer, M; Schuler, U; Ullmann, A J; Ehlken, B; Ostermann, H

    2012-11-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) causes increasing morbidity and mortality in haematological cancer patients. Reliable cost data for treating IFD in German hospitals is not available. Objective of the study was to determine the institutional cost of treating the IFD. Data were obtained by retrospective chart review in German hospitals. Patients had either newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Direct medical cost was calculated from hospital provider's perspective. A total of 108 patients were enrolled at 5 tertiary care hospitals, 36 IFD patients and 72 controls. The vast majority of IFD patients (74%) were diagnosed with invasive aspergillosis. On average, the hospital stay for IFD patients was 12 days longer than in control patients. All patients in the IFD group and 89% of patients in the control group received antifungal drugs. Mean direct costs per patient were €51,517 in the IFD group and €30,454 in the control group. Incremental costs of €21,063 were dominated by cost for antifungal drugs (36%), hospital stay (32%) and blood products (23%). From the perspective of hospitals in Germany the economic burden of IFD in patients with AML or MDS is substantial. Therefore, prevention of IFD is necessary with respect to both clinical and economic reasons.

  10. De novo AML exhibits greater microenvironment dysregulation compared to AML with myelodysplasia-related changes.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Matheus Rodrigues; Pereira, João Kleber Novais; de Melo Campos, Paula; Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Traina, Fabiola; Saad, Sara T Olalla; Favaro, Patricia

    2017-01-13

    The interaction between the bone marrow microenvironment and malignant hematopoietic cells can result in the protection of leukemia cells from chemotherapy in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We, herein, characterized the changes in cytokine expression and the function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in patients with MDS, AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (MRC), a well-recognized clinical subtype of secondary AML, and de novo AML. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of MDS-MSC on T lymphocyte proliferation and no significant differences in any of the cytokines tested. AML-MSC inhibited T-cell proliferation only at a very low MSC/T cell ratio. When compared to the control, AML-MRCderived MSC presented a significant increase in IL6 expression, whereas de novo AML MSC presented a significant increase in the expression levels of VEGFA, CXCL12, RPGE2, IDO, IL1β, IL6 and IL32, followed by a decrease in IL10 expression. Furthermore, data indicate that IL-32 regulates stromal cell proliferation, has a chemotactic potential and participates in stromal cell crosstalk with leukemia cells, which could result in chemoresistance. Our results suggest that the differences between AML-MRC and de novo AML also extend into the leukemic stem cell niche and that IL-32 can participate in the regulation of the bone marrow cytokine milieu.

  11. De novo AML exhibits greater microenvironment dysregulation compared to AML with myelodysplasia-related changes

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Matheus Rodrigues; Pereira, João Kleber Novais; de Melo Campos, Paula; Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Traina, Fabiola; Saad, Sara T. Olalla; Favaro, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the bone marrow microenvironment and malignant hematopoietic cells can result in the protection of leukemia cells from chemotherapy in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We, herein, characterized the changes in cytokine expression and the function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) in patients with MDS, AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (MRC), a well-recognized clinical subtype of secondary AML, and de novo AML. We observed a significant inhibitory effect of MDS-MSC on T lymphocyte proliferation and no significant differences in any of the cytokines tested. AML-MSC inhibited T-cell proliferation only at a very low MSC/T cell ratio. When compared to the control, AML-MRCderived MSC presented a significant increase in IL6 expression, whereas de novo AML MSC presented a significant increase in the expression levels of VEGFA, CXCL12, RPGE2, IDO, IL1β, IL6 and IL32, followed by a decrease in IL10 expression. Furthermore, data indicate that IL-32 regulates stromal cell proliferation, has a chemotactic potential and participates in stromal cell crosstalk with leukemia cells, which could result in chemoresistance. Our results suggest that the differences between AML-MRC and de novo AML also extend into the leukemic stem cell niche and that IL-32 can participate in the regulation of the bone marrow cytokine milieu. PMID:28084439

  12. Enhanced sensitivity to glucocorticoids in cytarabine-resistant AML.

    PubMed

    Malani, D; Murumägi, A; Yadav, B; Kontro, M; Eldfors, S; Kumar, A; Karjalainen, R; Majumder, M M; Ojamies, P; Pemovska, T; Wennerberg, K; Heckman, C; Porkka, K; Wolf, M; Aittokallio, T; Kallioniemi, O

    2016-12-02

    We sought to identify drugs that could counteract cytarabine resistance in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by generating eight resistant variants from MOLM-13 and SHI-1 AML cell lines by long-term drug treatment. These cells were compared with 66 ex vivo chemorefractory samples from cytarabine-treated AML patients. The models and patient cells were subjected to genomic and transcriptomic profiling and high-throughput testing with 250 emerging and clinical oncology compounds. Genomic profiling uncovered deletion of the deoxycytidine kinase (DCK) gene in both MOLM-13- and SHI-1-derived cytarabine-resistant variants and in an AML patient sample. Cytarabine-resistant SHI-1 variants and a subset of chemorefractory AML patient samples showed increased sensitivity to glucocorticoids that are often used in treatment of lymphoid leukemia but not AML. Paired samples taken from AML patients before treatment and at relapse also showed acquisition of glucocorticoid sensitivity. Enhanced glucocorticoid sensitivity was only seen in AML patient samples that were negative for the FLT3 mutation (P=0.0006). Our study shows that development of cytarabine resistance is associated with increased sensitivity to glucocorticoids in a subset of AML, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy that should be explored in a clinical trial of chemorefractory AML patients carrying wild-type FLT3.Leukemia advance online publication, 2 December 2016; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.314.

  13. Impaired hematopoietic differentiation of RUNX1-mutated induced pluripotent stem cells derived from FPD/AML patients.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, M; Kunimoto, H; Watanabe, N; Fukuchi, Y; Yuasa, S; Yamazaki, S; Nishimura, T; Sadahira, K; Fukuda, K; Okano, H; Nakauchi, H; Morita, Y; Matsumura, I; Kudo, K; Ito, E; Ebihara, Y; Tsuji, K; Harada, Y; Harada, H; Okamoto, S; Nakajima, H

    2014-12-01

    Somatic mutation of RUNX1 is implicated in various hematological malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and previous studies using mouse models disclosed its critical roles in hematopoiesis. However, the role of RUNX1 in human hematopoiesis has never been tested in experimental settings. Familial platelet disorder (FPD)/AML is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by germline mutation of RUNX1, marked by thrombocytopenia and propensity to acute leukemia. To investigate the physiological function of RUNX1 in human hematopoiesis and pathophysiology of FPD/AML, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three distinct FPD/AML pedigrees (FPD-iPSCs) and examined their defects in hematopoietic differentiation. By in vitro differentiation assays, FPD-iPSCs were clearly defective in the emergence of hematopoietic progenitors and differentiation of megakaryocytes, and overexpression of wild-type (WT)-RUNX1 reversed most of these phenotypes. We further demonstrated that overexpression of mutant-RUNX1 in WT-iPSCs did not recapitulate the phenotype of FPD-iPSCs, showing that the mutations were of loss-of-function type. Taken together, this study demonstrated that haploinsufficient RUNX1 allele imposed cell-intrinsic defects on hematopoietic differentiation in human experimental settings and revealed differential impacts of RUNX1 dosage on human and murine megakaryopoiesis. FPD-iPSCs will be a useful tool to investigate mutant RUNX1-mediated molecular processes in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis.

  14. Preclinical validation: LV/IL-12 transduction of patient leukemia cells for immunotherapy of AML

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju; Liu, Yuanfeng; Au, Bryan C; Barber, Dwayne L; Arruda, Andrea; Schambach, Axel; Rothe, Michael; Minden, Mark D; Paige, Christopher J; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a potent cytokine that may be harnessed to treat cancer. To date, nearly 100 IL-12-based clinical trials have been initiated worldwide. Yet systemic administration of IL-12 is toxic. Different strategies are being developed to reduce such toxicities by restricting IL-12 distribution. Our previous studies employed lentivector-mediated expression of murine IL-12 in tumor cells and demonstrated effective protection in both mouse leukemia and solid tumor challenge models. In this study, we carried out preclinical validation studies using a novel lentivector to engineer expression of human IL-12 in acute myeloid leukemia blast cells isolated from 21 patients. Acute myeloid leukemia cells were transduced with a bicistronic lentivector that encodes the human IL-12 cDNA as a fusion, as well as a LNGFR (ΔLNGFR)/mutant thymidylate kinase cassette as a marking and cell-fate control element. A range of 20–70% functional transduction efficiencies was achieved. Transduced acute myeloid leukemia cells produced bioactive IL-12 protein and displayed dose-dependent sensitivity to the prodrug 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine. In vitro immortalization assays using transduced mouse hematopoietic stem cells demonstrated minimal genotoxic risk from our IL-12 vector. Scale-up transduction and cell processing was subsequently validated in a GMP facility to support our (now approved) Clinical Trial Application (CTA). PMID:27933304

  15. Dose intensification in acute myeloid leukaemia: greater effectiveness at lower cost. Principal report of the Medical Research Council's AML9 study. MRC Leukaemia in Adults Working Party.

    PubMed

    Rees, J K; Gray, R G; Wheatley, K

    1996-07-01

    Between 1984 and 1990, 972 patients aged 1-79 years with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), from 85 British hospitals, were entered into the MRC's 9th AML trial. Patients were randomized between DAT 1 + 5 (daunorubicin for 1 d, with cytarabine and 6-thioguanine for 5 d) and DAT 3 + 10 (same dose drugs for 3 and 10 d respectively) as induction therapy. The 63% who achieved complete remission (CR) were randomized to receive two courses of DAT 2 + 7 alternating with two courses of either MAZE (m-AMSA, 5-azacytidine, etoposide) or COAP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, cytarabine, prednisone). Finally, those still in CR were randomized to receive either 1 year of maintenance treatment with eight courses of cytarabine and thioguanine followed by four courses of COAP, or no further cytotoxic therapy. Resistance to induction therapy was less common with the DAT 3 + 10 regimen than with DAT 1 + 5 (13% v 23%; P = 0.0001) and hence, despite a 5% increase in the risk of induction death, the CR rate was higher (66% v 61%; P = 0.15). Moreover, CR was achieved more rapidly with DAT 3 + 10 (median 34 v 46 d; P < 0.0001) and thus patients required less time in hospital (mean 20 v 29 d) and less blood product support. 5-year relapse-free survival (28% v 23%; P = 0.05) and survival (23% v 18%; P < 0.05) were also better with DAT 3 + 10. Post-remission intensification of therapy with MAZE resulted in fewer relapses (66% v 74% at 5 years; P = 0.03) but patients allocated MAZE required considerably more supportive care and 14 (4.5%) died following 312 MAZE courses, whereas no deaths occurred following COAP. 5-year survival was not significantly higher with MAZE (37% v 31%). Finally, although 1 year of outpatient maintenance treatment appeared to delay, but not prevent, recurrence it did not improve 5-year survival which was non-significantly worse for those allocated maintenance treatment (41% v 44%). We conclude that the more intensive induction regimen, DAT 3 + 10, is not only more

  16. Chemosensitivity of nonleukemic clonogenic precursors in AML patients in complete remission: association with CD34(+) mobilization and with disease-free survival.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Avola, Giuseppe; Leotta, Salvatore; Strano, Aurora; Camuglia, Maria Grazia; Pinto, Valeria; Mercurio, Salvatore; Poidomani, Massimo; Coppoletta, Stefania; Di Marco, Anna Lia; Consoli, Carla; Triolo, Anna; Spadaro, Andrea; Privitera, Antonella; Ragusa, Angela; Tibullo, Daniele; Di Mercurio, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    A high number of CD34(+) cells in the peripheral blood during mobilization in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in complete remission (CR) is associated with a high relapse rate. The variability in chemoresistance of normal bone marrow precursors has been hypothesized as explanation for the variable CD34 mobilization in AML. In 37 patients with AML in CR, we determined the chemosensitivity of bone marrow clonogenic precursors to maphosphamide and etoposide, which was then correlated with the degree of CD34(+) mobilization. In an enlarged set of 49 patients, we also studied the importance of chemosensitivity of marrow precursors for disease-free survival and relapse incidence. Significant correlations were demonstrated between the peak number of CD34(+) cells and residual growth of colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) after maphosphamide (R = 0.550; p = 0.0003) and after etoposide (R = 0.793; p = 0.0003). It was possible to identify three groups of AML patients based on chemosensitivity. The mean CD34(+) peak was 33 × 10(6)/L in the hyperchemosensitive group, 141 × 10(6)/L in the normochemosensitive (p = 0.03), and 379 × 10(6)/L in the chemoresistant group (p = 0.002). Failed CD34(+) mobilization was observed in 72% of the hyperchemosensitive group, 23% of the normochemosensitive group, and 0% of the chemoresistant group (p = 0.001). Hyperchemosensitivity of CFU-GM, together with a low platelet count, were independent factors important in the failure of CD34(+) cell mobilization. A disease-free survival significantly inferior to that of all other patients was associated with chemoresistance of CFU-GM (log rank, p = 0.030) and with chemoresistance of burst-forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) (log rank, p = 0.033). Chemoresistance of CFU-GM (p = 0.048) and BFU-E (p = 0.017) was also associated with increase relapse incidence. Nonleukemic nature of these precursors was demonstrated studying minimal residual disease from single colony cells

  17. Molecular genetic studies on 167 pediatric ALL patients from different areas of Pakistan confirm a low frequency of the favorable prognosis fusion oncogene TEL-AML1 (t 12; 21) in underdeveloped countries of the region.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Zafar

    2014-01-01

    TEL-AML1 fusion oncogene (t 12; 21) is the most common chromosomal abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This translocation is associated with a good prognosis and rarely shows chemotherapeutic resistance to 3-drug based remission induction phase of treatment as well as overall treatment. Thus, the higher the frequency of this fusion oncogene, the easier to manage childhood ALL in a given region with less intensive chemotherapy. Although global frequency of TEL-AML1 has been reported to be 20-30%, a very low frequency has been found in some geographical regions, including one study from Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan and others from India. The objective of present study was to investigate if this low frequency of TEL- AML1 in pediatric ALL is only in Lahore region or similar situation exists at other representative oncology centers of Pakistan. A total of 167 pediatric ALL patients were recruited from major pediatric oncology centers situated in Lahore, Faisalabad, Peshawar and Islamabad. Patients were tested for TEL-AML1 using nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Only 17 out of 167 (10.2%) patients were found to be TEL-AML1 positive. TEL-AML1+ALL patients had favorable prognosis, most of them (82.4%, 14/17) showing early remission and good overall survival. Thus, our findings indicate an overall low frequency of TEL-AML1 in Pakistan pediatric ALL patients, in accordance with lower representation of this prognostically important genetic abnormality in other less developed countries, specifically in south Asia, thus associating it with poor living standards in these ethnic groups. It also indicates ethnic and geographical differences in the distribution of this prognostically important genetic abnormality among childhood ALL patients, which may have a significant bearing on ALL management strategies in different parts of the world.

  18. Acquired TET2 mutation in one patient with familial platelet disorder with predisposition to AML led to the development of pre-leukaemic clone resulting in T2-ALL and AML-M0.

    PubMed

    Manchev, Vladimir T; Bouzid, Hind; Antony-Debré, Iléana; Leite, Betty; Meurice, Guillaume; Droin, Nathalie; Prebet, Thomas; Costello, Régis T; Vainchenker, William; Plo, Isabelle; Diop, M'boyba; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Asnafi, Vahid; Favier, Rémi; Baccini, Véronique; Raslova, Hana

    2016-12-20

    Familial platelet disorder with predisposition to acute myeloid leukaemia (FPD/AML) is characterized by germline RUNX1 mutations, thrombocytopaenia, platelet dysfunction and a risk of developing acute myeloid and in rare cases lymphoid T leukaemia. Here, we focus on a case of a man with a familial history of RUNX1(R174Q) mutation who developed at the age of 42 years a T2-ALL and, 2 years after remission, an AML-M0. Both AML-M0 and T2-ALL blast populations demonstrated a loss of 1p36.32-23 and 17q11.2 regions as well as other small deletions, clonal rearrangements of both TCRγ and TCRδ and a presence of 18 variants at a frequency of more than 40%. Additional variants were identified only in T2-ALL or in AML-M0 evoking the existence of a common original clone, which gave rise to subclonal populations. Next generation sequencing (NGS) performed on peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) cells 5 years prior to T2-ALL development revealed only the missense TET2(P1962T) mutation at a frequency of 1%, which increases to more than 40% in fully transformed leukaemic T2-ALL and AML-M0 clones. This result suggests that TET2(P1962T) mutation in association with germline RUNX1(R174Q) mutation leads to amplification of a haematopoietic clone susceptible to acquire other transforming alterations.

  19. Pediatric AML: From Biology to Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D E; Zwaan, C Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry

    2015-01-09

    Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents 15%-20% of all pediatric acute leukemias. Survival rates have increased over the past few decades to ~70%, due to improved supportive care, optimized risk stratification and intensified chemotherapy. In most children, AML presents as a de novo entity, but in a minority, it is a secondary malignancy. The diagnostic classification of pediatric AML includes a combination of morphology, cytochemistry, immunophenotyping and molecular genetics. Outcome is mainly dependent on the initial response to treatment and molecular and cytogenetic aberrations. Treatment consists of a combination of intensive anthracycline- and cytarabine-containing chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation in selected genetic high-risk cases or slow responders. In general, ~30% of all pediatric AML patients will suffer from relapse, whereas 5%-10% of the patients will die due to disease complications or the side-effects of the treatment. Targeted therapy may enhance anti-leukemic efficacy and minimize treatment-related morbidity and mortality, but requires detailed knowledge of the genetic abnormalities and aberrant pathways involved in leukemogenesis. These efforts towards future personalized therapy in a rare disease, such as pediatric AML, require intensive international collaboration in order to enhance the survival rates of pediatric AML, while aiming to reduce long-term toxicity.

  20. Up-regulation of a HOXA-PBX3 homeobox-gene signature following down-regulation of miR-181 is associated with adverse prognosis in patients with cytogenetically abnormal AML.

    PubMed

    Li, Zejuan; Huang, Hao; Li, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Ping; Arnovitz, Stephen; Radmacher, Michael D; Maharry, Kati; Elkahloun, Abdel; Yang, Xinan; He, Chunjiang; He, Miao; Zhang, Zhiyu; Dohner, Konstanze; Neilly, Mary Beth; Price, Colles; Lussier, Yves A; Zhang, Yanming; Larson, Richard A; Le Beau, Michelle M; Caligiuri, Michael A; Bullinger, Lars; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Lowenberg, Bob; Liu, Paul P; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D; Rowley, Janet D; Chen, Jianjun

    2012-03-08

    Increased expression levels of miR-181 family members have been shown to be associated with favorable outcome in patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia. Here we show that increased expression of miR-181a and miR-181b is also significantly (P < .05; Cox regression) associated with favorable overall survival in cytogenetically abnormal AML (CA-AML) patients. We further show that up-regulation of a gene signature composed of 4 potential miR-181 targets (including HOXA7, HOXA9, HOXA11, and PBX3), associated with down-regulation of miR-181 family members, is an independent predictor of adverse overall survival on multivariable testing in analysis of 183 CA-AML patients. The independent prognostic impact of this 4-homeobox-gene signature was confirmed in a validation set of 271 CA-AML patients. Furthermore, our in vitro and in vivo studies indicated that ectopic expression of miR-181b significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited viability/proliferation of leukemic cells and delayed leukemogenesis; such effects could be reversed by forced expression of PBX3. Thus, the up-regulation of the 4 homeobox genes resulting from the down-regulation of miR-181 family members probably contribute to the poor prognosis of patients with nonfavorable CA-AML. Restoring expression of miR-181b and/or targeting the HOXA/PBX3 pathways may provide new strategies to improve survival substantially.

  1. Clinical significance of in vivo cytarabine-induced gene expression signature in AML.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Jatinder K; Pounds, Stanley; Cao, Xueyuan; Crews, Kristine R; Cogle, Christopher R; Bhise, Neha; Raimondi, Susana C; Downing, James R; Baker, Sharyn D; Ribeiro, Raul C; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial remission, ∼60-70% of adult and 30% of pediatric patients experience relapse or refractory AML. Studies so far have identified base line gene expression profiles of pathogenic and prognostic significance in AML; however, the extent of change in gene expression post-initiation of treatment has not been investigated. Exposure of leukemic cells to chemotherapeutic agents such as cytarabine, a mainstay of AML chemotherapy, can trigger adaptive response by influencing leukemic cell transcriptome and, hence, development of resistance or refractory disease. It is, however, challenging to perform such a study due to lack of availability of specimens post-drug treatment. The primary objective of this study was to identify in vivo cytarabine-induced changes in leukemia cell transcriptome and to evaluate their impact on clinical outcome. The results highlight genes relevant to cytarabine resistance and support the concept of targeting cytarabine-induced genes as a means of improving response.

  2. Kinetics of Cytotoxic Lymphocytes Reconstitution after Induction Chemotherapy in Elderly AML Patients Reveals Progressive Recovery of Normal Phenotypic and Functional Features in NK Cells.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jérôme; Fauriat, Cyril; Kochbati, Eloïse; Orlanducci, Florence; Charbonnier, Aude; D'Incan, Evelyne; Andre, Pascale; Romagne, François; Barbarat, Bernadette; Vey, Norbert; Olive, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    NK cells are defective in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis. Here, we studied the kinetic of expression of the major activating and inhibitory receptors of NK, CD8 T, and γδ T cells in patients undergoing chemotherapy (CT) for the treatment of AML (n = 29). We showed that NK cells are the main affected population at diagnosis and that expression of activating receptors is partially restored within a few weeks after CT. CD8 T cells and γδ T cells are only weakly affected at diagnosis. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor expression by NK cells, but not NKG2A and CD85j, was downregulated. Interestingly, the development of NK cells appeared altered as the most immature CD56(bright) NK cells were seriously underrepresented. Finally, we showed that NK cell functions were only partially restored 6 weeks after CT as degranulation capabilities of NK cells recovered, whereas cytokine production remained low. Our data point out NK cells as antitumor effectors peculiarly hampered by leukemic cells. This study may indicate a timeline when NK-mediated therapies or other immunotherapies could be performed, particularly for patients excluded of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  3. Kinetics of Cytotoxic Lymphocytes Reconstitution after Induction Chemotherapy in Elderly AML Patients Reveals Progressive Recovery of Normal Phenotypic and Functional Features in NK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Jérôme; Fauriat, Cyril; Kochbati, Eloïse; Orlanducci, Florence; Charbonnier, Aude; D’Incan, Evelyne; Andre, Pascale; Romagne, François; Barbarat, Bernadette; Vey, Norbert; Olive, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    NK cells are defective in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at diagnosis. Here, we studied the kinetic of expression of the major activating and inhibitory receptors of NK, CD8 T, and γδ T cells in patients undergoing chemotherapy (CT) for the treatment of AML (n = 29). We showed that NK cells are the main affected population at diagnosis and that expression of activating receptors is partially restored within a few weeks after CT. CD8 T cells and γδ T cells are only weakly affected at diagnosis. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor expression by NK cells, but not NKG2A and CD85j, was downregulated. Interestingly, the development of NK cells appeared altered as the most immature CD56bright NK cells were seriously underrepresented. Finally, we showed that NK cell functions were only partially restored 6 weeks after CT as degranulation capabilities of NK cells recovered, whereas cytokine production remained low. Our data point out NK cells as antitumor effectors peculiarly hampered by leukemic cells. This study may indicate a timeline when NK-mediated therapies or other immunotherapies could be performed, particularly for patients excluded of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:28210257

  4. Effectivity of a strategy in elderly AML patients to reach allogeneic stem cell transplantation using intensive chemotherapy: Long-term survival is dependent on complete remission after first induction therapy.

    PubMed

    von dem Borne, P A; de Wreede, L C; Halkes, C J M; Marijt, W A F; Falkenburg, J H F; Veelken, H

    2016-07-01

    Intensive chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) can cure AML. Most studies on alloSCT in elderly AML report results of highly selected patient cohorts. Hardly any data exist on the effectiveness of prospective strategies intended to bring as many patients as possible to transplant. Between 2006 and 2011 we implemented a treatment algorithm for all newly diagnosed AML patients aged 61-75 years, consisting of intensive chemotherapy cycles to induce complete remission, followed by alloSCT. 44 of 60 (73%) newly diagnosed elderly AML patients started with chemotherapy. By meticulously following our algorithm in almost all patients, we could induce complete remission (CR) in 66% of patients starting with chemotherapy, and transplant 32% of these patients in continuous CR. Main reasons for failure were early relapse (16%), early death (14%), primary refractory disease (9%), and patient or physician decision to stop treatment (16%). Patients in continuous CR after first induction benefit most with 36% long-term survival. Patients not in CR after first induction benefit less; although additional chemotherapy induces CR in 45% of these patients, only 23% are transplanted and no long-term survival is observed, mainly due to relapse. Long-term survival in the group of 44 patients is 9% (median 4.5 years after alloSCT). Considering that 27% of patients do not start with chemotherapy and 64% of patients starting with chemotherapy do not reach alloSCT, the reasons for failure presented here should be used as a guide to develop new treatment algorithms to improve long-term survival in elderly AML patients.

  5. [AML treatment strategy based on cytogenetic abnormalities and somatic mutations].

    PubMed

    Imai, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    In addition to morphological and histocytochemical analyses of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), data on cytogenetic abnormalities and somatic mutations are used for classification of AML. The risk stratification based on these examinations facilitates determining the treatment strategy for AML. Cytogenetic risk category definitions by the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG), Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB), and The Medical Research Council (MRC) classify AML patients into favorable, intermediate, and adverse groups. Approximately 80% of patients in the intermediate group have a normal karyotype and the importance of molecular genetic analyses in these patients is increasing. Somatic mutations of NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 are known to be related to the prognosis of AML patients. The European LeukemiaNet (ELN) introduced risk stratification for AML patients based on cytogenetic abnormalities and NPM1, CEBPA, and FLT3 mutations. This risk stratification can be used to select only chemotherapy or chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as consolidation therapy for individual AML patients. Development of molecular targeted therapies against FLT3 or IDH mutations is in progress and these novel therapies are expected to contribute to improving the prognosis of AML patients.

  6. Osteoblasts Protect AML Cells from SDF-1-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Kimberly N.; Dudakovic, Amel; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E.; Philips, Rachael L.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Westendorf, Jennifer J.; Hedin, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow provides a protective environment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells that often allows leukemic stem cells to survive standard chemotherapeutic regimens. Targeting these leukemic stem cells within the bone marrow is critical for preventing relapse. We recently demonstrated that SDF-1, a chemokine abundant in the bone marrow, induces apoptosis in AML cell lines and in patient samples expressing high levels of its receptor, CXCR4. Here we show that a subset of osteoblast lineage cells within the bone marrow can protect AML cells from undergoing apoptosis in response to the SDF-1 naturally present in that location. In co-culture systems, osteoblasts at various stages of differentiation protected AML cell lines and patient isolates from SDF-1-induced apoptosis. The differentiation of the osteoblast cell lines, MC3T3 and W-20-17, mediated this protection via a cell contact-independent mechanism. In contrast, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, the precursors of osteoblasts, induced apoptosis in AML cells via a CXCR4-dependent mechanism and failed to protect AML cells from exogenously added SDF-1. These results indicate that osteoblasts in the process of differentiation potently inhibit the SDF-1-driven apoptotic pathway of CXCR4-expressing AML cells residing in the bone marrow. Drugs targeting this protective mechanism could potentially provide a new approach to treating AML by enhancing the SDF-1-induced apoptosis of AML cells residing within the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:24851270

  7. Chemosensitizing AML cells by targeting bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Raphael C; Wasserstrom, Briana; Meacham, Amy; Wise, Elizabeth; Drusbosky, Leylah; Walter, Glenn A; Chaplin, David J; Siemann, Dietmar W; Purich, Daniel L; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Refractory disease is the greatest challenge in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Blood vessels may serve as sanctuary sites for AML. When AML cells were co-cultured with bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs), a greater proportion of leukemia cells were in G0/G1. This led us to a strategy of targeting BMECs with tubulin-binding combretastatins, causing BMECs to lose their flat phenotype, degrade their cytoskeleton, cease growth, and impair migration despite unchanged BMEC viability and metabolism. Combretastatins also caused downregulation of BMEC adhesion molecules known to tether AML cells, including vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. When AML-BMEC co-cultures were treated with combretastatins, a significantly greater proportion of AML cells dislodged from BMECs and entered the G2/M cell cycle, suggesting enhanced susceptibility to cell cycle agents. Indeed, the combination of combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy enhanced additive AML cell death. In vivo mice xenograft studies confirmed this finding by revealing complete AML regression after treatment with combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Beyond highlighting the pathologic role of BMECs in the leukemia microenvironment as a protective reservoir of disease, these results support a new strategy for using vascular-targeting combretastatins in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy to treat AML.

  8. Second line azacitidine for elderly or infirmed patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) not eligible for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation-a retrospective national multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ram, Ron; Gatt, Moshe; Merkel, Drorit; Helman, Ilana; Inbar, Tsofia; Nagler, Arnon; Avivi, Irit; Ofran, Yishai

    2017-04-01

    Elderly and infirm patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with either induction refractory or relapse disease may benefit from treatment with azacitidine. We retrospectively reviewed the data from five tertiary centers in Israel, treated between 2009 and 2015. Thirty-four patients (median age 74 years) were identified. Sixty-two percent of the patients had relapsed disease and 38% had refractory disease. Median time of follow-up was 12.1 months. Out of a total of 327 courses, incidence of infectious episodes was 6%. Eighteen percent experienced major bleeding. Thirty-two percent of the patients achieved morphologic complete remission, and 26% had stabilization of disease during at least three courses. At 12 and 18 months after the first course of azacitidine, 33 and 10% of the patients were progression-free, respectively. Incidences of overall survival at 12 and 24 months were 54.5 and 16%, respectively. Age <75 years was associated with better overall survival. Normal leukocyte count at the first dose of azacitidine and standard doses of azacitidine were both associated with a better progression-free and overall survival. We conclude that azacitidine is feasible in patients who have failed induction chemotherapy and may be associated with prolongation of survival. A prospective trial to validate these results is warranted.

  9. RUNX1/AML1 DNA-binding domain and ETO/MTG8 NHR2-dimerization domain are critical to AML1-ETO9a leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ming; Ahn, Eun-Young; Hiebert, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The 8;21 translocation, which involves the gene encoding the RUNX family DNA-binding transcription factor AML1 (RUNX1) on chromosome 21 and the ETO (MTG8) gene on chromosome 8, generates AML1-ETO fusion proteins. Previous analyses have demonstrated that full-length AML1-ETO blocks AML1 function and requires additional mutagenic events to promote leukemia. More recently, we have identified an alternatively spliced form of AML1-ETO, AML1-ETO9a, from t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. AML1-ETO9a lacks the C-terminal NHR3 and NHR4 domains of AML1-ETO and is highly leukemogenic in the mouse model. Here, we report that the AML1 DNA-binding domain and the ETO NHR2-dimerization domain, but not the ETO NHR1 domain, are critical for the induction of AML by AML1-ETO9a. A region between NHR1 and NHR2 affects latency of leukemogenesis. These results provide valuable insight into further analysis of the molecular mechanism of t(8;21) in leukemogenesis. PMID:19036704

  10. Ten uncommon and unusual variants of renal angiomyolipoma (AML): radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Schieda, N; Kielar, A Z; Al Dandan, O; McInnes, M D F; Flood, T A

    2015-02-01

    Classic (triphasic) renal angiomyolipoma (AML) is currently classified as a neoplasm of perivascular epithelioid cells. For diagnosis of AML, the use of thin-section non-contrast enhanced CT (NECT) improves diagnostic accuracy; however, identifying gross fat within a very small AML is challenging and often better performed with chemical-shift MRI. Although the presence of gross intra-tumoural fat is essentially diagnostic of AML; co-existing intra-tumoural fat and calcification may represent renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Differentiating AML from retroperitoneal sarcoma can be difficult when AML is large; the feeding vessel and claw signs are suggestive imaging findings. AML can haemorrhage, with intra-tumoural aneurysm size >5 mm a more specific predictor of future haemorrhage than tumor size >4 cm. Diagnosis of AML in the setting of acute haemorrhage is complex; comparison studies or follow-up imaging may be required. Not all AML contain gross fat and imaging features of AML without visible fat overlap with RCC; however, homogeneity, hyperdensity at NECT, low T2-weighted signal intensity and, microscopic fat are suggestive features. Patients with tuberous sclerosis often demonstrate a combination of classic and minimal fat AML, but are also at a slightly increased risk for RCC and should be imaged cautiously. Several rare pathological variants of AML exist including AML with epithelial cysts and epithelioid AML, which have distinct imaging characteristics. Classic AML, although benign, can be locally invasive and the rare epithelioid AML can be frankly malignant. The purpose of this review is to highlight the imaging manifestations of 10 uncommon and unusual variants of AML using pathological correlation.

  11. Stage I of Phase II study assessing efficacy, safety and tolerability of barasertib (AZD1152) versus LDAC in elderly AML patients

    PubMed Central

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; Martinelli, Giovanni; Jabbour, Elias J; Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Ando, Kiyoshi; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Wei, Andrew; Gröpper, Stefanie; Papayannidis, Cristina; Owen, Kate; Pike, Laura; Schmitt, Nicola; Stockman, Paul K; Giagounidis, Aristoteles

    2013-01-01

    Background This Phase II study evaluated the efficacy, safety and tolerability of the Aurora B kinase inhibitor barasertib, compared with low-dose cytosine arabinoside (LDAC), in patients aged ≥60 years with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methods Patients were randomized 2:1 to open-label barasertib 1200 mg (7-day iv infusion) or LDAC 20 mg (sc twice-daily for 10 days) in 28-day cycles. The primary endpoint was objective complete response rate (OCRR: CR + CRi [Cheson criteria, additionally requiring CRi reconfirmation ≥21 days after first appearance and associated with partial recovery of platelets and neutrophils]). Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS) and safety. Results 74 patients (barasertib, n=48; LDAC, n=26) completed ≥1 cycle. A significant improvement in OCRR was observed with barasertib (35.4% vs 11.5%; difference, 23.9% [95% CI, 2.7–39.9]; P<0.05). Although not formally sized to compare OS data, the median OS with barasertib was 8.2 months versus 4.5 months with LDAC. (HR=0.88, 95% CI, 0.49-1.58; P=0.663;). Stomatitis and febrile neutropenia were the most common adverse events with barasertib versus LDAC (71% vs 15%; 67% vs 19%, respectively). Conclusions Barasertib showed a significant improvement in OCRR versus LDAC, with a more toxic but manageable safety profile that was consistent with previous studies. Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00952588. PMID:23605952

  12. Safety and pharmacokinetics of the antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) LY2181308 as a single-agent or in combination with idarubicin and cytarabine in patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Erba, Harry P; Sayar, Hamid; Juckett, Mark; Lahn, Michael; Andre, Valerie; Callies, Sophie; Schmidt, Shelly; Kadam, Sunil; Brandt, John T; Van Bockstaele, Dirk; Andreeff, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Survivin is expressed in tumor cells, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), regulates mitosis, and prevents tumor cell death. The antisense oligonucleotide sodium LY2181308 (LY2181308) inhibits survivin expression and may cause cell cycle arrest and restore apoptosis in AML. In this study, the safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics/efficacy of LY2181308 was examined in AML patients, first in a cohort with monotherapy (n = 8) and then post-amendment in a cohort with the combination of cytarabine and idarubicin treatment (n = 16). LY2181308 was administered with a loading dosage of three consecutive daily infusions of 750 mg followed by weekly intravenous (IV) maintenance doses of 750 mg. Cytarabine 1.5 g/m(2) was administered as a 4-hour IV infusion on Days 3, 4, and 5 of Cycle 1, and idarubicin 12 mg/m(2) was administered as a 30-minute IV infusion on Days 3, 4, and 5 of Cycle 1. Cytarabine and idarubicin were administered on Days 1, 2, and 3 of each subsequent 28-day cycle. Reduction of survivin was evaluated in peripheral blasts and bone marrow. Single-agent LY2181308 was well tolerated and survivin was reduced only in patients with a high survivin expression. In combination with chemotherapy, 4/16 patients had complete responses, 1/16 patients had incomplete responses, and 4/16 patients had cytoreduction. Nine patients died on study: 6 (monotherapy), 3 (combination). LY2181308 alone is well tolerated in patients with AML. In combination with cytarabine and idarubicin, LY2181308 does not appear to cause additional toxicity, and has shown some clinical benefit needing confirmation in future clinical trials.

  13. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  14. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies. PMID:27870639

  15. In adults with t(8;21)AML, posttransplant RUNX1/RUNX1T1-based MRD monitoring, rather than c-KIT mutations, allows further risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Wu, De-Pei; Liu, Qi-Fa; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Wang, Jing-Bo; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Yan-Rong; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Chen, Jia; Dai, Min; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2014-09-18

    We asked whether minimal residual disease (MRD) determined by RUNX1/RUNX1T1 transcript levels could identify allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo- HSCT) t(8;21) (q22;q22) acute myeloid leukemia patients who are at high risk for relapse, together with the impact of c-KIT mutations. Ninety-two consecutive adult t(8;21) patients who received allo-HSCT in complete remission were enrolled. MRD status at 1, 2, and 3 months after HSCT identified relapse patients (P5.05, P < .001, P5.0001, respectively). The 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) was 32% vs 9% (P 5 .01) and 55% vs 70% (P 5 .12) for patients with and without c-KIT mutations, respectively. In multivariate analysis, MRD at the first 3 months after HSCT, rather than c-KIT mutations,was an independent factor for CIR (P5.001) and LFS(P5.001). In addition, 17 patients received donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) as interventional therapy for MRD, and the 2-year CIR and LFS for patients with or without DLI was 24% vs 87% (P5.001) and 64%vs 0%(P < .001), respectively. In conclusion, MRD monitoring early after transplant allows further rapid identification of t(8;21) patients at high risk of relapse and was more predictive of relapse risk than c-KIT mutations.

  16. The role of the proteasome in AML

    PubMed Central

    Csizmar, C M; Kim, D-H; Sachs, Z

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is deadly hematologic malignancy. Despite a well-characterized genetic and molecular landscape, targeted therapies for AML have failed to significantly improve clinical outcomes. Over the past decade, proteasome inhibition has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic strategy in several hematologic malignancies. Proteasome inhibitors, such as bortezomib and carfilzomib, have become mainstays of treatment for multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. In light of this success, there has been a surge of literature exploring both the role of the proteasome and the effects of proteasome inhibition in AML. Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that proteasome inhibition disrupts proliferative cell signaling pathways, exhibits cytotoxic synergism with other chemotherapeutics and induces autophagy of cancer-related proteins. Meanwhile, clinical trials incorporating bortezomib into combination chemotherapy regimens have reported a range of responses in AML patients, with complete remission rates >80% in some cases. Taken together, this preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that inhibition of the proteasome may be efficacious in this disease. In an effort to focus further investigation into this area, these recent studies and their findings are reviewed here. PMID:27911437

  17. Microenvironmental hypoxia regulates FLT3 expression and biology in AML.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Silvia; Wagner, Michaela; Kuett, Alexander; Drolle, Heidrun; Polzer, Harald; Spiekermann, Karsten; Rieger, Christina; Fiegl, Michael

    2015-11-30

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase constitutively expressed by acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) blasts. In addition, 25% of AML patients harbour a FLT3-ITD mutation, associated with inferior outcome due to increased relapse rate. Relapse might be propagated by interactions between AML blasts and the bone marrow microenvironment. Besides cellular elements of the microenvironment (e.g. mesenchymal stromal cells), bone marrow hypoxia has emerged as an additional crucial component. Hence, effects of hypoxia on FLT3 expression and biology could provide novel insight into AML biology. Here we show that 25% of AML patients down-regulate FLT3 expression on blasts in response to in vitro hypoxia (1% O2), which was independent of its mutational state. While virtually no AML cell lines regulate FLT3 in response to hypoxia, the down-regulation could be observed in Ba/F3 cells stably transfected with different FLT3 mutants. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation was specific for FLT3, reversible and proteasome-dependent; with FLT3 half-life being significantly shorter at hypoxia. Also, PI-3K inhibition could partially abrogate down-regulation of FLT3. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation of FLT3 conferred resistance against cytarabine in vitro. In conclusion, FLT3 expression in AML is dependent on the oxygen partial pressure, but response to hypoxia differs.

  18. IS THE AMPLIFICATION OF c-MYC, MLL AND RUNX1 GENES IN AML AND MDS PATIENTS WITH TRISOMY 8, 11 AND 21 A FACTOR FOR A CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THEIR KARYOTYPE?

    PubMed

    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was 1) to define if the amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes is related to the progressive changes of the karyotype in patients with AML and MDS with trisomy 8, 11 and 21 (+8, +11 and +21) in bone marrow and 2) can that amplification be accepted as part of the clonal evolution (CE). Karyotype analysis was performed in 179 patients with AML or MDS with the different chromosomal aberrations (CA) aged 16-81. The findings were distributed as follow: initiating balanced CA (n = 60), aneuploidia (n = 55), unbalanced CA (n = 64). Amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was found in 35% (7 out of 20) of AML and MDS patients with +8, +11 u +21 as single CA in their karyotype; in 63.6% of pts (7 out of 11)--with additional numerical or structural CA and in 75% (9 out of 12)--with complex karyotype. We assume that the amplification of the respective chromosomal regions in patients with +8, +11 and +21 is related to CE. Considering the amplification as a factor of CE, we established 3 patterns of karyotype development depending on the type of the initiating CA in it. Significant statistical differences were found between the three patterns regarding the karyotype distribution in the different stages of progression (p < 0.001).

  19. Patient age, remission status and HCT-CI in a combined score are prognostic for patients with AML undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in CR1 and CR2.

    PubMed

    Michelis, F V; Messner, H A; Atenafu, E G; McGillis, L; Lambie, A; Uhm, J; Alam, N; Seftel, M D; Gupta, V; Kuruvilla, J; Lipton, J H; Kim, D D

    2015-11-01

    For AML, older age, advanced disease and increased hematopoietic cell transplant comorbidity index (HCT-CI) are associated with worse prognosis following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This single-center retrospective study investigated the influence of pre-transplant characteristics on outcomes of 387 patients undergoing allogeneic HCT for AML in CR1 and CR2. The multivariable analysis model for overall survival (OS) included age (hazard ratio (HR)=2.24 for ages 31-64 years and HR=3.23 for age ⩾65 years compared with age ⩽30 years, P=0.003), remission status (HR=1.49 for CR2 compared with CR1, P=0.005) and HCT-CI score (HR=1.47 for ⩾3 compared with <3, P=0.005). Transplant year was significantly associated with OS (P=0.001) but this did not influence the model. A weighted score was developed with age ⩽30, CR1 and HCT-CI score <3 receiving 0 points each, and CR2 and HCT-CI score ⩾3 receiving 1 point each. Ages 31-64 received 2 points, age ⩾65 received 3 points. Scores were grouped as follows: scores 0-1 (low risk, n=36), score 2 (intermediate-low risk, n=147), score 3 (intermediate-high risk, n=141) and scores 4-5 (high risk, n=63) with 3-year OS of 71%, 55%, 42% and 29% for scores 0-1, 2, 3 and 4-5, respectively (P<0.0001). The score predicted nonrelapse mortality (P=0.03) but not cumulative incidence of relapse (P=0.18). This model should be validated for the pre-HCT assessment of AML patients in CR1 and CR2.

  20. Rare CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts in AML with inv(16)/t(16;16) are associated with therapy-related AML M4eo, atypical cytomorphology, atypical immunophenotype, atypical additional chromosomal rearrangements and low white blood cell count: a study on 162 patients.

    PubMed

    Schnittger, S; Bacher, U; Haferlach, C; Kern, W; Haferlach, T

    2007-04-01

    The spectrum of CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) M4eo with inv(16)/t(16;16) is heterogeneous. Approximately 85% show type A CBFB-MYH11 fusion transcripts. In addition, more than 10 different fusion transcripts have been reported. The prognostic impact and biological background of rare fusion transcripts remain open. In this study, a molecular characterization of CBFB-MYH11 transcripts in 162 patients with CBFB-MYH11 positive AML at diagnosis was performed. In total, 128 patients (79.0%) showed the fusion transcript type A, whereas nine different rare CBFB-MYH11 fusion genes were detected in 34 cases (21.0%). Rare fusion transcripts were found more frequently in therapy-related AML (P=0.0106). Numerical gains of the chromosomes 8, 21 and 22 were more frequently associated with type A (28.3%) than with rare fusions (12.9%) (P=0.012). Median white blood cell (WBC) count was higher in type A (35.4 G/l; range=1.1-279 G/l) than in cases with rare types (7.8 G/l; range=0.8-148.0 G/l) (P<0.0001). Rare fusion transcripts were correlated with an atypical cytomorphology not primarily suggestive for the FAB subtype M4eo (P=0.0203). Immunophenotype revealed lower CD2, CD13, CD33 and CD90 levels than in type A fusion cases (P=0.036, 0.002, 0.029 and 0.045, respectively). However, the type of fusion was not an independent prognostic parameter.

  1. Natural killer cell immunosenescence in acute myeloid leukaemia patients: new targets for immunotherapeutic strategies?

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Correa, Beatriz; Campos, Carmen; Pera, Alejandra; Bergua, Juan M; Arcos, Maria Jose; Bañas, Helena; Casado, Javier G; Morgado, Sara; Duran, Esther; Solana, Rafael; Tarazona, Raquel

    2016-04-01

    Several age-associated changes in natural killer (NK) cell phenotype have been reported that contribute to the defective NK cell response observed in elderly patients. A remodelling of the NK cell compartment occurs in the elderly with a reduction in the output of immature CD56(bright) cells and an accumulation of highly differentiated CD56(dim) NK cells. Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is generally a disease of older adults. NK cells in AML patients show diminished expression of several activating receptors that contribute to impaired NK cell function and, in consequence, to AML blast escape from NK cell immunosurveillance. In AML patients, phenotypic changes in NK cells have been correlated with disease progression and survival. NK cell-based immunotherapy has emerged as a possibility for the treatment of AML patients. The understanding of age-associated alterations in NK cells is therefore necessary to define adequate therapeutic strategies in older AML patients.

  2. Update on rational targeted therapy in AML

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Danielle; Grant, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenge to both patients and clinicians. Despite improvements in our understanding of the disease, treatment has changed minimally and outcomes remain poor for the majority of patients. Within the last decade, there have been an increasing number of potential targets and pathways identified for development in AML. The classes of agents described in this review include but are not limited to epigenetic modifiers such as IDH inhibitors, BET inhibitors, and HDAC inhibitors as well as cell cycle and signaling inhibitors such as Aurora kinase inhibitors and CDK inhibitors. While the developments are encouraging, it is unlikely that targeting a single pathway will result in long-term disease control. Accordingly, we will also highlight potential rational partners for the novel agents described herein. PMID:26972558

  3. Update on rational targeted therapy in AML.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Danielle; Grant, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenge to both patients and clinicians. Despite improvements in our understanding of the disease, treatment has changed minimally and outcomes remain poor for the majority of patients. Within the last decade, there have been an increasing number of potential targets and pathways identified for development in AML. The classes of agents described in this review include but are not limited to epigenetic modifiers such as IDH inhibitors, BET inhibitors, and HDAC inhibitors as well as cell cycle and signaling inhibitors such as Aurora kinase inhibitors and CDK inhibitors. While the developments are encouraging, it is unlikely that targeting a single pathway will result in long-term disease control. Accordingly, we will also highlight potential rational partners for the novel agents described herein.

  4. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S.; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R.; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E.; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M. Eileen; Kogan, Scott C.; Downing, James R.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients. PMID:19339691

  5. Mouse models of human AML accurately predict chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Johannes; Radtke, Ina; Pardee, Timothy S; Zhao, Zhen; Rappaport, Amy R; Luo, Weijun; McCurrach, Mila E; Yang, Miao-Miao; Dolan, M Eileen; Kogan, Scott C; Downing, James R; Lowe, Scott W

    2009-04-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of cancer influences the trajectory of tumor progression and may underlie clinical variation in therapy response. To model such heterogeneity, we produced genetically and pathologically accurate mouse models of common forms of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and developed methods to mimic standard induction chemotherapy and efficiently monitor therapy response. We see that murine AMLs harboring two common human AML genotypes show remarkably diverse responses to conventional therapy that mirror clinical experience. Specifically, murine leukemias expressing the AML1/ETO fusion oncoprotein, associated with a favorable prognosis in patients, show a dramatic response to induction chemotherapy owing to robust activation of the p53 tumor suppressor network. Conversely, murine leukemias expressing MLL fusion proteins, associated with a dismal prognosis in patients, are drug-resistant due to an attenuated p53 response. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic information in guiding the treatment of human AML, functionally establish the p53 network as a central determinant of chemotherapy response in AML, and demonstrate that genetically engineered mouse models of human cancer can accurately predict therapy response in patients.

  6. The leukemogenic t(8;21) fusion protein AML1-ETO controls ribosomal RNA genes and associates with nucleolar organizing regions at mitotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Rachit; Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Pande, Sandhya; Hassan, Mohammad Q.; Young, Daniel W.; Lian, Jane B.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY RUNX1/AML1 is required for definitive hematopoiesis and is frequently targeted by chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemias (AML). The t(8;21) related AML1-ETO fusion protein blocks differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Here, we show by immunofluorescence microscopy that during interphase, endogenous AML1-ETO localizes to nuclear microenvironments distinct from those containing native RUNX1/AML1 protein. At mitosis, we clearly detect binding of AML1-ETO to nucleolar organizing regions (NORs) in AML derived Kasumi-1 cells and binding of RUNX1/AML1 to NORs in Jurkat cells. Both RUNX1/AML1 and AML1-ETO occupy ribosomal DNA repeats during interphase, as well as interact with the endogenous RNA Pol I transcription factor UBF-1. Promoter cytosine methylation analysis indicates that RUNX1/AML1 binds to rDNA repeats that are more highly CpG methylated than those bound by AML1-ETO. Down-regulation by RNA interference reveals that RUNX1/AML1 negatively regulates rDNA transcription, while AML1-ETO is a positive regulator in Kasumi-1 cells. Taken together, our findings identify a novel role for the leukemia-related AML1-ETO protein in epigenetic control of cell growth through upregulation of RNA Pol I-mediated ribosomal gene transcription, consistent with the hyper-proliferative phenotype of myeloid cells in AML patients. PMID:19001502

  7. De novo AML patients with favourable-intermediate karyotype may benefit from the addition of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) to fludarabine, Ara-C and idarubicin (FLAI): a contribution to the reopened "GO question".

