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Sample records for adult antennal lobe

  1. Adult-like complexity of the larval antennal lobe of D. melanogaster despite markedly low numbers of odorant receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Python, François; Stocker, Reinhard F

    2002-04-15

    We provide a detailed analysis of the larval head chemosensory system of Drosophila melanogaster, based on confocal microscopy of cell-specific reporter gene expression in P[GAL4] enhancer trap lines. In particular, we describe the neuronal composition of three external and three pharyngeal chemosensory organs, the nerve tracts chosen by their afferents, and their central target regions. With a total of 21 olfactory and 80 gustatory neurons, the sensory level is numerically much simpler than that of the adult. Moreover, its design is different than in the adult, showing an association between smell and taste sensilla. In contrast, the first-order relay of the olfactory afferents, the larval antennal lobe (LAL), exhibits adult-like features both in terms of structure and cell number. It shows a division into approximately 30 subunits, reminiscent of glomeruli in the adult antennal lobe. Taken together, the design of the larval chemosensory system is a "hybrid," with larval-specific features in the periphery and central characteristics in common with the adult. The largely reduced numbers of afferents and the similar architecture of the LAL and the adult antennal lobe, render the larval chemosensory system of Drosophila a valuable model system, both for studying smell and taste and for examining the development of its adult organization.

  2. Sex-specific antennal sensory system in the ant Camponotus japonicus: glomerular organizations of antennal lobes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Aki; Nishino, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yokohari, Fumio; Nishikawa, Michiko

    2010-06-15

    Ants have well-developed chemosensory systems for social lives. The goal of our study is to understand the functional organization of the ant chemosensory system based on caste- and sex-specific differences. Here we describe the common and sex-specific glomerular organizations in the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe of the carpenter ant Camponotus japonicus. Differential labeling of the two antennal nerves revealed distinct glomerular clusters innervated by seven sensory tracts (T1-T7 from ventral to dorsal) in the antennal lobe. T7 innervated 10 glomeruli, nine of which received thick axon terminals almost exclusively from the ventral antennal nerve. Coelocapitular (hygro-/thermoreceptive), coeloconic (thermoreceptive), and ampullaceal (CO2-receptive) sensilla, closely appositioned in the flagellum, housed one or three large sensory neurons supplying thick axons exclusively to the ventral antennal nerve. These axons, therefore, were thought to project into T7 glomeruli in all three castes. Workers and virgin females had about 140 T6 glomeruli, whereas males completely lacked these glomeruli. Female-specific basiconic sensilla (cuticular hydrocarbon-receptive) contained over 130 sensory neurons and were completely lacking in males' antennae. These sensory neurons may project into T6 glomeruli in the antennal lobe of workers and virgin females. Serotonin-immunopositive neurons innervated T1-T5 and T7 glomeruli but not T6 glomeruli in workers and virgin females. Because males had no equivalents to T6 glomeruli, serotonin-immunopositive neurons appeared to innervate all glomeruli in the male's antennal lobe. T6 glomeruli in workers and virgin females are therefore female-specific and may have functions related to female-specific tasks in the colony rather than sexual behaviors.

  3. Sex-specific antennal sensory system in the ant Camponotus japonicus: glomerular organizations of antennal lobes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Aki; Nishino, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yokohari, Fumio; Nishikawa, Michiko

    2010-06-15

    Ants have well-developed chemosensory systems for social lives. The goal of our study is to understand the functional organization of the ant chemosensory system based on caste- and sex-specific differences. Here we describe the common and sex-specific glomerular organizations in the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe of the carpenter ant Camponotus japonicus. Differential labeling of the two antennal nerves revealed distinct glomerular clusters innervated by seven sensory tracts (T1-T7 from ventral to dorsal) in the antennal lobe. T7 innervated 10 glomeruli, nine of which received thick axon terminals almost exclusively from the ventral antennal nerve. Coelocapitular (hygro-/thermoreceptive), coeloconic (thermoreceptive), and ampullaceal (CO2-receptive) sensilla, closely appositioned in the flagellum, housed one or three large sensory neurons supplying thick axons exclusively to the ventral antennal nerve. These axons, therefore, were thought to project into T7 glomeruli in all three castes. Workers and virgin females had about 140 T6 glomeruli, whereas males completely lacked these glomeruli. Female-specific basiconic sensilla (cuticular hydrocarbon-receptive) contained over 130 sensory neurons and were completely lacking in males' antennae. These sensory neurons may project into T6 glomeruli in the antennal lobe of workers and virgin females. Serotonin-immunopositive neurons innervated T1-T5 and T7 glomeruli but not T6 glomeruli in workers and virgin females. Because males had no equivalents to T6 glomeruli, serotonin-immunopositive neurons appeared to innervate all glomeruli in the male's antennal lobe. T6 glomeruli in workers and virgin females are therefore female-specific and may have functions related to female-specific tasks in the colony rather than sexual behaviors. PMID:20437523

  4. Calcium Imaging of Pheromone Responses in the Insect Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Susy M.; Wang, Jing W.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium imaging is a powerful technique that permits the visual monitoring of neural responses to pheromones and other odors in large ensembles of neurons. Here, we describe a method that permits the monitoring of Drosophila antennal lobe responses to odors using the genetically encoded calcium monitor GCaMP. PMID:24014361

  5. The compartment structures of the antennal lobe in the ant, Aphaenogaster smythiesi japonica.

    PubMed

    Sakura, Midori; Hiraguchi, T; Ohkawara, K; Aonuma, H

    2008-01-01

    Pheromones are important cues for social insects such as ants. As a first step in elucidation of pheromonal information processing mechanisms in the myrmicine ant, we investigated the morphological structure of the antennal lobe. Using autofluorescence imaging, labeling of neuronal filamentous actin, and reduced silver impregnation staining, the antennal lobe was found to consist of five compartments that, each received input from a different antennal sensory tract. Two major tracts of projection neurons, the medial and lateral antenno-cerebral tract (m- and 1-ACT), originated from a different region of the antennal lobe. The m-ACT originated from the posterior part of the antennal lobe whereas the 1-ACT originated from the anterior part. These results demonstrate a spatial segregation of function within the antennal lobe. PMID:18652391

  6. Neuropeptidome of Tribolium castaneum antennal lobes and mushroom bodies.

    PubMed

    Binzer, Marlene; Heuer, Carsten M; Kollmann, Martin; Kahnt, Jorg; Hauser, Frank; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Schachtner, Joachim

    2014-02-01

    Neuropeptides are a highly diverse group of signaling molecules that affect a broad range of biological processes in insects, including development, metabolism, behavior, and reproduction. In the central nervous system, neuropeptides are usually considered to act as neuromodulators and cotransmitters that modify the effect of "classical" transmitters at the synapse. The present study analyzes the neuropeptide repertoire of higher cerebral neuropils in the brain of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. We focus on two integrative neuropils of the olfactory pathway, the antennal lobes and the mushroom bodies. Using the technique of direct peptide profiling by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that these neuropils can be characterized by their specific neuropeptide expression profiles. Complementary immunohistological analyses of selected neuropeptides revealed neuropeptide distribution patterns within the antennal lobes and the mushroom bodies. Both approaches revealed consistent differences between the neuropils, underlining that direct peptide profiling by mass spectrometry is a fast and reliable method to identify neuropeptide content.

  7. Model of transient oscillatory synchronization in the locust antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Bazhenov, M; Stopfer, M; Rabinovich, M; Huerta, R; Abarbanel, H D; Sejnowski, T J; Laurent, G

    2001-05-01

    Transient pairwise synchronization of locust antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs) occurs during odor responses. In a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of the AL, interactions between excitatory PNs and inhibitory local neurons (LNs) created coherent network oscillations during odor stimulation. GABAergic interconnections between LNs led to competition among them such that different groups of LNs oscillated with periodic Ca(2+) spikes during different 50-250 ms temporal epochs, similar to those recorded in vivo. During these epochs, LN-evoked IPSPs caused phase-locked, population oscillations in sets of postsynaptic PNs. The model shows how alternations of the inhibitory drive can temporally encode sensory information in networks of neurons without precisely tuned intrinsic oscillatory properties.

  8. Sexual dimorphism in the antennal lobe of the ant Camponotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Michiko; Nishino, Hiroshi; Misaka, Yuko; Kubota, Maiko; Tsuji, Eriko; Satoji, Yuji; Ozaki, Mamiko; Yokohari, Fumio

    2008-02-01

    The carpenter ant, a social hymenopteran, has a highly elaborated antennal chemosensory system that is used for chemical communication in social life. The glomeruli in the antennal lobe are the first relay stations where sensory neurons synapse onto interneurons. The system is functionally and structurally similar to the olfactory bulbs of vertebrates. Using three-dimensional reconstruction of glomeruli and subsequent morphometric analyses, we found sexual dimorphism of the antennal lobe glomeruli in carpenter ants, Camponotus japonicus. Female workers and unmated queens had about 430 glomeruli, the highest number reported so far in ants. Males had a sexually dimorphic macroglomerulus and about 215 ordinary glomeruli. This appeared to result from a greatly reduced number of glomeruli in the postero-medial region of the antennal lobe compared with that in females. On the other hand, sexually isomorphic glomeruli were identifiable in the dorsal region of the antennal lobe. For example, large, uniquely shaped glomeruli located at the dorso-central margin of the antennal lobe were detected in all society members. The great sexual dimorphism seen in the ordinary glomeruli of the antennal lobe may reflect gender-specific tasks in chemical communications rather than different reproductive roles.

  9. Sexual dimorphism in the antennal lobe of the ant Camponotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Michiko; Nishino, Hiroshi; Misaka, Yuko; Kubota, Maiko; Tsuji, Eriko; Satoji, Yuji; Ozaki, Mamiko; Yokohari, Fumio

    2008-02-01

    The carpenter ant, a social hymenopteran, has a highly elaborated antennal chemosensory system that is used for chemical communication in social life. The glomeruli in the antennal lobe are the first relay stations where sensory neurons synapse onto interneurons. The system is functionally and structurally similar to the olfactory bulbs of vertebrates. Using three-dimensional reconstruction of glomeruli and subsequent morphometric analyses, we found sexual dimorphism of the antennal lobe glomeruli in carpenter ants, Camponotus japonicus. Female workers and unmated queens had about 430 glomeruli, the highest number reported so far in ants. Males had a sexually dimorphic macroglomerulus and about 215 ordinary glomeruli. This appeared to result from a greatly reduced number of glomeruli in the postero-medial region of the antennal lobe compared with that in females. On the other hand, sexually isomorphic glomeruli were identifiable in the dorsal region of the antennal lobe. For example, large, uniquely shaped glomeruli located at the dorso-central margin of the antennal lobe were detected in all society members. The great sexual dimorphism seen in the ordinary glomeruli of the antennal lobe may reflect gender-specific tasks in chemical communications rather than different reproductive roles. PMID:18533751

  10. Representation of Thermal Information in the Antennal Lobe of Leaf-Cutting Ants

    PubMed Central

    Ruchty, Markus; Helmchen, Fritjof; Wehner, Rüdiger; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Insects are equipped with various types of antennal sensilla, which house thermosensitive neurons adapted to receive different parameters of the thermal environment for a variety of temperature-guided behaviors. In the leaf-cutting ant Atta vollenweideri, the physiology and the morphology of the thermosensitive sensillum coeloconicum (Sc) has been thoroughly investigated. However, the central projections of its receptor neurons are unknown. Here we selectively stained the three neurons found in single Sc and tracked their axons into the brain of Atta vollenweideri workers. Each of the three axons terminates in a single glomerulus of the antennal lobe (Sc-glomeruli). Two of the innervated glomeruli are adjacent to each other and are located laterally, while the third one is clearly separated and located medially in the antennal lobe. Using two-photon Ca2+ imaging of antennal lobe projection neurons, we studied where in the antennal lobe thermal information is represented. In the 11 investigated antennal lobes, we found up to 10 different glomeruli in a single specimen responding to temperature stimulation. Both, warm- and cold-sensitive glomeruli could be identified. The thermosensitive glomeruli were mainly located in the medial part of the antennal lobe. Based on the general representation of thermal information in the antennal lobe and functional data on the Sc-glomeruli we conclude that temperature stimuli received by Sc are processed in the medial of the three target glomeruli. The present study reveals an important role of the antennal lobe in temperature processing and links a specific thermosensitive neuron to its central target glomerulus. PMID:21120133

  11. A large-scale model of the locust antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mainak; Rangan, Aaditya V; Cai, David

    2009-12-01

    The antennal lobe (AL) is the primary structure within the locust's brain that receives information from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) within the antennae. Different odors activate distinct subsets of ORNs, implying that neuronal signals at the level of the antennae encode odors combinatorially. Within the AL, however, different odors produce signals with long-lasting dynamic transients carried by overlapping neural ensembles, suggesting a more complex coding scheme. In this work we use a large-scale point neuron model of the locust AL to investigate this shift in stimulus encoding and potential consequences for odor discrimination. Consistent with experiment, our model produces stimulus-sensitive, dynamically evolving populations of active AL neurons. Our model relies critically on the persistence time-scale associated with ORN input to the AL, sparse connectivity among projection neurons, and a synaptic slow inhibitory mechanism. Collectively, these architectural features can generate network odor representations of considerably higher dimension than would be generated by a direct feed-forward representation of stimulus space.

  12. Functional feedback from mushroom bodies to antennal lobes in the Drosophila olfactory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Aiqun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zuoren

    2010-01-01

    Feedback plays important roles in sensory processing. Mushroom bodies are believed to be involved in olfactory learning/memory and multisensory integration in insects. Previous cobalt-labeling studies have suggested the existence of feedback from the mushroom bodies to the antennal lobes in the honey bee. In this study, the existence of functional feedback from Drosophila mushroom bodies to the antennal lobes was investigated through ectopic expression of the ATP receptor P2X2 in the Kenyon cells of mushroom bodies. Activation of Kenyon cells induced depolarization in projection neurons and local interneurons in the antennal lobes in a nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. Activation of Kenyon cell axons in the βγ-lobes in the mushroom body induced more potent responses in the antennal lobe neurons than activation of Kenyon cell somata. Our results indicate that functional feedback from Kenyon cells to projection neurons and local interneurons is present in Drosophila and is likely mediated by the βγ-lobes. The presence of this functional feedback from the mushroom bodies to the antennal lobes suggests top-down modulation of olfactory information processing in Drosophila. PMID:20479249

  13. Spatially resolved time-frequency analysis of odour coding in the insect antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Marco; Weisz, Nathan; Antolini, Renzo; Haase, Albrecht

    2016-09-01

    Antennal lobes constitute the first neurophils in the insect brain involved in coding and processing of olfactory information. With their stereotyped functional and anatomical organization, they provide an accessible model with which to investigate information processing of an external stimulus in a neural network in vivo. Here, by combining functional calcium imaging with time-frequency analysis, we have been able to monitor the oscillatory components of neural activity upon olfactory stimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of stimulus-induced oscillatory patterns in the honeybee antennal lobe, and to analyse the distribution of those patterns across the antennal lobe glomeruli. Fast two-photon calcium imaging reveals the presence of low-frequency oscillations, the intensity of which is perturbed by an incoming stimulus. Moreover, analysis of the spatial arrangement of this activity indicates that it is not homogeneous throughout the antennal lobe. On the contrary, each glomerulus displays an odorant-specific time-frequency profile, and acts as a functional unit of the oscillatory activity. The presented approach allows simultaneous recording of complex activity patterns across several nodes of the antennal lobe, providing the means to better understand the network dynamics regulating olfactory coding and leading to perception. PMID:27452956

  14. Spatially resolved time-frequency analysis of odour coding in the insect antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Paoli, Marco; Weisz, Nathan; Antolini, Renzo; Haase, Albrecht

    2016-09-01

    Antennal lobes constitute the first neurophils in the insect brain involved in coding and processing of olfactory information. With their stereotyped functional and anatomical organization, they provide an accessible model with which to investigate information processing of an external stimulus in a neural network in vivo. Here, by combining functional calcium imaging with time-frequency analysis, we have been able to monitor the oscillatory components of neural activity upon olfactory stimulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the presence of stimulus-induced oscillatory patterns in the honeybee antennal lobe, and to analyse the distribution of those patterns across the antennal lobe glomeruli. Fast two-photon calcium imaging reveals the presence of low-frequency oscillations, the intensity of which is perturbed by an incoming stimulus. Moreover, analysis of the spatial arrangement of this activity indicates that it is not homogeneous throughout the antennal lobe. On the contrary, each glomerulus displays an odorant-specific time-frequency profile, and acts as a functional unit of the oscillatory activity. The presented approach allows simultaneous recording of complex activity patterns across several nodes of the antennal lobe, providing the means to better understand the network dynamics regulating olfactory coding and leading to perception.

  15. Developmental changes in the density of ionic currents in antennal-lobe neurons of the sphinx moth, Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Alison R; Hildebrand, John G

    2002-06-01

    Early in metamorphic adult development, action potentials elicited from Manduca sexta antennal lobe neurons are small in amplitude, long in duration, and calcium dependent. As development proceeds, the action potential waveform becomes larger in amplitude, shorter in duration, and increasingly sodium dependent. Whole cell voltage-clamp analysis of Manduca antennal-lobe neurons in vitro has been used to identify voltage-activated currents that contribute to developmental changes in the electrical excitability of these cells. Proximal Branching neurons [putative projection (output) neurons] and Rick Rack neurons (putative local antennal-lobe interneurons) are examined in detail early (pupal stage 5) and late (pupal stage 14) in adult metamorphosis. In both cell types, four voltage-gated and two calcium-dependent ionic currents have been identified. Cell-type-specific changes in the density of sodium, calcium, and potassium currents correlate temporally with changes in cell excitability and spike waveform. Developmental changes in ionic current profiles are accompanied also by the emergence of cell-type-specific response characteristics in the cells. Together with the accompanying paper, this study provides an important foundation for examining the impact of developmental changes in electrical excitability on the growth, electrical properties and connectivity of neurons in central olfactory pathways of the moth.

  16. A 4-Dimensional Representation of Antennal Lobe Output Based on an Ensemble of Characterized Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erich M.; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    A central problem facing studies of neural encoding in sensory systems is how to accurately quantify the extent of spatial and temporal responses. In this study, we take advantage of the relatively simple and stereotypic neural architecture found in invertebrates. We combine standard electrophysiological techniques, recently developed population analysis techniques, and novel anatomical methods to form an innovative 4-dimensional view of odor output representations in the antennal lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. This novel approach allows quantification of olfactory responses of characterized neurons with spike time resolution. Additionally, arbitrary integration windows can be used for comparisons with other methods such as imaging. By assigning statistical significance to changes in neuronal firing, this method can visualize activity across the entire antennal lobe. The resulting 4-dimensional representation of antennal lobe output complements imaging and multi-unit experiments yet provides a more comprehensive and accurate view of glomerular activation patterns in spike time resolution. PMID:19464513

  17. Morphological characterization of the antennal lobes in the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Solari, Paolo; Corda, Valentina; Sollai, Giorgia; Kreissl, Sabine; Galizia, C Giovanni; Crnjar, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    The medfly Ceratitis capitata is one of the most important pests for horticulture worldwide. The knowledge about anatomy and function of the medfly olfactory system is still limited. The first brain structure to process olfactory information in insects is the antennal lobe (AL), which is composed of its functional and morphological units, the olfactory glomeruli. Here, we present a morphological three-dimensional reconstruction of AL glomeruli in adult brains. We used unilateral antennal backfills of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) with neural tracers, revealing the AL structure. We recorded confocal stacks acquired from whole-mount specimens, and analyzed them with the software AMIRA. The ALs in C. capitata are organized in glomeruli which are more tightly packed in the anterior part than the posterior one. Axons of ORNs bilaterally connect the ALs through a commissure between the two ALs. This commissure is formed by several distinct fascicles. Contralateral dye transfer suggests the presence of gap junctions connecting ORNs from both antennae. There was no statistical difference between the average volumes of female ALs (204,166 ± 12,554 μm(3)) and of male ALs (190,287 ± 11,823 μm(3)). In most specimens, we counted 53 glomeruli in each AL, seven of which were sexually dimorphic in size.

  18. Functional integration of a serotonergic neuron in the Drosophila antennal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Gaudry, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin plays a critical role in regulating many behaviors that rely on olfaction and recently there has been great effort in determining how this molecule functions in vivo. However, it remains unknown how serotonergic neurons that innervate the first olfactory relay respond to odor stimulation and how they integrate synaptically into local circuits. We examined the sole pair of serotonergic neurons that innervates the Drosophila antennal lobe (the first olfactory relay) to characterize their physiology, connectivity, and contribution to pheromone processing. We report that nearly all odors inhibit these cells, likely through connections made reciprocally within the antennal lobe. Pharmacological and immunohistochemical analyses reveal that these neurons likely release acetylcholine in addition to serotonin and that exogenous and endogenous serotonin have opposing effects on olfactory responses. Finally, we show that activation of the entire serotonergic network, as opposed to only activation of those fibers innervating the antennal lobe, may be required for persistent serotonergic modulation of pheromone responses in the antennal lobe. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16836.001 PMID:27572257

  19. Sexual dimorphism and phenotypic plasticity in the antennal lobe of a stingless bee, Melipona scutellaris.

    PubMed

    Roselino, Ana Carolina; Hrncir, Michael; da Cruz Landim, Carminda; Giurfa, Martin; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Among social insects, the stingless bees (Apidae, Meliponini), a mainly tropical group of highly eusocial bees, present an intriguing variety of well-described olfactory-dependent behaviors showing both caste- and sex-specific adaptations. By contrast, little is known about the neural structures underlying such behavioral richness or the olfactory detection and processing abilities of this insect group. This study therefore aimed to provide the first detailed description and comparison of the brains and primary olfactory centers, the antennal lobes, of the different members of a colony of the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris. Global neutral red staining, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and 3D reconstructions were used to compare the brain structures of males, workers, and virgin queens with a special emphasis on the antennal lobe. We found significant differences between both sexes and castes with regard to the relative volumes of olfactory and visual neuropils in the brain and also in the number and volume of the olfactory glomeruli. In addition, we identified one (workers, queens) and three or four (males) macroglomeruli in the antennal lobe. In both sexes and all castes, the largest glomerulus (G1) was located at a similar position relative to four identified landmark glomeruli, close to the entrance of the antennal nerve. This similarity in position suggests that G1s of workers, virgin queens, and males of M. scutellaris may correspond to the same glomerular entity, possibly tuned to queen-emitted volatiles since all colony members need this information.

  20. Sexual dimorphism and phenotypic plasticity in the antennal lobe of a stingless bee, Melipona scutellaris.

    PubMed

    Roselino, Ana Carolina; Hrncir, Michael; da Cruz Landim, Carminda; Giurfa, Martin; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Among social insects, the stingless bees (Apidae, Meliponini), a mainly tropical group of highly eusocial bees, present an intriguing variety of well-described olfactory-dependent behaviors showing both caste- and sex-specific adaptations. By contrast, little is known about the neural structures underlying such behavioral richness or the olfactory detection and processing abilities of this insect group. This study therefore aimed to provide the first detailed description and comparison of the brains and primary olfactory centers, the antennal lobes, of the different members of a colony of the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris. Global neutral red staining, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and 3D reconstructions were used to compare the brain structures of males, workers, and virgin queens with a special emphasis on the antennal lobe. We found significant differences between both sexes and castes with regard to the relative volumes of olfactory and visual neuropils in the brain and also in the number and volume of the olfactory glomeruli. In addition, we identified one (workers, queens) and three or four (males) macroglomeruli in the antennal lobe. In both sexes and all castes, the largest glomerulus (G1) was located at a similar position relative to four identified landmark glomeruli, close to the entrance of the antennal nerve. This similarity in position suggests that G1s of workers, virgin queens, and males of M. scutellaris may correspond to the same glomerular entity, possibly tuned to queen-emitted volatiles since all colony members need this information. PMID:25597397

  1. Distribution of neuropeptides in the antennal lobes of male Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Kromann, Sophie H; Hansson, Bill S; Ignell, Rickard

    2013-11-01

    Olfaction is an important sensory modality that regulates a plethora of behavioural expressions in insects. Processing of olfactory information takes place in the primary olfactory centres of the brain, namely the antennal lobes (ALs). Neuropeptides have been shown to be present in the olfactory system of various insect species. In the present study, we analyse the distribution of tachykinin, FMRFamide-related peptides, allatotropin, allatostatin, myoinhibitory peptides and SIFamide in the AL of the male Egyptian cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis. Immunocytochemical analyses revealed that most neuropeptides were expressed in different subpopulations of AL neurons. Their arborisation patterns within the AL suggest a significant role of neuropeptide signalling in the modulation of AL processing. In addition to local interneurons, our analysis also revealed a diversity of extrinsic peptidergic neurons that connected the antennal lobe with other brain centres. Their distributions suggest that extrinsic neurons perform various types of context-related modulation. PMID:23955643

  2. Innate Recognition of Pheromone and Food Odors in Moths: A Common Mechanism in the Antennal Lobe?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua P.; Hildebrand, John G.

    2010-01-01

    The survival of an animal often depends on an innate response to a particular sensory stimulus. For an adult male moth, two categories of odors are innately attractive: pheromone released by conspecific females, and the floral scents of certain, often co-evolved, plants. These odors consist of multiple volatiles in characteristic mixtures. Here, we review evidence that both categories of odors are processed as sensory objects, and we suggest a mechanism in the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), that encodes the configuration of these mixtures and may underlie recognition of innately attractive odors. In the pheromone system, mixtures of two or three volatiles elicit upwind flight. Peripheral changes are associated with behavioral changes in speciation, and suggest the existence of a pattern recognition mechanism for pheromone mixtures in the AL. Moths are similarly innately attracted to certain floral scents. Though floral scents consist of multiple volatiles that activate a broad array of receptor neurons, only a smaller subset, numerically comparable to pheromone mixtures, is necessary and sufficient to elicit behavior. Both pheromone and floral scent mixtures that produce attraction to the odor source elicit synchronous action potentials in particular populations of output (projection) neurons (PNs) in the AL. We propose a model in which the synchronous output of a population of PNs encodes the configuration of an innately attractive mixture, and thus comprises an innate mechanism for releasing odor-tracking behavior. The particular example of olfaction in moths may inform the general question of how sensory objects trigger innate responses. PMID:20953251

  3. A neural network model of general olfactory coding in the insect antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Getz, W M; Lutz, A

    1999-08-01

    A central problem in olfaction is understanding how the quality of olfactory stimuli is encoded in the insect antennal lobe (or in the analogously structured vertebrate olfactory bulb) for perceptual processing in the mushroom bodies of the insect protocerebrum (or in the vertebrate olfactory cortex). In the study reported here, a relatively simple neural network model, inspired by our current knowledge of the insect antennal lobes, is used to investigate how each of several features and elements of the network, such as synapse strengths, feedback circuits and the steepness of neural activation functions, influences the formation of an olfactory code in neurons that project from the antennal lobes to the mushroom bodies (or from mitral cells to olfactory cortex). An optimal code in these projection neurons (PNs) should minimize potential errors by the mushroom bodies in misidentifying the quality of an odor across a range of concentrations while maximizing the ability of the mushroom bodies to resolve odors of different quality. Simulation studies demonstrate that the network is able to produce codes independent or virtually independent of concentration over a given range. The extent of this range is moderately dependent on a parameter that characterizes how long it takes for the voltage in an activated neuron to decay back to its resting potential, strongly dependent on the strength of excitatory feedback by the PNs onto antennal lobe intrinsic neurons (INs), and overwhelmingly dependent on the slope of the activation function that transforms the voltage of depolarized neurons into the rate at which spikes are produced. Although the code in the PNs is degraded by large variations in the concentration of odor stimuli, good performance levels are maintained when the complexity of stimuli, as measured by the number of component odorants, is doubled. When excitatory feedback from the PNs to the INs is strong, the activity in the PNs undergoes transitions from initial

  4. Coding of odors by temporal binding within a model network of the locust antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mainak J; Rangan, Aaditya V; Cai, David

    2013-01-01

    The locust olfactory system interfaces with the external world through antennal receptor neurons (ORNs), which represent odors in a distributed, combinatorial manner. ORN axons bundle together to form the antennal nerve, which relays sensory information centrally to the antennal lobe (AL). Within the AL, an odor generates a dynamically evolving ensemble of active cells, leading to a stimulus-specific temporal progression of neuronal spiking. This experimental observation has led to the hypothesis that an odor is encoded within the AL by a dynamically evolving trajectory of projection neuron (PN) activity that can be decoded piecewise to ascertain odor identity. In order to study information coding within the locust AL, we developed a scaled-down model of the locust AL using Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons and biologically realistic connectivity parameters and current components. Using our model, we examined correlations in the precise timing of spikes across multiple neurons, and our results suggest an alternative to the dynamic trajectory hypothesis. We propose that the dynamical interplay of fast and slow inhibition within the locust AL induces temporally stable correlations in the spiking activity of an odor-dependent neural subset, giving rise to a temporal binding code that allows rapid stimulus detection by downstream elements.

  5. Coding of odors by temporal binding within a model network of the locust antennal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mainak J.; Rangan, Aaditya V.; Cai, David

    2013-01-01

    The locust olfactory system interfaces with the external world through antennal receptor neurons (ORNs), which represent odors in a distributed, combinatorial manner. ORN axons bundle together to form the antennal nerve, which relays sensory information centrally to the antennal lobe (AL). Within the AL, an odor generates a dynamically evolving ensemble of active cells, leading to a stimulus-specific temporal progression of neuronal spiking. This experimental observation has led to the hypothesis that an odor is encoded within the AL by a dynamically evolving trajectory of projection neuron (PN) activity that can be decoded piecewise to ascertain odor identity. In order to study information coding within the locust AL, we developed a scaled-down model of the locust AL using Hodgkin–Huxley-type neurons and biologically realistic connectivity parameters and current components. Using our model, we examined correlations in the precise timing of spikes across multiple neurons, and our results suggest an alternative to the dynamic trajectory hypothesis. We propose that the dynamical interplay of fast and slow inhibition within the locust AL induces temporally stable correlations in the spiking activity of an odor-dependent neural subset, giving rise to a temporal binding code that allows rapid stimulus detection by downstream elements. PMID:23630495

  6. Fast odor learning improves reliability of odor responses in the locust antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Stopfer, Mark; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Laurent, Gilles

    2005-05-01

    Recordings in the locust antennal lobe (AL) reveal activity-dependent, stimulus-specific changes in projection neuron (PN) and local neuron response patterns over repeated odor trials. During the first few trials, PN response intensity decreases, while spike time precision increases, and coherent oscillations, absent at first, quickly emerge. We examined this "fast odor learning" with a realistic computational model of the AL. Activity-dependent facilitation of AL inhibitory synapses was sufficient to simulate physiological recordings of fast learning. In addition, in experiments with noisy inputs, a network including synaptic facilitation of both inhibition and excitation responded with reliable spatiotemporal patterns from trial to trial despite the noise. A network lacking fast plasticity, however, responded with patterns that varied across trials, reflecting the input variability. Thus, our study suggests that fast olfactory learning results from stimulus-specific, activity-dependent synaptic facilitation and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio for repeatedly encountered odor stimuli.

  7. Stimulus and network dynamics collide in a ratiometric model of the antennal lobe macroglomerular complex.

    PubMed

    Chong, Kwok Ying; Capurro, Alberto; Karout, Salah; Pearce, Timothy Charles

    2012-01-01

    Time is considered to be an important encoding dimension in olfaction, as neural populations generate odour-specific spatiotemporal responses to constant stimuli. However, during pheromone mediated anemotactic search insects must discriminate specific ratios of blend components from rapidly time varying input. The dynamics intrinsic to olfactory processing and those of naturalistic stimuli can therefore potentially collide, thereby confounding ratiometric information. In this paper we use a computational model of the macroglomerular complex of the insect antennal lobe to study the impact on ratiometric information of this potential collision between network and stimulus dynamics. We show that the model exhibits two different dynamical regimes depending upon the connectivity pattern between inhibitory interneurons (that we refer to as fixed point attractor and limit cycle attractor), which both generate ratio-specific trajectories in the projection neuron output population that are reminiscent of temporal patterning and periodic hyperpolarisation observed in olfactory antennal lobe neurons. We compare the performance of the two corresponding population codes for reporting ratiometric blend information to higher centres of the insect brain. Our key finding is that whilst the dynamically rich limit cycle attractor spatiotemporal code is faster and more efficient in transmitting blend information under certain conditions it is also more prone to interference between network and stimulus dynamics, thus degrading ratiometric information under naturalistic input conditions. Our results suggest that rich intrinsically generated network dynamics can provide a powerful means of encoding multidimensional stimuli with high accuracy and efficiency, but only when isolated from stimulus dynamics. This interference between temporal dynamics of the stimulus and temporal patterns of neural activity constitutes a real challenge that must be successfully solved by the nervous system

  8. Olfactory Sensor Processing in Neural Networks: Lessons from Modeling the Fruit Fly Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Proske, J. Henning; Wittmann, Marco; Galizia, C. Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    The insect olfactory system can be a model for artificial olfactory devices. In particular, Drosophila melanogaster due to its genetic tractability has yielded much information about the design and function of such systems in biology. In this study we investigate possible network topologies to separate representations of odors in the primary olfactory neuropil, the antennal lobe. In particular we compare networks based on stochastic and homogeneous connection weight distributions to connectivities that are based on the input correlations between the glomeruli in the antennal lobe. We show that moderate homogeneous inhibition implements a soft winner-take-all mechanism when paired with realistic input from a large meta-database of odor responses in receptor cells (DoOR database). The sparseness of representations increases with stronger inhibition. Excitation, on the other hand, pushes the representation of odors closer together thus making them harder to distinguish. We further analyze the relationship between different inhibitory network topologies and the properties of the receptor responses to different odors. We show that realistic input from the DoOR database has a relatively high entropy of activation values over all odors and receptors compared to the theoretical maximum. Furthermore, under conditions in which the information in the input is artificially decreased, networks with heterogeneous topologies based on the similarity of glomerular response profiles perform best. These results indicate that in order to arrive at the most beneficial representation for odor discrimination it is important to finely tune the strength of inhibition in combination with taking into account the properties of the available sensors. PMID:22347182

  9. Stimulus and Network Dynamics Collide in a Ratiometric Model of the Antennal Lobe Macroglomerular Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Kwok Ying; Capurro, Alberto; Karout, Salah; Pearce, Timothy Charles

    2012-01-01

    Time is considered to be an important encoding dimension in olfaction, as neural populations generate odour-specific spatiotemporal responses to constant stimuli. However, during pheromone mediated anemotactic search insects must discriminate specific ratios of blend components from rapidly time varying input. The dynamics intrinsic to olfactory processing and those of naturalistic stimuli can therefore potentially collide, thereby confounding ratiometric information. In this paper we use a computational model of the macroglomerular complex of the insect antennal lobe to study the impact on ratiometric information of this potential collision between network and stimulus dynamics. We show that the model exhibits two different dynamical regimes depending upon the connectivity pattern between inhibitory interneurons (that we refer to as fixed point attractor and limit cycle attractor), which both generate ratio-specific trajectories in the projection neuron output population that are reminiscent of temporal patterning and periodic hyperpolarisation observed in olfactory antennal lobe neurons. We compare the performance of the two corresponding population codes for reporting ratiometric blend information to higher centres of the insect brain. Our key finding is that whilst the dynamically rich limit cycle attractor spatiotemporal code is faster and more efficient in transmitting blend information under certain conditions it is also more prone to interference between network and stimulus dynamics, thus degrading ratiometric information under naturalistic input conditions. Our results suggest that rich intrinsically generated network dynamics can provide a powerful means of encoding multidimensional stimuli with high accuracy and efficiency, but only when isolated from stimulus dynamics. This interference between temporal dynamics of the stimulus and temporal patterns of neural activity constitutes a real challenge that must be successfully solved by the nervous system

  10. Optical Imaging of Odor-Evoked Glomerular Activity Patterns in the Antennal Lobes of the Ant Camponotus rufipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galizia, C. G.; Menzel, R.; Hölldobler, B.

    Ants have a well developed olfactory sense, which they need both for the perception of environmental chemicals, and for a highly sophisticated intraspecific communication system based on pheromones. The question arises therefore as to how different odors are coded in the antennal lobe, the first central neuropil to process olfactory information. We measured odor-evoked activity patterns using in vivo neuropil calcium recording in the antennal lobe of the ant Camponotus rufipes. We found that (a) odors elicit focal activity spots (diameter ca. 20μm) which most probably represent the olfactory glomeruli; (b) different odors are coded in odor specific patterns of such activated spots, and a particular spot can participate in the pattern for different odors; (c) calcium increased in the activated spots within the 2-s stimulation period and slowly declined thereafter.

  11. Olfactory pathway of the hornet Vespa velutina: New insights into the evolution of the hymenopteran antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Couto, Antoine; Lapeyre, Benoit; Thiéry, Denis; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2016-08-01

    In the course of evolution, eusociality has appeared several times independently in Hymenoptera, within different families such as Apidae (bees), Formicidae (ants), and Vespidae (wasps and hornets), among others. The complex social organization of eusocial Hymenoptera relies on sophisticated olfactory communication systems. Whereas the olfactory systems of several bee and ant species have been well characterized, very little information is as yet available in Vespidae, although this family represents a highly successful insect group, displaying a wide range of life styles from solitary to eusocial. Using fluorescent labeling, confocal microscopy, and 3D reconstructions, we investigated the organization of the olfactory pathway in queens, workers, and males of the eusocial hornet Vespa velutina. First, we found that caste and sex dimorphism is weakly pronounced in hornets, with regard to both whole-brain morphology and antennal lobe organization, although several male-specific macroglomeruli are present. The V. velutina antennal lobe contains approximately 265 glomeruli (in females), grouped in nine conspicuous clusters formed by afferent tract subdivisions. As in bees and ants, hornets display a dual olfactory pathway, with two major efferent tracts, the medial and the lateral antennal lobe tracts (m- and l-ALT), separately arborizing two antennal lobe hemilobes and projecting to partially different regions of higher order olfactory centers. Finally, we found remarkable anatomical similarities in the glomerular cluster organizations among hornets, ants, and bees, suggesting the possible existence of homologies in the olfactory pathways of these eusocial Hymenoptera. We propose a common framework for describing AL compartmentalization across Hymenoptera and discuss possible evolutionary scenarios. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2335-2359, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26850231

  12. Data-driven honeybee antennal lobe model suggests how stimulus-onset asynchrony can aid odour segregation.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Thomas; Stierle, Jacob S; Galizia, C Giovanni; Szyszka, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Insects have a remarkable ability to identify and track odour sources in multi-odour backgrounds. Recent behavioural experiments show that this ability relies on detecting millisecond stimulus asynchronies between odourants that originate from different sources. Honeybees, Apis mellifera, are able to distinguish mixtures where both odourants arrive at the same time (synchronous mixtures) from those where odourant onsets are staggered (asynchronous mixtures) down to an onset delay of only 6ms. In this paper we explore this surprising ability in a model of the insects' primary olfactory brain area, the antennal lobe. We hypothesize that a winner-take-all inhibitory network of local neurons in the antennal lobe has a symmetry-breaking effect, such that the response pattern in projection neurons to an asynchronous mixture is different from the response pattern to the corresponding synchronous mixture for an extended period of time beyond the initial odourant onset where the two mixture conditions actually differ. The prolonged difference between response patterns to synchronous and asynchronous mixtures could facilitate odoursegregation in downstream circuits of the olfactory pathway. We present a detailed data-driven model of the bee antennal lobe that reproduces a large data set of experimentally observed physiological odour responses, successfully implements the hypothesised symmetry-breaking mechanism and so demonstrates that this mechanism is consistent with our current knowledge of the olfactory circuits in the bee brain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neural Coding 2012.

  13. The anatomical basis for modulatory convergence in the antennal lobe of Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Lizbinski, Kristyn M; Metheny, Jackie D; Bradley, Samual P; Kesari, Aditya; Dacks, Andrew M

    2016-06-15

    The release of neuromodulators by widely projecting neurons often allows sensory systems to alter how they process information based on the physiological state of an animal. Neuromodulators alter network function by changing the biophysical properties of individual neurons and the synaptic efficacy with which individual neurons communicate. However, most, if not all, sensory networks receive multiple neuromodulatory inputs, and the mechanisms by which sensory networks integrate multiple modulatory inputs are not well understood. Here we characterized the relative glomerular distribution of two extrinsic neuromodulators associated with distinct physiological states, serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA), in the antennal lobe (AL) of the moth Manduca sexta. By using immunocytochemistry and mass dye fills, we characterized the innervation patterns of both 5-HT- and tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive processes relative to each other, to olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), to projection neurons (PNs), and to several subsets of local interneurons (LNs). 5-HT immunoreactivity had nearly complete overlap with PNs and LNs, yet no overlap with ORNs, suggesting that 5-HT may modulate PNs and LNs directly but not ORNs. TH immunoreactivity overlapped with PNs, LNs, and ORNs, suggesting that dopamine has the potential to modulate all three cell types. Furthermore, the branching density of each neuromodulator differed, with 5-HT exhibiting denser arborizations and TH-ir processes being sparser. Our results suggest that 5-HT and DA extrinsic neurons target partially overlapping glomerular regions, yet DA extends further into the region occupied by ORNs. PMID:26560074

  14. Odour coding is bilaterally symmetrical in the antennal lobes of honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Galizia, C G; Nägler, K; Hölldobler, B; Menzel, R

    1998-09-01

    The primary olfactory neuropil, the antennal lobe (AL) in insects, is organized in glomeruli. Glomerular activity patterns are believed to represent the across-fibre pattern of the olfactory code. These patterns depend on an organized innervation from the afferent receptor cells, and interconnections of local interneurons. It is unclear how the complex organization of the AL is achieved ontogenetically. In this study, we measured the functional activity patterns elicited by stimulation with odours in the right and the left AL of the same honeybee (Apis mellifera) using optical imaging of the calcium-sensitive dye calcium green. We show here that these patterns are bilaterally symmetrical (n=25 bees). This symmetry holds true for all odours tested, irrespective of their role as pheromones or as environmental odours, or whether they were pure substances or complex blends (n=13 odours). Therefore, we exclude that activity dependent mechanisms local to one AL determine the functional glomerular activity. This identity is genetically predetermined. Alternatively, if activity dependent processes are involved, bilateral connections would have to shape symmetry, or, temporal constraints could lead to identical patterns on both sides due to their common history of odour exposure. PMID:9758166

  15. Distributed representation of social odors indicates parallel processing in the antennal lobe of ants.

    PubMed

    Brandstaetter, Andreas Simon; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes

    2011-11-01

    In colonies of eusocial Hymenoptera cooperation is organized through social odors, and particularly ants rely on a sophisticated odor communication system. Neuronal information about odors is represented in spatial activity patterns in the primary olfactory neuropile of the insect brain, the antennal lobe (AL), which is analog to the vertebrate olfactory bulb. The olfactory system is characterized by neuroanatomical compartmentalization, yet the functional significance of this organization is unclear. Using two-photon calcium imaging, we investigated the neuronal representation of multicomponent colony odors, which the ants assess to discriminate friends (nestmates) from foes (nonnestmates). In the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus, colony odors elicited spatial activity patterns distributed across different AL compartments. Activity patterns in response to nestmate and nonnestmate colony odors were overlapping. This was expected since both consist of the same components at differing ratios. Colony odors change over time and the nervous system has to constantly adjust for this (template reformation). Measured activity patterns were variable, and variability was higher in response to repeated nestmate than to repeated nonnestmate colony odor stimulation. Variable activity patterns may indicate neuronal plasticity within the olfactory system, which is necessary for template reformation. Our results indicate that information about colony odors is processed in parallel in different neuroanatomical compartments, using the computational power of the whole AL network. Parallel processing might be advantageous, allowing reliable discrimination of highly complex social odors.

  16. Modelling Odor Decoding in the Antennal Lobe by Combining Sequential Firing Rate Models with Bayesian Inference

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas Rivera, Dario; Bitzer, Sebastian; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory information that is received by the insect brain is encoded in the form of spatiotemporal patterns in the projection neurons of the antennal lobe. These dense and overlapping patterns are transformed into a sparse code in Kenyon cells in the mushroom body. Although it is clear that this sparse code is the basis for rapid categorization of odors, it is yet unclear how the sparse code in Kenyon cells is computed and what information it represents. Here we show that this computation can be modeled by sequential firing rate patterns using Lotka-Volterra equations and Bayesian online inference. This new model can be understood as an ‘intelligent coincidence detector’, which robustly and dynamically encodes the presence of specific odor features. We found that the model is able to qualitatively reproduce experimentally observed activity in both the projection neurons and the Kenyon cells. In particular, the model explains mechanistically how sparse activity in the Kenyon cells arises from the dense code in the projection neurons. The odor classification performance of the model proved to be robust against noise and time jitter in the observed input sequences. As in recent experimental results, we found that recognition of an odor happened very early during stimulus presentation in the model. Critically, by using the model, we found surprising but simple computational explanations for several experimental phenomena. PMID:26451888

  17. Transient dynamics versus fixed points in odor representations by locust antennal lobe projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Mazor, Ofer; Laurent, Gilles

    2005-11-23

    Projection neurons (PNs) in the locust antennal lobe exhibit odor-specific dynamic responses. We studied a PN population, stimulated with five odorants and pulse durations between 0.3 and 10 s. Odor representations were characterized as time series of vectors of PN activity, constructed from the firing rates of all PNs in successive 50 ms time bins. Odor representations by the PN population can be described as trajectories in PN state space with three main phases: an on transient, lasting 1-2 s; a fixed point, stable for at least 8 s; and an off transient, lasting a few seconds as activity returns to baseline. Whereas all three phases are odor specific, optimal stimulus separation occurred during the transients rather than the fixed points. In addition, the PNs' own target neurons respond least when their PN-population input stabilized at a fixed point. Steady-state measures of activity thus seem inappropriate to understand the neural code in this system.

  18. Distributed representation of social odors indicates parallel processing in the antennal lobe of ants.

    PubMed

    Brandstaetter, Andreas Simon; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes

    2011-11-01

    In colonies of eusocial Hymenoptera cooperation is organized through social odors, and particularly ants rely on a sophisticated odor communication system. Neuronal information about odors is represented in spatial activity patterns in the primary olfactory neuropile of the insect brain, the antennal lobe (AL), which is analog to the vertebrate olfactory bulb. The olfactory system is characterized by neuroanatomical compartmentalization, yet the functional significance of this organization is unclear. Using two-photon calcium imaging, we investigated the neuronal representation of multicomponent colony odors, which the ants assess to discriminate friends (nestmates) from foes (nonnestmates). In the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus, colony odors elicited spatial activity patterns distributed across different AL compartments. Activity patterns in response to nestmate and nonnestmate colony odors were overlapping. This was expected since both consist of the same components at differing ratios. Colony odors change over time and the nervous system has to constantly adjust for this (template reformation). Measured activity patterns were variable, and variability was higher in response to repeated nestmate than to repeated nonnestmate colony odor stimulation. Variable activity patterns may indicate neuronal plasticity within the olfactory system, which is necessary for template reformation. Our results indicate that information about colony odors is processed in parallel in different neuroanatomical compartments, using the computational power of the whole AL network. Parallel processing might be advantageous, allowing reliable discrimination of highly complex social odors. PMID:21849606

  19. Spiking Patterns and Their Functional Implications in the Antennal Lobe of the Tobacco Hornworm Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hong; Gabbur, Prasad; Hildebrand, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Bursting as well as tonic firing patterns have been described in various sensory systems. In the olfactory system, spontaneous bursts have been observed in neurons distributed across several synaptic levels, from the periphery, to the olfactory bulb (OB) and to the olfactory cortex. Several in vitro studies indicate that spontaneous firing patterns may be viewed as “fingerprints” of different types of neurons that exhibit distinct functions in the OB. It is still not known, however, if and how neuronal burstiness is correlated with the coding of natural olfactory stimuli. We thus conducted an in vivo study to probe this question in the OB equivalent structure of insects, the antennal lobe (AL) of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta. We found that in the moth's AL, both projection (output) neurons (PNs) and local interneurons (LNs) are spontaneously active, but PNs tend to produce spike bursts while LNs fire more regularly. In addition, we found that the burstiness of PNs is correlated with the strength of their responses to odor stimulation – the more bursting the stronger their responses to odors. Moreover, the burstiness of PNs was also positively correlated with the spontaneous firing rate of these neurons, and pharmacological reduction of bursting resulted in a decrease of the neurons' responsiveness. These results suggest that neuronal burstiness reflects a physiological state of these neurons that is directly linked to their response characteristics. PMID:21897842

  20. Nitric oxide affects short-term olfactory memory in the antennal lobe of Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Gage, Stephanie L.; Daly, Kevin C.; Nighorn, Alan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to play an important neuromodulatory role in olfaction. We are using the hawkmoth Manduca sexta to investigate the function of NO signaling in the antennal lobe (AL; the primary olfactory network in invertebrates). We have found previously that NO is present at baseline levels, dramatically increases in response to odor stimulation, and alters the electrophysiology of AL neurons. It is unclear, however, how these effects contribute to common features of olfactory systems such as olfactory learning and memory, odor detection and odor discrimination. In this study, we used chemical detection and a behavioral approach to further examine the function of NO in the AL. We found that basal levels of NO fluctuate with the daily light cycle, being higher during the nocturnal active period. NO also appears to be necessary for short-term olfactory memory. NO does not appear to affect odor detection, odor discrimination between dissimilar odorants, or learning acquisition. These findings suggest a modulatory role for NO in the timing of olfactory-guided behaviors. PMID:23685973

  1. Modelling Odor Decoding in the Antennal Lobe by Combining Sequential Firing Rate Models with Bayesian Inference.

    PubMed

    Cuevas Rivera, Dario; Bitzer, Sebastian; Kiebel, Stefan J

    2015-10-01

    The olfactory information that is received by the insect brain is encoded in the form of spatiotemporal patterns in the projection neurons of the antennal lobe. These dense and overlapping patterns are transformed into a sparse code in Kenyon cells in the mushroom body. Although it is clear that this sparse code is the basis for rapid categorization of odors, it is yet unclear how the sparse code in Kenyon cells is computed and what information it represents. Here we show that this computation can be modeled by sequential firing rate patterns using Lotka-Volterra equations and Bayesian online inference. This new model can be understood as an 'intelligent coincidence detector', which robustly and dynamically encodes the presence of specific odor features. We found that the model is able to qualitatively reproduce experimentally observed activity in both the projection neurons and the Kenyon cells. In particular, the model explains mechanistically how sparse activity in the Kenyon cells arises from the dense code in the projection neurons. The odor classification performance of the model proved to be robust against noise and time jitter in the observed input sequences. As in recent experimental results, we found that recognition of an odor happened very early during stimulus presentation in the model. Critically, by using the model, we found surprising but simple computational explanations for several experimental phenomena. PMID:26451888

  2. Apis mellifera octopamine receptor 1 (AmOA1) expression in antennal lobe networks of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Sinakevitch, Irina T.; Smith, Adrian N.; Locatelli, Fernando; Huerta, Ramon; Bazhenov, Maxim; Smith, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) underlies reinforcement during appetitive conditioning in the honey bee and fruit fly, acting via different subtypes of receptors. Recently, antibodies raised against a peptide sequence of one honey bee OA receptor, AmOA1, were used to study the distribution of these receptors in the honey bee brain (Sinakevitch et al., 2011). These antibodies also recognize an isoform of the AmOA1 ortholog in the fruit fly (OAMB, mushroom body OA receptor). Here we describe in detail the distribution of AmOA1 receptors in different types of neurons in the honey bee and fruit fly antennal lobes. We integrate this information into a detailed anatomical analysis of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), uni- and multi-glomerular projection neurons (uPNs, and mPNs) and local interneurons (LNs) in glomeruli of the antennal lobe. These neurons were revealed by dye injection into the antennal nerve, antennal lobe, medial and lateral antenno-protocerbral tracts (m-APT and l-APT), and lateral protocerebral lobe (LPL) by use of labeled cell lines in the fruit fly or by staining with anti-GABA. We found that ORN receptor terminals and uPNs largely do not show immunostaining for AmOA1. About seventeen GABAergic mPNs leave the antennal lobe through the ml-APT and branch into the LPL. Many, but not all, mPNs show staining for AmOA1. AmOA1 receptors are also in glomeruli on GABAergic processes associated with LNs. The data suggest that in both species one important action of OA in the antennal lobe involves modulation of different types of inhibitory neurons via AmOA1 receptors. We integrated this new information into a model of circuitry within glomeruli of the antennal lobes of these species. PMID:24187534

  3. Distinct antennal lobe phenotypes in the leaf-cutting ant (Atta vollenweideri).

    PubMed

    Kuebler, L S; Kelber, C; Kleineidam, C J

    2010-02-01

    Leaf-cutting ants (Atta vollenweideri) express a remarkable size polymorphism across the two sexual castes (queens and males) but in particular within the worker caste. Worker size is related to behavior (alloethism), separating workers into behavioral subcastes. The neuronal mechanisms underlying differences in behavior within the worker caste are still unknown. In this study, we first compared selected neuropils, in particular, the antennal lobes (AL) in males, queens, and workers. The males' ALs contain three extremely large, sex-specific glomeruli (macroglomeruli; MGs) and in total comprise fewer glomeruli (242) than the ALs of queens (about 346 glomeruli). In contrast to males, the queen ALs contain only one large glomerulus at a lateral position. The largest number of glomeruli was found in workers (396-442). In a previous paper, we described an MG in the workers' AL, and, in the second part of this study, we show that within workers two distinct, size-related AL phenotypes exist: the MG phenotype (containing a macroglomerulus) and the RG phenotype, with all glomeruli of regular size. This neuroanatomical polyphenism is established during pupal development and separates the worker caste into two neuroanatomical subcastes. Third, we investigate the functional significance of the MG in workers. By using calcium imaging to monitor activity of AL projection neurons, we show that the releaser component of the trail pheromone is represented in the same region as the MG. We propose that phenotypic trait variation in the organization of the ALs leads to differences in odor information processing that finally result in size-related differences in trail-following behavior. PMID:19950119

  4. Olfactory habituation in Drosophila-odor encoding and its plasticity in the antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Twick, Isabell; Lee, John Anthony; Ramaswami, Mani

    2014-01-01

    A ubiquitous feature of an animal's response to an odorant is that it declines when the odorant is frequently or continuously encountered. This decline in olfactory response, termed olfactory habituation, can have temporally or mechanistically different forms. The neural circuitry of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster's olfactory system is well defined in terms of component cells, which are readily accessible to functional studies and genetic manipulation. This makes it a particularly useful preparation for the investigation of olfactory habituation. In addition, the insect olfactory system shares many architectural and functional similarities with mammalian olfactory systems, suggesting that olfactory mechanisms in insects may be broadly relevant. In this chapter, we discuss the likely mechanisms of olfactory habituation in context of the participating cell types, their connectivity, and their roles in sensory processing. We overview the structure and function of key cell types, the mechanisms that stimulate them, and how they transduce and process odor signals. We then consider how each stage of olfactory processing could potentially contribute to behavioral habituation. After this, we overview a variety of recent mechanistic studies that point to an important role for potentiation of inhibitory synapses in the primary olfactory processing center, the antennal lobe, in driving the reduced response to familiar odorants. Following the discussion of mechanisms for short- and long-term olfactory habituation, we end by considering how these mechanisms may be regulated by neuromodulators, which likely play key roles in the induction, gating, or suppression of habituated behavior, and speculate on the relevance of these processes for other forms of learning and memory.

  5. Histamine-immunoreactive local neurons in the antennal lobes of the Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Andrew M.; Reisenman, Carolina E.; Paulk, Angelique C.; Nighorn, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Neural networks receive input which is transformed before being sent as output to higher centers of processing. These transformations are often mediated by local interneurons (LNs) that influence output based on activity across the network. In primary olfactory centers, the LNs that mediate these lateral interactions are extremely diverse. For instance, the antennal lobes (ALs) of bumble bees possess both GABA and histamine-immunoreactive (HA-ir) LNs, and both are neurotransmitters associated with fast forms of inhibition. Although the GABAergic network of the AL has been extensively studied, we sought to examine the anatomical features of the HA-ir LNs in relation to the other cellular elements of the bumble bee AL. As a population, HA-ir LNs densely innervate the glomerular core while sparsely arborizing in the outer glomerular rind, overlapping with the terminals of olfactory receptor neurons. Individual fills of HA-ir LNs revealed heavy arborization of the outer ring of a single “principal” glomerulus and sparse arborization in the core of other glomeruli. In contrast, projection neurons, and GABA-immunoreactive LNs project throughout the glomerular volume. To provide insight as to the selective pressures that resulted in the evolution of HA-ir LNs, we determined the phylogenetic distribution of HA-ir LNs in the AL. HA-ir LNs were present in all but the most basal hymenopteran examined, although there were significant morphological differences between major groups within the Hymenoptera. The ALs of other insect taxa examined lacked HA-ir LNs, suggesting that this population of LNs arose within the Hymenoptera and underwent extensive morphological modification. PMID:20533353

  6. Intrinsic and Network Mechanisms Constrain Neural Synchrony in the Moth Antennal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Lei, Hong; Yu, Yanxue; Zhu, Shuifang; Rangan, Aaditya V

    2016-01-01

    Projection-neurons (PNs) within the antennal lobe (AL) of the hawkmoth respond vigorously to odor stimulation, with each vigorous response followed by a ~1 s period of suppression-dubbed the "afterhyperpolarization-phase," or AHP-phase. Prior evidence indicates that this AHP-phase is important for the processing of odors, but the mechanisms underlying this phase and its function remain unknown. We investigate this issue. Beginning with several physiological experiments, we find that pharmacological manipulation of the AL yields surprising results. Specifically, (a) the application of picrotoxin (PTX) lengthens the AHP-phase and reduces PN activity, whereas (b) the application of Bicuculline-methiodide (BIC) reduces the AHP-phase and increases PN activity. These results are curious, as both PTX and BIC are inhibitory-receptor antagonists. To resolve this conundrum, we speculate that perhaps (a) PTX reduces PN activity through a disinhibitory circuit involving a heterogeneous population of local-neurons, and (b) BIC acts to hamper certain intrinsic currents within the PNs that contribute to the AHP-phase. To probe these hypotheses further we build a computational model of the AL and benchmark our model against our experimental observations. We find that, for parameters which satisfy these benchmarks, our model exhibits a particular kind of synchronous activity: namely, "multiple-firing-events" (MFEs). These MFEs are causally-linked sequences of spikes which emerge stochastically, and turn out to have important dynamical consequences for all the experimentally observed phenomena we used as benchmarks. Taking a step back, we extract a few predictions from our computational model pertaining to the real AL: Some predictions deal with the MFEs we expect to see in the real AL, whereas other predictions involve the runaway synchronization that we expect when BIC-application hampers the AHP-phase. By examining the literature we see support for the former, and we perform some

  7. Mechanisms Underlying Population Response Dynamics in Inhibitory Interneurons of the Drosophila Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Katherine I.

    2016-01-01

    Local inhibitory neurons control the timing of neural activity in many circuits. To understand how inhibition controls timing, it is important to understand the dynamics of activity in populations of local inhibitory interneurons, as well as the mechanisms that underlie these dynamics. Here we describe the in vivo response dynamics of a large population of inhibitory local neurons (LNs) in the Drosophila melanogaster antennal lobe, the analog of the vertebrate olfactory bulb, and we dissect the network and intrinsic mechanisms that give rise to these dynamics. Some LNs respond to odor onsets (“ON” cells) and others to offsets (“OFF” cells), whereas still others respond at both times. Moreover, different LNs signal odor concentration fluctuations on different timescales. Some respond rapidly, and can track rapid concentration fluctuations. Others respond slowly, and are best at tracking slow fluctuations. We found a continuous spectrum of preferred stimulation timescales among LNs, as well as a continuum of ON–OFF behavior. Using in vivo whole-cell recordings, we show that the timing of an LN′s response (ON vs OFF) can be predicted from the interplay of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents that it receives. Meanwhile, the preferred timescale of an LN is related to its intrinsic properties. These results illustrate how a population of inhibitory interneurons can collectively encode bidirectional changes in stimulus intensity on multiple timescales, and how this can arise via an interaction between synaptic and intrinsic mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most neural circuits contain diverse populations of inhibitory interneurons. The way inhibition shapes network activity will depend on the spiking dynamics of the interneuron population. Here we describe the dynamics of activity in a large population of inhibitory interneurons in the first brain relay of the fruit fly olfactory system. Because odor plumes fluctuate on multiple timescales, the drive

  8. Intrinsic and Network Mechanisms Constrain Neural Synchrony in the Moth Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hong; Yu, Yanxue; Zhu, Shuifang; Rangan, Aaditya V.

    2016-01-01

    Projection-neurons (PNs) within the antennal lobe (AL) of the hawkmoth respond vigorously to odor stimulation, with each vigorous response followed by a ~1 s period of suppression—dubbed the “afterhyperpolarization-phase,” or AHP-phase. Prior evidence indicates that this AHP-phase is important for the processing of odors, but the mechanisms underlying this phase and its function remain unknown. We investigate this issue. Beginning with several physiological experiments, we find that pharmacological manipulation of the AL yields surprising results. Specifically, (a) the application of picrotoxin (PTX) lengthens the AHP-phase and reduces PN activity, whereas (b) the application of Bicuculline-methiodide (BIC) reduces the AHP-phase and increases PN activity. These results are curious, as both PTX and BIC are inhibitory-receptor antagonists. To resolve this conundrum, we speculate that perhaps (a) PTX reduces PN activity through a disinhibitory circuit involving a heterogeneous population of local-neurons, and (b) BIC acts to hamper certain intrinsic currents within the PNs that contribute to the AHP-phase. To probe these hypotheses further we build a computational model of the AL and benchmark our model against our experimental observations. We find that, for parameters which satisfy these benchmarks, our model exhibits a particular kind of synchronous activity: namely, “multiple-firing-events” (MFEs). These MFEs are causally-linked sequences of spikes which emerge stochastically, and turn out to have important dynamical consequences for all the experimentally observed phenomena we used as benchmarks. Taking a step back, we extract a few predictions from our computational model pertaining to the real AL: Some predictions deal with the MFEs we expect to see in the real AL, whereas other predictions involve the runaway synchronization that we expect when BIC-application hampers the AHP-phase. By examining the literature we see support for the former, and we

  9. A global-wide search for sexual dimorphism of glomeruli in the antennal lobe of female and male Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin-Cheng; Ma, Bai-Wei; Berg, Bente G.; Xie, Gui-Ying; Tang, Qing-Bo; Guo, Xian-Ru

    2016-01-01

    By using immunostaining and three-dimensional reconstruction, the anatomical organization of the antennal lobe glomeruli of the female cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera was investigated. Eighty-one glomeruli were identified, 15 of which were not previously discovered. The general anatomical organization of the AL of female is similar to that of male and all glomeruli were classified into four sub-groups, including the female-specific glomerular complex, posterior complex, labial-palp pit organ glomerulus, and ordinary glomeruli. A global-wide comparison on the complete glomerular map of female and male was performed and for the first time the quantitative difference in volume for each individual homologous glomerulus was analyzed. We found that the sexual dimorphism includes not only the sex-specific glomeruli but also some of the other glomeruli. The findings in the present study may provide a reference to examine the antennal-lobe organization more in detail and to identify new glomeruli in other moth species. In addition, the complete identification and global-wide comparison of the sexes provide an important basis for mapping the function of distinct glomeruli and for understanding neural mechanisms underlying sexually dimorphic olfactory behaviors. PMID:27725758

  10. A macroglomerulus in the antennal lobe of leaf-cutting ant workers and its possible functional significance.

    PubMed

    Kleineidam, C J; Obermayer, M; Halbich, W; Rössler, W

    2005-06-01

    Ants have a well-developed olfactory system, and pheromone communication is essential for regulating social life within their colonies. We compared the organization of primary olfactory centers (antennal lobes, ALs) in the brain of two closely related species of leaf-cutting ants (Atta vollenweideri, Atta sexdens). Both species express a striking size polymorphism associated with polyethism. We discovered that the ALs of large workers contain a substantially enlarged glomerulus (macroglomerulus, MG) at the entrance of the antennal nerve. This is the first description of an MG in non-sexual individuals of an insect. The location of the MG is laterally reversed in the two species, and workers of different size express a disproportional allometry of glomerular volumes. While ALs of large workers contain an MG, glomeruli in small workers are all similar in size. We further compared electroantennogram (EAG) responses to two common trail pheromone components of leaf-cutting ants: 4-methylpyrrol-2-carboxylate and 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine. At high concentrations the ratio of the EAG signals to 2-ethyl-3,6-dimethylpyrazine versus 4-methylpyrrol-2-carboxylate was significantly smaller in A. vollenweideri compared with the ratio of EAG signals to the same two components in A. sexdens. The differences in EAG signals and the species specific MG location in large workers provide correlative evidence that the MG may be involved in the detection of the trail pheromone. PMID:15843501

  11. Physiology and pharmacology of acetylcholinergic responses of interneurons in the antennal lobes of the moth Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, B; Hildebrand, J G

    1989-01-01

    1. Neurons in the antennal lobe (AL) of the moth Manduca sexta respond to the application, via pressure injection into the neuropil, of acetylcholine (ACh). When synaptic transmission is not blocked, both excitatory (Fig. 2) and inhibitory (Fig. 3) responses are seen. 2. Responses to ACh appear to be receptor-mediated, as they are associated with an increase in input conductance (Figs. 2B and 3B) and are dose-dependent (Fig. 2 C). 3. All neurons responsive to ACh are also excited by nicotine. Responses to nicotine are stronger and more prolonged than responses to ACh (Fig. 4C). No responses are observed to the muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine (Fig. 4 B). 4. Curare blocks responses of AL neurons to applied ACh, while atropine and dexetimide are only weakly effective at reducing ACh responses (Figs. 5 and 6). 5. Curare is also more effective than atropine or dexetimide at reducing synaptically-mediated responses of AL neurons (Fig. 7). 6. In one AL neuron, bicuculline methiodide (BMI) blocked the IPSP produced by electrical stimulation of the antennal nerve, but it did not reduce the inhibitory response to application of ACh (Fig. 8). PMID:2926690

  12. Model of cellular and network mechanisms for odor-evoked temporal patterning in the locust antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Bazhenov, M; Stopfer, M; Rabinovich, M; Abarbanel, H D; Sejnowski, T J; Laurent, G

    2001-05-01

    Locust antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs) respond to olfactory stimuli with sequences of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing epochs, each lasting hundreds of milliseconds. A computer simulation of an AL network was used to test the hypothesis that slow inhibitory connections between local neurons (LNs) and PNs are responsible for temporal patterning. Activation of slow inhibitory receptors on PNs by the same GABAergic synapses that underlie fast oscillatory synchronization of PNs was sufficient to shape slow response modulations. This slow stimulus- and neuron-specific patterning of AL activity was resistant to blockade of fast inhibition. Fast and slow inhibitory mechanisms at synapses between LNs and PNs can thus form dynamical PN assemblies whose elements synchronize transiently and oscillate collectively, as observed not only in the locust AL, but also in the vertebrate olfactory bulb.

  13. Temporal Features of Spike Trains in the Moth Antennal Lobe Revealed by a Comparative Time-Frequency Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capurro, Alberto; Baroni, Fabiano; Kuebler, Linda S.; Kárpáti, Zsolt; Dekker, Teun; Lei, Hong; Hansson, Bill S.; Pearce, Timothy C.; Olsson, Shannon B.

    2014-01-01

    The discrimination of complex sensory stimuli in a noisy environment is an immense computational task. Sensory systems often encode stimulus features in a spatiotemporal fashion through the complex firing patterns of individual neurons. To identify these temporal features, we have developed an analysis that allows the comparison of statistically significant features of spike trains localized over multiple scales of time-frequency resolution. Our approach provides an original way to utilize the discrete wavelet transform to process instantaneous rate functions derived from spike trains, and select relevant wavelet coefficients through statistical analysis. Our method uncovered localized features within olfactory projection neuron (PN) responses in the moth antennal lobe coding for the presence of an odor mixture and the concentration of single component odorants, but not for compound identities. We found that odor mixtures evoked earlier responses in biphasic response type PNs compared to single components, which led to differences in the instantaneous firing rate functions with their signal power spread across multiple frequency bands (ranging from 0 to 45.71 Hz) during a time window immediately preceding behavioral response latencies observed in insects. Odor concentrations were coded in excited response type PNs both in low frequency band differences (2.86 to 5.71 Hz) during the stimulus and in the odor trace after stimulus offset in low (0 to 2.86 Hz) and high (22.86 to 45.71 Hz) frequency bands. These high frequency differences in both types of PNs could have particular relevance for recruiting cellular activity in higher brain centers such as mushroom body Kenyon cells. In contrast, neurons in the specialized pheromone-responsive area of the moth antennal lobe exhibited few stimulus-dependent differences in temporal response features. These results provide interesting insights on early insect olfactory processing and introduce a novel comparative approach for

  14. Cav3-type α1T calcium channels mediate transient calcium currents that regulate repetitive firing in Drosophila antennal lobe PNs

    PubMed Central

    Iniguez, Jorge; Schutte, Soleil S.

    2013-01-01

    Projection neurons (PNs), located in the antennal lobe region of the insect brain, play a key role in processing olfactory information. To explore how activity is regulated at the level of single PNs within this central circuit we have recorded from these neurons in adult Drosophila melanogaster brains. Our previous study demonstrated that PNs express voltage-gated calcium currents with a transient and sustained component. We found that the sustained component is mediated by cac gene-encoded Cav2-type channels involved in regulating action potential-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses. The function of the transient calcium current and the gene encoding the underlying channels, however, were unknown. Here we report that the transient current blocked by prepulse inactivation is sensitive to amiloride, a vertebrate Cav3-type channel blocker. In addition PN-specific RNAi knockdown of α1T, the Drosophila Cav3-type gene, caused a dramatic reduction in the transient current without altering the sustained component. These data demonstrate that the α1T gene encodes voltage-gated calcium channels underlying the amiloride-sensitive transient current. Alterations in evoked firing and spontaneous burst firing in the α1T knockdowns demonstrate that the Cav3-type calcium channels are important in regulating excitability in adult PNs. PMID:23864373

  15. Antennal lobe representations are optimized when olfactory stimuli are periodically structured to simulate natural wing beat effects

    PubMed Central

    Houot, Benjamin; Burkland, Rex; Tripathy, Shreejoy; Daly, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Animals use behaviors to actively sample the environment across a broad spectrum of sensory domains. These behaviors discretize the sensory experience into unique spatiotemporal moments, minimize sensory adaptation, and enhance perception. In olfaction, behaviors such as sniffing, antennal flicking, and wing beating all act to periodically expose olfactory epithelium. In mammals, it is thought that sniffing enhances neural representations; however, the effects of insect wing beating on representations remain unknown. To determine how well the antennal lobe (AL) produces odor dependent representations when wing beating effects are simulated, we used extracellular methods to record neural units and local field potentials (LFPs) from moth AL. We recorded responses to odors presented as prolonged continuous stimuli or periodically as 20 and 25 Hz pulse trains designed to simulate the oscillating effects of wing beating around the antennae during odor guided flight. Using spectral analyses, we show that ~25% of all recorded units were able to entrain to “pulsed stimuli”; this includes pulsed blanks, which elicited the strongest overall entrainment. The strength of entrainment to pulse train stimuli was dependent on molecular features of the odorants, odor concentration, and pulse train duration. Moreover, units showing pulse tracking responses were highly phase locked to LFPs during odor stimulation, indicating that unit-LFP phase relationships are stimulus-driven. Finally, a Euclidean distance-based population vector analysis established that AL odor representations are more robust, peak more quickly, and do not show adaptation when odors were presented at the natural wing beat frequency as opposed to prolonged continuous stimulation. These results suggest a general strategy for optimizing olfactory representations, which exploits the natural rhythmicity of wing beating by integrating mechanosensory and olfactory cues at the level of the AL. PMID:24971052

  16. Organization of the olfactory pathway and odor processing in the antennal lobe of the ant Camponotus floridanus.

    PubMed

    Zube, Christina; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes; Kirschner, Sebastian; Neef, Jakob; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2008-01-20

    Ants rely heavily on olfaction for communication and orientation. Here we provide the first detailed structure-function analyses within an ant's central olfactory system asking whether in the carpenter ant, Camponotus floridanus, the olfactory pathway exhibits adaptations to processing many pheromonal and general odors. Using fluorescent tracing, confocal microscopy, and 3D-analyses we demonstrate that the antennal lobe (AL) contains up to approximately 460 olfactory glomeruli organized in seven distinct clusters innervated via seven antennal sensory tracts. The AL is divided into two hemispheres regarding innervation of glomeruli by either projection neurons (PNs) with axons leaving via the medial (m) or lateral (l) antennocerebral tract (ACT). M- and l-ACT PNs differ in their target areas in the mushroom-body calyx and lateral horn. Three additional ACTs project to the lateral protocerebrum only. We analyzed odor processing in AL glomeruli by retrograde loading of PNs with Fura-2 dextran and fluorimetric calcium imaging. Odor responses were reproducible and comparable across individuals. Calcium responses to pheromonal and nonpheromonal odors were very sensitive (10(-11) dilution) and patterns were partly overlapping, indicating that processing of both odor classes is not spatially segregated within the AL. Response patterns to the main trail-pheromone component nerolic acid remained stable over a wide range of intensities (7-8 log units), while response durations increased indicating that odor quality is maintained by a stable pattern and intensity is mainly encoded in response durations. The structure-function analyses contribute new insights into important aspects of odor processing in a highly advanced insect olfactory system.