    PubMed

    Clavio, Marino; Cruciani, Fabio; Minetto, Paola; Guolo, Fabio; Ballerini, Filippo; Marani, Carlo; De Astis, Enrico; Aquino, Sara; Bergamaschi, Micaela; Mitscheunig, Laura; Grasso, Raffaella; Colombo, Nicoletta; Ghiggi, Chiara; Lovera, Davide; Pastori, Giordana; Avenoso, Daniele; Miglino, Maurizio; Gobbi, Marco

    2013-10-01

    We report the final results of a prospective trial testing the combination of fludarabine, Ara-C and idarubicin (FLAI) followed by low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (FLAI-GO) in 85 patients aged 60 years or more with CD33+ acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Median age was 68 years (60-82); karyotype was unfavourable in 21 patients (24%), intermediate in 63 (74%) and favourable in 1 (2%). There were five therapy-related deaths. Of the 80 evaluable patients, 47 achieved complete response (CR) (58%); CR rates were 65 and 32% in good-intermediate/poor karyotype patients, respectively. Median length of CR was 7 months (3-76). The cumulative incidence of relapse was 84% with an actuarial survival of 50.3% at 1 year and 14.4% at 2 years. The study control population is an unselected consecutive historic cohort of 104 patients treated with the FLAI regimen, who were matched for age and prognostic factors. CR rates after FLAI-GO and FLAI were comparable. However, patients with de novo AML and intermediate-favourable karyotype receiving GO had a significantly lower risk of relapse at 2 years as compared to patients not receiving GO (n = 77) (40 vs 80%, p = 0.01) and significantly better disease-free survival (p = 0.018) and overall survival (p = 0.022).

  8. Bone marrow cellularity at day 14 is the most important predictive factor for response in patients with AML who require double-induction chemotherapy: Analysis from a large, single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Patrick T; Komrokji, Rami S; Sweet, Kendra; Al Ali, Najla H; Padron, Eric; Kubal, Timothy E; List, Alan F; Lancet, Jeffrey E

    2017-03-01

    In patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the presence of residual disease at day 14 after primary induction therapy warrants consideration of a second induction cycle. However, data to guide retreatment decisions in such patients are presently limited. Here, we retrospectively reviewed data from 176 patients with AML treated at our institution with a second induction chemotherapy regimen because of day 14 residual disease. Clinical variables and nadir bone marrow features were assessed for correlations with complete remission (CR) and overall survival (OS). In our patient group, 59% achieved CR after a second induction course. Median OS for the entire group was 12.40 months (95% CI, 9.90-14.90) but 19.07 months (95% CI, 13.13-25.01) for those who attained a CR. Nadir marrow hypocellularity (P < 0.001) at day 14, absolute blast reduction of >50% (P = 0.030), and de novo disease status (P = 0.018) were significantly correlated with CR achievement after re-induction. Marrow hypocellularity at day 14 was the most significant predictor of CR on multivariate analysis (P < 0.001). Nadir marrow features did not independently correlate with OS when accounting for CR status. Re-induction was successful in achieving CR in most patients. Study patients who did not achieve CR were more likely to have nonhypocellular marrows.

  9. Alkylator-Induced and Patient-Derived Xenograft Mouse Models of Therapy-Related Myeloid Neoplasms Model Clinical Disease and Suggest the Presence of Multiple Cell Subpopulations with Leukemia Stem Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carl; Gratzinger, Dita; Majeti, Ravindra

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive bone marrow cancers arising from transformed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Therapy-related AML and MDS (t-AML/MDS) comprise a subset of AML cases occurring after exposure to alkylating chemotherapy and/or radiation and are associated with a very poor prognosis. Less is known about the pathogenesis and disease-initiating/leukemia stem cell (LSC) subpopulations of t-AML/MDS compared to their de novo counterparts. Here, we report the development of mouse models of t-AML/MDS. First, we modeled alkylator-induced t-AML/MDS by exposing wild type adult mice to N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea (ENU), resulting in several models of AML and MDS that have clinical and pathologic characteristics consistent with human t-AML/MDS including cytopenia, myelodysplasia, and shortened overall survival. These models were limited by their inability to transplant clinically aggressive disease. Second, we established three patient-derived xenograft models of human t-AML. These models led to rapidly fatal disease in recipient immunodeficient xenografted mice. LSC activity was identified in multiple HSPC subpopulations suggesting there is no canonical LSC immunophenotype in human t-AML. Overall, we report several new t-AML/MDS mouse models that could potentially be used to further define disease pathogenesis and test novel therapeutics. PMID:27428079

  10. The molecular signature of AML mesenchymal stromal cells reveals candidate genes related to the leukemogenic process.

    PubMed

    Binato, Renata; de Almeida Oliveira, Nathalia Correa; Du Rocher, Barbara; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by myeloid precursor proliferation in the bone marrow, apoptosis reduction and differentiation arrest. Although there are several studies in this field, events related to disease initiation and progression remain unknown. The malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is thought to generate leukemic stem cells, and this transformation could be related to changes in mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) signaling. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the gene expression profile of hMSC from AML patients (hMSC-AML) compared to healthy donors hMSCs (hMSC-HD). The results showed a common molecular signature for all hMSC-AML. Other assays were performed with a large number of patients and the results confirmed a molecular signature that is capable of distinguishing hMSC-AML from hMSC-HD. Moreover, CCL2 and BMP4 genes encode secreted proteins that could affect HSCs. To verify whether these proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, ELISA was performed with plasma samples. CCL2 and BMP4 proteins are differentially expressed in AML patients, indicating changes in hMSC-AML signaling. Altogether, hMSCs-AML signaling alterations could be an important factor in the leukemic transformation process.

  11. Dendritic cells (DCs) can be successfully generated from leukemic blasts in individual patients with AML or MDS: an evaluation of different methods.

    PubMed

    Kremser, Andreas; Dressig, Julia; Grabrucker, Christine; Liepert, Anja; Kroell, Tanja; Scholl, Nina; Schmid, Christoph; Tischer, Johanna; Kufner, Stefanie; Salih, Helmut; Kolb, Hans Jochem; Schmetzer, Helga

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-leukemic cells (AML, MDS, CML) can be differentiated to leukemia-derived dendritic cell [DC (DCleu)] potentially presenting the whole leukemic antigen repertoire without knowledge of distinct leukemia antigens and are regarded as promising candidates for a vaccination strategy. We studied the capability of 6 serum-free DC culture methods, chosen according to different mechanisms, to induce DC differentiation in 137 cases of AML and 52 cases of MDS. DC-stimulating substances were cytokines ("standard-medium", "MCM-Mimic", "cytokine-method"), bacterial lysates ("Picibanil"), double-stranded RNA ["Poly (I:C)"] or a cytokine bypass method ("Ca-ionophore"). The quality/quantity of DC generated was estimated by flow cytometry studying (co) expressions of "DC"antigens, costimulatory, maturation, and blast-antigens. Comparing these methods on average 15% to 32% DC, depending on methods used, could be obtained from blast-containing mononuclear cells (MNC) in AML/MDS cases with a DC viability of more than 60%. In all, 39% to 64% of these DC were mature; 31% to 52% of leukemic blasts could be converted to DCleu and DCleu-proportions in the suspension were 2% to 70% (13%). Average results of all culture methods tested were comparable, however not every given case of AML could be differentiated to DC with 1 selected method. However performing a pre-analysis with 3 DC-generating methods (MCM-Mimic, Picibanil, Ca-ionophore) we could generate DC in any given case. Functional analyses provided proof, that DC primed T cells to antileukemia-directed cytotoxic cells, although an anti-leukemic reaction was not achieved in every case. In summary our data show that a successful, quantitative DC/DCleu generation is possible with the best of 3 previously tested methods in any given case. Reasons for different functional behaviors of DC-primed T cells must be evaluated to design a practicable DC-based vaccination strategy.

  12. Emerging therapeutic drugs for AML

    PubMed Central

    Tallman, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple new drugs are being developed to treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), including novel formulations of traditional chemotherapy-antibody drug conjugates and agents that target specific mutant enzymes. Next-generation sequencing has allowed us to discover the genetic mutations that lead to the development and clinical progression of AML. Studies of clonal hierarchy suggest which mutations occur early and dominate. This has led to targeted therapy against mutant driver proteins as well as the development of drugs such as CPX-351 and SGN-CD33A whose mechanisms of action and efficacy may not be dependent on mutational complexity. In this brief review, we discuss drugs that may emerge as important for the treatment of AML in the next 10 years. PMID:26660428

  13. CD56 and RUNX1 isoforms in AML prognosis and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Z A; Motabi, Ibraheem H; Al-Shanqeeti, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM/CD56) expression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been associated with extramedullary leukemia, multidrug resistance, shorter remission and survival. Recently, Bloomfield et al. published a succinct review of issues surrounding the AML prognostication and current therapeutics. However, we want to reiterate the prognostic value and therapeutic potential of CD56 that is frequently expressed in AML as was also reported by their own group earlier. In addition, novel RUNX1 isoforms contribute in controlling CD56 expression in AML cells. Anti-CD56 antibody therapy deserves exploration as an arsenal against AML patients expressing CD56. Relevantly, targeting RNA splicing machinery or RUNX1 isoform-specific siRNA may also become part of future therapeutic strategies for AML with CD56 overexpression.

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  15. Results of a phase II study of thalidomide and azacitidine in patients with clinically advanced myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and low blast count acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Kenealy, Melita; Patton, Nigel; Filshie, Robin; Nicol, Andrew; Ho, Shir-Jing; Hertzberg, Mark; Mills, Tony; Prosser, Ian; Link, Emma; Cowan, Linda; Zannino, Diana; Seymour, John F

    2017-02-01

    Single agent azacitidine or immunomodulatory drugs are effective in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), with differing target mechanisms and toxicities. Objectives of this ALLG MDS3 study in clinically advanced MDS, AMML and low blast AML were to establish safety, response and quality of life of azacitidine and thalidomide. Patients received azacitidine (75mg/m(2)/d sc 7days every 28 days), and oral thalidomide up to 100mg/d for maximum 12months. Eighty patients registered; median age 68 years (range 42-82), 49% IPSS int2-high. With 36.5 months follow up, patients received median 9 cycles azacitidine, 6.1mths thalidomide. Nonhematologic toxicity grade 3+ in 85%, commonly infections. Overall response rate was 63%; 26% CR were unaffected by IPSS. Median response duration 26.3months; overall survival was 28.1months. This combination azacitidine and thalidomide in clinically advanced MDS, CMML and low-blast AML was tolerable without unexpected toxicity and encouraging responses support further investigation of combination approaches with hypomethylating agent and immunomodulatory drug.

  16. An Alternative Sugar Fuels AML.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Rob A; Mak, Tak W

    2016-11-14

    Although altered glucose metabolism is a well-studied feature of malignant cells, little is known about the direct metabolism of fructose. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Chen et al. report that AML cells consume fructose and use it to maintain viability, especially when glucose is scarce.

  17. MCM7 polymorphisms associated with the AML relapse and overall survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Sol; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Koh, Youngil; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex component 7 (MCM7) encodes a member of MCM complex, which plays a critical role in the initiation of gene replication. Due to the importance of MCM complex, MCM7 gene has been regarded as a candidate gene for cancer development. In the present study, seven MCM7 polymorphisms were genotyped in 344 subjects composed of 103 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and 241 normal controls to examine the possible associations between MCM7 polymorphisms and the risk of AML. MCM7 polymorphisms were not associated with the risk of AML (P > 0.05). However, MCM7 polymorphisms were significantly related to the relapse of AML and overall survival. The rs2070215 (N144S) showed a protective effect to the risk of AML relapse (OR = 0.37; P (corr) = 0.02). In haplotype analyses, the ht1 and ht2 showed significant associations with the risk of AML relapse (P (corr) = 0.02-0.03). In addition, rs1534309 showed an association with the overall survival of AML patients. Patients with major homozygote genotype (CC) of rs1534309 showed a higher survival rate than the patients with other genotypes (CG and GG). The results of the present study indicate that MCM7 polymorphisms may be able to predict the prognosis of AML patients.

  18. MPL expression on AML blasts predicts peripheral blood neutropenia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Philipp J; Ellegast, Jana M; Widmer, Corinne C; Fritsch, Kristin; Goede, Jeroen S; Valk, Peter J M; Löwenberg, Bob; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Manz, Markus G

    2016-11-03

    Although the molecular pathways that cause acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are increasingly well understood, the pathogenesis of peripheral blood cytopenia, a major cause of AML mortality, remains obscure. A prevailing assumption states that AML spatially displaces nonleukemic hematopoiesis from the bone marrow. However, examining an initial cohort of 223 AML patients, we found no correlation between bone marrow blast content and cytopenia, questioning the displacement theory. Measuring serum concentration of thrombopoietin (TPO), a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cells and megakaryocytes, revealed loss of physiologic negative correlation with platelet count in AML cases with blasts expressing MPL, the thrombopoietin (scavenging) receptor. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that MPL(hi) blasts could indeed clear TPO, likely therefore leading to insufficient cytokine levels for nonleukemic hematopoiesis. Microarray analysis in an independent multicenter study cohort of 437 AML cases validated MPL expression as a central predictor of thrombocytopenia and neutropenia in AML. Moreover, t(8;21) AML cases demonstrated the highest average MPL expression and lowest average platelet and absolute neutrophil counts among subgroups. Our work thus explains the pathophysiology of peripheral blood cytopenia in a relevant number of AML cases.

  19. The clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of MN1 gene and MN1-associated microRNA expression in adult patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lili; Li, Man; Liu, Yan; Cen, Jiangnong; Chen, Zixing; Zhen, Xiao; Xie, Xiaobao; Cao, Xiangshan; Gu, Weiying

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of the meningioma 1 (MN1) gene and MN1-associated microRNA expression in Chinese adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. The expression level of MN1, microRNA-20 (miR-20a), and microRNA-181b (miR-181b) in bone marrow mononuclear cells was measured in 158 newly diagnosed AML patients and 20 cases of normal healthy donors by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. All AML patients significantly overexpressed MN1 at the level of 0.01983 (P < 0.001) compared with normal controls. High MN1 expression was associated with spleen involvement (P = 0.037), NPM1 wild type (P = 0.001), lower miR-20a expression levels (P = 0.015), and higher miR-181b expression levels (P = 0.035). MiR-20a (P = 0.029) and miR-181b (P = 0.017) overexpressed in the bone marrow cells of patients with certain subtypes of AML compared with healthy donors. High MN1 expressers had lower complete remission (CR) rates and shorter overall survival (OS) within the Southwest Oncology Group classification. In multivariable models, high MN1 expression was associated with worse CR rates (P = 0.01), relapse-free survival (RFS; P = 0.02), and OS (P = 0.02); high miR-20a expression was associated with higher CR rates (P = 0.008) and longer OS (P = 0.04), whereas high miR-181b expression was associated with lower CR rates (P = 0.03), and shorter RFS (P = 0.045) and OS (P = 0.017). High MN1 expression confers worse prognosis in Chinese adult patients with de novo AML. MN1 gene and MN1-associated microRNAs provide clinical prognosis of AML patients and may refine their molecular risk classification.

  20. GFI1 as a novel prognostic and therapeutic factor for AML/MDS.

    PubMed

    Hönes, J M; Botezatu, L; Helness, A; Vadnais, C; Vassen, L; Robert, F; Hergenhan, S M; Thivakaran, A; Schütte, J; Al-Matary, Y S; Lams, R F; Fraszscak, J; Makishima, H; Radivoyevitch, T; Przychodzen, B; da Conceição Castro, S V; Görgens, A; Giebel, B; Klein-Hitpass, L; Lennartz, K; Heuser, M; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Dührsen, U; Maciejewski, J P; Möröy, T; Khandanpour, C

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and epigenetic aberrations contribute to the initiation and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). GFI1, a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor, exerts its function by recruiting histone deacetylases to target genes. We present data that low expression of GFI1 is associated with an inferior prognosis of AML patients. To elucidate the mechanism behind this, we generated a humanized mouse strain with reduced GFI1 expression (GFI1-KD). Here we show that AML development induced by onco-fusion proteins such as MLL-AF9 or NUP98-HOXD13 is accelerated in mice with low human GFI1 expression. Leukemic cells from animals that express low levels of GFI1 show increased H3K9 acetylation compared to leukemic cells from mice with normal human GFI1 expression, resulting in the upregulation of genes involved in leukemogenesis. We investigated a new epigenetic therapy approach for this subgroup of AML patients. We could show that AML blasts from GFI1-KD mice and from AML patients with low GFI1 levels were more sensitive to treatment with histone acetyltransferase inhibitors than cells with normal GFI1 expression levels. We suggest therefore that GFI1 has a dose-dependent role in AML progression and development. GFI1 levels are involved in epigenetic regulation, which could open new therapeutic approaches for AML patients.

  1. Isoform-Specific Potentiation of Stem and Progenitor Cell Engraftment by AML1/RUNX1

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Shinobu; Hong, Dengli; Gupta, Rajeev; Matsuo, Keitaro; Seto, Masao; Enver, Tariq

    2007-01-01

    Background AML1/RUNX1 is the most frequently mutated gene in leukaemia and is central to the normal biology of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the role of different AML1 isoforms within these primitive compartments is unclear. Here we investigate whether altering relative expression of AML1 isoforms impacts the balance between cell self-renewal and differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Findings The human AML1a isoform encodes a truncated molecule with DNA-binding but no transactivation capacity. We used a retrovirus-based approach to transduce AML1a into primitive haematopoietic cells isolated from the mouse. We observed that enforced AML1a expression increased the competitive engraftment potential of murine long-term reconstituting stem cells with the proportion of AML1a-expressing cells increasing over time in both primary and secondary recipients. Furthermore, AML1a expression dramatically increased primitive and committed progenitor activity in engrafted animals as assessed by long-term culture, cobblestone formation, and colony assays. In contrast, expression of the full-length isoform AML1b abrogated engraftment potential. In vitro, AML1b promoted differentiation while AML1a promoted proliferation of progenitors capable of short-term lymphomyeloid engraftment. Consistent with these findings, the relative abundance of AML1a was highest in the primitive stem/progenitor compartment of human cord blood, and forced expression of AML1a in these cells enhanced maintenance of primitive potential both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the “a” isoform of AML1 has the capacity to potentiate stem and progenitor cell engraftment, both of which are required for successful clinical transplantation. This activity is consistent with its expression pattern in both normal and leukaemic cells. Manipulating the balance of AML1 isoform expression may offer novel therapeutic strategies, exploitable in the contexts of

  2. Molecular Changes During Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Evolution and Identification of Novel Treatment Strategies Through Molecular Stratification.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, E; Repasky, G A

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic malignancy characterized by impaired differentiation and uncontrollable proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells. Due to high relapse rates, overall survival for this rapidly progressing disease is poor. The significant challenge in AML treatment is disease heterogeneity stemming from variability in maturation state of leukemic cells of origin, genetic aberrations among patients, and existence of multiple disease clones within a single patient. Disease heterogeneity and the lack of biomarkers for drug sensitivity lie at the root of treatment failure as well as selective efficacy of AML chemotherapies and the emergence of drug resistance. Furthermore, standard-of-care treatment is aggressive, presenting significant tolerability concerns to the commonly advanced-age AML patient. In this review, we examine the concept and potential of molecular stratification, particularly with biologically relevant drug responses, in identifying low-toxicity precision therapeutic combinations and clinically relevant biomarkers for AML patient care as a way to overcome these challenges in AML treatment.

  3. Cytidine deaminase polymorphisms and worse treatment response in normal karyotype AML.

    PubMed

    Hyo Kim, Lyoung; Sub Cheong, Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Lee, Chansu; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Doo Shin, Hyoung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The cytidine deaminase (CDA) catalyzes the irreversible hydrolytic deamination of the cytarabine (AraC) into a 1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (AraU), an inactive metabolite that plays a crucial role in lowering the amount of AraC, a key chemotherapeutic drug, in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we hypothesized that CDA polymorphisms were associated with the AraC metabolism for AML treatment and/or related clinical phenotypes. We analyzed 16 polymorphisms of CDA among 50 normal karyotype AML (NK-AML) patients, 45 abnormal karyotype AML (AK-AML) patients and 241 normal controls (NC). Several polymorphisms and haplotypes, rs532545, rs2072671, rs471760, rs4655226, rs818194 and CDA-ht3, were found to have a strong correlation with NK-AML compared with NC and these polymorphisms also revealed strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. Among them, rs2072671 (79A>C), which is located in a coding region and the resultant amino acid change K27Q, showed significant associations with NK-AML compared with NC (P=0.009 and odds ratio=2.44 in the dominant model). The AC and CC genotypes of rs2072671 (79A>C) were significantly correlated with shorter overall survival rates (P=0.03, hazard ratio=1.84) and first complete remission duration (P=0.007, hazard ratio=3.24) compared with the AA genotype in the NK-AML patients. Our results indicate that rs2072671 in CDA may be an important prognostic marker in NK-AML patients.

  4. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  5. [Proportion of CD34(+)CD38(-) cell population in bone marrow of patients with de novo AML as prognostic factor of complete remission at first course of induction chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cui-Ping; Wei, Hui; Wang, Hui-Jun; Huai, Lei; He, Kan; Chen, Yi-Rui; Lin, Dong; Wang, Jian-Xiang

    2011-10-01

    This study was to investigate the relationship between the CD34(+)CD38(-) cell population and its proportion in G(0) phase of de novo AML non-M(3) at diagnosis and the clinical and experimental characteristics. The flow cytometry was used to detect the expression of the cell surface antigen CD34 and CD38 in the bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) of the AML non-M(3) at diagnosis and investigate the cell cycle of the subpopulations, and then the relationships between the proportion of CD34(+)CD38(-)cell population and its G(0) state and the complete remission (CR) rate after the first induction chemotherapy was analyzed. The results showed that the proportion of the CD34(+)CD38(-) cell population and its G(0) phase had no relationship with the karyotypes and WBC count at new diagnosis and the Flt3/ITD status, but correlate with the blasts in the bone marrow after the first course induction chemotherapy. The proportion of the CD34(+)CD38(-) cells in patients who have visible blasts in the bone marrow at day 7 after completion of the first course induction chemotherapy was (12.47 ± 26.26)%, but the counterparts was (2.62 ± 7.20)% in the group of patients whose bone marrow had no visible blasts (p = 0.031). The proportion of the CD34(+) cell population in patients who had visible blasts in the bone marrow at day 1 after completion of the first course induction chemotherapy was (17.40 ± 21.20)%, yet the proportion of the CD34(+) cell populations was (5.64 ± 6.96)% in the patients who had no visible blasts in the bone marrow (p = 0.001). The proportion of the CD34(+)CD38(-) cell populations in the patients who achieved CR after the first course induction chemotherapy was (2.51 ± 9.72)%, which was lower than the proportion (24.92 ± 27.04%) of the non-CR patients (p = 0.001). Furthermore, the proportion (1.60 ± 4.82%) of the CD34(+)CD38(-) cell population in the AML non-M(2b) CR patients was more obviously lower than that in the non-CR patients (p < 0.001). In

  6. Generating Peripheral Blood Derived Lymphocytes Reacting Against Autologous Primary AML Blasts.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Chen, Xiaohua; Antony, Jeyaraj; Boyiadzis, Michael; Szabolcs, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Expanding on our prior studies with cord blood T cells, we hypothesized that primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-reactive autologous T cells could be generated ex vivo under immunomodulatory conditions. We purified AML and T cells from 8 newly diagnosed high-risk patients. After 2 weeks expansion, T cells were stimulated with interferon-γ-treated autologous AML weekly × 3, interleukin-15, and agonistic anti-CD28 antibody. Cytotoxic T cells and ELISpot assays tested functionality; reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction tested AML and T-cell gene expression profiles. On the basis of combined positive ELIspot and cytotoxic T cells assays, T cells reactive against AML were generated in 5 of 8 patients. Treg proportion declined after cocultures in reactive T-cell samples. AML-reactive T cells displayed an activated gene expression profile. "Resistant" AML blasts displayed genes associated with immunosuppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We discuss our approach to creating primary AML-reactive autologous T cell and limitations that require further work. Our study provides a platform for future research targeting on generating autologous leukemia-reactive T cells.

  7. Generating Peripheral Blood Derived Lymphocytes Reacting Against Autologous Primary AML Blasts

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; Chen, Xiaohua; Antony, Jeyaraj; Boyiadzis, Michael; Szabolcs, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Expanding on our prior studies with cord blood T-cells, we hypothesized that primary AML-reactive autologous T-cells could be generated ex vivo under immunomodulatory conditions. We purified AML and T-cells from 8 newly diagnosed high-risk patients. After 2 weeks expansion, T-cells were stimulated with IFN-γ treated autologous AML weekly X 3, IL-15 and agonistic anti-CD28 antibody. CTL and ELISpot assays tested functionality; RT-qPCR tested AML and T-cell gene expression profiles. Based on combined positive ELIspot and CTL assays, T-cells reactive against AML were generated in 5/8 patients. Treg proportion declined post-co-cultures in reactive T-cell samples. AML-reactive T-cells displayed an activated gene expression profile. “Resistant” AML blasts displayed genes associated with immunosuppressive MDSC. We discuss our approach to creating primary AML-reactive autologous T-cell and limitations that require further work. Our study provides a platform for future research targeting on generating autologous leukemia reactive T-cells. PMID:26849076

  8. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  9. How I treat FLT3-mutated AML

    PubMed Central

    Pratz, Keith W.

    2017-01-01

    FLT3-mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML), despite not being recognized as a distinct entity in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification system, is readily recognized as a particular challenge by clinical specialists who treat acute leukemia. This is especially true with regards to the patients harboring the most common type of FLT3 mutation, the internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation. Here we present 4 patient cases from our institution and discuss how our management reflects what we have learned about this subtype of the disease. We also reflect on how we anticipate the management might change in the near future, with the emergence of clinically useful tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:27872057

  10. IL8-CXCR2 pathway inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against MDS and AML stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schinke, Carolina; Giricz, Orsolya; Li, Weijuan; Shastri, Aditi; Gordon, Shanisha; Barreyro, Laura; Barreryo, Laura; Bhagat, Tushar; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Ramachandra, Nandini; Bartenstein, Matthias; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Wickrema, Amittha; Yu, Yiting; Will, Britta; Wei, Sheng; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit

    2015-05-14

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are associated with disease-initiating stem cells that are not eliminated by conventional therapies. Novel therapeutic targets against preleukemic stem cells need to be identified for potentially curative strategies. We conducted parallel transcriptional analysis of highly fractionated stem and progenitor populations in MDS, AML, and control samples and found interleukin 8 (IL8) to be consistently overexpressed in patient samples. The receptor for IL8, CXCR2, was also significantly increased in MDS CD34(+) cells from a large clinical cohort and was predictive of increased transfusion dependence. High CXCR2 expression was also an adverse prognostic factor in The Cancer Genome Atlas AML cohort, further pointing to the critical role of the IL8-CXCR2 axis in AML/MDS. Functionally, CXCR2 inhibition by knockdown and pharmacologic approaches led to a significant reduction in proliferation in several leukemic cell lines and primary MDS/AML samples via induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Importantly, inhibition of CXCR2 selectively inhibited immature hematopoietic stem cells from MDS/AML samples without an effect on healthy controls. CXCR2 knockdown also impaired leukemic growth in vivo. Together, these studies demonstrate that the IL8 receptor CXCR2 is an adverse prognostic factor in MDS/AML and is a potential therapeutic target against immature leukemic stem cell-enriched cell fractions in MDS and AML.

  11. Prognostic stratification in the treatment of AML.

    PubMed

    Asou, Norio

    Current treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) still relies on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). AML is a heterogeneous neoplasm characterized by distinct chromosomal and genetic abnormalities. Recent comprehensive gene analyses have highlighted distinct genetic subgroups that are associated with different responses to chemotherapy. Therefore, the molecular landscape of AML is fundamental to the development of novel therapeutic approaches and provides opportunities for individualization of therapy. In addition, the age-related incidence of clonal hematopoiesis is high, affecting nearly 10% of healthy people more than 65 years of age. Clonal hematopoiesis is confirmed by the presence of mutations related to AML including genes involved in DNA methylation, chromatin modification and RNA splicing. In the analysis of gene mutation profiles in secondary AML (s-AML) from myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms, secondary-type gene mutations were identified with >95% specificity in s-AML as compared with de novo AML, including RNA splicing, chromatin modification and cohesion complex genes, and were highly associated with poor responses to chemotherapy as well as TP53 mutation. It is important to identify genetic subgroups at relatively high-risk of relapses who should receive allogeneic HSCT during the first remission. In this review, prognostic stratification for individualized treatment of AML is discussed.

  12. Standard anatomical medullary locking (AML) versus tricalcium phosphate-coated AML femoral prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, D.W.C. (Bill); Davies, Donna M.; Beaupré, Lauren A.; Lavoie, Guy

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To compare the preliminary rate and amount of bony ingrowth and calcar resorption between patients receiving either a standard anatomical medullary locking (AML) or a tricalcium phosphate (TCP)-coated AML femoral prosthesis and to compare preliminary clinical results. Design A prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial. Setting An acute care tertiary institution. Patients Between January 1993 and March 1995, 92 patients underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). They were randomized to 2 groups of 46 — a control group or a treatment group. Of the 46 subjects enrolled in each group, no significant differences were seen preoperatively with respect to age, sex, diagnosis, clinical and radiographic assessment. Seventy-one patients were followed up for 24 months. Interventions Insertion of either a standard AML femoral implant (control group) or a TCP-coated AML femoral implant (treatment group). Outcome measures The degree of hypertrophy, calcar atrophy and the number of spot welds on standard postoperative radiographs at 6, 12 and 24 months. Clinically, assessment according to the Société internationale de chirurgie orthopédique et de traumatologie (SICOT) scale and a 100-point visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. Results There were no prosthetic stem revisions in either group at the 24-month follow-up. Radiographically, bony ingrowth was not significantly different in the TCP-coated stem, by χ2 analysis of the degree of hypertrophy and number of spot welds present. Also by χ2 analysis, the degree of calcar atrophy was not significantly different between groups. The mean VAS score for pain at 24 months was 12.5 for the control and 12.1 for the treatment group. No significant differences were seen in any of the clinical categories of the SICOT Scale over the 24-month interval. Conclusion The objective of TCP-coating — to increase the rate and amount of bony ingrowth while reducing the rate of calcar resorption in non-cemented THA

  13. Two splice-factor mutant leukemia subgroups uncovered at the boundaries of MDS and AML using combined gene expression and DNA-methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Havermans, Marije; van Lom, Kirsten; Sanders, Mathijs A; van Norden, Yvette; Bindels, Eric; Hoogenboezem, Remco; Reinders, Marcel J T; Figueroa, Maria E; Valk, Peter J M; Löwenberg, Bob; Melnick, Ari; Delwel, Ruud

    2014-05-22

    Mutations in splice factor (SF) genes occur more frequently in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) than in acute myeloid leukemias (AML). We sequenced complementary DNA from bone marrow of 47 refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) patients, 29 AML cases with low marrow blast cell count, and 325 other AML patients and determined the presence of SF-hotspot mutations in SF3B1, U2AF35, and SRSF2. SF mutations were found in 10 RAEB, 12 AML cases with low marrow blast cell count, and 25 other AML cases. Our study provides evidence that SF-mutant RAEB and SF-mutant AML are clinically, cytologically, and molecularly highly similar. An integrated analysis of genomewide messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiling and DNA-methylation profiling data revealed 2 unique patient clusters highly enriched for SF-mutant RAEB/AML. The combined genomewide mRNA expression profiling/DNA-methylation profiling signatures revealed 1 SF-mutant patient cluster with an erythroid signature. The other SF-mutant patient cluster was enriched for NRAS/KRAS mutations and showed an inferior survival. We conclude that SF-mutant RAEB/AML constitutes a related disorder overriding the artificial separation between AML and MDS, and that SF-mutant RAEB/AML is composed of 2 molecularly and clinically distinct subgroups. We conclude that SF-mutant disorders should be considered as myeloid malignancies that transcend the boundaries of AML and MDS.

  14. FLT3-ITD Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients in Northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kumsaen, Piyawan; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sirijerachai, Chittima; Chainansamit, Su-On; Wisanuyothin, Nittaya; Kuwatjanakul, Pichayanan; Wiangnon, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most frequent genetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) where it is associated with a poor prognosis. The FLT3-ITD mutation could, therefore, be a potential molecular prognostic marker important for risk-stratified treatment options. We amplified the FLT3 gene at exon 14 and 15 in 52 AML patients (aged between 2 months and 74 years) from 4 referral centers (a university hospital and 3 regional hospitals in Northeast Thailand), using a simple PCR method. FLT3-ITD mutations were found in 10 patients (19.2%), being more common in adults than in children (21.1% vs. 14.3%) and more prevalent in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (AML-M3) than AML-non M3 (4 of 10 AML-M3 vs. 6 of 42 AML- non M3 patients). Duplication sequences varied in size-between 27 and 171 nucleotides (median=63.5) and in their location. FLT3-ITD mutations with common duplication sequences accounted for a significant percentage in AML patients in northeastern Thailand. This simple PCR method is feasible for routine laboratory practice and these data could help tailor use of the national protocol for AML.

  15. Epigenetic landscape of the TERT promoter: a potential biomarker for high risk AML/MDS.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Tian, Xin; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Cantilena, Caroline R; Strickland, Stephen; Savani, Bipin N; Mohan, Sanjay; Feng, Xingmin; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dunavin, Neil; Townsley, Danielle M; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Battiwalla, Minoo; Rezvani, Katayoun; Young, Neal S; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa

    2016-11-01

    Although recent observations implicate the importance of telomerase activity in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), the roles of epigenetic regulations of the TERT gene in leukaemogenesis, drug resistance and clinical prognosis in AML are not fully understood. We developed a quantitative pyrosequencing-based methylation assay covering the TERT proximal promoter and a partial exon 1 (TERTpro/Ex1) region and tested both cell lines and primary leukaemia cells derived from AML and AML with preceding myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) patients (n = 43). Prognostic impact of methylation status of the upstream TERT promoter region was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The activity of the telomerase inhibitor, imetelstat, was measured using leukaemia cell lines. The TERTpro/Ex1 region was highly methylated in all cell lines and primary leukaemia cells showed diverse methylation profiles. Most cases showed hypermethylated regions at the upstream TERTpro/Ex1 region, which were associated with inferior patient survival. TERTpro/Ex1 methylation status was correlated with the cytotoxicity to imetelstat and its combination with hypomethylating agent enhanced the cytotoxicity of imetelstat. AML cell lines and primary blasts harbour distinct TERTpro/Ex1 methylation profiles that could serve as a prognostic biomarker of AML. However, validation in a large cohort of patients is necessary to confirm our findings.

  16. Rapid expansion of preexisting nonleukemic hematopoietic clones frequently follows induction therapy for de novo AML.

    PubMed

    Wong, Terrence N; Miller, Christopher A; Klco, Jeffery M; Petti, Allegra; Demeter, Ryan; Helton, Nichole M; Li, Tiandao; Fulton, Robert S; Heath, Sharon E; Mardis, Elaine R; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F; Walter, Matthew J; Welch, John S; Graubert, Timothy A; Wilson, Richard K; Ley, Timothy J; Link, Daniel C

    2016-02-18

    There is interest in using leukemia-gene panels and next-generation sequencing to assess acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) response to induction chemotherapy. Studies have shown that patients with AML in morphologic remission may continue to have clonal hematopoiesis with populations closely related to the founding AML clone and that this confers an increased risk of relapse. However, it remains unknown how induction chemotherapy influences the clonal evolution of a patient's nonleukemic hematopoietic population. Here, we report that 5 of 15 patients with genetic clearance of their founding AML clone after induction chemotherapy had a concomitant expansion of a hematopoietic population unrelated to the initial AML. These populations frequently harbored somatic mutations in genes recurrently mutated in AML or myelodysplastic syndromes and were detectable at very low frequencies at the time of AML diagnosis. These results suggest that nonleukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, harboring specific aging-acquired mutations, may have a competitive fitness advantage after induction chemotherapy, expand, and persist long after the completion of chemotherapy. Although the clinical importance of these "rising" clones remains to be determined, it will be important to distinguish them from leukemia-related populations when assessing for molecular responses to induction chemotherapy.

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of micafungin in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gumbo, Tawanda; Hiemenz, John; Ma, Lei; Keirns, James J; Buell, Donald N; Drusano, George L

    2008-03-01

    We performed population pharmacokinetic analysis of micafungin in adult patients treated with doses between 12.5 and 200 mg/day. Our analysis identified a breakpoint patient weight of 66.3 kg above which serum clearance increased by approximately 50%. Patients with weight >66.3 kg may need larger doses to achieve similar exposures to those <66.3 kg. However, the clinical implications are still unknown.

  18. Fatty acid-binding protein FABP4 mechanistically links obesity with aggressive AML by enhancing aberrant DNA methylation in AML cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, F; Shen, N; Pang, J X; Zhang, Y W; Rao, E Y; Bode, A M; Al-Kali, A; Zhang, D E; Litzow, M R; Li, B; Liu, S J

    2016-12-02

    Obesity is becoming more prevalent worldwide and is a major risk factor for cancer development. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common acute leukemia in adults, remains a frequently fatal disease. Here we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which obesity favors AML growth and uncovered the fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4) and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) regulatory axis that mediates aggressive AML in obesity. We showed that leukemia burden was much higher in high-fat diet-induced obese mice, which had higher levels of FABP4 and interleukin (IL)-6 in the sera. Upregulation of environmental and cellular FABP4 accelerated AML cell growth in both a cell-autonomous and cell-non-autonomous manner. Genetic disruption of FABP4 in AML cells or in mice blocked cell proliferation in vitro and induced leukemia regression in vivo. Mechanistic investigations showed that FABP4 upregulation increased IL-6 expression and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 phosphorylation leading to DNMT1 overexpression and further silencing of the p15(INK4B) tumor-suppressor gene in AML cells. Conversely, FABP4 ablation reduced DNMT1-dependent DNA methylation and restored p15(INK4B) expression, thus conferring substantial protection against AML growth. Our findings reveal the FABP4/DNMT1 axis in the control of AML cell fate in obesity and suggest that interference with the FABP4/DNMT1 axis might be a new strategy to treat leukemia.Leukemia advance online publication, 2 December 2016; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.349.

  19. Timothy Ley, M.D., Advocates for Personalized Medicine in AML - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Oncologist Dr. Timothy Ley talks about how repurposing of existing drugs based on better understanding of the genetic basis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can help patients receive personalized care.

  20. SAB--a promising new treatment to improve remission rates in AML in the elderly?

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Keith

    2002-08-01

    This short report presents the results of a comparison of complete remission rates and reasons for failure, between two series of patients aged 60 years or over with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), and discusses their interpretation.

  1. The Adult Diabetic Patient: An Education Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    finding that he/she, too, must care for sicker patients. To better prepare these patients for life after discharge, patient education must be initiated as...admitted, patient education often begins at the physicians’ office. This paper explores diabetes mellitus in relation to concepts of self-care and adult...betting foj.L eduuation and iio.w, wore ofteni, patient education and follow-up sercvices- a:leL beiny p~rovided on ani outpatient bcdtsis" (p. 36) . Thet

  2. Activity of 8F4, a T-cell receptor-like anti-PR1/HLA-A2 antibody, against primary human AML in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, A; He, H; Ruisaard, K; St John, L; Alatrash, G; Clise-Dwyer, K; Li, D; Patenia, R; Hong, R; Sukhumalchandra, P; You, M J; Gagea, M; Ma, Q; Molldrem, J J

    2016-07-01

    The PR1 peptide, derived from the leukemia-associated antigens proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase, is overexpressed on HLA-A2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We developed a high-affinity T-cell receptor-like murine monoclonal antibody, 8F4, that binds to the PR1/HLA-A2 complex, mediates lysis of AML and inhibits leukemia colony formation. Here, we explored whether 8F4 was active in vivo against chemotherapy-resistant AML, including secondary AML. In a screening model, coincubation of AML with 8F4 ex vivo prevented engraftment of all tested AML subtypes in immunodeficient NSG (NOD scid IL-2 receptor γ-chain knockout) mice. In a treatment model of established human AML, administration of 8F4 significantly reduced or eliminated AML xenografts and extended survival compared with isotype antibody-treated mice. Moreover, in secondary transfer experiments, mice inoculated with bone marrow from 8F4-treated mice showed no evidence of AML engraftment, supporting the possible activity of 8F4 against the subset of AML with self-renewing potential. Our data provide evidence that 8F4 antibody is highly active in AML, including chemotherapy-resistant disease, supporting its potential use as a therapeutic agent in patients with AML.

  3. Inhibiting glutaminase in acute myeloid leukemia: metabolic dependency of selected AML subtypes.

    PubMed

    Matre, Polina; Velez, Juliana; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Qi, Yuan; Su, Xiaoping; Cai, Tianyu; Chan, Steven M; Lodi, Alessia; Sweeney, Shannon R; Ma, Helen; Davis, Richard Eric; Baran, Natalia; Haferlach, Torsten; Su, Xiaohua; Flores, Elsa Renee; Gonzalez, Doriann; Konoplev, Sergej; Samudio, Ismael; DiNardo, Courtney; Majeti, Ravi; Schimmer, Aaron D; Li, Weiqun; Wang, Taotao; Tiziani, Stefano; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-11-29

    Metabolic reprogramming has been described as a hallmark of transformed cancer cells. In this study, we examined the role of the glutamine (Gln) utilization pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and primary AML samples. Our results indicate that a subset of AML cell lines is sensitive to Gln deprivation. Glutaminase (GLS) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of Gln to glutamate. One of the two GLS isoenzymes, GLS1 is highly expressed in cancer and encodes two different isoforms: kidney (KGA) and glutaminase C (GAC). We analyzed mRNA expression of GLS1 splicing variants, GAC and KGA, in several large AML datasets and identified increased levels of expression in AML patients with complex cytogenetics and within specific molecular subsets. Inhibition of glutaminase by allosteric GLS inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide or by novel, potent, orally bioavailable GLS inhibitor CB-839 reduced intracellular glutamate levels and inhibited growth of AML cells. In cell lines and patient samples harboring IDH1/IDH2 (Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) mutations, CB-839 reduced production of oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, inducing differentiation. These findings indicate potential utility of glutaminase inhibitors in AML therapy, which can inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and/or differentiation in specific leukemia subtypes.

  4. Rapid expansion of preexisting nonleukemic hematopoietic clones frequently follows induction therapy for de novo AML

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Terrence N.; Miller, Christopher A.; Klco, Jeffery M.; Petti, Allegra; Demeter, Ryan; Helton, Nichole M.; Li, Tiandao; Fulton, Robert S.; Heath, Sharon E.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F.; Walter, Matthew J.; Welch, John S.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    There is interest in using leukemia-gene panels and next-generation sequencing to assess acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) response to induction chemotherapy. Studies have shown that patients with AML in morphologic remission may continue to have clonal hematopoiesis with populations closely related to the founding AML clone and that this confers an increased risk of relapse. However, it remains unknown how induction chemotherapy influences the clonal evolution of a patient’s nonleukemic hematopoietic population. Here, we report that 5 of 15 patients with genetic clearance of their founding AML clone after induction chemotherapy had a concomitant expansion of a hematopoietic population unrelated to the initial AML. These populations frequently harbored somatic mutations in genes recurrently mutated in AML or myelodysplastic syndromes and were detectable at very low frequencies at the time of AML diagnosis. These results suggest that nonleukemic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, harboring specific aging-acquired mutations, may have a competitive fitness advantage after induction chemotherapy, expand, and persist long after the completion of chemotherapy. Although the clinical importance of these “rising” clones remains to be determined, it will be important to distinguish them from leukemia-related populations when assessing for molecular responses to induction chemotherapy. PMID:26631115

  5. Inhibiting glutaminase in acute myeloid leukemia: metabolic dependency of selected AML subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jacamo, Rodrigo; Qi, Yuan; Su, Xiaoping; Cai, Tianyu; Chan, Steven M.; Lodi, Alessia; Sweeney, Shannon R.; Ma, Helen; Davis, Richard Eric; Baran, Natalia; Haferlach, Torsten; Su, Xiaohua; Flores, Elsa Renee; Gonzalez, Doriann; Konoplev, Sergej; Samudio, Ismael; DiNardo, Courtney; Majeti, Ravi; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Li, Weiqun; Wang, Taotao; Tiziani, Stefano; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming has been described as a hallmark of transformed cancer cells. In this study, we examined the role of the glutamine (Gln) utilization pathway in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and primary AML samples. Our results indicate that a subset of AML cell lines is sensitive to Gln deprivation. Glutaminase (GLS) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of Gln to glutamate. One of the two GLS isoenzymes, GLS1 is highly expressed in cancer and encodes two different isoforms: kidney (KGA) and glutaminase C (GAC). We analyzed mRNA expression of GLS1 splicing variants, GAC and KGA, in several large AML datasets and identified increased levels of expression in AML patients with complex cytogenetics and within specific molecular subsets. Inhibition of glutaminase by allosteric GLS inhibitor bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide or by novel, potent, orally bioavailable GLS inhibitor CB-839 reduced intracellular glutamate levels and inhibited growth of AML cells. In cell lines and patient samples harboring IDH1/IDH2 (Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2) mutations, CB-839 reduced production of oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate, inducing differentiation. These findings indicate potential utility of glutaminase inhibitors in AML therapy, which can inhibit cell growth, induce apoptosis and/or differentiation in specific leukemia subtypes. PMID:27806325

  6. The incidence and outcome of myeloid malignancies in 2,112 adult patients in southeast England.

    PubMed

    Phekoo, Karen J; Richards, Mike A; Møller, Henrik; Schey, Steve A

    2006-10-01

    There is a paucity of epidemiological data on chronic myeloproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), while subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are rarely defined. We identified 2,112 adult myeloid malignancies in the South Thames area between 1999 and 2000. The incidence (European standard population) of AML was 3.00/100,000, that of MDS 3.47/100,000, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) 0.46/100,000, idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) 0.37/100,000, polycythemia vera (PV) 1.08/100,000, primary thrombocythemia (PT) 1.65/100,000 and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) 1.09/100,000. The 3-year survival for AML was 15%, MDS 45%, CMML 29%, IMF 48%, PV 80%, PT 81% and CML 50% We believe this study reflects the true incidence and outcome of myeloid malignancies in South East England.

  7. Design of the randomized, Phase III, QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) maintenance therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Roboz, Gail J; Montesinos, Pau; Selleslag, Dominik; Wei, Andrew; Jang, Jun-Ho; Falantes, Jose; Voso, Maria T; Sayar, Hamid; Porkka, Kimmo; Marlton, Paula; Almeida, Antonio; Mohan, Sanjay; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Skikne, Barry; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2016-02-01

    Older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have worse rates of complete remission and shorter overall survival than younger patients. The epigenetic modifier CC-486 is an oral formulation of azacitidine with promising clinical activity in patients with AML in Phase I studies. The Phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled QUAZAR AML Maintenance trial (CC-486-AML-001) examines CC-486 maintenance therapy (300 mg/day for 14 days of 28-day treatment cycles) for patients aged ≥55 years with AML in first complete remission. The primary end point is overall survival. Secondary end points include relapse-free survival, safety, health-related quality of life and healthcare resource utilization. This trial will investigate whether CC-486 maintenance can prolong remission and improve survival for older patients with AML.

  8. Prognostic factors of childhood and adolescent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: evidence from four decades of US population data.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li; Caywood, Emi H

    2015-10-01

    Growing insight into prognosis of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival has led to improved outcome over time and could be further enhanced through investigation using a large number of patients. To characterize the extent of the association of pediatric AML survival with its identified prognostic factors, we analyzed the United States population-based Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) large dataset of 3442 pediatric AML patients diagnosed and followed between 1973 and 2011 using a Cox proportional hazards model stratified by year of diagnosis. Patients diagnosed between 10 and 19 years of age were at a higher risk of death compared to those diagnosed before age 10 (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR): 1.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.17-1.44). African Americans (1.27, 1.09-1.48) and Hispanics (1.15, 1.00-1.32) had an elevated risk of mortality than Caucasians. Compared to the subtype acute promyelocytic leukemia, AML with minimal differentiation (2.44, 1.78-3.35); acute erythroid leukemia (2.34, 1.60-3.40); AML without maturation (1.87, 1.35-2.59); and most other AML subtypes had a higher risk of mortality, whereas AML with inv(16) had a substantially lower risk. Age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity, AML subtype, county level poverty and geographic region appeared as significant prognostic factors of pediatric AML survival in the US. Contrary to previous findings, the subtypes of AML with t(9;11)(p22;q23)MLLT3-MLL, AML without maturation and acute myelomonocytic leukemia emerged to be indicative of poor outcome.

  9. Hierarchy in gene expression is predictive of risk, progression, and outcome in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shubham; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-02-01

    Cancer progresses with a change in the structure of the gene network in normal cells. We define a measure of organizational hierarchy in gene networks of affected cells in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. With a retrospective cohort analysis based on the gene expression profiles of 116 AML patients, we find that the likelihood of future cancer relapse and the level of clinical risk are directly correlated with the level of organization in the cancer related gene network. We also explore the variation of the level of organization in the gene network with cancer progression. We find that this variation is non-monotonic, which implies the fitness landscape in the evolution of AML cancer cells is non-trivial. We further find that the hierarchy in gene expression at the time of diagnosis may be a useful biomarker in AML prognosis.

  10. Trisomy 8 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: A NOPHO-AML study.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Anne Cathrine Lund; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Asdahl, Peter; Ha, Shau-Yin; Heldrup, Jesper; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is a common cytogenetic aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the impact of +8 in pediatric AML is largely unknown. We retrospectively investigated 609 patients from the NOPHO-AML database to determine the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of +8 in pediatric AML and to investigate its prognostic impact. Complete cytogenetic data were available in 596 patients (98%) aged 0-18 years, diagnosed from 1993 to 2012, and treated according to the NOPHO-AML 1993 and 2004 protocols in the Nordic countries and Hong Kong. We identified 86 patients (14%) with +8. Trisomy 8 was combined with other cytogenetic aberrations in 68 patients (11%) (+8 other) and in 18 patients (3%), it was the sole abnormality (+8 alone). Trisomy 8 was associated with FAB M5 (36%) but otherwise clinically comparable with non-trisomy 8 patients. Trisomy 8 was favorable in patients of young age and with t(9;11). Trisomy 8 alone was associated with older age (median age 10.1 years), FAB M2 (33%), and FLT3-ITD mutations (58%). The 5-year event-free survival for patients with +8 alone was 50% and 5-year overall survival was 75%. In conclusion, +8 is one of the most common cytogenetic aberrations in pediatric AML. Trisomy 8 positive AML is a heterogeneous group and the majority of cases have additional cytogenetic aberrations. Patients with +8 alone differed from patients with +8 other and were associated with older age, FAB M2, and FLT3-ITD aberrations. There were no differences in survival despite the more frequent occurrence of FLT3-ITD in +8 alone. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Sorafenib inhibition of Mcl-1 accelerates ATRA induced apoptosis in differentiation responsive AML cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Xia, Lijuan; Gabrilove, Janice; Waxman, Samuel; Jing, Yongkui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose All trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is successful in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) by inducing terminal differentiation-mediated cell death, but it has limited activity in non-APL acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We aim to improve ATRA therapy of AML by enhancing apoptosis through repression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. Experimental Design APL and AML cell lines, as well as primary AML samples, were used to explore the mechanisms regulating differentiation and apoptosis during ATRA treatment. Stable transfection and gene silencing with siRNA were used to identify the key factors that inhibit apoptosis during induction of differentiation and drugs that accelerate apoptosis. Results In differentiation responsive AML cells, ATRA treatment induces long-lasting repression of Bcl-2 while first up-modulating and then reducing the Mcl-1 level. The Mcl-1 level appears to serve as a gatekeeper between differentiation and apoptosis. During differentiation induction, activation of MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways by ATRA leads to activation of p90RSK and inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), which increase Mcl-1 levels by increasing its translation and stability. Sorafenib blocks ATRA-induced Mcl-1 increase by reversing p90RSK activation and GSK3β inactivation, maintains the repressed Bcl-2 level, and enhances ATRA induced apoptosis in non-APL AML cell lines and in primary AML cells. Conclusion Inhibition of Mcl-1 is required for apoptosis induction in ATRA differentiation responsive AML cells. ATRA and Sorafenib can be developed as a novel drug combination therapy for AML patients because this drug combination augments apoptosis by inhibiting Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. PMID:26459180

  12. TEL/AML-1 fusion gene. its frequency and prognostic significance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jamil, A; Theil, K S; Kahwash, S; Ruymann, F B; Klopfenstein, K J

    2000-10-15

    TEL gene rearrangement due to the 12;21 chromosome translocation is believed to be the most common molecular genetic abnormality in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A study was conducted to investigate the frequency and prognostic significance of TEL/AML-1 fusion gene resulting from a cryptic t(12;21)(p13;q22). Bone marrow samples from 86 patients diagnosed over the past 5 years at Columbus Children's Hospital were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for TEL/AML-1 fusion gene, using LSI((R)) DNA probes. The positive cases were analyzed for clinical outcome. Patients in this study received treatment according to Children's Cancer Group (CCG) protocols. Fifteen of the 86 cases (17%) were positive for the fusion gene. All were B-cell lineage and except for one, all were CD10 positive. TEL/AML-1 was not found in any T-cell ALL. The mean overall survival (OS) following diagnosis for the TEL/AML-1-positive group was significantly longer than for the TEL/AML-1-negative group by log-rank = 7.84, P = 0.005. Similarly, the event-free survival (EFS) after remission for the positive group (median 94.5 months) was longer than the negative group (median 57 months) by log-rank = 7.19, P = 0.007. This study confirms that the TEL/AML-1 fusion gene may be the most common genetic event in childhood ALL, occurring in 17% of the patients. It appears restricted to the B-cell lineage. In this study, the presence of a TEL/AML-1 fusion gene was statistically significant in predicting both OS and EFS, indicating a favorable clinical outcome for these patients. Screening for TEL/AML-1 should become routine at diagnosis and a useful biological variable for risk stratification in future clinical trials.