  17. Organization of the olfactory pathway and odor processing in the antennal lobe of the ant Camponotus floridanus.

    PubMed

    Zube, Christina; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes; Kirschner, Sebastian; Neef, Jakob; Rössler, Wolfgang

    2008-01-20

    Ants rely heavily on olfaction for communication and orientation. Here we provide the first detailed structure-function analyses within an ant's central olfactory system asking whether in the carpenter ant, Camponotus floridanus, the olfactory pathway exhibits adaptations to processing many pheromonal and general odors. Using fluorescent tracing, confocal microscopy, and 3D-analyses we demonstrate that the antennal lobe (AL) contains up to approximately 460 olfactory glomeruli organized in seven distinct clusters innervated via seven antennal sensory tracts. The AL is divided into two hemispheres regarding innervation of glomeruli by either projection neurons (PNs) with axons leaving via the medial (m) or lateral (l) antennocerebral tract (ACT). M- and l-ACT PNs differ in their target areas in the mushroom-body calyx and lateral horn. Three additional ACTs project to the lateral protocerebrum only. We analyzed odor processing in AL glomeruli by retrograde loading of PNs with Fura-2 dextran and fluorimetric calcium imaging. Odor responses were reproducible and comparable across individuals. Calcium responses to pheromonal and nonpheromonal odors were very sensitive (10(-11) dilution) and patterns were partly overlapping, indicating that processing of both odor classes is not spatially segregated within the AL. Response patterns to the main trail-pheromone component nerolic acid remained stable over a wide range of intensities (7-8 log units), while response durations increased indicating that odor quality is maintained by a stable pattern and intensity is mainly encoded in response durations. The structure-function analyses contribute new insights into important aspects of odor processing in a highly advanced insect olfactory system. PMID:18041786

  18. Odour-evoked responses to queen pheromone components and to plant odours using optical imaging in the antennal lobe of the honey bee drone Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2006-09-01

    The primordial functional role of honey bee males (drones) is to mate with virgin queens, a behaviour relying heavily on the olfactory detection of queen pheromone. In the present work I studied olfactory processing in the drone antennal lobe (AL), the primary olfactory centre of the insect brain. In drones, the AL consists of about 103 ordinary glomeruli and four enlarged glomeruli, the macroglomeruli (MG). Two macroglomeruli (MG1 and MG2) and approximately 20 ordinary glomeruli occupy the anterior surface of the antennal lobe and are thus accessible to optical recordings. Calcium imaging was used to measure odour-evoked responses to queen pheromonal components and plant odours. MG2 responded specifically to the main component of the queen mandibular pheromone, 9-ODA. The secondary components HOB and HVA each triggered activity in one, but not the same, ordinary glomerulus. MG1 did not respond to any of the tested stimuli. Plant odours induced signals only in ordinary glomeruli in a combinatorial manner, as in workers. This study thus shows that the major queen pheromonal component is processed in the most voluminous macroglomerulus of the drone antennal lobe, and that plant odours, as well as some queen pheromonal components, are processed in ordinary glomeruli.

  19. Odour-evoked responses to queen pheromone components and to plant odours using optical imaging in the antennal lobe of the honey bee drone Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2006-09-01

    The primordial functional role of honey bee males (drones) is to mate with virgin queens, a behaviour relying heavily on the olfactory detection of queen pheromone. In the present work I studied olfactory processing in the drone antennal lobe (AL), the primary olfactory centre of the insect brain. In drones, the AL consists of about 103 ordinary glomeruli and four enlarged glomeruli, the macroglomeruli (MG). Two macroglomeruli (MG1 and MG2) and approximately 20 ordinary glomeruli occupy the anterior surface of the antennal lobe and are thus accessible to optical recordings. Calcium imaging was used to measure odour-evoked responses to queen pheromonal components and plant odours. MG2 responded specifically to the main component of the queen mandibular pheromone, 9-ODA. The secondary components HOB and HVA each triggered activity in one, but not the same, ordinary glomerulus. MG1 did not respond to any of the tested stimuli. Plant odours induced signals only in ordinary glomeruli in a combinatorial manner, as in workers. This study thus shows that the major queen pheromonal component is processed in the most voluminous macroglomerulus of the drone antennal lobe, and that plant odours, as well as some queen pheromonal components, are processed in ordinary glomeruli. PMID:16943499

  20. Integration of the Antennal Lobe Glomeruli and Three Projection Neurons in the Standard Brain Atlas of the Moth Heliothis Virescens

    PubMed Central

    Løfaldli, Bjarte Bye; Kvello, Pål; Mustaparta, Hanna

    2010-01-01

    Digital three dimensional standard brain atlases (SBAs) are valuable tools for integrating neuroimaging data of different preparations. In insects, SBAs of five species are available, including the atlas of the female Heliothis virescens moth brain. Like for the other species, the antennal lobes (ALs) of the moth brain atlas were integrated as one material identity without internal structures. Different from the others, the H. virescens SBA exclusively included the glomerular layer of the AL. This was an advantage in the present study for performing a direct registration of the glomerular layer of individual preparations into the standard brain. We here present the H. virescens female SBA with a new model of the AL glomeruli integrated into the atlas, i.e. with each of the 66 glomeruli identified and labelled with a specific number. The new model differs from the previous H. virescens AL model both in respect to the number of glomeruli and the numbering system; the latter according to the system used for the AL atlases of two other heliothine species. For identifying female specific glomeruli comparison with the male AL was necessary. This required a new male AL atlas, included in this paper. As demonstrated by the integration of three AL projection neurons of different preparations, the new SBA with the integrated glomruli is a helpful tool for determining the glomeruli innervated as well as the relative position of the axonal projections in the protocerebrum. PMID:20179785

  1. Data-driven inference of network connectivity for modeling the dynamics of neural codes in the insect antennal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Shlizerman, Eli; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The antennal lobe (AL), olfactory processing center in insects, is able to process stimuli into distinct neural activity patterns, called olfactory neural codes. To model their dynamics we perform multichannel recordings from the projection neurons in the AL driven by different odorants. We then derive a dynamic neuronal network from the electrophysiological data. The network consists of lateral-inhibitory neurons and excitatory neurons (modeled as firing-rate units), and is capable of producing unique olfactory neural codes for the tested odorants. To construct the network, we (1) design a projection, an odor space, for the neural recording from the AL, which discriminates between distinct odorants trajectories (2) characterize scent recognition, i.e., decision-making based on olfactory signals and (3) infer the wiring of the neural circuit, the connectome of the AL. We show that the constructed model is consistent with biological observations, such as contrast enhancement and robustness to noise. The study suggests a data-driven approach to answer a key biological question in identifying how lateral inhibitory neurons can be wired to excitatory neurons to permit robust activity patterns. PMID:25165442

  2. Postsynaptic Odorant Concentration Dependent Inhibition Controls Temporal Properties of Spike Responses of Projection Neurons in the Moth Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Terufumi; Kazawa, Tomoki; Haupt, Stephan Shuichi; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    Although odorant concentration-response characteristics of olfactory neurons have been widely investigated in a variety of animal species, the effect of odorant concentration on neural processing at circuit level is still poorly understood. Using calcium imaging in the silkmoth (Bombyx mori) pheromone processing circuit of the antennal lobe (AL), we studied the effect of odorant concentration on second-order projection neuron (PN) responses. While PN calcium responses of dendrites showed monotonic increases with odorant concentration, calcium responses of somata showed decreased responses at higher odorant concentrations due to postsynaptic inhibition. Simultaneous calcium imaging and electrophysiology revealed that calcium responses of PN somata but not dendrites reflect spiking activity. Inhibition shortened spike response duration rather than decreasing peak instantaneous spike frequency (ISF). Local interneurons (LNs) that were specifically activated at high odorant concentrations at which PN responses were suppressed are the putative source of inhibition. Our results imply the existence of an intraglomerular mechanism that preserves time resolution in olfactory processing over a wide odorant concentration range. PMID:24586546

  3. Transformation of the sex pheromone signal in the noctuid moth Agrotis ipsilon: from peripheral input to antennal lobe output.

    PubMed

    Jarriault, David; Gadenne, Christophe; Lucas, Philippe; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Anton, Sylvia

    2010-10-01

    How information is transformed along synaptic processing stages is critically important to understand the neural basis of behavior in any sensory system. In moths, males rely on sex pheromone to find their mating partner. It is essential for a male to recognize the components present in a pheromone blend, their ratio, and the temporal pattern of the signal. To examine pheromone processing mechanisms at different levels of the olfactory pathway, we performed single-cell recordings of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in the antenna and intracellular recordings of central neurons in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) of the antennal lobe of sexually mature Agrotis ipsilon male moths, using the same pheromone stimuli, stimulation protocol, and response analyses. Detailed characteristics of the ORN and MGC-neuron responses were compared to describe the transformation of the neuronal responses that takes place in the MGC. Although the excitatory period of the response is similar in both neuron populations, the addition of an inhibitory phase following the MGC neuron excitatory phase indicates participation of local interneurons (LN), which remodel the ORN input. Moreover, MGC neurons showed a wider tuning and a higher sensitivity to single pheromone components than ORNs.

  4. Two types of local interneurons are distinguished by morphology, intrinsic membrane properties, and functional connectivity in the moth antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Masashi; Dong, Li; Inoue, Shigeki; Namiki, Shigehiro; Sakurai, Takeshi; Nakatani, Kei; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-11-01

    Neurons in the silkmoth antennal lobe (AL) are well characterized in terms of their morphology and odor-evoked firing activity. However, their intrinsic electrical properties including voltage-gated ionic currents and synaptic connectivity remain unclear. To address this, whole cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings were made from second-order projection neurons (PNs) and two morphological types of local interneurons (LNs) in the silkmoth AL. The two morphological types of LNs exhibited distinct physiological properties. One morphological type of LN showed a spiking response with a voltage-gated sodium channel gene expression, whereas the other type of LN was nonspiking without a voltage-gated sodium channel gene expression. Voltage-clamp experiments also revealed that both of two types of LNs as well as PNs possessed two types of voltage-gated potassium channels and calcium channels. In dual whole cell recordings of spiking LNs and PNs, activation of the PN elicited depolarization responses in the paired spiking LN, whereas activation of the spiking LN induced no substantial responses in the paired PN. However, simultaneous recording of a nonspiking LN and a PN showed that activation of the nonspiking LN induced hyperpolarization responses in the PN. We also observed bidirectional synaptic transmission via both chemical and electrical coupling in the pairs of spiking LNs. Thus our results indicate that there were two distinct types of LNs in the silkmoth AL, and their functional connectivity to PNs was substantially different. We propose distinct functional roles for these two different types of LNs in shaping odor-evoked firing activity in PNs.

  5. Long-term enhancement of synaptic transmission between antennal lobe and mushroom body in cultured Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kohei; Naganos, Shintaro; Hirano, Yukinori; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Saitoe, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is a critical brain structure for olfactory associative learning. During aversive conditioning, the MBs are thought to associate odour signals, conveyed by projection neurons (PNs) from the antennal lobe (AL), with shock signals conveyed through ascending fibres of the ventral nerve cord (AFV). Although synaptic transmission between AL and MB might play a crucial role for olfactory associative learning, its physiological properties have not been examined directly. Using a cultured Drosophila brain expressing a Ca2+ indicator in the MBs, we investigated synaptic transmission and plasticity at the AL–MB synapse. Following stimulation with a glass micro-electrode, AL-induced Ca2+ responses in the MBs were mediated through Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (dnAChRs), while AFV-induced Ca2+ responses were mediated through Drosophila NMDA receptors (dNRs). AL–MB synaptic transmission was enhanced more than 2 h after the simultaneous ‘associative-stimulation’ of AL and AFV, and such long-term enhancement (LTE) was specifically formed at the AL–MB synapses but not at the AFV–MB synapses. AL–MB LTE was not induced by intense stimulation of the AL alone, and the LTE decays within 60 min after subsequent repetitive AL stimulation. These phenotypes of associativity, input specificity and persistence of AL–MB LTE are highly reminiscent of olfactory memory. Furthermore, similar to olfactory aversive memory, AL–MB LTE formation required activation of the Drosophila D1 dopamine receptor, DopR, along with dnAChR and dNR during associative stimulations. These physiological and genetic analogies indicate that AL–MB LTE might be a relevant cellular model for olfactory memory. PMID:23027817

  6. Long-term enhancement of synaptic transmission between antennal lobe and mushroom body in cultured Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kohei; Naganos, Shintaro; Hirano, Yukinori; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Saitoe, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is a critical brain structure for olfactory associative learning. During aversive conditioning, the MBs are thought to associate odour signals, conveyed by projection neurons (PNs) from the antennal lobe (AL), with shock signals conveyed through ascending fibres of the ventral nerve cord (AFV). Although synaptic transmission between AL and MB might play a crucial role for olfactory associative learning, its physiological properties have not been examined directly. Using a cultured Drosophila brain expressing a Ca(2+) indicator in the MBs, we investigated synaptic transmission and plasticity at the AL-MB synapse. Following stimulation with a glass micro-electrode, AL-induced Ca(2+) responses in the MBs were mediated through Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (dnAChRs), while AFV-induced Ca(2+) responses were mediated through Drosophila NMDA receptors (dNRs). AL-MB synaptic transmission was enhanced more than 2 h after the simultaneous 'associative-stimulation' of AL and AFV, and such long-term enhancement (LTE) was specifically formed at the AL-MB synapses but not at the AFV-MB synapses. AL-MB LTE was not induced by intense stimulation of the AL alone, and the LTE decays within 60 min after subsequent repetitive AL stimulation. These phenotypes of associativity, input specificity and persistence of AL-MB LTE are highly reminiscent of olfactory memory. Furthermore, similar to olfactory aversive memory, AL-MB LTE formation required activation of the Drosophila D1 dopamine receptor, DopR, along with dnAChR and dNR during associative stimulations. These physiological and genetic analogies indicate that AL-MB LTE might be a relevant cellular model for olfactory memory.

  7. Functional Roles for Synaptic-Depression within a Model of the Fly Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Aaditya V.

    2012-01-01

    Several experiments indicate that there exists substantial synaptic-depression at the synapses between olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and neurons within the drosophila antenna lobe (AL). This synaptic-depression may be partly caused by vesicle-depletion, and partly caused by presynaptic-inhibition due to the activity of inhibitory local neurons within the AL. While it has been proposed that this synaptic-depression contributes to the nonlinear relationship between ORN and projection neuron (PN) firing-rates, the precise functional role of synaptic-depression at the ORN synapses is not yet fully understood. In this paper we propose two hypotheses linking the information-coding properties of the fly AL with the network mechanisms responsible for ORNAL synaptic-depression. Our first hypothesis is related to variance coding of ORN firing-rate information — once stimulation to the ORNs is sufficiently high to saturate glomerular responses, further stimulation of the ORNs increases the regularity of PN spiking activity while maintaining PN firing-rates. The second hypothesis proposes a tradeoff between spike-time reliability and coding-capacity governed by the relative contribution of vesicle-depletion and presynaptic-inhibition to ORNAL synaptic-depression. Synaptic-depression caused primarily by vesicle-depletion will give rise to a very reliable system, whereas an equivalent amount of synaptic-depression caused primarily by presynaptic-inhibition will give rise to a less reliable system that is more sensitive to small shifts in odor stimulation. These two hypotheses are substantiated by several small analyzable toy models of the fly AL, as well as a more physiologically realistic large-scale computational model of the fly AL involving glomerular channels. PMID:22927802

  8. Synchronous firing of antennal-lobe projection neurons encodes the behaviorally effective ratio of sex-pheromone components in male Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua P.; Lei, Hong; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Hildebrand, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory stimuli that are essential to an animal's survival and reproduction are often complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds in characteristic proportions. Here, we investigated how these proportions are encoded in the primary olfactory processing center, the antennal lobe (AL), of male Manduca sexta moths. Two key components of the female's sex pheromone, present in an approximately 2:1 ratio, are processed in each of two neighboring glomeruli in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) of males of this species. In wind-tunnel flight experiments, males exhibited behavioral selectivity for ratios approximating the ratio released by conspecific females. The ratio between components was poorly represented, however, in the firing-rate output of uniglomerular MGC projection neurons (PNs). PN firing rate was mostly insensitive to the ratio between components, and individual PNs did not exhibit a preference for a particular ratio. Recording simultaneously from pairs of PNs in the same glomerulus, we found that the natural ratio between components elicited the most synchronous spikes, and altering the proportion of either component decreased the proportion of synchronous spikes. The degree of synchronous firing between PNs in the same glomerulus thus selectively encodes the natural ratio that most effectively evokes the natural behavioral response to pheromone. PMID:24002682

  9. Ensemble Response in Mushroom Body Output Neurons of the Honey Bee Outpaces Spatiotemporal Odor Processing Two Synapses Earlier in the Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Strube-Bloss, Martin F.; Herrera-Valdez, Marco A.; Smith, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    Neural representations of odors are subject to computations that involve sequentially convergent and divergent anatomical connections across different areas of the brains in both mammals and insects. Furthermore, in both mammals and insects higher order brain areas are connected via feedback connections. In order to understand the transformations and interactions that this connectivity make possible, an ideal experiment would compare neural responses across different, sequential processing levels. Here we present results of recordings from a first order olfactory neuropile – the antennal lobe (AL) – and a higher order multimodal integration and learning center – the mushroom body (MB) – in the honey bee brain. We recorded projection neurons (PN) of the AL and extrinsic neurons (EN) of the MB, which provide the outputs from the two neuropils. Recordings at each level were made in different animals in some experiments and simultaneously in the same animal in others. We presented two odors and their mixture to compare odor response dynamics as well as classification speed and accuracy at each neural processing level. Surprisingly, the EN ensemble significantly starts separating odor stimuli rapidly and before the PN ensemble has reached significant separation. Furthermore the EN ensemble at the MB output reaches a maximum separation of odors between 84–120 ms after odor onset, which is 26 to 133 ms faster than the maximum separation at the AL output ensemble two synapses earlier in processing. It is likely that a subset of very fast PNs, which respond before the ENs, may initiate the rapid EN ensemble response. We suggest therefore that the timing of the EN ensemble activity would allow retroactive integration of its signal into the ongoing computation of the AL via centrifugal feedback. PMID:23209711

  10. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  11. Differential antennal proteome comparison of adult honeybee drone, worker and queen (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu; Song, Feifei; Zhang, Lan; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Feng, Mao; Li, Jianke

    2012-01-01

    To understand the olfactory mechanism of honeybee antennae in detecting specific volatile compounds in the atmosphere, antennal proteome differences of drone, worker and queen were compared using 2-DE, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Therefore, 107 proteins were altered their expressions in the antennae of drone, worker and queen bees. There were 54, 21 and 32 up-regulated proteins in the antennae of drone, worker and queen, respectively. Proteins upregulated in the drone antennae were involved in fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, protein folding and cytoskeleton. Proteins upregulated in the antennae of worker and queen bees were related to carbohydrate metabolism and energy production while molecular transporters were upregulated in the queen antennae. Our results explain the role played by the antennae of drone is to aid in perceiving the queen sexual pheromones, in the worker antennae to assist for food search and social communication and in the queen antennae to help pheromone communication with the worker and the drone during the mating flight. This first proteomic study significantly extends our understanding of honeybee olfactory activities and the possible mechanisms played by the antennae in response to various environmental, social, biological and biochemical signals.

  12. Differential antennal proteome comparison of adult honeybee drone, worker and queen (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu; Song, Feifei; Zhang, Lan; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Feng, Mao; Li, Jianke

    2012-01-01

    To understand the olfactory mechanism of honeybee antennae in detecting specific volatile compounds in the atmosphere, antennal proteome differences of drone, worker and queen were compared using 2-DE, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Therefore, 107 proteins were altered their expressions in the antennae of drone, worker and queen bees. There were 54, 21 and 32 up-regulated proteins in the antennae of drone, worker and queen, respectively. Proteins upregulated in the drone antennae were involved in fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, protein folding and cytoskeleton. Proteins upregulated in the antennae of worker and queen bees were related to carbohydrate metabolism and energy production while molecular transporters were upregulated in the queen antennae. Our results explain the role played by the antennae of drone is to aid in perceiving the queen sexual pheromones, in the worker antennae to assist for food search and social communication and in the queen antennae to help pheromone communication with the worker and the drone during the mating flight. This first proteomic study significantly extends our understanding of honeybee olfactory activities and the possible mechanisms played by the antennae in response to various environmental, social, biological and biochemical signals. PMID:21982827

  13. New Approach to Evaluate the Antennal Response of an Adult Predator Insect to Different Volatile Chemical Compounds by using Electroantennogram Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonouda, Mourad L.

    The antennal response of adult syrphid flies to selected plant volatile chemical compounds was investigated in the present study. The main chemical classes and their chemical compounds were aldehydes (nonanal and benzaldehyde), monoterpene-alcohols (linalool and alpha-terpineol), ketones (6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one and 2-undecanone), hydrocarbons (tetradecane) and benzoids (methyl salicylate). Electroantennogram (EAG) records showed that the syrphid antennae were strongly responded to linalool, 6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one and methyl salicylate even at low concentrations, in addition to the high dose concentration of nonanal comparably to the other chemical compounds. The antennae of old syrphid adults were more responsive and elicited higher levels of responses to all compounds rather than young syrphid adults. The antennal sensitivity may differ from one compound to another according to the sex. The difference in responses could be attributed to the sensitivity of olfactory receptors and/or the characterization of binding protein(s). The quality of biocontrol agent could be improved if the chemical interaction between beneficial natural enemies and the surrounding environment is intensively studied and we clearly understand the chemical ecology of each natural enemy.

  14. Adult clinical neuropsychology: lessons from studies of the frontal lobes.

    PubMed

    Stuss, Donald T; Levine, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Clinical neuropsychologists have adopted numerous (and sometimes conflicting) approaches to the assessment of brain-behavior relationships. We review the historical development of these approaches and we advocate an approach to clinical neuropsychology that is informed by recent findings from cognitive neuroscience. Clinical assessment of executive and emotional processes associated with the frontal lobes of the human brain has yet to incorporate the numerous experimental neuroscience findings on this topic. We review both standard and newer techniques for assessment of frontal lobe functions, including control operations involved in language, memory, attention, emotions, self-regulation, and social functioning. Clinical and experimental research has converged to indicate the fractionation of frontal subprocesses and the initial mapping of these subprocesses to discrete frontal regions. One anatomical distinction consistent in the literature is that between dorsal and ventral functions, which can be considered cognitive and affective, respectively. The frontal lobes, in particular the frontal poles, are involved in uniquely human capacities, including self-awareness and mental time travel.

  15. Adult clinical neuropsychology: lessons from studies of the frontal lobes.

    PubMed

    Stuss, Donald T; Levine, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Clinical neuropsychologists have adopted numerous (and sometimes conflicting) approaches to the assessment of brain-behavior relationships. We review the historical development of these approaches and we advocate an approach to clinical neuropsychology that is informed by recent findings from cognitive neuroscience. Clinical assessment of executive and emotional processes associated with the frontal lobes of the human brain has yet to incorporate the numerous experimental neuroscience findings on this topic. We review both standard and newer techniques for assessment of frontal lobe functions, including control operations involved in language, memory, attention, emotions, self-regulation, and social functioning. Clinical and experimental research has converged to indicate the fractionation of frontal subprocesses and the initial mapping of these subprocesses to discrete frontal regions. One anatomical distinction consistent in the literature is that between dorsal and ventral functions, which can be considered cognitive and affective, respectively. The frontal lobes, in particular the frontal poles, are involved in uniquely human capacities, including self-awareness and mental time travel. PMID:11752491

  16. Memory reorganization in adult brain: observations in three patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gleissner, Ulrike; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian Erich

    2002-02-01

    We present three patients with left-sided temporal lobe epilepsy who exhibited preoperatively a neuropsychological pattern characteristic for interhemispheric language transfer (marked nonverbal memory deficits, relatively preserved verbal memory and language performance). The Wada test indicated atypical language dominance in two patients, but one patient was clearly left hemispheric language dominant. All patients showed a marked recovery of nonverbal memory after left-sided surgery. Results are discussed with respect to memory transfer and plasticity for memory functions in the adult brain. PMID:11904242

  17. Liver graft regeneration in right lobe adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y-F; Huang, T-L; Chen, T-Y; Tsang, L L-C; Ou, H-Y; Yu, C-Y; Concejero, A; Wang, C-C; Wang, S-H; Lin, T-S; Liu, Y-W; Yang, C-H; Yong, C-C; Chiu, K-W; Jawan, B; Eng, H-L; Chen, C-L

    2009-06-01

    Optimal portal flow is one of the essentials in adequate liver function, graft regeneration and outcome of the graft after right lobe adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). The relations among factors that cause sufficient liver graft regeneration are still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential predisposing factors that encourage liver graft regeneration after ALDLT. The study population consisted of right lobe ALDLT recipients from Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Taiwan. The records, preoperative images, postoperative Doppler ultrasound evaluation and computed tomography studies performed 6 months after transplant were reviewed. The volume of the graft 6 months after transplant divided by the standard liver volume was calculated as the regeneration ratio. The predisposing risk factors were compiled from statistical analyses and included age, recipient body weight, native liver disease, spleen size before transplant, patency of the hepatic venous graft, graft weight-to-recipient weight ratio (GRWR), posttransplant portal flow, vascular and biliary complications and rejection. One hundred forty-five recipients were enrolled in this study. The liver graft regeneration ratio was 91.2 +/- 12.6% (range, 58-151). The size of the spleen (p = 0.00015), total portal flow and GRWR (p = 0.005) were linearly correlated with the regeneration rate. Patency of the hepatic venous tributary reconstructed was positively correlated to graft regeneration and was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Splenic artery ligation was advantageous to promote liver regeneration in specific cases but splenectomy did not show any positive advantage. Spleen size is a major factor contributing to portal flow and may directly trigger regeneration after transplant. Control of sufficient portal flow and adequate hepatic outflow are important factors in graft regeneration.

  18. Vasculobiliary complications following adult right lobe split liver transplantation from the perspective of reconstruction techniques.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk Mourad, Moustafa; Liossis, Christos; Kumar, Senthil; Gunson, Bridget K; Mergental, Hynek; Isaac, John; Bramhall, Simon R; Muiesan, Paolo; Mirza, Darius F; Thamara P R Perera, M

    2015-01-01

    Split liver transplantation (SLT) compensates for the organ shortage and provides an alternative solution for recipients disadvantaged by a smaller body size. Variations in the hepatic arterial anatomy and reconstructive techniques may lead to more technical complications, and we sought to analyze the incidence and risk factors of vasculobiliary complications with respect to reconstructive techniques. We identified 171 adult right lobe SLT procedures and 1412 whole liver transplantation (WLT) procedures between January 2000 and June 2012 and compared the results of these 2 groups. In the SLT group, arterial reconstruction techniques were classified into 4 subgroups (I-IV), and biliary reconstruction was classified into 2 groups [duct-to-duct (DD) anastomosis and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy (RH)]. Specific surgical complications were analyzed against reconstruction techniques. The overall incidence of vascular and biliary complications in the SLT group was greater than that in the WLT group (P = 0.009 and P = 0.001, respectively). There was no difference in hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT), but we saw a tendency toward early HAT in the presence of multiple hepatic arteries supplying the right lobe graft (group IV; 20%) in comparison with the other arterial reconstruction groups (P = 0.052). No difference was noticed in the overall incidence of biliary complications in either DD or RH recipients across 4 arterial reconstruction groups. When the arterial reconstruction involved a right hepatic artery (groups II and III) combined with a DD biliary anastomosis, there was a significant preponderance of biliary complications (P = 0.04 and P = 0.01, respectively). There was no survival difference between SLT and WLT grafts. In conclusion, the complications of SLT are directly related to arterial and biliary reconstruction techniques, and this classification helps to identify high-risk reconstructive techniques. PMID:25302412

  19. [Hyperlexia in an adult patient with lesions in the left medial frontal lobe].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Yamadori, A; Kumabe, T; Endo, K; Fujii, T; Yoshimoto, T

    2000-04-01

    A 69-year-old right-handed woman developed a transcortical motor aphasia with hyperlexia following resection of a glioma in the left medial frontal lobe. Neurological examination revealed grasp reflex in the right hand and underutilization of the right upper extremity. An MRI demonstrated lesions in the left medial frontal lobe including the supplementary motor area and the anterior part of the cingulate gyrus, which extended to the anterior part of the body of corpus callosum. Neuropsychologically she was alert and cooperative. She demonstrated transcortical motor aphasia. Her verbal output began with echolalia. Furthermore hyperlexia was observed in daily activities and during examinations. During conversation she suddenly read words written on objects around her which were totally irrelevant to the talk. When she was walking in the ward with an examiner she read words written on a trash bag that passed by and signboards which indicated a name of a room. Her conversation while walking was intermingled with reading words, which was irrelevant to the conversation. She also read time on analog clocks, which were hung on a wall in a watch store. In a naming task, she read words written on objects first and named them upon repeated question about their names. When an examiner opened a newspaper in front of her without any instructions she began reading until the examiner prohibited it. Then she began reading again when an examiner turned the page, although she remembered that she should not read it aloud. She showed mild ideomotor apraxia of a left hand. Utilization behavior, imitation behavior, hypergraphia, or compulsive use of objects was not observed throughout the course. Hyperlexic tendency is a prominent feature of this patient's language output. Hyperlexia was often reported in children with pervasive developmental disorders including autism. There are only a few reports about hyperlexia in adults and some of them were related to diffuse brain dysfunction

  20. Morphologic representation of visual and antennal information in the ant brain.

    PubMed

    Gronenberg, W; Hölldobler, B

    1999-09-20

    Ants in general are primarily olfactory animals, but many species also express visual behaviors. We analyze in 14 species, which range from purely olfactory to predominantly visually behaving ants, how the brains are equipped to control such behavior. We take the size and manifestation of the eyes as an indicator for the prevalence of vision in a given species, and we correlate it with the size of particular brain regions. Our morphometric data show that the size of the eyes generally correlates well with that of the optic lobes. The antennal lobes and the mushroom bodies have a surprisingly constant relative volume whereas, as expected, the relative size of the optic lobes varies strongly across species. Males of different species are more similar. Compared with workers, they all have large eyes, relatively larger optic lobes, smaller mushroom bodies, and similarly sized antennal lobes. The input regions of the mushroom bodies, the lip and the collar, generally correlate with the size of the optic and antennal lobe, respectively. Accordingly, the composition of the calyx reflects the importance of vision for the animal. We present data supporting the view that the mushroom bodies may participate in spatial orientation, landmark recognition, and visual information storage. PMID:10441753

  1. Central Projection of Antennal Sensory Neurons in the Central Nervous System of the Mirid Bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür).

    PubMed

    Xie, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Xin-Cheng; Ma, Bai-Wei; Guo, Pei; Li, Guo-Ping; Feng, Hong-Qiang; Wu, Guo-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür), a polyphagous pest, is dependent on olfactory cues to locate various host plant species and mates. In this study, we traced the projection pathway of the antennal sensory neurons and visualized their projection patterns in the central nervous system of A. lucorum through confocal microscopy and digital reconstructions. We also examined the glomerular organization of the primary olfactory center of the brain, the antennal lobe, and created a three-dimensional model of the glomeruli. We found that the axons of the sensory neurons project into the brain via the ipsilateral antennal nerve, and descend further into the gnathal ganglion, prothoracic ganglion, mesothoracic ganglion, and metathoracic ganglion, and reach as far as to the abdominal ganglion. Such a projection pattern indicates that antennal sensory neurons of A. lucorum may be potentially directly connected to motor neurons. The antennal lobe, however, is the major target area of antennal sensory neurons. The antennal lobe is composed of a large number of glomeruli, i.e. 70-80 glomeruli in one AL of A. lucorum. The results of this study which provide information about the basic anatomical arrangement of the brain olfactory center of A. lucorum, are important for further investigations of chemosensory encoding mechanisms of the mirid bug. PMID:27478892

  2. Central Projection of Antennal Sensory Neurons in the Central Nervous System of the Mirid Bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Xin-Cheng; Ma, Bai-Wei; Guo, Pei; Li, Guo-Ping; Feng, Hong-Qiang; Wu, Guo-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür), a polyphagous pest, is dependent on olfactory cues to locate various host plant species and mates. In this study, we traced the projection pathway of the antennal sensory neurons and visualized their projection patterns in the central nervous system of A. lucorum through confocal microscopy and digital reconstructions. We also examined the glomerular organization of the primary olfactory center of the brain, the antennal lobe, and created a three-dimensional model of the glomeruli. We found that the axons of the sensory neurons project into the brain via the ipsilateral antennal nerve, and descend further into the gnathal ganglion, prothoracic ganglion, mesothoracic ganglion, and metathoracic ganglion, and reach as far as to the abdominal ganglion. Such a projection pattern indicates that antennal sensory neurons of A. lucorum may be potentially directly connected to motor neurons. The antennal lobe, however, is the major target area of antennal sensory neurons. The antennal lobe is composed of a large number of glomeruli, i.e. 70–80 glomeruli in one AL of A. lucorum. The results of this study which provide information about the basic anatomical arrangement of the brain olfactory center of A. lucorum, are important for further investigations of chemosensory encoding mechanisms of the mirid bug. PMID:27478892

  3. Morphological and developmental analysis of peripheral antennal chemosensory sensilla and central olfactory glomeruli in worker castes of Camponotus compressus (Fabricius, 1787).

    PubMed

    Mysore, Keshava; Shyamala, Baragur V; Rodrigues, Veronica

    2010-09-01

    The antennal lobes of different castes of the ant species Camponotus compressus show a marked diversity in the organization of their olfactory glomeruli. Notably, there is a significant difference in the number and size of glomeruli between the reproductives and the workers and among the different worker castes. In this report, we investigate the notion that these caste-specific differences in glomerular number might be accounted for, at least in part, by the differences in numbers of olfactory sensilla that target the antennal lobe. For this, we examine the number of sensilla on the antennal flagella of all the individual castes of C. compressus. This analysis reveals a striking correlation between sensillar number and the number of antennal glomeruli in a given caste. As a first step in investigating the causal mechanisms that might give raise to this correlation, we carry out an initial characterization of olfactory system development in the minor workers of C. compressus. We analyze the temporal pattern of innervations of the developing antennal lobe by olfactory sensory neuron axons. We document the development of the olfactory glomeruli in the antennal lobe during this process, which occurs during early pupal stages. Our findings provide the basis for future manipulative developmental studies on the role of sensory afferent number in glomerular development of different castes within the same species. PMID:20438861

  4. Right lobe split liver transplantation versus whole liver transplantation in adult recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ping; Li, Qigen; Zhang, Jianjun; Xia, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Split liver transplantation (SLT) has proven to be an effective technique to reduce the mortality of children on the waiting list, but whether creating 2 split grafts from 1 standard-criteria whole liver would compromise outcomes of adult recipients remains uncertain. We conducted this meta-analysis to compare outcomes of right lobe SLT and whole liver transplantation (WLT) in adult patients. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for relevant articles published before December 2014. Outcomes assessed were patient survival (PS), graft survival (GS), and major surgical complications after transplantation. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to synthesize the results. Seventeen studies with a total of 48,457 patients met the full inclusion criteria. PS and GS rates were all found to be equivalent between SLT and WLT recipients. However, SLT was associated with higher rates of overall biliary complications (OR = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.29-2.15; P < 0.001), bile leaks (OR = 4.30; 95% CI = 2.97-6.23; P < 0.001), overall vascular complications (OR = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.29-2.53; P < 0.001), hepatic artery thromboses (OR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.17-2.50; P = 0.005), and outflow tract obstructions (OR = 4.17; 95% CI = 1.75-9.94; P = 0.001). No significant difference was observed in incidences of biliary stricture, portal vein complications, postoperative bleeding requiring surgical treatments, primary nonfunction, and retransplantations. In subgroup analyses, biliary and vascular complications only increased after ex vivo SLT rather than in situ SLT, and SLT recipients had more retransplantations if they matched with WLT recipients in terms of urgent status. In conclusion, adult right lobe SLT was associated with increased biliary and vascular complications compared with WLT, but it did not show significant inferiority in PSs and GSs. PMID:25832308

  5. Antennal lobe organization and pheromone usage in bombycid moths

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Shigehiro; Daimon, Takaaki; Iwatsuki, Chika; Shimada, Toru; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the neuroanatomy of the macroglomerular complex (MGC), which is involved in sex pheromone processing, in five species in the subfamily Bombycinae, including Ernolatia moorei, Trilocha varians, Rondotia menciana, Bombyx mandarina and Bombyx mori. The glomerulus located at the dorsal-most part of the olfactory centre shows the largest volume in moth species examined to date. Such normal glomerular organization has been observed in E. moorei and T. varians, which use a two-component mixture and includes the compound bombykal as a mating signal. By contrast, the other three species, which use another component as a single attractant, exhibited a modified arrangement of the MGC. This correlation between pheromone usage and neural organization may be useful for understanding the process of speciation. PMID:24759369

  6. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS AND THE SUBSEQUENT EFFECTS ON THE PROSTRATE OF THE ADULT RAT: EVALUATION OF INFLAMMATION IN THE VENTRAL AND LATERAL LOBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perinatal exposure to estrogenic compounds and the subsequent effects on the prostate of the adult rat: evaluation of inflammation in the ventral and lateral lobes.

    Stoker TE, Robinette CL, Cooper RL.

    Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National ...

  7. The Frontal Lobes and Theory of Mind: Developmental Concepts from Adult Focal Lesion Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuss, Donald T.; Anderson, Vicki

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective in this paper is to present a framework to understand the structure of consciousness. We argue that consciousness has been difficult to define because there are different kinds of consciousness, hierarchically organized, which need to be differentiated. Our framework is based on evidence from adult focal lesion research. The…

  8. Enriched Environment Altered Aberrant Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Improved Long-Term Consequences After Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Liu, Tingting; Zhou, Zhike; Mu, Xiaopeng; Song, Chengguang; Xiao, Ting; Zhao, Mei; Zhao, Chuansheng

    2015-06-01

    Abnormal hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to contribute to cognitive impairments in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its specific receptor CXCR4 play important roles in neurogenesis. We investigated whether enriched environment (EE) might be beneficial for TLE. Adult rats were randomly assigned as control rats, rats subjected to status epilepticus (SE), or post-SE rats treated with EE for 30 days. We used immunofluorescence staining to analyze the hippocampal neurogenesis and Nissl staining to evaluate hippocampal damage. Electroencephalography was used to measure the duration of spontaneous seizures. Cognitive function was evaluated by Morris water maze. Western blot was used to measure the expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in the hippocampus. In the present study, we found the TLE model resulted in aberrant neurogenesis such as reduced proliferation, intensified dendritic development of newborn neurons, as well as spontaneous seizures and cognitive impairments. More importantly, EE treatment significantly increased the cell proliferation and survival, extended the apical dendrites, and delayed the attenuation of the expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4, accompanied by decreased long-term seizure activity and improved cognitive impairments in adult rats after TLE. These results provided morphological evidence that EE might be beneficial for treating TLE. PMID:25946980

  9. Antennal cropping during colony foundation in termites

    PubMed Central

    Nalepa, Christine A.; Evans, Theodore A.; Lenz, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The literature on pairing and mating behavior in termites indicates that a number of distal antennal segments in dealates of both sexes are often removed during colony foundation, with terms such as amputation, mutilation and cannibalism typically employed to report the phenomenon. Here we propose the use of the phrase ‘antennal cropping’ to describe the behavior, and assess naturally occurring levels of its occurrence by comparing the number of antennal segments in museum specimens of alates and dealates in 16 species of Australian termites (four families), supplemented by analyzing published data on Coptotermes gestroi. Dealates had significantly fewer antennal segments than alates in 14 of the 16 termite species, with both exceptions belonging to the family Termitidae. Levels of antennal cropping were not significantly different between the sexes but did vary by family. Dealates in the Kalotermitidae removed the most segments (41.3%) and those in the Termitidae removed the fewest (8.9%). We discuss the biological significance of this phylogenetically widespread termite behavior, and suggest that controlled antennal cropping is not only a normal part of their behavioral repertoire but also a key influence that changes the conduct and physiology of the royal pair during the initial stages of colony foundation. PMID:22287897

  10. Antennal sensilla of the green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Liu, X H; Li, X Y; Zhang, M; Li, K

    2013-11-01

    Lucilia sericata (Meigen) is a cosmopolitan synanthropic fly of forensic and medical importance, which can work as a mechanic vector of pathogens or cause myiasis of both human and sheep. As essential olfactory organs, antennae of adult L. sericata were examined with stereoscopic microscope, scanning electron microscope, and laser scanning confocal microscope. On antennal scape and pedicel, both microtirchiae and several bristles are detected, while another two structures, setiferous plaques and pedicellar buttons, are also found on the antennal pedicel. Seven subtypes of antennal sensilla are observed on antennal funiculus including one subtype of trichoid sensilla, two subtypes of basiconic sensilla, two subtypes of coeloconic sensilla, and two subtypes of sensory pits. Size and density of the former four types of sensilla on antennal funiculus are measured. Three distinctive sensillar characters of L. sericata are detected, which may contribute to greater olfactory sensitivity of this species and their wide distribution throughout the world. Unlike the common poreless pedicellar button with mechanoreceptor function, every pedicellar button in L. sericata is perforated by three pores, which might indicate potential chemoreceptor function of this structure. Besides, another unique feature is greater number of setiferous plaques in genus Lucilia than calliphorids of other genera. Expect for the common sensory pits with basiconic or basiconic-like sensilla in them, sensory pits filled with rarely described coeloconic-like sensilla are founded in L. sericata as well. After comparison with previous equivalent findings, the functions of these specific structures are discussed according to the life history of this calliphorid. PMID:23955594

  11. The anatomical pathways for antennal sensory information in the central nervous system of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Atsushi; Aonuma, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    Antennae are one of the major organs to detect chemo- and mechanosensory cue in crickets. Little is known how crickets process and integrate different modality of information in the brain. We thus used a number of different anatomical techniques to gain an understanding of the neural pathways extending from the antennal sensory neurons up to centers in the brain. We identified seven antennal sensory tracts (assigned as T1-7) utilizing anterograde dye filling from the antennal nerve. Tracts T1-T4 project into the antennal lobe (AL), while tracts T5 and T6 course into the dorsal region of the deutocerebrum or the suboesophageal ganglion, and finally, tract T7 terminates in the ventral area of flagellar afferent (VFA). By analyzing autofluorescence images of the AL, we identified 49 sexually isomorphic glomeruli on the basis of shape, relative position and size. On the basis of our sensory-tract data, we assigned the glomeruli into one of four separate groups. We then three-dimensionally reconstructed the internal structures in the AL (glomeruli) and the VFA (layers). Next in the protocerebrum, we identified both the tracts and their terminations from the AL and VFA. We found that 10 tracts originate in the AL, whereas there are at least eight tracts from the VFA. Several tracts from the AL share their routes with those from the VFA, but their termination areas are segregated. We now have a better anatomical understanding of the pathways for the antennal information in cricket.

  12. Serotonin-immunoreactive neurons in the antennal sensory system of the brain in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Eriko; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Yokohari, Fumio; Nishikawa, Michiko

    2007-08-01

    Social Hymenoptera such as ants or honeybees are known for their extensive behavioral repertories and plasticity. Neurons containing biogenic amines appear to play a major role in controlling behavioral plasticity in these insects. Here we describe the morphology of prominent serotonin-immunoreactive neurons of the antennal sensory system in the brain of an ant, Camponotus japonicus. Immunoreactive fibers were distributed throughout the brain and the subesophageal ganglion (SOG). The complete profile of a calycal input neuron was identified. The soma and dendritic elements are contralaterally located in the lateral protocerebrum. The neuron supplies varicose axon terminals in the lip regions of the calyces of the mushroom body, axon collaterals in the basal ring but not in the collar region, and other axon terminals ipsilaterally in the lateral protocerebrum. A giant neuron innervating the antennal lobe has varicose axon terminals in most of 300 glomeruli in the ventral region of the antennal lobe (AL) and a thick neurite that spans the entire SOG and continues towards the thoracic ganglia. However, neither a soma nor a dendritic element of this neuron was found in the brain or the SOG. A deutocerebral projection neuron has a soma in the lateral cell-body group of the AL, neuronal branches at most of the 12 glomeruli in the dorsocentral region of the ipsilateral AL, and varicose terminal arborizations in both hemispheres of the protocerebrum. Based on the present results, tentative subdivisions in neuropils related to the antennal sensory system of the ant brain are discussed.

  13. Serotonin-immunoreactive neurons in the antennal sensory system of the brain in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Eriko; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Yokohari, Fumio; Nishikawa, Michiko

    2007-08-01

    Social Hymenoptera such as ants or honeybees are known for their extensive behavioral repertories and plasticity. Neurons containing biogenic amines appear to play a major role in controlling behavioral plasticity in these insects. Here we describe the morphology of prominent serotonin-immunoreactive neurons of the antennal sensory system in the brain of an ant, Camponotus japonicus. Immunoreactive fibers were distributed throughout the brain and the subesophageal ganglion (SOG). The complete profile of a calycal input neuron was identified. The soma and dendritic elements are contralaterally located in the lateral protocerebrum. The neuron supplies varicose axon terminals in the lip regions of the calyces of the mushroom body, axon collaterals in the basal ring but not in the collar region, and other axon terminals ipsilaterally in the lateral protocerebrum. A giant neuron innervating the antennal lobe has varicose axon terminals in most of 300 glomeruli in the ventral region of the antennal lobe (AL) and a thick neurite that spans the entire SOG and continues towards the thoracic ganglia. However, neither a soma nor a dendritic element of this neuron was found in the brain or the SOG. A deutocerebral projection neuron has a soma in the lateral cell-body group of the AL, neuronal branches at most of the 12 glomeruli in the dorsocentral region of the ipsilateral AL, and varicose terminal arborizations in both hemispheres of the protocerebrum. Based on the present results, tentative subdivisions in neuropils related to the antennal sensory system of the ant brain are discussed. PMID:18217492

  14. A precocious adult visual center in the larva defines the unique optic lobe of the split-eyed whirligig beetle Dineutus sublineatus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Whirligig beetles (Coleoptera: Gyrinidae) are aquatic insects living on the water surface. They are equipped with four compound eyes, an upper pair viewing above the water surface and a lower submerged pair viewing beneath the water surface, but little is known about how their visual brain centers (optic lobes) are organized to serve such unusual eyes. We show here, for the first time, the peculiar optic lobe organization of the larval and adult whirligig beetle Dineutus sublineatus. Results The divided compound eyes of adult whirligig beetles supply optic lobes that are split into two halves, an upper half and lower half, comprising an upper and lower lamina, an upper and lower medulla and a bilobed partially split lobula. However, the lobula plate, a neuropil that in flies is known to be involved in mediating stabilized flight, exists only in conjunction with the lower lobe of the lobula. We show that, as in another group of predatory beetle larvae, in the whirligig beetle the aquatic larva precociously develops a lobula plate equipped with wide-field neurons. It is supplied by three larval laminas serving the three dorsal larval stemmata, which are adjacent to the developing upper compound eye. Conclusions In adult whirligig beetles, dual optic neuropils serve the upper aerial eyes and the lower subaquatic eyes. The exception is the lobula plate. A lobula plate develops precociously in the larva where it is supplied by inputs from three larval stemmata that have a frontal-upper field of view, in which contrasting objects such as prey items trigger a body lunge and mandibular grasp. This precocious lobula plate is lost during pupal metamorphosis, whereas another lobula plate develops normally during metamorphosis and in the adult is associated with the lower eye. The different roles of the upper and lower lobula plates in supporting, respectively, larval predation and adult optokinetic balance are discussed. Precocious development of the upper lobula

  15. Venous Outflow Reconstruction in Adult Living Donor Liver Transplant: Outcome of a Policy for Right Lobe Grafts without the Middle Hepatic Vein

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Mohamad T.; Soliman, Hosam El-Din; El-Gendy, Magdy; Ibrahim, Tarek; Davidson, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The difficulty and challenge of recovering a right lobe graft without MHV drainage is reconstructing the outflow tract of the hepatic veins. With the inclusion or the reconstruction of the MHV, early graft function is satisfactory. The inclusion of the MHV or not in the donor's right lobectomy should be based on sound criteria to provide adequate functional liver mass for recipient, while keeping risk to donor to the minimum. Objective. Reviewing the results of a policy for right lobe grafts transplant without MHV and analyzing methods of venous reconstruction related to outcome. Materials and Methods. We have two groups Group A (with more than one HV anast.) (n = 16) and Group B (single HV anast.) (n = 24). Both groups were compared regarding indications for reconstruction, complications, and operative details and outcomes, besides describing different modalities used for venous reconstruction. Results. Significant increase in operative details time in Group A. When comparison came to complications and outcomes in terms of laboratory findings and overall hospital stay, there were no significant differences. Three-month and one-year survival were better in Group A. Conclusion. Adult LDLT is safely achieved with better outcome to recipients and donors by recovering the right lobe without MHV, provided that significant MHV tributaries (segments V, VIII more than 5 mm) are reconstructed, and any accessory considerable inferior right hepatic veins (IRHVs) or superficial RHVs are anastomosed. PMID:24489434

  16. A retroactive spatial cue improved VSTM capacity in mild cognitive impairment and medial temporal lobe amnesia but not in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Rachel N; Duarte, Audrey; Pun, Carson; Smith, Victoria M; Ferber, Susanne; Barense, Morgan D

    2015-10-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is a vital cognitive ability, connecting visual input with conscious awareness. VSTM performance declines with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and medial temporal lobe (MTL) amnesia. Many studies have shown that providing a spatial retrospective cue ("retrocue") improves VSTM capacity estimates for healthy young adults. However, one study has demonstrated that older adults are unable to use a retrocue to inhibit irrelevant items from memory. It is unknown whether patients with MCI and MTL amnesia will be able to use a retrocue to benefit their memory. We administered a retrocue and a baseline (simultaneous cue, "simucue") task to young adults, older adults, MCI patients, and MTL cases. Consistent with previous findings, young adults showed a retrocue benefit, whereas healthy older adults did not. In contrast, both MCI patients and MTL cases showed a retrocue benefit--the use of a retrocue brought patient performance up to the level of age-matched controls. We speculate that the patients were able to use the spatial information from the retrocue to reduce interference and facilitate binding items to their locations.

  17. A retroactive spatial cue improved VSTM capacity in mild cognitive impairment and medial temporal lobe amnesia but not in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Rachel N; Duarte, Audrey; Pun, Carson; Smith, Victoria M; Ferber, Susanne; Barense, Morgan D

    2015-10-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is a vital cognitive ability, connecting visual input with conscious awareness. VSTM performance declines with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and medial temporal lobe (MTL) amnesia. Many studies have shown that providing a spatial retrospective cue ("retrocue") improves VSTM capacity estimates for healthy young adults. However, one study has demonstrated that older adults are unable to use a retrocue to inhibit irrelevant items from memory. It is unknown whether patients with MCI and MTL amnesia will be able to use a retrocue to benefit their memory. We administered a retrocue and a baseline (simultaneous cue, "simucue") task to young adults, older adults, MCI patients, and MTL cases. Consistent with previous findings, young adults showed a retrocue benefit, whereas healthy older adults did not. In contrast, both MCI patients and MTL cases showed a retrocue benefit--the use of a retrocue brought patient performance up to the level of age-matched controls. We speculate that the patients were able to use the spatial information from the retrocue to reduce interference and facilitate binding items to their locations. PMID:26300388

  18. Antennal Sensilla in the Parasitoid Sclerodermus sp. (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chang-Xiang; Sun, Xiao; Mi, Feng; Chen, Jingyuan; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps of the genus Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) are an important natural enemy of the Japanese pine sawyer beetle Monochamus alternatus Hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). In this study, we used scanning electron microscopy to examine the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of Sclerodermus sp. Antennae of females and males comprised the scape, pedicel, and 11 flagellomere segments. Based on the morphology of the sensilla in each sex, seven types of sensillum were identified: sensilla trichodea (Tr.1, Tr.2 and Tr.3), sensilla basiconica (Ba.1, Ba.2, and Ba.3), sensilla styloconica (St.1 and St.2), sensilla placodea, sensilla coeloconica, sensilla squamiforma, and Bohm’s bristles. Tr.2, Ba.1, and St.1 were only found in females, whereas Ba.2, Ba.3, and St.2 were only observed in males. Sensilla placodea were the most common, given that they occur on the antennae of many parasitoid Hymenoptera, whereas sensilla Tr were the most abundant, being distributed over the entire antennal surface. These sensilla are likely to have roles in the host locating and habitat searching behavior of adult Sclerodermus wasps. Therefore, our findings provide a basis for further studies of the host location behavior of this and other species of parasitic wasp. PMID:25843589

  19. Antennal pathways in the central nervous system of a blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Barrozo, Romina B; Couton, Louise; Lazzari, Claudio R; Insausti, Teresita C; Minoli, Sebastian A; Fresquet, Nadine; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Anton, Sylvia

    2009-03-01

    The haematophagous bug Rhodnius prolixus has been a model system in insect physiology for a long time. Recently, several studies have been devoted to its sensory systems, including olfaction. However, few data are available on the basic organisation of the nervous system in this species. By means of neuronal backfills, histology, confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction methods, we have characterized the projection patterns of antennal sensory neurons within the central nervous system of this disease-vector insect. We established the first partial three-dimensional map of the antennal lobe (AL) of a hemipteran insect. The ALs of this species are relatively diffuse structures, which nevertheless show a glomerular organisation. Based on computer reconstruction of the AL, 22 glomeruli with a radius of 8-25 microm could be identified. No obvious sexual dimorphism of the glomerular architecture was observed. Antennal afferents project not only into the deutocerebrum, but also some fibres descend through the ventral nerve cord to ganglia belonging to the abdominal segments.

  20. [Asymmetry of antennal grooming in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana)].

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the key features of antennal grooming of male American cockroaches in neutral circumstances. It was shown for the first time that the right antenna was cleaned significantly more often than the left one, which indicates the presence of functional asymmetry of antennal grooming in this insect species. At the same time, no statistically significant asymmetry was found for grooming of antennal bases and legs. Morphological asymmetries of antennae and legs and/or brain lateralization are the plausible sources of observed behavioral asymmetry in antennal grooming.

  1. Changes in memory function in children and young adults with temporal lobe epilepsy: a follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Linda M; Mahdavi, Niloufar; Anderson, Vicki A; Harvey, A Simon

    2012-03-01

    This longitudinal study explored change in memory function from childhood to young adulthood in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The 24 participants (11 left TLE; 13 right TLE) had a mean age of 16.10 years (SD=4.13 years), and 14 had undergone surgery since initial assessment. Contrary to baseline, verbal memory deficits were lateralized (left

  2. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal < 100 pM). Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was reinitiated. Two months later, her hippocampal abnormalities had improved and 3 months later her VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  3. Eph Receptor and Ephrin Signaling in Developing and Adult Brain of the Honeybee (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Vidovic, Maria; Nighorn, Alan; Koblar, Simon; Maleszka, Ryszard

    2007-01-01

    Roles for Eph receptor tyrosine kinase and ephrin signaling in vertebrate brain development are well established. Their involvement in the modulation of mammalian synaptic structure and physiology is also emerging. However, less is known of their effects on brain development and their function in adult invertebrate nervous systems. Here, we report on the characterization of Eph receptor and ephrin orthologs in the honeybee, Apis mellifera (Am), and their role in learning and memory. In situ hybridization for mRNA expression showed a uniform distribution of expression of both genes across the developing pupal and adult brain. However, in situ labeling with Fc fusion proteins indicated that the AmEphR and Amephrin proteins were differentially localized to cell body regions in the mushroom bodies and the developing neuropiles of the antennal and optic lobes. In adults, AmEphR protein was localized to regions of synaptic contacts in optic lobes, in the glomeruli of antennal lobes, and in the medial lobe of the mushroom body. The latter two regions are involved in olfactory learning and memory in the honeybee. Injections of EphR-Fc and ephrin-Fc proteins into the brains of adult bees, 1 h before olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex, sig-nificantly reduced memory 24 h later. Experimental amnesia in the group injected with ephrin-Fc was apparent 1 h post-training. Experimental amnesia was also induced by post-training injections with ephrin-Fc suggesting a role in recall. This is the first demonstration that Eph molecules function to regulate the formation of memory in insects. PMID:17443785

  4. Airflow and optic flow mediate antennal positioning in flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Roy Khurana, Taruni; Sane, Sanjay P

    2016-01-01

    To maintain their speeds during navigation, insects rely on feedback from their visual and mechanosensory modalities. Although optic flow plays an essential role in speed determination, it is less reliable under conditions of low light or sparse landmarks. Under such conditions, insects rely on feedback from antennal mechanosensors but it is not clear how these inputs combine to elicit flight-related antennal behaviours. We here show that antennal movements of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, are governed by combined visual and antennal mechanosensory inputs. Frontal airflow, as experienced during forward flight, causes antennae to actively move forward as a sigmoidal function of absolute airspeed values. However, corresponding front-to-back optic flow causes antennae to move backward, as a linear function of relative optic flow, opposite the airspeed response. When combined, these inputs maintain antennal position in a state of dynamic equilibrium. PMID:27097104

  5. Airflow and optic flow mediate antennal positioning in flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Roy Khurana, Taruni; Sane, Sanjay P

    2016-01-01

    To maintain their speeds during navigation, insects rely on feedback from their visual and mechanosensory modalities. Although optic flow plays an essential role in speed determination, it is less reliable under conditions of low light or sparse landmarks. Under such conditions, insects rely on feedback from antennal mechanosensors but it is not clear how these inputs combine to elicit flight-related antennal behaviours. We here show that antennal movements of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, are governed by combined visual and antennal mechanosensory inputs. Frontal airflow, as experienced during forward flight, causes antennae to actively move forward as a sigmoidal function of absolute airspeed values. However, corresponding front-to-back optic flow causes antennae to move backward, as a linear function of relative optic flow, opposite the airspeed response. When combined, these inputs maintain antennal position in a state of dynamic equilibrium.

  6. Airflow and optic flow mediate antennal positioning in flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Roy Khurana, Taruni; Sane, Sanjay P

    2016-01-01

    To maintain their speeds during navigation, insects rely on feedback from their visual and mechanosensory modalities. Although optic flow plays an essential role in speed determination, it is less reliable under conditions of low light or sparse landmarks. Under such conditions, insects rely on feedback from antennal mechanosensors but it is not clear how these inputs combine to elicit flight-related antennal behaviours. We here show that antennal movements of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, are governed by combined visual and antennal mechanosensory inputs. Frontal airflow, as experienced during forward flight, causes antennae to actively move forward as a sigmoidal function of absolute airspeed values. However, corresponding front-to-back optic flow causes antennae to move backward, as a linear function of relative optic flow, opposite the airspeed response. When combined, these inputs maintain antennal position in a state of dynamic equilibrium. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14449.001 PMID:27097104

  7. Odd-skipped labels a group of distinct neurons associated with the mushroom body and optic lobe in the adult Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Levy, Peter; Larsen, Camilla

    2013-11-01

    Olfactory processing has been intensively studied in Drosophila melanogaster. However, we still know little about the descending neural pathways from the higher order processing centers and how these connect with other neural circuits. Here we describe, in detail, the adult projections patterns that arise from a cluster of 78 neurons, defined by the expression of the Odd-skipped transcription factor. We term these neurons Odd neurons. By using expression of genetically encoded axonal and dendritic markers, we show that a subset of the Odd neurons projects dendrites into the calyx of the mushroom body (MB) and axons into the inferior protocerebrum. We exclude the possibility that the Odd neurons are part of the well-known Kenyon cells whose projections form the MB and conclude that the Odd neurons belong to a previously not described class of extrinsic MB neurons. In addition, three of the Odd neurons project into the lobula plate of the optic lobe, and two of these cells extend axons ipsi- and contralaterally in the brain. Anatomically, these cells do not resemble any previously described lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs) in Drosophila. We show that the Odd neurons are predominantly cholinergic but also include a small number of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons. Finally, we provide evidence that the Odd neurons are a hemilineage, suggesting they are born from a defined set of neuroblasts. Our anatomical analysis hints at the possibility that subgroups of Odd neurons could be involved in olfactory and visual processing.

  8. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress. PMID:25461224

  9. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress.

  10. Treating autism by targeting the temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Chi, Richard P; Snyder, Allan W

    2014-11-01

    Compelling new findings suggest that an early core signature of autism is a deficient left anterior temporal lobe response to language and an atypical over-activation of the right anterior temporal lobe. Intriguingly, our recent results from an entirely different line of reasoning and experiments also show that applying cathodal stimulation (suppressing) at the left anterior temporal lobe together with anodal stimulation (facilitating) at the right anterior temporal lobe, by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), can induce some autistic-like cognitive abilities in otherwise normal adults. If we could briefly induce autistic like cognitive abilities in healthy individuals, it follows that we might be able to mitigate some autistic traits by reversing the above stimulation protocol, in an attempt to restore the typical dominance of the left anterior temporal lobe. Accordingly, we hypothesize that at least some autistic traits can be mitigated, by applying anodal stimulation (facilitating) at the left anterior temporal lobe together with cathodal stimulation (suppressing) at the right anterior temporal lobe. Our hypothesis is supported by strong convergent evidence that autistic symptoms can emerge and later reverse due to the onset and subsequent recovery of various temporal lobe (predominantly the left) pathologies. It is also consistent with evidence that the temporal lobes (especially the left) are a conceptual hub, critical for extracting meaning from lower level sensory information to form a coherent representation, and that a deficit in the temporal lobes underlies autistic traits.

  11. Secreted Semaphorins from Degenerating Larval ORN Axons Direct Adult Projection Neuron Dendrite Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Lora B.; Chou, Ya-Hui; Wu, Zhuhao; Joo, William; Komiyama, Takaki; Potter, Christopher J.; Kolodkin, Alex L.; Garcia, K. Christopher; Luo, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY During assembly of the Drosophila olfactory circuit, projection neuron (PN) dendrites pre-pattern the developing antennal lobe before the arrival of axons from their presynaptic partners, the adult olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). We previously found that levels of transmembrane Semaphorin-1a, which acts as a receptor, instruct PN dendrite targeting along the dorsolateral-ventromedial axis. Here we show that two secreted semaphorins, Sema-2a and Sema-2b, provide spatial cues for PN dendrite targeting. Sema-2a and Sema-2b proteins are distributed in gradients opposing the Sema-1a protein gradient, and Sema-1a binds to Sema-2a-expressing cells. In Sema-2a and Sema-2b double mutants, PN dendrites that normally target dorsolaterally in the antennal lobe mistarget ventromedially, phenocopying cell-autonomous Sema-1a removal from these PNs. Cell ablation, cell-specific knockdown, and rescue experiments indicate that secreted semaphorins from degenerating larval ORN axons direct dendrite targeting. Thus, a degenerating brain structure instructs the wiring of a developing circuit through the repulsive action of secreted semaphorins. PMID:22153371

  12. Elucidating the Neuronal Architecture of Olfactory Glomeruli in the Drosophila Antennal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Grabe, Veit; Baschwitz, Amelie; Dweck, Hany K M; Lavista-Llanos, Sofia; Hansson, Bill S; Sachse, Silke

    2016-09-20

    Olfactory glomeruli are morphologically conserved spherical compartments of the olfactory system, distinguishable solely by their chemosensory repertoire, anatomical position, and volume. Little is known, however, about their numerical neuronal composition. We therefore characterized their neuronal architecture and correlated these anatomical features with their functional properties in Drosophila melanogaster. We quantitatively mapped all olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) innervating each glomerulus, including sexually dimorphic distributions. Our data reveal the impact of OSN number on glomerular dimensions and demonstrate yet unknown sex-specific differences in several glomeruli. Moreover, we quantified uniglomerular projection neurons for each glomerulus, which unraveled a glomerulus-specific numerical innervation. Correlation between morphological features and functional specificity showed that glomeruli innervated by narrowly tuned OSNs seem to possess a larger number of projection neurons and are involved in less lateral processing than glomeruli targeted by broadly tuned OSNs. Our study demonstrates that the neuronal architecture of each glomerulus encoding crucial odors is unique. PMID:27653699

  13. Projection neurons in Drosophila antennal lobes signal the acceleration of odor concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2015-05-14

    Temporal experience of odor gradients is important in spatial orientation of animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster exhibits robust odor-guided behaviors in an odor gradient field. In order to investigate how early olfactory circuits process temporal variation of olfactory stimuli, we subjected flies to precisely defined odor concentration waveforms and examined spike patterns of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and projection neurons (PNs). We found a significant temporal transformation between OSN and PN spike patterns, manifested by the PN output strongly signaling the OSN spike rate and its rate of change. A simple two-dimensional model admitting the OSN spike rate and its rate of change as inputs closely predicted the PN output. When cascaded with the rate-of-change encoding by OSNs, PNs primarily signal the acceleration and the rate of change of dynamic odor stimuli to higher brain centers, thereby enabling animals to reliably respond to the onsets of odor concentrations.

  14. Scanning electron microscopy of antennal sensory organs of the cattle grub, Hypoderma lineatum (Diptera: Oestridae).

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Liu, X H; Ge, Y Q; Zhang, D

    2015-10-01

    Hypoderma lineatum (Villers, 1789) (Diptera: Oestridae) is a hypodermosis fly that has resulted in great economic losses worldwide. The antennae of cattle grub males and females were examined through stereoscopic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to reveal the general morphology, combined with distribution, type, size, and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. All of the three antennal segments (antennal scape, pedicel, and funiculus) possess microtrichiae on their surface. Mechanoreceptors only exist on the antennal scape and pedicel. The antennal funiculus presents four types of antennal sensilla: trichoid, basiconic, coeloconic, and clavate sensilla. Three distinctive characters of H. lineatum are obvious: (1) the relatively slender, flexible, and equal-height mechanoreceptors; (2) the enlarged antennal pedicel, and numerous antennal sensory pits and pit sensilla on the antennal funiculus; and (3) all types of antennal sensilla clustered in sensory pits, respectively. Additionally, the enlarged antennal pedicel and abundant sensory pits and pit sensilla might facilitate odor detection, enhance olfactory sensitivity and accuracy, and also protect the fragile antennal sensilla from mechanical irritation or damage. PMID:26193822

  15. Stability of lobed balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagitz, M.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a computational study of the stability of simple lobed balloon structures. The particular structure that is investigated is a stack of pumpkin-shaped envelopes with a common axis of symmetry, and hence forming a kind of lobed cylinder. The number of the pumpkin envelopes is one of the variables that is investigated; a number of shape imperfections are also considered. This lobed cylinder is an axi-symmetric, idealised version of the lobed pumpkin balloons that have occasionally deployed into anomalous, clefted configurations. By studying in detail the behaviour of lobed cylinder we are able to draw some preliminary conclusions about general features of the behaviour of lobed pumpkin balloons.

  16. Frontal lobe function in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Stretton, J.; Thompson, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is typically associated with long-term memory dysfunction. The frontal lobes support high-level cognition comprising executive skills and working memory that is vital for daily life functioning. Deficits in these functions have been increasingly reported in TLE. Evidence from both the neuropsychological and neuroimaging literature suggests both executive function and working memory are compromised in the presence of TLE. In relation to executive impairment, particular focus has been paid to set shifting as measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task. Other discrete executive functions such as decision-making and theory of mind also appear vulnerable but have received little attention. With regard to working memory, the medial temporal lobe structures appear have a more critical role, but with emerging evidence of hippocampal dependent and independent processes. The relative role of underlying pathology and seizure spread is likely to have considerable bearing upon the cognitive phenotype and trajectory in TLE. The identification of the nature of frontal lobe dysfunction in TLE thus has important clinical implications for prognosis and surgical management. Longitudinal neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies assessing frontal lobe function in TLE patients pre- and postoperatively will improve our understanding further. PMID:22100147

  17. Antennal development in the praying mantis (Tenodera aridifolia) highlights multitudinous processes in hemimetabolous insect species.

    PubMed

    Carle, Thomas; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yokohari, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Insects possess antennae equipped with a large number of segments (flagellomeres) on which sensory organs (sensilla) are located. Hemimetabolous insects grow by molting until they reach adulthood. In these species, the sensory structures develop and mature during each stage of development; new flagellomeres are generated at each molt elongating the antennae, and new sensilla appear. The praying mantis (Tenodera aridifolia) is a hemimetabolous insect with 7 different instars before it reaches adulthood. Because their antennae are provided with an atypical sensillar distribution, we previously suggested that their antennae develop with a different mechanism to other hemimetaboulous insect species. In the present study, we measured the number, length and width of flagellomeres along the antennae in nymph and adult mantis Tenodera aridifolia. For this study, we developed a new and innovative methodology to reconstruct the antennal development based on the length of flagellomeres. We observed and confirmed that the antennae of mantises develop with the addition of new segments at two distinct sites. In addition, we constructed a complete database of the features of the flagellum for each stage of development. From our data, we found that sexual dimorphism appears from the 6 instar (larger number and wider flagellomeres in males) in accordance with the appearance of their genital apparatus. The antennal sexual dimorphism completes at adulthood with longer flagellomeres and the emergence of a huge number of grooved peg sensilla in males during the last molting, which suggests once again their function as sex-pheromone receptive sensilla. PMID:24896610

  18. Antennal Development in the Praying Mantis (Tenodera aridifolia) Highlights Multitudinous Processes in Hemimetabolous Insect Species

    PubMed Central

    Carle, Thomas; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yokohari, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Insects possess antennae equipped with a large number of segments (flagellomeres) on which sensory organs (sensilla) are located. Hemimetabolous insects grow by molting until they reach adulthood. In these species, the sensory structures develop and mature during each stage of development; new flagellomeres are generated at each molt elongating the antennae, and new sensilla appear. The praying mantis (Tenodera aridifolia) is a hemimetabolous insect with 7 different instars before it reaches adulthood. Because their antennae are provided with an atypical sensillar distribution, we previously suggested that their antennae develop with a different mechanism to other hemimetaboulous insect species. In the present study, we measured the number, length and width of flagellomeres along the antennae in nymph and adult mantis Tenodera aridifolia. For this study, we developed a new and innovative methodology to reconstruct the antennal development based on the length of flagellomeres. We observed and confirmed that the antennae of mantises develop with the addition of new segments at two distinct sites. In addition, we constructed a complete database of the features of the flagellum for each stage of development. From our data, we found that sexual dimorphism appears from the 6 instar (larger number and wider flagellomeres in males) in accordance with the appearance of their genital apparatus. The antennal sexual dimorphism completes at adulthood with longer flagellomeres and the emergence of a huge number of grooved peg sensilla in males during the last molting, which suggests once again their function as sex-pheromone receptive sensilla. PMID:24896610

  19. Ultrastructural studies and Na+,K+-ATPase immunolocalization in the antennal urinary glands of the lobster Homarus gammarus (Crustacea, Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Khodabandeh, Saber; Charmantier, Guy; Charmantier-Daures, Mireille

    2005-10-01

    Unlike in crustacean freshwater species, the structure and ultrastructure of the excretory antennal gland is poorly documented in marine species. The general organization and ultrastructure of the cells and the localization of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were examined in the antennal gland of the adult lobster Homarus gammarus. Each gland is composed of a centrally located coelomosac surrounded ventrally by a labyrinth divided into two parts (I and II) and dorsally by a voluminous bladder. There is no differentiated nephridal tubule between them. The labyrinth and bladder cells have in common a number of ultrastructural cytological features, including basal membrane infoldings associated with mitochondria, apical microvilli, and cytoplasmic extrusions, and a cytoplasm packed with numerous vacuoles, vesicles, lysosome-like bodies, and swollen mitochondria. Each type of cell also presents distinctive characters. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was detected through immunofluorescence in the basal part of the cells of the labyrinth and in the bladder cells with an increasing immunostaining from labyrinth I to the bladder. No immunoreactivity was detected in the coelomosac. The cells of the labyrinth and of the bladder present morphological and enzymatic features of ionocytes. The antennal glands of the lobster thus possess active ion exchanges capabilities. PMID:15879578

  20. Ultrastructural studies and Na+,K+-ATPase immunolocalization in the antennal urinary glands of the lobster Homarus gammarus (Crustacea, Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Khodabandeh, Saber; Charmantier, Guy; Charmantier-Daures, Mireille

    2005-10-01

    Unlike in crustacean freshwater species, the structure and ultrastructure of the excretory antennal gland is poorly documented in marine species. The general organization and ultrastructure of the cells and the localization of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were examined in the antennal gland of the adult lobster Homarus gammarus. Each gland is composed of a centrally located coelomosac surrounded ventrally by a labyrinth divided into two parts (I and II) and dorsally by a voluminous bladder. There is no differentiated nephridal tubule between them. The labyrinth and bladder cells have in common a number of ultrastructural cytological features, including basal membrane infoldings associated with mitochondria, apical microvilli, and cytoplasmic extrusions, and a cytoplasm packed with numerous vacuoles, vesicles, lysosome-like bodies, and swollen mitochondria. Each type of cell also presents distinctive characters. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was detected through immunofluorescence in the basal part of the cells of the labyrinth and in the bladder cells with an increasing immunostaining from labyrinth I to the bladder. No immunoreactivity was detected in the coelomosac. The cells of the labyrinth and of the bladder present morphological and enzymatic features of ionocytes. The antennal glands of the lobster thus possess active ion exchanges capabilities.