  13. Focal Adhesion Kinase as a Potential Target in AML and MDS.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bing Z; Mak, Po Yee; Wang, Xiangmeng; Yang, Hui; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Mak, Duncan; Mu, Hong; Ruvolo, Vivian; Qiu, Yihua; Coombes, Kevin; Zhang, Nianxiang; Ragon, Brittany; Weaver, David T; Pachter, Jonathan A; Kornblau, Steven; Andreeff, Michael

    2017-03-07

    Although overexpression/activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is widely known in solid tumors to control cell growth, survival, invasion, metastasis, gene expression, and stem cell self-renewal, its expression and function in myeloid leukemia are not well investigated. Using reverse-phase protein arrays in large cohorts of newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myeloid dysplastic syndrome (MDS) samples, we found that high FAK expression was associated with unfavorable cytogenetics (P = 2 x 10-4) and relapse (P = 0.02) in AML. FAK expression was significantly lower in patients with FLT3-ITD (P = 0.0024) or RAS (P = 0.05) mutations and strongly correlated with p-SRC and integrinβ3 levels. FAK protein levels were significantly higher in CD34+ (P = 5.42 x 10-20) and CD34+ CD38- MDS (P = 7.62 x 10-9) cells compared to normal CD34+ cells. MDS patients with higher FAK in CD34+ cells tended to have better OS (P = 0.05). FAK expression was significantly higher in MDS patients who later transformed to compared with not transformed to AML and in AML patients who transformed from MDS compared with those with de novo AML. Co-culture with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) increased FAK expression in AML cells. Inhibition of FAK decreased MSC-mediated adhesion/migration and viability of AML cells and prolonged survival in an AML xenograft murine model. Our results suggest that FAK regulates leukemia-stromal interactions and supports leukemia cell survival; hence FAK is a potential therapeutic target in myeloid leukemia.

  14. The efficacy of the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor Didox in preclinical models of AML.

    PubMed

    Cook, Guerry J; Caudell, David L; Elford, Howard L; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy which leads to marrow failure, and ultimately death. There is a desperate need for new therapeutics for these patients. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. Didox (3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid) is a novel RR inhibitor noted to be more potent than hydroxyurea. In this report we detail the activity and toxicity of Didox in preclinical models of AML. RR was present in all AML cell lines and primary patient samples tested. Didox was active against all human and murine AML lines tested with IC50 values in the low micromolar range (mean IC50 37 µM [range 25.89-52.70 µM]). It was active against primary patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Didox exposure resulted in DNA damage and p53 induction culminating in apoptosis. In syngeneic, therapy-resistant AML models, single agent Didox treatment resulted in a significant reduction in leukemia burden and a survival benefit. Didox was well tolerated, as marrow from treated animals was morphologically indistinguishable from controls. Didox exposure at levels that impaired leukemia growth did not inhibit normal HSC engraftment. In summary, Didox was well tolerated and effective against preclinical models of AML.

  15. The Efficacy of the Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor Didox in Preclinical Models of AML

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Guerry J.; Caudell, David L.; Elford, Howard L.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy which leads to marrow failure, and ultimately death. There is a desperate need for new therapeutics for these patients. Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is the rate limiting enzyme in DNA synthesis. Didox (3,4-Dihydroxybenzohydroxamic acid) is a novel RR inhibitor noted to be more potent than hydroxyurea. In this report we detail the activity and toxicity of Didox in preclinical models of AML. RR was present in all AML cell lines and primary patient samples tested. Didox was active against all human and murine AML lines tested with IC50 values in the low micromolar range (mean IC50 37 µM [range 25.89–52.70 µM]). It was active against primary patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Didox exposure resulted in DNA damage and p53 induction culminating in apoptosis. In syngeneic, therapy-resistant AML models, single agent Didox treatment resulted in a significant reduction in leukemia burden and a survival benefit. Didox was well tolerated, as marrow from treated animals was morphologically indistinguishable from controls. Didox exposure at levels that impaired leukemia growth did not inhibit normal HSC engraftment. In summary, Didox was well tolerated and effective against preclinical models of AML. PMID:25402485

  16. Profiling of microRNAs in AML cells following overexpression or silencing of the VEGF gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Zhu, Lixia; Wang, Yungui; Zhou, De; Zhu, Jingjing; Xie, Wanzhuo; Ye, Xiujin

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease of the hematopoietic progenitor cells associated with heterogeneous clonal proliferation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis during physiological and pathological processes. It is thought that AML cells have an autocrine VEGF pathway that contributes to the development and progression of AML. In addition, growing evidence has suggested that numerous microRNAs are involved in AML. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between VEGF dysregulation and microRNA profiles in AML cells and patients. VEGF-overexpressing and VEGF-knockdown leukemia cells were constructed and changes in the patterns of microRNA expression were analyzed using a microRNA array. Subsequently, mononuclear cells from the blood of patients with AML showing high or low expression levels of VEGF were obtained and were used to assess the patterns of microRNA expression by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study suggested that downregulation of VEGF markedly altered the profile of microRNAs in AML cells, while upregulation of VEGF did not. Examination of clinical samples from patients with AML showed that several microRNAs were closely associated with the expression level of VEGF, including miR-20a, miR-93, miR-16-5p, miR-17-5p, miR-124-5p and miR-17-3p. These results suggested that VEGF may be a pivotal protein that can both receive and initiate signals in leukemia cells.

  17. Profiling of microRNAs in AML cells following overexpression or silencing of the VEGF gene

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Zhu, Lixia; Wang, Yungui; Zhou, De; Zhu, Jingjing; Xie, Wanzhuo; Ye, Xiujin

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease of the hematopoietic progenitor cells associated with heterogeneous clonal proliferation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis during physiological and pathological processes. It is thought that AML cells have an autocrine VEGF pathway that contributes to the development and progression of AML. In addition, growing evidence has suggested that numerous microRNAs are involved in AML. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between VEGF dysregulation and microRNA profiles in AML cells and patients. VEGF-overexpressing and VEGF-knockdown leukemia cells were constructed and changes in the patterns of microRNA expression were analyzed using a microRNA array. Subsequently, mononuclear cells from the blood of patients with AML showing high or low expression levels of VEGF were obtained and were used to assess the patterns of microRNA expression by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study suggested that downregulation of VEGF markedly altered the profile of microRNAs in AML cells, while upregulation of VEGF did not. Examination of clinical samples from patients with AML showed that several microRNAs were closely associated with the expression level of VEGF, including miR-20a, miR-93, miR-16-5p, miR-17-5p, miR-124-5p and miR-17-3p. These results suggested that VEGF may be a pivotal protein that can both receive and initiate signals in leukemia cells. PMID:28123529

  18. Correlation of chromosome patterns in leukemic cells of patients with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1990-08-01

    Progress made in understanding the molecular genetics of leukemia is described. We have had remarkable success in applying the new techniques of using nonradiolabeled DNA probes to identify chromosome abnormalities more precisely. We have continued to update our series of patients who have treatment related acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplasia (MDS). We have identified malignant cells in five adult patients with MDS or AML. Also discussed is mapping DNA probes to chromosome 5.5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Identification of ins(8;21) with AML1/ETO fusion in acute myelogenous leukemia M2 by molecular cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Martínez-Ramírez, A; Cigudosa, J C; Mateo, M S; Martínez, P; Contra, T; Benítez, J

    2002-02-01

    A high percentage of cases of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) of the M2 subtype show a rearrangement between the AML1 and ETO genes. The detection of the AML1/ETO fusion has clinical relevance because patients with this subtype have a good prognosis. We present the results of conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia French-American-British M2 classification, who had a complex karyotype involving chromosomes 8 and 21. Dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the AML1/ETO probe demonstrated a recombination of both genes on an add(8) chromosome. The use of other FISH probes (CEP8, c-myc and TEL21) and spectral karyotyping indicated that AML1/ETO fusion occurred as a consequence of a previously undescribed ins(8;21)(q22;q22.1q22.3).

  20. The AML1-ETO fusion gene and the FLT3 length mutation collaborate in inducing acute leukemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schessl, Christina; Rawat, Vijay P.S.; Cusan, Monica; Deshpande, Aniruddha; Kohl, Tobias M.; Rosten, Patricia M.; Spiekermann, Karsten; Humphries, R. Keith; Schnittger, Susanne; Kern, Wolfgang; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Buske, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The molecular characterization of leukemia has demonstrated that genetic alterations in the leukemic clone frequently fall into 2 classes, those affecting transcription factors (e.g., AML1-ETO) and mutations affecting genes involved in signal transduction (e.g., activating mutations of FLT3 and KIT). This finding has favored a model of leukemogenesis in which the collaboration of these 2 classes of genetic alterations is necessary for the malignant transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The model is supported by experimental data indicating that AML1-ETO and FLT3 length mutation (FLT3-LM), 2 of the most frequent genetic alterations in AML, are both insufficient on their own to cause leukemia in animal models. Here we report that AML1-ETO collaborates with FLT3-LM in inducing acute leukemia in a murine BM transplantation model. Moreover, in a series of 135 patients with AML1-ETO–positive AML, the most frequently identified class of additional mutations affected genes involved in signal transduction pathways including FLT3-LM or mutations of KIT and NRAS. These data support the concept of oncogenic cooperation between AML1-ETO and a class of activating mutations, recurrently found in patients with t(8;21), and provide a rationale for therapies targeting signal transduction pathways in AML1-ETO–positive leukemias. PMID:16025155

  1. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858-mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2016-06-09

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858-opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858-induced NK-cell-mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858-mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858-mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML.

  2. Decitabine enhances anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody BI 836858–mediated natural killer ADCC against AML blasts

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Sumithira; He, Shun; Cheney, Carolyn; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lozanski, Gerard; Mo, Xiaokui; Groh, Veronica; Whitman, Susan P.; Konopitzky, Renate; Kössl, Christian; Bucci, Donna; Lucas, David M.; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Blum, William; Adam, Paul J.; Borges, Eric; Rueter, Bjoern; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Marcucci, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia, affecting older individuals at a median age of 67 years. Resistance to intensive induction chemotherapy is the major cause of death in elderly AML; hence, novel treatment strategies are warranted. CD33-directed antibody-drug conjugates (gemtuzumab ozogamicin) have been shown to improve overall survival, validating CD33 as a target for antibody-based therapy of AML. Here, we report the in vitro efficacy of BI 836858, a fully human, Fc-engineered, anti-CD33 antibody using AML cell lines and primary AML blasts as targets. BI 836858–opsonized AML cells significantly induced both autologous and allogeneic natural killer (NK)-cell degranulation and NK-cell–mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro treatment of AML blasts with decitabine (DAC) or 5-azacytidine, 2 hypomethylating agents that show efficacy in older patients, did not compromise BI 836858–induced NK-cell–mediated ADCC. Evaluation of BI 836858–mediated ADCC in serial marrow AML aspirates in patients who received a 10-day course of DAC (pre-DAC, days 4, 11, and 28 post-DAC) revealed significantly higher ADCC in samples at day 28 post-DAC when compared with pre-DAC treatment. Analysis of ligands to activating receptors (NKG2D) showed significantly increased NKG2D ligand [NKG2DL] expression in day 28 post-DAC samples compared with pre-DAC samples; when NKG2DL receptor was blocked using antibodies, BI 836858–mediated ADCC was significantly decreased, suggesting that DAC enhances AML blast susceptibility to BI 836858 by upregulating NKG2DL. These data provide a rationale for combination therapy of Fc-engineered antibodies such as BI 836858 with azanucleosides in elderly patients with AML. PMID:27013443

  3. Ab interno trabeculectomy in the adult patient.

    PubMed

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R; Seibold, Leonard K; Kahook, Malik Y

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient.

  4. Ab Interno Trabeculectomy in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Seibold, Leonard K.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is a potentially blinding disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The mainstay of treatment is lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP) through the use of medications, laser and/or incisional surgery. The trabecular meshwork (TM) is thought to be the site of significant resistance to aqueous outflow in open angle glaucoma. Theoretically, an incision through TM or TM removal should decrease this resistance and lead to a significant reduction in IOP. This approach, commonly referred to as goniotomy or trabeculotomy, has been validated in the pediatric population and has been associated with long-term IOP control. In adults, however, removal of TM tissue has been historically associated with more limited and short-lived success. More recent evidence, reveals that even adult patients may benefit significantly from removal of diseased TM tissue and can lead to a significant reduction in IOP that is long-lasting and safe. In this review, we discuss current evidence and techniques for ab interno trabeculectomy using various devices in the adult patient. PMID:25624670

  5. Trauma injury in adult underweight patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Lai, Wei-Hung; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury characteristics, severity, and outcome between underweight and normal-weight patients hospitalized for the treatment of all kinds of trauma injury. This study was based on a level I trauma center Taiwan. The detailed data of 640 underweight adult trauma patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <18.5 kg/m2 and 6497 normal-weight adult patients (25 > BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m2) were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the differences. Propensity score matching with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of underweight on mortality. Underweight patients presented a different bodily injury pattern and a significantly higher rate of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU) than did normal-weight patients; however, no significant differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay were found between the two groups. However, further analysis of the patients stratified by two major injury mechanisms (motorcycle accident and fall injury) revealed that underweight patients had significantly lower GCS scores (13.8 ± 3.0 vs 14.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.020), but higher ISS (10.1 ± 6.9 vs 8.4 ± 5.9, P = 0.005), in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–11.35; P = 0.006), and ICU admittance rate (24.1% vs 14.3%, P = 0.007) than normal-weight patients in the fall accident group, but not in the motorcycle accident group. However, after propensity score matching, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs of patients with either all trauma, motorcycle accident, or fall injury did not show a significant influence of underweight on mortality. Exploratory data analysis revealed that underweight patients

  6. STAT activation status differentiates leukemogenic from non-leukemogenic stem cells in AML and is suppressed by arsenic in t(6;9)-positive AML.

    PubMed

    Oancea, Claudia; Rüster, Brigitte; Brill, Boris; Roos, Jessica; Heinssmann, Maria; Bug, Gesine; Mian, Afsar Ali; Guillen, Nathalie Andrea; Kornblau, Steven M; Henschler, Reinhard; Ruthardt, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by an aberrant self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and a block in differentiation. The major therapeutic challenge is the characterization of the leukemic stem cell as a target for the eradication of the disease. Until now the biology of AML-associated fusion proteins (AAFPs), such as the t(15;17)-PML/RARα, t(8;21)-RUNX1/RUNX1T1 and t(6;9)-DEK/NUP214, all able to induce AML in mice, was investigated in different models and genetic backgrounds, not directly comparable to each other. To avoid the bias of different techniques and models we expressed these three AML-inducing oncogenes in an identical genetic background and compared their influence on the HSC compartment in vitro and in vivo. These AAFPs exerted differential effects on HSCs and PML/RARα, similar to DEK/NUP214, induced a leukemic phenotype from a small subpopulation of HSCs with a surface marker pattern of long-term HSC and characterized by activated STAT3 and 5. In contrast the established AML occurred from mature populations in the bone marrow. The activation of STAT5 by PML/RARα and DEK/NUP214 was confirmed in t(15;17)(PML/RARα) and t(6;9)(DEK/NUP214)-positive patients as compared to normal CD34+ cells. The activation of STAT5 was reduced upon the exposure to Arsenic which was accompanied by apoptosis in both PML/RARα- and DEK/NUP214-positive leukemic cells. These findings indicate that in AML the activation of STATs plays a decisive role in the biology of the leukemic stem cell. Furthermore we establish exposure to arsenic as a novel concept for the treatment of this high risk t(6;9)-positive AML.

  7. Outcome of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) experiencing primary induction failure in the AIEOP AML 2002/01 clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Quarello, Paola; Fagioli, Franca; Basso, Giuseppe; Putti, Maria C; Berger, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Rizzari, Carmelo; Menna, Giuseppe; Masetti, Riccardo; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-11-01

    Paediatric patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) who fail induction due to primary resistance to chemotherapy account for a significant proportion of cases and have a particularly dismal prognosis. We report the clinical and biological data, and final outcome of 48 paediatric patients with primary-resistant AML enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica AML 2002/01 clinical trial. These patients had a significantly higher white blood cell count at diagnosis compared to other AML patients. Cytogenetic and molecular features did not differ between patients with primary induction failure and patients allocated to the high-risk group. For the whole patient population, the probability of overall survival, event-free survival (EFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was 21·8% ± 6·2, 20·4% ± 5·9, and 49·5% ± 11·3, respectively. Twenty-eight (58%) patients received haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); 3 were autologous and 25 were allogeneic. Patients who underwent HSCT had improved EFS (31·2% vs. 5%, P < 0·0001). Only one of the 20 patients who did not receive HSCT is alive and disease free. The 19 patients in complete remission at time of HSCT showed significantly better DFS than the 9 with active disease (46% vs. 0%, P = 0·02). This study represents one of the largest series with long-term follow up of paediatric AML patients with primary refractory disease. Children who underwent transplantation had an encouraging long-term outcome. Disease recurrence remains the major cause of treatment failure; a better understanding of the disease biology is desirable to develop more effective treatment strategies.

  8. Mutation position within evolutionary subclonal architecture in AML.

    PubMed

    Welch, John S

    2014-10-01

    Cytogenetic data suggest that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) develops through a process of branching evolution, especially during relapse and progression. Recent genomic data from AML cases using digital sequencing, temporal comparisons, xenograft cloning, and single-cell analysis indicate that most, if not all, AML cases emerge through branching evolution. According to a review of the current literature, the balanced translocations (t[15;17], t[8;21], and inv[16]) and nucleotide variants in DNMT3A and TET2 most commonly occur in the founding clone at diagnosis. These mutations are rarely gained or lost at relapse, and the latter 2 mutations are observed in elderly subjects with mosaic hematopoiesis antedating overt leukemia. In contrast, +8, +13, +22, -X, -Y, and nucleotide variants in FLT3, NRAS/KRAS, WT1, and KIT frequently occur in subclones and are observed either to emerge or to be lost at relapse. Because drugs that target mutations within a subclone are unlikely to eliminate all leukemic cells, it will be essential to understand not only which mutations a patient has but also how they organize within the leukemic subclonal architecture.

  9. All-trans retinoic acid as adjunct to intensive treatment in younger adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia: results of the randomized AMLSG 07-04 study.

    PubMed

    Schlenk, Richard F; Lübbert, Michael; Benner, Axel; Lamparter, Alexander; Krauter, Jürgen; Herr, Wolfgang; Martin, Hans; Salih, Helmut R; Kündgen, Andrea; Horst, Heinz-A; Brossart, Peter; Götze, Katharina; Nachbaur, David; Wattad, Mohammed; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Fiedler, Walter; Bentz, Martin; Wulf, Gerald; Held, Gerhard; Hertenstein, Bernd; Salwender, Hans; Gaidzik, Verena I; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Weber, Daniela; Döhner, Konstanze; Ganser, Arnold; Döhner, Hartmut

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the impact of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in combination with chemotherapy and to assess the NPM1 status as biomarker for ATRA therapy in younger adult patients (18-60 years) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patients were randomized for intensive chemotherapy with or without open-label ATRA (45 mg/m(2), days 6-8; 15 mg/m(2), days 9-21). Two cycles of induction therapy were followed by risk-adapted consolidation with high-dose cytarabine or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Due to the open label character of the study, analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat (ITT) and a per-protocol (PP) basis. One thousand one hundred patients were randomized (556, STANDARD; 544, ATRA) with 38 patients treated vice versa. Median follow-up for survival was 5.2 years. ITT analyses revealed no difference between ATRA and STANDARD for the total cohort and for the subset of NPM1-mutated AML with respect to event-free (EFS; p = 0.93, p = 0.17) and overall survival (OS; p = 0.24 and p = 0.32, respectively). Pre-specified PP analyses revealed better EFS in NPM1-mutated AML (p = 0.05) and better OS in the total cohort (p = 0.03). Explorative subgroup analyses on an ITT basis revealed better OS (p = 0.05) in ATRA for genetic low-risk patients according to ELN recommendations. The clinical trial is registered at clinicaltrialsregister.eu (EudraCT Number: 2004-004321-95).

  10. Human AML-iPSCs Reacquire Leukemic Properties after Differentiation and Model Clonal Variation of Disease.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mark P; Gentles, Andrew J; Chatterjee, Susmita; Lan, Feng; Reinisch, Andreas; Corces, M Ryan; Xavy, Seethu; Shen, Jinfeng; Haag, Daniel; Chanda, Soham; Sinha, Rahul; Morganti, Rachel M; Nishimura, Toshinobu; Ameen, Mohamed; Wu, Haodi; Wernig, Marius; Wu, Joseph C; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-02

    Understanding the relative contributions of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) should assist integrated design of targeted therapies. In this study, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from AML patient samples harboring MLL rearrangements and found that they retained leukemic mutations but reset leukemic DNA methylation/gene expression patterns. AML-iPSCs lacked leukemic potential, but when differentiated into hematopoietic cells, they reacquired the ability to give rise to leukemia in vivo and reestablished leukemic DNA methylation/gene expression patterns, including an aberrant MLL signature. Epigenetic reprogramming was therefore not sufficient to eliminate leukemic behavior. This approach also allowed us to study the properties of distinct AML subclones, including differential drug susceptibilities of KRAS mutant and wild-type cells, and predict relapse based on increased cytarabine resistance of a KRAS wild-type subclone. Overall, our findings illustrate the value of AML-iPSCs for investigating the mechanistic basis and clonal properties of human AML.

  11. Epidemiology, outcomes, and risk factors of invasive fungal infections in adult patients with acute myelogenous leukemia after induction chemotherapy☆,☆☆,★,★★

    PubMed Central

    Neofytos, Dionissios; Lu, Kit; Hatfield-Seung, Amy; Blackford, Amanda; Marr, Kieren A.; Treadway, Suzanne; Ostrander, Darin; Nussenblatt, Veronique; Karp, Judith

    2014-01-01

    This is a retrospective, single-center study of adult patients with newly diagnosed acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), who received intensive induction timed sequential chemotherapy from 1/2005 to 6/2010. Among 254 consecutive AML patients, 123 (48.4%) developed an invasive fungal infection (IFI): 14 (5.5%) patients with invasive candidiasis (IC) and 108 (42.5%) patients with invasive mould infections (IMI). Among 108 IMI identified, 4 (3.7%) were proven, 1 (0.9%) probable, and 103 (95.4%) were possible, using current definitions. Overall, 6-month mortality was 23.7% (27/114) and 20.6% (26/126) for patients with and without an IFI, respectively. Older age (≥50 years; hazard ratio [HR]: 2.5, P < 0.001), female gender (HR: 1.7, P = 0.006), and baseline renal and/or liver dysfunction (HR: 2.4, P < 0.001) were the strongest mortality predictors. We report relatively low rates of IC despite lack of routine primary antifungal prophylaxis, albeit associated with poor long-term survival. High rates of IMI, the vast majority with a possible diagnosis, were observed. Host-related variables (demographics and baseline organ dysfunction) were identified as the most significant risk factors for IFI and mortality predictors in this series. PMID:23142166

  12. CHK1 as a therapeutic target to bypass chemoresistance in AML.

    PubMed

    David, Laure; Fernandez-Vidal, Anne; Bertoli, Sarah; Grgurevic, Srdana; Lepage, Benoît; Deshaies, Dominique; Prade, Naïs; Cartel, Maëlle; Larrue, Clément; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel; Delabesse, Eric; Cazaux, Christophe; Didier, Christine; Récher, Christian; Manenti, Stéphane; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-09-13

    The nucleoside analog cytarabine, an inhibitor of DNA replication fork progression that results in DNA damage, is currently used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We explored the prognostic value of the expression of 72 genes involved in various aspects of DNA replication in a set of 198 AML patients treated by cytarabine-based chemotherapy. We unveiled that high expression of the DNA replication checkpoint gene CHEK1 is a prognostic marker associated with shorter overall, event-free, and relapse-free survivals and determined that the expression of CHEK1 can predict more frequent and earlier postremission relapse. CHEK1 encodes checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1), which is activated by the kinase ATR when DNA replication is impaired by DNA damage. High abundance of CHK1 in AML patient cells correlated with higher clonogenic ability and more efficient DNA replication fork progression upon cytarabine treatment. Exposing the patient cells with the high abundance of CHK1 to SCH900776, an inhibitor of the kinase activity of CHK1, reduced clonogenic ability and progression of DNA replication in the presence of cytarabine. These results indicated that some AML cells rely on an efficient CHK1-mediated replication stress response for viability and that therapeutic strategies that inhibit CHK1 could extend current cytarabine-based treatments and overcome drug resistance. Furthermore, monitoring CHEK1 expression could be used both as a predictor of outcome and as a marker to select AML patients for CHK1 inhibitor treatments.

  13. CBFβ is critical for AML1-ETO and TEL-AML1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Roudaia, Liya; Cheney, Matthew D.; Manuylova, Ekaterina; Chen, Wei; Morrow, Michelle; Park, Sangho; Lee, Chung-Tsai; Kaur, Prabhjot; Williams, Owen

    2009-01-01

    AML1-ETO and TEL-AML1 are chimeric proteins resulting from the t(8;21)(q22;q22) in acute myeloid leukemia, and the t(12;21)(p13;q22) in pre-B-cell leukemia, respectively. The Runt domain of AML1 in both proteins mediates DNA binding and heterodimerization with the core binding factor β (CBFβ) subunit. To determine whether CBFβ is required for AML1-ETO and TEL-AML1 activity, we introduced amino acid substitutions into the Runt domain that disrupt heterodimerization with CBFβ but not DNA binding. We show that CBFβ contributes to AML1-ETO's inhibition of granulocyte differentiation, is essential for its ability to enhance the clonogenic potential of primary mouse bone marrow cells, and is indispensable for its cooperativity with the activated receptor tyrosine kinase TEL-PDGFβR in generating acute myeloid leukemia in mice. Similarly, CBFβ is essential for TEL-AML1's ability to promote self-renewal of B cell precursors in vitro. These studies validate the Runt domain/CBFβ interaction as a therapeutic target in core binding factor leukemias. PMID:19179469

  14. TP53 mutations in older adults with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yanada, Masamitsu; Yamamoto, Yukiya; Iba, Sachiko; Okamoto, Akinao; Inaguma, Yoko; Tokuda, Masutaka; Morishima, Satoko; Kanie, Tadaharu; Mizuta, Shuichi; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Okamoto, Masataka; Emi, Nobuhiko

    2016-04-01

    The net benefits of induction therapy for older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain controversial. Because AML in older adults is a heterogeneous disease, it is important to identify those who are unlikely to benefit from induction therapy based on information available at the initial assessment. We used next-generation sequencing to analyze TP53 mutation status in AML patients aged 60 years or older, and evaluated its effects on outcomes. TP53 mutations were detected in 12 of 77 patients (16 %), and there was a significant association between TP53 mutations and monosomal karyotype. Patients with TP53 mutations had significantly worse survival than those without (P = 0.009), and multivariate analysis identified TP53 mutation status as the most significant prognostic factor for survival. Neverthelsess, TP53-mutated patients had a 42 % chance of complete remission and a median survival of 8.0 months, which compares favorably with those who did not undergo induction therapy, even in the short term. These results suggest that screening for TP53 mutations at diagnosis is useful for identifying older adults with AML who are least likely to respond to chemotherapy, although the presence of this mutation alone does not seem to justify rejecting induction therapy.

  15. Clinical phenotypes in adult patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Lonni, Sara; Dore, Simone; McDonnell, Melissa J; Goeminne, Pieter C; Dimakou, Katerina; Fardon, Thomas C; Rutherford, Robert; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Chalmers, James D

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a heterogeneous disease. This study aimed at identifying discrete groups of patients with different clinical and biological characteristics and long-term outcomes.This was a secondary analysis of five European databases of prospectively enrolled adult outpatients with bronchiectasis. Principal component and cluster analyses were performed using demographics, comorbidities, and clinical, radiological, functional and microbiological variables collected during the stable state. Exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during a 3-year follow-up were recorded. Clusters were externally validated in an independent cohort of patients with bronchiectasis, also investigating inflammatory markers in sputum.Among 1145 patients (median age 66 years; 40% male), four clusters were identified driven by the presence of chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosaor other pathogens and daily sputum: "Pseudomonas" (16%), "Other chronic infection" (24%), "Daily sputum" (33%) and "Dry bronchiectasis" (27%). Patients in the four clusters showed significant differences in terms of quality of life, exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during follow-up. In the validation cohort, free neutrophil elastase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1β levels in sputum were significantly different among the clusters.Identification of four clinical phenotypes in bronchiectasis could favour focused treatments in future interventional studies designed to alter the natural history of the disease.

  16. TET2 exon 2 skipping is an independent favorable prognostic factor for cytogenetically normal acute myelogenous leukemia (AML): TET2 exon 2 skipping in AML.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Aminetou Mint; Balsat, Marie; Koering, Catherine; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Boissel, Nicolas; Payen-Gay, Lea; Cheok, Meyling; Mortada, Hussein; Auboeuf, Didier; Pinatel, Christiane; El-Hamri, Mohamed; Tigaud, Isabelle; Hayette, Sandrine; Dumontet, Charles; Cros, Emeline; Flandrin-Gresta, Pascale; Nibourel, Olivier; Preudhomme, Claude; Thomas, Xavier; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Solly, Françoise; Guyotat, Denis; Campos, Lydia; Michallet, Mauricette; Ceraulo, Antony; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric

    2017-01-16

    In AML, approximately one-third of expressed genes are abnormally spliced, including aberrant TET2 exon 2 expression. In a discovery cohort (n=99), TET2 exon 2 skipping (TET2E2S) was found positively associated with a significant reduction in the cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR). Age, cytogenetics, and TET2E2S were independent prognostic factors for disease-free survival (DFS), and favorable effects on outcomes predominated in cytogenetic normal (CN)-AML and younger patients. Using the same cutoff in a validation cohort of 86 CN-AML patients, TET2E2S(high) patients were found to be younger than TET2(low) patients without a difference in the rate of complete remission. However, TET2E2S(high) patients exhibited a significantly lower CIR (p<10(-4)). TET2E2S and FLT3-ITD, but not age or NPM1 mutation status were independent prognostic factors for DFS and event-free survival (EFS), while TET2E2S was the sole prognostic factor that we identified for overall survival (OS). In both the intermediate-1 and favorable ELN genetic categories, TET2E2S remained significantly associated with prolonged survival. There was no correlation between TET2E2S status and outcomes in 34 additional AML patients who were unfit for IC. Therefore our results suggest that assessments of TET2 exon 2 splicing status might improve risk stratification in CN-AML patients treated with IC.

  17. Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Types Prognostic Factors in Childhood Leukemia (ALL or AML) Certain factors that can affect a ... myelogenous leukemia (AML). Prognostic factors for children with ALL Children with ALL are often divided into risk ...

  18. Assisting sexually abused adults. Practical guide to interviewing patients.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, M. M.; Bethune, C.

    1996-01-01

    Millions of adults have been sexually abused. Patients often confide in their family physicians concerning their abuse. Physicians must understand their own issues surrounding sexual abuse and its sequelae before they attempt to treat sexually abused patients. The PLISSIT model offers a practical guide for assisting abused adult patients. PMID:8924817

  19. Budget impact analysis of CYP2C19-guided voriconazole prophylaxis in AML

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Neil T.; Bell, Gillian C.; Quilitz, Rod E.; Greene, John N.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the economic impact of proactive, CYP2C19 genotype-guided voriconazole prophylaxis in AML. Methods An Excel-based model was created to project the cost of treating a simulated cohort of severely neutropenic AML patients undergoing antifungal prophylaxis. The model compares (i) standard prophylactic dosing with voriconazole and (ii) CYP2C19 genotyping of all AML patients to guide voriconazole dosing and prescribing. Results Based on the model, genotype-guided dosing of voriconazole conservatively spares 2.3 patients per year from invasive fungal infections. Implementing proactive genotyping of all AML patients in a simulated 100 patient cohort is expected to save a total of $41467 or $415 per patient. Conclusions The model, based on the robust literature of clinical and economic data, predicts that proactive genotype-guided voriconazole prophylaxis is likely to yield modest cost savings while improving patient outcomes. The primary driver of savings is the avoidance of expensive antifungal treatment and extended hospital stays, costing $30 952 per patient, in patients succumbing to fungal infection. PMID:26233624

  20. Adult Acute Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, K.; Wells, D. G.; Clink, H. McD.; Kay, H. E. M.; Powles, R.; McElwain, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL). The periodic acid-Schiff stain was of little value in differentiating the 3 groups. The treatment response in each group was different: 94% of patients with ALL (16/17) achieved complete remission with prednisone, vincristine and other drugs in standard use in childhood ALL; 59% of patients with AML (27/46) achieved complete remission with cytosine arabinoside and daunorubicin (22 patients), or 6-thioguanine and cyclophosphamide (2 patients), 6-thioguanine, cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin (1 patient), and cytosine and Adriamycin (1 patient); only 2 out of 14 patients (14%) with acute undifferentiated leukaemia achieved complete remission using cytosine and daunorubicin after an initial trial of prednisone and vincristine had failed. Prednisone and vincristine would seem to be of no value in acute undifferentiated leukaemia. It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as “adult acute leukaemia” and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen. The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:4141625

  1. Improved FLT3/ITD PCR assay predicts outcome following allogeneic transplant for AML

    PubMed Central

    Grunwald, Michael R.; Tseng, Li-Hui; Lin, Ming-Tseh; Pratz, Keith W.; Eshleman, James R.; Levis, Mark J.; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients harboring internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene carry a poor prognosis. While allogeneic transplantation may improve outcomes, relapse occurs frequently. The FLT3/ITD mutation has been deemed an unsuitable minimal residual disease (MRD) marker because it is unstable and because the standard assay for the mutation is relatively insensitive. The FLT3 mutation is undetectable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at pre- or post-transplant time points in many FLT3/ITD AML patients who subsequently relapse following transplant. We report the application of a new technique, tandem duplication PCR (TD-PCR), for detecting MRD in FLT3/ITD AML patients. Between October 2004 and January 2012, 54 FLT3/ITD AML patients in remission underwent transplantation at our institution. Of 37 patients with available Day 60 marrow samples, 28 (76%) were evaluable for MRD detection. In seven (25%) of the 28 patients, the FLT3/ITD mutation was detectable by TD-PCR, but not by standard PCR, on day 60. Six out of the seven patients (86%) with MRD by TD-PCR have relapsed to date compared with only 2 of 21 (10%) patients who were negative for MRD (p = 0.0003). The ability to detect MRD by this sensitive technique may provide an opportunity for early clinical intervention. PMID:25240816

  2. A Crowdsourcing Approach to Developing and Assessing Prediction Algorithms for AML Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Noren, David P; Long, Byron L; Norel, Raquel; Rrhissorrakrai, Kahn; Hess, Kenneth; Hu, Chenyue Wendy; Bisberg, Alex J; Schultz, Andre; Engquist, Erik; Liu, Li; Lin, Xihui; Chen, Gregory M; Xie, Honglei; Hunter, Geoffrey A M; Boutros, Paul C; Stepanov, Oleg; Norman, Thea; Friend, Stephen H; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Kornblau, Steven; Qutub, Amina A

    2016-06-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a fatal hematological cancer. The genetic abnormalities underlying AML are extremely heterogeneous among patients, making prognosis and treatment selection very difficult. While clinical proteomics data has the potential to improve prognosis accuracy, thus far, the quantitative means to do so have yet to be developed. Here we report the results and insights gained from the DREAM 9 Acute Myeloid Prediction Outcome Prediction Challenge (AML-OPC), a crowdsourcing effort designed to promote the development of quantitative methods for AML prognosis prediction. We identify the most accurate and robust models in predicting patient response to therapy, remission duration, and overall survival. We further investigate patient response to therapy, a clinically actionable prediction, and find that patients that are classified as resistant to therapy are harder to predict than responsive patients across the 31 models submitted to the challenge. The top two performing models, which held a high sensitivity to these patients, substantially utilized the proteomics data to make predictions. Using these models, we also identify which signaling proteins were useful in predicting patient therapeutic response.

  3. AML Guide: Information for Patients and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat infections caused by bacteria and fungi. Penicillin is one type of antibiotic. Basophil. A type of white cell that plays a part in allergies. Blast cells. Early bone marrow cells. About 1 ...

  4. Characteristics, clinical outcome, and prognostic significance of IDH mutations in AML.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Courtney D; Ravandi, Farhad; Agresta, Sam; Konopleva, Marina; Takahashi, Koichi; Kadia, Tapan; Routbort, Mark; Patel, Keyur P; Mark Brandt; Pierce, Sherry; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-08-01

    The pathophysiology of IDH mutations in tumorigenesis is increasingly described, yet the prognostic significance of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in AML remains controversial. The primary objective of this study was to define the natural history and prognosis of patients with AML and IDH1 or IDH2 mutations and provide historical survival expectations. A total of 826 patients treated from 2010 to 2014 at a single institution were evaluated, including 167 patients (20%) with AML and IDH1 or IDH2 mutations. Median age was 62 years (range 18-92). There were 59 IDH1-R132, 83 IDH2-R140, and 23 IDH2-R172 mutations. Clinicopathologic characteristics associated with IDH-mutations included older age, less frequent therapy-related status, and increased incidence of intermediate-risk cytogenetics, FLT3-ITD mutations, and NPM1 mutations. Remission rates (CR/CRi) by AML treatment status were: induction, 68%; Salvage-1 (S1), 42%; and Salvage-2 and beyond (S2+), 27%. No difference in response was identified by IDH mutation status. Similarly, overall survival (OS) was not dependent on IDH status within any cohort. The median OS was 15.4 months in induction, 8.7 months in S1, and 4.8 months in S2+. This analysis defines the clinical outcome associated with IDH-mutations in both the front-line and salvage AML treatment settings, and confirms that response rate and OS for both IDH-mutated and IDH wild-type AML patients is comparable. This provides contemporary data to be used for comparison with results of novel investigational (e.g., selective IDH inhibitor) strategies.

  5. Esculetin Downregulates the Expression of AML1-ETO and C-Kit in Kasumi-1 Cell Line by Decreasing Half-Life of mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Sawney, Sharad; Arora, Rashi; Aggarwal, Kamal K.; Saluja, Daman

    2015-01-01

    One of the most frequent genetic aberrations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is chromosomal translocation between AML1/RUNX1 on chromosome 21 and ETO gene on chromosome 8 resulting in the expression of chimeric oncogene AML1-ETO. Although patients with t(8;21) translocation have good prognosis, 5-year survival is observed only in 50% of the cases. AML1-ETO translocation is usually accompanied by overexpression of mutant C-Kit, a tyrosine kinase, which contributes to uncontrolled proliferation of premature blood cells leading to relapse and poor prognosis. We illustrate the potential use of esculetin on leukemic cell line, Kasumi-1, bearing t(8;21) translocation and mutated C-Kit gene. Esculetin decreases the expression of AML1-ETO at both protein and transcript level within 24 hours of treatment. Half-life of AML1-ETO mRNA was reduced from 7 hours to 1.5 hours. Similarly half-life of C-Kit mRNA was reduced to 2 hours from 5 hours in esculetin treated cells. Esculetin also perturbed the expression of ectopically expressed AML1-ETO in U937 cells. The decreased expression of AML1-ETO chimeric gene was associated with increased expression of LAT1 and RUNX3 genes, targets of AML1. We envisage that discovery of a drug candidate which could target both these mutated genes would be a considerable breakthrough for future application. PMID:25861270

  6. Coordinate regulation of residual bone marrow function by paracrine trafficking of AML exosomes.

    PubMed

    Huan, J; Hornick, N I; Goloviznina, N A; Kamimae-Lanning, A N; David, L L; Wilmarth, P A; Mori, T; Chevillet, J R; Narla, A; Roberts, C T; Loriaux, M M; Chang, B H; Kurre, P

    2015-12-01

    We recently demonstrated that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines and patient-derived blasts release exosomes that carry RNA and protein; following an in vitro transfer, AML exosomes produce proangiogenic changes in bystander cells. We reasoned that paracrine exosome trafficking may have a broader role in shaping the leukemic niche. In a series of in vitro studies and murine xenografts, we demonstrate that AML exosomes downregulate critical retention factors (Scf, Cxcl12) in stromal cells, leading to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization from the bone marrow. Exosome trafficking also regulates HSPC directly, and we demonstrate declining clonogenicity, loss of CXCR4 and c-Kit expression, and the consistent repression of several hematopoietic transcription factors, including c-Myb, Cebp-β and Hoxa-9. Additional experiments using a model of extramedullary AML or direct intrafemoral injection of purified exosomes reveal that the erosion of HSPC function can occur independent of direct cell-cell contact with leukemia cells. Finally, using a novel multiplex proteomics technique, we identified candidate pathways involved in the direct exosome-mediated modulation of HSPC function. In aggregate, this work suggests that AML exosomes participate in the suppression of residual hematopoietic function that precedes widespread leukemic invasion of the bone marrow directly and indirectly via stromal components.

  7. Changes in the MALT1-A20-NF-κB expression pattern may be related to T cell dysfunction in AML.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li; Chen, Shaohua; Lu, Yuhong; Wang, Xu; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Fan; Yang, Lijian; Wu, Xiuli; Li, Bo; Li, Yangqiu

    2013-04-30

    To elucidate the characteristics of T-cell receptor (TCR) signal transduction in T-cells from acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue lymphoma-translocation gene 1 (MALT1), A20, NF-κB and MALT1-V1 gene expression levels in CD3+ T cells sorted from the peripheral blood of patients with AML were analyzed by real-time PCR. A significantly lower MALT1 and A20 expression level was found in T cells from patients with AML compared with healthy controls (p = 0.045, p < 0.0001); however, the expression level of MALT1-V1 (variant 1) was significantly higher in the AML group than in the healthy control group (p = 0.006), and the expression level of NF-κB was increased in the AML group. In conclusion, the characteristics of the expression pattern of MALT1-A20-NF-κB and the distribution of MALT1 variants in T cells from AML were first characterized. Overall, low TCR-CD3 signaling is related to low MALT1 expression, which may related to T cell immunodeficiency, while the up-regulation of MALT1-V1 may play a role in overcoming the T cell activity by downregulating A20 in patients with AML, which may be related to a specific response to AML-associated antigens.

  8. Donor lymphocyte infusions in AML and MDS: Enhancing the graft-versus-leukemia effect.

    PubMed

    Orti, Guillermo; Barba, Pere; Fox, Laura; Salamero, Olga; Bosch, Francesc; Valcarcel, David

    2017-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents the only curative therapy for many haematological malignancies. Its curative potential is mostly attributed to the graft-versus-leukemia effect (GvL), which is mainly driven by donor T-cells. Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI), likewise a second allo-HCT, have become a standard approach to treat AML and MDS relapses post allo-HCT. Although DLI have been used in this setting for decades, its effectivity and toxicity are still unpredictable in many patients. Over these recent years, new DLI strategies and therapies have been developed for AML and MDS. In this review, we will overview the recent use of DLI for AML and MDS, with up to date information from novel studies and research lines.

  9. Inhibition of Wild-Type p53-Expressing AML by the Novel Small Molecule HDM2 Inhibitor CGM097.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Ellen; Halilovic, Ensar; Cooke, Vesselina G; Nonami, Atsushi; Ren, Tao; Sanda, Takaomi; Simkin, Irene; Yuan, Jing; Antonakos, Brandon; Barys, Louise; Ito, Moriko; Stone, Richard; Galinsky, Ilene; Cowens, Kristen; Nelson, Erik; Sattler, Martin; Jeay, Sebastien; Wuerthner, Jens U; McDonough, Sean M; Wiesmann, Marion; Griffin, James D

    2015-10-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a key regulator of apoptosis and functions upstream in the apoptotic cascade by both indirectly and directly regulating Bcl-2 family proteins. In cells expressing wild-type (WT) p53, the HDM2 protein binds to p53 and blocks its activity. Inhibition of HDM2:p53 interaction activates p53 and causes apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Here, we investigated the ability of the novel HDM2 inhibitor CGM097 to potently and selectively kill WT p53-expressing AML cells. The antileukemic effects of CGM097 were studied using cell-based proliferation assays (human AML cell lines, primary AML patient cells, and normal bone marrow samples), apoptosis, and cell-cycle assays, ELISA, immunoblotting, and an AML patient-derived in vivo mouse model. CGM097 potently and selectively inhibited the proliferation of human AML cell lines and the majority of primary AML cells expressing WT p53, but not mutant p53, in a target-specific manner. Several patient samples that harbored mutant p53 were comparatively unresponsive to CGM097. Synergy was observed when CGM097 was combined with FLT3 inhibition against oncogenic FLT3-expressing cells cultured both in the absence as well as the presence of cytoprotective stromal-secreted cytokines, as well as when combined with MEK inhibition in cells with activated MAPK signaling. Finally, CGM097 was effective in reducing leukemia burden in vivo. These data suggest that CGM097 is a promising treatment for AML characterized as harboring WT p53 as a single agent, as well as in combination with other therapies targeting oncogene-activated pathways that drive AML.

  10. Augmentation of autologous T cell reactivity with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts by Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists.

    PubMed

    Zhong, RuiKun; Li, Hongying; Messer, Karen; Lane, Thomas A; Zhou, Jiehua; Ball, Edward D

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated whether TNF-α, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7/8 agonist resiquimod (R848), the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and their combinations can enhance autologous AML-reactive T cell generation in an in vitro culture. AML peripheral blood or bone marrow mononuclear cells were cultured in medium supplemented with GM-CSF/IL-4 to induce dendritic cell (DC) differentiation of AML blasts (AML-DC). The impact of TNF-α, LPS, R848 and their combinations on AML-DC cultures was analyzed. Significantly enhanced CD80, CD40, CD83, CD54, HLA-DR and CD86 expression of AML cells was observed by addition of TNF-α, LPS, R848 alone or combinations. Induced CD80 expression of AML cells was significantly higher through the combination of TNF-α, LPS and R848 (T + L + R) than that by T alone. CTL induced from T + L + R, T + R, T + L, L + R and R, but not T, L alone stimulated cultures showed significantly higher IFN-γ release than the medium control in response to autologous AML cells. IFN-γ release by T + L + R was significantly higher than T or L alone, and T + R was significantly higher than T alone. CTL generated from T + L + R, T + L, T + R, L + R and L alone exerted significantly higher AML cell killing than medium control. AML cell killing by T + L + R and T + R was significantly higher than T or R alone. These results indicate that the combination of T + L + R induces a significantly enhanced antigen presentation effect of AML-DC. We speculate that the complementary effects of reagent combinations may better address the heterogeneity of responses to any single agent in AML cells from different patients.

  11. The promoter of miR-663 is hypermethylated in Chinese pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence supporting a role for microRNAs (miRNA) as targets in aberrant mechanisms of DNA hypermethylation. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor miRNAs, including miR-663, which has recently been reported to be inactivated by hypermethylation in several cancers, may play important roles in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, expression of miR-663 and its promoter methylation remain status unclear in childhood leukemia. Methods Promoter methylation status of miR-663 was investigated by methylation specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfate genomic sequencing (BGS). Transcriptional expression of miR-663 was evaluated by semi-quantitative and real-time PCR, and the relationship between expression of miR-663 and promoter methylation was confirmed using 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) demethylation reagent. Results MiR-663 was aberrantly methylated in 45.5% (5/11) leukemia cell lines; BGS showed that the promoter was significantly methylated in three AML cell lines; methylation of miR-663 was significantly higher in Chinese pediatric AML patients [41.4% (29/70)] compared to normal bone marrow (NBM) control samples [10.0% (3/30)]. These results were confirmed by both BGS and 5-Aza demethylation analysis. In addition, miR-663 transcript expression was significantly lower in AML patients, both with and without miR-663 methylation, compared to controls; however, there were no significant differences in clinical features or French-American-British (FAB) classification between patients with and without miR-663 methylation. Conclusions Expression of miR-663 was significantly lower in pediatric AML cells compared to NBM controls; furthermore, a high frequency of miR-663 promoter hypermethylation was observed in both AML cell lines and pediatric AML samples. Inactivation of miR-663 by promoter hypermethylation could be affected by 5-Aza demethylation. These findings suggest that hypermethylation of the miR-663 promoter may be an early event in

  12. Establishment of xenotransplantation model of human CN-AML with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) in NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhen; Wang, Jue; Wang, Di; Xiao, Min; Li, Tong-juan; Wang, Na; Huang, Liang; Zhou, Jian-feng

    2013-06-01

    Patients with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML), as high-risk molecular group in CN-AML, are associated with a worse prognosis than other CN-AML patients. It is beneficial to generate xenotransplantation model of FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML to better understand the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies of such AML subtype. The purpose of present study was to establish the xenotransplantation model in NOD/SCID mice with FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells. The FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML primary cells from 3 of 7 cases were successfully transplanted into NOD/SCID mice, and human CD45 positive cells were detected in the peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow of mice by using flow cytometry. Infiltration of human leukemia cells in various organs of mice was observed by using immunohistochemistry. Gene analysis confirmed sustained FLT3/ITD mutation without NPM1 mutation in mice. By performing serial transplantation, it was found that characteristics of the leukemia cells in secondary and tertiary generation models remained unchanged. Moreover, in vivo cytarabine administration could extend survival of NOD/SCID mice, which was consistent with clinical observation. In conclusion, we successfully established xenotransplantation model of human FLT3-ITD (mut) /NPM1 (-) CN-AML in NOD/SCID mice. The model was able to present primary disease and suitable to evaluate the curative effects of new drugs or therapy strategies.