  1. A functional genetic analysis in flour beetles (Tenebrionidae) reveals an antennal identity specification mechanism active during metamorphosis in Holometabola.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank W; Angelini, David R; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-05-01

    The antenna was the first arthropod ventral appendage to evolve non-leg identity. Models of antennal evolution have been based on comparisons of antennal and leg identity specification mechanisms in Drosophila melanogaster, a species in which appendages develop from highly derived imaginal discs during the larval period. We test for conservation of the Drosophila antennal identity specification mechanism at metamorphosis in Tribolium castaneum and three other flour beetle species (Tribolium confusum, Tribolium brevicornis and Latheticus oryzae) in the family Tenebrionidae. In Drosophila, loss of function of four transcription factors-homothorax, extradenticle, Distal-less, and spineless-causes large-scale transformations of the antenna to leg identity. Distal-less and spineless function similarly during metamorphosis in T. castaneum. RNA interference (RNAi) targeting homothorax (hth) or extradenticle (exd) caused transformation of the proximal antenna to distal leg identity in flour beetles, but did not affect the identity of the distal antenna. This differs from the functional domain of these genes in early instar Drosophila, where they are required for identity specification throughout the antenna, but matches their functional domain in late instar Drosophila. The similarities between antennal identity specification at metamorphosis in flour beetles and in late larval Drosophila likely reflect the conservation of an ancestral metamorphic developmental mechanism. There were two notable differences in hth/exd loss of function phenotypes between flies and beetles. Flour beetles retained all of their primary segments in both the antenna and legs, whereas flies undergo reduction and fusion of primary segments. This difference in ground state appendage morphology casts doubt on interpretations of developmental ground states as evolutionary atavisms. Additionally, adult Tribolium eyes were transformed to elytron-like structures; we provide a developmental hypothesis for

  2. Multiple List Learning in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Parallels with Frontal Lobe Damage or Further Evidence of Diminished Relational Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Dermot M.; Gaigg, Sebastian B.; Gardiner, John M.

    2010-01-01

    To test the effects of providing relational cues at encoding and/or retrieval on multi-trial, multi-list free recall in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 16 adults with ASD and 16 matched typical adults learned a first followed by a second categorised list of 24 words. Category labels were provided at encoding,…

  3. Ontogeny of the antennal glands in the crayfish Astacus leptodactylus (Crustacea, Decapoda): immunolocalization of Na+,K+-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Khodabandeh, S; Kutnik, M; Aujoulat, F; Charmantier, G; Charmantier-Daures, M

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of the antennal urinary glands in the ontogeny of osmoregulatory functions was investigated during the development of Astacus leptodactylus by measurements of hemolymph and urine osmolality in juvenile and adult crayfish and by the immunodetection of the enzyme Na+,K+-ATPase. In stage II juveniles, 1-year-old juveniles, and adults, all of which were maintained in freshwater, urine was significantly hypotonic to hemolymph. In adults, chloride and sodium concentrations were much lower in urine than in hemolymph. During embryonic development, Na+,K+-ATPase was detected by immunocytochemistry in ionocytes lining the tubule and the bladder, at an eye index (EI) of 220-250 microm, and in the labyrinth, at EI 350 microm. In all regions, immunofluorescence was mainly located at the basolateral side of the cells. No immunofluorescence was detected at any stage in the coelomosac. In late embryonic stages (EI 410-440 microm), in stage I juveniles, and in adults, strong positive immunofluorescence was found from the labyrinth up to and including the bladder. These results show that, as early as hatching, juvenile crayfish are able to produce dilute urine hypotonic to hemolymph. This ability originates from the presence of Na+,K+-ATPase in ion-transporting cells located in the labyrinth, the tubule, and the bladder of the antennal glands and constitutes one of the main adaptations of crayfish to freshwater.

  4. Antennal phenotype of Mexican haplogroups of the Triatoma dimidiata complex, vectors of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    May-Concha, Irving; Guerenstein, Pablo G; Ramsey, Janine M; Rojas, Julio C; Catalá, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille) is a species complex that spans North, Central, and South America and which is a key vector of all known discrete typing units (DTU) of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Morphological and genetic studies indicate that T. dimidiata is a species complex with three principal haplogroups (hg) in Mexico. Different markers and traits are still inconclusive regarding if other morphological differentiation may indicate probable behavioral and vectorial divergences within this complex. In this paper we compared the antennae of three Mexican haplogroups (previously verified by molecular markers ND4 and ITS-2) and discussed possible relationships with their capacity to disperse and colonized new habitats. The abundance of each type of sensillum (bristles, basiconics, thick- and thin-walled trichoids) on the antennae of the three haplogroups, were measured under light microscopy and compared using Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric and multivariate non-parametric analyses. Discriminant analyses indicate significant differences among the antennal phenotype of haplogroups either for adults and some nymphal stages, indicating consistency of the character to analyze intraspecific variability within the complex. The present study shows that the adult antennal pedicel of the T. dimidiata complex have abundant chemosensory sensilla, according with good capacity for dispersal and invasion of different habitats also related to their high capacity to adapt to conserved as well as modified habitats. However, the numerical differences among the haplogroups are suggesting variations in that capacity. The results here presented support the evidence of T. dimidiata as a species complex but show females and males in a different way. Given the close link between the bug's sensory system and its habitat and host-seeking behavior, AP characterization could be useful to complement genetic, neurological and ethological studies of the closely

  5. Antennal courtship and functional morphology of tyloids in the parasitoid wasp Syrphoctonus tarsatorius (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Diplazontinae).

    PubMed

    Steiner, Salome M; Kropf, Christian; Graber, Werner; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Klopfstein, Seraina

    2010-01-01

    Courtship behaviour and associated morphological characters are believed to evolve under diversifying sexual selection. In Hymenoptera, sexually dimorphic antennal structures, the 'tyloids', show a large variability. Although crucial for functional interpretation, the link between tyloid morphology and courtship behaviour has gained only limited attention. Here, we investigate antennal morphology and antennal courtship in the parasitoid wasp Syrphoctonus tarsatorius (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Diplazontinae). We confirm the glandular nature of the tyloids by light and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, we report a new form of antennation during courtship, antennal double-coiling, which links morphology and behaviour by bringing the tyloids in direct contact with the antennae of the female, thus probably facilitating the transfer of a contact pheromone. We show that a change in haemolymph pressure is the activator of the antennal movement and that it can be reproduced in the laboratory using amputated antennae. Investigations of antennal structure and movement in three additional hymenopteran species suggest that the number and location of tyloids coincide with the modality of antennal coiling. Our method for simulating antennal movement will enable retrieving information about courtship behaviour from museum specimens, thus leading to a better understanding of the evolution of courtship behaviour in Hymenoptera.

  6. The functional organisation of glia in the adult brain of Drosophila and other insects

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tara N.; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    This review annotates and categorises the glia of adult Drosophila and other model insects and describes the developmental origins of these in the Drosophila optic lobe. The functions of glia in the adult vary depending upon their sub-type and location in the brain. The task of annotating glia is essentially complete only for the glia of the fly's lamina, which comprise: two types of surface glia - the pseudocartridge and fenestrated glia; two types of cortex glia - the distal and proximal satellite glia; and two types of neuropile glia - the epithelial and marginal glia. We advocate that the term subretinal glia, as used to refer to both pseudocartridge and fenestrated glia, be abandoned. Other neuropiles contain similar glial subtypes, but other than the antennal lobes these have not been described in detail. Surface glia form the blood brain barrier, regulating the flow of substances into and out of the nervous system, both for the brain as a whole and the optic neuropiles in particular. Cortex glia provide a second level of barrier, wrapping axon fascicles and isolating neuronal cell bodies both from neighbouring brain regions and from their underlying neuropiles. Neuropile glia can be generated in the adult and a subtype, ensheathing glia, are responsible for cleaning up cellular debris during Wallerian degeneration. Both the neuropile ensheathing and astrocyte-like glia may be involved in clearing neurotransmitters from the extracellular space, thus modifying the levels of histamine, glutamate and possibly dopamine at the synapse to ultimately affect behaviour. PMID:20109517

  7. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases. PMID:27621745

  8. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases. PMID:27621745

  9. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases.

  10. Bridging the Gap between Evidence and Practice for Adults with Medically Refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Is a Change in Funding Policy Needed to Stimulate a Shift in Practice?

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Alireza; Aldakkan, Abdulrahman; Kosicka, Magda J.; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Valiante, Taufik A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Surgery for medically refractory epilepsy (MRE) in adults has been shown to be effective but underutilized. Comprehensive health economic evaluations of surgery compared with continued medical management are limited. Policy changes may be necessary to influence practice shift. Methods. A critical review of the literature on health economic analyses for adults with MRE was conducted. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CRD, and EconLit databases were searched using relevant subject headings and keywords pertaining to adults, epilepsy, and health economic evaluations. The screening was conducted independently and in duplicate. Results. Four studies were identified (1 Canadian, 2 American, and 1 French). Two were cost-utility analyses and 2 were cost-effectiveness evaluations. Only one was conducted after the effectiveness of surgery was established through a randomized trial. All suggested surgery to be favorable in the medium to long term (7-8 years and beyond). The reduction of medication use was the major cost-saving parameter in favor of surgery. Conclusions. Although updated evaluations that are more generalizable across settings are necessary, surgery appears to be a favorable option from a health economic perspective. Given the limited success of knowledge translation endeavours, funder-level policy changes such as quality-based purchasing may be necessary to induce a shift in practice. PMID:26770822

  11. Ultrastructure of the Antennal Sensillae of Male and Female Peach Fruit Fly, Bactrocera zonata

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Azza A.; Ali, Nashat A.; Mohamed, Hend O.

    2014-01-01

    Antennal morphology and funicular sensillae of male and female peach fruit flies, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) (Diptera: Tephritidae), were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study focused on the sensillae found on the antennal segments (scape, pedicel, and flagellum or funiculus that bears the arista) of B. zonata. Antennal segments of females tended to be larger than those of the males. The first two antennal segments, scape and pedicel, were heavily covered with microtrichia and bear bristles. Numerous microtrichia as well as trichoid (I, II), basiconic, clavate, and coeloconic sensillae were observed on the funiculus. SEM studies showed some differences in size and also in position of some sensillae on the antennae of the females of B. zonata. The sensillae found on the funiculus, such as trichoid and basiconic sensillae, were significantly larger in females. PMID:25373192

  12. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  13. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  14. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  15. Antennal morphology and sensilla ultrastructure of the web-spinning sawfly Acantholyda posticalis Matsumura (Hymenoptera: Pamphiliidae).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiujie; Zhang, Sufang; Zhang, Zhen; Kong, Xiangbo; Wang, Hongbin; Shen, Gengchen; Zhang, Haijun

    2013-07-01

    Acantholyda posticalis (Hymenoptera: Pamphiliidae) is an important pine pest with a world-wide distribution. To clarify the olfactory receptive mechanism of A. posticalis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the morphology, ultrastructure, and distribution of antennal sensilla of adults from two sites in China. The antennae were filiform, and the flagella comprised 32-35 flagellomeres. Six sensillum types were found. Sensilla chaetica were straight setae with sharply pointed tips and without dendrites in the lumen. Sensilla trichodea were characterized by a parallel-grooved wall and one terminal pore and were innervated by four dendrites at the base. Sensilla basiconica I possessed longitudinally grooved surfaces and multiple terminal pores, with five dendrites in the lumen. Sensilla basiconica II not only had a distinct terminal pore but also had numerous tiny wall pores and many dendritic branches within the sensillum lymph. Sensilla coeloconica had deep longitudinal grooves, one terminal pore and six dendrites, while sensilla campaniformia were thick-walled with a terminal opening and sensory nerve bundles in the lumen. Sensilla chaetica and s. trichodea were most abundant and distributed over the entire antennae, while s. basiconica I and II, s. coeloconica, and s. campaniformia were restricted to the ventral flagellar surfaces. Although the shape and structure of antennae were similar in males and females, females had significantly longer antennae than males, and males had significantly more s. basiconica I than females. We compared the morphology and structure of these sensilla to other Hymenoptera and discussed their possible functions.

  16. Stability of Lobed Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Danny (Technical Monitor); Pagitz, M.; Pellegrino, Xu S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the stability of simple lobed balloon structures. Two approaches are presented, one based on a wrinkled material model and one based on a variable Poisson s ratio model that eliminates compressive stresses iteratively. The first approach is used to investigate the stability of both a single isotensoid and a stack of four isotensoids, for perturbations of in.nitesimally small amplitude. It is found that both structures are stable for global deformation modes, but unstable for local modes at su.ciently large pressure. Both structures are stable if an isotropic model is assumed. The second approach is used to investigate the stability of the isotensoid stack for large shape perturbations, taking into account contact between di.erent surfaces. For this structure a distorted, stable configuration is found. It is also found that the volume enclosed by this con.guration is smaller than that enclosed by the undistorted structure.

  17. Ultrastructure of antennal sensory organs of horse nasal-myiasis fly, Rhinoestrus purpureus (Diptera: Oestridae).

    PubMed

    Liu, X H; Li, X Y; Li, K; Zhang, D

    2015-07-01

    Rhinoestrus purpureus (Brauer, 1858) (Diptera: Oestridae) is an economically important parasite that can cause severe nasal myiasis in equids or even attacking humans. The antennae of R. purpureus were examined using stereoscopic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The general morphology was provided detailedly, together with distribution, type, size, and ultrastructure of antennal sensilla. All the three antennal segments, antennal scape, pedicel, and funiculus, are interspersed by microtrichiae. Only mechanoreceptors are detected on antennal scape and pedicel. On antennal funiculus, three types of sensilla were observed, including basiconic sensilla, coeloconic sensilla and clavate sensilla. Two features are characterized of this host-specific bot fly: (1) numerous sensory pits with branched basiconic sensilla on antennal funiculus and (2) the absence of trichoid sensilla. The function of these distinctive traits are discussed in association with the life history. We suggest that more sensory pits with branched sensilla could increase the sensitivity of olfactory system for host orientation, while the capability of pheromone identification might be reduced due to the absence of trichoid sensilla. Besides, we support both thermo- and chemo-functions of coeloconic sensilla. PMID:25859927

  18. Axogenesis in the antennal nervous system of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria revisited: the base pioneers.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, Erica; Liu, Yu; Boyan, George

    2015-01-01

    The antennal nervous system of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria comprises two parallel pathways projecting to the brain, each pioneered early in embryogenesis by a pair of sibling cells located at the antennal tip. En route, the growth cones of pioneers from one pathway have been shown to contact a guidepost-like cell called the base pioneer. Its role in axon guidance remains unclear as do the cellular guidance cues regulating axogenesis in the other pathway supposedly without a base pioneer. Further, while the tip pioneers are known to delaminate from the antennal epithelium into the lumen, the origin of this base pioneer is unknown. Here, we use immunolabeling and immunoblocking methods to clarify these issues. Co-labeling against the neuron-specific marker horseradish peroxidase and the pioneer-specific cell surface glycoprotein Lazarillo identifies not only the tip pioneers but also a base pioneer associated with each of the developing antennal pathways. Both base pioneers co-express the mesodermal label Mes3, consistent with a lumenal origin, whereas the tip pioneers proved Mes3-negative confirming their affiliation with the ectodermal epithelium. Lazarillo antigen expression in the antennal pioneers followed a different temporal dynamic: continuous in the tip pioneers, but in the base pioneers, only at the time their filopodia and those of the tip pioneers first recognize one another. Immunoblocking of Lazarillo expression in cultured embryos disrupts this recognition resulting in misguided axogenesis in both antennal pathways.

  19. Structural and functional changes in the olfactory pathway of adult Drosophila take place at a critical age.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Jean-Marc; Acebes, Angel; Ramaswami, Mani; Ferrús, Alberto

    2003-07-01

    The olfactory system of several holometabolous insect species undergoes anatomical changes after eclosion of the imago, following those occurring during metamorphosis. In parallel, odor experience and learning performance also evolve with age. Here, we analyze the case of adult Drosophila females. Synaptogenesis in the antennal lobe (AL) starts in late pupa and continues during the first days of adult life, at the same time as the behavioral response to odors matures. Individual olfactory glomeruli (DM6, DM2, and V) display specific growth patterns between days 1 and 12 of adult life. Experience can modify the olfactory pathway both structurally and functionally as shown by adaptation experiments. The modifications associated with this form of nonassociative learning seem to take place at a critical age. Exposure to benzaldehyde at days 2-5 of adult life, but not at 8-11, causes behavioral adaptation as well as structural changes in DM2 and V glomeruli. Altered levels in intracellular cAMP, caused by dunce and rutabaga mutants, do not affect the normal changes in glomerular size, at least at day 6 of development, but they prevent those elicited by experience, establishing a molecular difference between glomerular changes of intrinsic versus environmental origin. Taken together, these data demonstrate an imprinting-like phenomenon in the olfactory pathway of young Drosophila adults, and illustrate its glomerulus-specific dynamics.

  20. Antennal proteome comparison of sexually mature drone and forager honeybees.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mao; Song, Feifei; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Li, Jianke

    2011-07-01

    Honeybees have evolved an intricate system of chemical communication to regulate their complex social interactions. Specific proteins involved in odorant detection most likely supported this chemical communication. Odorant reception takes place mainly in the antennae within hairlike structures called olfactory sensilla. Antennal proteomes of sexually mature drone and forager worker bees (an age group of bees assigned to perform field tasks) were compared using two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and bioinformatics. Sixty-one differentially expressed proteins were identified in which 67% were highly upregulated in the drones' antennae whereas only 33% upregulated in the worker bees' antennae. The antennae of the worker bees strongly expressed carbohydrate and energy metabolism and molecular transporters signifying a strong demand for metabolic energy and odorant binding proteins for their foraging activities and other olfactory responses, while proteins related to fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, and protein folding were strongly upregulated in the drones' antennae as an indication of the importance for the detection and degradation of sex pheromones during queen identification for mating. On the basis of both groups of altered antenna proteins, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production and molecular transporters comprised more than 80% of the functional enrichment analysis and 45% of the constructed biological interaction networks (BIN), respectively. This suggests these two protein families play crucial roles in the antennal olfactory function of sexually mature drone and forager worker bees. Several key node proteins in the BIN were validated at the transcript level. This first global proteomic comparative analysis of antennae reveals sex-biased protein expression in both bees, indicating that odorant response mechanisms are sex-specific because of natural selection for different olfactory

  1. Antennal proteome comparison of sexually mature drone and forager honeybees.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mao; Song, Feifei; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Li, Jianke

    2011-07-01

    Honeybees have evolved an intricate system of chemical communication to regulate their complex social interactions. Specific proteins involved in odorant detection most likely supported this chemical communication. Odorant reception takes place mainly in the antennae within hairlike structures called olfactory sensilla. Antennal proteomes of sexually mature drone and forager worker bees (an age group of bees assigned to perform field tasks) were compared using two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and bioinformatics. Sixty-one differentially expressed proteins were identified in which 67% were highly upregulated in the drones' antennae whereas only 33% upregulated in the worker bees' antennae. The antennae of the worker bees strongly expressed carbohydrate and energy metabolism and molecular transporters signifying a strong demand for metabolic energy and odorant binding proteins for their foraging activities and other olfactory responses, while proteins related to fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, and protein folding were strongly upregulated in the drones' antennae as an indication of the importance for the detection and degradation of sex pheromones during queen identification for mating. On the basis of both groups of altered antenna proteins, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production and molecular transporters comprised more than 80% of the functional enrichment analysis and 45% of the constructed biological interaction networks (BIN), respectively. This suggests these two protein families play crucial roles in the antennal olfactory function of sexually mature drone and forager worker bees. Several key node proteins in the BIN were validated at the transcript level. This first global proteomic comparative analysis of antennae reveals sex-biased protein expression in both bees, indicating that odorant response mechanisms are sex-specific because of natural selection for different olfactory

  2. Massive Temporal Lobe Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Waidyasekara, Pasan; Dowthwaite, Samuel A.; Stephenson, Ellison; Bhuta, Sandeep; McMonagle, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Intracranial extension of cholesteatoma is rare. This may occur de novo or recur some time later either contiguous with or separate to the site of the original cholesteatoma. Presentation of Case. A 63-year-old female presented to a tertiary referral hospital with a fluctuating level of consciousness, fever, headache, and right-sided otorrhoea, progressing over several days. Her past medical history included surgery for right ear cholesteatoma and drainage of intracranial abscess 23 years priorly. There had been no relevant symptoms in the interim until 6 weeks prior to this presentation. Imaging demonstrated a large right temporal lobe mass contiguous with the middle ear and mastoid cavity with features consistent with cholesteatoma. The patient underwent a combined transmastoid/middle fossa approach for removal of the cholesteatoma and repair of the tegmen dehiscence. The patient made an uneventful recovery and remains well over 12 months later. Conclusion. This case presentation details a large intracranial cholesteatoma which had extended through a tegmen tympani dehiscence from recurrent right ear cholesteatoma treated by modified radical mastoidectomy over two decades priorly. There was a completely asymptomatic progression of disease until several weeks prior to this presentation. PMID:25821620

  3. Salivary conditioning with antennal gustatory unconditioned stimulus in an insect.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Sato, Chihiro; Kuramochi, Tomokazu; Nishino, Hiroshi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2008-07-01

    Classical conditioning of olfactory conditioning stimulus (CS) with gustatory unconditioned stimulus (US) in insects has been used as a pertinent model for elucidation of neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. However, a conditioning system in which stable intracellular recordings from brain neurons are feasibly obtained while monitoring the conditioning effect has remained to be established. Recently, we found classical conditioning of salivation in cockroaches Periplaneta americana, in which an odor was associated with sucrose solution applied to the mouth, and this conditioning could be monitored by activities of salivary neurons. Application of gustatory US to the mouth, however, leads to feeding movement accompanying a movement of the brain that prevents stable recordings from brain neurons. Here we investigated whether a gustatory stimulus presented to an antenna could serve as an effective US for producing salivary conditioning. Presentation of sucrose or sodium chloride solution to an antenna induced salivation and also increased activities of salivary neurons. A single pairing trial of an odor with antennal presentation of sucrose or sodium chloride solution produced conditioning of salivation or of activities of salivary neurons. Five pairing trials led to a conditioning effect that lasted for one day. Water or tactile stimulus presented to an antenna was not effective for producing conditioning. The results demonstrate that gustatory US presented to an antenna is as effective as that presented to the mouth for producing salivary conditioning. This conditioning system provides a useful model for studying the neural basis of learning at the level of singly identifiable neurons.

  4. Atrophy of the parietal lobe in preclinical dementia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Heidi I L; Van Boxtel, Martin P J; Uylings, Harry B M; Gronenschild, Ed H B M; Verhey, Frans R; Jolles, Jelle

    2011-03-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and inferior parietal lobule was measured in 75 older adults (38 cognitively stable and 37 individuals with cognitive decline after 3 years). Dementia screening 6 years after scanning resulted in nine AD cases from the cognitively stable (n=3) and cognitive decline group (n=6), who were assigned to a third group, the preclinical AD group. When regional differences in cortical volume in the parietal lobe areas were compared between groups, significant differences were found between either the cognitive decline or stable group on the one hand and preclinical AD individuals on the other hand in the inferior parietal lobule. Group membership was best predicted by the grey matter volume of the inferior parietal lobule, compared to the other parietal lobe areas. The parietal lobe was characterised by a differential atrophy pattern based on cognitive status, which is in agreement with the 'last-developed-first-atrophied' principle. Future studies should investigate the surplus value of the inferior parietal lobe as a potential marker for the diagnosis of AD compared to other brain regions, such as the medial temporal lobe and the prefrontal lobe. PMID:21130554

  5. Charting the Maturation of the Frontal Lobe: An Electrophysiological Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segalowitz, S. J.; Davies, Patricia L.

    2004-01-01

    Tracking the functional development of specific regions of the prefrontal cortex in children using event-related potentials (ERPs) is challenging for both technical and conceptual reasons. In this paper we outline our strategy for studying frontal lobe development and present preliminary results from children aged 7-17 years and young adults using…

  6. Pioneer neurons of the antennal nervous system project to protocerebral pioneers in the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Boyan, George; Ehrhardt, Erica

    2015-11-01

    The twin nerve tracts of the antenna of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria are established early in embryogenesis by sibling pairs of pioneers which delaminate from the epithelium into the lumen at the antennal tip. These cells can be uniquely identified via their co-expression of the neuronal labels horseradish peroxidase and the lipocalin Lazarillo. The apical pioneers direct axons toward the antennal base where they encounter guidepost-like cells called base pioneers which transiently express the same molecular labels as the apical pioneers. To what extent the pioneer growth cones then progress into the brain neuropil proper, and what their targets there might be, has remained unclear. In this study, we show that the apical antennal pioneers project centrally beyond the antennal base first into the deutocerebral, and then into the protocerebral brain neuropils. In the protocerebrum, we identify their target circuitry as being identified Lazarillo-positive cells which themselves pioneer the primary axon scaffold of the brain. The apical and base antennal pioneers therefore form part of a molecularly contiguous pathway from the periphery to an identified central circuit of the embryonic grasshopper brain. PMID:26553379

  7. Antennal regulation of migratory flight in the neotropical moth Urania fulgens.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Srygley, Robert B; Dudley, Robert

    2010-06-23

    Migrating insects use their sensory systems to acquire local and global cues about their surroundings. Previous research on tethered insects suggests that, in addition to vision and cephalic bristles, insects use antennal mechanosensory feedback to maintain their airspeeds. Owing to the large displacements of migratory insects and difficulties inherent in tracking single individuals, the roles of these sensory inputs have never been tested in freely migrating insects. We tracked individual uraniid moths (Urania fulgens) as they migrated diurnally over the Panama Canal, and measured airspeeds and orientation for individuals with either intact or amputated flagella. Consistent with prior observations that antennal input is necessary for flight control, 59 per cent of the experimental moths could not fly after flagella amputation. The remaining fraction (41%) was flight-capable and maintained its prior airspeeds despite severe reduction in antennal input. Thus, maintenance of airspeeds may not involve antennal input alone, and is probably mediated by other modalities. Moths with amputated flagella could not recover their proper migratory orientations, suggesting that antennal integrity is necessary for long-distance navigation.

  8. Pioneer neurons of the antennal nervous system project to protocerebral pioneers in the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Boyan, George; Ehrhardt, Erica

    2015-11-01

    The twin nerve tracts of the antenna of the grasshopper Schistocerca gregaria are established early in embryogenesis by sibling pairs of pioneers which delaminate from the epithelium into the lumen at the antennal tip. These cells can be uniquely identified via their co-expression of the neuronal labels horseradish peroxidase and the lipocalin Lazarillo. The apical pioneers direct axons toward the antennal base where they encounter guidepost-like cells called base pioneers which transiently express the same molecular labels as the apical pioneers. To what extent the pioneer growth cones then progress into the brain neuropil proper, and what their targets there might be, has remained unclear. In this study, we show that the apical antennal pioneers project centrally beyond the antennal base first into the deutocerebral, and then into the protocerebral brain neuropils. In the protocerebrum, we identify their target circuitry as being identified Lazarillo-positive cells which themselves pioneer the primary axon scaffold of the brain. The apical and base antennal pioneers therefore form part of a molecularly contiguous pathway from the periphery to an identified central circuit of the embryonic grasshopper brain.

  9. Antennal regulation of migratory flight in the neotropical moth Urania fulgens.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Srygley, Robert B; Dudley, Robert

    2010-06-23

    Migrating insects use their sensory systems to acquire local and global cues about their surroundings. Previous research on tethered insects suggests that, in addition to vision and cephalic bristles, insects use antennal mechanosensory feedback to maintain their airspeeds. Owing to the large displacements of migratory insects and difficulties inherent in tracking single individuals, the roles of these sensory inputs have never been tested in freely migrating insects. We tracked individual uraniid moths (Urania fulgens) as they migrated diurnally over the Panama Canal, and measured airspeeds and orientation for individuals with either intact or amputated flagella. Consistent with prior observations that antennal input is necessary for flight control, 59 per cent of the experimental moths could not fly after flagella amputation. The remaining fraction (41%) was flight-capable and maintained its prior airspeeds despite severe reduction in antennal input. Thus, maintenance of airspeeds may not involve antennal input alone, and is probably mediated by other modalities. Moths with amputated flagella could not recover their proper migratory orientations, suggesting that antennal integrity is necessary for long-distance navigation. PMID:20181558

  10. Amelα8 subunit knockdown in the mushroom body vertical lobes impairs olfactory retrieval in the honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Louis, Thierry; Musso, Pierre-Yves; de Oliveira, Sabrina Barbosa; Garreau, Lucile; Giurfa, Martin; Raymond, Valérie; Gauthier, Monique

    2012-11-01

    We studied the involvement of the α8 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in olfactory learning and memory in Apis mellifera. We have previously shown, by injecting different nicotinic antagonists into the bee brain, that pharmacologically different subtypes of nAChRs are important for honeybee memory -α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors are necessary for memory consolidation and mecamylamine-sensitive receptors are involved in retrieval processes. Here, we took advantage of the honeybee genome sequencing and the development of a small interfering RNA (siRNA) tool to focus on the role of the α8 subunit, which has been shown to be expressed in brain areas important for olfactory learning, such as the antennal lobes and mushroom bodies. We first demonstrated the efficacy of the siRNA tool by showing a decrease of the α8 protein level at 6 h after brain injection of α8 siRNA. We then tested the general role of this subunit in olfactory conditioning, using brain systemic or localized siRNA injections in the antennal lobes or the calyces and vertical lobes of the mushroom bodies. These injections were performed at either 6 h before the learning acquisition or 6 h before the memory test. The most prominent result was that 6-h pre-test injection of siRNA in the mushroom body vertical lobes impaired memory retrieval at 24 and 48 h post-training. This indicated the importance of cholinergic extrinsic neurons and nAChRs containing the α8 subunit for this process.

  11. CCAP and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of the antennal accessory pulsatile organs (auxiliary hearts) of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Suggs, Julia M; Jones, Talitha H; Murphree, Steven C; Hillyer, Julián F

    2016-08-01

    Insects rely on specialized accessory pulsatile organs (APOs), also known as auxiliary hearts, to propel hemolymph into their antennae. In most insects, this is accomplished via the pulsations of a pair of ampulla located in the head, each of which propels hemolymph across an antenna via an antennal vessel. Once at the distal end of the appendage, hemolymph returns to the head via the antennal hemocoel. Although the structure of the antennal hearts has been elucidated in various insect orders, their hormonal modulation has only been studied in cockroaches and other hemimetabolous insects within the superorder Polyneoptera, where proctolin and FMRFamide-like peptides accelerate the contraction rate of these auxiliary hearts. Here, we assessed the hormonal modulation of the antennal APOs of mosquitoes, a group of holometabolous (Endopterygota) insects within the order Diptera. We show that crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), FMRFamide and SALDKNFMRFamide increase the contraction rate of the antennal APOs and the heart of Anopheles gambiae Both antennal hearts are synchronously responsive to these neuropeptides, but their contractions are asynchronous with the contraction of the heart. Furthermore, we show that these neuropeptides increase the velocity and maximum acceleration of hemolymph within the antennal space, suggesting that each contraction is also more forceful. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that hormones of a holometabolous insect modulate the contraction dynamics of an auxiliary heart, and the first report that shows that the hormones of any insect accelerate the velocity of hemolymph in the antennal space.

  12. Dementia of frontal lobe type.

    PubMed Central

    Neary, D; Snowden, J S; Northen, B; Goulding, P

    1988-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with presenile dementia due to primary cerebral atrophy do not have Alzheimer's disease. One form of non-Alzheimer dementia may be designated as dementia of frontal lobe type (DFT), on the basis of a characteristic neuropsychological picture suggestive of frontal lobe disorder, confirmed by findings on single photon emission tomography. The case histories of seven patients exemplify the disorder: a presentation of social misconduct and personality change, unconcern and disinhibition, in the presence of physical well-being and few neurological signs. Assessment revealed economic and concrete speech with verbal stereotypes, variable memory impairment, and marked abnormalities on tasks sensitive to frontal lobe function. Visuo-spatial disorder was invariably absent. Comparisons of DFT and Alzheimer patients revealed qualitative differences in clinical presentation, neurological signs, profile of psychological disability, electroencephalography, single photon emission tomography and demography. DFT, which may represent forms of Pick's disease, may be more common than is often recognised. PMID:3258902

  13. Differences in Antennal Sensillae of Male and Female Peach Fruit Flies in Relation to Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Azza A.; Mohamed, Hend O.; Ali, Nashat A.

    2015-01-01

    Antennal sensillae of male and female peach fruit flies, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) (Diptera: Tephritidae), obtained from three different host fruit species (guava, Psidium guajava L. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae); peach, Prunus persica (L.) Stokes (Rosales: Rosaceae); and orange, Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck (Sapindales: Rutaceae)), were studied with scanning electron microscopy. This study was carried out to describe the different types of sensillae present on the three antennal segments (scape, pedicel, and flagellum or funiculus) of both sexes of B. zonata on different host fruit. The antennal segments of females tended to be larger than those of males feeding on peach and guava fruit. On orange, both sexes were similar (no significant differences were found). The first two antennal segments, scape and pedicel, are reinforced by some bristles and have different types of sensillae, including trichoid I, II, S; basiconic II; and sensilla chaetica in different numbers on different host fruit species. Numerous microtrichia, as well as trichoid (I, II), basiconic (I), clavate, and coeloconic (I, II) sensillae were observed on the funiculus with a great variation in number and length. As a result of feeding on different hosts, differences were found between sexes and some plasticity in size, number, distribution, and position of some sensillae, including trichoid, basiconic, chaetica, and clavate on the antennae of the female B. zonata. These sensillae were significantly larger in females. Also, some morphological and morphemetric differences have been found according to their feeding on different host fruit. PMID:25688086

  14. Functional anatomy and ion regulatory mechanisms of the antennal gland in a semi-terrestrial crab, Ocypode stimpsoni

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jyuan-Ru; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Brachyuran crabs from diverse habitats show great differences in their osmoregulatory processes, especially in terms of the structural and physiological characteristics of the osmoregulatory organs. In crustaceans, the antennal glands are known to be important in osmoregulation, and they play a functional role analogous to that of the vertebrate kidney. Nevertheless, the detailed structure and function of the antennal glands in different species have rarely been described. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the antennal gland in ion regulation by examining the ultrastructure of the cells and the distribution of the ion regulatory proteins in each cell type in the antennal gland of a semi-terrestrial crab. The results showed that Na+, K+-ATPase activity significantly increased in the antennal gland after a 4-day acclimation in dilute seawater and returned to its original (day 0) level after 7 days. Three major types of cells were identified in the antennal gland, including coelomic cells (COEs), labyrinthine cells (LBRs) and end-labyrinthine cells (ELBRs). The proximal tubular region (PT) and distal tubular region (DT) of the antennal gland consist of LBRs and COEs, whereas the end tubular region (ET) consists of all three types of cells, with fewer COEs and more ELBRs. We found a non-uniform distribution of NKA immunoreactivity, with increasing intensity from the proximal to the distal regions of the antennal gland. We summarise our study with a proposed model for the urine reprocessing pathway and the role of each cell type or segment of the antennal gland. PMID:24795144

  15. Temporal lobe epilepsy in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Gataullina, S; Dulac, O; Bulteau, C

    2015-03-01

    Clinical expression of temporal lobe seizures is different with a more diverse and more extensive etiology in infants and children than it is in adults. It is dominated by cortical dysplasia, low-grade tumors and perinatal damage. Hippocampal sclerosis, although less frequent, exists in children usually as a dual pathology associated with ipsilateral neocortical lesions. The clinical semiology of temporal seizures is more varied, and sometimes misleading. Motor features including tonic, clonic or myoclonic behaviors, and infantile spasms predominate in infants. Classical complex partial seizures with behavioral arrest and automatisms, as well as lateralizing signs are rare and occur mostly with onset after the age of two years. Interestingly, aura, emotional, and autonomic signs seem to be independent on the brain maturation process. Moreover, the neuropsychological profile varies according to age of onset and duration, lateralization of the focus and etiology. Quality of care benefits from individual cognitive assessment for memory and emotional processes.