  13. Exploring Adult Care Experiences and Barriers to Transition in Adult Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bemrich-Stolz, CJ; Halanych, JH; Howard, TH; Hilliard, LM; Lebensburger, JD

    2015-01-01

    Background Young adults with sickle cell anemia are at high risk for increased hospitalization and death at the time of transition to adult care. This may be related to failure of the transition system to prepare young adults for the adult healthcare system. This qualitative study was designed to identify factors related to transition that may affect the health of adults with sickle cell anemia. Procedure Ten patients currently treated in an adult hematology clinic participated in semi-structured qualitative interviews to describe their experience transitioning from pediatric to adult care and differences in adult and pediatric healthcare systems. Results Participants were generally unprepared for the adult healthcare system. Negative issues experienced by participants included physician mistrust, difficulty with employers, keeping insurance, and stress in personal relationships. Positive issues experienced by participants included improved self efficacy with improved self care and autonomy. Conclusions In the absence of a formalized transition program, adults with sickle cell anemia experience significant barriers to adult care. In addition to medical history review and identification of an adult provider, transition programs should incorporate strategies to navigate the adult medical system, insurance and relationships as well as encouraging self efficacy. PMID:26900602

  14. [Bacterial parotitis in an immunocompromised patient in adult ICU].

    PubMed

    Vassal, O; Bernet, C; Wallet, F; Friggeri, A; Piriou, V

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial parotitis is a common childhood disease with a favorable outcome. Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently involved pathogen. Clinical presentation in adult patients can be misleading, Onset occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities, making diagnosis difficult--particularly in ICU. Different pathogens are found in adults with worse outcomes observed. We report here the case of a critically ill patient and discuss diagnosis and management of bacterial parotitis.

  15. A randomized assessment of adding the kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib to first-line chemotherapy for FLT3-mutated AML.

    PubMed

    Knapper, Steven; Russell, Nigel; Gilkes, Amanda; Hills, Robert K; Gale, Rosemary E; Cavenagh, James D; Jones, Gail; Kjeldsen, Lars; Grunwald, Michael R; Thomas, Ian; Konig, Heiko; Levis, Mark J; Burnett, Alan K

    2017-03-02

    The clinical benefit of adding FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3)-directed small molecule therapy to standard first-line treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not yet been established. As part of the UK AML15 and AML17 trials, patients with previously untreated AML and confirmed FLT3-activating mutations, mostly younger than 60 years, were randomly assigned either to receive oral lestaurtinib (CEP701) or not after each of 4 cycles of induction and consolidation chemotherapy. Lestaurtinib was commenced 2 days after completing chemotherapy and administered in cycles of up to 28 days. The trials ran consecutively. Primary endpoints were overall survival in AML15 and relapse-free survival in AML17; outcome data were meta-analyzed. Five hundred patients were randomly assigned between lestaurtinib and control: 74% had FLT3-internal tandem duplication mutations, 23% FLT3-tyrosine kinase domain point mutations, and 2% both types. No significant differences were seen in either 5-year overall survival (lestaurtinib 46% vs control 45%; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI 0.70-1.15; P = .3) or 5-year relapse-free survival (40% vs 36%; hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI 0.69-1.12; P = .3). Exploratory subgroup analysis suggested survival benefit with lestaurtinib in patients receiving concomitant azole antifungal prophylaxis and gemtuzumab ozogamicin with the first course of chemotherapy. Correlative studies included analysis of in vivo FLT3 inhibition by plasma inhibitory activity assay and indicated improved overall survival and significantly reduced rates of relapse in lestaurtinib-treated patients who achieved sustained greater than 85% FLT3 inhibition. In conclusion, combining lestaurtinib with intensive chemotherapy proved feasible in younger patients with newly diagnosed FLT3-mutated AML, but yielded no overall clinical benefit. The improved clinical outcomes seen in patients achieving sustained FLT3 inhibition encourage continued evaluation of FLT3-directed therapy alongside

  16. Physical and psychosocial challenges in adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    duTreil, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Numerous challenges confront adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors, including difficulty in controlling bleeding episodes, deterioration of joints, arthritic pain, physical disability, emotional turmoil, and social issues. High-intensity treatment regimens often used in the treatment of patients with inhibitors also impose significant scheduling, economic, and emotional demands on patients and their families or primary caregivers. A comprehensive multidisciplinary assessment of the physical, emotional, and social status of adult hemophilia patients with inhibitors is essential for the development of treatment strategies that can be individualized to address the complex needs of these patients. PMID:25093002

  17. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  18. Apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain is regulated by MAPK/PI3K and confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P. Y.; Mak, D. H.; Mu, H.; Shi, Y.; Ruvolo, P.; Ruvolo, V.; Jacamo, R.; Burks, J. K.; Wei, W.; Huang, X.; Kornblau, S. M.; Andreeff, M.; Carter, B. Z.

    2014-01-01

    The apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) protein is known to suppress both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. We previously reported that ARC expression is a strong, independent adverse prognostic factor in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we investigated the regulation and role of ARC in AML. ARC expression is upregulated in AML cells co-cultured with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and suppressed by inhibition of MAPK and PI3K signaling. AML patient samples with RAS mutations (N = 64) expressed significantly higher levels of ARC than samples without RAS mutations (N = 371) (P = 0.016). ARC overexpression protected and ARC knockdown sensitized AML cells to cytarabine and to agents that selectively induce intrinsic (ABT-737) or extrinsic (TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand) apoptosis. NOD-SCID mice harboring ARC-overexpressing KG-1 cells had significantly shorter survival than mice injected with control cells (median 84 versus 111 days) and significantly fewer leukemia cells were present when NOD/SCID IL2R null mice were injected with ARC knockdown as compared to control Molm13 cells (P = 0.005 and 0.03 at 2 and 3 weeks, respectively). Together, these findings demonstrate that MSCs regulate ARC in AML through activation of MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways. ARC confers drug resistance and survival advantage to AML in vitro and in vivo, suggesting ARC as a novel target in AML therapy. PMID:24337870

  19. New study reveals relatively few mutations in AML genomes - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have detailed and broadly classified the genomic alterations that frequently underlie the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  20. Pre-transplant MRD predicts outcome following reduced-intensity and myeloablative allogeneic hemopoietic SCT in AML.

    PubMed

    Anthias, C; Dignan, F L; Morilla, R; Morilla, A; Ethell, M E; Potter, M N; Shaw, B E

    2014-05-01

    The presence of minimal residual disease (MRD) by multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) has been associated with adverse outcomes in AML patients treated with chemotherapy alone, but its impact in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is less clear. We studied 88 patients who underwent myeloablative (MA) or reduced-intensity conditioned allogeneic HSCT for AML in first or subsequent remission at our center. MRD status was determined using three-color MFC on pre-HSCT BM aspirates, and patients were stratified by MRD status into MRD-negative, low-level MRD-positive (<1%) or high-level MRD-positive groups (1-4.9%). Two-year survival estimates in these groups were 66.8%, 51% and 30%, respectively (P=0.012), and 2-year estimates of relapse were 7.6, 37 and 70% (P<0.001). Pre-HSCT MRD was related to disease characteristics including secondary AML (P=0.002) and primary induction failure (P=0.005), but, despite these strong correlations, MRD remained independently associated with poorer survival in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 1.92; P=0.014). Pre-HSCT MRD is associated with adverse clinical outcomes in AML patients undergoing reduced-intensity or MA HSCT in first or subsequent remission and should be integrated into transplant strategies for patients with AML.

  1. A pyrrolo-pyrimidine derivative targets human primary AML stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoriko; Yuki, Hitomi; Kuratani, Mitsuo; Hashizume, Yoshinobu; Takagi, Shinsuke; Honma, Teruki; Tanaka, Akiko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Mikuni, Junko; Handa, Noriko; Ogahara, Ikuko; Sone, Akiko; Najima, Yuho; Tomabechi, Yuri; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Tomizawa-Murasawa, Mariko; Kaneko, Akiko; Tanaka, Satoshi; Suzuki, Nahoko; Kajita, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yuki; Ohara, Osamu; Shultz, Leonard D; Fukami, Takehiro; Goto, Toshio; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

    2013-04-17

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that survive conventional chemotherapy are thought to contribute to disease relapse, leading to poor long-term outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We previously identified a Src-family kinase (SFK) member, hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK), as a molecular target that is highly differentially expressed in human primary LSCs compared with human normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We performed a large-scale chemical library screen that integrated a high-throughput enzyme inhibition assay, in silico binding prediction, and crystal structure determination and found a candidate HCK inhibitor, RK-20449, a pyrrolo-pyrimidine derivative with an enzymatic IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) in the subnanomolar range. A crystal structure revealed that RK-20449 bound the activation pocket of HCK. In vivo administration of RK-20449 to nonobese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immunodeficient (SCID)/IL2rg(null) mice engrafted with highly aggressive therapy-resistant AML significantly reduced human LSC and non-stem AML burden. By eliminating chemotherapy-resistant LSCs, RK-20449 may help to prevent relapse and lead to improved patient outcomes in AML.

  2. Negative immunomagnetic selection of T cells from peripheral blood of presentation AML specimens.

    PubMed

    Le Dieu, Rifca; Taussig, David; Lister, T Andrew; Gribben, John G

    2009-08-31

    To date, studies on T cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have been limited to flow cytometric analysis of whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) specimens or functional work looking at the impact of AML myeloblasts on normal or remission T cells. This lack of information on T cells at the time of presentation with disease is due in part to the difficulty in isolating sufficiently pure T cells from these specimens for further study. Negative immunomagnetic selection has been the method of choice for isolating immune cells for functional studies due to concerns that binding antibodies to the cell surface may induce cellular activation, block ligand-receptor interactions or result in immune clearance. In order specifically to study T cells in presentation AML specimens, we set out to develop a method of isolating highly pure CD4 and CD8 T cells by negative selection from the peripheral blood (PB) of newly diagnosed AML patients. This technique, unlike T cell selection from PB from normal individuals or from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, was extremely problematic due to properties of the leukaemic myeloblasts. A successful method was eventually optimized requiring the use of a custom antibody cocktail consisting of CD33, CD34, CD123, CD11c and CD36, to deplete myeloblasts.

  3. Blastic leukaemias (AML): a biologist's view.

    PubMed

    Cáceres-Cortés, Julio Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Acute myeloblastic leukaemia is characterised by the extreme clonal proliferation of haematopoietic precursor cells with abnormal or arrested differentiation. Chemotherapy of acute leukaemia is channelled towards the reduction and eradication of leukaemic cells. However, relapse is generally assumed to occur in residual host cells, which are refractory to or elude therapy. The cancer stem cell hypothesis has gained considerable importance in recent years and could interpret this behaviour. This persuasive theory states that cells within a tumour are organised in a hierarchy similar to that of normal tissues and are maintained by a small subset of cells responsible for tumour dormancy. These cells, defined as 'tumour initiating cells' (TICs), possess several properties of normal tissue stem cells. Recently, the TICs associated with AML have been shown to comprise distinct, hierarchically arranged classes similar to those observed for haematopoietic stem cells. We know now that the growth and survival of blasts in AML are driven by the same growth factors that stimulate normal cells. Furthermore, direct evidence of the role of membrane stem cell factor and its receptor c-Kit in cell-cell interactions and cell survival in primary AML blasts have been provided, defining the importance of juxtacrine stimulation. Inhibition of c-Kit signalling induces combinations of cell death: autophagy (compensatory mechanism towards survival) and apoptosis. While recent work confirmed that c-Kit inhibitors reduce cancer cell proliferation, it also demonstrated that future inappropriate prescriptions could cause normal tissue deterioration. The purpose of this paper was to review some of the salient features of leukaemic blasts in support of the proposal that research into neoplasia be increased. Rather than presenting the details of various studies, I have attempted to indicate general areas in which work has been done or is in progress. It is hoped that this survey of the subject

  4. Defining and Treating Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Ineligible for Intensive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Pettit, Kristen; Odenike, Olatoyosi

    2015-01-01

    Although acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults (age ≥60 years), the optimal treatment for older adults remains largely undefined. Intensive chemotherapy is rarely beneficial for frail older adults or those with poor-risk disease, but criteria that define fitness and/or appropriateness for intensive chemotherapy remain to be standardized. Evaluation of disease-related and patient-specific factors in the context of clinical decision making has therefore been largely subjective. A uniform approach to identify those patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapies is needed. Here, we review currently available objective measures to define older adults with AML who are ineligible for intensive chemotherapy, and discuss promising investigational approaches. PMID:26697412

  5. AML Therapy With Irradiated Allogeneic Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Polymorphisms and haplotypes of the CYP2B6 detoxification gene in the predisposition of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and induction of its cytogenetic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Daraki, Aggeliki; Kakosaiou, Katerina; Zachaki, Sophia; Sambani, Constantina; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki; Kollia, Panagoula; Manola, Kalliopi N

    2016-11-01

    CYP2B6 is a polymorphic detoxification gene which plays a vital role in the degradation of genotoxic compounds. In this study we hypothesized that inadequate detoxification due to CYP2B6 polymorphisms may contribute to AML. To evaluate the potential impact of CYP2B6 polymorphisms on AML development and induction of its specific chromosomal abnormalities we studied C(777)A and A(785)G polymorphisms for the first time in AML. Furthermore, we investigated the co-existence of the above polymorphisms with G(516)T polymorphism to determine the CYP2B6 high-risk haplotypes in AML susceptibility. Our study included 619 AML patients and 430 healthy donors. Concerning C(777)A CYP2B6 polymorphism, no significant difference was found between patients and controls. However, A(785)G CYP2B6 polymorphism showed a statistically higher frequency of the variant genotypes in patients (48.2%), mainly in secondary AML patients (49.1%) than in controls (26.1%). Moreover, an increased frequency of the variant genotypes was found in those with abnormal karyotypes, especially with -7/del(7q), -5/del(5q), +8, inv(16) and t(8;21). The combination of the three CYP2B6 polymorphisms (G(516)T, C(777)A & A(785)G) revealed seven haplotypes. Four out of six haplotypes with at least one mutant allele were significantly associated with an increased risk for AML. Interestingly, T516A777G785 haplotype, where the three mutant alleles co-existed, had ~3-fold increased risk to be found in patients than controls. The association between haplotypes and cytogenetic aberrations revealed a positive correlation between specific CYP2B6 haplotypes and AML cytogenetic abnormalities. Our data suggest that A(785)G CYP2B6 gene polymorphism and specific CYP2B6 haplotypes may contribute to AML and its specific chromosomal aberrations.

  7. Frequent ASXL2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia patients with t(8;21)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1 chromosomal translocations

    PubMed Central

    Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Duployez, Nicolas; Boissel, Nicolas; Petit, Arnaud; Geffroy, Sandrine; Nibourel, Olivier; Lacombe, Catherine; Lapillonne, Helene; Etancelin, Pascaline; Figeac, Martin; Renneville, Aline; Castaigne, Sylvie; Leverger, Guy; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé; Preudhomme, Claude; Jourdan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;21) (q22;q22) is considered to have favorable risk; however, nearly half of t(8;21) patients are not cured, and recent studies have highlighted remarkable genetic heterogeneity in this subset of AML. Here we identify somatic mutations in additional sex combs-like 2 (ASXL2) in 22.7% (25/110) of patients with t(8;21), but not in patients with inv(16)/t(16;16) (0/60) or RUNX1-mutated AML (0/26). ASXL2 mutations were similarly frequent in adults and children t(8;21) and were mutually exclusive with ASXL1 mutations. Although overall survival was similar between ASXL1 and ASXL2 mutant t(8;21) AML patients and their wild-type counterparts, patients with ASXL1 or ASXL2 mutations had a cumulative incidence of relapse of 54.6% and 36.0%, respectively, compared with 25% in ASXL1/2 wild-type counterparts (P = .226). These results identify a high-frequency mutation in t(8;21) AML and identify the need for future studies to investigate the clinical and biological relevance of ASXL2 mutations in this unique subset of AML. PMID:24973361

  8. A prognostic model for survival after salvage treatment with FLAG-Ida +/- gemtuzumab-ozogamicine in adult patients with refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Bergua, Juan M; Montesinos, Pau; Martinez-Cuadrón, David; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; Serrano, Josefina; Sayas, María J; Prieto-Fernandez, Julio; García, Raimundo; García-Huerta, Ana J; Barrios, Manuel; Benavente, Celina; Pérez-Encinas, Manuel; Simiele, Adriana; Rodríguez-Macias, Gabriela; Herrera-Puente, Pilar; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Martínez-Sánchez, María P; Amador-Barciela, María L; Riaza-Grau, Rosalía; Sanz, Miguel A

    2016-09-01

    The combination of fludarabine, cytarabine, idarubicin, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (FLAG-Ida) is widely used in relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We retrospectively analysed the results of 259 adult AML patients treated as first salvage with FLAG-Ida or FLAG-Ida plus Gentuzumab-Ozogamicin (FLAGO-Ida) of the Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología (PETHEMA) database, developing a prognostic score system of survival in this setting (SALFLAGE score). Overall, 221 patients received FLAG-Ida and 38 FLAGO-Ida; 92 were older than 60 years. The complete remission (CR)/CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi) rate was 51%, with 9% of induction deaths. Three covariates were associated with lower CR/CRi: high-risk cytogenetics and t(8;21) at diagnosis, no previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) and relapse-free interval <1 year. Allo-SCT was performed in second CR in 60 patients (23%). The median overall survival (OS) of the entire cohort was 0·7 years, with 22% OS at 5-years. Four independent variables were used to construct the score: cytogenetics, FLT3-internal tandem duplication, length of relapse-free interval and previous allo-SCT. Using this stratification system, three groups were defined: favourable (26% of patients), intermediate (29%) and poor-risk (45%), with an expected 5-year OS of 52%, 26% and 7%, respectively. The SALFLAGE score discriminated a subset of patients with an acceptable long-term outcome using FLAG-Ida/FLAGO-Ida regimen. The results of this retrospective analysis should be validated in independent external cohorts.

  9. Management of older or unfit patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Walter, R B; Estey, E H

    2015-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is primarily a disease of older adults, for whom optimal treatment strategies remain controversial. Because of the concern for therapeutic resistance and, in particular, excessive toxicity or even treatment-related mortality, many older or medically unfit patients do not receive AML-directed therapy. Yet, evidence suggests that outcomes are improved if essentially all of these patients are offered AML therapy, ideally at a specialized cancer center. Medical fitness for tolerating intensive chemotherapy can be estimated relatively accurately with multiparameter assessment tools; this information should serve as basis for the assignment to intensive or non-intensive therapy. Until our accuracy in predicting the success of individual therapies improves, all patients should be considered for participation in a randomized controlled trial. Comparisons between individual trials will be facilitated once standardized, improved response criteria are developed, and standard treatment approaches have been defined against which novel therapies can be tested.

  10. Intensive care of the adult patient with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Allan, Catherine K

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence of congenital heart disease in the adult population has increased out of proportion to that of the pediatric population as survival has improved, and adult congenital heart disease patients make up a growing percentage of pediatric and adult cardiac intensive care unit admissions. These patients often develop complex multiorgan system disease as a result of long-standing altered cardiac physiology, and many require reoperation during adulthood. Practitioners who care for these patients in the cardiac intensive care unit must have a strong working knowledge of the pathophysiology of complex congenital heart disease, and a full team of specialists must be available to assist in the care of these patients. This chapter will review some of the common multiorgan system effects of long-standing congenital heart disease (eg, renal and hepatic dysfunction, coagulation abnormalities, arrhythmias) as well as some of the unique cardiopulmonary physiology of this patient population.

  11. Umbilical cord blood transplantation in adult myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tse, W W; Zang, S L; Bunting, K D; Laughlin, M J

    2008-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a life-saving procedure for hematopoietic malignancies, marrow failure syndromes and hereditary immunodeficiency disorders. However, wide application of this procedure is limited by availability of suitable human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched adult donors. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been increasingly used as an alternative HSC source for patients lacking matched-HSC donors. The clinical experience of using UCB transplantation to treat pediatric acute leukemias has already shown that higher-level HLA-mismatched UCB can be equally as good as or even better than matched HSC. Recently, large registries and multiple single institutional studies conclusively demonstrated that UCB is an acceptable source of HSCs for adult acute leukemia patients who lack HLA-matched donors. These studies will impact the future clinical allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is the most common acute leukemia in adults. UCB has unique advantages of easy procurement, absence of risk to donors, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability, greater tolerance of HLA disparity and lower-than-expected incidence of severe graft-versus-host disease. These features of UCB permit successful transplantation available to almost every patient who needs it. We anticipate that using UCB as a HSC source for allogeneic transplantation for adult AML will increase dramatically over the next 5 years, by expanding the available allogeneic donor pool. Clinical studies are needed with focus on disease-specific UCB transplantation outcomes, including AML, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and lymphoma.

  12. The t(8;21) fusion protein interferes with AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, S; Lenny, N; Hiebert, S W

    1995-01-01

    The AML-1/CBF beta transcription factor complex is targeted by both the t(8;21) and the inv(16) chromosomal alterations, which are frequently observed in acute myelogenous leukemia. AML-1 is a site-specific DNA-binding protein that recognizes the enhancer core motif TGTGGT. The t(8;21) translocation fuses the first 177 amino acids of AML-1 to MTG8 (also known as ETO), generating a chimeric protein that retains the DNA-binding domain of AML-1. Analysis of endogenous AML-1 DNA-binding complexes suggested the presence of at least two AML-1 isoforms. Accordingly, we screened a human B-cell cDNA library and isolated a larger, potentially alternatively spliced, form of AML1, termed AML1B. AML-1B is a protein of 53 kDa that binds to a consensus AML-1-binding site and complexes with CBF beta. Subcellular fractionation experiments demonstrated that both AML-1 and AML-1/ETO are efficiently extracted from the nucleus under ionic conditions but that AML-1B is localized to a salt-resistant nuclear compartment. Analysis of the transcriptional activities of AML-1, AML-1B, and AML-1/ETO demonstrated that only AML-1B activates transcription from the T-cell receptor beta enhancer. Mixing experiments indicated that AML-1/ETO can efficiently block AML-1B-dependent transcriptional activation, suggesting that the t(8;21) translocation creates a dominant interfering protein. PMID:7891692

  13. Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, Carl F., Jr.; Potts, Jack; Brown, Jerry; Schell, Ken; Manley, Mary; Chen, Irving; Earhart, Richard; Urrutia, Chuck; Randolph, Ray; Morris, Jim

    1992-01-01

    To assure national leadership in space operations and exploration in the future, NASA must be able to provide cost effective and operationally efficient space transportation. Several NASA studies and the joint NASA/DoD Space Transportation Architecture Studies (STAS) have shown the need for a multi-vehicle space transportation system with designs driven by enhanced operations and low costs. NASA is currently studying an advanced manned launch system (AMLS) approach to transport crew and cargo to the Space Station Freedom. Several single and multiple stage systems from air-breathing to all-rocket concepts are being examined in a series of studies potential replacements for the Space Shuttle launch system in the 2000-2010 time frame. Rockwell International Corporation, under contract to the NASA Langley Research Center, has analyzed a two-stage all-rocket concept to determine whether this class of vehicles is appropriate for the AMLS function. The results of the pre-phase A study are discussed.

  14. Selecting initial treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Podoltsev, Nikolai A; Stahl, Maximilian; Zeidan, Amer M; Gore, Steven D

    2016-10-08

    More than half of the patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are older than 60years. The treatment outcomes in this group remain poor with a median overall survival of <1year. Selecting initial treatment for these patients involves an assessment of 'fitness' for induction chemotherapy. This is done based on patient and disease-related characteristics which help to estimate treatment-related mortality and chance of complete remission with induction chemotherapy. If the risk of treatment-related mortality is high and/or the likelihood of a patient achieving a complete remission is low, lower-intensity treatment (low-dose cytarabine, decitabine and azacitidine) should be discussed. As outcomes in both groups of patients remain poor, enrolment into clinical trials of novel agents with varying mechanisms of action should be considered for all older adults with AML. Novel agents in Phase III development include CPX-351, guadecitabine (SGI-110), quizartinib, crenolanib, sapacitabine, vosaroxin and volasertib.

  15. Nassi-Schneiderman Diagram in HTML Based on AML

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menyhárt, László

    2013-01-01

    In an earlier work I defined an extension of XML called Algorithm Markup Language (AML) for easy and understandable coding in an IDE which supports XML editing (e.g. NetBeans). The AML extension contains annotations and native language (English or Hungarian) tag names used when coding our algorithm. This paper presents a drawing tool with which…

  16. Adult-onset amenorrhea: a study of 262 patients.

    PubMed

    Reindollar, R H; Novak, M; Tho, S P; McDonough, P G

    1986-09-01

    A series of 262 patients with amenorrhea of adult onset are reported. Hypothalamic suppression followed by inappropriate positive feedback, and then hyperprolactinemia and ovarian failure are the most frequently encountered etiologies. Other etiologies are diverse and numerically less frequent. Amenorrhea after use of oral contraceptives, or postpill amenorrhea, occurred in 77 (29%) of all patients. The average age of presentation, prior menstrual history, associated morbidity, and subsequent reproductive potential of each diagnostic group are reported. Adult-onset amenorrhea has a less significant impact on future wellbeing than was reported for a similar-sized group of patients whose amenorrhea developed as a result of pubertal aberrancy.

  17. Maintenance therapy with decitabine in younger adults with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission: a phase 2 Cancer and Leukemia Group B study (CALGB 10503)

    PubMed Central

    Blum, William; Sanford, Ben L.; Klisovic, Rebecca; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Uy, Geoffrey; Powell, Bayard L.; Stock, Wendy; Baer, Maria R.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Hoke, Eva; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Geyer, Susan; Marcucci, Guido; Stone, Richard M.; Larson, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective phase 2 clinical trial conducted by Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB, now the Alliance), we studied decitabine as maintenance therapy for younger adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who remained in first complete remission (CR1) following intensive induction and consolidation. Given that decitabine is clinically active in AML and with hypomethylating activity distinct from cytotoxic chemotherapy, we hypothesized that one year of maintenance therapy would improve disease-free survival (DFS) for AML patients <60 years who did not receive allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHCT) in CR1. After blood count recovery from final consolidation, patients received decitabine at 20mg/m2 IV daily for 4–5 days, every 6 weeks for 8 cycles. One-hundred-thirty-four patients received decitabine, 85 (63%) had favorable risk AML. The median number of cycles received was 7 (range, 1–8), and the primary reason for discontinuation was relapse. DFS at 1-year and 3-years was 79% and 54%, respectively. These results are similar to the outcomes in the historical control comprised of similar patients treated on recent CALGB trials. Thus, maintenance with decitabine provided no benefit overall. Standard use of decitabine maintenance in younger AML patients in CR1 is not warranted. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00416598. PMID:27624549

  18. Maintenance therapy with decitabine in younger adults with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission: a phase 2 Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study (CALGB 10503).

    PubMed

    Blum, W; Sanford, B L; Klisovic, R; DeAngelo, D J; Uy, G; Powell, B L; Stock, W; Baer, M R; Kolitz, J E; Wang, E S; Hoke, E; Mrózek, K; Kohlschmidt, J; Bloomfield, C D; Geyer, S; Marcucci, G; Stone, R M; Larson, R A

    2017-01-01

    In this prospective phase 2 clinical trial conducted by Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB, now the Alliance), we studied decitabine as maintenance therapy for younger adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who remained in first complete remission (CR1) following intensive induction and consolidation. Given that decitabine is clinically active in AML and with hypomethylating activity distinct from cytotoxic chemotherapy, we hypothesized that 1 year of maintenance therapy would improve disease-free survival (DFS) for AML patients <60 years, who did not receive allogeneic stem cell transplantation in CR1. After blood count recovery from final consolidation, patients received decitabine at 20 mg/m(2) intravenously daily for 4-5 days, every 6 weeks for eight cycles. One hundred and thirty-four patients received decitabine and 85 (63%) had favorable risk AML. The median number of cycles received was 7 (range: 1-8) and the primary reason for discontinuation was relapse. DFS at 1 year and 3 years was 79% and 54%, respectively. These results are similar to the outcomes in the historical control comprising similar patients treated on recent CALGB trials. Thus, maintenance with decitabine provided no benefit overall. Standard use of decitabine maintenance in younger AML patients in CR1 is not warranted. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00416598.

  19. Detectable FLT3-ITD or RAS mutation at the time of transformation from MDS to AML predicts for very poor outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Badar, Talha; Patel, Keyur P; Thompson, Philip A; DiNardo, Courtney; Takahashi, Koichi; Cabrero, Monica; Borthakur, Gautam; Cortes, Jorge; Konopleva, Marina; Kadia, Tapan; Bohannan, Zach; Pierce, Sherry; Jabbour, Elias J; Ravandi, Farhad; Daver, Naval; Luthra, Raja; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background The molecular events that drive the transformation from myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have yet to be fully characterized. We hypothesized that detection of these mutations at the time of transformation from MDS to AML may lead to poorer outcomes. Methods We analyzed 102 MDS patients who were admitted to our institution between 2004 and 2013, had wild-type (wt) FLT3-ITD and RAS at diagnosis, progressed to AML, and had serial mutation testing at both the MDS and AML stages. Results We detected FLT3-ITD and/or RAS mutations in twenty-seven (26%) patients at the time of transformation to AML. Twenty-two patients (81%) had RAS mutations and five (19%) had FLT3-ITD mutations. The median survival after leukemia transformation in patients who had detectable RAS and/or FLT3-ITD mutations was 2·4 months compared to 7·5 months in patients who retained wt RAS and FLT3-ITD (hazard ratio [HR]: 3·08, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1·9–5·0, p < 0·0001). In multivariate analysis, FLT3-ITD and RAS mutations had independent prognostic significance for poor outcome. Conclusions We conclude that 26% of patients had detectable FLT3-ITD or RAS mutation at transformation to AML, and these mutations were associated with very poor outcome. PMID:26547258

  20. MDS/AML del(11)(q14) Share Common Morphological Features Despite Different Chromosomal Breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Dambruoso, Irene; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Boni, Marina; Zappatore, Rita; Giardini, Ilaria; Cavigliano, Maria Paola; Rocca, Barbara; Calvello, Celeste; Bastia, Raffaella; Caresana, Marilena; Pasi, Francesca; Nano, Rosanna; Bernasconi, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    In myelodysplatic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (MDS/AML) deletion of the 11q14 region is a rare chromosomal defect (incidence: 0.6-1.0%), included within the intermediate risk criteria by the International Prognostic Scoring System. No fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study has yet been performed to identify a common breakpoint region (CBR). In our study through FISH with bacterial artificial chromosomes and commercial probes, we analyzed seven patients with MDS/AML harboring 11q14 deletion on conventional cytogenetic analysis. FISH revealed deletions in five patients and amplifications in two. Three patients with deletion carried a CBR, two had a deletion involving a more centromeric breakpoint. These five patients exhibited multilineage dysplasia, blast cells with large round nuclei, loose chromatin, small and abundant nucleoli, and vacuolated cytoplasm with very thin Auer bodies. In conclusion, the morphological features which occur independently of the extent of the deletion are of multilineage dysplasia in MDS and leukemic blasts strongly reactive to peroxidase in AML; despite the variable size of the deleted area, some patients harbor a CBR.

  1. Acne in the adult female patient: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Kamangar, Faranak; Shinkai, Kanade

    2012-10-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common reason why adult women present to dermatologists and can be a clinical challenge to treat. It may also be an important sign of an underlying endocrine disease such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). Although standard acne therapies can be successfully used to treat acne in adult female patients, hormonal treatment is a safe and effective therapeutic option that may provide an opportunity to better target acne in this population, even when other systemic therapies have failed. In this article, a practical approach to the adult female patient with acne will be reviewed to enhance the dermatologist's ability to use hormonal acne therapies and to better identify and evaluate patients with acne in the setting of a possible endocrine disorder.

  2. Integrating a prospective pilot trial and patient-derived xenografts to trace metabolic changes associated with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Carrabba, Matteo G; Tavel, Laurette; Oliveira, Giacomo; Forcina, Alessandra; Quilici, Giacomo; Nardelli, Francesca; Tresoldi, Cristina; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Ciceri, Fabio; Bernardi, Massimo; Vago, Luca; Musco, Giovanna

    2016-10-28

    Despite the considerable progress in understanding the molecular bases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), new tools to link disease biology to the unpredictable patient clinical course are still needed. Herein, high-throughput metabolomics, combined with the other "-omics" disciplines, holds promise in identifying disease-specific and clinically relevant features.In this study, we took advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to trace AML-associated metabolic trajectory employing two complementary strategies. On the one hand, we performed a prospective observational clinical trial to identify metabolic changes associated with blast clearance during the first two cycles of intensive chemotherapy in nine adult patients. On the other hand, to reduce the intrinsic variability associated with human samples and AML genetic heterogeneity, we analyzed the metabolic changes in the plasma of immunocompromised mice upon engraftment of primary human AML blasts.Combining the two longitudinal approaches, we narrowed our screen to seven common metabolites, for which we observed a mirror-like trajectory in mice and humans, tracing AML progression and remission, respectively. We interpreted this set of metabolites as a dynamic fingerprint of AML evolution.Overall, these NMR-based metabolomic data, to be consolidated in larger cohorts and integrated in more comprehensive system biology approaches, hold promise for providing valuable and non-redundant information on the systemic effects of leukemia.

  3. Lifetime Increased Risk of Adult Onset Atopic Dermatitis in Adolescent and Adult Patients with Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hsu-Sheng; Tu, Hung-Pin; Hong, Chien-Hui; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis. Atopic dermatitis (AD) causes intense itching and impaired quality of life. Previous studies have shown that patients with classical early-onset AD tend to develop food allergy and that 10% of adults with food allergies have concomitant AD. However, it is not known whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD, a recently recognized disease entity. Using an initial cohort of one-million subjects, this study retrospectively followed-up 2851 patients with food allergy (age > 12 years) for 14 years and compared them with 11,404 matched controls. While 2.8% (81) of the 2851 food allergy patients developed AD, only 2.0% (227) of the 11,404 controls developed AD. Multivariate regression analysis showed that food allergy patients were more likely to develop AD (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.49, p < 0.0001). Controls had a 1.99% risk of developing AD, while food allergy patients had a significantly higher risk (7.18% and 3.46% for patients with ≥3 and <3 food allergy claims, respectively) of developing adult-onset AD. This is the first study to describe the chronological and dose-dependent associations between food allergy in adolescence and the development of adult-onset AD. PMID:28035995

  4. Dreaming during anaesthesia in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Kate; Skrzypek, Hannah

    2007-09-01

    Dreaming during anaesthesia is defined as any recalled experience (excluding awareness) that occurred between induction of anaesthesia and the first moment of consciousness upon emergence. Dreaming is a commonly-reported side-effect of anaesthesia. The incidence is higher in patients who are interviewed immediately after anaesthesia (approximately 22%) than in those who are interviewed later (approximately 6%). A minority of dreams, which include sensory perceptions obtained during anaesthesia, provide evidence of near-miss awareness. These patients may have risk factors for awareness and this type of dreaming may be prevented by depth of anaesthesia monitoring. Most dreaming however, occurs in younger, fitter patients, who have high home dream recall, who receive propofol-based anaesthesia and who emerge rapidly from anaesthesia. Their dreams are usually short and pleasant, are related to work, family and recreation, are not related to inadequate anaesthesia and probably occur during recovery. Dreaming is a common, fascinating, usually pleasant and harmless phenomenon.

  5. The immunocompromised adult patient and surgery.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Keith E

    2008-09-01

    The perioperative management of immunosuppressed patients remains relatively unsophisticated. Rational management involves understanding the normal immune response to injury as modified by the preexisting or imposed abnormalities that immunosuppressed patients manifest on the basis of their disease and/or treatment. Patients with cancer, infected with human immunodeficiency virus, and having had an organ transplant are extreme examples of disordered immunity and it is important to understand the effects of their diseases and treatments. In the future, however, more appropriate management will require anticipation and appreciation of frequent preoperative immunotherapy, a more complete understanding of the immunological response to anesthesia and surgery, the ability to assess immune reserve and stratify risk within the context of that profile, and a better knowledge of the immunological effect of anesthetic agents.

  6. ELMO1 Is Upregulated in AML CD34+ Stem/Progenitor Cells, Mediates Chemotaxis and Predicts Poor Prognosis in Normal Karyotype AML

    PubMed Central

    Capala, Marta E.; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Both normal as well leukemic hematopoietic stem cells critically depend on their microenvironment in the bone marrow for processes such as self-renewal, survival and differentiation, although the exact pathways that are involved remain poorly understood. We performed transcriptome analysis on primitive CD34+ acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells (n = 46), their more differentiated CD34− leukemic progeny, and normal CD34+ bone marrow cells (n = 31) and focused on differentially expressed genes involved in adhesion and migration. Thus, Engulfment and Motility protein 1 (ELMO1) was identified amongst the top 50 most differentially expressed genes. ELMO1 is a crucial link in the signaling cascade that leads to activation of RAC GTPases and cytoskeleton rearrangements. We confirmed increased ELMO1 expression at the mRNA and protein level in a panel of AML samples and showed that high ELMO1 expression is an independent negative prognostic factor in normal karyotype (NK) AML in three large independent patient cohorts. Downmodulation of ELMO1 in human CB CD34+ cells did not significantly alter expansion, progenitor frequency or differentiation in stromal co-cultures, but did result in a decreased frequency of stem cells in LTC-IC assays. In BCR-ABL-transduced human CB CD34+ cells depletion of ELMO1 resulted in a mild decrease in proliferation, but replating capacity of progenitors was severely impaired. Downregulation of ELMO1 in a panel of primary CD34+ AML cells also resulted in reduced long-term growth in stromal co-cultures in two out of three cases. Pharmacological inhibition of the ELMO1 downstream target RAC resulted in a severely impaired proliferation and survival of leukemic cells. Finally, ELMO1 depletion caused a marked decrease in SDF1-induced chemotaxis of leukemic cells. Taken together, these data show that inhibiting the ELMO1-RAC axis might be an alternative way to target leukemic cells. PMID:25360637

  7. A Novel Tandem Duplication Assay to Detect Minimal Residual Disease in FLT3/ITD AML

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Tseh; Tseng, Li-Hui; Dudley, Jonathan C.; Riel, Stacey; Tsai, Harrison; Zheng, Gang; Pratz, Keith W.; Levis, Mark J.; Gocke, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Internal tandem duplication (ITD) of the FLT3 gene is associated with poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with a normal karyotype. The current standard PCR assay for FLT3/ITD detection is not sufficiently sensitive to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD). Clone-specific assays may have sufficient sensitivity but are not practical to implement, since each clone-specific primer/probe requires clinical validation. Objective To develop an assay for clinical molecular diagnostics laboratories to monitor MRD in FLT3/ITD AMLs. Methods We designed a simple novel assay, tandem duplication PCR (TD-PCR), and tested its sensitivity, specificity and clinical utility in FLT3/ITD AML patients. Results TD-PCR was capable of detecting a single ITD molecule and was applicable to 75% of ITD mutants tested. TD-PCR detected MRD in bone marrow prior to patient relapse. TD-PCR also identified low level ITD mutants not only in FLT3/ITD AMLs but also in initial diagnostic specimens reportedly negative by the standard assay in patients who progressed with the same ITDs detected by the TD-PCR assay. Conclusion Detection of MRD by TD-PCR may guide patient selection for early clinical intervention. In contrast to clone-specific approaches, TD-PCR assay can be more easily validated for MRD detection in clinical laboratories due to standardized primers and a universal positive control. In addition, our results on multi-clonality and low-level ITDs suggest that further studies are warranted to elucidate their clinical/biological significance. PMID:26446915

  8. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major.

    PubMed

    Vlychou, Marianna; Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients.

  9. Body Composition in Adult Patients with Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, Evangelos; Thriskos, Paschalis; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess body composition in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and to compare the findings with a group of healthy age-matched controls. Methods. Our study group included sixty-two patients (27 males, mean age 36 years, and 35 females, mean age 36.4 years) and fifteen age-matched healthy controls. All patients had an established diagnosis of thalassemia major and followed a regular blood transfusion scheme since childhood and chelation treatment. Fat, lean, and bone mineral density (BMD) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Ferritin levels and body mass index of all patients and controls were also recorded. Student t-test and Wilcoxon test were performed and statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results. BMD and whole body lean mass are lower in both male and female adult patients compared with controls (p < 0.01 in both groups), whereas whole body fat mass was found to have no statistically significant difference compared to controls. Regional trunk fat around the abdomen was found to be lower in male patients compared to controls (p = 0.02). Conclusion. Severe bone loss and diminished lean mass are expected in adult male and female patients with thalassemia major. Fat changes seem to affect mainly male patients. PMID:27956899

  10. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  11. Intravenous lipids in adult surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Klek, Stanislaw; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition is considered an essential element of the perioperative management of surgical patients. It is recommended in patients who require nutritional therapy but in whom the enteral route is contraindicated, not recommended or non-feasible. The new generation of lipid emulsions (LEs) based on olive and fish oils are safe and may improve clinical outcome in surgical patients. The increased provision of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil-containing LEs seems to be associated with fewer infectious complications and shorter ICU and hospital stays following major abdominal surgery. Increased provision of olive oil in the absence of fish oil may also exert beneficial effects, but a clear conclusion on this is limited due to the low number of available studies. Hence, at the moment, the evidence supports the use of n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acid-enriched LEs as a part of the parenteral nutrition regimen for selected groups of patients, such as those with major surgical trauma or those undergoing extended resections or liver transplantation.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA damage by bleomycin induces AML cell death.

    PubMed

    Yeung, ManTek; Hurren, Rose; Nemr, Carine; Wang, Xiaoming; Hershenfeld, Samantha; Gronda, Marcela; Liyanage, Sanduni; Wu, Yan; Augustine, Jeevan; Lee, Eric A; Spagnuolo, Paul A; Southall, Noel; Chen, Catherine; Zheng, Wei; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Minden, Mark D; Laposa, Rebecca; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own 16.6 kb circular genome. To explore the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage on mitochondrial (mt) function and viability of AML cells, we screened a panel of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic agents to identify drugs that could damage mtDNA. We identified bleomycin as an agent that damaged mtDNA in AML cells at concentrations that induced cell death. Bleomycin also induced mtDNA damage in primary AML samples. Consistent with the observed mtDNA damage, bleomycin reduced mt mass and basal oxygen consumption in AML cells. We also demonstrated that the observed mtDNA damage was functionally important for bleomycin-induced cell death. Finally, bleomycin delayed tumor growth in xenograft mouse models of AML and anti-leukemic concentrations of the drug induced mtDNA damage in AML cells preferentially over normal lung tissue. Taken together, mtDNA-targeted therapy may be an effective strategy to target AML cells and bleomycin could be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  13. Activity of a selective inhibitor of nuclear export, selinexor (KPT-330), against AML-initiating cells engrafted into immunosuppressed NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Etchin, J; Montero, J; Berezovskaya, A; Le, BT; Kentsis, A; Christie, AL; Conway, AS; Chen, WC; Reed, C; Mansour, MR; Ng, CEL; Adamia, S; Rodig, SJ; Galinsky, IA; Stone, RM; Klebanov, B; Landesman, Y; Kauffman, M; Shacham, S; Kung, AL; Wang, JCY; Letai, A; Look, AT

    2016-01-01

    Currently available combination chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) often fails to result in long-term remissions, emphasizing the need for novel therapeutic strategies. We reasoned that targeted inhibition of a prominent nuclear exporter, XPO1/CRM1, could eradicate self-renewing leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) whose survival depends on timely XPO1-mediated transport of specific protein and RNA cargoes. Using an immunosuppressed mouse model bearing primary patient-derived AML cells, we demonstrate that selinexor (KPT-330), an oral antagonist of XPO1 that is currently in clinical trials, has strong activity against primary AML cells while sparing normal stem and progenitor cells. Importantly, limiting dilution transplantation assays showed that this cytotoxic activity is not limited to the rapidly proliferating bulk population of leukemic cells but extends to the LICs, whose inherent drug resistance and unrestricted self-renewal capacity has been implicated in the difficulty of curing AML patients with conventional chemotherapy alone. PMID:26202935

  14. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B.; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H.; Bel, Elisabeth H.D.; ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×109 L−1) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×109 L−1) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7–8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice. PMID:27730197

  15. Clinical profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Jantina C; Storm, Huib; Amelink, Marijke; de Nijs, Selma B; Eichhorn, Edwin; Reitsma, Bennie H; Bel, Elisabeth H D; Ten Brinke, Anneke

    2016-04-01

    Adult-onset eosinophilic asthma is increasingly recognised as a severe and difficult-to-treat subtype of asthma. In clinical practice, early recognition of patients with this asthma subtype is important because it may have treatment implications. Therefore, physicians need to know the distinct characteristics of this asthma phenotype. The objective of the present study was to determine the characteristic profile of patients with adult-onset eosinophilic asthma. 130 patients with adult-onset (>18 years of age) asthma and high blood eosinophil counts (≥0.3×10(9) L(-1)) were compared with 361 adult-onset asthma patients with low (<0.3×10(9) L(-1)) blood eosinophils. Measurements included a series of clinical, functional and imaging parameters. Patients with high blood eosinophils were more often male, had less well controlled asthma and higher exacerbation rates, despite the use of higher doses of inhaled corticosteroids. They had higher levels of total IgE without more sensitisation to common inhaled allergens. In addition, these patients had worse lung function, and more often showed fixed airflow limitation, air trapping, nasal polyposis and abnormalities on sinus computed tomography scanning. Chronic rhinosinusitis, air trapping and male sex were three independent factors associated with blood eosinophilia (adjusted OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.7-8.1), 3.0 (95% CI 1.1-8.1) and 2.4 (95% CI 1.3-4.4), respectively). Patients with adult-onset asthma with elevated blood eosinophils exhibit a distinct profile, which can readily be recognised in clinical practice.

  16. When it comes to MRD, AML ≠ ALL.

    PubMed

    Paietta, Elisabeth

    2012-08-23

    Only the most specific main institutional affiliation is listed for Inside Blood authors, without indications of subdivisions, departments, parent institutions, or postal/geographic information. Please confirm or correct affiliation. Minimal residual disease (MRD) detection is standard of care in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL),(1) but not acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this issue of Blood, an AML trial by Loken and colleagues from the Children's Oncology Group (COG) retrospectively demonstrates clinical significance of MRD.(2) These data reaffirm that AML-MRD is unlike ALL-MRD.

  17. Movement disorders in adult patients with classical galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Carecchio, Miryam; Bhatia, Kailash P; Kojovic, Maja; Parees, Isabel; Chandrashekar, Hoskote S; Footitt, Emma J; Burke, Derek; Edwards, Mark J; Lachmann, Robin H L; Murphy, Elaine

    2013-06-01

    Classical galactosemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism leading to toxic accumulation of galactose and derived metabolites. It presents with acute systemic complications in the newborn. Galactose restriction resolves these symptoms, but long-term complications, such as premature ovarian failure and neurological problems including motor dysfunction, may occur despite adequate treatment. The objective of the current study was to determine the frequency and phenotype of motor problems in adult patients with classical galactosemia. In this cross-sectional study, adult patients with a biochemically confirmed diagnosis of galactosemia attending our clinic were assessed with an interview and neurological examination and their notes retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified according to the presence/absence of motor dysfunction on examination. Patients with motor dysfunction were further categorized according to the presence/absence of reported motor symptoms. Forty-seven patients were included. Thirty-one patients showed evidence of motor dysfunction including: tremor (23 patients), dystonia (23 patients), cerebellar signs (6 patients), and pyramidal signs (4 patients). Tremor and dystonia were often combined (16 patients). Thirteen patients reported motor symptoms, with 8 describing progressive worsening. Symptomatic treatment was effective in 4 of 5 patients. Nonmotor neurological features (cognitive, psychiatric, and speech disorders) and premature ovarian failure were more frequent in patients with motor dysfunction. Motor dysfunction is a common complication of classical galactosemia, with tremor and dystonia the most frequent findings. Up to one third of patients report motor symptoms and may benefit from appropriate treatment. Progressive worsening is not uncommon and may suggest ongoing brain damage in a subset of patients.

  18. Subclones with the t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 rearrangement occur in AML and seem to cooperate with distinct genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Torsten; Alpermann, Tamara; Zenger, Melanie; Hochhaus, Andreas; Beelen, Dietrich W; Uppenkamp, Michael; Rummel, Mathias; Kern, Wolfgang; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Claudia

    2011-03-01

    In AML, cooperation of mutations suppressing differentiation ('class-II-mutations') with 'class-I-mutations' increasing cell proliferation is frequent. In rare cases of myeloid malignancies, the BCR-ABL1 fusion was reported to cooperate as class-I-mutation with class-II-mutations, but most cases had to be classified as blast phase of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). We identified five cases of Philadelphia positive subclones in AML occurring in coincidence with other genetic lesions: 1:220 patients with inv(16)/CBFB-MYH11 (0·5%), 2:272 AML cases with t(8;21)/RUNX1-RUNX1T1 (0·7%), 1:1029 NPM1-mutated AML (0·1%), and one patient with s-AML following MDS with a 5q-deletion. Four patients had m-BCR (e1a2) BCR-ABL1 transcripts; one case only had an M-BCR (b3a2) breakpoint. These cases allow some interesting conclusions: The BCR-ABL1 rearrangement apparently can cooperate with the NPM1 mutation similar to other class-I-mutations. The identification of Philadelphia positive subclones in <1% of patients with CBF-leukaemias fits well with previous observations that most CBF-AML are accompanied by activating mutations in genes enhancing proliferation. Since we observed the occurrence of the Philadelphia positive subclones at diagnosis, at relapse, or throughout the disease, the time point of the emergence of Philadelphia subclones seems variable in AML. Clinical research should further concentrate on Philadelphia positive subclones in AML to assess the clinical impact.

  19. Nutritional profile of adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, L; Delibasic, M; Peta, V; Turkulov, V; De Lorenzo, A; Medić-Stojanoska, M

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated gluten dependent enteropathy induced by ingestion of gluten, characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotals or total atrophy of intestinal villi. The predominant consequence of CD in untreated patients, is malnutrition as a result of malabsorption. Moreover, several and increasing extra-intestinal clinical manifestations have been described in the CD patients. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves nutritional status, inducing an increase in fat and bone compartments, but does not completely normalize body composition and nutritional deficiencies. An early and accurate evaluation of nutritional status can be of the pivotal step in the clinical management of the adult CD patients. The aim of this review is to present the most important and recent data on nutritional and metabolic features in the CD adult patients, the related implications and the effects of the GFD on these conditions.

  20. Rhabdomyosarcoma in adolescent and young adult patients: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Egas-Bejar, Daniela; Huh, Winston W

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a malignant tumor of mesenchymal origin, is the third most common extracranial malignant solid tumor in children and adolescents. However, in adults, RMS represents <1% of all solid tumor malignancies. The embryonal and alveolar histologic variants are more commonly seen in pediatric patients, while the pleomorphic variant is rare in children and seen more often in adults. Advances in the research of the embryonal and alveolar variants have improved our understanding of certain genes and biologic pathways that are involved in RMS, but much less is known for the other variants. Multimodality therapy that includes surgery and chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy is the mainstay of treatment for RMS. Improvements in the risk stratification of the pediatric patients based on presurgical (primary tumor site, tumor size, regional lymph node involvement, presence of metastasis) and postsurgical parameters (completeness of resection or presence of residual disease or metastasis) has allowed for the treatment assignment of patients in different studies and therapeutic trials, leading to increases in 5-year survival from 25%–70% over the past 40 years. However, for adult patients, in great part due to rarity of the disease and the lack of consensus on optimal treatment, clinical outcome is still poor. Many factors have been implicated for the differing outcomes between pediatric RMS versus adult RMS, such as the lack of standardized treatment protocols for adult RMS patients and the increased prevalence of advanced presentations. Now that there are increased numbers of survivors, we can appreciate the sequelae from therapy in these patients, such as bone growth abnormalities, endocrinopathies, and infertility. Improvements in risk stratification have led to clinical trials using lower doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy with the intention of decreasing the incidence of side effects without compromising survival outcome. PMID

  1. The blind men and the AML elephant: can we feel the progress?

    PubMed Central

    Tauro, S

    2016-01-01

    The pharmacological therapy of non-promyelocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has remained unchanged for over 40 years with an anthracycline–cytarabine combination forming the backbone of induction treatments. Nevertheless, the survival of younger patients has increased due to improved management of the toxicity of therapies including stem cell transplantation. Older patients and those with infirmity that precludes treatment-intensification have, however, not benefited from improvements in supportive care and continue to experience poor outcomes. An increased understanding of the genomic heterogeneity of AML raises the possibility of treatment-stratification to improve prognosis. Thus, efforts to identify agents with non-conventional anti-leukemic effects have paralleled those aiming to optimize leukemia cell-kill with conventional chemotherapy, resulting in a number of randomized controlled trials (RCT). In the last 18 months, RCTs investigating the effects of vosaroxin, azacitidine and gemtuzumab ozogamycin and daunorubicin dose have been reported with some studies indicating a statistically significant survival benefit with the investigational agent compared with standard therapy and potentially, a new era in AML therapeutics. Given the increasing costs of cancer care, a review of these studies, with particular attention to the magnitude of clinical benefit with the newer agents would be useful, especially for physicians treating patients in single-payer health systems. PMID:27176800

  2. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy in AML: How close are we?

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar

    2016-12-01

    The majority of patients presenting with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially respond to chemotherapy but post-remission therapy is required to consolidate this response and achieve long-term disease-free survival. The most effective form of post-remission therapy relies on T cell immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, patients with active disease cannot usually expect to be cured with HCT. This inherent dichotomy implies that traditional T cell-based immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic HCT stops being efficacious somewhere between the measurable residual disease (MRD) and the morphologically obvious range. This is in part because the full power of T cells must be restrained in order to avoid lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and partly because only a sub-population of donor T cells are expected to be able to recognize AML cells via their T cell receptor. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, most advanced in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, may circumvent some of these limitations. However, major challenges remain to be overcome before CAR T cell therapy can be safely applied to AML.

  3. A new Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System for refractory/relapsed adult acute myelogeneous leukaemia patients: a GOELAMS study.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, P; Labopin, M; Turlure, P; Prebet, T; Pigneux, A; Hunault, M; Filanovsky, K; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Luquet, I; Lode, L; Richebourg, S; Blanchet, O; Gachard, N; Vey, N; Ifrah, N; Milpied, N; Harousseau, J-L; Bene, M-C; Mohty, M; Delaunay, J

    2011-06-01

    A simplified prognostic score is presented based on the multivariate analysis of 138 refractory/relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients (median age 55 years, range: 19-70) receiving a combination of intensive chemotherapy+Gemtuzumab as salvage regimen. Overall, 2-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 29±4% and 36±4%, respectively. Disease status (relapse <12 months, including refractory patients), FLT3-ITD-positive status and high-risk cytogenetics were the three strongest independent adverse prognostic factors for OS and EFS in this series. We then defined three subgroups with striking different outcomes at 2 years: no adverse factor (favourable, N=36): OS 58%, EFS 45%; one adverse factor (intermediate, N=54): OS 37%, EFS 31%; two or three adverse factors (poor, N=43): OS 12%, EFS 12% (P<10(-4), P=0.001). This new simplified Leukemia Prognostic Scoring System was then validated on an independent cohort of 111 refractory/relapsed AML patients. This new simplified prognostic score, using three clinical and biological parameters routinely applied, allow to discriminate around two third of the patients who should benefit from a salvage intensive regimen in the setting of refractory/relapsed AML patients. The other one third of the patients should receive investigational therapy.

  4. A Future for Adult Educators in Patient Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jean E.

    2014-01-01

    Adult education in healthcare comes in several forms: degree and certificate programs aimed at preparing better academic and clinical educators; and community education programs aimed at wellness, rehabilitation, or learning to live with chronic diseases. Patient-centered healthcare, however, is part of something new: coordinated and transitional…

  5. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  6. Patient-specific FDG dosimetry for adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niven, Erin

    Fluorodeoxyglucose is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical in Positron Emission Tomography, with applications in neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Despite its routine use worldwide, the radiation absorbed dose estimates from FDG have been based primarily on data obtained from two dogs studied in 1977 and 11 adults (most likely males) studied in 1982. In addition, the dose estimates calculated for FDG have been centered on the adult male, with little or no mention of variations in the dose estimates due to sex, age, height, weight, nationality, diet, or pathological condition. Through an extensive investigation into the Medical Internal Radiation Dose schema for calculating absorbed doses, I have developed a simple patient-specific equation; this equation incorporates the parameters necessary for alterations to the mathematical values of the human model to produce an estimate more representative of the individual under consideration. I have used this method to determine the range of absorbed doses to FDG from the collection of a large quantity of biological data obtained in adult males, adult females, and very low birth weight infants. Therefore, a more accurate quantification of the dose to humans from FDG has been completed. My results show that per unit administered activity, the absorbed dose from FDG is higher for infants compared to adults, and the dose for adult women is higher than for adult men. Given an injected activity of approximately 3.7 MBq kg-1, the doses for adult men, adult women, and full-term newborns would be on the order of 5.5, 7.1, and 2.8 mSv, respectively. These absorbed doses are comparable to the doses received from other nuclear medicine procedures.

  7. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  8. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  9. MRD-directed risk stratification treatment may improve outcomes of t(8;21) AML in the first complete remission: results from the AML05 multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Hu; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Liu, Dai-Hong; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Huan; Jiang, Qian; Xu, Lan-Ping; Lu, Jin; Han, Wei; Bao, Li; Wang, Yu; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Wang, Feng-Rong; Lai, Yue-Yun; Chai, Jun-Yue; Wang, Li-Ru; Liu, Yan-Rong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-05-16

    We aimed to improve the outcome of t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the first complete remission (CR1) by applying risk-directed therapy based on minimal residual disease (MRD) determined by RUNX1/RUNX1T1 transcript levels. Risk-directed therapy included recommending allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for high-risk patients and chemotherapy/autologous-HSCT (auto-HSCT) for low-risk patients. Among 116 eligible patients, MRD status after the second consolidation rather than induction or first consolidation could discriminate high-risk relapse patients (P = .001). Allo-HSCT could reduce relapse and improve survival compared with chemotherapy for high-risk patients (cumulative incidence of relapse [CIR]: 22.1% vs 78.9%, P < .0001; disease-free survival [DFS]: 61.7% vs 19.6%, P = .001), whereas chemotherapy/auto-HSCT achieved a low relapse rate (5.3%) and high DFS (94.7%) for low-risk patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that MRD status and treatment choice were independent prognostic factors for relapse, DFS, and OS. We concluded that MRD status after the second consolidation may be the best timing for treatment choice. MRD-directed risk stratification treatment may improve the outcome of t(8;21) AML in CR1. This trial was registered at http://www.chictr.org as #ChiCTR-OCH-12002406.

  10. [Diagnosis and therapy of adult patients with facial asymmetry].

    PubMed

    Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Kuroda, Shingo

    2009-09-01

    The goal of orthodontic treatment is to improve the patient's life by enhancing dental and jaw functions and dentofacial esthetics [Graber TM, et al., Orthodontics current principles and techniques. 4(e) ed. St Louis: Elsevier, 2005.]. Harmonious occlusion is achieved following improvements of malocclusion via orthodontic treatment [Ehmer U and Broll P, Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1992;7:153-159. Throckmorton GS, et al., J Prosthet Dent 1984;51:252-261.]. Perfect facial symmetry is extremely rare, and normal faces have a degree of asymmetry. Patients with dentofacial deformity more frequently have asymmetry of the face and jaws. There was a relationship between the type of malocclusion and the prevalence of asymmetry; 28% of the Class III group, but 40% to 42% of the Class I, Class II and long face groups respectively, were asymmetric [Severt TR and Proffit WR, Int J Adult Orthod Orthogn Surg 1997;12:171-176.]; therefore, facial asymmetry is a common complaint among orthodontic patients. Treatment of severe facial asymmetry in adults consists mainly of surgically repositioning the maxilla or the mandible [Bardinet E, et al., Orthod Fr 2002;73:243-315. Guyuron B, Clin Plast Surg 1989;16:795-801. Proffit WR, et al., Contemporary treatment of dentofacial deformity. 2003. St Louis: Mosby, 2003:574-644.], however, new methods, i.e. orthodontic tooth movement with implant anchorage, have recently been introduced [Costa A, et al., Int J Adult Orthod Orthognath Surg 1998;3:201-209. Creekmore TD and Eklund MK, J Clin Orthod 1983;17:266-269. Miyawaki S,et al., Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 2003;124:373-378. Park HS, et al., J Clin Orthod 2001;35:417-422. Roberts WE, et al., Angle Orthod 1989;59:247-256.], and various treatment options can be chosen in patients with facial asymmetry. In this article, we describe the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with facial asymmetry.

  11. Pneumococci Can Persistently Colonize Adult Patients with Chronic Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, A.; Balsalobre, L.; Marti, S.; Calatayud, L.; De la Campa, A. G.; Brueggemann, A. B.; Liñares, J.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae plays an important role in causing acute exacerbations in patients with chronic respiratory disease. However, few data are available regarding pneumococcal persistence in adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Fifty pneumococci recovered from sputum samples (1995 to 2010) from 13 adult patients with ≥3 episodes of acute exacerbation or pneumonia, with the same serotype and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern, were studied. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) loci, penicillin-binding protein (PBP) genes (pbp2x, pbp1a, pbp2b), and the quinolone-resistant determining regions (QRDRs) of parC, parE, and gyrA were PCR amplified and sequenced. The average time between the first and last episode was 582 days (standard deviation [SD], ±362). All but two patients received multiple courses of β-lactam treatment, and all persistent strains were resistant to penicillin; however, the PBP sequences were stable over time apart from one variable nucleotide in pbp2x, observed among pneumococci isolated from three patients. In contrast, 7/11 patients treated with fluoroquinolones had fluoroquinolone-resistant pneumococci. In three patients, the initially fluoroquinolone-susceptible strain developed resistance after fluoroquinolone therapy, and in the remaining four patients, the persistent strain was fluoroquinolone resistant from the first episode. QRDR changes involved in fluoroquinolone resistance were frequently observed in persistent strains after fluoroquinolone treatment; however, the PBP sequences and MLST genotypes of these strains were stable over time. PMID:23052300

  12. Amelogenesis imperfecta - lifelong management. Restorative management of the adult patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; McDonnell, S T; Iram, S; Chan, M F W-Y

    2013-11-08

    The biggest challenge restorative dentists face in rehabilitating patients with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is trying to restore aesthetics, function and occlusal stability while keeping the treatment as conservative as possible. The goals of treatment should be to prolong the life of the patient's own teeth and avoid or delay the need for extractions and subsequent replacement with conventional fixed, removable or implant retained prostheses. In order to achieve these goals a stepwise approach to treatment planning is required starting with the most conservative but aesthetically acceptable treatment. This article discusses the management of AI and presents the various treatment options available for restoring the adult patient who presents to the dentist with AI.

  13. Optimal serum phenylalanine for adult patients with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Okano, Yoshiyuki; Nagasaka, Hironori

    2013-12-01

    High serum phenylalanine in adult patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) causes neuropsychological and psychosocial problems that can be resolved by phenylalanine-restricted diet. Therefore, PKU patients must continue to adhere to phenylalanine-restricted diet for life, although the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life has yet to be established. The purpose of this review was to establish the optimal serum phenylalanine level in later life of PKU patients. We evaluated oxidative stress status, nitric oxide metabolism, cholesterol-derived oxysterols, vitamin D and bone status, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in adult PKU patients according to serum phenylalanine level. Oxidative stress increased markedly at serum phenylalanine of 700-800 μmol/L. Serum phenylalanine higher than 700-850 μmol/L correlated with the disturbance of nitric oxide regulatory system. Adult PKU patients had poor vitamin D status and exhibited predominance of bone resorption over bone formation. In the brain, the levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol, a marker of brain cholesterol elimination, were low at serum phenylalanine levels exceeding 650 μmol/L. MRI studies showed high signal intensity in deep white matter on T2-weighted and FLAIR images of PKU patients with serum phenylalanine greater than 500 μmol/L, with decreased apparent diffusion coefficients. Changes in most parameters covering the entire body organs in adult PKU were almost acceptable below 700-800 μmol/L of phenylalanine level. However, the optimal serum phenylalanine level should be 500 μmol/L or less in later life for the brain to be safe.

  14. Coronary Arteriovenous Fistulas in Adult Patients: Surgical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Albeyoglu, Sebnem; Aldag, Mustafa; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Sargin, Murat; Oz, Tugba Kemaloglu; Kutlu, Hakan; Dagsali, Sabri

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical and anatomic characteristics of coronary arteriovenous fistulas in adult patients who underwent open cardiac surgery and to review surgical management and outcomes. Methods Twenty-one adult patients (12 female, 9 male; mean age: 56.1±7.9 years) who underwent surgical treatment for coronary arteriovenous fistulas were retrospectively included in this study. Coronary angiography, chest X-ray, electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were preoperatively performed in all patients. Demographic and clinical data were also collected. Postoperative courses of all patients were monitored and postoperative complications were noted. Results A total of 25 coronary arteriovenous fistulas were detected in 21 patients; the fistulas originated mainly from left anterior descending artery (n=9, 42.8%). Four (19.4%) patients had bilateral fistulas originating from both left anterior descending and right coronary artery. The main drainage site of coronary arteriovenous fistulas was the pulmonary artery (n=18, 85.7%). Twelve (57.1%) patients had isolated coronary arteriovenous fistulas and 4 (19.4%), concomitant coronary artery disease. Twenty (95.3%) of all patients were symptomatic. Seventeen patients were operated on with and 4 without cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no mortality. Three patients had postoperative atrial fibrillation. One patient had pericardial effusion causing cardiac tamponade who underwent reoperation. Conclusion The decision of surgical management should be made on the size and the anatomical location of coronary arteriovenous fistulas and concomitant cardiac comorbidities. Surgical closure with ligation of coronary arteriovenous fistulas can be performed easily with on-pump or off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, even in asymptomatic patients to prevent fistula related complications with very low risk of mortality and morbidity.

  15. Socioeconomic status (SES) and childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mortality risk: Analysis of SEER data.

    PubMed

    Knoble, Naomi B; Alderfer, Melissa A; Hossain, Md Jobayer

    2016-10-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is a complex construct of multiple indicators, known to impact cancer outcomes, but has not been adequately examined among pediatric AML patients. This study aimed to identify the patterns of co-occurrence of multiple community-level SES indicators and to explore associations between various patterns of these indicators and pediatric AML mortality risk. A nationally representative US sample of 3651 pediatric AML patients, aged 0-19 years at diagnosis was drawn from 17 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database registries created between 1973 and 2012. Factor analysis, cluster analysis, stratified univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used. Four SES factors accounting for 87% of the variance in SES indicators were identified: F1) economic/educational disadvantage, less immigration; F2) immigration-related features (foreign-born, language-isolation, crowding), less mobility; F3) housing instability; and, F4) absence of moving. F1 and F3 showed elevated risk of mortality, adjusted hazards ratios (aHR) (95% CI): 1.07(1.02-1.12) and 1.05(1.00-1.10), respectively. Seven SES-defined cluster groups were identified. Cluster 1 (low economic/educational disadvantage, few immigration-related features, and residential-stability) showed the minimum risk of mortality. Compared to Cluster 1, Cluster 3 (high economic/educational disadvantage, high-mobility) and Cluster 6 (moderately-high economic/educational disadvantages, housing-instability and immigration-related features) exhibited substantially greater risk of mortality, aHR(95% CI)=1.19(1.0-1.4) and 1.23 (1.1-1.5), respectively. Factors of correlated SES-indicators and their pattern-based groups demonstrated differential risks in the pediatric AML mortality indicating the need of special public-health attention in areas with economic-educational disadvantages, housing-instability and immigration-related features.

  16. SGN-CD33A: a novel CD33-targeting antibody-drug conjugate using a pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer is active in models of drug-resistant AML.

    PubMed

    Kung Sutherland, May S; Walter, Roland B; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Yu, Changpu; Kostner, Heather; Stone, Ivan; Ryan, Maureen C; Sussman, Django; Lyon, Robert P; Zeng, Weiping; Harrington, Kimberly H; Klussman, Kerry; Westendorf, Lori; Meyer, David; Bernstein, Irwin D; Senter, Peter D; Benjamin, Dennis R; Drachman, Jonathan G; McEarchern, Julie A

    2013-08-22

    Outcomes in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory, and novel treatments are urgently needed. One strategy explores antibodies and their drug conjugates, particularly those targeting CD33. Emerging data with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) demonstrate target validity and activity in some patients with AML, but efficacy is limited by heterogeneous drug conjugation, linker instability, and a high incidence of multidrug resistance. We describe here the development of SGN-CD33A, a humanized anti-CD33 antibody with engineered cysteines conjugated to a highly potent, synthetic DNA cross-linking pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer via a protease-cleavable linker. The use of engineered cysteine residues at the sites of drug linker attachment results in a drug loading of approximately 2 pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimers per antibody. In preclinical testing, SGN-CD33A is more potent than GO against a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML cells in vitro and in xenotransplantation studies in mice. Unlike GO, antileukemic activity is observed with SGN-CD33A in AML models with the multidrug-resistant phenotype. Mechanistic studies indicate that the cytotoxic effects of SGN-CD33A involve DNA damage with ensuing cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Together, these data suggest that SGN-CD33A has CD33-directed antitumor activity and support clinical testing of this novel therapeutic in patients with AML.

  17. Unique medical issues in adult patients with mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, John; Berger, Kenneth I; Borgo, Andrea; Braunlin, Elizabeth A; Burton, Barbara K; Ghotme, Kemel A; Kircher, Susanne G; Molter, David; Orchard, Paul J; Palmer, James; Pastores, Gregory M; Rapoport, David M; Wang, Raymond Y; White, Klane

    2016-10-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses are a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by deficiencies in enzymes involved in the sequential degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) leading to substrate accumulation in various tissues and organs. GAG accumulation can cause growth retardation and progressive damage to respiratory, cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, gastrointestinal, auditory, and visual systems. In the past, few people with severe phenotypic mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) reached adulthood. However, better methods for diagnosis, multi-disciplinary care, and new therapies have extended lifespan, leading to an increasing number of patients surviving beyond childhood. The growing number of adult MPS patients poses significant challenges for clinicians who may not be familiar with the clinical manifestations of MPS. In addition, as new interventions have changed the natural history of these disorders, it is difficult to anticipate both the impact on life expectancy and other complications that may occur as these patients age. Because the MPS disorders are multi-organ diseases, their management requires a coordinated multi-disciplinary approach. Here we discuss the unique pattern of medical issues and multi-organ involvement in adult patients with MPS and identify the challenges that are associated with management of MPS. This review is based on information from an expert investigator meeting with MPS specialists held October 2-4, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland, as well as on current literature searches focusing on MPS and adults.

  18. Neuropsychological Assessment of Adult Patients with Shunted Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Bakar, Emel Erdogan

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study is planned to determine the neurocognitive difficulties of hydrocephalic adults. Methods The research group contained healthy adults (control group, n : 15), and hydrocephalic adults (n : 15). Hydrocephalic group consisted of patients with idiopathic aquaduct stenosis and post-meningitis hydrocephalus. All patients were followed with shunted hydrocephalus and not gone to shunt revision during last two years. They were chosen from either asymptomatic or had only minor symptoms without motor and sensorineural deficit. A neuropsychological test battery (Raven Standart Progressive Matrices, Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, Clock Drawing Test, Facial Recognition Test, Line Orientation Test, Serial Digit Learning Test, Stroop Color Word Interference Test-TBAG Form, Verbal Fluency Test, Verbal Fluency Test, Visual-Aural Digit Span Test-B) was applied to all groups. Results Neuropsychological assessment of hydrocephalic patients demonstrated that they had poor performance on visual, semantic and working memory, visuoconstructive and frontal functions, reading, attention, motor coordination and executive function of parietal lobe which related with complex and perseverative behaviour. Eventually, these patients had significant impairment on the neurocognitive functions of their frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. On the other hand, the statistical analyses performed on demographic data showed that the aetiology of the hydrocephalus, age, sex and localization of the shunt (frontal or posterior parietal) did not affect the test results. Conclusion This prospective study showed that adult patients with hydrocephalus have serious neuropsychological problems which might be directly caused by the hydrocephalus; and these problems may cause serious adaptive difficulties in their social, cultural, behavioral and academic life. PMID:20379471

  19. PU.1 downregulation in murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): from molecular mechanism to human AML

    PubMed Central

    Verbiest, Tom; Bouffler, Simon; Nutt, Stephen L.; Badie, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1, encoded by the murine Sfpi1 gene (SPI1 in humans), is a member of the Ets transcription factor family and plays a vital role in commitment and maturation of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Murine studies directly link primary acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and decreased PU.1 expression in specifically modified strains. Similarly, a radiation-induced chromosome 2 deletion and subsequent Sfpi1 point mutation in the remaining allele lead to murine radiation-induced AML. Consistent with murine data, heterozygous deletion of the SPI1 locus and mutation of the −14kb SPI1 upstream regulatory element were described previously in human primary AML, although they are rare events. Other mechanisms linked to PU.1 downregulation in human AML include TP53 deletion, FLT3-ITD mutation and the recurrent AML1-ETO [t(8;21)] and PML-RARA [t(15;17)] translocations. This review provides an up-to-date overview on our current understanding of the involvement of PU.1 in the initiation and development of radiation-induced AML, together with recommendations for future murine and human studies. PMID:25750172

  20. Ebstein's anomaly in adult patients over 50 years of age.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Shigeaki; Yoshitake, Kiyonobu; Matsuo, Atsutoshi; Tayama, Kei-Ichiro; Hida, Satoru; Mito, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Ebstein's anomaly (EA) is a rare congenital heart disease of the tricuspid valve, and less than 5% of patients with EA survive beyond the age of 50. We report two unoperated cases of EA in adult patients aged over 50 years. Two patients, a 70-year-old Japanese woman and a 59-year-old Chinese woman, were referred to us for tachyarrhythmias. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated apical displacement (>8 mm/m(2) body surface area) of the septal leaflet of the tricuspid valve from the atrioventricular ring with tricuspid regurgitation in both patients. The former suddenly expired 20 months later after suffering from repetitive supraventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or heart failure, and the latter is alive with minimal signs of heart failure 12 months after the diagnosis of EA. Although the natural history of EA is extremely variable, these two patients are exceptional in that they tolerated EA well for over 50 years without any surgical intervention.

  1. LIN28B Activation by PRL-3 Promotes Leukemogenesis and a Stem Cell-like Transcriptional Program in AML.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Chan, Zit-Liang; Bi, Chonglei; Lu, Xiao; Chong, Phyllis S Y; Chooi, Jing-Yuan; Cheong, Lip-Lee; Liu, Shaw-Cheng; Ching, Ying Qing; Zhou, Yafeng; Osato, Motomi; Tan, Tuan Zea; Ng, Chin Hin; Ng, Siok-Bian; Wang, Shi; Zeng, Qi; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2017-03-01

    PRL-3 (PTP4A3), a metastasis-associated phosphatase, is also upregulated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is unknown. Here, constitutive expression of PRL-3 in human AML cells sustains leukemogenesis in vitro and in vivo Furthermore, PRL-3 phosphatase activity dependently upregulates LIN28B, a stem cell reprogramming factor, which in turn represses the let-7 mRNA family, inducing a stem cell-like transcriptional program. Notably, elevated levels of LIN28B protein independently associate with worse survival in AML patients. Thus, these results establish a novel signaling axis involving PRL-3/LIN28B/let-7, which confers stem cell-like properties to leukemia cells that is important for leukemogenesis.Implications: The current study offers a rationale for targeting PRL-3 as a therapeutic approach for a subset of AML patients with poor prognosis. Mol Cancer Res; 15(3); 294-303. ©2016 AACR.

  2. High expression of costimulatory molecules correlates with low relapse-free survival probability in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Graf, M; Reif, S; Hecht, K; Pelka-Fleischer, R; Kroell, T; Pfister, K; Schmetzer, H

    2005-05-01

    Costimulatory molecules such as lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 (CD11a), LFA-3 (CD58), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 (CD54), neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (CD56), B7-1 (CD80), or B7-2 (CD86) are important regulatory elements in healthy immunological cascades, but their role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has only been rarely investigated. We studied their expression on mononuclear bone marrow (BM) cells from 105 patients with AML at initial diagnosis and evaluated their prognostic significance. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses were performed using antibodies directly conjugated with fluorescein. A BM sample was considered positive if more than 20% of the cells in the blast containing gate expressed the respective marker. The surface expression of CD11a (27 of 29 cases positive with an average of 71% positive blasts; 27(+)/29, 71%), CD54 (23(+)/33, 37%), CD56 (24(+)/93, 20%), CD58 (29(+)/29, 95%), CD80 (13(+)/28, 30%), and CD86 (19(+)/29, 39%) was measured. The expression of these markers in different French-American-British (FAB) classification types (M0-M5) was heterogeneous, except for CD56, which showed a higher proportion of positive cells in monocytic subtypes of AML. In addition, cases with a "poor risk" karyotype as well as patients succumbing to "early death" after double induction therapy according to the AML Cooperative Group (CG) protocol were characterized by a high expression of CD56. Relapse-free survival analyses demonstrated that patients with more than 8% CD56(+) cells in the BM relapsed significantly sooner. CD54 was preferentially expressed in AML M4(eo) and in addition in "favorable" cytogenetic risk groups and in cases that had responded to AML-CG therapy. Only very high proportions (>60%) of CD54(+) cells were associated with a lower probability for relapse-free survival. CD80 and CD86 expressions were similar in all FAB types. Patients who had responded to AML-CG therapy showed higher CD80

  3. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  4. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult patients with congenital heart disease].

    PubMed

    Serino, G; Giacomazzi, F

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is definited by a mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAPm) >25 mmHg at rest. The Dana Point 2008 Revised Classification System represents the most recent classification system update with respect of various etiologies of PH. About 10 % of adolescents or adults with uncorrected congenital heart disease (CHD) with left-to-right shunt and high pulmonary blood flow develop Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) . Progressive vascular remodeling and increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) may ultimately lead to reversal of the shunt (pulmonary to systemic) causing cyanosis and determining the so-called Eisenmenger Syndrome (ES). Recent advances in the early diagnosis and medical targeted treatment of adult patients with CHD-PAH and ES can improve PAP, PVR and exercise tolerance, together with NYHA Class and survival, and may potentially reverse the vascular remodeling process in selected patients.

  5. Modified Fontan Conversion: An Alternative Technique for Adult Patients.

    PubMed

    González-López, María-Teresa; Pita-Fernández, Ana-María; Gil-Jaurena, Juan-Miguel; Pérez-Caballero-Martínez, Ramón; Sánchez-Valenzuela, Diego; Las, Cynthia-Jahavee

    2015-07-01

    A need persists for Fontan conversion that provides alternative approaches for the individual anatomical challenges occurring in these unusual and complex adult patients. The pulmonary arteries present unique variations and the surgical technique needs to be intraoperatively addressed. We describe a technique for Fontan conversion for performing the distal anastomosis of the extracardiac conduit, allowing adequate matching to the pulmonary arteries and preserving an optimal flow into the Fontan circuit.

  6. Hypohidrosis induced by topiramate in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Karachristianou, Styliani; Papamichalis, Evangelos; Sarantopoulos, Alexandros; Boura, Panagiota; Georgiadis, George

    2013-06-01

    Hypohidrosis is an uncommon and reversible side effect of topiramate treatment, reported mainly in children. This report presents an adult patient with complex partial seizures who was treated with topiramate and developed hypohidrosis coupled with hyperthermia, related to high environmental temperature and physical exercise. Reduced sweat response was confirmed using the Neuropad test. Signs and symptoms ceased after drug discontinuation. During topiramate treatment, it is important to recognise this side effect, although the exact causal mechanism has not yet been clarified.

  7. Supraphysiologic levels of the AML1-ETO isoform AE9a are essential for transformation

    PubMed Central

    Link, Kevin A.; Lin, Shan; Shrestha, Mahesh; Bowman, Melissa; Wunderlich, Mark; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Huang, Gang; Mulloy, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation 8;21 is found in 40% of the FAB M2 subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The resultant in-frame fusion protein AML1-ETO (AE) acts as an initiating oncogene for leukemia development. AE immortalizes human CD34+ cord blood cells in long-term culture. We assessed the transforming properties of the alternatively spliced AE isoform AE9a (or alternative splicing at exon 9), which is fully transforming in a murine retroviral model, in human cord blood cells. Full activity was realized only upon increased fusion protein expression. This effect was recapitulated in the AE9a murine AML model. Cotransduction of AE and AE9a resulted in a strong selective pressure for AE-expressing cells. In the context of AE, AE9a did not show selection for increased expression, affirming observations of human t(8;21) patient samples where full-length AE is the dominant protein detected. Mechanistically, AE9a showed defective transcriptional regulation of AE target genes that was partially corrected at high expression. Together, these results bring an additional perspective to our understanding of AE function and highlight the contribution of oncogene expression level in t(8;21) experimental models. PMID:27457952

  8. RNA Splicing Modulation Selectively Impairs Leukemia Stem Cell Maintenance in Secondary Human AML.

    PubMed

    Crews, Leslie A; Balaian, Larisa; Delos Santos, Nathaniel P; Leu, Heather S; Court, Angela C; Lazzari, Elisa; Sadarangani, Anil; Zipeto, Maria A; La Clair, James J; Villa, Reymundo; Kulidjian, Anna; Storb, Rainer; Morris, Sheldon R; Ball, Edward D; Burkart, Michael D; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2016-11-03

    Age-related human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) exhaustion and myeloid-lineage skewing promote oncogenic transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into therapy-resistant leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). While acquisition of clonal DNA mutations has been linked to increased rates of secondary AML for individuals older than 60 years, the contribution of RNA processing alterations to human hematopoietic stem and progenitor aging and LSC generation remains unclear. Comprehensive RNA sequencing and splice-isoform-specific PCR uncovered characteristic RNA splice isoform expression patterns that distinguished normal young and aged human stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from malignant myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and AML progenitors. In splicing reporter assays and pre-clinical patient-derived AML models, treatment with a pharmacologic splicing modulator, 17S-FD-895, reversed pro-survival splice isoform switching and significantly impaired LSC maintenance. Therapeutic splicing modulation, together with monitoring splice isoform biomarkers of healthy HSPC aging versus LSC generation, may be employed safely and effectively to prevent relapse, the leading cause of leukemia-related mortality.

  9. Relationship of Hemoglobin Concentration in Adult Asthmatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Nasreen, S; Nessa, A; Islam, M F; Husain, M F; Khatun, N; Wahed, F; Zannat, M R; Tajkia, T

    2016-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Asthma is one of the most common diseases globally and currently affects 300 million people. The epidemic rise in anemia, asthma, and related allergic disease is a common major public health problem worldwide. Asthma and anemia associated with acute infections occur both in children and adults. This descriptive type of cross sectional study was done to find out the levels of hemoglobin concentration in adult asthmatic patients and carried out in the Department of Physiology, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh from July 2014 to January 2016. Fifty (50) male and 50 (fifty) female adult asthmatic patients aged 18-60 years were included in the study group. They are enrolled from the Department of Medicine, Mymensingh Medical College, Mymensingh, Bangladesh and also from locality. For comparison age matched 50 male and 50 female apparently healthy persons were also studied as control. Hemoglobin concentration was estimated by Cyanmethemoglobin method. For statistical analysis unpaired student's 't' test was used. Mean hemoglobin concentration was significantly decreased in study group in comparison to control group and the result was statistically significant (p<0.001). The study findings showed a high prevalence of anemia among asthmatic patients than non asthmatic healthy persons.

  10. Health-related Quality of Life (HR-QOL) and Chronic Health Conditions in Survivors of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) with Down Syndrome (DS): A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Kris Ann P; Chen, Lu; Kunin-Batson, Alicia; Chen, Zhengjia; Woods, William G; Gamis, Alan; Kawashima, Toana; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Nicholson, H Stacy; Neglia, Joseph P

    2017-01-01

    Survival rates for children with Down syndrome (DS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are high; however, little is known regarding the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) of these survivors. Individuals who survived ≥5 years following diagnosis of childhood AML were invited to complete parent or patient-report surveys measuring HR-QOL and chronic health conditions. In total, 26 individuals with DS had a median age at diagnosis of 1.8 years (range, 0.77 to 10.9 y) and median age at interview of 15 years (range, 8.3 to 27.6 y). Participants with DS and AML were compared with AML survivors without DS whose caregiver completed a HR-QOL survey (CHQ-PF50). In total, 77% of survivors with DS reported ≥1 chronic health condition compared with 50% of AML survivors without DS (P=0.07). Mean physical and psychosocial QOL scores for children with DS and AML were statistically lower than the population mean, though not discrepant from AML survivors without DS. Although the overall prevalence of chronic health conditions in survivors with DS is higher than in survivors without DS, prior studies of children with DS have reported similarly high rates of chronic health conditions, suggesting that AML therapy may not substantially increase this risk.

  11. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  12. Vaccination of Adult Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca; Antunes, Ana Margarida; Gruner, Heidi; Riso, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the Portuguese vaccination program 50th anniversary it seems appropriate to review vaccination in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Controversial issues as regards the association between autoimmune diseases, infections, and vaccines are discussed as well as vaccine safety and efficacy issues as regards chronic immunosuppressant (IS) drug therapy. After a brief overview of national policies, specific recommendations are made as regards vaccination for adult patients with SLE with a particular focus on current IS therapy and unmet needs. PMID:27069477

  13. Stepping to stability and fall prevention in adult psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Emory, Sara L; Silva, Susan G; Christopher, Eric J; Edwards, Pamela B; Wahl, Leanne E

    2011-12-01

    Fall prevention is a major area of concern in inpatient settings. This article reports on the feasibility of implementing a daily exercise program that features line dancing to promote stability, balance, and flexibility in adult psychiatric patients and describes the impact of that program. Six hundred sixty-five patient charts drawn from before and after the practice change were reviewed. The fall rate after the introduction of line dancing was 2.8% compared with 3.2% before implementation. In a setting that treats both men and women of many ages and with varying levels of mobility, line dancing offers a viable approach to exercise in a secure setting.

  14. Emerging strategies for the treatment of older patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel A; Iacoboni, Gloria; Montesinos, Pau; Venditti, Adriano

    2016-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults, and its incidence increases with age. Clinical outcomes in younger patients have improved over the years but, unfortunately, there is little evidence for an equivalent improvement in outcome for older patients. Approximately 50 % of older patients who are able to receive intensive chemotherapy will achieve a complete remission; however, they face a much higher relapse rate than younger patients, and survival rates for this group are low. Therefore, there is an urgent need to improve outcomes in older patients with AML. In this article, we discuss current treatment paradigms for older patients with AML including the challenges faced when determining which patients are eligible for intensive chemotherapy. We then highlight new treatments in development that may benefit this patient group. Cytotoxic agents, hypomethylating agents, molecularly targeted agents, and cell cycle kinase inhibitors are discussed, with a focus on novel agents that have achieved an advanced stage of development. Overall, the treatment of AML in older patients remains a challenge and, whenever possible, treatment should be offered in the context of clinical trials and should be planned with curative intent.

  15. [The definition of the medical clown's role with adult patients].

    PubMed

    Scheyer, Rachel; Nuttman-Shwartz, Orit; Ziyoni, Herzel

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the healthcare system has grown increasingly aware of the need to develop and adopt new models and intervention methods aimed at improving patients' quality of life. As part of this perception, medical clowns have been integrated into hospitals, primarily in work with children. Recently, there have been attempts to integrate clowns into work with adult patients in emergency rooms, but this intervention method has not yet been systematically implemented and studied. This article describes and examines the definition of the medical clown's role as an intervention strategy with adult outpatients suffering from chronic and life-threatening illnesses. The study is qualitative and based on a content analysis of the documentation of the work of two medical clowns over two years. The dominant theme arising from this analysis involves the definition of the clown's role within the medical space of the hospital and includes perspectives on his integration into the hospital's multidisciplinary medical staff and his impact on the staff and on patients and their families. The findings indicate that, from the clowns' point of view, integrated medical clowns as part of the medical team, would contribute to the functioning of both patients and staff. This is in accord with additional studies conducted recently in medical centers around the world. Since this is a pioneering study, there is room to further probe and research the medical clown's contribution to assisting and improving patients' and staff's quality of life and to develop ways of increasing his integration and professionalism.

  16. Study of inhaler technique in asthma patients: differences between pediatric and adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Manríquez, Pablo; Acuña, Ana María; Muñoz, Luis; Reyes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Inhaler technique comprises a set of procedures for drug delivery to the respiratory system. The oral inhalation of medications is the first-line treatment for lung diseases. Using the proper inhaler technique ensures sufficient drug deposition in the distal airways, optimizing therapeutic effects and reducing side effects. The purposes of this study were to assess inhaler technique in pediatric and adult patients with asthma; to determine the most common errors in each group of patients; and to compare the results between the two groups. Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Using a ten-step protocol, we assessed inhaler technique in 135 pediatric asthma patients and 128 adult asthma patients. Results: The most common error among the pediatric patients was failing to execute a 10-s breath-hold after inhalation, whereas the most common error among the adult patients was failing to exhale fully before using the inhaler. Conclusions: Pediatric asthma patients appear to perform most of the inhaler technique steps correctly. However, the same does not seem to be true for adult patients. PMID:26578130

  17. Overproduction of NOX-derived ROS in AML promotes proliferation and is associated with defective oxidative stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Hole, Paul S; Zabkiewicz, Joanna; Munje, Chinmay; Newton, Zarabeth; Pearn, Lorna; White, Paul; Marquez, Nuria; Hills, Robert K; Burnett, Alan K; Tonks, Alex; Darley, Richard L

    2013-11-07

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is frequently observed in cancer and is known to strongly influence hematopoietic cell function. Here we report that extracellular ROS production is strongly elevated (mean >10-fold) in >60% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and that this increase is attributable to constitutive activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (NOX). In contrast, overproduction of mitochondrial ROS was rarely observed. Elevated ROS was found to be associated with lowered glutathione levels and depletion of antioxidant defense proteins. We also show for the first time that the levels of ROS generated were able to strongly promote the proliferation of AML cell lines, primary AML blasts, and, to a lesser extent, normal CD34(+) cells, and that the response to ROS is limited by the activation of the oxidative stress pathway mediated though p38(MAPK). Consistent with this, we observed that p38(MAPK) responses were attenuated in patients expressing high levels of ROS. These data show that overproduction of NOX-derived ROS can promote the proliferation of AML blasts and that they also develop mechanisms to suppress the stress signaling that would normally limit this response. Together these adaptations would be predicted to confer a competitive advantage to the leukemic clone.

  18. Clofarabine in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-04

    Solid Tumors; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Adult; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Pediatric; Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute, Adult; Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Adult

  19. Minimal Residual Disease as a Predictive Factor for Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in Adult Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First and Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Grubovikj, Rada M.; Alavi, Asif; Koppel, Ahrin; Territo, Mary; Schiller, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is potentially curative for patients with high-risk leukemia, but disease recurrence remains the leading cause of treatment failure. Our objective was to determine the impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) by any technique in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in morphologic first and second complete remission undergoing allo-SCT. Fifty nine patients were eligible for the study of 160 patients transplanted over ten years. For the MRD assessment we used multiparametric flow cytometry, cytogenetics and fluorescent in situ hybridization; 19 patients (32.2%) were identified as MRD positive. Patients with MRD had a consistently worse outcome over those without MRD, with 3-years leukemia-free survival (LFS) of 15.8% vs. 62.4% and overall survival (OS) of 17.5% vs. 62.3%. Relapse rate was significantly higher in MRD-positive patients; 3 years relapse rate in MRD-positive patients was 57.9% vs. 15.1% in MRD-negative patients. Detection of MRD in complete remission was associated with increased overall mortality (HR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.45–7.57; p = 0.0044) and relapse (HR = 5.26; 95% CI: 2.0–14.0; p = 0.001), even after controlling for other risk factors. Our study showed that for patients in morphologic complete remission the presence of MRD predicts for significantly increased risk of relapse and reduced LFS and OS. PMID:24213327

  20. Phase I Trial of Maintenance Sorafenib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for FLT3-ITD AML

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Bin; Li, Shuli; Lane, Andrew A.; Connolly, Christine; Del Rio, Candice; Valles, Betsy; Curtis, Morgan; Ballen, Karen; Cutler, Corey; Dey, Bimalangshu R.; El-Jawahri, Areej; Fathi, Amir T.; Ho, Vincent T.; Joyce, Amy; McAfee, Steven; Rudek, Michelle; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Verselis, Sigitas; Antin, Joseph H.; Spitzer, Thomas R.; Levis, Mark; Soiffer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is associated with a high relapse rate for patients with AML even after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Sorafenib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor which inhibits the FLT3 tyrosine kinase and has shown encouraging activity in FLT3-ITD AML. We conducted a phase I trial of maintenance sorafenib after HSCT in patients with FLT3-ITD AML (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398501). Patients received a variety of conditioning regimens and graft sources. A dose escalation 3+3 cohort design was used to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) with an additional 10 patients treated at the MTD. Sorafenib was initiated between days 45 and 120 after HSCT continued for twelve 28-day cycles. Twenty-two patients were enrolled (status at HSCT: CR1=16, CR2=3, refractory=3). The MTD was established at 400 mg BID with one DLT observed (pericardial effusion). Two patients died of transplant-related causes, both unrelated to sorafenib. Two patients stopped sorafenib after relapse and 5 stopped due to attributable toxicities after the DLT period. Median follow-up for surviving patients is 16.7 months after HSCT (range, 8.1–35.0). There was one case of grade II acute GVHD after starting sorafenib and the 12-month cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 38% (90% CI, 21%–56%). For all patients, one-year progression-free survival (PFS) is 85% (90% CI, 66%–94%) and one-year overall survival (OS) is 95% (90% CI, 79%–99%) after HSCT. For patients in CR1 / CR2 prior to HSCT (n=19), one-year PFS is 95% (90% CI, 76%–99%) and one-year OS is 100% with only one patient who has relapsed. Sorafenib is safe after HSCT for FLT3-ITD AML and merits further investigation for the prevention of relapse. PMID:25239228

  1. The epidemiology of adult Rapid Response Team patients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Jones, D

    2014-03-01

    Rapid Response Teams (RRT) are specialised teams that review deteriorating ward patients in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality. Most studies have assessed the effect of implementing an RRT into a hospital. There is much less literature on the characteristics and outcomes of RRT patients themselves. This article reviews the epidemiology of adult RRT patients in Australia and proposes three models of RRT syndromes. The number of RRT calls varies considerably in Australian hospitals from 1.35 to 71.3/1000 hospital admissions. Common causes of RRT calls include sepsis, atrial fibrillation, seizures and pulmonary oedema. Approximately 20% of patients to whom an RRT has responded have more than one RRT call, and up to one-third have issues around end-of-life care. Calls are least common overnight. Between 10 to 25% of patients are admitted to a critical care area after the call. The in-hospital mortality for RRT patients is approximately 25% overall but only 15% in patients without a limitation of medical therapy. RRT syndromes can be conceptually described by the trigger for the call (e.g. hypotension) or the clinical condition causing the call (e.g. sepsis). Alternatively, the RRT call can be described by the major theme of the call: "end-of-life care", "requiring critical care" and "stable enough to initially remain on the ward". Based on these themes, education strategies and quality improvement initiatives may be developed to reduce the incidence of RRT calls, further improving patient outcome.

  2. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-03

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

  3. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Angelini, Gianni D

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was the impact of modified ultrafiltration on adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in terms of inflammatory and metabolic changes, blood loss and early clinical outcomes. A total of 155 papers were identified using the search as described below. Of these, six papers presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question as they reported data to reach conclusions regarding the issues of interest for this review. The author, date and country of publication, patient group, study type and weaknesses and relevant outcomes were tabulated. Modified ultrafiltration in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery seems to attenuate the levels of inflammatory molecules associated with surgery, reduces blood loss and blood transfusion and improves cardiac output, index and systemic vascular resistance. However, this was not translated in any reduction in length of stay in intensive care unit or hospital. Most studies were single-centre prospective non-blinded trials that included a small cohort of elective coronary artery bypass grafting patients, which makes it underpowered to provide unbiased evidence regarding clinical outcomes. Properly designed and conducted prospective randomized studies are required to answer whether the beneficial effect of modified ultrafiltration on systemic inflammatory molecules associated with surgery can translate with improvement in clinical outcome.

  4. Optimizing outcomes following allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation in AML: the role of hypomethylating agents.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Fedele, Roberta; Moscato, Tiziana; Ronco, Francesca

    2013-07-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is a key pathological mechanism in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and provides rationale for the clinical development of hypomethylating agents (HMAs) for the treatment of these diseases. One HMA, azacitidine (Vidaza®, Celgene Corp.), has demonstrated improved survival versus conventional care regimens in patients with intermediate-2/high-risk MDS and AML (20-30% blasts) and has a favorable tolerability profile. Emerging evidence indicates that azacitidine can have an immunomodulatory effect by, for example, increasing functional regulatory T-cell (Treg) numbers and killer-cell-immunoglobulin-like receptor expression. Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (allo HPCT) is the only potentially curative treatment approach in patients with advanced MDS or AML. Unfortunately, allo HPCT in these settings is limited because most patients are ineligible due to age/comorbidities, or are at a high risk of treatment failure due to disease relapse. Recent studies have shown that azacitidine after allo HPCT increases Treg numbers while inducing a cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell response, suggesting a potential mechanism for augmenting the graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect without increasing graft-versushost- disease (GVHD). In patients at a high risk of relapse following allo HPCT, pre-emptive azacitidine may help prevent/delay relapse. For patients who have relapsed following allo HPCT, azacitidine may be a salvage therapy option, either as monotherapy or in combination with donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI). In this mini-review, we discuss these emerging clinical data for HMAs in the post-allo HPCT regimens and highlight the possible future role of azacitidine in this setting.

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Rao, Arati V; Pardee, Timothy S

    2014-08-20

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases.

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Klepin, Heidi D.; Rao, Arati V.; Pardee, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of older adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is challenging because of disease morbidity and associated treatments. Both diseases represent a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders primarily affecting older adults, with treatment strategies ranging from supportive care to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Although selected older adults can benefit from intensive therapies, as a group they experience increased treatment-related morbidity, are more likely to relapse, and have decreased survival. Age-related outcome disparities are attributed to both tumor and patient characteristics, requiring an individualized approach to treatment decision making beyond consideration of chronologic age alone. Selection of therapy for any individual requires consideration of both disease-specific risk factors and estimates of treatment tolerance and life expectancy derived from evaluation of functional status and comorbidity. Although treatment options for older adults are expanding, clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and aging are needed to define standard-of-care treatments for both disease groups. In addition, trials should include outcomes addressing quality of life, maintenance of independence, and use of health care services to assist in patient-centered decision making. This review will highlight available evidence in treatment of older adults with AML or MDS and unanswered clinical questions for older adults with these diseases. PMID:25071138

  7. CBL mutation in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia secondary to familial platelet disorder with propensity to develop acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML).

    PubMed

    Shiba, Norio; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Park, Myoung-ja; Murata, Chisato; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Ogawa, Chitose; Manabe, Atsushi; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Seishi; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2012-03-15

    Familial platelet disorder with a propensity to develop acute myeloid leukemia (FPD/AML) is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, and a propensity to develop myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and AML. So far, > 20 affected families have been reported. Recently, a second RUNX1 alteration has been reported; however, no additional molecular abnormalities have been found so far. We identified an acquired CBL mutation and 11q-acquired uniparental disomy (11q-aUPD) in a patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) secondary to FPD with RUNX1 mutation but not in the same patient during refractory cytopenia. This finding suggests that alterations of the CBL gene and RUNX1 gene may cooperate in the pathogenesis of CMML in patients with FPD/AML. The presence of CBL mutations and 11q-aUPD was an important "second hit" that could be an indicator of leukemic transformation of MDS or AML in patients with FPD/AML.

  8. Wetland development as a portion of AML reclamation

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, W.L.

    1990-12-31

    The goal of Abandoned Mine Land (AML) reclamation is the development a multi-user land use that enhances the sites positive characteristics and eliminates negative ones. The AML program in the State of Kansas developed and reclaimed a large coal slurry disposal area by the use of wetlands. The main objective was to eliminate the acid mine drainage from the coal slurry and coarse fuel refuse areas but at the same time retain the wildlife habitat that had naturally developed on site. Selective flooding of various areas by the use of a series of small dams was the selected reclamation option. The project is now completed and is working as planned.

  9. Thyroid gland diseases in adult patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Vondra, K; Vrbikova, J; Dvorakova, K

    2005-12-01

    This review concerns the relation between most frequent thyroid gland diseases and diabetes mellitus in adult patients. Special attention is paid to autoimmune thyroiditis, Graves' disease, thyroid autoimmunity in pregnant diabetic women, and iodine metabolism. We focused on mechanisms leading to coexistence of both endocrine disorders, and on distinctions in the prevalence, diagnosis, clinical course and treatment of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients. The prevalence of thyroid diseases in diabetic patients is 2-3 times higher than in nondiabetic subjects; it raises with age, and is strongly influenced by female gender and autoimmune diabetes. Clinical relevance of thyroid diseases, especially in diabetic patients, significantly increases if it is associated with deteriorated function, which always cause a number problems with metabolic compensation of diabetes. Most serious consequences are increased frequency of hypoglycaemia in hypothyroidism and development of potentially life-threatening ketoacidosis in thyrotoxicosis. In spite of that, little attention is paid to the diagnosis of thyroid diseases in diabetics, as they are diagnosed in only about half of the patients. At the end, we provide recommendations for the thyroid disease screening and diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus based on our experience.