  16. Appetitive but not aversive olfactory conditioning modifies antennal movements in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Cholé, Hanna; Junca, Pierre; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2015-12-01

    In honeybees, two olfactory conditioning protocols allow the study of appetitive and aversive Pavlovian associations. Appetitive conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) involves associating an odor, the conditioned stimulus (CS) with a sucrose solution, the unconditioned stimulus (US). Conversely, aversive conditioning of the sting extension response (SER) involves associating the odor CS with an electric or thermal shock US. Each protocol is based on the measure of a different behavioral response (proboscis versus sting) and both only provide binary responses (extension or not of the proboscis or sting). These limitations render the measure of the acquired valence of an odor CS difficult without testing the animals in a freely moving situation. Here, we studied the effects of both olfactory conditioning protocols on the movements of the antennae, which are crucial sensory organs for bees. As bees' antennae are highly mobile, we asked whether their movements in response to an odorant change following appetitive or aversive conditioning and if so, do odor-evoked antennal movements contain information about the acquired valence of the CS? We implemented a tracking system for harnessed bees' antennal movements based on a motion capture principle at a high frequency rate. We observed that differential appetitive conditioning had a strong effect on antennal movements. Bees responded to the reinforced odorant with a marked forward motion of the antennae and a strong velocity increase. Conversely, differential aversive conditioning had no associative effect on antennal movements. Rather than revealing the acquired valence of an odorant, antennal movements may represent a novel conditioned response taking place during appetitive conditioning and may provide a possible advantage to bees when foraging in natural situations. PMID:26572651

  17. Appetitive but not aversive olfactory conditioning modifies antennal movements in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Cholé, Hanna; Junca, Pierre; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2015-12-01

    In honeybees, two olfactory conditioning protocols allow the study of appetitive and aversive Pavlovian associations. Appetitive conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) involves associating an odor, the conditioned stimulus (CS) with a sucrose solution, the unconditioned stimulus (US). Conversely, aversive conditioning of the sting extension response (SER) involves associating the odor CS with an electric or thermal shock US. Each protocol is based on the measure of a different behavioral response (proboscis versus sting) and both only provide binary responses (extension or not of the proboscis or sting). These limitations render the measure of the acquired valence of an odor CS difficult without testing the animals in a freely moving situation. Here, we studied the effects of both olfactory conditioning protocols on the movements of the antennae, which are crucial sensory organs for bees. As bees' antennae are highly mobile, we asked whether their movements in response to an odorant change following appetitive or aversive conditioning and if so, do odor-evoked antennal movements contain information about the acquired valence of the CS? We implemented a tracking system for harnessed bees' antennal movements based on a motion capture principle at a high frequency rate. We observed that differential appetitive conditioning had a strong effect on antennal movements. Bees responded to the reinforced odorant with a marked forward motion of the antennae and a strong velocity increase. Conversely, differential aversive conditioning had no associative effect on antennal movements. Rather than revealing the acquired valence of an odorant, antennal movements may represent a novel conditioned response taking place during appetitive conditioning and may provide a possible advantage to bees when foraging in natural situations.

  18. Occipital lobe infarction caused by tentorial herniation.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Tanaka, S; Kohama, A; Fujii, C

    1986-03-01

    Occipital lobe infarction caused by tentorial herniation was described based on computed tomography findings in nine patients. The whole area of the occipital lobe was involved in five patients; some areas were spared in the others. Infarction other than the ipsilateral occipital lobe was seen in four areas of nine patients: the ispsilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule, contralateral Ammon's horn, and two contralateral occipital lobes. Hemorrhagic infarction was seen in two patients.

  19. Identification of Putative Olfactory Genes from the Oriental Fruit Moth Grapholita molesta via an Antennal Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiping; Wu, Junxiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta, is an extremely important oligophagous pest species of stone and pome fruits throughout the world. As a host-switching species, adult moths, especially females, depend on olfactory cues to a large extent in locating host plants, finding mates, and selecting oviposition sites. The identification of olfactory genes can facilitate investigation on mechanisms for chemical communications. Methodology/Principal Finding We generated transcriptome of female antennae of G.molesta using the next-generation sequencing technique, and assembled transcripts from RNA-seq reads using Trinity, SOAPdenovo-trans and Abyss-trans assemblers. We identified 124 putative olfactory genes. Among the identified olfactory genes, 118 were novel to this species, including 28 transcripts encoding for odorant binding proteins, 17 chemosensory proteins, 48 odorant receptors, four gustatory receptors, 24 ionotropic receptors, two sensory neuron membrane proteins, and one odor degrading enzyme. The identified genes were further confirmed through semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for transcripts coding for 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs. OBP transcripts showed an obvious antenna bias, whereas CSP transcripts were detected in different tissues. Conclusion Antennal transcriptome data derived from the oriental fruit moth constituted an abundant molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of the species. This study provides a foundation for future research on the molecules involved in olfactory recognition of this insect pest, and in particular, the feasibility of using semiochemicals to control this pest. PMID:26540284

  20. Identification of Candidate Olfactory Genes in Chilo suppressalis by Antennal Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Wei, Jinjin; Liao, Xinyan; Walker, William B.; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by multiple proteins in the antenna, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, we identified the olfactory gene repertoire of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, an economically important agricultural pest, which inflicts great damage to the rice yield in south and east part of Asia, especially in Southern China. By Illumina sequencing of male and female antennal transcriptomes, we identified 47 odorant receptors, 20 ionotropic receptors, 26 odorant binding proteins, 21 chemosensory proteins and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins. Our findings make it possible for future research of the olfactory system of C. suppressalis at the molecular level. PMID:25076861

  1. Identification of candidate olfactory genes in Chilo suppressalis by antennal transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Wei, Jinjin; Liao, Xinyan; Walker, William B; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by multiple proteins in the antenna, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, we identified the olfactory gene repertoire of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, an economically important agricultural pest, which inflicts great damage to the rice yield in south and east part of Asia, especially in Southern China. By Illumina sequencing of male and female antennal transcriptomes, we identified 47 odorant receptors, 20 ionotropic receptors, 26 odorant binding proteins, 21 chemosensory proteins and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins. Our findings make it possible for future research of the olfactory system of C. suppressalis at the molecular level. PMID:25076861

  2. Gravity Perception in a Cladoceran-zooplankter: Anatomy of Antennal Socket Setae of Daphnia Magna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Night orientation in Daphnia magna was recently associated with setae on the basal socket of the swimming antennae. Daphnids are suspected of maintaining nocturnal equilibrium by monitoring the gravity vector through upward setal deflections caused by sinking between antennal swimming strokes. Setae appear to be hydrodynamic rheoceptors that sense the gravity vector indirectly by mechanoreceptivity to the direction and velocity of water currents. Neuroanatomical stains have revealed cell bodies at the base of the setal shafts, dendritic connections through to the distal ends of the shafts, and axonal tracts around the antennal socket connecting with an additional cell body and continuing toward the brain. These anatomical observations combined with previous scanning electron microscopy studies suggest that the setae are similar to mechanoreceptors and propreceptors used by higher crustaceans to sense water currents and gravity, and maintained balance.

  3. Antennal Transcriptome Analysis of Odorant Reception Genes in the Red Turpentine Beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shuang-Lin; Zhang, Long-Wa

    2015-01-01

    Background The red turpentine beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a destructive invasive pest of conifers which has become the second most important forest pest nationwide in China. Dendroctonus valens is known to use host odors and aggregation pheromones, as well as non-host volatiles, in host location and mass-attack modulation, and thus antennal olfaction is of the utmost importance for the beetles’ survival and fitness. However, information on the genes underlying olfaction has been lacking in D. valens. Here, we report the antennal transcriptome of D. valens from next-generation sequencing, with the goal of identifying the olfaction gene repertoire that is involved in D. valens odor-processing. Results We obtained 51 million reads that were assembled into 61,889 genes, including 39,831 contigs and 22,058 unigenes. In total, we identified 68 novel putative odorant reception genes, including 21 transcripts encoding for putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), six chemosensory proteins (CSP), four sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 22 odorant receptors (OR), four gustatory receptors (GR), three ionotropic receptors (IR), and eight ionotropic glutamate receptors. We also identified 155 odorant/xenobiotic degradation enzymes from the antennal transcriptome, putatively identified to be involved in olfaction processes including cytochrome P450s, glutathione-S-transferases, and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Predicted protein sequences were compared with counterparts in Tribolium castaneum, Megacyllene caryae, Ips typographus, Dendroctonus ponderosae, and Agrilus planipennis. Conclusion The antennal transcriptome described here represents the first study of the repertoire of odor processing genes in D. valens. The genes reported here provide a significant addition to the pool of identified olfactory genes in Coleoptera, which might represent novel targets for insect management. The results from our study also will

  4. Antennal sensilla of the pine weevil Pissodes nitidus Roel. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Yan, Shan-Chun; Meng, Zhao-Jun; Peng, Lu; Liu, Dan

    2011-05-01

    The antennal sensilla of the pine weevil (Pissodes nitidus Roel.) were observed with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The weevil antenna consists of a long scape, a pedicel, and a flagellum with 10 segments; the last four flagellum segments are fused, forming the antennal club, which is densely covered by various sensilla. In both sexes, six types of sensilla, sensilla palmate 1-4, sensilla chaetica, sensilla trichoid, sensilla basiconic 1-2, sensilla rod-like 1-3, sensilla falciform, were identified. Sensilla palmate represent a unique sensillum type in the Pissodes genus, and named here after their palmate shape, also represent the most abundant sensillum type. The TEM analysis of sensilla palmate represents the first such analysis of this sensillum type, and we speculate that the sensilla have an olfactory function. The sensilla trichoid and chaetica were evenly distributed on the three or four hair bands of the club, with much lower numbers than the palmate sensilla. No significant sexual differences in the types, numbers, and distribution of the antennal sensilla were found except for the size. TEM observation indicated that sensilla chaetica and trichoid may function as olfactory sensors. The putative functions of other sensilla type were also discussed with reference to their morphology, distribution, and ultrastructure.

  5. Occipital lobe seizures and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Jane E; Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2012-10-01

    Occipital lobe epilepsies (OLEs) manifest with occipital seizures from an epileptic focus within the occipital lobes. Ictal clinical symptoms are mainly visual and oculomotor. Elementary visual hallucinations are common and characteristic. Postictal headache occurs in more than half of patients (epilepsy-migraine sequence). Electroencephalography (EEG) is of significant diagnostic value, but certain limitations should be recognized. Occipital spikes and/or occipital paroxysms either spontaneous or photically induced are the main interictal EEG abnormalities in idiopathic OLE. However, occipital epileptiform abnormalities may also occur without clinical relationship to seizures particularly in children. In cryptogenic/symptomatic OLE, unilateral posterior EEG slowing is more common than occipital spikes. In neurosurgical series of symptomatic OLE, interictal EEG abnormalities are rarely strictly occipital. The most common localization is in the posterior temporal regions and less than one-fifth show occipital spikes. In photosensitive OLE, intermittent photic stimulation elicits (1) spikes/polyspikes confined in the occipital regions or (2) generalized spikes/polyspikes with posterior emphasis. In ictal EEG, a well-localized unifocal rhythmic ictal discharge during occipital seizures is infrequent. A bioccipital field spread to the temporal regions is common. Frequency, severity, and response to treatment vary considerably from good to intractable and progressive mainly depending on underlying causes.

  6. Anomalous Feeding of the Left Upper Lobe.

    PubMed

    Hazzard, Christopher; Itagaki, Shinobu; Lajam, Fouad; Flores, Raja M

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old woman who presented with massive hemoptysis. Computed tomographic angiography revealed an anomalous vessel arising from the abdominal aorta, coursing anteriorly and through the diaphragm, and feeding the left upper lobe. At operation the vessel was found to anastomose to the left upper lobe lingula, which contained multiple vascular abnormalities and arteriovenous fistulas. The vessel was ligated, and the affected portion of the left upper lobe was resected. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of an upper lobe is an especially rare form of a Pryce type 1 abnormality. Recognition of these unusual anatomic variants is crucial to successful treatment and avoidance of adverse events.

  7. Species Specificity of the Putative Male Antennal Aphrodisiac Pheromone in Leptopilina heterotoma, Leptopilina boulardi, and Leptopilina victoriae

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ingmar; Ruther, Joachim; Stökl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Male antennal aphrodisiac pheromones have been suggested to elicit female receptiveness in several parasitic Hymenoptera, including Leptopilina boulardi. None of the proposed pheromones, however, has been fully identified to date. It is also unknown whether these antennal pheromones are species specific, because the species specificity of mate recognition and courtship elicitation in Leptopilina prevented such experiments. In this study we present an experimental design that allows the investigation of the species specificity of the putative male aphrodisiac pheromone of L. heterotoma, L. boulardi, and L. victoriae. This is achieved by chemical manipulation of the odour profile of heterospecific females, so that males perceive them as conspecifics and show antennal courtship behaviour. Males courted the manipulated heterospecific females and antennal contact between the male and the female was observed. However, males elicited receptiveness only in conspecific females, never in the manipulated heterospecific females. Chemical analysis showed the presence of species specific unsaturated hydrocarbons on the antennae of males. Only trace amounts of these hydrocarbons are found on the antennae of females. Our results are an important step towards the understanding and identification of antennal pheromones of parasitic wasps. PMID:26839881

  8. Adaptation of the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, to different salinities through an excretory function of the antennal gland.

    PubMed

    Buranajitpirom, Decha; Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Wongprasert, Kanokpan; Namwong, Wisa; Poltana, Pisit; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm

    2010-06-01

    Black tiger shrimps (Penaeus monodon) are able to survive and can be reared under various salinities, possibly by the cellular adaptation of their excretory system, particularly the antennal gland, which is known to regulate body fluid in crustaceans. We have investigated the morphological and biochemical alterations of the antennal glands in shrimp reared in 7, 15, or 30 ppt seawater. Drastic changes occur in animals reared under 7 ppt conditions. Ultrastructural studies of the antennal gland in shrimps reared in 7 ppt seawater have revealed that podocytic cells in the coelomosacs ramify with more cytoplasmic processes forming the filtration slits, and that the tubular labyrinth cells possess more mitochondria in their basal striation and a wider tubular lumen than those found in the other groups. Many apical cytoplasmic blebs from labyrinth cells have also been seen in the lumen of the labyrinths under 7 ppt conditions, a feature that is not as prominent under the other conditions. The expression and activity of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the antennal gland are also correlated with the surrounding environment: the lower the salinity, the higher the expression and activity of the enzyme. Immunohistochemistry results have demonstrated the highest staining intensity in the labyrinth cells of shrimps reared under 7 ppt conditions. Our findings thus suggest that one of the adaptation mechanisms of this shrimp to the surrounding salinity is the regulation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase expression in the antennal gland, in conjunction with subcellular changes in its excretory cells.

  9. Phylogenetic relationship of seven Dendrolimus (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) species based on the ultrastructure of male moths' antennae and antennal sensilla.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiong; Yan, Xiong-Fei; Wen, Jun-Bao; Li, Zhen-Yu

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and ultrastructure of the antennae and antennal sensilla of seven male Dendrolimus species and a male Trabala vishnou gigantina (Yang) (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) were examined by light microscope and scanning electron microscope. Six morphological types of antennal sensilla were identified: Sensilla trichodea, Sensilla chaetica, Sensilla styloconica, Sensilla coeloconica, Böhm bristles, and foot-like sensilla. Six of the Dendrolimus moths and Trabala vishnou gigantina Yang share the same antennal sensilla type, as do various geographic populations of the same species. The exception, Dendrolimus spectabilis Butler, has foot-like sensilla. However, the antennal sensilla subtypes were significantly different among species and/or populations. There were no remarkable differences in the width of the scape, pedicel, subflagellum, and the side-branches between the eight male species studied. However, we observed significant differences in the number of flagellomere and the length of scape, pedicel, subflagellums, and side-branches. The length and basal diameter of various types of antennal sensilla did not vary significantly among Dendrolimus moths. Beyond that, there were no differences among populations of the same kind of species. Hierarchical cluster analysis found two clusters: the first contained D. punctata punctata (Walker), D. punctata wenshanensis (Tsai et Liu), D. tabulaeformis (Tsai et Liu), and D. spectabilis and D. superans (Butler), and the second contained D. grisea (Moore) and D. kikuchii kikuchii (Matsumura). Trabala vishnou gigantina was placed separately from the two clusters. We conclude that D. punctata wenshanensis,D. tabulaeformis, and D. spectabilis are geographic subspecies of D. punctata punctata.

  10. Species Specificity of the Putative Male Antennal Aphrodisiac Pheromone in Leptopilina heterotoma, Leptopilina boulardi, and Leptopilina victoriae.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ingmar; Ruther, Joachim; Stökl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Male antennal aphrodisiac pheromones have been suggested to elicit female receptiveness in several parasitic Hymenoptera, including Leptopilina boulardi. None of the proposed pheromones, however, has been fully identified to date. It is also unknown whether these antennal pheromones are species specific, because the species specificity of mate recognition and courtship elicitation in Leptopilina prevented such experiments. In this study we present an experimental design that allows the investigation of the species specificity of the putative male aphrodisiac pheromone of L. heterotoma, L. boulardi, and L. victoriae. This is achieved by chemical manipulation of the odour profile of heterospecific females, so that males perceive them as conspecifics and show antennal courtship behaviour. Males courted the manipulated heterospecific females and antennal contact between the male and the female was observed. However, males elicited receptiveness only in conspecific females, never in the manipulated heterospecific females. Chemical analysis showed the presence of species specific unsaturated hydrocarbons on the antennae of males. Only trace amounts of these hydrocarbons are found on the antennae of females. Our results are an important step towards the understanding and identification of antennal pheromones of parasitic wasps. PMID:26839881

  11. Localization of a GABA transporter to glial cells in the developing and adult olfactory pathway of the moth Manduca sexta1

    PubMed Central

    Oland, Lynne A; Gibson, Nicholas J; Tolbert, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Glial cells have several critical roles in the developing and adult olfactory (antennal) lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. Early in development, glial cells occupy discrete regions of the developing olfactory pathway and processes of GABAergic neurons extend into some of these regions. Because GABA is known to have developmental effects in a variety of systems, we explored the possibility that the glial cells express a GABA transporter that could regulate GABA levels to which olfactory neurons and glial cells are exposed. Using an antibody raised against a characterized high-affinity M. sexta GABA transporter with high sequence homology to known mammalian GABA transporters (Mbungu et al., 1995; Umesh and Gill, 2002), we found that the GABA transporter is localized to subsets of centrally derived glial cells during metamorphic adult development. The transporter persists into adulthood in a subset of the neuropil-associated glial cells, but its distribution pattern as determined by light- and electron-microscopic-level immunocytochemistry indicates that it could not serve to regulate GABA concentration in the synaptic cleft. Rather its role is more likely to regulate extracellular GABA levels within the glomerular neuropil. Expression in the sorting zone glial cells disappears after the period of olfactory receptor axon ingrowth, but may be important during ingrowth if GABA regulates axon growth. Glial cells take up GABA, and that uptake can be blocked by DABA. This is the first molecular evidence that the central glial cell population in this pathway is heterogeneous. PMID:20058309

  12. Determining Surgical Candidacy in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Alireza; Fallah, Aria; Valiante, Taufik A.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy that is amenable to surgical treatment. In the carefully selected patient, excellent seizure outcome can be achieved with minimal or no side effects from surgery. This may result in improved psychosocial functioning, achieving higher education, and maintaining or gaining employment. The objective of this paper is to discuss the surgical selection process of a patient with TLE. We define what constitutes a patient that has medically refractory TLE, describe the typical history and physical examination, and distinguish between mesial TLE and neocortical TLE. We then review the role of routine (ambulatory/sleep-deprived electroencephalography (EEG), video EEG, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neuropsychological testing, and Wada testing) and ancillary preoperative testing (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), subtraction ictal SPECT correlated to MRI (SISCOM), magnetoencephalography, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and functional MRI) in selecting surgical candidates. We describe the surgical options for resective epilepsy surgery in TLE and its commonly associated risks while highlighting some of the controversies. Lastly, we present teaching cases to illustrate the presurgical workup of patients with medically refractory TLE. PMID:22957238

  13. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology. PMID:27288809

  14. Developmental consequences of childhood frontal lobe damage.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, P J; Grattan, L M; Damasio, H; Damasio, A R

    1992-07-01

    A 33-year-old woman underwent neurologic and neuropsychological studies 26 years after she sustained damage to the frontal lobe. The findings of the neurologic examination were normal, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion in left prefrontal cortex and deep white matter. Cerebral blood flow studies showed an abnormal pattern in both left and right frontal regions. The patient exhibited striking neuropsychological defects in higher cognition, most notably in self-regulation of emotion and affect and in social behavior. Analysis of her behavioral development failed to yield a pattern of abrupt onset of defect immediately after the lesion occurred. On the contrary, there was a delayed onset of defects, followed by a period of seeming progression, and finally an arrest of development in adolescence. We suggest that this peculiar pattern is the natural consequence of the varied changes that occurred in brain development and social cognition during the patient's formative years. While certain long-term neuropsychological deficits in our case are similar to those following frontal damage in adults, the delayed onset and progression of deficits are different. PMID:1497505

  15. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology.

  16. The antennal sensilla of the praying mantis Tenodera aridifolia: a new flagellar partition based on the antennal macro-, micro- and ultrastructures.

    PubMed

    Carle, Thomas; Toh, Yoshihiro; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yokohari, Fumio

    2014-03-01

    In insects, the antenna consists of a scapus, a pedicellus, and a flagellum comprising many segments (flagellomeres). These segments possess many morphological types of sensory organs (sensilla) to process multimodal sensory information. We observed the sensilla on flagellomeres in praying mantis (Tenodera aridifolia) with both scanning and transmission electron microscopes. We classified the sensilla into six types: chaetic, campaniform, coelocapitular, basiconic, trichoid and grooved peg sensilla, and inferred their presumptive functions on the basis of their external and internal structures. In addition, based on their distribution, we newly divided the flagellum into 6 distinct parts. This new division leads to a better understanding about the sexual dimorphism and the antennal development in the mantises. The sexual difference in distribution of the grooved peg sensilla suggests that this type of sensilla may play a role in sex-pheromone detection in mantis, which is a rare case of double-walled sensilla mediating this function. PMID:24231672

  17. Middle lobe syndrome in children today.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Vittorio; Priftis, Kostas N; de Benedictis, Fernando M

    2014-06-01

    Middle lobe syndrome in children is a distinct clinical and radiographic entity that has been well described in the pediatric literature. However, issues regarding its etiology, clinical presentation, and management continue to puzzle the clinical practitioner. Pathophysiologically, there are two forms of middle lobe syndrome, namely obstructive and nonobstructive. Middle lobe syndrome may present as symptomatic or asymptomatic, as persistent or recurrent atelectasis, or as pneumonitis or bronchiectasis of the middle lobe and/or lingula. A lower threshold of performing a chest radiograph is warranted in children with persistent or recurrent nonspecific respiratory symptoms, particularly if there is clinical deterioration, in order to detect middle lobe syndrome and to initiate a further diagnostic and therapeutic workup.

  18. Antennal Transcriptome and Differential Expression Analysis of Five Chemosensory Gene Families from the Asian Honeybee Apis cerana cerana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiting; Du, Yali; Gao, Pengfei; Wang, Shujie; Pan, Jianfang; Jiang, Yusuo

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory genes play a central role in sensing chemical signals and guiding insect behavior. The Chinese honeybee, Apis cerana cerana, is one of the most important insect species in China in terms of resource production, and providing high-quality products for human consumption, and also serves as an important pollinator. Communication and foraging behavior of worker bees is likely linked to a complex chemosensory system. Here, we used transcriptome sequencing on adult A. c. cerana workers of different ages to identify the major chemosensory gene families and the differentially expressed genes(DEGs), and to investigate their expression profiles. A total of 109 candidate chemosensory genes in five gene families were identified from the antennal transcriptome assemblies, including 17 OBPs, 6 CSPs, 74 ORs, 10 IRs, and 2SNMPs, in which nineteen DEGs were screened and their expression values at different developmental stages were determined in silico. No chemosensory transcript was specific to a certain developmental period. Thirteen DEGs were upregulated and 6were downregulated. We created extensive expression profiles in six major body tissues using qRT-PCR and found that most DEGs were exclusively or primarily expressed in antennae. Others were abundantly expressed in the other tissues, such as head, thorax, abdomen, legs, and wings. Interestingly, when a DEG was highly expressed in the thorax, it also had a high level of expression in legs, but showed a lowlevel in antennae. This study explored five chemoreceptor superfamily genes using RNA-Seq coupled with extensive expression profiling of DEGs. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of odorant detection in the Asian honeybee and also serve as an extensive novel resource for comparing and investigating olfactory functionality in hymenopterans. PMID:27776190

  19. Ontogeny of the antennal glands in the crayfish Astacus leptodactylus (Crustacea, Decapoda): anatomical and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Khodabandeh, S; Charmantier, G; Blasco, C; Grousset, E; Charmantier-Daures, M

    2005-01-01

    The ontogeny of the antennal glands was studied during the embryonic and post-embryonic development of Astacus leptodactylus. The future glands arising from undifferentiated columnar cells were detectable at the metanauplius stage EI 150 microm (EI: eye index; approximately 440 microm at hatching). The tubule and labyrinth differentiated in embryos at EI 190 microm, and the bladder and coelomosac at EI 250 microm. At EI 350 microm, the tubule lengthened and divided into proximal and distal sub-regions. In later stages, the gland retained the same morpho-anatomy but the differentiation and size of each part increased. The cells of the coelomosac displayed the cytological features of podocytes in late embryonic development at EI 440 microm. Only small apical microvilli and a few mitochondria were observable in the labyrinth cells at EI 250 microm; by EI 440 microm, these cells presented well-shaped apical microvilli, formed bodies, basal infoldings and mitochondria. In the cells of the tubules and bladder, mitochondria and basal infoldings occurred at EI 440 microm and EI 250 microm, respectively. The differentiation of the tubules and bladder cells suggested that they were involved in active transport at EI 440 microm. Following hatching, the differentiation of the cells and the size of the glands increased. The ontogeny of the antennal glands thus starts in early embryos, the specific cellular functional features being differentiated in the various parts of the glands by EI 440 microm. The antennal glands are probably functional just before hatching, i.e., before the juveniles are confronted with the low osmolality of freshwater.

  20. Visual evoked potentials in occipital lobe lesions.

    PubMed

    Streletz, L J; Bae, S H; Roeshman, R M; Schatz, N J; Savino, P J

    1981-02-01

    Recording of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to pattern reversal is considered to be a reliable diagnostic procedure for examining patients with anterior visual pathway lesions (optic nerves and chiasm). Less consistent results have been reported in studies of more posterior lesions. The VEPs were recorded in 20 patients with occipital lobe lesions. A maximal VEP response (P94) was recorded at the scalp electrodes situated over the involved occipital lobes and contralateral to the hemianoptic visual field defect, indicating a positive correlation of unilateral occipital lobe lesions, homonymous visual field loss, and the VEP abnormality.

  1. Insight Into the Ultrastructure of Antennal Sensilla of Mythimna separata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiang-Qian; Zhang, Shu; Lv, Liang; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    The oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walk), is one of the most serious pests of cereals in Asia and Australasia. The structure and distribution of the antennal sensilla of M. separata were studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that antennae of both female and male M. separata are filiform in shape. Three groups and seven morphological sensillum types were recorded in both sexes, including uniporous sensilla (sensilla chaetica), multiporous sensilla (sensilla trichodea, basiconica, coeloconica, and styloconica), and aporous sensilla (sensilla squamiformia and Böhm bristles). S. trichodea, which were the most abundant sensilla, was made of three subtypes (ST I, ST II, and ST III) according to external features and two subtypes of s. basiconica (SB I and SB II) and s. coeloconica (SCo I and SCo II) were identified, respectively. Sexual dimorphisms in sensilla of M. separata were mainly perceived as the variations in the numbers of several sensilla subtypes. Also, the possible functions of the antennal sensilla were discussed. These results contribute to our understanding of the function of antennae in the behavior of M. separata. PMID:26363060

  2. The antennal sensilla of Melipona quadrifasciata (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponini): a study of different sexes and castes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaiano, Samira Veiga; Ferreira, Ríudo de Paiva; Campos, Lucio Antonio de Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2014-08-01

    The sensilla of insects are integumental units that play a role as sensory structures and are crucial for the perception of stimuli and for communication. In this study, we compared the antennal sensilla of females (workers and queens), males (haploid (n) and diploid (2n)), and queen-like males (QLMs, resulting from 2n males after juvenile hormone (JH) treatment) in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata. Images of the dorsal antenna surfaces were acquired using a scanning electron microscope. As reported for other hymenopterans, this species exhibits a heterogeneous sensillar distribution along the antennae. Thirteen different types of sensilla were found in the antennae of M. quadrifasciata: trichodea (subtypes I to VI), chaetica (subtypes I and II), placodea, basiconica, ampullacea, coeloconica, and coelocapitula. Sensilla trichodea I were the most abundant, followed by sensilla placodea, which might function in olfactory perception. Sensilla basiconica, sensilla chaetica I, sensilla coeloconica, and sensilla ampullacea were found exclusively in females. In terms of the composition and size of the sensilla, the antennae of QLMs most closely resemble those of the 2n male, although QLMs exhibit a queen phenotype. This study represents the first comparative analysis of the antennal sensilla of M. quadrifasciata. The differences found in the type and amount of sensilla between the castes and sexes are discussed based on the presumed sensillary functions.

  3. Identification and Expression Analysis of Putative Chemosensory Receptor Genes in Microplitis mediator by Antennal Transcriptome Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Ning; Peng, Yong; Lu, Zi-Yun; Dhiloo, Khalid Hussain; Gu, Shao-Hua; Li, Rui-Jun; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Zhang, Yong-Jun; Guo, Yu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Host-seeking, ovipositional behavior and mating of insects are controlled mainly by odor perception through sensory organs such as antennae. Antennal chemoreception is extremely important for insect survival. Several antennal chemosensory receptors are involved in mediating the odor detection in insects, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), to ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In the present study, we identified the chemosensory receptor gene repertoire of the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator, a generalist endoparasitoid that infests more than 40 types of Lepidopterous larvae and is widely distributed in the Palaearctic region. By transcriptome sequencing of male and female antennae we identified 60 candidate odorant receptors, six candidate ionotropic receptors and two gustatory receptors in M. mediator. The full-length sequences of these putative chemosensory receptor genes were obtained by using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR (RACE-PCR) method. We also conducted reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) combined with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for investigating the expression profiles of these chemosensory receptor genes in olfactory and non-olfactory tissues. The tissue- and sex-biased expression patterns may provide insights into the roles of the chemosensory receptor in M. mediator. Our findings support possible future study of the chemosensory behavior of M. mediator at the molecular level. PMID:26078716

  4. Sensilla on the antennal funiculus of the horse stomach bot fly, Gasterophilus nigricornis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D; Wang, Q K; Hu, D F; Li, K

    2012-09-01

    Gasterophilus nigricornis (Loew) (Diptera: Oestridae) is one of the most damaging obligate parasites of equids in Kalamaili, Xinjiang, China. The main olfactory organs of this stomach bot fly are paired antennae that bear microscopic sensillar structures. The external morphology of the antennal funiculus and sensilla of male G. nigricornis were studied using stereopic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A cross-sectional view of the funiculus shows it to be triangular, with an anterodorsal surface, a dorsolateral margin and a posteroventral surface. Almost the entire surface of the funiculus is densely covered with microtrichiae. Small patches lacking these microtrichiae appear as depressions or pits in the surface of the funiculus. Six distinct types of sensilla are recorded, including one trichoid, three basiconic, one auriculate and one clavate sensilla. Trichoid sensilla are the most abundant, followed by the basiconic, auriculate and clavate types in descending order. Only auriculate sensilla are found in pits on the funiculus. Distributions of different sensilla types located on the antennal funiculus are provided. These results are compared with equivalent findings in several other fly species. In addition, the possible functions of the various sensilla types are discussed.

  5. The antennal sensilla of Melipona quadrifasciata (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponini): a study of different sexes and castes.

    PubMed

    Ravaiano, Samira Veiga; Ferreira, Ríudo de Paiva; Campos, Lucio Antonio de Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2014-08-01

    The sensilla of insects are integumental units that play a role as sensory structures and are crucial for the perception of stimuli and for communication. In this study, we compared the antennal sensilla of females (workers and queens), males (haploid (n) and diploid (2n)), and queen-like males (QLMs, resulting from 2n males after juvenile hormone (JH) treatment) in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata. Images of the dorsal antenna surfaces were acquired using a scanning electron microscope. As reported for other hymenopterans, this species exhibits a heterogeneous sensillar distribution along the antennae. Thirteen different types of sensilla were found in the antennae of M. quadrifasciata: trichodea (subtypes I to VI), chaetica (subtypes I and II), placodea, basiconica, ampullacea, coeloconica, and coelocapitula. Sensilla trichodea I were the most abundant, followed by sensilla placodea, which might function in olfactory perception. Sensilla basiconica, sensilla chaetica I, sensilla coeloconica, and sensilla ampullacea were found exclusively in females. In terms of the composition and size of the sensilla, the antennae of QLMs most closely resemble those of the 2n male, although QLMs exhibit a queen phenotype. This study represents the first comparative analysis of the antennal sensilla of M. quadrifasciata. The differences found in the type and amount of sensilla between the castes and sexes are discussed based on the presumed sensillary functions. PMID:24861136

  6. Adaptation of antennal neurons in moths is associated with cessation of pheromone-mediated upwind flight.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, T C; Hansson, B S; Löfstedt, C; Löfqvist, J

    1988-01-01

    A wind-borne plume of sex pheromone from a female moth or a synthetic source has a fine, filamentous structure that creates steep and rapid fluctuations in concentration for a male moth flying up the plume's axis. The firing rates from single antennal neurons on Agrotis segetum antennae decreased to nearly zero within seconds after the antennae were placed in a pheromone plume 70 cm downwind of a high-concentration source known from previous studies to cause in-flight arrestment of upwind progress. In a separate experiment, the fluctuating output from chilled neurons on Grapholita molesta antennae became attenuated in response to repetitive, experimentally delivered pheromone pulses. The attenuation was correlated with a previously reported higher percentage of in-flight arrestment exhibited by moths flying at cooler compared to warmer temperatures. These results indicate that two peripheral processes related to excessive concentration, complete adaptation of antennal neurons, or merely the attenuation of fluctuations in burst frequency, are important determinants of when upwind progress by a moth flying in a pheromone plume stops and changes to station keeping. Also, adaptation and attenuation may affect the sensation of blend quality by preferentially affecting cells sensitive to the most abundant components in airborne pheromone blends. PMID:3200859

  7. Anomalous Feeding of the Left Upper Lobe.

    PubMed

    Hazzard, Christopher; Itagaki, Shinobu; Lajam, Fouad; Flores, Raja M

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of a 53-year-old woman who presented with massive hemoptysis. Computed tomographic angiography revealed an anomalous vessel arising from the abdominal aorta, coursing anteriorly and through the diaphragm, and feeding the left upper lobe. At operation the vessel was found to anastomose to the left upper lobe lingula, which contained multiple vascular abnormalities and arteriovenous fistulas. The vessel was ligated, and the affected portion of the left upper lobe was resected. Anomalous systemic arterial supply of an upper lobe is an especially rare form of a Pryce type 1 abnormality. Recognition of these unusual anatomic variants is crucial to successful treatment and avoidance of adverse events. PMID:27549539

  8. Alterations of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tohid, Hassaan; Faizan, Muhammad; Faizan, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    The relationship of the occipital lobe of the brain with schizophrenia is not commonly studied; however, this topic is considered an essential subject matter among clinicians and scientists. We conducted this systematic review to elaborate the relationship in depth. We found that most schizophrenic patients show normal occipital anatomy and physiology, a minority showed dwindled values, and some demonstrated augmented function and structure. The findings are laborious to incorporate within single disease models that present the involvement of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia progresses clinically in the mid-twenties and thirties and its prognosis is inadequate. Changes in the volume, the gray matter, and the white matter in the occipital lobe are quite evident; however, the mechanism behind this involvement is not yet fully understood. Therefore, we recommend further research to explore the occipital lobe functions and volumes across the different stages of schizophrenia. PMID:26166588

  9. Frontal lobe dementia and motor neuron disease.

    PubMed Central

    Neary, D; Snowden, J S; Mann, D M; Northen, B; Goulding, P J; Macdermott, N

    1990-01-01

    Four patients are described, in whom a profound and rapidly progressive dementia occurred in association with clinical features of motor neuron disease. The pattern of dementia indicated impaired frontal lobe function, confirmed by reduced tracer uptake in the frontal lobes on single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Pathological examination of the brains of two patients revealed frontal-lobe atrophy, with mild gliosis and spongiform change. The spinal cord changes were consistent with motor neuron disease. The clinical picture and pathological findings resembled those of dementia of frontal-lobe type and were distinct from those of Alzheimer's disease. The findings have implications for the understanding of the spectrum of non-Alzheimer forms of primary degenerative dementia. Images PMID:2303828

  10. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  11. Human Frontal Lobes and AI Planning Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Richard; Lum, Henry Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Human frontal lobes are essential for maintaining a self-regulating balance between predictive and reactive behavior. This paper describes a system that integrates prediction and reaction based on neuropsychological theories of frontal lobe function. In addition to enhancing our understanding of deliberate action in humans' the model is being used to develop and evaluate the same properties in machines. First, the paper presents some background neuropsychology in order to set a general context. The role of frontal lobes is then presented by summarizing three theories which formed the basis for this work. The components of an artificial frontal lobe are then discussed from both neuropsychological and AI perspectives. The paper concludes by discussing issues and methods for evaluating systems that integrate planning and reaction.