  10. Updates in vaccination: Recommendations for adult inflammatory bowel disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudrey, Khadija; Salvaggio, Michelle; Ahmed, Aftab; Mahmood, Sultan; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Treatment regimens for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) incorporate the use of a variety of immunosuppressive agents that increase the risk of infections. Prevention of many of these infections can be achieved by the timely and judicious use of vaccinations. IBD patients tend to be under-immunized. Some of the contributing factors are lack of awareness regarding the significance of vaccinating IBD patients, misperception about safety of vaccinations in immunocompromised patients, ambiguity about the perceived role of the gastroenterologist in contrast to the primary care physician and unavailability of vaccination guidelines focused on IBD population. In general, immunocompetent IBD patients can be vaccinated using standard vaccination recommendations. However there are special considerations for IBD patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, IBD travelers and pregnant women with IBD. This review discusses current vaccination recommendations with updates for adult IBD patients. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2013 vaccination guidelines with 2014 updates and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations have been highlighted as a primary source of recommendations. PMID:25805924

  11. Group B streptococcal necrotizing pneumonia in a diabetic adult patient.

    PubMed

    Pacha, Andrea; Luna Cian, Ramiro; Bonofiglio, Laura; Solari, Melisa; Strada, Virginia; Suárez, Mariana; Vigliarolo, Laura; Tersigni, Carina; Mollerach, Marta; Lopardo, Horacio

    2017-03-18

    The aim of this report is to describe a rare case of necrotizing pneumonia due to group B Streptococcus serotype III in a relatively young male adult (48 years old) suffering from diabetes. The organism was isolated from his pleural fluid and was only resistant to tetracycline. The patient first received ceftazidime (2g/8h i.v.)+clindamycin (300mg/8h) for 18 days and then he was discharged home and orally treated with amoxicillin clavulanic acid (1g/12h) for 23 days with an uneventful evolution. As in the cases of invasive infection by Streptococcus pyogenes, clindamycin could prevent streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

  12. Increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhi-fen; Ju, Ying; Li, Li; Zhang, Bing-chang; Liu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are thought to help provide a cellular microenvironments in many solid tumors, in which transformed cells proliferate, acquire new mutations, and evade host immunosurveillance. In the present study, we found that MDSCs (CD33 + CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg)) in bone marrow were significantly increased in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. MDSCs levels in newly diagnosed AML patients correlated well with extramedullary infiltration and plasma D-dimer levels. Remission rates in the MDSCs > 1500 group and MDSCs < 1500 group were 72.73 and 81.25 %, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups. MDSC levels in the complete remission group were significantly decreased after chemotherapy, while in the partial remission and non-remission groups, there were no significant differences. The level of MDSCs in the high minimal residual disease (MRD) group was significantly higher than that in the middle and low MRD groups. High levels of Wilms' Tumor-1 (WT-1) protein were strongly correlated with higher bone marrow MDSC levels. In conclusion, we report here a population of immunosuppressive monocytes in the bone marrow of patients with AML characterized by the CD33(high)CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg) phenotype. These cells appear to impact the clinical course and prognosis of AML. This data may provide potentially important targets for novel therapies.

  13. Is visualising ureter before pyeloplasty necessary in adult patients?

    PubMed

    Cakan, M; Yalçinkaya, F; Demirel, F; Satir, A

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to detect whether or not visualising ureter and ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) preoperatively is necessary in adult patients who have primer UPJ obstruction. Between January 1995 to June 1999, 46 renal units in 45 patients with primer UPJ obstruction were evaluated. The patients were separated into 2 groups. In group 1, intravenous pyelography (IVP) and renal scintigraphy were performed to 17 renal units preoperatively. In group 2, in addition to these methods, either retrograde pyelography (RGP) or antegrade pyelography (AGP) were performed to 29 renal units. Renal/bladder sonogram was used in patients with poor renal function in IVP or in renal scintigraphy. All the operations were performed through a flank incision. In group 2, additional information was gained for 8 (27.5%) of the renal units preoperatively. No additional information for this group found intraoperatively. In group 1, we found additional information in 4 (23.53%) of the units intraoperatively. All the pathologies in both groups were corrected intraoperatively. Double-J (D-J) stent was used in 6 (35.29%) of the units in group 1 and 8 (27.58%) of the units in group 2 intraoperatively (p > 0.05). In group 2, 4 (13.79%) preoperative complications were seen due to RGP and they were treated either medically or conservatively. In the early postoperative period, a complication observed in 1 (5.88%) of the patients in group 1 and 1 of the patients in group 2 (3.44%) (p > 0.05). The first patient was treated with inserting D-J and the latter one was treated conservatively. In the 3rd postoperative month, success rate was found to be 94.11% in group 1 and 96.55% in group 2 (p > 0.05). Additional pathologies in adult patients with primer UPJ obstruction can be corrected intraoperatively through a flank incision. Therefore, imaging of ureter and UPJ may not be necessary in these patients.

  14. MRD in AML: does it already guide therapy decision-making?

    PubMed

    Ossenkoppele, Gert; Schuurhuis, Gerrit Jan

    2016-12-02

    Prognostic factors determined at diagnosis are predictive for outcome whereas achievement of morphological complete remission (CR) is still an important end point during treatment. Residual disease after therapy may reflect the sum of all diagnosis and postdiagnosis resistance mechanisms/factors; its measurement could hypothetically be very instrumental for guiding treatment. The possibility of defining residual disease (minimal residual disease [MRD]) far below the level of 5% blast cells is changing the landscape of risk classification. In this manuscript, the various methods, all different in sensitivity, specificity, and phase of development, to assess MRD are discussed. Currently, the 2 methods mostly used are flow cytometry-based immune MRD (multiparameter flow cytometry [MPFC]) and molecular MRD assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Both have advantages and disadvantages that are summarized in detail. Many studies in children as well as adults already demonstrated that MRD detection by MPFC or molecular MRD provides strong prognostic information in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after both induction and consolidation. These studies are summarized in this review. The general conclusion of this review is that a better definition of disease burden than morphological CR is now emerging. MRD assessed by flow or molecular techniques should become standard in every clinical trial in AML. Harmonization of antibody panels, introduction of single-cell tube systems (for determination of residual leukemic stem cells), and standardized analytical programs will pave the way for individual risk assessment and become a surrogate end point for survival in studies investigating new drugs, hopefully resulting in faster drug approval in AML.

  15. Results of the AIEOP AML 2002/01 multicenter prospective trial for the treatment of children with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pession, Andrea; Masetti, Riccardo; Rizzari, Carmelo; Putti, Maria Caterina; Casale, Fiorina; Fagioli, Franca; Luciani, Matteo; Lo Nigro, Luca; Menna, Giuseppe; Micalizzi, Concetta; Santoro, Nicola; Testi, Anna Maria; Zecca, Marco; Biondi, Andrea; Pigazzi, Martina; Rutella, Sergio; Rondelli, Roberto; Basso, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Franco

    2013-07-11

    We evaluated the outcome of 482 children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) enrolled in the Associazione Italiana di Ematologia e Oncologia Pediatrica AML 2002/01 trial. Treatment was stratified according to risk group; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was used in high-risk (HR) children. Patients with core binding factor leukemia achieving complete remission (CR) after the first induction course were considered standard risk (SR; 99 patients), whereas the others (n = 383) were assigned to the HR group. Allogeneic (ALLO) or autologous (AUTO) HSCT was employed, respectively, in 141 and 102 HR patients after consolidation therapy. CR, early death, and induction failure rates were 87%, 3%, and 10%, respectively. Relapse occurred in 24% of patients achieving CR. The 8-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were 68%, 55%, and 63%, respectively. OS, EFS, and DFS for SR and HR patients were 83%, 63%, and 66% and 64%, 53%, and 62%. DFS was 63% and 73% for HR patients given AUTO-HSCT and ALLO-HSCT, respectively. In multivariate analysis, risk group, white blood cell >100 × 10(9)/L at diagnosis, and monosomal karyotype predicted poorer EFS. Risk-oriented treatment and broad use of HSCT result in a long-term EFS comparing favorably with previously published studies on childhood AML.

  16. MLN0128, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, disrupts survival signaling and triggers apoptosis in AML and AML stem/ progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhihong; Wang, Rui-Yu; Qiu, Yi Hua; Mak, Duncan H; Coombes, Kevin; Yoo, Suk Young; Zhang, Qi; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Kornblau, Steven M; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-08-23

    mTOR activation leads to enhanced survival signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The active-site mTOR inhibitors (asTORi) represent a promising new approach to targeting mTOR in AKT/mTOR signaling. MLN0128 is an orally-administered, second-generation asTORi, currently in clinical development. We examined the anti-leukemic effects and the mechanisms of action of MLN0128 in AML cell lines and primary samples, with a particular focus on its effect in AML stem/progenitor cells. MLN0128 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AML by attenuating the activity of mTOR complex 1 and 2. Using time-of-flight mass cytometry, we demonstrated that MLN0128 selectively targeted and functionally inhibited AML stem/progenitor cells with high AKT/mTOR signaling activity. Using the reverse-phase protein array technique, we measured expression and phosphorylation changes in response to MLN0128 in 151 proteins from 24 primary AML samples and identified several pro-survival pathways that antagonize MLN0128-induced cellular stress. A combined blockade of AKT/mTOR signaling and these pro-survival pathways facilitated AML cell killing. Our findings provide a rationale for the clinical use of MLN0128 to target AML and AML stem/progenitor cells, and support the use of combinatorial multi-targeted approaches in AML therapy.

  17. MLN0128, a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, disrupts survival signaling and triggers apoptosis in AML and AML stem/ progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhihong; Wang, Rui-Yu; Qiu, Yi Hua; Mak, Duncan H.; Coombes, Kevin; Yoo, Suk Young; Zhang, Qi; Jessen, Katti; Liu, Yi; Rommel, Christian; Fruman, David A.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    mTOR activation leads to enhanced survival signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The active-site mTOR inhibitors (asTORi) represent a promising new approach to targeting mTOR in AKT/mTOR signaling. MLN0128 is an orally-administered, second-generation asTORi, currently in clinical development. We examined the anti-leukemic effects and the mechanisms of action of MLN0128 in AML cell lines and primary samples, with a particular focus on its effect in AML stem/progenitor cells. MLN0128 inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in AML by attenuating the activity of mTOR complex 1 and 2. Using time-of-flight mass cytometry, we demonstrated that MLN0128 selectively targeted and functionally inhibited AML stem/progenitor cells with high AKT/mTOR signaling activity. Using the reverse-phase protein array technique, we measured expression and phosphorylation changes in response to MLN0128 in 151 proteins from 24 primary AML samples and identified several pro-survival pathways that antagonize MLN0128-induced cellular stress. A combined blockade of AKT/mTOR signaling and these pro-survival pathways facilitated AML cell killing. Our findings provide a rationale for the clinical use of MLN0128 to target AML and AML stem/progenitor cells, and support the use of combinatorial multi-targeted approaches in AML therapy. PMID:27391151

  18. Early mixed T-cell chimerism is predictive of pediatric AML or MDS relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Broglie, Larisa; Helenowski, Irene; Jennings, Lawrence J; Schafernak, Kristian; Duerst, Reggie; Schneiderman, Jennifer; Tse, William; Kletzel, Morris; Chaudhury, Sonali

    2017-03-07

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) have dismal outcomes. Our ability to predict those at risk for relapse is limited. We examined chimerism trends post-HCT in 63 children who underwent HCT for AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Mixed T-cell chimerism at engraftment and absence of chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) were associated with relapse (P = 0.04 and P = 0.02, respectively). Mixed T-cell chimerism at engraftment was predictive in patients without cGVHD (P = 0.03). Patients with engraftment mixed T-cell chimerism may warrant closer disease monitoring and consideration for early intervention.

  19. Ileal function in patients with untreated adult coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, D B; Kumar, P J; Webb, J P; Lane, A E; Clark, M L; Dawson, A M

    1975-01-01

    A double-lumen perfusion technique has been used to investigate jejunal and ileal absorption of glucose, water, and electrolytes in a group of patients with untreated adult coeliac disease. Correct positioning of the tube was confirmed by measuring the differential jejunal and ileal handling of bicarbonate. Eight control subjects and eight patients with coeliac disease were perfused with an isotonic electrolyte solution containing 50 mM glucose and 25 mM bicarbonate. The group of coeliac patients had impaired jejunal absorption of glucose (P less than 0.001), water (P less than 0.01), sodium (P less than 0.02), and chloride (P greater than 0.05) compared with the control group. In contrast the group of coeliac patients had normal ileal glucose and water absorption and increased ileal sodium (P greater than 0.01) and chloride (P greater than 0.05) absorption compared with the controls. Evidence for ileal adaptation was found in three individual patients who had absorptive values outside 2SD of the normal mean. The results indicate that the distal small intestine in coeliac disease has the ability to adopt to the damage and loss of absorptive capacity in the proximal small intestine. PMID:1132801

  20. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype.

  1. Challenges in Treating Older Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Eleni, Lagadinou D.; Nicholas, Zoumbos C.; Alexandros, Spyridonidis

    2010-01-01

    Whereas in younger patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment is straightforward and the goal is cure, the optimal treatment decision for older adults remains highly controversial. Physicians need to determine whether palliation, “something” beyond palliation, intensive therapy, or an investigational therapy is the most appropriate treatment option. This requires understanding of the biology and risk profile of the AML, clinical judgment in evaluating the functional status of the patient, communication skills in understanding the patient's wishes and social background, and medical expertise in available therapies. The physician has to accurately inform the patient about (a) the unique biological considerations of his leukemia and his prognosis; (b) the risks and benefits of all available treatment options; (c) novel therapeutic approaches and how the patient can get access to these treatments. Last but not least, he has to recommend a treatment. This paper tries to discuss each of these issues. PMID:20628485

  2. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3+CD4−CD8− T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient. PMID:27979843

  3. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-12-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient.

  4. Recommended vaccinations for asplenic and hyposplenic adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Grazzini, Maddalena; Niccolai, Giuditta; Paolini, Diana; Varone, Ornella; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Bartalesi, Filippo; Santini, Maria Grazia; Baretti, Simonetta; Bonito, Carlo; Zini, Paola; Mechi, Maria Teresa; Niccolini, Fabrizio; Magistri, Lea; Pulci, Maria Beatrice; Bechini, Angela

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Asplenic or hyposplenic (AH) individuals are particularly vulnerable to invasive infections caused by encapsulated bacteria. Such infections have often a sudden onset and a fulminant course. Infectious diseases (IDs) incidence in AH subjects can be reduced by preventive measures such as vaccination. The aim of our work is to provide updated recommendations on prevention of infectious diseases in AH adult patients, and to supply a useful and practical tool to healthcare workers for the management of these subjects, in hospital setting and in outpatients consultation. A systematic literature review on evidence based measures for the prevention of IDs in adult AH patients was performed in 2015. Updated recommendations on available vaccines were consequently provided. Vaccinations against S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae type b and influenza virus are strongly recommended and should be administered at least 2 weeks before surgery in elective cases or at least 2 weeks after the surgical intervention in emergency cases. In subjects without evidence of immunity, 2 doses of live attenuated vaccines against measles-mumps-rubella and varicella should be administered 4–8 weeks apart from each other; a booster dose of tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis vaccine should be administered also to subjects fully vaccinated, and a 3-dose primary vaccination series is recommended in AH subjects with unknown or incomplete vaccination series (as in healthy people). Evidence based prevention data support the above recommendations to reduce the risk of infection in AH individuals. PMID:27929751

  5. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaomeng; Li, Ji; Li, Jing; Cai, Baiqiang

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study described the characteristics of the systemic arterial supply of pulmonary sequestration (PS) in an attempt to better distinguish PS from other acquired lesions. METHODS: We identified 25 patients hospitalized at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital during January 2013 to December 2015 with the assistance of medical catalogers. Twenty-three patients with a definite diagnosis of “pulmonary sequestration” clinically or pathologically were included in the study. The medical records, imaging information, and pathological data were reviewed retrospectively. The general characteristics of the patients and the features of the anomalous arteries were summarized. RESULTS: Aberrant arterial supply of PS was found in all 23 (100%) cases. Among them, twenty patients received surgery, including 14 (70%) with aberrant arterial supply found before surgery, and the other 6 (30%) found during surgery. Nineteen (82.6%) patients had a single systematic arterial supply, with a median diameter of 8 mm. More than one arterial supplies were found in four (17.4%) cases. In 21 (91.3%) cases, the anomalous systemic artery originated from the descending thoracic aorta just adjacent to the sequestrated lung which it supplied, without the presence of accompanying bronchi. In twenty (87.0%) patients who received the surgical intervention, samples of 12 (85.7%) were proved to have elastic vessel walls, out of the 14 samples in which the anomalous systemic arteries were available for analysis. CONCLUSIONS: There are no certain pathology diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of PS. The detecting of the aberrant systematic artery and distinguishing it from the bronchial arteries corresponded to certain lung abnormalities are the keys to the accurate diagnosis of pulmonary sequestration in adult patients. We propose that the characteristic features of the anomalous arteries include: Originating from aorta and its main branches, adjacent to the sequestrated area

  6. Cytokine Release Patterns in Mixed Lymphocyte Culture (MLC) of T-Cells with Dendritic Cells (DC) Generated from AML Blasts Contribute to Predict anti-Leukaemic T-Cell Reactions and Patients' Response to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fischbacher, Dorothea; Merle, Marion; Liepert, Anja; Grabrucker, Christine; Kroell, Tanja; Kremser, Andreas; Dreyßig, Julia; Freudenreich, Markus; Schuster, Friedhelm; Borkhardt, Arndt; Kraemer, Doris; Koehne, Claus-Henning; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Schmid, Christoph; Schmetzer, Helga Maria

    To enlighten interactions between autologous, allogeneic or T-cells from patients after stem cell transplantation with leukaemia-derived-dendritic-cells containing dendritic cells or blast containing mononuclear cells (n = 21, respectively), we determined cytokine-concentrations (interleukin 2, 4, 6, 10, tumor-necrosis-factor-α, interferon-γ) in supernatants of mixed-lymphocyte-culture and in serum (n = 16) of 20 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and three patients with myelodysplastic syndromes by cytometric-bead-assay. We correlated our data with lytic capabilities of stimulated T-cells in a fluorolysis-assay and clinical data: Dendritic-cell-/mononuclear-cell-stimulation of T-cells resulted in increased cytokine-levels in culture-medium compared to serum. There were no significant differences between cytokine-patterns of cases with/without lytic T-cell-activity, response to immunotherapy (stem cell transplantation/donor-lymphocyte-infusion) or graft-versus-host-disease. However, some predictive cytokine-cut-off-values for antileukaemic T-cell-activity, patients' response to immunotherapy and graft-versus-host-disease could be defined. Cytokine-profiles alone, without functional assays, are no useful tool to predict antileukaemic T-cell-function, although they can indicate lytic T-cell-activity, patients' response to immunotherapy and graft-versus-host-disease.

  7. Are Adult Patients More Tolerant of Treatment Risks Than Parents of Juvenile Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, F. Reed; Özdemir, Semra; Mansfield, Carol; Hass, Steven; Siegel, Corey A.; Sands, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding patient-specific differences in risk tolerance for new treatments that offer improved efficacy can assist in making difficult regulatory and clinical decisions for new treatments that offer both the potential for greater effectiveness in relieving disease symptoms, but also risks of disabling or fatal side effects. The aim of this study is to elicit benefit-risk trade-off preferences for hypothetical treatments with varying efficacy and risk levels using a stated-choice (SC) survey. We derive estimates of “maximum acceptable risk” (MAR) that can help decisionmakers identify welfare-enhancing alternatives. In the case of children, parent caregivers are responsible for treatment decisions and their risk tolerance may be quite different than adult patients' own tolerance for treatment-related risks. We estimated and compared the willingness of Crohn's disease (CD) patients and parents of juvenile CD patients to accept serious adverse event (SAE) risks in exchange for symptom relief. The analyzed data were from 345 patients over the age of 18 and 150 parents of children under the age of 18. The estimation results provide strong evidence that adult patients and parents of juvenile patients are willing to accept tradeoffs between treatment efficacy and risks of SAEs. Parents of juvenile CD patients are about as risk tolerant for their children as adult CD patients are for themselves for improved treatment efficacy. SC surveys provide a systematic method for eliciting preferences for benefit-risk tradeoffs. Understanding patients' own risk perceptions and their willingness to accept risks in return for treatment benefits can help inform risk management decision making. PMID:18826414

  8. Respiratory pattern in an adult population of dystrophic patients.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, M G; Romei, M; Lo Mauro, A; Marchi, E; Gandossini, S; Bonato, S; Comi, G P; Magri, F; Turconi, A C; Pedotti, A; Bresolin, N; Aliverti, A

    2011-07-15

    We studied respiratory function and Chest Wall kinematics in a large population of adult patients affected by slow course muscular dystrophies such as Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD, n=38), Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD, n=20) and Facio-Scapulo Humeral Dystrophy (FSHD, n=30), through standard spirometry and through the Optoelectronic Plethysmography, to measure the thoraco-abdominal motion during Quiet Breathing and Slow Vital Capacity maneuvers. Within the restrictive pulmonary syndrome characterizing LGMD and FSHD, several different thoraco-abdominal patterns compared to those of healthy subjects were present in the more advanced stages of the disease. These differences were present in the seated position, during the execution of a maximal maneuver such as Slow Vital Capacity. A global respiratory (both inspiratory and expiratory) muscle involvement was more pronounced in the LGMD and FSHD than in the BMD patients, and a significant reduction of abdominal contribution in wheelchair bound patients was observed. In conclusion, OEP technique is able to reveal mild initial modifications in the respiratory muscles in FSHD and LGMD patients, which could be helpful for functional and new therapeutic strategy evaluation.

  9. Interpretation of multiple isolate urine cultures in adult male patients.

    PubMed Central

    Khalifa, M. A.; Abdoh, A. A.; Silva, F. G.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective analytical study examined the records of 220 adult males (mean age 64.9 years) to determine the relative probability that multiple urine culture isolates (MUI) represent urinary tract infection (UTI) versus contamination or colonization. Nonculture laboratory data were used to determine the likelihood of UTI. Patients were classified into three categories: group 1 (those with single isolate cultures; n = 110), group 2 (those with MUI and either symptomatic UTI or an underlying pathologic condition; n = 71) and group 3 (those with MUI and either surgically altered urinary passages or absence of UTI symptoms; n = 39). Nonculture laboratory data suggested UTI in 48.2% of patients in group 1, 46.5% in group 2, and 23.1% in group 3. Patients in groups 1 or 2 with cultures yielding isolate counts of 10(5) colony forming units/mL were 6.2 times more likely to be classified as having a UTI (by nonculture laboratory data) compared with patients having only one or more of these two criteria. This study proposes a more objective approach to interpretation of MUI cultures using the results of nonculture laboratory data, clinical profiles, and colony counts. PMID:7897687

  10. Hypomethylation and up-regulation of PD-1 in T cells by azacytidine in MDS/AML patients: A rationale for combined targeting of PD-1 and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Ørskov, Andreas D; Treppendahl, Marianne B; Skovbo, Anni; Holm, Mette S; Friis, Lone S; Hokland, Marianne; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-04-20

    The hypomethylating agents (HMAs) are standard therapy for patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS); however, the majority of the patients will lose their response to HMAs over time due to unknown mechanisms. It has recently been shown that T cell expression of the immunoinhibitory receptor PD-1 is regulated by DNA methylation. In 12 of 27 patients (44%) PD-1 promoter demethylation was observed in sorted peripheral blood T cells isolated over consecutive cycles of treatment with 5-azacytidine (5-aza). The PD-1 promoter demethylation correlated with an increase in PD-1 expression. Moreover, demethylation of the PD-1 promoter correlated with a significantly worse overall response rate (8% vs. 60%, p = 0.014), and a trend towards a shorter overall survival (p = 0.11) was observed. A significantly higher baseline methylation level of the PD-1 promoter was observed in T cells of non-responding patients compared to healthy controls (p = 0.023). Accordingly, in addition to their beneficial function, HMAs induce PD-1 expression on T cells in the MDS microenvironment, thereby likely hampering the immune response against the MDS blasts. Thus, we suggest that activation of the PD-1 checkpoint during HMA treatment can be a possible resistance mechanism, which may be overcome by combination therapy with a PD-1 pathway inhibitor.

  11. Systematic review of surgical treatment techniques for adult and pediatric patients with pectus excavatum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This compares outcome measures of current pectus excavatum (PEx) treatments, namely the Nuss and Ravitch procedures, in pediatric and adult patients. Original investigations that stratified PEx patients based on current treatment and age (pediatric = 0–21; adult 17–99) were considered for inclusion. Outcome measures were: operation duration, analgesia duration, blood loss, length of stay (LOS), outcome ratings, complications, and percentage requiring reoperations. Adult implant patients (18.8%) had higher reoperation rates than adult Nuss or Ravitch patients (5.3% and 3.3% respectively). Adult Nuss patients had longer LOS (7.3 days), more strut/bar displacement (6.1%), and more epidural analgesia (3 days) than adult Ravitch patients (2.9 days, 0%, 0 days). Excluding pectus bar and strut displacements, pediatric and adult Nuss patients tended to have higher complication rates (pediatric - 38%; adult - 21%) compared to pediatric and adult Ravitch patients (12.5%; 8%). Pediatric Ravitch patients clearly had more strut displacements than adult Ravitch patients (0% and 6.4% respectively). These results suggest significantly better results in common PEx surgical repair techniques (i.e. Nuss and Ravitch) than uncommon techniques (i.e. Implants and Robicsek). The results suggest slightly better outcomes in pediatric Nuss procedure patients as compared with all other groups. We recommend that symptomatic pediatric patients with uncomplicated PEx receive the Nuss procedure. We suggest that adult patients receive the Nuss or Ravitch procedure, even though the long-term complication rates of the adult Nuss procedure require more investigation. PMID:24506826

  12. Orthodontics in the adult patient, with special reference to the periodontally compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Johal, A; Ide, M

    1999-04-01

    There is increasing demand from adult patients for orthodontic treatment, either purely for aesthetics, to improve aesthetics or function following previous disease, or to facilitate the stabilization, restoration or replacement of teeth. Orthodontics may have a major role in the rehabilitation of patients suffering the effects of advanced periodontal disease, but there are a number of important factors to be considered in the management of such patients if the optimal outcome is to be obtained. This paper summarizes important aspects of treatment and the potential complications and how to avoid them.

  13. Poor outcome in a pediatric patient with acute myeloid leukemia associated with a variant t(8;21) and trisomy 6.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michael J; Meloni-Ehrig, Aurelia M; Manley, Peter E; Altura, Rachel A

    2009-02-01

    RUNX1T1/RUNX1 (formerly ETO/AML1) is a molecular marker that is usually associated with a favorable outcome in both pediatric and adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We describe a 10-year-old girl with AML associated with an RUNX1T1/RUNX1 fusion. The patient's karyotype at the time of diagnosis was 46,X,-X,t(4;21;8)(q25;q22;q22),+6. She had an early relapse while being treated on a standard protocol and had significant difficulty in attaining a second remission. She subsequently underwent a matched related donor bone marrow transplant, but a second bone marrow relapse with extensive extramedullary disease followed on day +199. Cytogenetic analysis at second relapse showed evidence of clonal evolution in the form of a highly complex karyotype with numeric and structural abnormalities in addition to the t(4;21;8) and trisomy 6 detected in the diagnostic sample. Trisomy 6 is an uncommon cytogenetic abnormality in myeloid diseases. As a sole abnormality, it has been associated mainly with myelodysplastic syndrome and AML. The presence of this novel variant of t(8;21)(q22;q22) associated with trisomy 6 may have abrogated the usual favorable prognosis associated with RUNX1T1/RUNX1 in AML.

  14. Preference for One or Two Hearing Aids among Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robyn M; Schwartz, Kathryn S.; Noe, Colleen M.; Alexander, Genevieve C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Most practitioners believe that use of two hearing aids is the ideal fitting for adults with bilateral symmetrical hearing loss. However, previous research has consistently shown that a substantial proportion of these patients actually prefer to use only one hearing aid. The current study explored whether this pattern of preferences is seen with technologically advanced hearing aids. In addition, a selection of variables that were available pre-fitting were used to attempt to predict which patients will prefer one hearing aid rather than two. Design The study was designed as a 12-week field trial including structured and unstructured use of one and two hearing aids. Ninety-four subjects with mild to moderate bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss were bilaterally fit with 2005-2007 era hearing aids. Potential predictors included demographic, audiometric, auditory lifestyle, personality, and binaural processing variables. After the field trial, each subject stated his/her preference for one or two hearing aids and completed three self-report outcome questionnaires for their preferred fitting. Results Previous research was confirmed with modern technology hearing aids: after the field trial 46% of the subjects preferred to use one hearing aid rather than two. Subjects who preferred two hearing aids tended to report better real-world outcomes than those who preferred one. Subjects who reported more hearing problems in daily life, who experienced more binaural loudness summation, and whose ears were more equivalent in dichotic listening were more likely to prefer to use two hearing aids. Contrary to conventional wisdom (ideas that are generally accepted as true), audiometric hearing loss and auditory lifestyle were not predictive of aiding preference. However, the best predictive approach from these data yielded accurate predictions for only two-thirds of subjects. Conclusions Evidence-based practice calls for a conscientious melding of current evidence

  15. Repetitive genomic elements and overall DNA methylation changes in acute myeloid and childhood B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Bujko, Mateusz; Musialik, Ewa; Olbromski, Rafał; Przestrzelska, Marta; Libura, Marta; Pastwińska, Anna; Juszczyński, Przemysław; Zwierzchowski, Lech; Baranowski, Paweł; Siedlecki, Janusz Aleksander

    2014-07-01

    Aberrant epigenetic regulation is a hallmark of neoplastic cells. Increased DNA methylation of individual genes' promoter regions and decreases in overall DNA methylation level are both generally observed in cancer. In solid tumors, this global DNA hypomethylation is related to reduced methylation of repeated DNA elements (REs) and contributes to genome instability. The aim of the present study was to assess methylation level of LINE-1 and ALU REs and total 5-methylcytosine (5metC) content in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 58), childhood B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 32), as the most frequent acute leukemias in two age categories and in normal adult bone marrow and children's blood samples. DNA pyrosequencing and ELISA assays were used, respectively. Global DNA hypomethylation was not observed in leukemia patients. Results revealed higher DNA methylation of LINE-1 in AML and ALL samples compared to corresponding normal controls. Elevated methylation of ALU and overall 5metC level were also observed in B-cell ALL patients. Differences of REs and global DNA methylation between AML cytogenetic-risk groups were observed, with the lowest methylation levels in intermediate-risk/cytogenetically normal patients. B-cell ALL is characterized by the highest DNA methylation level compared to AML and controls and overall DNA methylation is correlated with leukocyte count.

  16. Scrotal tuberculosis in adult patients: a 10-year clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Yang, Wen-Chou; Liu, Jien-Wei

    2007-10-01

    Twenty-nine adults (mean age, 59.9 +/- 13.5 years) with scrotal tuberculosis (TB) were retrospectively analyzed. The mean interval from emergence of symptoms suggestive of scrotal TB to diagnosis established was 142.44 +/- 227.66 days. Scrotal TB was initially suspected in only five (17.2%) patients, and infection caused by bacteria other than Mycobacterium tuberculosis (55.2%) was the leading presumptive diagnosis. Of 28 patients with chest radiographs available, 7 (25%) disclosed active pulmonary TB, and 9 (32.1%) showed a TB scar. All patients received anti-TB chemotherapy; 20 (69%) additionally underwent surgery. Pathologic examination of resected tissue at therapeutic surgery, biopsy, or polymerase chain reaction assay of urine led to rapid diagnosis of scrotal TB. Although evidence of scrotal TB was easily obtainable, the lack of alertness made clinicians avert from the appropriate diagnostic approaches and rendered a delayed diagnosis. Our report underscores the urgent need for improving clinicians' awareness of scrotal TB.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tonsillectomized adult patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Katkowska, Marta; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Stromkowski, Józef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains from 118 tonsillectomized adults due to recurrent tonsillitis (RT). The study included strains isolated from the tonsillar surface prior to tonsillectomy, recovered from the tonsillar core at the time of surgery, and from the posterior throat 2-4 weeks after the procedure. Susceptibility of isolates to 19 antibiotics was tested in line with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Irrespective of the stage, the most commonly isolated bacteria were gram-positive cocci, and among them S. aureus. The tonsillar core was the most common site of S. aureus isolation (30.5%), followed by the tonsillar surface (10.8%) and the posterior pharynx (5.9%). This difference turned out to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Beta-hemolytic streptococci, most often Streptococcus pyogenes (5.1%), were isolated from 2.5% to 10.2% of patients. Staphylococcal isolates were susceptible to most tested antibiotics (except from penicillin and ampicillin) and rarely showed methicillin resistance (n = 1). Staphylococcus aureus seems to be the most common pathogen isolated from patients tonsillectomized due to RT. Staphylococcal isolates associated with RT are present mostly within the tonsillar core and susceptible to most antibiotics. They are typically isolated from patients between 21 and 30 years of age. Tonsillectomy results in less frequent isolation of S. aureus strains.

  18. Cephalometric appraisal of posttreatment vertical changes in adult orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J G; Schneider, B J

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate vertical facial changes in adult orthodontic patients and to evaluate the stability of these changes. Thirty-three patients (8 males and 25 females) were examined. The patients had been treated with full fixed edgewise appliance mechanics and exhibited at least 1.0 degrees of clockwise rotation of the mandible during treatment. Mandibular rotation was determined by the angular change in the Y-axis to the Frankfort plane. Twelve angular and 14 linear skeletal and dental measurements and 3 skeletal ratios were derived from pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), and postretention (T3) cephalometric radiographs. Paired t tests were used to compare vertical changes that occurred as a result of orthodontic treatment and their stability or relapse tendency during the retention and postretention periods. Twenty-five percent (P <.001) of the opening rotation of the mandible recovered during the posttreatment period, resulting in a significant overall rotation that was maintained. Both treatment and posttreatment changes in the Y-axis angle showed a high correlation with the horizontal position of pogonion (r = -0.797 and -0.889, respectively). Only overjet showed a low correlation between treatment changes and posttreatment changes in the Y-axis angle. Stepwise regression analysis of pretreatment variables and treatment changes failed to predict the behavior of the Y-axis angle change.

  19. Humidification during Mechanical Ventilation in the Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Al Ashry, Haitham S.; Modrykamien, Ariel M.

    2014-01-01

    Humidification of inhaled gases has been standard of care in mechanical ventilation for a long period of time. More than a century ago, a variety of reports described important airway damage by applying dry gases during artificial ventilation. Consequently, respiratory care providers have been utilizing external humidifiers to compensate for the lack of natural humidification mechanisms when the upper airway is bypassed. Particularly, active and passive humidification devices have rapidly evolved. Sophisticated systems composed of reservoirs, wires, heating devices, and other elements have become part of our usual armamentarium in the intensive care unit. Therefore, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of action of each of these devices, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, becomes a necessity for the respiratory care and intensive care practitioner. In this paper, we review current methods of airway humidification during invasive mechanical ventilation of adult patients. We describe a variety of devices and describe the eventual applications according to specific clinical conditions. PMID:25089275

  20. The Frequency and Clinical Significance of IDH1 Mutations in Chinese Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Li, Meng; Yin, Yue; Yu, Li; Gao, Chunji

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenease 1 (IDH1) occur in various hematopoietic tumors including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasms and myelodysplastic syndromes. IDH1 mutations are significant in both diagnosis and prognosis of these conditions. In the present study we determined the prevalence and clinical significance of IDH1 mutations in 349 samples from newly diagnosed AML patients. Results Of the 349 AML patient specimens analyzed, 35 (10.03%) were found to have IDH1 mutations including 4 IDH1 R132 mutations and 31 non-R132 mutations. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were largely concentrated within AML-M1 (35.72%, p<0.01). We identified five IDH1 mutations that were novel to AML: (1) c.299 G>A, p.R100Q; (2) c.311G>T, p.G104V; (3) c.322T>C, p.F108L; (4) c.356G>A, p.R119Q; and (5) c.388A>G, p.I130V. In addition, we identified three IDH1 mutations that were previously described in AML. The frequency of IDH1 mutations in AML patients with normal karyotype was 9.9%. IDH1 non-R132 mutations were concurrent with mutations in FLT3-ITD (p<0.01), CEBPA (p<0.01), and NRAS (p<0.01), as well as the overexpression of MN1 (p<0.01) and WT1(p<0.01). The overall survival (OS) in the patients with IDH1 non-R132 mutations compared to patients without IDH1 mutations don't reach statistically significance (median 521 days vs median: not reached; n.s.). Conclusion IDH1 non-R132 mutations occurred frequently in newly diagnosed adult Chinese AML patients, and these mutations were associated with genetic alterations. The OS was not influenced by IDH1 non-R132 mutations in the present study. PMID:24376688

  1. Novel B55α-PP2A mutations in AML promote AKT T308 phosphorylation and sensitivity to AKT inhibitor-induced growth arrest

    PubMed Central

    Shouse, Geoffrey; de Necochea-Campion, Rosalia; Mirshahidi, Saied; Liu, Xuan; Chen, Chien-Shing

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the Protein Kinase B (PKB), or AKT pathway has been shown to correlate with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) prognosis. B55α-Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has been shown to dephosphorylate AKT at Thr-308 rendering it inactive. In fact, low expression of the PP2A regulatory subunit B55α was associated with activated phospho-AKT and correlated with inferior outcomes in AML. Despite this fact, no studies have specifically demonstrated a mechanism whereby B55α expression is regulated in AML. In this study, we demonstrate novel loss of function mutations in the PPP2R2A gene identified in leukemic blasts from three AML patients. These mutations eliminate B55α protein expression thereby allowing constitutive AKT activation. In addition, leukemic blasts with PPP2R2A gene mutation were more sensitive to treatment with the AKT inhibitor MK2206, but less responsive to the PP2A activator FTY720. Using leukemia cell lines, we further demonstrate that B55α expression correlates with AKT Thr-308 phosphorylation and predicts responsiveness to AKT inhibition and PP2A activation. Together our data illustrate the importance of the B55α-PP2A-AKT pathway in leukemogenesis. Screening for disruptions in this pathway at initial AML diagnosis may predict response to targeted therapies against AKT and PP2A. PMID:27531894

  2. Standardization of WT1 mRNA quantitation for minimal residual disease monitoring in childhood AML and implications of WT1 gene mutations: a European multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Willasch, A M; Gruhn, B; Coliva, T; Kalinova, M; Schneider, G; Kreyenberg, H; Steinbach, D; Weber, G; Hollink, I H I M; Zwaan, C M; Biondi, A; van der Velden, V H J; Reinhardt, D; Cazzaniga, G; Bader, P; Trka, J

    2009-08-01

    A standardized, sensitive and universal method for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still pending. Although hyperexpression of Wilms' tumor (WT1) gene transcript has been frequently proposed as an MRD marker in AML, wide comparability of the various methods used for evaluating WT1 expression has not been given. We established and standardized a multicenter approach for quantifying WT1 expression by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), on the basis of a primer/probe set combination at exons 6 and 7. In a series of quality-control rounds, we analyzed 69 childhood AML samples and 47 normal bone marrow (BM) samples from 4 participating centers. Differences in the individual WT1 expressions levels ranged within <0.5 log of the mean in 82% of the cases. In AML samples, the median WT1/1E+04 Abelson (ABL) expression was 3.5E+03 compared with that of 2.3E+01 in healthy BM samples. As 11.5% of childhood AML samples in this cohort harbored WT1 mutations in exon 7, the effect of mutations on WT1 expression has been investigated, showing that mutated cases expressed significantly higher WT1 levels than wild-type cases. Hence, our approach showed high reproducibility and applicability, even in patients with WT1 mutations; therefore, it can be widely used for the quantitation of WT1 expression in future clinical trials.

  3. A Phase II Study Of The Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor ZANESTRA (R115777, NSC #702818, IND #58,359) In Complete Remission Following Induction And/Or Consolidation Chemotherapy In Adults With Poor-Risk Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) And High-Risk Myelodysplasia (MDS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  4. Population Pharmacokinetics of Benznidazole in Adult Patients with Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, E.; Guerrero, L.; Posada, E.; Serret, N.; Mejía, T.; Urbina, J. A.; Gascón, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to build a population pharmacokinetic (popPK) model to characterize benznidazole (BNZ) pharmacokinetics in adults with chronic Chagas disease. This study was a prospective, open-label, single-center clinical trial approved by the local ethics committee. Patients received BNZ at 2.5 mg/kg of body weight/12 h (Abarax, Elea Laboratory, Argentina) for 60 days. Plasma BNZ samples were taken several times during the study and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-visible detection (HPLC-UV). The popPK analysis was done with NONMEMv.7.3. Demographic and biological data were tested as covariates. Intraindividual, interoccasion, and residual variabilities were modeled. Internal and external validations were completed to assess the robustness of the model. Later on, simulations were performed to generate BNZ concentration-time course profiles for different dosage regimens. A total of 358 plasma BNZ concentrations from 39 patients were included in the analysis. A one-compartment PK model characterized by clearance (CL/F) and the apparent volume of distribution (V/F), with first-order absorption (Ka) and elimination, adequately described the data (CL/F, 1.73 liters/h; V/F, 89.6 liters; and Ka, 1.15 h−1). No covariates were found to be significant for CL/F and V/F. Internal and external validations of the final model showed adequate results. Data from simulations revealed that a dose of 2.5 mg/kg/12 h might lead to overexposure in most patients. A lower dose (2.5 mg/kg/24 h) was able to achieve trough BNZ plasma concentrations within the accepted therapeutic range of 3 to 6 mg/liter. In summary, we developed a population PK model for BNZ in adults with chronic Chagas disease. Dosing simulations showed that a BNZ dose of 2.5 mg/kg/24 h will adequately keep BNZ trough plasma concentrations within the recommended target range for the majority of patients. (This study has been registered at EudraCT under number 2011

  5. Exosomes Secreted by Apoptosis-Resistant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Blasts Harbor Regulatory Network Proteins Potentially Involved in Antagonism of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Schuurhuis, Gerrit J; Kessler, Floortje L; Piersma, Sander R; Knol, Jaco C; Pham, Thang V; Jansen, Gerrit; Musters, René J P; van Meerloo, Johan; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Zweegman, Sonja; Cloos, Jacqueline; Jimenez, Connie R

    2016-04-01

    Expression of apoptosis-regulating proteins (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 - BCL-2, Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 - MCL-1, BCL-2 like 1 - BCL-X and BCL-2-associated X protein - BAX) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts at diagnosis is associated with disease-free survival. We previously found that the initially high apoptosis-resistance of AML cells decreased after therapy, while regaining high levels at relapse. Herein, we further explored this aspect of dynamic apoptosis regulation in AML. First, we showed that the intraindividualex vivoapoptosis-related profiles of normal lymphocytes and AML blasts within the bone marrow of AML patients were highly correlated. The expression values of apoptosis-regulating proteins were far beyond healthy control lymphocytes, which implicates the influence of microenvironmental factors. Second, we demonstrated that apoptosis-resistant primary AML blasts, as opposed to apoptosis-sensitive cells, were able to up-regulate BCL-2 expression in sensitive AML blasts in contact cultures (p= 0.0067 andp= 1.0, respectively). Using secretome proteomics, we identified novel proteins possibly engaged in apoptosis regulation. Intriguingly, this analysis revealed that major functional protein clusters engaged in global gene regulation, including mRNA splicing, protein translation, and chromatin remodeling, were more abundant (p= 4.01E-06) in secretomes of apoptosis-resistant AML. These findings were confirmed by subsequent extracellular vesicle proteomics. Finally, confocal-microscopy-based colocalization studies show that splicing factors-containing vesicles secreted by high AAI cells are taken up by low AAI cells. The current results constitute the first comprehensive analysis of proteins released by apoptosis-resistant and sensitive primary AML cells. Together, the data point to vesicle-mediated release of global gene regulatory protein clusters as a plausible novel mechanism of induction of apoptosis resistance. Deciphering the modes of communication

  6. Exosomes Secreted by Apoptosis-Resistant Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) Blasts Harbor Regulatory Network Proteins Potentially Involved in Antagonism of Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Wojtuszkiewicz, Anna; Schuurhuis, Gerrit J.; Kessler, Floortje L.; Piersma, Sander R.; Knol, Jaco C.; Pham, Thang V.; Jansen, Gerrit; Musters, René J. P.; van Meerloo, Johan; Assaraf, Yehuda G.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Zweegman, Sonja; Cloos, Jacqueline; Jimenez, Connie R.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of apoptosis-regulating proteins (B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 - BCL-2, Myeloid Cell Leukemia 1 - MCL-1, BCL-2 like 1 - BCL-X and BCL-2-associated X protein - BAX) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts at diagnosis is associated with disease-free survival. We previously found that the initially high apoptosis-resistance of AML cells decreased after therapy, while regaining high levels at relapse. Herein, we further explored this aspect of dynamic apoptosis regulation in AML. First, we showed that the intraindividual ex vivo apoptosis-related profiles of normal lymphocytes and AML blasts within the bone marrow of AML patients were highly correlated. The expression values of apoptosis-regulating proteins were far beyond healthy control lymphocytes, which implicates the influence of microenvironmental factors. Second, we demonstrated that apoptosis-resistant primary AML blasts, as opposed to apoptosis-sensitive cells, were able to up-regulate BCL-2 expression in sensitive AML blasts in contact cultures (p = 0.0067 and p = 1.0, respectively). Using secretome proteomics, we identified novel proteins possibly engaged in apoptosis regulation. Intriguingly, this analysis revealed that major functional protein clusters engaged in global gene regulation, including mRNA splicing, protein translation, and chromatin remodeling, were more abundant (p = 4.01E-06) in secretomes of apoptosis-resistant AML. These findings were confirmed by subsequent extracellular vesicle proteomics. Finally, confocal-microscopy-based colocalization studies show that splicing factors-containing vesicles secreted by high AAI cells are taken up by low AAI cells. The current results constitute the first comprehensive analysis of proteins released by apoptosis-resistant and sensitive primary AML cells. Together, the data point to vesicle-mediated release of global gene regulatory protein clusters as a plausible novel mechanism of induction of apoptosis resistance. Deciphering the modes of

  7. Relationship between perceived sleep and polysomnography in older adult patients

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Silva, Mayra; Bazzana, Caroline Moreira; de Souza, Altay Lino; Ramos, Luiz Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Lucchesi, Lígia M.; Lopes, Guiomar Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Aging is a multifactorial process that elicits changes in the duration and quality of sleep. Polysomnography is considered to be the standard examination for the analysis of sleep and consists of the simultaneous recording of selected physiological variables during sleep. Objective The objective of this study was to use polysomnography to compare sleep reported by senior citizens. Methods We selected 40 patients, both male and female, with ages ranging from 64 to 89 years from the Center for the Study of Aging at the Federal University of São Paulo. Patients answered questions about sleep on the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and underwent polysomnography. Results The results were compared, and agreement between perceived sleep and polysomnography was found in several areas. There was an association between difficulty sleeping and sleep onset latency (p=0.015), waking up at night with sleep onset latency (p=0.005), total sleep time with daytime sleepiness (0.005) and snoring (0.027), sleep efficiency with sleepiness (0.004), snoring (0.033) and pause in breathing (p=0.024), awakenings with snoring (p=0.012) and sleep apnea with pauses in breathing (p=0.001). Conclusion These results suggest that the older adult population have a good perception of their sleep. The questionnaires aimed at this population should be used as an alternative to polysomnography. PMID:26483948

  8. Metabolic aspects of adult patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Abenavoli, Ludovico; Milic, Natasa; Di Renzo, Laura; Preveden, Tomislav; Medić-Stojanoska, Milica; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major cause of chronic liver disease and it encompasses a spectrum from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, or cirrhosis. The mechanisms involved in the occurrence of NAFLD and its progression are probably due to a metabolic profile expressed within the context of a genetic predisposition and is associated with a higher energy intake. The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic alterations associated with an increased risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. NAFLD patients have more than one feature of the MS, and now they are considered the hepatic components of the MS. Several scientific advances in understanding the association between NAFLD and MS have identified insulin resistance (IR) as the key aspect in the pathophysiology of both diseases. In the multi parallel hits theory of NAFLD pathogenesis, IR was described to be central in the predisposition of hepatocytes to be susceptible to other multiple pathogenetic factors. The recent knowledge gained from these advances can be applied clinically in the prevention and management of NAFLD and its associated metabolic changes. The present review analyses the current literature and highlights the new evidence on the metabolic aspects in the adult patients with NAFLD. PMID:27610012

  9. Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for cytogenetically normal AML and identification of high-risk subgroup using WT1 expression in association with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutations.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hee-Je; Jeon, Young-Woo; Lee, Sung-Eun; Cho, Byung-Sik; Eom, Ki-Seong; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung

    2015-06-06

    According to recent guidelines, cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN AML) is divided into four molecular subgroups based on nucleophosmin-1 (NPM1) and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutations. All subgroups except for isolated NPM1mut are associated with poor prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed 223 patients with CN AML, 156 of whom were treated with standard chemotherapy. For postremission therapy, patients with available donors underwent allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the rest were treated with autologous HSCT or chemotherapy alone. We first compared the 4 conventional molecular subgroups, and then created another 4 subgroups based on WT1 expression: isolated NPM1mut, NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg with low WT1 or high WT1, and FLT3-ITD-pos CN AML. We finally evaluated 89 patients who were treated with allo HSCT and achieved complete remission after standard chemotherapy. FLT3-ITD CN AML showed the worst outcome irrespective of NPM1mut, and isolated NPM1mut CN AML showed no significant differences compared with NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg CN AML. In contrast, two newly stratified low-risk subgroups (NPM1wt/FLT3-ITD-neg with low WT1 and isolated NPM1mut CN AML) showed higher remission rates with superior overall survival (OS) compared with the other two high-risk subgroups, which showed a higher relapse rate even after allo HSCT. Further analysis showed that higher pre-HSCT expression of WT1 resulted in a higher relapse rate and poorer OS after allo HSCT. For CN AML, a risk-adapted approach using allo HSCT with novel agents should be evaluated with stratification specified by WT1. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Increased frequency of dicentric chromosomes in therapy-related MDS and AML compared to de novo disease is significantly related to previous treatment with alkylating agents and suggests a specific susceptibility to chromosome breakage at the centromere.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M K; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J

    2000-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are observed in many malignant diseases including myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and have often been observed in a subset of these diseases, namely therapy-related MDS (t-MDS) and AML (t-AML). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with centromere-specific probes, we investigated the frequency and type of dicentric chromosomes in 180 consecutive patients with t-MDS and t-AML and in 231 consecutive patients with de novo MDS and AML, whose karyotypes had been studied previously by conventional G-banding. Twenty-seven out of 180 patients with t-MDS or t-AML presented dicentric chromosomes compared to only seven out of 231 patients with de novo disease (P = 0.00003). A dic(1q;7p) was observed in 10 cases, a dic(5p;17q) was observed in six cases, whereas various isodicentric chromosomes were observed in six cases. Excluding these six cases with isodicentrics, all 25 patients with dicentric chromosomes had involvement of at least one of the chromosome arms 1q, 5p, or 7p resulting in monosomy for 5q or 7q, and/or trisomy for 1q. Patients with dicentric chromosomes presented significantly more often as t-MDS compared to patients without dicentrics (P = 0.046), and the presence of a dicentric chromosome was significantly related to previous therapy with alkylating agents (P = 0.026). Thus, only one out of 27 patients with a dicentric chromosome had not previously received an alkylating agent. A specific susceptibility to breakage at the centromere after exposure to alkylating agents is suggested and may explain the frequent loss of whole chromosomes, in particular chromosomes 5 and 7 in t-MDS and t-AML, if the breaks are not followed by rejoining. Leukemia (2000) 14, 105-111.

  11. Patient knowledge and pulmonary medication adherence in adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ann Hsu-An; Kendrick, Jennifer G; Wilcox, Pearce G; Quon, Bradley S

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives Patient knowledge of lung function (ie, forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV1]% predicted) and the intended benefits of their prescribed pulmonary medications might play an important role in medication adherence, but this relationship has not been examined previously in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods All patients diagnosed with CF and without prior lung transplantation were invited to complete knowledge and self-reported medication adherence questionnaires during routine outpatient visits to the Adult CF Clinic, St Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, Canada from June 2013 to August 2014. Results A total of 142 out of 167 (85%) consecutive adults attending CF clinic completed patient knowledge and medication adherence survey questionnaires. Sixty-four percent of the patients recalled their last FEV1% predicted value within 5%, and 70% knew the intended benefits of all their prescribed medications. Self-reported adherence rates were highest for inhaled antibiotics (81%), azithromycin (87%), and dornase alpha (76%) and lowest for hypertonic saline (47%). Individuals who knew their FEV1% predicted value within 5% were more likely to self-report adherence to dornase alpha (84% vs 62%, P=0.06) and inhaled antibiotics (88% vs 64%, P=0.06) compared to those who did not, but these associations were not statistically significant. There were no significant associations observed between patient knowledge of intended medication benefits and self-reported medication adherence. Conclusion Contrary to our hypothesis, disease- and treatment-related knowledge was not associated with self-reported medication adherence. This suggests other barriers to medication adherence should be targeted in future studies aiming to improve medication adherence in adults with CF.

  12. WT1 vaccination in AML and MDS: A pilot trial with synthetic analog peptides.

    PubMed

    Brayer, Jason; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Powers, John; List, Alan; Balducci, Lodovico; Komrokji, Rami; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Peptide vaccines are capable of eliciting immune responses targeting tumor-associated antigens such as the Wilms' Tumor 1 (WT1) antigen, often overexpressed in myeloid malignancies. Here, we assessed the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of a polyvalent WT1 peptide vaccine. Individuals with WT1-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first (CR1) or second (CR2) remission or with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following at least 1 prior line of therapy were vaccinated with a mixture of peptides derived from the WT1 protein, with sargramostim injections before vaccination to amplify immunogenicity. Six vaccinations were delivered biweekly, continuing then monthly until patients received 12 vaccinations or showed disease relapse or progression. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by progression-free and overall survival. Immune responses were evaluated by delayed-type hypersensitivity testing and T-cell IFNγ ELISPOT at specified intervals. In 16 patients who received at least one vaccination, 10 completed the planned course of six vaccinations and six continued for up to six additional monthly vaccinations. Vaccinations were well tolerated, with no patients discontinuing due to toxicity. One of two patients with high-risk MDS experienced a prolonged decrease in transfusion dependence. Two of 14 AML patients demonstrated relapse-free survival >1 year. Both patients were in CR2 at time of vaccination, with duration of their remission exceeding duration of their first remission, suggesting a potential benefit. Our WT1 vaccine was well-tolerated. The clinical benefit that we observed in several patients suggests engagement of a protective immune response, indicating a need for further trials.

  13. Evaluation of BAALC gene expression in normal cytogenetic acute myeloid leukemia patients in north-east of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amirpour, Mojgan; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Sheikhi, Maryam; Azarkerdar, Somaye; Shams, Seyyede Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is known as one of the most common leukemia among adults. Environmental and different genetic factors affect disease process, prognosis and treatment. Among different genetic factors NPM1, FLT3, MLL and BAALC genes are the most effective on patient's survival rate. The aim of this study was to assess amount of BAALC gene expression in AML patients, and its relation to survival rate. Methods: In this case-control study, from all 94 individuals referred to Ghaem Medical Center during 2012-2015, 47 cases were normal cytogenetic AML and others were healthy individuals that were studied as control group. Real-time PCR method was applied for gene expression evaluation. Other information of patients was extracted from medical documents. SPSS v.21 was used for data processing. Results: Mean age of studied cases was 31.50 years. The most of BAALC gene expression was seen in M1 and M2 subtypes, and the less was in M5. A significant relation was found between amount of gene expression and patient's survival rate. Conclusion: BAALC gene expression was increased significantly in AML cases. BAALC expression had reverse relation with patients' survival rate in North-East of Iran. PMID:28210583

  14. A Phase 1 Study of AMG 900, an Orally Administered Pan-Aurora Kinase Inhibitor, in Adult Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kantarjian, Hagop M; Schuster, Michael W; Jain, Nitin; Advani, Anjali; Jabbour, Elias; Gamelin, Erick; Rasmussen, Erik; Juan, Gloria; Anderson, Abraham; Chow, Vincent F; Friberg, Greg; Vogl, Florian D; Sekeres, Mikkael A

    2017-03-28

    Aurora kinases are involved in the pathophysiology of several cancers including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this phase 1 study, we investigated the safety and efficacy of AMG 900, an orally administered, highly potent, selective, small-molecule inhibitor of both Aurora kinase A and B, in patients with AML. Patients with pathologically documented AML who either declined standard treatments or had relapsed from or were refractory to previous therapies were enrolled. Two every-2-week dose-escalation schedules using a modified 3 + 3+3 design were used: AMG 900 given daily for 4 days with 10 days off (4/10 schedule), and AMG 900 given daily for 7 days with 7 days off (7/7 schedule). Thirty-five patients were enrolled at 9 different dose levels: 22 patients on the 4/10 schedule (doses from 15 to 100 mg daily), and 13 patients on the 7/7 schedule (doses from 30 to 50 mg daily). Both schedules were tolerated; nausea (31%), diarrhea (29%), febrile neutropenia (29%), and fatigue (23%) were the most common treatment-related adverse events. Three patients (9%) achieved complete response with incomplete count recovery. Patients with higher baseline expression of a set of specific pathway-related genes (BIRC5, AURKA, TTK, CDC2, and CCNB1) were more likely to respond in an exploratory biomarker analysis. AMG 900 was tolerated in a general AML population, and pathway-specific biomarkers identified a potential target population. Future research efforts will be directed toward further exploration of biomarkers of response and combination of AMG 900 with other anticancer agents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. [Some aspects of the orthodontic-prosthetic approach for adult patients. A case report].

    PubMed

    Fábián, G; Gáspár, J; Fábián, T K

    2000-08-01

    Authors present a case report of an adult patient treated with the combination of orthodontic and prosthetic treatment methods. The importance of periodontal and psychological management of such patients is pointed out.

  16. Carnitine transporter CT2 (SLC22A16) is over-expressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and target knockdown reduces growth and viability of AML cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Hurren, Rose; MacLean, Neil; Gronda, Marcela; Jitkova, Yulia; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Minden, Mark D; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-08-01

    AML (acute myeloid leukemia) cells have a unique reliance on mitochondrial metabolism and fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Thus, blocking FAO is a potential therapeutic strategy to target these malignant cells. In the current study, we assessed plasma membrane carnitine transporters as novel therapeutic targets for AML. We examined the expression of the known plasma membrane carnitine transporters, OCTN1, OCTN2, and CT2 in AML cell lines and primary AML samples and compared expression to normal hematopoietic cells. Of the three carnitine transporters, CT2 demonstrated the greatest differential expression between AML and normal cells. Using shRNA, we knocked down CT2 and demonstrated that target knockdown impaired the function of the transporter. In addition, knockdown of CT2 reduced the growth and viability of AML cells with high expression of CT2 (OCI-AML2 and HL60), but not low expression. CT2 knockdown reduced basal oxygen consumption without a concomitant increase in glycolysis. Thus, CT2 may be a novel target for a subset of AML.

  17. Clofarabine, idarubicin, and cytarabine (CIA) as frontline therapy for patients ≤60 years with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nazha, Aziz; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad; Huang, Xuelin; Choi, Sangbum; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Jabbour, Elias; Borthakur, Gautam; Kadia, Tapan; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Kornblau, Steve; Daver, Naval; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Andreeff, Michael; Estrov, Zeev; Du, Min; Brandt, Mark; Faderl, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Clofarabine is a second generation nucleoside analogue with activity in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A phase I trial of clofarabine, idarubicin, and cytarabine (CIA) in relapsed and refractory AML had shown an overall response rate (ORR) of 48%. To explore this combination further, we conducted a phase II study of (CIA) in patients with newly diagnosed AML ≤60 years. Patients ≥18-60 years with AML and adequate organ function were enrolled. Induction therapy consisted of clofarabine (C) 20 mg m⁻² IV daily (days 1-5), idarubicin (I) 10 mg m⁻² IV daily (days 1-3), and cytarabine (A) 1 g m⁻² IV daily (days 1-5). Patients in remission received up to six consolidation cycles (C 15 mg m⁻² × 3, I 8 mg m⁻² × 2, and A 0.75 g m⁻² × 3). Fifty-seven patients were evaluable. ORR was 79%. With a median follow up of 10.9 months, the median overall survival (OS) was not reached, the median event-free survival (EFS) was 13.5 months. Most toxicities were ≤grade 2. Four week mortality was 2%. In subgroup analysis, patients ≤40 years had better OS (P = 0.04) and EFS (P = 0.04) compared to patients >40 years. Compared to historical patients treated with idarubicin and cyarabine (IA), the OS and EFS were significantly longer for CIA treated patients. In multivariate analysis, CIA retained its favorable impact on OS compared to IA. Thus, CIA is an effective and safe therapy for patients ≤60 years with newly diagnosed AML.

  18. Rasch Measurement in the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adult Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, Luis; Roset, Montse; Badia, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Tested the metric properties of a Spanish version of the Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA) questionnaire through Rasch analysis with a sample of 356 adult patients in Spain. Results suggest that the Spanish AGHDA could be a useful complement of the clinical evaluation of growth hormone deficiency patients at group and…

  19. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  20. FLT3 mutational status is an independent risk factor for adverse outcomes after allogeneic transplantation in AML

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yumeng; Braun, Thomas; Chang, Lawrence; Bixby, Dale; Hanauer, David A.; Chughtai, Komal A.; Gatza, Erin; Couriel, Daniel; Goldstein, Steven; Pawarode, Attaphol; Reddy, Pavan; Riwes, Mary; Connelly, James; Harris, Andrew; Kitko, Carrie; Levine, John; Yanik, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic HCT has been increasingly used in the setting of FLT3 mutated AML. However, its role in conferring durable relapse-free intervals remains in question. Herein, we sought to investigate FLT3 mutational status on transplant outcomes. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 262 consecutive AML patients who underwent first-time allogeneic HCT (2008-2014), of whom 171 had undergone FLT3-ITD mutational testing. FLT3 mutated AML was associated with nearly twice the relapse risk (RR) compared with those without FLT3 mutation 3 years post-HCT (63% vs. 37%, P<0.001), and with a shorter median time to relapse (100 vs. 121 days). FLT3 mutational status remained significantly associated with this outcome after controlling for patient, disease, and transplant-related risk factors (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of FLT3 mutation with increased 3-year RR (HR 3.63, 95% CI: 2.13, 6.19, P<0.001), and inferior disease-free survival (HR 2.05, 95% CI: 1.29, 3.27, P<0.01) and overall survival (HR 1.92, 95% CI: 1.14, 3.24, P<0.05). These data demonstrate high risk of early relapse after allogeneic HCT for FLT3 mutated AML that translates into adverse disease-free and overall survival outcomes. Additional targeted and coordinated interventions are needed to maintain durable remission after allogeneic HCT in this high-risk population. PMID:26191952

  1. Data-driven phenotypic dissection of AML reveals progenitor-like cells that correlate with prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Jacob H.; Simonds, Erin F.; Bendall, Sean C.; Davis, Kara L.; Amir, El-ad D.; Tadmor, Michelle; Litvin, Oren; Fienberg, Harris; Jager, Astraea; Zunder, Eli; Finck, Rachel; Gedman, Amanda L.; Radtke, Ina; Downing, James R.; Pe’er, Dana; Nolan, Garry P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) manifests as phenotypically and functionally diverse cells, often within the same patient. Intratumor phenotypic and functional heterogeneity have been linked primarily by physical sorting experiments, which assume that functionally distinct subpopulations can be prospectively isolated by surface phenotypes. This assumption has proven problematic and we therefore developed a data-driven approach. Using mass cytometry, we profiled surface and intracellular signaling proteins simultaneously in millions of healthy and leukemic cells. We developed PhenoGraph, which algorithmically defines phenotypes in high-dimensional single-cell data. PhenoGraph revealed that the surface phenotypes of leukemic blasts do not necessarily reflect their intracellular state. Using hematopoietic progenitors, we defined a signaling-based measure of cellular phenotype, which led to isolation of a gene expression signature that was predictive of survival in independent cohorts. This study presents new methods for large-scale analysis of single-cell heterogeneity and demonstrates their utility, yielding insights into AML pathophysiology. PMID:26095251

  2. The 3; 21 translocation in myelodysplasia results in a fusion transcript between the AML1 gene and the gene for EAP, a highly conserved protein associated with the Epstein-Barr virus small RNA EBER 1

    SciTech Connect

    Nucifora, G.; Begy, C.R.; Rowley, J.D. ); Erickson, P.; Drabkin, H.A. )

    1993-08-15

    In the 8;21 translocation, the AML1 gene, located at chromosome band 21q22, is translocated to chromosome 8 (q22), where it is fused to the ETO gene and transcribed as a chimeric gene. AML1 is the human homolog of the recently cloned mouse gene pebp2[alpha]B, homologous to the DNA binding [alpha] subunit of the polyoma enhancer factor pebp2. AML1 is also involved in a translocation with chromosome 3 that is seen in patients with therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome and in chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. The authors have isolated a fusion cDNA clone from a t(3;21) library derived from a patient with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome; this clone contains sequences from AML1 and from EAP, which have now been localized to ban 3q26. EAP has previously been characterized as a highly expressed small nuclear protein of 128 residues (EBER 1) associated with Epstein-Barr virus small RNA. The fusion clone contains the DNA binding 5[prime] part of AML1 that is fused to ETO in the t(8;21) and, in addition, at least one other exon. The translocation replaces the last nine codons of AML1 with the last 96 codons of EAP. The fusion does not maintain the correct reading frame of EAP and may not lead to a functional chimeric protein. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Localized Tetanus in an Adult Patient: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gulamhussein, Mohamed Amirali; Li, Yueyang; Guha, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tetanus is a severe and potentially fatal infection caused by the bacterium Clostridium tetani. Of all the cases described in literature, generalized tetanus is by far the most common presentation, but it may also present as neonatal tetanus, cephalic tetanus, and localized tetanus, the latter two being much rarer. In this case report, we present the rare form of this disease, i.e., localized tetanus in an adult male with a history of minimal trauma as well as a late, unusual mode of presentation. Case Report: A 35-year-old Caucasian male presented with an acutely painful, swollen right thumb associated with a small superficial collection on the dorsal aspect of the base of the thumb. A formal wound exploration and washout were carried out in theater, however, at the time of tourniquet inflation, the right hand went into a carpopedal spasm and remained in that position until an infusion of a muscle relaxant was given. The findings were consistent with a case of localized tetanus. The patient was treated with human immunoglobulin and tetanus toxoid and safely discharged home 48 h later without any complications. Conclusion: This case report emphasizes the importance of the recognition of a rare form of this fatal infectious disease, which may present with prodromal symptoms before the generalized form shows its clinical effects. Moreover, the astute clinician should be aware of the variable presentations of this infectious disease, with early identification greatly reducing the associated risks of morbidity and mortality. PMID:28164065

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis in adult and child patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Fouzan, Afnan F.; Al-Shinaiber, Rafif M.; Al-Baijan, Refal S.; Al-Balawi, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate dentists’ knowledge regarding the prevention of infective endocarditis in Saudi Arabia and their implementation of the 2007 American Heart Association guidelines. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, in March 2014, 801 dentists who practice in different regions of Saudi Arabia completed a questionnaire regarding the need for antibiotic prophylaxis for specific cardiac conditions and specific dental procedures, prophylaxis regimens in adults and children, and recommendations for patients on chronic antibiotics, and in dental emergencies. The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) and independent t-tests, and a p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The total knowledge level regarding antibiotic prophylaxis among all participants was 52.2%, with a significant difference between dentists who graduated before and after 2007. Comparing the level of knowledge among different dental specialists, surgeons and periodontists had the highest level of knowledge regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis. Amoxicillin was prescribed as the drug of choice by 63.9% of the participants. Conclusion: This study emphasized the need for continuous education and for formal inclusion of the guidelines in the students’ curriculum, as well as for strategic placement of the guidelines in locations throughout dental clinics. PMID:25935175

  5. Mental health care Monitor Older adults (MEMO): monitoring patient characteristics and outcome in Dutch mental health services for older adults.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, Marjolein; Oude Voshaar, Richard; Depla, Marja; Pot, Anne Margriet

    2013-06-01

    Information on which older adults attend mental health care and whether they profit from the care they receive is important for policy-makers. To assess this information in daily practice, the "Mental health care Monitor Older adults" (MEMO) was developed in the Netherlands. The aim of this paper is to describe MEMO and the older adults who attend outpatient mental health care regarding their predisposing and enabling characteristics and need for care. In MEMO all patients referred to the division of old age psychiatry of the participating mental health care organisations are assessed at baseline and monitored at 4, 8 and 12-month follow-up. Primary outcomes are mental and social functioning, consumer satisfaction, and type of treatment provided (MEMO Basic). Over the years, MEMO Basic is repeated. In each cycle, additional information on specific patient groups is added (e.g. mood disorders). Data collection is supported by a web-based system for clinicians, including direct feedback to monitor patients throughout treatment. First results at baseline showed that the majority of patients that entered the division of old age psychiatry was female (69%), had low education (83%), lived alone (53%), was depressed (42%) and had a comorbid condition (82%). It seemed that older immigrants were not sufficiently reached. The current study is the first in the Netherlands to evaluate patient characteristics and outcome in mental health care provided for older adults in day-to-day practice. If MEMO works out successfully, the method should be extended to other target groups.

  6. T-replete haploidentical allogeneic transplantation using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide in advanced AML and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Devillier, R; Bramanti, S; Fürst, S; Sarina, B; El-Cheikh, J; Crocchiolo, R; Granata, A; Chabannon, C; Morabito, L; Harbi, S; Faucher, C; Santoro, A; Weiller, P-J; Vey, N; Carlo-Stella, C; Castagna, L; Blaise, D

    2016-02-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical transplantation (Haplo-SCT) using post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy) represents an alternative for patients with high-risk diseases lacking HLA-identical donor. Although it provides low incidences of GVHD, the efficacy of Haplo-SCT is still questioned, especially for patients with myeloid malignancies. Thus, we analyzed 60 consecutive patients with refractory (n=30) or high-risk CR (n=30) AML or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) who underwent PT-Cy Haplo-SCT. The median age was 57 years (22-73 years), hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index was ⩾3 in 38 patients (63%) and Haplo-SCT was the second allogeneic transplantation for 10 patients (17%). Although most of patients received PBSC as graft source (n=48, 80%), we found low incidences of grade 3-4 acute (2%) and severe chronic GVHD (4%). Among patients with high-risk CR diseases, 1-year non-relapse mortality, cumulative incidence of relapse, progression-free and overall survivals were 20%, 32%, 47% and 62%, respectively. In patients with refractory disease, corresponding results were 34%, 35%, 32% and 37%, respectively. We conclude that PT-Cy Haplo-SCT could provide promising anti-leukemic effect even in the setting of very advanced diseases. Thus, it represents a viable alternative for high-risk AML/MDS patients without HLA-identical donor.

  7. A Randomized Phase 2 Trial of 177Lu Radiolabeled Anti-PSMA Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Patients with High-Risk Castrate, Biochemically Relapsed Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    additionally identify reasons for low accrual, meet with study team members to discuss strategies to increase accrual, and to deliver a scientific...after cessation of DIC. In the other AML patients MP-TF activity was low . D-dimer levels were highly elevated in the two AML patients with overt...TF activity is highly elevated during AML-related overt DIC and low after cessation. To our surprise MP-TF activity was low in AML patients with

  8. Personality Traits and Common Psychiatric Conditions in Adult Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Çölgeçen, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Background We believe that instances of neuroticism and common psychiatric disorders are higher in adults with acne vulgaris than the normal population. Objective Instances of acne in adults have been increasing in frequency in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate personality traits and common psychiatric conditions in patients with adult acne vulgaris. Methods Patients who visited the dermatology outpatient clinic at Bozok University Medical School with a complaint of acne and who volunteered for this study were included. The Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL 90-R) Global Symptom Index (GSI), somatization, depression, and anxiety subscales and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Short Form (EPQ-RSF) were administered to 40 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria before treatment. The results were compared with those of a control group. Results Of the 40 patients included in this study, 34 were female and 6 were male. The GSI and the somatization, depression, and anxiety subscales of the SCL 90-R were evaluated. Patients with adult acne had statistically significant higher scores than the control group on all of these subscales. In addition, patients with adult acne had statistically significantly higher scores on the neuroticism subscale of the EPQ-RSF. Conclusion Our results show that common psychiatric conditions are frequent in adult patients with acne. More importantly, neurotic personality characteristics are observed more frequently in these patients. These findings suggest that acne in adults is a disorder that has both medical and psychosomatic characteristics and requires a multi-disciplinary approach. PMID:25673931

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia after aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ayami; Strahm, Brigitte; Baumann, Irith; Furlan, Ingrid; Schwarz, Stephan; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Walther, Joachim-Ulrich; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Nöllke, Peter; Führer, Monika; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2014-03-01

    Secondary myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myelogenous leukemia (sMDS/sAML) are the most serious secondary events occurring after immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. Here we evaluate the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 17 children and young adults with sMDS/sAML after childhood aplastic anemia. The median interval between the diagnosis of aplastic anemia and the development of sMDS/sAML was 2.9 years (range, 1.2 to 13.0 years). At a median age of 13.1 years (range, 4.4 to 26.7 years), patients underwent HSCT with bone marrow (n = 6) or peripheral blood stem cell (n = 11) grafts from HLA-matched sibling donors (n = 2), mismatched family donors (n = 2), or unrelated donors (n = 13). Monosomy 7 was detected in 13 patients. The preparative regimen consisted of busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and melphalan in 11 patients and other agents in 6 patients. All patients achieved neutrophil engraftment. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 47%, and that of chronic GVHD was 70%. Relapse occurred in 1 patient. The major cause of death was transplant-related complication (n = 9). Overall survival and event-free survival at 5 years after HSCT were both 41%. In summary, this study indicates that HSCT is a curative therapy for some patients with sMDS/sAML after aplastic anemia. Future efforts should focus on reducing transplantation-related mortality.

  10. Oncogenic pathways of AML1-ETO in acute myeloid leukemia: multifaceted manipulation of marrow maturation

    PubMed Central

    Elagib, Kamaleldin E.; Goldfarb, Adam N.

    2007-01-01

    The leukemic fusion protein AML1-ETO occurs frequently in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and has received much attention over the past decade. An initial model for its pathogenetic effects emphasized the conversion of a hematopoietic transcriptional activator, RUNX1 (or AML1), into a leukemogenic repressor which blocked myeloid differentiation at the level of target gene regulation. This view has been absorbed into a larger picture of AML1-ETO pathogenesis, encompassing dysregulation of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis at several mechanistic levels. Recent reports have highlighted a multifaceted capacity of AML1-ETO directly to inhibit key hematopoietic transcription factors that function as tumor suppressors at several nodal points during hematopoietic differentiation. A new model is presented in which AML1-ETO coordinates expansion of the stem cell compartment with diminished lineage commitment and with genome instability. PMID:17125917

  11. PI-103, a dual inhibitor of Class IA phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase and mTOR, has antileukemic activity in AML.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Chapuis, N; Bardet, V; Tamburini, J; Gallay, N; Willems, L; Knight, Z A; Shokat, K M; Azar, N; Viguié, F; Ifrah, N; Dreyfus, F; Mayeux, P; Lacombe, C; Bouscary, D

    2008-09-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathways are frequently activated in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). mTORC1 inhibition with RAD001 induces PI3K/Akt activation and both pathways are activated independently, providing a rationale for dual inhibition of both pathways. PI-103 is a new potent PI3K/Akt and mTOR inhibitor. In human leukemic cell lines and in primary blast cells from AML patients, PI-103 inhibited constitutive and growth factor-induced PI3K/Akt and mTORC1 activation. PI-103 was essentially cytostatic for cell lines and induced cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase. In blast cells, PI-103 inhibited leukemic proliferation, the clonogenicity of leukemic progenitors and induced mitochondrial apoptosis, especially in the compartment containing leukemic stem cells. In contrast, apoptosis was not induced with RAD001 and IC87114 association, which specifically inhibits mTORC1 and p110delta activity, respectively. PI-103 had additive proapoptotic effects with etoposide in blast cells and in immature leukemic cells. Interestingly, PI-103 did not induce apoptosis in normal CD34(+) cells and had moderate effects on their clonogenic and proliferative properties. Here, we demonstrate that multitargeted therapy against PI3K/Akt and mTOR with PI-103 may be of therapeutic value in AML.

  12. Segregation of the AML t(7;11)(p15;p15) translocation chromosomes in somatic cell hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Borrow, J.; Munroe, D.; Housman, D.E.

    1994-09-01

    The t(7;11)(p15;p15) translocation is a recurrent chromosomal abnormality associated predominately with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) FAB M2 and occasionally with other types of AML or CML blast crisis. High resolution banding techniques have previously localized the breakpoints to 7q15.1 and 11p15.5. We have fused t(7;11)(p15;p15) blast cells from an AML patient to CHTG (hamster) cells in order to segregate the translocated chromosomes from their normal counterparts in somatic cell hybrids. Fusion events containing the derivative chromosomes or the normal chromosome 11 were enriched by panning with the antibodies M1C1 and MER2. These antibodies recognize cell surface markers which are expressed from genes which map to opposite sides of the breakpoint on chromosome 11 (11p13 and 11p15.5, respectively). Individual hybrids were expanded and typed with a series of ordered STSs from chromosomes 7 and 11, and hybrids containing the der(7) and der(11) chromosomes were identified. The segregation of the STSs between the two derivatives is in full agreement with the consensus breakpoint positions as determined cytogenetically. These hybrids may prove useful in further delineation of the breakpoint regions on chromosomes 7 and 11.

  13. AML1-ETO mediates hematopoietic self-renewal and leukemogenesis through a COX/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiyun; Wang, Jianfeng; Wheat, Justin; Chen, Xi; Jin, Shan; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Fathi, Amir T.; Peterson, Randall T.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Developing novel therapies that suppress self-renewal of leukemia stem cells may reduce the likelihood of relapses and extend long-term survival of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). AML1-ETO (AE) is an oncogene that plays an important role in inducing self-renewal of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), leading to the development of leukemia stem cells. Previously, using a zebrafish model of AE and a whole-organism chemical suppressor screen, we have discovered that AE induces specific hematopoietic phenotypes in embryonic zebrafish through a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and β-catenin–dependent pathway. Here, we show that AE also induces expression of the Cox-2 gene and activates β-catenin in mouse bone marrow cells. Inhibition of COX suppresses β-catenin activation and serial replating of AE+ mouse HSPCs. Genetic knockdown of β-catenin also abrogates the clonogenic growth of AE+ mouse HSPCs and human leukemia cells. In addition, treatment with nimesulide, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, dramatically suppresses xenograft tumor formation and inhibits in vivo progression of human leukemia cells. In summary, our data indicate an important role of a COX/β-catenin–dependent signaling pathway in tumor initiation, growth, and self-renewal, and in providing the rationale for testing potential benefits from common COX inhibitors as a part of AML treatments. PMID:23645839

  14. AML1-ETO mediates hematopoietic self-renewal and leukemogenesis through a COX/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyun; Wang, Jianfeng; Wheat, Justin; Chen, Xi; Jin, Shan; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; Fathi, Amir T; Peterson, Randall T; Kung, Andrew L; Sweetser, David A; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna

    2013-06-13

    Developing novel therapies that suppress self-renewal of leukemia stem cells may reduce the likelihood of relapses and extend long-term survival of patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). AML1-ETO (AE) is an oncogene that plays an important role in inducing self-renewal of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), leading to the development of leukemia stem cells. Previously, using a zebrafish model of AE and a whole-organism chemical suppressor screen, we have discovered that AE induces specific hematopoietic phenotypes in embryonic zebrafish through a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and β-catenin-dependent pathway. Here, we show that AE also induces expression of the Cox-2 gene and activates β-catenin in mouse bone marrow cells. Inhibition of COX suppresses β-catenin activation and serial replating of AE(+) mouse HSPCs. Genetic knockdown of β-catenin also abrogates the clonogenic growth of AE(+) mouse HSPCs and human leukemia cells. In addition, treatment with nimesulide, a COX-2 selective inhibitor, dramatically suppresses xenograft tumor formation and inhibits in vivo progression of human leukemia cells. In summary, our data indicate an important role of a COX/β-catenin-dependent signaling pathway in tumor initiation, growth, and self-renewal, and in providing the rationale for testing potential benefits from common COX inhibitors as a part of AML treatments.

  15. Prognotic significance of pretreatment proliferative activity in adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hart, J S; George, S L; Frei, E; Bodey, G P; Nickerson, R C; Freireich, E J

    1977-04-01

    A statistical analysis of the prognostic significance of eight pretreatment variables was undertaken for 71 previously untreated adult patients with acute leukemia seen at M.D. Anderson Hospital over a 5 1/2-year period. None of the patients had received any prior therapy. Nearly all of the patients (68 of the 71) were treated with 4- or 5-day courses of arabinosyl-cytosine alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide, vincristine (oncovin) and prednisone (COAP). The pretreatment variables studied were age at diagnosis, the percent labeling index of the bone marrow leukemic cells, diagnosis, the highest temperature prior to start of treatment, the marrow clot section cellularity and smear differential percent of blasts, percent absolute marrow leukemic cell infiltrate and absolute number of blasts X 10(3)/mm3 in the peripheral blood. Fifty-one patients had acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and 20 patients had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using a statistical regression model approach, the only variables found to be of significant prognostic importance with respect to the probability of complete remission for AML patients were the pretreatment percent labeling index, the age of the patient and the highest temperature prior to start of treatment. Unlike AML, the initial percent labeling index did not appear to be of prognostic significance for ALL patients. AML patients with high labeling indices (larger than or equal to 9%) and young patients in general (especially those less than 40 years old) had the best remission rates. With respect to the length of complete remission and survival for all patients, the only important variables were the pretreatment percent labeling index and the age of the patient, respectively. Once in complete remission, an initially high labeling index was an unfavorable sign with respect to length of remission, regardless of the patient's diagnosis. The results of this study are supportive of studies in experimental systems

  16. Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) in México: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Macías-Gallardo, Julio; Lutz-Presno, Julia; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Hernández-Arizpe, Ana; Montes-Montiel, Maryel; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2011-01-01

    Twenty one patients with CBF-AML presented prospectively in the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla (Puebla, México) between February 1995 and March 2010, 14 with the t(8;21)(q22;q22) and 7 with the inv(16)(p13;q22)/t(16;16)(p13;q22); they represent 13% of all cases of AML. The median age of the patients was 24 years (range 1 to 61). Seven of 14 patients with t(8;21)(q22;q22) had an M2 morphology whereas 3/7 with the inv(16) had an M4 morphology; in addition to the myeloid markers identified by flow-cytometry (surface CD13, surface CD33, and cytoplasmic myeloperoxidase) lymphoid markers were identified in the blast cells of 8/14 cases of the t(8;21) patients, but in no patient with the inv(16). Nineteen patients were treated with combined chemotherapy and 16 (84%) achieved a complete molecular remission. Seven patients were auto or allografted. Relapses presented in 10/16 patients. The median probability of overall survival (OS) has not been reached being above 165 months, whereas the 165-month probability of OS and leukemia-free survival was 52%; despite a tendency for a better outcome of patients with the t(8;21), there were no significant differences in survival of patients with either the t(8;21) or the inv(16). In this single institution experience in México, we found that the CBF variants of AML have a similar prevalence as compared with Caucasian populations, that the co-expression of lymphoid markers in the blast cells was frequent in the t(8;21) and that these two AML subtypes were associated with a relatively good long-term prognosis. Further studies are needed to describe with more detail the precise biological features of these molecular subtypes of acute leukemia.

  17. Disease-specific analyses of unrelated cord blood transplantation compared with unrelated bone marrow transplantation in adult patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Atsuta, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kai, Shunro; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Kouzai, Yasushi; Kasai, Masaharu; Fukuda, Takahiro; Azuma, Hiroshi; Takanashi, Minoko; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Kawa, Keisei; Morishima, Yasuo; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Kato, Shunichi

    2009-02-19

    We made a disease-specific comparison of unrelated cord blood (CB) recipients and human leukocyte antigen allele-matched unrelated bone marrow (BM) recipients among 484 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML; 173 CB and 311 BM) and 336 patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL; 114 CB and 222 BM) who received myeloablative transplantations. In multivariate analyses, among AML cases, lower overall survival (hazard ratio [HR]=1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-2.0, P= .028) and leukemia-free survival (HR=1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.0, P= .012) were observed in CB recipients. The relapse rate did not differ between the 2 groups of AML (HR=1.2; 95% CI, 0.8-1.9, P= .38); however, the treatment-related mortality rate showed higher trend in CB recipients (HR=1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.3, P= .085). In ALL, there was no significant difference between the groups for relapse (HR=1.4, 95% CI, 0.8-2.4, P= .19) and treatment-related mortality (HR=1.0; 95% CI, 0.6-1.7, P= .98), which contributed to similar overall survival (HR=1.1; 95% CI, 0.7-1.6, P= .78) and leukemia-free survival (HR=1.2; 95% CI, 0.9-1.8, P= .28). Matched or mismatched single-unit CB is a favorable alternative stem cell source for patients without a human leukocyte antigen-matched related or unrelated donor. For patients with AML, decreasing mortality, especially in the early phase of transplantation, is required to improve the outcome for CB recipients.

  18. Addition of cladribine to the standard induction treatment improves outcomes in a subset of elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients. Results of a randomized Polish Adult Leukemia Group (PALG) phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Agnieszka; Robak, Tadeusz; Wrzesien-Kus, Agata; Katarzyna Budziszewska, Bozena; Sulek, Kazimierz; Wawrzyniak, Ewa; Czemerska, Magdalena; Zwolinska, Malgorzata; Golos, Aleksandra; Holowiecka-Goral, Aleksandra; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Piszcz, Jaroslaw; Kloczko, Janusz; Mordak-Domagala, Monika; Lange, Andrzej; Razny, Małgorzata; Madry, Krzysztof; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Grosicki, Sebastian; Butrym, Aleksandra; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Giebel, Sebastian; Szydlo, Richard; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka

    2017-04-01

    Intensive induction chemotherapy using anthracycline and cytarabine backbone is considered the most effective upfront therapy in physically fit older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, outcomes of the standard induction in elderly AML are inferior to those observed in younger patients, and they are still unsatisfactory. As addition of cladribine to the standard induction therapy is known to improve outcome in younger AML patients. The present randomized phase II study compares efficacy and toxicity of the DAC (daunorubicin plus cytarabine plus cladribine) regimen with the standard DA (daunorubicin plus cytarabine) regimen in the newly diagnosed AML patients over 60 years of age. A total of 171 patients were enrolled in the study (DA, 86; DAC, 85). A trend toward higher complete remission (CR) was observed in the DAC arm compared to the DA arm (44% vs. 34%; P = .19), which did not lead to improved median overall survival, which in the case of the DAC group was 8.6 months compared to in 9.1 months in the DA group (P = .64). However, DAC appeared to be superior in the group of patients aged 60-65 (CR rate: DAC 51% vs. DA 29%; P = .02). What is more, a subgroup of patients, with good and intermediate karyotypes, benefited from addition of cladribine also in terms of overall survival (P = .02). No differences in hematological and nonhematological toxicity between the DA and DAC regimens were observed.

  19. SCLLTargeting FGFR1 to suppress leukemogenesis in syndromic and de novo AML in murine models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Qin, Haiyan; Karp, Judith; Malek, Sami; Cowell, John K; Ren, Mingqiang

    2016-08-02

    Although over expression of chimeric FGFR1 kinase consistently leads to the development of AML in the rare Stem Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma syndrome, we now show that overexpression of FGFR1 is also seen in up to 20% of non-syndromic, de novo AML. To determine whether targeting FGFR1 in both of these AML subtypes can suppress leukemogenesis, we evaluated the effects of different FGFR1 inhibitors in a side-by-side comparison for their ability to affect in vitro proliferation in FGFR1 overexpressing murine and human cells lines. Three newly developed pan-FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547, BGJ398 and JNJ42756493, show a significantly improved efficacy over the more established FGFR inhibitors, PD173074 and TKI258. To examine whether targeting FGFR1 suppresses leukemogenesis in de novo AML in vivo, we created xenografts in immunocompromized mice from primary, de novo AML that showed > 3-fold increased expression of FGFR1. Using BGJ398, the most potent inhibitor identified in the in vitro studies, AML progression in these mice was significantly suppressed compared with vehicle treated animals and overall survival improved. Importantly, no difference in disease course or survival was seen in AML xenografts that did not show overexpression of FGFR1. These observations support the idea that FGFR1 is a driver oncogene in de novo, FGFR1-overexpressing AML and that molecularly targeted therapies using FGFR1 inhibitors may provide a valuable therapeutic regimen for all FGFR1-overexpressing AML.

  20. Targeting FGFR1 to suppress leukemogenesis in syndromic and de novo AML in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Qin, Haiyan; Karp, Judith; Malek, Sami; Cowell, John K; Ren, Mingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Although over expression of chimeric FGFR1 kinase consistently leads to the development of AML in the rare Stem Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma syndrome, we now show that overexpression of FGFR1 is also seen in up to 20% of non-syndromic, de novo AML. To determine whether targeting FGFR1 in both of these AML subtypes can suppress leukemogenesis, we evaluated the effects of different FGFR1 inhibitors in a side-by-side comparison for their ability to affect in vitro proliferation in FGFR1 overexpressing murine and human cells lines. Three newly developed pan-FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547, BGJ398 and JNJ42756493, show a significantly improved efficacy over the more established FGFR inhibitors, PD173074 and TKI258. To examine whether targeting FGFR1 suppresses leukemogenesis in de novo AML in vivo, we created xenografts in immunocompromized mice from primary, de novo AML that showed > 3-fold increased expression of FGFR1. Using BGJ398, the most potent inhibitor identified in the in vitro studies, AML progression in these mice was significantly suppressed compared with vehicle treated animals and overall survival improved. Importantly, no difference in disease course or survival was seen in AML xenografts that did not show overexpression of FGFR1. These observations support the idea that FGFR1 is a driver oncogene in de novo, FGFR1-overexpressing AML and that molecularly targeted therapies using FGFR1 inhibitors may provide a valuable therapeutic regimen for all FGFR1-overexpressing AML. PMID:27391347

  1. Cell Type Dependent Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-1 Gene Expression by AML1-ETO

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Robert; Boyapati, Anita; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2007-01-01

    The AML1-ETO fusion protein is generated from the 8;21 chromosome translocation that is commonly identified in acute myeloid leukemia. AML1-ETO is a DNA binding transcription factor and has been demonstrated to play a critical role in promoting leukemogenesis. Therefore, it is important to define the molecular mechanism of AML1-ETO in the regulation of gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of AML1-ETO on the promoter of multidrug resistance-1 (MDR1) gene, a known AML1-ETO target, is highly cell type specific. Besides observing repression of the MDR1 promoter in C33A and CV-1 cells as reported previously, AML1-ETO strongly activated the promoter in K562 and B210 cells. More importantly, this activation required both the AML1 and ETO portions of the fusion protein, but did not depend on the AML1 binding site in MDR1 promoter. Furthermore, results from promoter deletion analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggested that this activation effect was likely through the influence of the general transcription machinery rather than promoter-specific factors. Based on these data, we propose that AML1-ETO may have opposing effects on gene expression depending on the various conditions of the cellular environment. PMID:17590361

  2. Characterization of children with FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the AIEOP AML-2002 study group.

    PubMed

    Manara, E; Basso, G; Zampini, M; Buldini, B; Tregnago, C; Rondelli, R; Masetti, R; Bisio, V; Frison, M; Polato, K; Cazzaniga, G; Menna, G; Fagioli, F; Merli, P; Biondi, A; Pession, A; Locatelli, F; Pigazzi, M

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent molecular markers have been routinely used in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) for risk assessment at diagnosis, whereas their post-induction monitoring still represents a debated issue. We evaluated the prognostic value and biological impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) and of the allelic ratio (AR) of FLT3-internal-tandem duplication (ITD) in childhood AML. We retrospectively screened 494 children with de novo AML for FLT3-ITD mutation, identifying 54 harboring the mutation; 51% of them presented high ITD-AR at diagnosis and had worse event-free survival (EFS, 19.2 versus 63.5% for low ITD-AR, <0.05). Forty-one percent of children with high levels of MRD after the 1st induction course, measured by a patient-specific real-time-PCR, had worse EFS (22.2 versus 59.4% in low-MRD patients, P<0.05). Next, we correlated these parameters with gene expression, showing that patients with high ITD-AR or persistent MRD had characteristic expression profiles with deregulated genes involved in methylation and acetylation. Moreover, patients with high CyclinA1 expression presented an unfavorable EFS (20.3 versus 51.2% in low CyclinA1 group, P<0.01). Our results suggest that ITD-AR levels and molecular MRD should be considered in planning clinical management of FLT3-ITD patients. Different transcriptional activation of epigenetic and oncogenic profiles may explain variability in outcome among these patients, for whom novel therapeutic approaches are desirable.

  3. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D; Geiger, Ann M; Tooze, Janet A; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Williamson, Jeff D; Pardee, Timothy S; Ellis, Leslie R; Powell, Bayard L

    2013-05-23

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients.

  4. Geriatric assessment predicts survival for older adults receiving induction chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Ann M.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Pardee, Timothy S.; Ellis, Leslie R.; Powell, Bayard L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the predictive value of geriatric assessment (GA) on overall survival (OS) for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Consecutive patients ≥ 60 years with newly diagnosed AML and planned intensive chemotherapy were enrolled at a single institution. Pretreatment GA included evaluation of cognition, depression, distress, physical function (PF) (self-reported and objectively measured), and comorbidity. Objective PF was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB, timed 4-m walk, chair stands, standing balance) and grip strength. Cox proportional hazards models were fit for each GA measure as a predictor of OS. Among 74 patients, the mean age was 70 years, and 78.4% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score ≤ 1. OS was significantly shorter for participants who screened positive for impairment in cognition and objectively measured PF. Adjusting for age, gender, ECOG score, cytogenetic risk group, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hemoglobin, impaired cognition (Modified Mini-Mental State Exam < 77) and impaired objective PF (SPPB < 9) were associated with worse OS. GA methods, with a focus on cognitive and PF, improve risk stratification and may inform interventions to improve outcomes for older AML patients. PMID:23550038

  5. Tailored therapy of adult acute leukaemia in Jehovah's Witnesses: unjustified reluctance to treat.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Daniele; Agazzi, Alberto; Goldhirsch, Aron; Cinieri, Saverio; Bertolini, Francesco; Rabascio, Cristina; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Calabrese, Liliana; Cocquio, Angela; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2004-04-01

    Treatment of acute leukaemia in adult Jehovah's Witnesses (JW) is challenging because of 'a priori' refusal of most physicians to apply diagnostic and therapeutic procedures to haematological abnormalities resembling acute leukaemia. Rejection of blood transfusions by individuals of this faith is usually blamed to justify this attitude, thus leading to severe personal, medical and psychological distress related to the lack of care. We therefore intended to verify whether a standard (tailored) chemotherapy, without the use of prophylactic blood product transfusions, could be applied during treatment of acute leukaemia under such circumstances. Eleven consecutive JW adult patients with acute leukaemia, all of whom had been denied care in other institutions, were treated at the European Institute of Oncology (EIO) in Milan, Italy. Five had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) (one bcr/abl positive), six had acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) with immunophenotype and/or cytogenetic intermediate-high risk features, except one patient with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APML). Standard induction chemotherapy [cytosine arabinoside (ARA-C) and daunorubicin (DNR) for AML, vincristine (VCR), DNR and prednisone (PDN) for ALL, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and DNR for APML] with the antracycline dose of at least 30 mg/sqm were used. All patients experienced severe anaemia after induction chemotherapy despite erythropoietin. Median haemoglobin nadir for patients with ALL and AML was 4.5 g/dL (range 1.3-6.9) and 5.1 g/dL (range 2.6-6.8), respectively. Median platelet nadir counts for all patients was 14.5 x 10(9))/L (range 1-24). One patient died during induction probably due to haemorrhage. Four of five patients with ALL achieved a complete remission (CR) (including the bcr/abl case) while among patients with AML only the one with APML achieved CR. Three patients (APML = 1 and ALL = 2) are still alive and disease-free. This small series of adult patients with leukaemia illustrates

  6. The impact of TP53 mutations and TP53 deletions on survival varies between AML, ALL, MDS and CLL: an analysis of 3307 cases.

    PubMed

    Stengel, A; Kern, W; Haferlach, T; Meggendorfer, M; Fasan, A; Haferlach, C

    2017-03-01

    Alterations in TP53 have been described in many cancer types including hematological neoplasms. We aimed at comparing TP53 mutations (mut) and deletions (del) in a large cohort of patients with hematological malignancies (n=3307), including AML (n=858), MDS (n=943), ALL (n=358), CLL (n=1148). Overall, alterations in TP53 were detected in 332/3307 cases (10%). The highest frequency was observed in ALL (total: 19%; mut+del: 6%; mut only: 8%; del only: 5%) and AML (total: 13%; mut+del: 5%; mut only: 7%; del only: 1%), whereas TP53 alterations occurred less frequently in CLL (total: 8%) and MDS (total: 7%). TP53 mutations were significantly more frequent in patients ⩾60 vs <60 years in AML (9% vs 2%, P<0.001) and ALL (12% vs 6%, P<0.001). TP53mut+del had a significant negative impact on overall survival in all entities, whereas differences were observed regarding TP53mut only or TP53del only: TP53mut only impacted survival in AML (36 vs 9 months, P<0.001) and MDS (65 vs 19 months, P<0.001), TP53del only in CLL (not reached vs 64 months, P=0.008) and MDS (65 vs 24 months, P=0.011). As substantial differences between the entities are observed regarding correlation to age and survival, we suggest evaluation of both TP53 deletion and mutation status.

  7. Occupational Outcome in Adult ADHD: Impact of Symptom Profile, Comorbid Psychiatric Problems, and Treatment--A Cross-Sectional Study of 414 Clinically Diagnosed Adult ADHD Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halmoy, Anne; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Gillberg, Christopher; Haavik, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of symptom profile, comorbid psychiatric problems, and treatment on occupational outcome in adult ADHD patients. Method: Adult ADHD patients (N = 414) responded to questionnaires rating past and present symptoms of ADHD, comorbid conditions, treatment history, and work status. Results: Of the patients, 24%…

  8. A phase 2 study of the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib in poor-risk and elderly patients with previously untreated acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lancet, Jeffrey E; Gojo, Ivana; Gotlib, Jason; Feldman, Eric J; Greer, Jacqueline; Liesveld, Jane L; Bruzek, Laura M; Morris, Lawrence; Park, Youn; Adjei, Alex A; Kaufmann, Scott H; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Greenberg, Peter L; Wright, John J; Karp, Judith E

    2007-02-15

    Outcomes for older adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are poor due to both disease and host-related factors. In this phase 2 study, we tested the oral farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib in 158 older adults with previously untreated, poor-risk AML. The median age was 74 years, and a majority of patients had antecedent myelodysplastic syndrome. Complete remission (CR) was achieved in 22 patients (14%); partial remission or hematologic improvement occurred in 15 patients, for an overall response rate of 23%. The median duration of CR was 7.3 months and the median survival of complete responders was 18 months. Adverse karyotype, age 75 years or older, and poor performance status correlated negatively with survival. Early death in the absence of progressive disease was rare, and drug-related nonhematologic serious adverse events were observed in 74 patients (47%). Inhibition of farnesylation of the surrogate protein HDJ-2 occurred in the large majority of marrow samples tested. Baseline levels of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT did not correlate with clinical response. Tipifarnib is active and well tolerated in older adults with poor-risk AML and may impart a survival advantage in those patients who experience a clinical response.

  9. G-CSF-Associated Bone Marrow Necrosis in AML after Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Osuorji, Ikenna; Goldman, Lyle

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow necrosis (BMN) is defined as necrosis of the myeloid tissues and stroma without involvement of the cortical bone. We report a case of 66-year-old male with AML-M4 (FAB classification) who was given induction chemotherapy with cytarabine and daunorubicin. Filgrastim at 480 micrograms was administered on days 15-19 to shorten the duration of neutropenia. Consequently patient developed severe pelvic bone pain, leukoerythroblastosis, and severe leukocytosis. Repeat bone marrow aspiration and biopsy on day 21 confirmed bone marrow necrosis. These manifestations responded quickly to discontinuation of filgrastim. Subsequently, he recovered full myelopoiesis. We suggest that there may be more cases of BMN associated with G-CSF that are undiagnosed.

  10. Donor-Derived Smoldering Multiple Myeloma following a Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for AML

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Mark; Slade, Michael; Westervelt, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) is one of the most common malignancies complicating solid organ transplantation. In contrast, PTLD accounts for a minority of secondary cancers following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Here we report on a 61-year-old woman who received an ABO-mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation from a presumably healthy donor for a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Eighteen months following her transplant, she developed a monoclonal gammopathy. Bone marrow studies revealed 10% plasma cells, but the patient lacked clinical defining features of multiple myeloma (MM); thus a diagnosis of smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) was established. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of the bone marrow confirmed the plasma cells were donor-derived. The donor lacks a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, SMM, or MM. PMID:28316846

  11. Symptoms and socio-economic impact of ependymoma on adult patients: results of the Adult Ependymoma Outcomes Project 2.

    PubMed

    Walbert, Tobias; Mendoza, Tito R; Vera-Bolaños, Elizabeth; Acquaye, Alvina; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-01-01

    Ependymoma is a rare central nervous system tumor of adults. Reports of patient symptoms, interference patterns and costs encountered by patients and families are limited. Adult ependymoma patients completed the online Ependymoma Outcomes Questionnaire II. The survey assesses disease and functional status as well as socio-economic factors. Descriptive statistics were used to report disease characteristics as well as economic and social impact. Independent samples t test was used to test if differences exist between high- and low-income groups in terms of symptom severity. Correlations were calculated between symptoms and cost estimates. 86 international patients participated (male = 50 %). The economic analysis focused on 78 respondents from the US. 48 % were employed and 55 % earned ≥$60,000. Tumors were located in the brain (44 %), spine (44 %) or both (12 %). Spine patients compared to brain patients reported significantly worse pain (4.4 versus 2.2, p < .003), numbness (5.3 versus 2.2, p < .001), fatigue (5.1 versus 3.6, p < .03), changes in bowel patterns (3.8 versus 1.4, p < .003) and weakness (4.2 versus 2.1, p < .006). Brain patients compared with spine patients had increased lack of appetite (.4 versus 2, p < .014). Patients with lower income (≤$59,999) had more problems concentrating (p < .024) and worse cognitive module severity scores (p < .024). Estimated average monthly out-of-pocket spending was $168 for medical co-pays and $59 for prescription medication. Patients with ependymoma are highly affected by their symptoms. Spinal patients report higher severity of symptoms. Patients in the lower income group report significantly higher severity of cognitive symptoms independent of disease site.