  12. Alterations of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tohid, Hassaan; Faizan, Muhammad; Faizan, Uzma

    2015-07-01

    The relationship of the occipital lobe of the brain with schizophrenia is not commonly studied; however, this topic is considered an essential subject matter among clinicians and scientists. We conducted this systematic review to elaborate the relationship in depth. We found that most schizophrenic patients show normal occipital anatomy and physiology, a minority showed dwindled values, and some demonstrated augmented function and structure. The findings are laborious to incorporate within single disease models that present the involvement of the occipital lobe in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia progresses clinically in the mid-twenties and thirties and its prognosis is inadequate. Changes in the volume, the gray matter, and the white matter in the occipital lobe are quite evident; however, the mechanism behind this involvement is not yet fully understood. Therefore, we recommend further research to explore the occipital lobe functions and volumes across the different stages of schizophrenia.

  13. Antennal and behavioral response of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) to degradation products of citrus volatiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) vectors the bacterial causal pathogen of the deadly citrus disease, Huanglongbing (citrus greening) which is a major threat to citrus industry worldwide. We studied antennal and behavioral responses to principal components of head...

  14. Pleomorphic adenoma of an unusual size in the deep lobe of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Uslu, S S; Inal, E; Ataoglu, O; Sezer, C

    1995-10-01

    Tumors of the salivary glands in children are not as common as in adults and they are mostly benign. The most common benign epithelial neoplasm seen in children is pleomorphic adenoma. As is usually the case in the adult population, it is usually found in the superficial lobe of the parotid gland. Its localization in the deep lobe is rare. Pleomorphic adenomas of the deep lobe present with a neck mass and when it is large, it may have an intraoral extension as well. It may also assume a dumb-bell shape as it enlarges and may be observed on CT or MRI scans as a prestyloid mass. The choice of treatment depends on the localization and the size of the tumor. The method can be transoral, cervical, transmandibular, transparotid, retromandibular fossa or a combination of these. A child with an unusually large pleomorphic adenoma of the deep lobe of the parotid gland is presented in this study. The deep lobe tumor was totally removed using a combination of cervical and transmandibular approaches.

  15. Lobe cell convection and polar cap precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Bonnell, J. W.; Su, Y.-J.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.-K.; Parks, G. K.; Carlson, C. W.

    2003-05-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite in 55 dawn-dusk passes are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 34 events of UV image coverage suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation in ˜62% of these cases. However, in some cases where the field signatures are suggestive of lobe cell convection, there is no detectable particle precipitation either in Polar UVI or the FAST data sets. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2000-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ˜59% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of lobe cell events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes during these events.

  16. Fornax A's Western Radio Lobe Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jason J.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Kraft, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present an analysis of the western radio lobe of Fornax A based on an XMM-Newton observation. We find little evidence for the inverse-Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background as reported previously. The spectra in the energy range of 0.5-5 keV are well fitted by a thermal plus power law model for every spectral region we extracted. With a fixed photon index of 1.68, the X-ray flux density at 1 keV from the power law fit was measured to be < 28 nJy at the 90% confidence level, leading to a lower limit on the magnetic field in this region of 6 micro-Gauss. Our spectral fits suggest that there is hot gas surrounding the radio lobe. A filament of dense, cool gas extends from the central galaxy in the direction of the radio lobe of Fornax A. Spectral fits give a temperature of kT=0.76 keV over the radio lobe and kT=0.32 keV for the cool filament. The thermal emission from the radio lobe region is best explained as emission from a thin shell of shocked gas swept up by the rapidly expanding lobe. This work is supported in part by the NSF REU and DOD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 0754568 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  17. Robust pulmonary lobe segmentation against incomplete fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Suicheng; Zheng, Qingfeng; Siegfried, Jill; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-03-01

    As important anatomical landmarks of the human lung, accurate lobe segmentation may be useful for characterizing specific lung diseases (e.g., inflammatory, granulomatous, and neoplastic diseases). A number of investigations showed that pulmonary fissures were often incomplete in image depiction, thereby leading to the computerized identification of individual lobes a challenging task. Our purpose is to develop a fully automated algorithm for accurate identification of individual lobes regardless of the integrity of pulmonary fissures. The underlying idea of the developed lobe segmentation scheme is to use piecewise planes to approximate the detected fissures. After a rotation and a global smoothing, a number of small planes were fitted using local fissures points. The local surfaces are finally combined for lobe segmentation using a quadratic B-spline weighting strategy to assure that the segmentation is smooth. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed by comparing with a manually created reference standard on a dataset of 30 lung CT examinations. These examinations covered a number of lung diseases and were selected from a large chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) dataset. The results indicate that our scheme of lobe segmentation is efficient and accurate against incomplete fissures.

  18. Antennal malformations in light ocelli drones of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Chaud-Netto, J

    2000-02-01

    Malformed antennae of Apis mellifera light ocelli drones were drawn, dissected and mounted permanently on slides containing Canada balsam, in order to count the olfactory discs present in each segment, in comparison with the number of those structures in normal antennae of their brothers. Some drones presented morphological abnormalities in a single segment of the right or left antenna, but others had two or more malformed segments in a same antenna. Drones with malformations in both antennae were also observed. The 4th and 5th flagellum segments were the most frequently affected. In a low number of cases the frequency of olfactory discs in malformed segments did not differ from that one recorded for normal segments. However, in most cases studied, the antennal malformations brought about a significant reduction in the number of olfactory discs from malformed segments.

  19. Gravity receptors in a microcrustacean water flea - Sensitivity of antennal-socket setae in Daphnia magna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. G.; Farmer, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Gravity receptors of Dephnia magna were discovered on the basal segment of the swimming antennae and were shown to respond to upward water currents that pass the animal as it sinks between swimming strokes. Sensitivity of the gravity perceiving mechanism was tested by subjecting daphnids to a series of five decreasingly dense aqueous solutions (neutral density to water) in darkness (to avoid visual cues). Three-dimensional, video analysis of body position (pitch, yaw and roll) and swimming path (hop and sink, vertical and horizontal patterns) revealed a gradual threshold that occurred near a density difference between the animal and its environment of less than 0.25%. Because daphnids do not sink but continue to slide after stroking in the increased density solutions, gravity perception appears to occur during a vertical swing of the longitudinal body axis to the vertical plane, about their center of gravity, and, thereby, implies a multidirectional sensitivity for the antennal-socket setae.

  20. Comparison of the Antennal Sensilla Ultrastructure of Two Cryptic Species in Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Man; Wang, Su; Li, Shu; Luo, Chen; Li, Yuan-Xi; Zhang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci is an important agricultural pest with worldwide distribution and host preference. Therefore, understanding the biology of this pest is important to devise specific pest control strategies. The antennae of herbivorous insects play an important role in the identification of hosts using plant volatiles. To understand the features of antennae in B. tabaci MEAM 1(formerly known as biotype ‘B’) and MED (formerly known as biotype ‘Q’), the morphology and distribution of the antennal sensilla were examined using scanning electron micrographs. The results showed that the average antennae length in MEAM 1 was longer than MED. No differences were observed in the number and distribution of antennal sensilla in MEAM 1 and MED antennae; each antenna had nine different types of sensilla. Both cryptic species possessed Microtrichia, Grooved surface trichodea sensilla, Chaetae sensilla, Coeloconic sensillaⅠandⅡ, Basiconic sensilla Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ and Finger-like sensilla. This is the first report of Grooved surface trichodea sensilla and Basiconic sensilla Ⅱ on B. tabaci flies. The numbers of Chaetae sensilla were different in the females and males of MEAM 1 and MED, which females having 5 and males containing 7. The surface structure of Basiconic sensilla Ⅰ was different with MEAM 1 showing a multiple-pitted linen surface and MED showing a multiple-pitted pocking surface. Basiconic sensillaⅡ were double in one socket with the longer one having a multiple-pitted surface and the shorter one with a smooth surface. Basiconic Ⅲ and Finger-like sensillae were longer in MEAM 1 antennae than in MED antennae. Our results are expected to further the studies that link morphological characteristics to insect behavior and help devise strategies to control insect pests. PMID:25822843

  1. Morphology and Ultrastructure of Antennal Sensilla in Male and Female Agrilus mali (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhihao; Liu, Deguang; Cui, Xiaoning; Shang, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    The apple buprestid beetle, Agrilus mali Matsumura, is an invasive pest causing significant damages to rare wild apple forests of Xinjiang. The morphology, abundance and distribution of antennal sensilla in both sexes of this pest were examined. We found that the antennae of A. mali females were longer than those of males. Five types of antennal sensilla were characterized, including trichodea (subtypes Tr.1, Tr.2, and Tr.3), chaetica (subtypes Sc.1, Sc.2, Sc.3, and Sc.4), basiconica (subtypes Ba. 1, Ba. 2, Ba. 3 and Ba.4), Böhm bristles (subtypes BB. 1, and BB. 2), and multiporous grooved sensilla. The most abundant sensilla of Ba.2 tended to occur mainly on flagellomeres 5-8 in both sexes. The last three flagellomeres tended to have the most abundant Tr.1 in both sexes. Overall, the abundance and distribution of these sensilla appeared to be highly conserved in both sexes, and their olfactory organs seemed to cluster on flagellomeres 6-8. However, some sex dimorphisms were also observed. Tr.3 and BB.2 were found only in females. Sensilla of Sc.2 were found on the pedicel and first two flagellomeres only in males. When compared with males, females showed a higher number of Sc.3, but a lower number of Sc.4 on the pedicel. These results indicate that contact cues could be important in intersexual communication in A. mali. The functional roles of these sensilla and their implications in A. mali behaviors are discussed, and further studies of identified chemosensitive sensilla can provide a foundation for developing semiochemical-based management strategies. PMID:27620559

  2. Antennal tactile learning in the honeybee: effect of nicotinic antagonists on memory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dacher, M; Lagarrigue, A; Gauthier, M

    2005-01-01

    Restrained worker honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) are able to learn to associate antennal-scanning of a metal plate with a sucrose reinforcement delivered to the mouthparts. Learning occurs reliably in a single association of the two sensory stimuli. The involvement of nicotinic pathways in memory formation and retrieval processes was tested by injecting, into the whole brain through the median ocellus, either mecamylamine (0.6 microg per bee) or alpha-bungarotoxin (2.4 ng per bee). Saline served as a control. Mecamylamine injected 10 min before the retrieval test impairs the retention level tested 3 h and 24 h after single- or multi-trial learning. Retrieval tests performed at various times after the injection show that the blocking effect of mecamylamine lasts about 1 h. The drug has no effect on the reconsolidation or extinction processes. Mecamylamine injected 10 min before conditioning impairs single-trial learning but has no effect on five-trial learning and on the consolidation process. By contrast, alpha-bungarotoxin only impairs the formation of long-term memory (24 h) induced by the five-trial learning and has no effect on medium-term memory (3 h), on single-trial learning or on the retrieval process. Hence, owing to previous data, at least two kinds of nicotinic receptors seem to be involved in honeybee memory, an alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive and an alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive receptor. Our results extend to antennal mechanosensory conditioning the role of the cholinergic system that we had previously described for olfactory conditioning in the honeybee. Moreover, we describe here in this insect a pharmacological dissociation between alpha-bungarotoxin sensitive long-term memory and alpha-bungarotoxin insensitive medium-term memory, the last one being affected by mecamylamine.

  3. Morphology and Ultrastructure of Antennal Sensilla in Male and Female Agrilus mali (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhihao; Liu, Deguang; Cui, Xiaoning; Shang, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    The apple buprestid beetle, Agrilus mali Matsumura, is an invasive pest causing significant damages to rare wild apple forests of Xinjiang. The morphology, abundance and distribution of antennal sensilla in both sexes of this pest were examined. We found that the antennae of A. mali females were longer than those of males. Five types of antennal sensilla were characterized, including trichodea (subtypes Tr.1, Tr.2, and Tr.3), chaetica (subtypes Sc.1, Sc.2, Sc.3, and Sc.4), basiconica (subtypes Ba. 1, Ba. 2, Ba. 3 and Ba.4), Böhm bristles (subtypes BB. 1, and BB. 2), and multiporous grooved sensilla. The most abundant sensilla of Ba.2 tended to occur mainly on flagellomeres 5–8 in both sexes. The last three flagellomeres tended to have the most abundant Tr.1 in both sexes. Overall, the abundance and distribution of these sensilla appeared to be highly conserved in both sexes, and their olfactory organs seemed to cluster on flagellomeres 6–8. However, some sex dimorphisms were also observed. Tr.3 and BB.2 were found only in females. Sensilla of Sc.2 were found on the pedicel and first two flagellomeres only in males. When compared with males, females showed a higher number of Sc.3, but a lower number of Sc.4 on the pedicel. These results indicate that contact cues could be important in intersexual communication in A. mali. The functional roles of these sensilla and their implications in A. mali behaviors are discussed, and further studies of identified chemosensitive sensilla can provide a foundation for developing semiochemical-based management strategies.

  4. Comparison of the antennal sensilla ultrastructure of two cryptic species in Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Man; Wang, Su; Li, Shu; Luo, Chen; Li, Yuan-Xi; Zhang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Bemisia tabaci is an important agricultural pest with worldwide distribution and host preference. Therefore, understanding the biology of this pest is important to devise specific pest control strategies. The antennae of herbivorous insects play an important role in the identification of hosts using plant volatiles. To understand the features of antennae in B. tabaci MEAM 1(formerly known as biotype 'B') and MED (formerly known as biotype 'Q'), the morphology and distribution of the antennal sensilla were examined using scanning electron micrographs. The results showed that the average antennae length in MEAM 1 was longer than MED. No differences were observed in the number and distribution of antennal sensilla in MEAM 1 and MED antennae; each antenna had nine different types of sensilla. Both cryptic species possessed Microtrichia, Grooved surface trichodea sensilla, Chaetae sensilla, Coeloconic sensillaⅠandⅡ, Basiconic sensilla Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ and Finger-like sensilla. This is the first report of Grooved surface trichodea sensilla and Basiconic sensilla Ⅱ on B. tabaci flies. The numbers of Chaetae sensilla were different in the females and males of MEAM 1 and MED, which females having 5 and males containing 7. The surface structure of Basiconic sensilla Ⅰ was different with MEAM 1 showing a multiple-pitted linen surface and MED showing a multiple-pitted pocking surface. Basiconic sensillaⅡ were double in one socket with the longer one having a multiple-pitted surface and the shorter one with a smooth surface. Basiconic Ⅲ and Finger-like sensillae were longer in MEAM 1 antennae than in MED antennae. Our results are expected to further the studies that link morphological characteristics to insect behavior and help devise strategies to control insect pests. PMID:25822843

  5. Morphology and Ultrastructure of Antennal Sensilla in Male and Female Agrilus mali (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhihao; Liu, Deguang; Cui, Xiaoning; Shang, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    The apple buprestid beetle, Agrilus mali Matsumura, is an invasive pest causing significant damages to rare wild apple forests of Xinjiang. The morphology, abundance and distribution of antennal sensilla in both sexes of this pest were examined. We found that the antennae of A. mali females were longer than those of males. Five types of antennal sensilla were characterized, including trichodea (subtypes Tr.1, Tr.2, and Tr.3), chaetica (subtypes Sc.1, Sc.2, Sc.3, and Sc.4), basiconica (subtypes Ba. 1, Ba. 2, Ba. 3 and Ba.4), Böhm bristles (subtypes BB. 1, and BB. 2), and multiporous grooved sensilla. The most abundant sensilla of Ba.2 tended to occur mainly on flagellomeres 5–8 in both sexes. The last three flagellomeres tended to have the most abundant Tr.1 in both sexes. Overall, the abundance and distribution of these sensilla appeared to be highly conserved in both sexes, and their olfactory organs seemed to cluster on flagellomeres 6–8. However, some sex dimorphisms were also observed. Tr.3 and BB.2 were found only in females. Sensilla of Sc.2 were found on the pedicel and first two flagellomeres only in males. When compared with males, females showed a higher number of Sc.3, but a lower number of Sc.4 on the pedicel. These results indicate that contact cues could be important in intersexual communication in A. mali. The functional roles of these sensilla and their implications in A. mali behaviors are discussed, and further studies of identified chemosensitive sensilla can provide a foundation for developing semiochemical-based management strategies. PMID:27620559

  6. Mixing Enhancement in a Lobed Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.; Majamaki, A. J.; Lam, I. T.; Delabroy, O.; Karagozian, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Smith, O. I.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the non-reactive mixing processes associated with a lobed fuel injector in a coflowing air stream is presented. The lobed fuel injector is a device which generates streamwise vorticity, producing high strain rates which can enhance the mixing of reactants while delaying ignition in a controlled manner. The lobed injectors examined in the present study consist of two corrugated plates between which a fuel surrogate, CO2, is injected into coflowing air. Acetone is seeded in the CO2 supply as a fuel marker. Comparison of two alternative lobed injector geometries is made with a straight fuel injector to determine net differences in mixing and strain fields due to streamwise vorticity generation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the seeded acetone yields two-dimensional images of the scalar concentration field at various downstream locations, from which local mixing and scalar dissipation rates are computed. It is found that the lobed injector geometry can enhance molecular mixing and create a highly strained flowfield, and that the strain rates generated by scalar energy dissipation can potentially delay ignition in a reacting flowfield.

  7. Preservation of the superficial lobe for deep-lobe parotid tumors: a better aesthetic outcome.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Akhtar; Murray, Daran P

    2005-08-01

    Deep-lobe parotid tumors are relatively uncommon. Most of these tumors present as external masses. They can also present in the oral cavity or oropharynx. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for biopsy and cytology have made it possible to establish a definitive diagnosis and identify the exact location of the tumor in almost all cases before surgery. Traditionally, deep-lobe tumors have been managed by a formal superficial parotidectomy and identification and preservation of the facial nerve, followed by removal of the deep lobe that contains the tumor Superficialparotidectomy is associated in most cases with periauricular depression secondary to a loss of volume, leading to variable aesthetic deformities. A complete parotidectomy is more likely to be associated with a larger aesthetic deficit secondary to a greater loss of tissue volume. The incidence of gustatory sweating is high after superficial parotidectomy, particularly in the early postoperative period. We hypothesize that if the superficial lobe is preserved, there is less likelihood of gustatory sweating because of the interposition of tissue between the skin and the cut ends of the secretomotor fibers. Approximately 80% of parotid tissue volume is made up of the superficial lobe, and therefore preservation of the superficial lobe should be associated with less postparotidectomy depression. Therefore, we decided to preserve the superficial lobe of the gland for deep-lobe tumors. Nine patients underwent deep-lobe parotidectomy with preservation of the superficial lobe over a 6-year period. Patients were studied prospectively with regard to technical difficulty, complications, and cosmetic outcome. Follow-up ranged from 12 months to 6 years. We did not experience any undue technical difficulty, and there were no cases of facial weakness. One patient developed gustatory sweating, which almost completely resolved over a 2-year period. There were no cases of post

  8. Parietal Lobes in Schizophrenia: Do They Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Murat; Borgwardt, Stefan J.; Berger, Gregor E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Despite observations that abnormal parietal lobe (PL) function is associated with psychotic-like experiences, our knowledge about the nature of PL involvement in schizophrenia is modest. The objective of this paper is to investigate the role of the PL in schizophrenia. Method. Medline databases were searched for English language publications using the following key words: parietal lobe, combined with schizophrenia, lesions, epilepsy, cognition, rare genetic disorders, MRI, fMRI, PET, and SPECT, respectively, followed by cross-checking of references. Results. Imaging studies in childhood onset schizophrenia suggest that grey matter abnormalities start in parietal and occipital lobes and proceed to frontal regions. Although, the findings are inconsistent, several studies with patients at risk to develop schizophrenia indicate early changes in the PL. Conclusions. We want to propose that in a proportion of individuals with emerging schizophrenia structural and functional alterations may start in the PL and progress to frontal regions. PMID:22937268

  9. Automated MRI parcellation of the frontal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Ranta, Marin E.; Chen, Min; Crocetti, Deana; Prince, Jerry L.; Subramaniam, Krish; Fischl, Bruce; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2014-01-01

    Examination of associations between specific disorders and physical properties of functionally relevant frontal lobe sub-regions is a fundamental goal in neuropsychiatry. Here we present and evaluate automated methods of frontal lobe parcellation with the programs FreeSurfer(FS) and TOADS-CRUISE(T-C), based on the manual method described in Ranta et al. (2009) in which sulcal-gyral landmarks were used to manually delimit functionally relevant regions within the frontal lobe: i.e., primary motor cortex, anterior cingulate, deep white matter, premotor cortex regions (supplementary motor complex, frontal eye field and lateral premotor cortex) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions (medial PFC, dorsolateral PFC, inferior PFC, lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial OFC). Dice's coefficient, a measure of overlap, and percent volume difference were used to measure the reliability between manual and automated delineations for each frontal lobe region. For FS, mean Dice's coefficient for all regions was 0.75 and percent volume difference was 21.2%. For T-C the mean Dice's coefficient was 0.77 and the mean percent volume difference for all regions was 20.2%. These results, along with a high degree of agreement between the two automated methods (mean Dice's coefficient = 0.81, percent volume difference = 12.4%) and a proof-of-principle group difference analysis that highlights the consistency and sensitivity of the automated methods, indicate that the automated methods are valid techniques for parcellation of the frontal lobe into functionally relevant sub-regions. Thus, the methodology has the potential to increase efficiency, statistical power and reproducibility for population analyses of neuropsychiatric disorders with hypothesized frontal lobe contributions. PMID:23897577

  10. Temporal lobe surgery in childhood and neuroanatomical predictors of long-term declarative memory outcome

    PubMed Central

    Skirrow, Caroline; Cross, J. Helen; Harrison, Sue; Cormack, Francesca; Harkness, William; Coleman, Rosie; Meierotto, Ellen; Gaiottino, Johanna; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-01-01

    The temporal lobes play a prominent role in declarative memory function, including episodic memory (memory for events) and semantic memory (memory for facts and concepts). Surgical resection for medication-resistant and well-localized temporal lobe epilepsy has good prognosis for seizure freedom, but is linked to memory difficulties in adults, especially when the removal is on the left side. Children may benefit most from surgery, because brain plasticity may facilitate post-surgical reorganization, and seizure cessation may promote cognitive development. However, the long-term impact of this intervention in children is not known. We examined memory function in 53 children (25 males, 28 females) who were evaluated for epilepsy surgery: 42 underwent unilateral temporal lobe resections (25 left, 17 right, mean age at surgery 13.8 years), 11 were treated only pharmacologically. Average follow-up was 9 years (range 5–15). Post-surgical change in visual and verbal episodic memory, and semantic memory at follow-up were examined. Pre- and post-surgical T1-weighted MRI brain scans were analysed to extract hippocampal and resection volumes, and evaluate post-surgical temporal lobe integrity. Language lateralization indices were derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging. There were no significant pre- to postoperative decrements in memory associated with surgery. In contrast, gains in verbal episodic memory were seen after right temporal lobe surgery, and visual episodic memory improved after left temporal lobe surgery, indicating a functional release in the unoperated temporal lobe after seizure reduction or cessation. Pre- to post-surgical change in memory function was not associated with any indices of brain structure derived from MRI. However, better verbal memory at follow-up was linked to greater post-surgical residual hippocampal volumes, most robustly in left surgical participants. Better semantic memory at follow-up was associated with smaller resection

  11. Temporal lobe surgery in childhood and neuroanatomical predictors of long-term declarative memory outcome.

    PubMed

    Skirrow, Caroline; Cross, J Helen; Harrison, Sue; Cormack, Francesca; Harkness, William; Coleman, Rosie; Meierotto, Ellen; Gaiottino, Johanna; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Baldeweg, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The temporal lobes play a prominent role in declarative memory function, including episodic memory (memory for events) and semantic memory (memory for facts and concepts). Surgical resection for medication-resistant and well-localized temporal lobe epilepsy has good prognosis for seizure freedom, but is linked to memory difficulties in adults, especially when the removal is on the left side. Children may benefit most from surgery, because brain plasticity may facilitate post-surgical reorganization, and seizure cessation may promote cognitive development. However, the long-term impact of this intervention in children is not known. We examined memory function in 53 children (25 males, 28 females) who were evaluated for epilepsy surgery: 42 underwent unilateral temporal lobe resections (25 left, 17 right, mean age at surgery 13.8 years), 11 were treated only pharmacologically. Average follow-up was 9 years (range 5-15). Post-surgical change in visual and verbal episodic memory, and semantic memory at follow-up were examined. Pre- and post-surgical T1-weighted MRI brain scans were analysed to extract hippocampal and resection volumes, and evaluate post-surgical temporal lobe integrity. Language lateralization indices were derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging. There were no significant pre- to postoperative decrements in memory associated with surgery. In contrast, gains in verbal episodic memory were seen after right temporal lobe surgery, and visual episodic memory improved after left temporal lobe surgery, indicating a functional release in the unoperated temporal lobe after seizure reduction or cessation. Pre- to post-surgical change in memory function was not associated with any indices of brain structure derived from MRI. However, better verbal memory at follow-up was linked to greater post-surgical residual hippocampal volumes, most robustly in left surgical participants. Better semantic memory at follow-up was associated with smaller resection

  12. The gyri of the octopus vertical lobe have distinct neurochemical identities.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-06-15

    The cephalopod vertical lobe is the largest learning and memory structure known in invertebrate nervous systems. It is part of the visual learning circuit of the central brain, which also includes the superior frontal and subvertical lobes. Despite the well-established functional importance of this system, little is known about neuropil organization of these structures and there is to date no evidence that the five longitudinal gyri of the vertical lobe, perhaps the most distinctive morphological feature of the octopus brain, differ in their connections or molecular identities. We studied the histochemical organization of these structures in hatchling and adult Octopus bimaculoides brains with immunostaining for serotonin, octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (oGNRH), and octopressin-neurophysin (OP-NP). Our major finding is that the five lobules forming the vertical lobe gyri have distinct neurochemical signatures. This is most prominent in the hatchling brain, where the median and mediolateral lobules are enriched in OP-NP fibers, the lateral lobule is marked by oGNRH innervation, and serotonin immunostaining heavily labels the median and lateral lobules. A major source of input to the vertical lobe is the superior frontal lobe, which is dominated by a neuropil of interweaving fiber bundles. We have found that this neuropil also has an intrinsic neurochemical organization: it is partitioned into territories alternately enriched or impoverished in oGNRH-containing fascicles. Our findings establish that the constituent lobes of the octopus superior frontal-vertical system have an intricate internal anatomy, one likely to reflect the presence of functional subsystems within cephalopod learning circuitry.

  13. The gyri of the octopus vertical lobe have distinct neurochemical identities.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-06-15

    The cephalopod vertical lobe is the largest learning and memory structure known in invertebrate nervous systems. It is part of the visual learning circuit of the central brain, which also includes the superior frontal and subvertical lobes. Despite the well-established functional importance of this system, little is known about neuropil organization of these structures and there is to date no evidence that the five longitudinal gyri of the vertical lobe, perhaps the most distinctive morphological feature of the octopus brain, differ in their connections or molecular identities. We studied the histochemical organization of these structures in hatchling and adult Octopus bimaculoides brains with immunostaining for serotonin, octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (oGNRH), and octopressin-neurophysin (OP-NP). Our major finding is that the five lobules forming the vertical lobe gyri have distinct neurochemical signatures. This is most prominent in the hatchling brain, where the median and mediolateral lobules are enriched in OP-NP fibers, the lateral lobule is marked by oGNRH innervation, and serotonin immunostaining heavily labels the median and lateral lobules. A major source of input to the vertical lobe is the superior frontal lobe, which is dominated by a neuropil of interweaving fiber bundles. We have found that this neuropil also has an intrinsic neurochemical organization: it is partitioned into territories alternately enriched or impoverished in oGNRH-containing fascicles. Our findings establish that the constituent lobes of the octopus superior frontal-vertical system have an intricate internal anatomy, one likely to reflect the presence of functional subsystems within cephalopod learning circuitry. PMID:25644267

  14. Graph theory findings in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Sharon; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLE is a disorder of abnormal epileptogenic networks, rather than focal sources. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks, and has potential to illuminate characteristics of brain topology conducive to TLE pathophysiology, including seizure initiation and spread. We review basic concepts which we believe will prove helpful in interpreting results rapidly emerging from graph theory research in TLE. In addition, we summarize the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain its pathophysiology. Several common findings have emerged from the many modalities which have been used to study TLE using graph theory, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, surface EEG, intracranial EEG, magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, cell cultures, simulated models, and mouse models, involving increased regularity of the interictal network configuration, altered local segregation and global integration of the TLE network, and network reorganization of temporal lobe and limbic structures. As different modalities provide different views of the same phenomenon, future studies integrating data from multiple modalities are needed to clarify findings and contribute to the formation of a coherent theory on the pathophysiology of TLE. PMID:24831083

  15. Graph theory findings in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Sharon; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLE is a disorder of abnormal epileptogenic networks, rather than focal sources. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks, and has potential to illuminate characteristics of brain topology conducive to TLE pathophysiology, including seizure initiation and spread. We review basic concepts which we believe will prove helpful in interpreting results rapidly emerging from graph theory research in TLE. In addition, we summarize the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain its pathophysiology. Several common findings have emerged from the many modalities which have been used to study TLE using graph theory, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, surface EEG, intracranial EEG, magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, cell cultures, simulated models, and mouse models, involving increased regularity of the interictal network configuration, altered local segregation and global integration of the TLE network, and network reorganization of temporal lobe and limbic structures. As different modalities provide different views of the same phenomenon, future studies integrating data from multiple modalities are needed to clarify findings and contribute to the formation of a coherent theory on the pathophysiology of TLE.

  16. Subregional Mesiotemporal Network Topology Is Altered in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Boris C; Bernasconi, Neda; Hong, Seok-Jun; Dery, Sebastian; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most frequent drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and commonly associated with variable degrees of mesiotemporal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Analyses of inter-regional connectivity have unveiled disruptions in large-scale cortico-cortical networks; little is known about the topological organization of the mesiotemporal lobe, the limbic subnetwork central to the disorder. We generated covariance networks based on high-resolution MRI surface-shape descriptors of the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and amygdala in 134 TLE patients and 45 age- and sex-matched controls. Graph-theoretical analysis revealed increased path length and clustering in patients, suggesting a shift toward a more regularized arrangement; findings were reproducible after split-half assessment and across 2 parcellation schemes. Analysis of inter-regional correlations and module participation showed increased within-structure covariance, but decreases between structures, particularly with regards to the hippocampus and amygdala. While higher clustering possibly reflects topological consequences of axonal sprouting, decreases in interstructure covariance may be a consequence of disconnection within limbic circuitry. Preoperative network parameters, specifically the segregation of the ipsilateral hippocampus, predicted long-term seizure freedom after surgery. PMID:26223262

  17. Southern Laurentide ice lobes were created by ice streams: Des Moines Lobe in Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    Regional mapping in southern Minnesota has illuminated a suite of landforms developed by the Des Moines Lobe that delimit the position of the lobe at its maximum and at lesser readvances. The ice lobe repeatedly advanced, discharged its subglacial water, and subsequently stagnated. Recent glaciological research on Antarctic ice streams has led some glacial geologists to postulate that ice streams drained parts of the marine-based areas of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. I postulate that such ice streams may develop in land-based areas of an ice sheet as well, and that the Des Moines Lobe, 200 km wide and 900 km long, was an outlet glacier of an ice stream. It appears to have been able to advance beyond the Laurentide Ice Sheet as long as adequate water pressure was maintained. However, the outer part of the lobe stagnated because subglacial water that facilitated the flow was able to drain away through tunnel valleys. Stagnation of the lobe is not equivalent to stoppage of the ice stream, because ice repeatedly advanced into and onto the stagnant margins, stacking ice and debris. Similar landforms are also seen in other lobes of the upper midwestern United States.

  18. [An operated case of bitemporal lobe epilepsy associated with old infarction in the left occipital lobe].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, T; Morioka, T; Nishio, S; Mizokami, K; Sasaki, M; Ishii, K; Fukui, M

    2001-01-01

    A 15-year-old female, who presented with bitemporal lobe epilepsy associated with old infarction in the left occipital lobe, was reported. MRI with fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequence demonstrates cortical atrophy with hyperintensity of the white matter in the left occipital lobe as well as volume loss and hyperintensity of the left hippocampus. Interictal positron emission tomography with [18F]fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG-PET) and single photon emission computed tomography with technetium-99m-ethyl-cysteinate dimer indicate hypometabolism and hypoperfusion in the left occipital lobe and the left temporal lobe, respectively. Scalp recorded EEG did not lateralize the side of the epileptogenic zone. Chronic subdural electrode recording demonstrated that the ictal onset zones were located in the bilateral side of the temporal lobe. Eighty-nine percent of 19 spontaneous seizures were left sided onset. The anterior temporal lobectomy with hippocampectomy was performed for the left side. Although temporal lobe epilepsy is sometimes a bilateral disease, unilateral lobectomy for a strong predominant side, based on the MRI and FDG-PET findings, is effective for some patients.

  19. Recurrent diarrhea as a manifestation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Murai, Tomohiko; Tohyama, Teruhiko; Kinoshita, Masako

    2014-01-01

    A woman with temporal lobe epilepsy manifesting with repeated episodes of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness is reported. A 63-year-old, right-handed female presented with chief complaints of sudden diarrhea and loss of consciousness for almost three decades. The first attack occurred in her 30s, and similar attacks repeated several times in a year. Her attacks comprised abrupt abdominal discomfort, diarrhea, sudden emergence of old memories relating to when she had played with her brother in her childhood, and loss of consciousness during defecation. She had no convulsion or automatism and fully recovered in a few minutes. Every time she was transferred to emergency hospital by ambulance, she had examinations such as blood test, head computed tomography, electrocardiogram, abdominal ultrasound, and electroencephalography (EEG), but no specific diagnosis was made. On admission to our hospital, vital signs, neurological examination, and blood tests did not show abnormal findings. During long-term video-EEG monitoring for 40 h, she had no habitual event. Interictal EEG showed intermittent irregular delta waves and sharp regional transients in the left anterio-midtemporal area. Sharp transients were not as outstanding from background activities as to be defined as epileptiform discharges, but they were reproducible in morphology and distribution and appeared not only in sleep but also in wakefulness. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was unremarkable. Single-photon emission computed tomography showed a decrease of blood flow in the left frontal and temporal lobes. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III showed a decline of verbal comprehension. We concluded that the patient was suffering from partial epilepsy originating from the left temporal lobe. Carbamazepine markedly improved her seizures. Temporal lobe epilepsy can manifest with diverse autonomic symptoms and signs. Abdominal sensations often herald the onset of epileptic seizures. Among them is an uncommon

  20. Rheoceptive mediators of graviperception in a water flea: Morphological implications of antennal-socket setae in daphnia magna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Aquatic microcrustaceans of the genus Daphnia are known to orient to light during the day. At night, in the absence of visual cues, daphnids were suspected of maintaining equilibrium by monitoring the direction of gravity through their swimming antennae. Recent investigations using simulated, weightlessness conditions coupled with absence of illumination revealed hair like structures or setae on the basal, articulating socket of the antennae that, when surgically removed, resulted in disorientation. Given the simulated weightlessness or neutrally buoyant condition that eliminated sinking of the normally negatively buoyant Daphnia, it was proposed that the antennal socket setae function as rheoceptors stimulated by the upward rush of water currents during gravity induced, sinking phase of daphnid swimming movements. This rheoceptively mediated, gravity perception hypothesis is further supported by morphological investigations. Scanning electron micrographs indicate that antennal socket setae are anatomically similar to proprioceptors used by higher crustaceans to monitor gravitational direction.

  1. Lobe Cell Convection and Polar cap Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Peria, W. J.; Su, Y.; Ergun, R. E.; Tung, Y.; Parks, G.; Carlson, C. W.

    2002-12-01

    The characteristic electric and magnetic field signature of lobe cells as observed by the low-altitude FAST satellite are compared with Polar ultraviolet images of polar cap auroral activity. Initial results from 55 events suggest that there is an intimate coupling between the sunward convection flow of the lobe cell and transpolar auroral arcs or diffuse polar cap precipitation. Moreover, the presence of lobe cells coincide with UV data intensifications in the premidnight 2100-2400 MLT sector and/or the postnoon 1500 MLT region in ~54% of all cases with UVI coverage. The magnetic local time dependence of the lobe cells and polar cap precipitation on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are examined using the upstream Wind monitor. The relative importance of the IMF By and Bz components are investigated and compared with the predictions of the antiparallel merging model and strongly suggests a connection with the magnetospheric sash, as is further implied by the mapping of magnetic field lines using the Tsyganenko [2002] (T01) model. It was also noted that a majority of events occurred during enhanced AE index substorm-like conditions and that generally stronger AE indices are measured for stronger IMF By magnitudes.