  12. Combination of cytogenetic classification and MRD status correlates with outcome of autologous versus allogeneic stem cell transplantation in adults with primary acute myeloid leukemia in first remission.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jianfeng; Zhang, Guixin; Liang, Chen; Li, Gang; Chen, Xin; Ma, Qiaoling; Zhai, Weihua; Yang, Donglin; He, Yi; Jiang, Erlie; Feng, Sizhou; Han, Mingzhe

    2017-04-01

    Both autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (auto- and allo-SCT) are treatment choice for adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after complete remission (CR). However, the decision-making remains controversial in some situations. To figure out the treatment choice, we retrospectively investigated 172 consecutive patients with primary AML who received auto- (n=46) or allo-SCT (n=126) from a single transplant center. Auto- and allo-SCT group demonstrated comparable overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) (P=0.616, P=0.559, respectively). Cytogenetic classification and minimal residual disease (MRD) after one course of consolidation were identified as independent risk factors for DFS (hazard ratio (HR), 1.800; 95% CI, 1.172-2.763; P=0.007; HR, 2.042; 95%CI, 1.003-4.154; P=0.049; respectively). We subsequently found that auto- and allo-SCT offered comparable DFS to patients with favorable or intermediate risk and were tested MRD(neg) after one course of consolidation (P=0.270) otherwise auto-SCT were inferior due to increased risk of leukemia relapse. Our study indicated that the combination of cytogenetic classification and MRD monitoring correlated with outcome of auto- versus allo-SCT and might help the choice between the two types of SCT for adults with primary AML, which is of significance for patients with expected intermediate prognosis in the current scenario.

  13. Unique dual targeting of thymidylate synthase and topoisomerase1 by FdUMP[10] results in high efficacy against AML and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pardee, Timothy S; Gomes, Evan; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Caudell, David; Gmeiner, William H

    2012-04-12

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy that leads to marrow failure and death. There is a desperate need for new therapies. The novel fluoropyrimidine, FdUMP[10], was highly active against both human AML cell lines, (IC(50) values, 3.4nM-21.5nM) and murine lines (IC(50) values, 123.8pM-131.4pM). In all cases, the IC(50) of FdUMP[10] was lower than for cytarabine and ∼ 1000 times lower than 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). FdUMP[10] remained effective against cells expressing the Flt3 internal tandem duplication, BCR-ABL, MN1, and an shRNA against p53. It had activity against patient samples at concentrations that did not affect normal hematopoietic cells. FdUMP[10] inhibited thymidylate synthase (TS) and trapped topoisomerase I cleavage complexes (Top1CCs), leading to DNA damage and apoptosis. All cell lines and nearly all primary AML samples examined expressed both TS and Top1. In vivo, FdUMP[10] was active against a syngeneic AML model with a survival advantage equivalent to doxorubicin plus cytarabine. 5-FU treatment was toxic and did not improve survival. FdUMP[10] was better tolerated than 5-FU or cytarabine plus doxorubicin and did not affect normal HSCs, while 5-FU dramatically impaired their ability to engraft. In summary, FdUMP[10] was highly efficacious and better tolerated than standard therapies.

  14. Dual inhibition of AKT/FLT3-ITD by A674563 overcomes FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenchao; Yu, Kailin; Liu, Xiaochuan; Zou, Fengming; Zhao, Zheng; Wu, Jiaxin; Liu, Juan; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Li; Stone, Richard M.; Galinksy, Ilene A.; Griffin, James D.; Zhang, Shanchun; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is one of the most prevalent oncogenic mutations in AML. Several FLT3 kinase inhibitors have shown impressive activity in clinical evaluation, however clinical responses are usually transient and clinical effects are rapidly lost due to drug resistance. One of the resistance mechanisms in the AML refractory patients involves FLT3-ligand induced reactivation of AKT and/or ERK signaling via FLT3 wt kinase. Via a screen of numerous AKT kinase inhibitors, we identified the well-established orally available AKT inhibitor, A674563, as a dual suppressor of AKT and FLT3-ITD. A674563 suppressed FLT3-ITD positive AML both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, compared to other FLT3 inhibitors, A674563 is able to overcome FLT3 ligand-induced drug resistance through simultaneous inhibition of FLT3-ITD- and AKT-mediated signaling. Our findings suggest that A674563 might be a potential drug candidate for overcoming FLT3 ligand-mediated drug resistance in FLT3-ITD positive AML. PMID:27074558

  15. Deletion and deletion/insertion mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene in adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Kristin K.; Smonskey, Matthew T.; DeFedericis, HanChun; Deeb, George; Sait, Sheila N.J.; Wetzler, Meir; Wang, Eunice S.; Starostik, Petr

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to FLT3 ITD mutations, in-frame deletions in the FLT3 gene have rarely been described in adult acute leukemia. We report two cases of AML with uncommon in-frame mutations in the juxtamembrane domain of the FLT3 gene: a 3-bp (c.1770_1774delCTACGinsGT; p.F590_V592delinsLF) deletion/insertion and a 12-bp (c.1780_1791delTTCAGAGAATAT; p.F594_Y597del) deletion. We verified by sequencing that the reading frame of the FLT3 gene was preserved and by cDNA analysis that the mRNA of the mutant allele was expressed in both cases. Given the recent development of FLT3 inhibitors, our findings may be of therapeutic value for AML patients harboring similar FLT3 mutations. PMID:25379410

  16. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yared, Jean A.; Kimball, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients. PMID:26610571

  17. Epigenetic therapy as a novel approach for GFI136N-associated murine/human AML.

    PubMed

    Botezatu, Lacramioara; Michel, Lars C; Helness, Anne; Vadnais, Charles; Makishima, Hideki; Hönes, Judith M; Robert, François; Vassen, Lothar; Thivakaran, Aniththa; Al-Matary, Yahya; Lams, Robert F; Schütte, Judith; Giebel, Bernd; Görgens, André; Heuser, Michael; Medyouf, Hind; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Dührsen, Ulrich; Möröy, Tarik; Khandanpour, Cyrus

    2016-08-01

    Epigenetic changes can contribute to development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a malignant disease of the bone marrow. A single-nucleotide polymorphism of transcription factor growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) generates a protein with an asparagine at position 36 (GFI1(36N)) instead of a serine at position 36 (GFI1(36S)), which is associated with de novo AML in humans. However, how GFI1(36N) predisposes to AML is poorly understood. To explore the mechanism, we used knock-in mouse strains expressing GFI1(36N) or GFI1(36S). Presence of GFI1(36N) shortened the latency and increased the incidence of AML in different murine models of myelodysplastic syndrome/AML. On a molecular level, GFI1(36N) induced genomewide epigenetic changes, leading to expression of AML-associated genes. On a therapeutic level, use of histone acetyltransferase inhibitors specifically impeded growth of GFI1(36N)-expressing human and murine AML cells in vitro and in vivo. These results establish, as a proof of principle, how epigenetic changes in GFI1(36N)-induced AML can be targeted.

  18. Transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of mouse radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    Badie, Christophe; Blachowicz, Agnieszka; Barjaktarovic, Zarko; Finnon, Rosemary; Michaux, Arlette; Sarioglu, Hakan; Brown, Natalie; Manning, Grainne; Benotmane, M. Abderrafi; Tapio, Soile; Polanska, Joanna; Bouffler, Simon D.

    2016-01-01

    A combined transcriptome and proteome analysis of mouse radiation-induced AMLs using two primary AMLs, cell lines from these primaries, another cell line and its in vivo passage is reported. Compared to haematopoietic progenitor and stem cells (HPSC), over 5000 transcriptome alterations were identified, 2600 present in all materials. 55 and 3 alterations were detected in the proteomes of the cell lines and primary/in vivo passage material respectively, with one common to all materials. In cell lines, approximately 50% of the transcriptome changes are related to adaptation to cell culture, and in the proteome this proportion was higher. An AML ‘signature’ of 17 genes/proteins commonly deregulated in primary AMLs and cell lines compared to HPSCs was identified and validated using human AML transcriptome data. This also distinguishes primary AMLs from cell lines and includes proteins such as Coronin 1, pontin/RUVBL1 and Myeloperoxidase commonly implicated in human AML. C-Myc was identified as having a key role in radiation leukaemogenesis. These data identify novel candidates relevant to mouse radiation AML pathogenesis, and confirm that pathways of leukaemogenesis in the mouse and human share substantial commonality. PMID:27250028

  19. Focal Epileptogenic Lesions in Adult Patients with Epilepsy and Generalized Epileptiform Discharges

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Seo-Young; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose There are reports of successful resective epilepsy surgery for pediatric patients with epilepsy and generalized epileptiform discharges when they had focal epileptogenic lesions identified by MRI. However, there is limited information regarding adult patients with epilepsy who have both generalized epileptiform discharges and focal epileptogenic lesions. Methods To investigate the incidence and characteristics of adult patients who have both generalized epileptiform discharges and potentially epileptogenic lesions, we retrospectively analyzed data of clinical features and results of EEG and MRI of all patients with adult-onset epilepsy in a tertiary referral hospital. Results While 1315 patients were classified as having partial seizures, 207 patients were classified as having generalized seizures. Five of 207 patients (2.4%) with generalized seizures had potentially epileptogenic lesions. All the epileptogenic lesions were congenital or acquired during early life, such as focal cortical dysplasia, dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor, and cerebromalacic change because of perinatal injury. Conclusions The presence of epileptogenic lesions in adult patients with generalized epileptiform discharges may be an incidental finding, but it has been suggested that some adult-onset epilepsy with generalized epileptiform discharges may actually have focal onset, which may have significant clinical implications for the choice of appropriate treatment. PMID:28101478

  20. Sinonasal characteristics and quality of life by SNOT-22 in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Suzie Hyeona; Meotti, Camila Degen; Bombardelli, Karine; Piltcher, Otávio Bejzman; de Tarso Roth Dalcin, Paulo

    2017-04-01

    The prevalence of chronic sinus disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) has gradually increased. Sinonasal involvement may have influence on pulmonary exacerbations and can have a negative impact on the quality of life. To evaluate nasal characteristics and quality of life in adult patients with CF; to establish an association and determine the predictors in SNOT-22 questionnaire. Cross- sectional study with prospective data collection was performed to evaluate adult CF patients. Patients underwent clinical evaluation, lung function tests, nasal endoscopy, and paranasal sinuses CT scan. All the patients answered the SNOT-22 questionnaire.

  1. AML1-ETO inhibits maturation of multiple lymphohematopoietic lineages and induces myeloblast transformation in synergy with ICSBP deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Maike; Löhler, Jürgen; Friel, Jutta; Scheller, Marina; Horak, Ivan; Stocking, Carol

    2002-11-04

    The translocation (8;21), generating the AML1-ETO fusion protein, is one of the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). To elucidate its role in oncogenesis, bone marrow (BM) cells were infected with a retroviral vector carrying AML1-ETO and transplanted into mice. In contrast to previous transgenic mouse models, we show that AML1-ETO directly stimulates granulopoiesis, suppresses erythropoiesis, and impairs the maturation of myeloid, B, and T lymphoid cells in vivo. To determine the significance of earlier findings that expression of the tumor suppressor ICSBP is often downregulated in AML myeloblasts, AML1-ETO was introduced into BM cells derived from mice lacking the interferon regulatory factor ICSBP. Our findings demonstrate that AML1-ETO synergizes with an ICSBP deficiency to induce myeloblastic transformation in the BM, reminiscent of AML.

  2. AML1-ETO Inhibits Maturation of Multiple Lymphohematopoietic Lineages and Induces Myeloblast Transformation in Synergy with ICSBP Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schwieger, Maike; Löhler, Jürgen; Friel, Jutta; Scheller, Marina; Horak, Ivan; Stocking, Carol

    2002-01-01

    The translocation (8;21), generating the AML1-ETO fusion protein, is one of the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). To elucidate its role in oncogenesis, bone marrow (BM) cells were infected with a retroviral vector carrying AML1-ETO and transplanted into mice. In contrast to previous transgenic mouse models, we show that AML1-ETO directly stimulates granulopoiesis, suppresses erythropoiesis, and impairs the maturation of myeloid, B, and T lymphoid cells in vivo. To determine the significance of earlier findings that expression of the tumor suppressor ICSBP is often downregulated in AML myeloblasts, AML1-ETO was introduced into BM cells derived from mice lacking the interferon regulatory factor ICSBP. Our findings demonstrate that AML1-ETO synergizes with an ICSBP deficiency to induce myeloblastic transformation in the BM, reminiscent of AML. PMID:12417632

  3. Influence of Marital Status on the Quality of Life of Chinese Adult Patients with Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fu-Li; Gu, Xiang-Min; Hao, Bao-Yun; Wang, Shan; Chen, Ze-Jie; Ding, Cheng-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by recurrent seizures and has significant psychological and social consequence for everyday living. Epilepsy affects various aspects of ones’ social life. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of marital status on the quality of life of adult Chinese patients with epilepsy. Methods: This study surveyed 805 Chinese adults who have been clinically diagnosed with epilepsy for longer than 1 year in 11 hospitals in Beijing. In this survey, 532 (66.1%) participants were married. All of them completed the case report form with enquiries on demographic data, social factors, and illness. The marriage status of adult epileptic quality of life was the dependent variable, and demographic data and clinical data were independent variables, analyzed through the multiple linear regression analysis methods. The patients’ quality of life was assessed using the Quality of Life in patients with Epilepsy-31 items (QOLIE-31) questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 items (PHQ-9), and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 items (GAD-7). Results: The PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores in the unmarried group (PHQ-9 = 6.0 and GAD-7 = 5.0) were significantly higher than that of the married group (PHQ-9 = 4.0 and GAD-7 =3.0). The scores of married adult patients with epilepsy on QOLIE (61.8 ± 15.3) and social function (70.9 ± 22.7) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients aged between 20 and 44 years. The scores of married adult epileptics on the QOLIE (58.4 ± 14.6) and the energy/fatigue (62.1 ± 20.4) were higher than the scores of the unmarried patients (QOLIE = 58.4 ± 14.6 and the energy/fatigue = 62.1 ± 20.4) aged between 45 and 59 years. For the adult epilepsy patients, depression, anxiety, seizures within the last year, disease course, medical expense category, and marriage* age are negatively correlated with the quality of life. Occupation, educational level, and average monthly income are closely

  4. Adult Day Care for Alzheimer's Patients and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sands, Dan; Suzuki, Thelma

    1983-01-01

    Harbor Area Adult Day Care Center has operated for two years with a primary purpose of providing respite care to families caring for a relative with Alzheimer's disease or related disorders. The rationale, history, program, staffing, funding, and experience for the first two years of the project are provided. (Author/RC)

  5. Rules for improving pharmacotherapy in older adult patients: part 2 (rules 6-10).

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2015-03-01

    The population of older adult patients in the United States is growing each year. Appropriate pharmacotherapy has allowed many older patients to live longer and maintain healthy lives. Unfortunately, the inappropriate utilization of medications can be harmful to older adult patients. Inappropriate pharmacotherapy may lead to overusing medications and polypharmacy. Polypharmacy can contribute to a higher incidence of adverse effects, increase the risk of dangerous drug interactions, cause noncompliance with appropriate medication use, and significantly increase the cost of health care. The polypharmacy issue with geriatric patients has been described as an epidemic and this issue must be addressed. This review provides objective rules that may help prevent polypharmacy. Consideration of these rules when prescribing, dispensing, and caring for older adult patients will improve the overall pharmacotherapy regimens instituted by healthcare providers.

  6. Rules for improving pharmacotherapy in older adult patients: part 1 (rules 1-5).

    PubMed

    Wooten, James M

    2015-02-01

    The population of older adult patients in the United States is growing each year. Appropriate pharmacotherapy has allowed many older patients to live longer and maintain healthy lives. Unfortunately, the inappropriate utilization of medications can be harmful to older adult patients. Inappropriate pharmacotherapy may lead to overusing medications and polypharmacy. Polypharmacy can contribute to a higher incidence of adverse effects, increase the risk of dangerous drug interactions, cause noncompliance with appropriate medication use, and significantly increase the cost of health care. The polypharmacy issue with geriatric patients has been described as an epidemic and this issue must be addressed. This review provides objective rules that may help prevent polypharmacy. Consideration of these rules when prescribing, dispensing, and caring for older adult patients will improve the overall pharmacotherapy regimens instituted by healthcare providers.

  7. Efficacy of mizoribine and prednisolone combination therapy in adult patients with IgA vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Mima, Akira

    2017-03-02

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)A vasculitis (IgAV), formerly known as Henoch-Schönlein purpura, is one of the most common vasculitis caused by an IgA-mediated immune complex. It occurs most frequently in childhood and less commonly in adulthood. As for the treatment of IgAV in adults, there are few studies dealing with the administration and efficacy of intravenous pulse steroid therapy or combination therapy using prednisolone (PSL) and immunosuppressive drugs. Mizoribine (MZB) is a newly developed immunosuppressive drug with few adverse effects; however, there are currently few studies using MZB in adult patients with IgAV. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of MZB combined with a course of PSL in adult patients with IgAV. Five patients with adult onset IgAV were enrolled in the study. All patients received oral PSL (initial dose 30-50 mg/day), and MZB was administered orally at a single morning dose of 150 mg. We investigated the clinical manifestations and prognosis of these patients receiving the combination therapy of MZB and PSL retrospectively. All patients showed complete or partial remission of proteinuria and microscopic hematuria with the combination therapy of MZB and PSL. Furthermore, no significant adverse effects were observed. Although this study had an uncontrolled small group, our results indicate that the combination of MZB with PSL could be a possible new treatment for adult patients with IgAV.

  8. Low Literacy Levels in Adults: Implications for Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Evelyn

    1999-01-01

    Health-education materials often require reading levels higher than that of many patients. Nurses need awareness of the prevalence of low literacy and the ability to assess reading levels so they can develop appropriate patient-education materials. (SK)

  9. Decreased survival in normal karyotype AML with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding the AraC metabolizing enzymes cytidine deaminase and 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Falk, Ingrid Jakobsen; Fyrberg, Anna; Paul, Esbjörn; Nahi, Hareth; Hermanson, Monica; Rosenquist, Richard; Höglund, Martin; Palmqvist, Lars; Stockelberg, Dick; Wei, Yuan; Gréen, Henrik; Lotfi, Kourosh

    2013-12-01

    De novo acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (NK-AML) comprises a large group of patients with no common cytogenetic alterations and with a large variation in treatment response. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to the metabolism of the nucleoside analogue AraC, the backbone in AML treatment, might affect drug sensitivity and treatment outcome. Therefore, SNPs may serve as prognostic biomarkers aiding clinicians in individualized treatment decisions, with the aim of improving patient outcomes. We analyzed polymorphisms in genes encoding cytidine deaminase (CDA 79A>C rs2072671 and -451C>T rs532545), 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II 7A>G rs10883841), and deoxycytidine kinase (DCK 3'UTR 948T>C rs4643786) in 205 de novo NK-AML patients. In FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD)-positive patients, the CDA 79C/C and -451T/T genotypes were associated with shorter overall survival compared to other genotypes (5 vs. 24 months, P < 0.001 and 5 vs. 23 months, P = 0.015, respectively), and this was most pronounced in FLT3-ITD-positive/NPM1-positive patients. We observed altered in vitro sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitory drugs, but not to nucleoside analogues, and a decrease in global DNA methylation in cells carrying both CDA variant alleles. A shorter survival was also observed for the cN-II variant allele, but only in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (25 vs. 31 months, P = 0.075). Our results indicate that polymorphisms in genes related to nucleoside analog drug metabolism may serve as prognostic markers in de novo NK-AML.

  10. 30 CFR 874.17 - AML agency procedures for reclamation projects receiving less than 50 percent government funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false AML agency procedures for reclamation projects... RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.17 AML agency procedures for reclamation projects receiving less than 50 percent government funding. This section tells you, the AML agency, what to do when considering...

  11. 30 CFR 874.17 - AML agency procedures for reclamation projects receiving less than 50 percent government funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false AML agency procedures for reclamation projects... RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.17 AML agency procedures for reclamation projects receiving less than 50 percent government funding. This section tells you, the AML agency, what to do when considering...

  12. Outcome of children with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia given autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in the aieop AML-2002/01 study.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, F; Masetti, R; Rondelli, R; Zecca, M; Fagioli, F; Rovelli, A; Messina, C; Lanino, E; Bertaina, A; Favre, C; Giorgiani, G; Ripaldi, M; Ziino, O; Palumbo, G; Pillon, M; Pession, A; Rutella, S; Prete, A

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed the outcome of 243 children with high-risk (HR) AML in first CR1 enrolled in the AIEOP-2002/01 protocol, who were given either allogeneic (ALLO; n=141) or autologous (AUTO; n=102) hematopoietic SCT (HSCT), depending on the availability of a HLA-compatible sibling. Infants, patients with AML-M7, or complex karyotype or those with FLT3-ITD, were eligible to be transplanted also from alternative donors. All patients received a myeloablative regimen combining busulfan, cyclophosphamide and melphalan; [corrected] AUTO-HSCT patients received BM cells in most cases, while in children given ALLO-HSCT stem cell source was BM in 96, peripheral blood in 19 and cord blood in 26. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range 12-130), the probability of disease-free survival (DFS) was 73% and 63% in patients given either ALLO- or AUTO-HSCT, respectively (P=NS). Although the cumulative incidence (CI) of relapse was lower in ALLO- than in AUTO-HSCT recipients (17% vs 28%, respectively; P=0.043), the CI of TRM was 7% in both groups. Patients transplanted with unrelated donor cord blood had a remarkable 92.3% 8-year DFS probability. Altogether, these data confirm that HSCT is a suitable option for preventing leukemia recurrence in HR children with CR1 AML.

  13. Conservative and surgical management of pancreatic trauma in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Menahem, Benjamin; Lim, Chetana; Lahat, Eylon; Salloum, Chady; Osseis, Michael; Lacaze, Laurence; Compagnon, Philippe; Pascal, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of pancreatic trauma is complex. The aim of this study was to report our experience in the management of pancreatic trauma. Methods All patients hospitalized between 2005 and 2013 for pancreatic trauma were included. Traumatic injuries of the pancreas were classified according to the American Association for Surgery of Trauma (AAST) in five grades. Mortality and morbidity were analyzed. Results A total of 30 patients were analyzed (mean age: 38±17 years). Nineteen (63%) patients had a blunt trauma and 12 (40%) had pancreatic injury ≥ grade 3. Fifteen patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and the other 15 patients had nonoperative management (NOM). Four (13%) patients had a partial pancreatectomy [distal pancreatectomy (n=3) and pancreaticoduodenectomy (n=1)]. Overall, in hospital mortality was 20% (n=6). Postoperative mortality was 27% (n=4/15). Mortality of NOM group was 13% (n=2/15) in both cases death was due to severe head injury. Among the patients who underwent NOM, three patients had injury ≥ grade 3, one patient had a stent placement in the pancreatic duct and two patients underwent endoscopic drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Conclusions Operative management of pancreatic trauma leads to a higher mortality. This must not be necessarily related to the pancreas injury alone but also to the associated injuries including liver, spleen and vascular trauma which may cause impaired outcome more than pancreas injury. PMID:28124001

  14. Renal concentration capacity in adult patients with urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Sterner, G

    1991-01-01

    The maximal urine concentration capacity was studied in patients with acute pyelonephritis and in patients with clinically diagnosed acute cystitis. In the former group renal concentration ability was reduced in 16 of 22 patients and improved in all but two patients. Among patients with symptoms of acute cystitis 6 of 22 had a concentration capacity below 2 SD of normal values. Several of these patients had raised acute phase proteins and increased their urine osmolality at follow-up indicating that cases of acute pyelonephritis could have been included. It is concluded that the wide overlap between the groups makes the maximal urinary concentration capacity a method of limited value for level diagnosis in acute UTI infection. The test should be reserved for follow-up to reveal permanent renal damage.

  15. Effects of neurofeedback on adult patients with psychiatric disorders in a naturalistic setting.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Song, Shin-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Few well-controlled studies have considered neurofeedback treatment in adult psychiatric patients. In this regard, the present study investigates the characteristics and effects of neurofeedback on adult psychiatric patients in a naturalistic setting. A total of 77 adult patients with psychiatric disorders participated in this study. Demographic data and neurofeedback states were retrospectively analyzed, and the effects of neurofeedback were evaluated using clinical global impression (CGI) and subjective self-rating scales. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (19; 24.7 %), followed by anxiety disorders (18; 23.4 %). A total of 69 patients (89.6 %) took medicine, and the average frequency of neurofeedback was 17.39 ± 16.64. Neurofeedback was applied to a total of 39 patients (50.6 %) more than 10 times, and 48 patients (62.3 %) received both β/SMR and α/θ training. The discontinuation rate was 33.8 % (26 patients). There was significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatment CGI scores (<.001), and the self-rating scale also showed significant differences in depressive symptoms, anxiety, and inattention (<.001). This is a naturalistic study in a clinical setting, and has several limitations, including the absence of a control group and a heterogenous sample. Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the potential of neurofeedback as an effective complimentary treatment for adult patients with psychiatric disorders.

  16. Non-motor symptoms in patients with adult-onset focal dystonia: Sensory and psychiatric disturbances.

    PubMed

    Conte, Antonella; Berardelli, Isabella; Ferrazzano, Gina; Pasquini, Massimo; Berardelli, Alfredo; Fabbrini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by the presence of involuntary muscle contractions that cause abnormal movements and posture. Adult onset focal dystonia include cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, arm dystonia and laryngeal dystonia. Besides motor manifestations, patients with focal dystonia frequently also display non-motor signs and symptoms. In this paper, we review the evidence of sensory and psychiatric disturbances in adult patients with focal dystonia. Clinical studies and neurophysiological investigations consistently show that the sensory system is involved in dystonia. Several studies have also demonstrated that neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, are more frequent in patients with focal dystonia, whereas data on obsessive compulsive disorders are more contrasting.

  17. Childhood sexual abuse in adult patients with borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Preethi; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Saldanha, Daniel; Devabhaktuni, Spandana; Bhattacharya, Labanya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Researchers have found elevated rates of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients. They have also implicated the role of CSA later in BPD. However, there has been a scarcity of studies regarding this in Indian population. Objectives: To profile the occurrence of CSA and its parameters in BPD patients and to document symptomatology of BPD associated with CSA. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six consecutive patients with BPD were administered with a two-staged semi-structured interview by different interviewers with the first stage for collecting sociodemographic details and confirming BPD diagnosis and the second stage for collecting information about CSA. Results: Of 36 BPD patients, 16 (44.44%) reported a history of definite CSA. The majority of CSA associated with BPD were having characteristics of onset at 7–12 years, <10 occasions of abuse, perpetrator being a close relative or a close acquaintance and genital type of CSA. Identity disturbances (P = 0.0354), recurrent suicidal/self-harm behavior (P = 0.0177), and stress-related paranoid/dissociative symptoms (P = 0.0177) were significantly associated with the presence of CSA while unstable interpersonal relationships (P = 0.001) were significantly associated with the absence of CSA. Conclusion: Significant proportion of BPD patients reported CSA. The specific symptom profile of BPD patients can be used to predict the presence of CSA in these patients, which has a direct implication in the treatment of these patients. PMID:28163415

  18. Targeting PDK1 with dichloroacetophenone to inhibit acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell growth.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lijun; Tian, Yun; Yu, Zhenlong; Shi, Dingbo; Wang, Jingshu; Zhang, Changlin; Peng, Ruoyu; Chen, Xuezhen; Liu, Congcong; Chen, Yiming; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo

    2016-01-12

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 (PDK1), a key metabolic enzyme involved in aerobic glycolysis, is highly expressed in many solid tumors. Small molecule compound DAP (2,2-dichloroacetophenone) is a potent inhibitor of PDK1. Whether targeting PDK1 with DAP can inhibit acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and how it works remains unknown. In this study, we evaluated the effect of inhibition of PDK1 with DAP on cell growth, apoptosis and survival in AML cells and identified the underlying mechanisms. We found that treatment with DAP significantly inhibited cell proliferation, increased apoptosis induction and suppressed autophagy in AML cells in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in an AML mouse model in vivo. We also showed that inhibition of PDK1 with DAP increased the cleavage of pro-apoptotic proteins (PARP and Caspase 3) and decreased the expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins (BCL-xL and BCL-2) and autophagy regulators (ULK1, Beclin-1 and Atg). In addition, we found that DAP inhibited the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PDK1 interacted with ULK1, BCL-xL and E3 ligase CBL-b in AML cells, and DPA treatment could inhibit the interactions. Collectively, our results indicated that targeting PDK1 with DAP inhibited AML cell growth via multiple signaling pathways and suggest that targeting PDK1 may be a promising therapeutic strategy for AMLs.

  19. Benefits of preoperative education for adult elective surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Kruzik, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Patient education is a major concern for perioperative nurses in an ambulatory surgery setting. It has proven difficult to develop formal preoperative teaching programs in this environment, but research has shown that preoperative education can improve patient outcomes and satisfaction with the surgical experience. Typical patient education consists of pamphlets that are given to the patient before surgery and verbal instructions from the physicians and nurses on the day of surgery. Ideally, preoperative patient education should begin in the surgeon's office, continue through preadmission testing, and be completed at admission. Having a well-designed preoperative education program enables perioperative nurses in ambulatory surgery centers to provide a thoughtful approach to perioperative teaching in a limited time. AORN J 90 (September 2009) 381-387. (c) AORN, Inc, 2009.

  20. Need for Prophylactic Treatment in Adult Haemophilia A Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Berthold; Richter, Heinrich; Pollmann, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background and Methods A single centre study including 52 German patients aged ≥16 years with severe haemophilia A was performed to compare the amount of clotting factor and outcome between on-demand therapy (26 patients) and continuous prophylaxis (26 patients) over 1 year. Results Prophylaxis reduced the number of bleeds significantly. Compared to on-demand treatment (20.5 ± 3.0 bleeds/year/patient), under prophylaxis 7.8 ± 1.3 bleeds/year/patient were observed. Joint bleeds were reduced from 12.2 ± 1.5 to 4.7 ± 1.0/year/ patient. In the on-demand group 38% of the patients suffered from more than 2 bleeds/month, whereas in the prophylaxis group no patient was found with more than 2 bleeds/month. Mean annual factor VIII (FVIII) consumption increased from 767 ± 110 IU/kg body weight under on-demand treatment to 2,841 ± 341 IU/kg body weight under continuous prophylaxis, displaying a nearly fourfold increase in FVIII consumption. Furthermore, prophylaxis implies a more than four-fold increase in treatment days which escalated from a mean weekly injection rate of 0.56 ± 0.08 FVIII injections/week when bleeds were treated on demand to 2.52 ± 0.30 FVIII injections/week during prophylaxis. Conclusion Even though the results reflect a benefit also for prophylactically treated patients regarding their bleeding frequency, one has to take into account a substantial increase of the costs for coagulation concentrates when all patients with severe haemophilia A switch to continuous prophylaxis. PMID:20877667

  1. Laparoscopic Nephroureterectomy for Adult Patient with Primary Obstructive Megaureter

    PubMed Central

    Makiyama, Kazuhide; Ohtake, Shinji; Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Sano, Futoshi; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old female with a complaint of abdominal distension was referred to our hospital. She had a history of being treated for pyelonephritis three times. By computed tomography and retrograde pyelography, she was diagnosed with adult left primary megaureter. Her left renal function was severely deteriorated. She hoped for surgical intervention before becoming pregnant. Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for megaureters seems to be difficult due to the large size. By sucking urine from an inserted ureteral catheter and setting trocar positions, we successfully performed laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for megaureter. PMID:24455395

  2. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole prophylaxis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mattiuzzi, Gloria; Yilmaz, Musa; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Jabbour, Elias; Brown, Yolanda; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis is routinely given to patients with hematologic malignancies at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI), yet breakthrough IFI may still occur. Posaconazole emerged as an excellent alternative for fungal prophylaxis in high-risk patients. There is limited data about pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of posaconazole when given as prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. We recruited 20 adult patients for prospective, open label trial of posaconazole given as a prophylaxis in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy or first salvage therapy. The median age of all patients was 65 years and received prophylaxis for a median of 38 days (range: 5-42 days).Ten patients (50%) completed 42 days on posaconazole prophylaxis. Median plasma posaconazole levels showed no statistical difference across gender, body surface area, patients developing IFI, and patients acquiring grade 3 or 4 elevation of liver enzymes. However, there was an overall trend for higher trough concentrations among patients with no IFI than those with IFI. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole varies from patient to patient, and AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy who never develop IFI tend to have higher plasma concentrations after oral administration of posaconazole.

  3. Parental substance abuse, reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher; Whitfield, Keith; Sudhakar, Shiv; Pearce, Michele; Byrd, Goldie; Wood, Mary; Feliu, Miriam; Leach-Beale, Brittani; DeCastro, Laura; Whitworth, Elaine; Abrams, Mary; Jonassaint, Jude; Harrison, M. Ojinga; Mathis, Markece; Scott, Lydia; Johnson, Stephanie; Durant, Lauren; Holmes, Anita; Presnell, Katherine; Bennett, Gary; Shelby, Rebecca; Robinson, Elwood

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing interest from a social learning perspective in understanding the role of parental factors on adult health behaviors and health outcomes. Our review revealed no studies, to date, that have evaluated the effects of parental substance abuse on reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We explored the effects of parental substance (alcohol or drug) abuse on reports of the sensory, affective and summary indices of pain in 67 adult patients, mean age 38.9 (13.5), with SCD. We also explored the effects of parental substance abuse on psychopathology associated with pain and active coping. Twenty-four percent of patients reported that their parent(s) abused substances. Patients whose parent(s) were characterized as substance abusers reported greater sensory (p=0.02), affective (p=0.01) and summary (VAS; p=0.02) indices of pain as compared to their counterparts, whose parent(s) were not characterized as substance abusers. Patients did not differ in average age, education or the propensity to respond in a socially acceptable manner. There was a significant trend towards patients who characterized their parents as abusers scoring higher than their counterparts on active coping. We propose a Social Learning Theory to explain the current findings and suggest a need for additional prospective research to simultaneously explore biological (genetic) and social factors that influence the interpretation, experience and reporting of chronic pain in adult patients with chronic disease. PMID:16573309

  4. Influence of striatal dopamine transporter availability on the response to methylphenidate in adult patients with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Krause, Johanna; la Fougere, Christian; Krause, Klaus-Henning; Ackenheil, Manfred; Dresel, Stefan H

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we investigated whether availability of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) may have an influence on the response of adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on methylphenidate (MPH). In 18 non-smoking and non-medicated adult patients with ADHD, availability of DAT was measured with [(99m)Tc] TRODAT-1 SPECT. Then, the patients received methylphenidate (MPH), individually titrated up to 60 mg per day. Ten weeks later, clinical improvement was rated by Clinical Global Impressions scale. In all, 6 patients were classified as non-responders, and 12 responded to MPH. From the non-responders, 5 presented with a DAT availability below that of normal controls of the same age, whereas in the group of responders all patients had elevated DAT availability. There was a significant negative correlation between values for global clinical improvement and striatal DAT availability. In conclusion, ADHD patients with low DAT availability seem not to respond to therapy with MPH.

  5. [Acute cerebral ischemia: an unusual clinical presentation of isolated left ventricular noncompaction in an adult patient].

    PubMed

    Fiorencis, Andrea; Quadretti, Laura; Bacich, Daniela; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Mele, Donato; Fiorencis, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction in adults is uncommon. The most frequent clinical manifestations are heart failure due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction and supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias, which may be sustained and associated with sudden death. Thromboembolic complications are also possible. We report the case of an adult patient with isolated left ventricular noncompaction who came to our observation because of acute cerebral ischemia, an initial presentation of the disease only rarely described.

  6. Management of adult Jehovah's Witness patients with acute bleeding.

    PubMed

    Berend, Kenrick; Levi, Marcel

    2009-12-01

    Because of the firm refusal of transfusion of blood and blood components by Jehovah's Witnesses, the management of Jehovah's Witness patients with severe bleeding is often complicated by medical, ethical, and legal concerns. Because of a rapidly growing and worldwide membership, physicians working in hospitals should be prepared to manage these patients. Appropriate management of a Jehovah's Witness patient with severe bleeding entails understanding of the legal and ethical issues involved, and meticulous medical management, including treatment of hypovolemic shock, local hemostatic interventions, and administration of prohemostatic agents, when appropriate. In addition, high-dose recombinant erythropoietin in combination with supplemental iron may enhance the speed of hemoglobin synthesis.

  7. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  8. [Preoperative tests recommendations in adult patients for ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Zaballos, M; López-Álvarez, S; Argente, P; López, A

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic assessment traditionally included a series of laboratory tests intended to detect undiagnosed diseases, and to ensure that the patient undergoes surgery following safety criteria. These tests, without a specific clinical indication, are expensive, of questionable diagnostic value and often useless. In the context of outpatient surgery, recent evidence suggests that patients of any age without significant comorbidity, ASA physical status gradei and grade ii, do not need additional preoperative tests routinely. The aim of the present recommendations is to determine the general indications in which these tests should be performed in ASA gradei and grade ii patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

  9. Sabril® registry 5-year results: Characteristics of adult patients treated with vigabatrin.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Gregory; Faught, Edward; Foroozan, Rod; Pellock, John M; Sergott, Robert C; Shields, W Donald; Ziemann, Adam; Dribinsky, Yekaterina; Lee, Deborah; Torri, Sarah; Othman, Feisal; Isojarvi, Jouko

    2016-03-01

    Vigabatrin (Sabril®), approved in the US in 2009, is currently indicated as adjunctive therapy for refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS) in patients ≥ 10 years old who have responded inadequately to several alternative treatments and as monotherapy for infantile spasms (IS) in patients 1 month to 2 years of age. Because of reports of vision loss following vigabatrin exposure, FDA approval required a risk evaluation mitigation strategy (REMS) program. Vigabatrin is only available in the US through Support, Help, And Resources for Epilepsy (SHARE), which includes a mandated registry. This article describes 5 years of demographic and treatment exposure data from adult patients (≥ 17 years old) in the US treated with vigabatrin and monitored in the ongoing Sabril® registry. Registry participation is mandatory for all US Sabril® prescribers and patients. A benefit-risk assessment must be documented by the physician for a patient to progress to maintenance therapy, defined as 1 month of vigabatrin treatment for patients with IS and 3 months for patients with rCPS. Ophthalmologic assessments must be documented during and after completion of therapy. As of August 26, 2014, a total of 6823 patients were enrolled in the registry, of which 1200 were adults at enrollment. Of these patients, 1031 (86%) were naïve to vigabatrin. The majority of adult patients (n=783, 65%) had previously been prescribed ≥ 4 AEDs, and 719 (60%) were receiving ≥ 3 concomitant AEDs at vigabatrin initiation. Prescribers submitted an initial ophthalmological assessment form for 863 patients; an ophthalmologic exam was not completed for 300 (35%) patients and thus, were considered exempted from vision testing. Of these patients, 128 (43%) were exempted for neurologic disabilities. Clinicians discontinued treatment in 8 patients because of visual field deficits (VFD) (5 patients naïve to vigabatrin and 3 patients previously exposed). Based on Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, it is

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in adult patients with cystic fibrosis in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Clarke, L; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Crowe, M; Xu, J; Goldsmith, C E; Murphy, R G; Dooley, J S G; Rendall, J; Elborn, J S

    2008-01-01

    Isolates (n = 51) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa obtained from the sputa of 29 adult patients attending the Regional Cystic Fibrosis Centre in Northern Ireland were compared using an enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence (ERIC2) primer in a random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Resulting banding patterns showed a high degree of genetic heterogeneity among all isolates from the patients examined, suggesting a non-clonal relationship between isolates from these patients, when employing this genotyping technique.

  11. Concurrent Bilateral Renal Angiomyolipoma and Renal Cell Carcinoma in a Patient With Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Khallouk, Abdelhak; Ahallal, Younes; Doublali, Mbarek; Tazi, Mohamed Fadl; Mellas, Soufiane; el Fassi, Mohamed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are often associated with tuberous sclerosis. These tumors are predominantly benign, although malignant forms do exist and are known to be associated with renal cell carcinoma. This case report describes a patient with tuberous sclerosis and massive bilateral AML. Total right nephrectomy was performed; histopathologic examination revealed the coexistence of AML and clear cell renal carcinoma in the same kidney. Because differentiation between renal cell carcinoma and AML with minimal or no fat component can be difficult, an accurate diagnosis is critical in the management of renal AML. PMID:20111634

  12. Concurrent bilateral renal angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma in a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Khallouk, Abdelhak; Ahallal, Younes; Doublali, Mbarek; Tazi, Mohamed Fadl; Mellas, Soufiane; El Fassi, Mohamed Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are often associated with tuberous sclerosis. These tumors are predominantly benign, although malignant forms do exist and are known to be associated with renal cell carcinoma. This case report describes a patient with tuberous sclerosis and massive bilateral AML. Total right nephrectomy was performed; histopathologic examination revealed the coexistence of AML and clear cell renal carcinoma in the same kidney. Because differentiation between renal cell carcinoma and AML with minimal or no fat component can be difficult, an accurate diagnosis is critical in the management of renal AML.

  13. Use of Patient Portals for Personal Health Information Management: The Older Adult Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Anne M.; Osterhage, Katie; Hartzler, Andrea; Joe, Jonathan; Lin, Lorelei; Kanagat, Natasha; Demiris, George

    2015-01-01

    The personal health information management (PHIM) practices and needs of older adults are poorly understood. We describe initial results from the UW SOARING project (Studying Older Adults & Researching Information Needs and Goals), a participatory design investigation of PHIM in older adults (60 years and older). We conducted in-depth interviews with older adults (n=74) living in a variety of residential settings about their management of personal health information. A surprising 20% of participants report using patient portals and another 16% reported prior use or anticipated use of portals in the future. Participants cite ease of access to health information and direct communication with providers as valuable portal features. Barriers to the use of patient portals include a general lack of computer proficiency, high internet costs and security concerns. Design features based on consideration of needs and practices of older adults will facilitate appeal and maximize usability; both are elements critical to adoption of tools such as patient portals that can support older adults and PHIM. PMID:26958263

  14. Transition Readiness in Adolescents and Emerging Adults with Diabetes: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Marisa; Sweenie, Rachel; Riekert, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Transition from pediatric to adult care represents a high risk period for adolescents and emerging adults with diabetes. Fundamental differences between pediatric and adult care delivery models may contribute to increased risk for poor health outcomes. This review provides a brief overview of models of care in pediatric and adult settings and focuses on patient-provider communication content and quality as potential points of intervention to improve transition-related outcomes. This review also highlights disparities in transition and communication for adolescents and emerging adults from racial/ethnic minority groups and discusses recent changes in health care legislation that have significant implications for the transition process. Intervention opportunities include programs to enhance developmentally-appropriate patient-provider interactions and increased attention to promoting transition readiness skills. Improving patient-provider communication may hasten the development of vital self-advocacy skills needed in adult health care systems and, thus, help establish a lasting pattern of positive diabetes self-care. PMID:24014075

  15. Preoperative Assessment of Adult Patients for Intracranial Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sivanaser, Vanitha; Manninen, Pirjo

    2010-01-01

    The preoperative assessment of the patient for neurosurgical and endovascular procedures involves the understanding of the neurological disease and its systemic presentation, and the requirements of the procedure. There is a wide spectrum of different neurosurgical disorders and procedures. This article provides an overview of the preoperative evaluation of these patients with respect to general principles of neuroanesthesia, and considerations for specific intracranial and vascular neurosurgical and interventional neuroradiological procedures. PMID:20700431

  16. Dysnatremias and Survival in Adult Burn Patients: A Retrospective Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-11

    hyponatre- mia occurred in 6.8% (n = 134) with mortality rates of 33.5 and 13.8%, respectively. Patients without a dysnatremia had Received: July 14...A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to ana - lyze the relationship between independent variables of age, gen- der, %TBSA, %FT...15] . Of the 194 patients with hypernatre- mia , only 6 had concurrent head trauma for which an elevated sodium level was recommended by neurosur

  17. Caring for adult patients who require nasogastric feeding tubes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kristine

    Nasogastric tubes provide a safe means of delivering nutrition support to many patients in hospital and the community. Insertion and care of these tubes will be familiar to many nurses. Evidence has shown that misplaced tubes, either on insertion or during use, can cause serious harm or even death to patients. This article explores the safety challenges posed during the insertion and maintenance of nasogastric tubes. Guidance and evidence should provide nurses with the knowledge, skills and reassurance to manage these tubes safely.

  18. SKLB-677, an FLT3 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor, displays potent activity in models of FLT3-driven AML

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuang; Yang, Ling-Ling; Niu, Ting; Cheng, Chuan; Zhong, Lei; Zheng, Ming-Wu; Xiong, Yu; Li, Lin-Li; Xiang, Rong; Chen, Li-Juan; Zhou, Qiao; Wei, Yu-Quan; Yang, Sheng-Yong

    2015-01-01

    FLT3 has been identified as a valid target for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and some FLT3 inhibitors have shown very good efficacy in treating AML in clinical trials. Nevertheless, recent studies indicated that relapse and drug resistance are still difficult to avoid, and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are considered one of the most important contributors. Here, we report the characterization of SKLB-677, a new FLT3 inhibitor developed by us recently. SKLB-677 exhibits low nanomolar potency in biochemical and cellular assays. It is efficacious in animal models at doses as low as 1mg/kg when administrated orally once daily. In particular, SKLB-677 but not first-generation and second-generation FLT3 inhibitors in clinical trials has the ability to inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signaling; Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for the development of LSCs, but not necessary for the development of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This compound indeed showed considerable suppression effects on leukemia stem-like cells in in vitro functional assays, but had no influence on normal HSCs. Collectively, SKLB-677 is an interesting lead compound for the treatment of AML, and deserves further investigations. PMID:26497577

  19. Role for c-jun N-terminal kinase in treatment-refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML): signaling to multidrug-efflux and hyperproliferation.

    PubMed

    Cripe, L D; Gelfanov, V M; Smith, E A; Spigel, D R; Phillips, C A; Gabig, T G; Jung, S-H; Fyffe, J; Hartman, A D; Kneebone, P; Mercola, D; Burgess, G S; Boswell, H S

    2002-05-01

    A relationship was proved between constitutive activity of leukemic cell c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and treatment failure in AML. Specifically, early treatment failure was predicted by the presence of constitutive JNK activity. The mechanistic origins of this association was sought. A multidrug resistant leukemic cell line, HL-60/ADR, characterized by hyperexpression of c-jun and JNK activity, was transfected with a mutant c-jun vector, whose substrate N-terminal c-jun serines were mutated. Down-regulated expression occurred of c-jun/AP-1-dependent genes, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pi, which participate in cellular homeostasis to oxidative stress and xenobiotic exposure. MRP-efflux was abrogated in HL-60/ADR cells with dominant-negative c-jun, perhaps because MRP1 protein expression was also lost. Heightened sensitivity to daunorubicin resulted in cells subjected to this change. Biochemical analysis in 67 primary adult AML samples established a statistical correlation between cellular expression of c-jun and JNK activity, JNK activity with hyperleukocytosis at presentation of disease, and with exuberant MRP efflux. These findings reflect the survival role for c-jun/AP-1 and its regulatory kinase previously demonstrated for yeast in homeostatic response to oxidative stress and in operation of ATP-binding cassette efflux pumps, and may support evolutionary conservation of such function. Thus, JNK and c-jun may be salient drug targets in multidrug resistant AML.

  20. [Perspectives in the management of congenital heart defects in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Hartyánszky, István; Varga, Sándor; Havasi, Kálmán; Babik, Barna; Katona, Márta; Bogáts, Gábor

    2015-01-18

    Due to improving results in congenital heart surgery, the number of adult patients with congenital heart defect is increasing. The question is: what kind of problems can be managed in this patient-group? The authors review the different problems of management of congenital heart defects in adults based on national and international literature data. Simple defects recognised in adults, postoperative residual problems, changing of small grafts and valves, correction of primary or operated coarctation aortae can be usually managed without problems. A very close follow-up is necessary to establish the correct period for heart transplantation in patients with transposition of great arteries with Senning/Mustard operation, and univentricular heart corrected with "Fontan-circulation" type surgical procedure. The authors conclude that although the number of patients increases, only a few congenital heart diseases may cause problems. It seems important (1) to monitor asymptomatic patient who underwent operation (Fallot-IV, Ross procedure, etc.), (2) follow up regularly patients who underwent Senning/Mustard procedure (magnetic resonance imaging, echocardiography, brain natriuretic peptide measurement), (3) define the proper period of preparation for heart transplantation of patients with a univentricular heart, with special attention to the possibility of multiorgan (lung, liver, etc.) failure. Due to the improvement of foetal diagnosis of congenital heart defects, the number of patients with complex congenital heart defects is decreasing. The standard management of these patients could be primary heart transplantation in infancy.

  1. Anaphylaxis: lack of hospital doctors' knowledge of adrenaline (epinephrine) administration in adults could endanger patients' safety.

    PubMed

    Droste, J; Narayan, N

    2012-06-01

    Adrenaline (epinephrine) is the first line drug to be given in anaphylaxis and can save patients' lives. Conversely, incorrect administration of adrenaline in anaphylaxis has caused patients serious harm, including death. We compared the survey results of doctors' knowledge of adrenaline administration in adults of two District General Hospitals Trusts in England and found, that from 284 Hospital Doctors, 14.4% (n = 41) would administer adrenaline as recommended by published anaphylaxis guidelines. This survey comparison shows that a significant number of hospital doctors, regardless of seniority and specialty, have an educational deficit regarding correct administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) administration in adults with anaphylaxis. Multilevel strategies to educate doctors and prevent patient harm are needed. We propose a mnemonic for remembering the recommended treatment for anaphylaxis in the adult: "A Thigh 500" forAdrenaline into the antero-lateral thigh, 500 micrograms.

  2. Patient safety in the rehabilitation of the adult with an amputation.

    PubMed

    Latlief, Gail; Elnitsky, Christine; Hart-Hughes, Stephanie; Phillips, Samuel L; Adams-Koss, Laurel; Kent, Robert; Highsmith, M Jason

    2012-05-01

    This article reviews and summarizes the literature on patient safety issues in the rehabilitation of adults with an amputation. Safety issues in the following areas are discussed; the prosthesis, falls, wound care, pain, and treatment of complex patients. Specific recommendations for further research and implementation strategies to prevent injury and improve safety are also provided. Communication between interdisciplinary team members and patient and caregiver education are crucial to executing a safe treatment plan. The multidisci