  2. VATS right upper lobe bronchial sleeve resection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qianli

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to discuss video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) sleeve bronchial lobectomy when handling the locally advanced central lung cancer (involving the trachea and/or main bronchus). Methods A 2.5 cm × 1.0 cm mass was found in the right upper lobe. Bronchoscopy demonstrated the tumor obstructing the right upper lobe bronchus and involved the right main bronchus and bronchus intermedius. Interrupted sutures were chosen for bronchial anastomosis. Bronchial membrane was sutured first, and then circumference end-to-end anastomoses were carried out using 3-0 absorbable sutures. Results There were no complications and the patient was discharged 8 days postoperatively. Conclusions The third intercostal space of the anterior axillary line was suggested for right upper lobe bronchial sleeve resection. This incision can reduce the distance and angle between the anastomosis to the incision, and facilitate anastomosis. This approach can also prevent operator from fatigue for keeping one posture for a long time. Clearance of the mediastinal lymph nodes before cutting the bronchus was helpful for exposing the right main bronchus, the upper lobe bronchus and bronchus intermedius satisfied. And this option would avoid pulling bronchial anastomosis during mediastinal lymph nodes clearance. Interrupted suture was safe and effective for VATS bronchial anastomosis. PMID:27621889

  3. A case of bilateral temporal lobe agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, C; Lehrl, S; Huk, W

    1981-01-01

    A 76-year-old man with bilateral temporal lobe agenesis producing clinical features resembling the Robinson syndrome is described. The malformation was discovered during a routine CT examination after the appearance of a homonymous visual field defect. The patient was examined by (neuro) psychological testing. The findings are compared with other reported cases and discussed with regard to cerebral localisation. Images PMID:7288451

  4. Diverse Filters to Sense: Great Variability of Antennal Morphology and Sensillar Equipment in Gall-Wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae)

    PubMed Central

    Polidori, Carlo; Nieves-Aldrey, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies on antennal sensillar equipment in insects are largely lacking, despite their potential to provide insights into both ecological and phylogenetic relationships. Here we present the first comparative study on antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in female Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera), a large and diverse group of wasps, with special reference to the so-called gall-wasps (Cynipidae). A SEM analysis was conducted on 51 species from all extant cynipoid families and all cynipid tribes, and spanning all known life-histories in the superfamily (gall-inducers, gall-inquilines, and non-gall associated parasitoids). The generally filiform, rarely clavate, antennal flagellum of Cynipoidea harbours overall 12 types of sensilla: s. placoidea (SP), two types of s. coeloconica (SCo-A, SCo-B), s. campaniformia (SCa), s. basiconica (SB), five types of s. trichoidea (ST-A, B, C, D, E), large disc sensilla (LDS) and large volcano sensilla (LVS). We found a great variability in sensillar equipment both among and within lineages. However, few traits seem to be unique to specific cynipid tribes. Paraulacini are, for example, distinctive in having apical LVS; Pediaspidini are unique in having ≥3 rows of SP, each including 6–8 sensilla per flagellomere, and up to 7 SCo-A in a single flagellomere; Eschatocerini have by far the largest SCo-A. Overall, our data preliminarily suggest a tendency to decreased numbers of SP rows per flagellomere and increased relative size of SCo-A during cynipoid evolution. Furthermore, SCo-A size seems to be higher in species inducing galls in trees than in those inducing galls in herbs. On the other hand, ST seem to be more abundant on the antennae of herb-gallers than wood-gallers. The antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in Cynipoidea are the complex results of different interacting pressures that need further investigations to be clarified. PMID:25003514

  5. Diverse filters to sense: great variability of antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in gall-wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae).

    PubMed

    Polidori, Carlo; Nieves-Aldrey, José L

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies on antennal sensillar equipment in insects are largely lacking, despite their potential to provide insights into both ecological and phylogenetic relationships. Here we present the first comparative study on antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in female Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera), a large and diverse group of wasps, with special reference to the so-called gall-wasps (Cynipidae). A SEM analysis was conducted on 51 species from all extant cynipoid families and all cynipid tribes, and spanning all known life-histories in the superfamily (gall-inducers, gall-inquilines, and non-gall associated parasitoids). The generally filiform, rarely clavate, antennal flagellum of Cynipoidea harbours overall 12 types of sensilla: s. placoidea (SP), two types of s. coeloconica (SCo-A, SCo-B), s. campaniformia (SCa), s. basiconica (SB), five types of s. trichoidea (ST-A, B, C, D, E), large disc sensilla (LDS) and large volcano sensilla (LVS). We found a great variability in sensillar equipment both among and within lineages. However, few traits seem to be unique to specific cynipid tribes. Paraulacini are, for example, distinctive in having apical LVS; Pediaspidini are unique in having ≥3 rows of SP, each including 6-8 sensilla per flagellomere, and up to 7 SCo-A in a single flagellomere; Eschatocerini have by far the largest SCo-A. Overall, our data preliminarily suggest a tendency to decreased numbers of SP rows per flagellomere and increased relative size of SCo-A during cynipoid evolution. Furthermore, SCo-A size seems to be higher in species inducing galls in trees than in those inducing galls in herbs. On the other hand, ST seem to be more abundant on the antennae of herb-gallers than wood-gallers. The antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in Cynipoidea are the complex results of different interacting pressures that need further investigations to be clarified.

  6. Medial temporal lobe memory in childhood: Developmental transitions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore MTL-dependent memory across middle childhood. Children (6 – 10 years old) and adults completed two computerized tasks, place learning (PL) and transitive inference (TI), that each examined relational memory, as well as the flexible use of relational learning. Findings suggest that the development of relational memory precedes the development of the ability to use relational knowledge flexibly in novel situations. Implications for the development of underlying brain areas and ideas for future neuroimaging investigations are discussed. PMID:20712740

  7. Distinct lobes of Limulus ventral photoreceptors. II. Structure and ultrastructure

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The structure of Limulus ventral photoreceptors fixed in situ has been investigated using light and electron microscopy and computer-assisted reconstruction and planimetry. Photoreceptors occur singly and in clusters. All photoreceptors have two types of lobes. The rhabdomeral lobe (R lobe) appears to be specialized for light sensitivity, containing the rhabdomere, which completely covers its external surface and forms infoldings into the lobe. The structure of the external rhabdom differs from that within infoldings. The other main structures of the R lobe are the palisades along the rhabdom, multivesicular bodies, lamellar bodies, and mitochondria. The arhabdomeral lobe (A lobe) bears the axon and contains the nucleus, clusters of residual bodies, lamellar arrays of endoplasmic reticulum, masses of glycogen, lipid droplets, and Golgi complexes. The R lobe and A lobe are analogous to the outer and inner segments of vertebrae photoreceptors. In single photoreceptors A and R lobes are separated by an indentation filled with glial processes. Computer reconstructions of cell clusters reveal that each cell has both types of lobes and an axon. Most of the rhabdom is formed from abutting arrays of external rhabdom from the R lobes of different members of the cluster. Efferent fibers containing characteristic angular granules penetrate single cells and clusters in glial invaginations. The main, if not exclusive, target of the efferent fibers is the internal rhabdom. PMID:7175491

  8. Morphology, Ultrastructure and Possible Functions of Antennal Sensilla of Sitodiplosis mosellana Géhin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Li, Dan; Liu, Yang; Li, Xue-Jiao; Cheng, Wei-Ning; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the olfactory receptive mechanisms involved in host selection and courtship behavior of Sitodiplosis mosellana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), one of the most important pests of wheat, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the external morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. The moniliform antennae exhibit obvious sexual dimorphism: antennae of the males are markedly longer than those of the females. Furthermore, each male flagellomere consists of two globular nodes, whereas each female flagellomere is cylindrical. Seven types of sensilla were identified in both sexes. Two types of s. chaetica have a lumen without dendrites and thick walls, suggesting that they are mechanoreceptors. S. trichodea and s. circumfila are typical chemoreceptors, possessing thin multiporous walls encircling a lumen with multiple dendrites. There are significantly more s. trichodea in female than in male, which may be related to host plant localization. In contrast, male s. circumfila are highly elongated compared to those of females, perhaps for pheromone detection. Peg-shaped s. coeloconica are innervated with unbranched dendrites extending from the base to the distal tip. Type 1 s. coeloconica, which have deep longitudinal grooves and finger-like projections on the surface, may serve as olfactory or humidity receptors, whereas type 2 s. coeloconica, smooth with a terminal pore, may be contact chemoreceptors. Also, this is the first report of Böhm' bristles at proximal scape on antennae of Cecidomyiid species potentially functioning as mechanoreceptors. PMID:27623751

  9. Lateralized antennal control of aggression and sex differences in red mason bees, Osmia bicornis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L J; Frasnelli, E; Versace, E

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of lateralization in social and non-social bees tests the hypothesis that population-level, directional asymmetry has evolved as an adjunct to social behaviour. Previous research has supported this hypothesis: directional bias of antennal use in responding to odours and learning to associate odours with a food reward is absent in species that feed individually, such as mason bees, whereas it is clearly present in eusocial honeybees and stingless bees. Here we report that, when mason bees engage in agonistic interactions, a species-typical interactive behaviour, they do exhibit a directional bias according to which antenna is available to be used. Aggression was significantly higher in dyads using only their left antennae (LL) than it was in those using only their right antennae (RR). This asymmetry was found in both males and females but it was stronger in females. LL dyads of a male and a female spent significantly more time together than did other dyadic combinations. No asymmetry was present in non-aggressive contacts, latency to first contact or body wiping. Hence, population-level lateralization is present only for social interactions common and frequent in the species' natural behaviour. This leads to a refinement of the hypothesis linking directional lateralization to social behaviour. PMID:27388686

  10. Segmental mismatch in crustacean appendages: the naupliar antennal exopod of Artemia (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Anostraca).

    PubMed

    Maruzzo, Diego; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2009-03-01

    Based on traditional techniques and confocal laser scanning microscopy for external morphology, and immunohistochemistry for the muscular system, we describe here the segmental features of the antennal exopod of Artemia nauplii. Two kinds of serial elements are present, i.e. setae (with cuticular folds at their base) and ringlets (serially arranged sclerites separated by joint-like cuticular folds not extending to form complete rings around the appendage). The two series are usually not in register. The cuticular folds of the setae and of the ringlets are also sites of intermediate insertions of the three exopod muscles: as the two tegumentary structures are discordant in periodicity, this is also mirrored in the pattern of muscle insertions on the two sides of the appendage. Similar cases of segmental mismatch are known for the trunk of several arthropods, but segmental mismatch along the appendages has received very little attention. The occurrence of segmental mismatch in the naupliar appendages of both extant and fossil crustaceans is reviewed and it is suggested here to be a primitive feature of the exopods of both second antennae and mandibles. Problems in the interpretation of morphological evidence are discussed, also in relation to development and evolution of segmentation of naupliar appendages.

  11. Antennal-Expressed Ammonium Transporters in the Malaria Vector Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Pulous, Fadi E.; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    The principal Afrotropical malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae remains a significant threat to human health. In this anthropophagic species, females detect and respond to a range of human-derived volatile kairomones such as ammonia, lactic acid, and other carboxylic acids in their quest for blood meals. While the molecular underpinnings of mosquito olfaction and host seeking are becoming better understood, many questions remain unanswered. In this study, we have identified and characterized two candidate ammonium transporter genes, AgAmt and AgRh50 that are expressed in the mosquito antenna and may contribute to physiological and behavioral responses to ammonia, which is an important host kairomone for vector mosquitoes. AgAmt transcripts are highly enhanced in female antennae while a splice variant of AgRh50 appears to be antennal-specific. Functional expression of AgAmt in Xenopus laevis oocytes facilitates inward currents in response to both ammonium and methylammonium, while AgRh50 is able to partially complement a yeast ammonium transporter mutant strain, validating their conserved roles as ammonium transporters. We present evidence to suggest that both AgAmt and AgRh50 are in vivo ammonium transporters that are important for ammonia sensitivity in An. gambiae antennae, either by clearing ammonia from the sensillar lymph or by facilitating sensory neuron responses to environmental exposure. Accordingly, AgAmt and AgRh50 represent new and potentially important targets for the development of novel vector control strategies. PMID:25360676

  12. Lateralized antennal control of aggression and sex differences in red mason bees, Osmia bicornis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, L. J.; Frasnelli, E.; Versace, E.

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of lateralization in social and non-social bees tests the hypothesis that population-level, directional asymmetry has evolved as an adjunct to social behaviour. Previous research has supported this hypothesis: directional bias of antennal use in responding to odours and learning to associate odours with a food reward is absent in species that feed individually, such as mason bees, whereas it is clearly present in eusocial honeybees and stingless bees. Here we report that, when mason bees engage in agonistic interactions, a species-typical interactive behaviour, they do exhibit a directional bias according to which antenna is available to be used. Aggression was significantly higher in dyads using only their left antennae (LL) than it was in those using only their right antennae (RR). This asymmetry was found in both males and females but it was stronger in females. LL dyads of a male and a female spent significantly more time together than did other dyadic combinations. No asymmetry was present in non-aggressive contacts, latency to first contact or body wiping. Hence, population-level lateralization is present only for social interactions common and frequent in the species’ natural behaviour. This leads to a refinement of the hypothesis linking directional lateralization to social behaviour. PMID:27388686

  13. Morphology, Ultrastructure and Possible Functions of Antennal Sensilla of Sitodiplosis mosellana Géhin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Li, Dan; Liu, Yang; Li, Xue-Jiao; Cheng, Wei-Ning; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the olfactory receptive mechanisms involved in host selection and courtship behavior of Sitodiplosis mosellana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), one of the most important pests of wheat, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the external morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. The moniliform antennae exhibit obvious sexual dimorphism: antennae of the males are markedly longer than those of the females. Furthermore, each male flagellomere consists of two globular nodes, whereas each female flagellomere is cylindrical. Seven types of sensilla were identified in both sexes. Two types of s. chaetica have a lumen without dendrites and thick walls, suggesting that they are mechanoreceptors. S. trichodea and s. circumfila are typical chemoreceptors, possessing thin multiporous walls encircling a lumen with multiple dendrites. There are significantly more s. trichodea in female than in male, which may be related to host plant localization. In contrast, male s. circumfila are highly elongated compared to those of females, perhaps for pheromone detection. Peg-shaped s. coeloconica are innervated with unbranched dendrites extending from the base to the distal tip. Type 1 s. coeloconica, which have deep longitudinal grooves and finger-like projections on the surface, may serve as olfactory or humidity receptors, whereas type 2 s. coeloconica, smooth with a terminal pore, may be contact chemoreceptors. Also, this is the first report of Böhm’ bristles at proximal scape on antennae of Cecidomyiid species potentially functioning as mechanoreceptors.

  14. Size determines antennal sensitivity and behavioral threshold to odors in bumblebee workers.

    PubMed

    Spaethe, Johannes; Brockmann, Axel; Halbig, Christine; Tautz, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    The eusocial bumblebees exhibit pronounced size variation among workers of the same colony. Differently sized workers engage in different tasks (alloethism); large individuals are found to have a higher probability to leave the colony and search for food, whereas small workers tend to stay inside the nest and attend to nest duties. We investigated the effect of size variation on morphology and physiology of the peripheral olfactory system and the behavioral response thresholds to odors in workers of Bombus terrestris. Number and density of olfactory sensilla on the antennae correlate significantly with worker size. Consistent with these morphological changes, we found that antennal sensitivity to odors increases with body size. Antennae of large individuals show higher electroantennogram responses to a given odor concentration than those of smaller nestmates. This finding indicates that large antennae exhibit an increased capability to catch odor molecules and thus are more sensitive to odors than small antennae. We confirmed this prediction in a dual choice behavioral experiment showing that large workers indeed are able to respond correctly to much lower odor concentrations than small workers. Learning performance in these experiments did not differ between small and large bumblebees. Our results clearly show that, in the social bumblebees, variation in olfactory sensilla number due to size differences among workers strongly affects individual odor sensitivity. We speculate that superior odor sensitivity of large workers has favored size-related division of labor in bumblebee colonies. PMID:17479233

  15. Morphology, Ultrastructure and Possible Functions of Antennal Sensilla of Sitodiplosis mosellana Géhin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Li, Dan; Liu, Yang; Li, Xue-Jiao; Cheng, Wei-Ning; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the olfactory receptive mechanisms involved in host selection and courtship behavior of Sitodiplosis mosellana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), one of the most important pests of wheat, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the external morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. The moniliform antennae exhibit obvious sexual dimorphism: antennae of the males are markedly longer than those of the females. Furthermore, each male flagellomere consists of two globular nodes, whereas each female flagellomere is cylindrical. Seven types of sensilla were identified in both sexes. Two types of s. chaetica have a lumen without dendrites and thick walls, suggesting that they are mechanoreceptors. S. trichodea and s. circumfila are typical chemoreceptors, possessing thin multiporous walls encircling a lumen with multiple dendrites. There are significantly more s. trichodea in female than in male, which may be related to host plant localization. In contrast, male s. circumfila are highly elongated compared to those of females, perhaps for pheromone detection. Peg-shaped s. coeloconica are innervated with unbranched dendrites extending from the base to the distal tip. Type 1 s. coeloconica, which have deep longitudinal grooves and finger-like projections on the surface, may serve as olfactory or humidity receptors, whereas type 2 s. coeloconica, smooth with a terminal pore, may be contact chemoreceptors. Also, this is the first report of Böhm’ bristles at proximal scape on antennae of Cecidomyiid species potentially functioning as mechanoreceptors. PMID:27623751

  16. Antennal and cephalic organelles in the social wasp Paravespula germanica (Hymenoptera, Vespinae): form and possible function.

    PubMed

    Agmon, Ifaat; Plotkin, Marian; Ermakov, Natalya Y; Barkay, Zahava; Ishay, Jacob S

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with hairs and organelles present on the head and antennae of the German wasp, Paravespula germanica, and their possible role in sensing the physical and chemical ambience, as well as in intercommunicating both while in flight outside or in the nest. Via scanning electron microscope photography, we detected on the frons plate of the wasp's head, hairs that were about 300 microm long and comprised the longest hairs on the body of the wasps. Additionally, the two antennae bore along their entire length photoreceptors, placoids, campaniforms, trichoids, and agmons. These organelles are located at high but variable density along the antennal segments. The paper provides the dimensions of each of the mentioned organelles, and discusses the possible functions of the organelles as well as of the hairs on the frons. Photographs taken via atomic force microscope reveal that the epicuticle of the antenna is of two typical shapes; one, bearing both longitudinal stripes as well as transverse bands that are about 1 mum in width, and a second granulated form. Conceivably, the wasp uses the various organelles mentioned to communicate with its mates that are some distance away, somewhat like the use of radar by humans.

  17. Size determines antennal sensitivity and behavioral threshold to odors in bumblebee workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaethe, Johannes; Brockmann, Axel; Halbig, Christine; Tautz, Jürgen

    2007-09-01

    The eusocial bumblebees exhibit pronounced size variation among workers of the same colony. Differently sized workers engage in different tasks (alloethism); large individuals are found to have a higher probability to leave the colony and search for food, whereas small workers tend to stay inside the nest and attend to nest duties. We investigated the effect of size variation on morphology and physiology of the peripheral olfactory system and the behavioral response thresholds to odors in workers of Bombus terrestris. Number and density of olfactory sensilla on the antennae correlate significantly with worker size. Consistent with these morphological changes, we found that antennal sensitivity to odors increases with body size. Antennae of large individuals show higher electroantennogram responses to a given odor concentration than those of smaller nestmates. This finding indicates that large antennae exhibit an increased capability to catch odor molecules and thus are more sensitive to odors than small antennae. We confirmed this prediction in a dual choice behavioral experiment showing that large workers indeed are able to respond correctly to much lower odor concentrations than small workers. Learning performance in these experiments did not differ between small and large bumblebees. Our results clearly show that, in the social bumblebees, variation in olfactory sensilla number due to size differences among workers strongly affects individual odor sensitivity. We speculate that superior odor sensitivity of large workers has favored size-related division of labor in bumblebee colonies.

  18. Identification of candidate chemosensory genes in the antennal transcriptome of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Rao, Xiang-Jun; Li, Mao-Ye; Feng, Ming-Feng; He, Meng-Zhu; Li, Shi-Guang

    2015-03-01

    We present the first antennal transcriptome sequencing information for the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Analysis of the transcriptome dataset obtained 52,216,616 clean reads, from which 35,363 unigenes were assembled. Of these, 18,820 unigenes showed significant similarity (E-value <10(-5)) to known proteins in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Gene ontology (GO) and Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) analyses were used for functional classification of these unigenes. We identified 19 putative odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes, 12 chemosensory protein (CSP) genes, 20 olfactory receptor (OR) genes, 6 ionotropic receptor (IR) genes and 2 sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMP) genes. BLASTX best hit results indicated that these chemosensory genes were most identical to their respective orthologs from Tribolium castaneum. Phylogenetic analyses also revealed that the T. molitor OBPs and CSPs are closely related to those of T. castaneum. Real-time quantitative PCR assays showed that eight TmolOBP genes were antennae-specific. Of these, TmolOBP5, TmolOBP7 and TmolOBP16 were found to be predominantly expressed in male antennae, while TmolOBP17 was expressed mainly in the legs of males. Several other genes were identified that were neither tissue-specific nor sex-specific. These results establish a firm foundation for future studies of the chemosensory genes in T. molitor. PMID:25665775

  19. Cephalic aura after frontal lobe resection.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jehi, Lara; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Wang, Zhong I; Enatsu, Rei; Mosher, John C; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Burgess, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    A cephalic aura is a common sensory aura typically seen in frontal lobe epilepsy. The generation mechanism of cephalic aura is not fully understood. It is hypothesized that to generate a cephalic aura extensive cortical areas need to be excited. We report a patient who started to have cephalic aura after right frontal lobe resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed interictal spike and ictal change during cephalic aura, both of which were distributed in the right frontal region, and the latter involved much more widespread areas than the former on MEG sensors. The peculiar seizure onset pattern may indicate that surgical modification of the epileptic network was related to the appearance of cephalic aura. We hypothesize that generation of cephalic aura may be associated with more extensive cortical involvement of epileptic activity than that of interictal activity, in at least a subset of cases.

  20. Occipital lobe infarction after open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Cross, S A

    1983-03-01

    The most common permanent neuro-ophthalmologic complication of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery is visual loss. Bilateral lower altitudinal visual field defects were documented in a patient who noted blurred vision following open heart surgery. A difference of opinion existed as to whether the field defects were due to retina-optic nerve or occipital lobe lesions. Two points are emphasized in this report: 1) the field defects were much easier to define on the tangent screen than on Goldman perimetry, and 2) occipital coronal high resolution CT scan confirmed bilateral upper bank calcarine cortex infarctions in this patient. Occipital coronal, thin-section, high-resolution computed tomographic scans are helpful in studying patients with occipital lobe visual field defects.

  1. Occipital lobe infarction following cardiac ablation.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Rukhsana G; Biller, Jose; Jay, Walter M

    2004-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with the chief complaint of seeing a blurred area just up and to the left of the center of his vision. The patient noted this visual field defect immediately after he awoke from a cardiac electrophysiologic study with a catheter ablation procedure. On neuro-ophthalmologic testing, a small scotoma was present superior and left of fixation in both eyes. MRI showed a small irregular area of abnormal signal in the right occipital lobe consistent with an ischemic lesion. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case report of a homonymous visual field defect secondary to an occipital lobe infarction following a cardiac catheter ablation procedure.

  2. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul, Hayri

    2015-10-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of "threat" was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility. PMID:26644774

  3. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul4, Hayri

    2015-01-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of “threat” was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility. PMID:26644774

  4. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul, Hayri

    2015-10-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of "threat" was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility.

  5. Dimorphic Olfactory Lobes in the Arthropoda

    PubMed Central

    Strausfeld, Nicholas; Reisenman, Carolina E.

    2009-01-01

    Specialized olfactory lobe glomeruli relating to sexual or caste differences have been observed in at least five orders of insects, suggesting an early appearance of this trait in insect evolution. Dimorphism is not limited to nocturnal species, but occurs even in insects that are known to use vision for courtship. Other than a single description there is no evidence for similar structures occuring in the Crustacea, suggesting that the evolution of dimorphic olfactory systems may typify terrestrial arthropods. PMID:19686183

  6. Dimorphic olfactory lobes in the arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas; Reisenman, Carolina E

    2009-07-01

    Specialized olfactory lobe glomeruli relating to sexual or caste differences have been observed in at least five orders of insects, suggesting an early appearance of this trait in insect evolution. Dimorphism is not limited to nocturnal species, but occurs even in insects that are known to use vision for courtship. Other than a single description, there is no evidence for similar structures occurring in the Crustacea, suggesting that the evolution of dimorphic olfactory systems may typify terrestrial arthropods.

  7. Frontal lobe astrocytoma following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.S.; Kushner, M.J.; Dell, S.

    1981-05-01

    A young woman had a frontal lobe astrocytoma 14 years after successful treatment of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma by surgery and whole-neuraxis irradiation. The association of these two tumors is rare, and it is unlikely that the second tumor was the result of metastasis and differentiation of residual or recurrent medulloblastoma. We review the evidence supporting this view and also the likelihood that the astrocytoma was induced by the prior radiation.

  8. Manual MRI parcellation of the frontal lobe.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Marin E; Crocetti, Deana; Clauss, Jacqueline A; Kraut, Michael A; Mostofsky, Stewart H; Kaufmann, Walter E

    2009-05-15

    The ability to examine associations between neuropsychiatric conditions and functionally relevant frontal lobe sub-regions is a fundamental goal in neuropsychiatry, but methods for identifying frontal sub-regions in MR (magnetic resonance) images are not well established. Prior published techniques have principally defined gyral regions that do not necessarily correspond to known functional divisions. We present a method in which sulcal-gyral landmarks are used to manually delimit functionally relevant regions within the frontal lobe: primary motor cortex, anterior cingulate, deep white matter, premotor cortex regions (supplementary motor complex (SMC), frontal eye field and lateral premotor cortex) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions (medial PFC, dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC), inferior PFC, lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial OFC). Feasibility was tested by applying the protocol to brain MR data from 15 boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and 15 typically developing controls, 8-12 years old. Intra- and inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated using parcellation volumes from a subset of that group. Inter-rater results for the 22 hemisphere specific sub-regions ranged from 0.724 to 0.997, with all but seven values above 0.9. Boys with ADHD showed significantly smaller left hemisphere SMC and DLPFC volumes after normalization for total cerebral volume. These findings support the method as a reliable and valid technique for parcellating the frontal lobe into functionally relevant sub-regions.

  9. Occipital lobe infarction and positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, K; Nagata, K; Shishido, F

    1990-08-01

    Even though the PET study revealed a total infarct in the territory of the left PCA in our 3 cases of pure alexia, it is still obscure which part of the left occipital lobe is most closely associated with the occurrence of the pure alexia. In order to elucidate the intralobar localization of the pure alexia, it is needed to have an ideal case who shows an pure alexia due to the localized lesion within the left occipital lobe. Furthermore, high-resolution PET scanner will circumvent the problem in detecting the metabolism and blood flow in the corpus callosum which plays an important role in the pathogenesis. We have shown that the occlusion of the right PCA also produced a left unilateral agnosia which is one of the common neurological signs in the right MCA infarction. To tell whether the responsible lesion for the unilateral spatial agnosia differs between the PCA occlusion and the MCA occlusion, the correlation study should be carried out in a greater number of the subjects. Two distinctive neuropsychological manifestations, cerebral color blindness and prosopagnosia, have been considered to be produced by the bilateral occipital lesion. The PET studies disclosed reduction of blood flow and oxygen metabolism in both occipital lobes in our particular patient who exhibited cerebral color blindness and prosopagnosia.

  10. Human frontal lobes are not relatively large.

    PubMed

    Barton, Robert A; Venditti, Chris

    2013-05-28

    One of the most pervasive assumptions about human brain evolution is that it involved relative enlargement of the frontal lobes. We show that this assumption is without foundation. Analysis of five independent data sets using correctly scaled measures and phylogenetic methods reveals that the size of human frontal lobes, and of specific frontal regions, is as expected relative to the size of other brain structures. Recent claims for relative enlargement of human frontal white matter volume, and for relative enlargement shared by all great apes, seem to be mistaken. Furthermore, using a recently developed method for detecting shifts in evolutionary rates, we find that the rate of change in relative frontal cortex volume along the phylogenetic branch leading to humans was unremarkable and that other branches showed significantly faster rates of change. Although absolute and proportional frontal region size increased rapidly in humans, this change was tightly correlated with corresponding size increases in other areas and whole brain size, and with decreases in frontal neuron densities. The search for the neural basis of human cognitive uniqueness should therefore focus less on the frontal lobes in isolation and more on distributed neural networks.

  11. Manual MRI parcellation of the frontal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Marin E.; Crocetti, Deana; Clauss, Jacqueline A.; Kraut, Michael A.; Mostofsky, Stewart H.; Kaufmann, Walter E.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to examine associations between neuropsychiatric conditions and functionally relevant frontal lobe sub-regions is a fundamental goal in neuropsychiatry, but methods for identifying frontal sub-regions in MR (magnetic resonance) images are not well established. Prior published techniques have principally defined gyral regions that do not necessarily correspond to known functional divisions. We present a method in which sulcal-gyral landmarks are used to manually delimit functionally relevant regions within the frontal lobe: primary motor cortex, anterior cingulate, deep white matter, premotor cortex regions (supplementary motor complex (SMC), frontal eye field and lateral premotor cortex) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions (medial PFC, dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC), inferior PFC, lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and medial OFC). Feasibility was tested by applying the protocol to brain MR data from 15 boys with ADHD and 15 typically developing controls, 8–12 years old. Intra- and inter-rater intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated using parcellation volumes from a subset of that group. Inter-rater results for the 22 hemisphere specific sub-regions ranged from 0.724 to 0.997, with all but six values above 0.9. Boys with ADHD showed significantly smaller left hemisphere SMC and DLPFC volumes after normalization for total cerebral volume. These findings support the method as a reliable and valid technique for parcellating the frontal lobe into functionally relevant subregions. PMID:19324532

  12. Impaired Facial Expression Recognition in Children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Impact of Early Seizure Onset on Fear Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golouboff, Nathalie; Fiori, Nicole; Delalande, Olivier; Fohlen, Martine; Dellatolas, Georges; Jambaque, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    The amygdala has been implicated in the recognition of facial emotions, especially fearful expressions, in adults with early-onset right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study investigates the recognition of facial emotions in children and adolescents, 8-16 years old, with epilepsy. Twenty-nine subjects had TLE (13 right, 16 left) and…

  13. Peri-ictal water drinking: a rare automatic behaviour in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pietrafusa, Nicola; Trivisano, Marina; de Palma, Luca; Serino, Domenico; Moavero, Romina; Benvenga, Antonella; Cappelletti, Simona; Boero, Giovanni; Vigevano, Federico; La Neve, Angela; Specchio, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Peri-ictal water drinking (PIWD) has been reported as the action of drinking during or within two minutes of an electroclinical seizure. It is considered a peri-ictal vegetative symptom, evident both during childhood and adulthood epilepsy. The aim of this paper was to describe the clinical and electroencephalographic features of two new adult subjects suffering from symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy with episodes of PIWD recorded by VIDEO-EEG and to review literature data in order to better define this peculiar event during seizures, a rare and probably underestimated semiological sign. To date, 51 cases with focal epilepsy and seizures associated with PIWD have been reported. All patients presented with temporal lobe epilepsy. All cases but one had symptomatic epilepsy. Most of the patients had an involvement of the right hemisphere. Water drinking was reported as an ictal sign in the majority of patients, and less frequently was reported as postictal. We believe that PIWD might be considered a rare automatic behaviour, like other automatisms. Automatisms are more frequently described in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. PIWD was reported also to have lateralizing significance in the non-dominant temporal lobe, however, because of its rarity, this finding remains unclear.

  14. Morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla of Sitophilus granarius (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Ali, S A I; Diakite, M M; Ali, S; Wang, M-Q

    2016-08-01

    Sensilla are sense organs in insects, typically consisting of a group of cuticle or epidermal cells that appear as hairs or rod-shaped structures. Sensilla serve as the functional elements of sensory systems. The goal of this study was to determine the type and distribution of sensilla in the antennae of Sitophilus granarius (L.) using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This is one of the first studies in which the morphology and distribution patterns of sensilla on antennal segments of male and female S. granarius have been investigated using SEM, followed by TEM. Different morphological sensilla types, including two sensilla basiconica (SB) types, with two subtypes, four sensilla coeloconica (SC) types and five sensilla chaetica (SCH) types, with one subtype, have been identified on S. granarius antennae, whose external structure and shape are peculiar. TEM micrographs of SB on the antennae of S. granarius are characterized by strongly corrugated pores around the cuticle, while micrographs of SC longitudinal sections showed flat-tipped and smooth-surfaced pegs bearing an apical pore that is suggestive of a gustatory function. TEM micrographs of SCH longitudinal sections showed dendrite branches and cuticular pore arrow heads that may be involved in the perception of humidity, temperature, heat and CO2. Because SCH of different sizes were distributed around the head and rostrum, these may function as contact-chemoreceptors .These results are discussed in relation to the possible roles of the sensilla types in the host location behavior of S. granarius. PMID:27019274

  15. Antennal transcriptome profiles of anopheline mosquitoes reveal human host olfactory specialization in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two sibling members of the Anopheles gambiae species complex display notable differences in female blood meal preferences. An. gambiae s.s. has a well-documented preference for feeding upon human hosts, whereas An. quadriannulatus feeds on vertebrate/mammalian hosts, with only opportunistic feeding upon humans. Because mosquito host-seeking behaviors are largely driven by the sensory modality of olfaction, we hypothesized that hallmarks of these divergent host seeking phenotypes will be in evidence within the transcriptome profiles of the antennae, the mosquito’s principal chemosensory appendage. Results To test this hypothesis, we have sequenced antennal mRNA of non-bloodfed females from each species and observed a number of distinct quantitative and qualitative differences in their chemosensory gene repertoires. In both species, these gene families show higher rates of sequence polymorphisms than the overall rates in their respective transcriptomes, with potentially important divergences between the two species. Moreover, quantitative differences in odorant receptor transcript abundances have been used to model potential distinctions in volatile odor receptivity between the two sibling species of anophelines. Conclusion This analysis suggests that the anthropophagic behavior of An. gambiae s.s. reflects the differential distribution of olfactory receptors in the antenna, likely resulting from a co-option and refinement of molecular components common to both species. This study improves our understanding of the molecular evolution of chemoreceptors in closely related anophelines and suggests possible mechanisms that underlie the behavioral distinctions in host seeking that, in part, account for the differential vectorial capacity of these mosquitoes. PMID:24182346

  16. Analysis of the Antennal Transcriptome and Insights into Olfactory Genes in Hyphantria cunea (Drury)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian-Tian; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Long; Yang, Yun-Qiu; Huang, Chang-Chun; Jiang, Li-Ya; Ding, De-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Hyphantria cunea (Drury) (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) is an invasive insect pest which, in China, causes unprecedented damage and economic losses due to its extreme fecundity and wide host range, including forest and shade trees, and even crops. Compared to the better known lepidopteran species which use Type-I pheromones, little is known at the molecular level about the olfactory mechanisms of host location and mate choice in H. cunea, a species using Type-II lepidopteran pheromones. In the present study, the H. cunea antennal transcriptome was constructed by Illumina Hiseq 2500TM sequencing, with the aim of discovering olfaction-related genes. We obtained 64,020,776 clean reads, and 59,243 unigenes from the analysis of the transcriptome, and the putative gene functions were annotated using gene ontology (GO) annotation. We further identified 124 putative chemosensory unigenes based on homology searches and phylogenetic analysis, including 30 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 52 odorant receptors (ORs), 14 ionotropic receptors (IRs), nine gustatory receptors (GRs) and two sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs). We also found many conserved motif patterns of OBPs and CSPs using a MEME system. Moreover, we systematically analyzed expression patterns of OBPs and CSPs based on reverse transcription PCR and quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) with RNA extracted from different tissues and life stages of both sexes in H. cunea. The antennae-biased expression may provide a deeper further understanding of olfactory processing in H. cunea. The first ever identification of olfactory genes in H. cunea may provide new leads for control of this major pest. PMID:27741298

  17. Proline transport by brush-border membrane vesicles of lobster antennal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, R.D.; Wong, R.K.; Huse, S.M.; Reshkin, S.J.; Ahearn, G.A. )

    1990-02-01

    Purified brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of lobster antennal gland labyrinth and bladder were separately formed by a magnesium precipitation technique. L-(3H)proline uptake was stimulated by a transmembrane NaCl gradient (outside (o) greater than inside (i)) to a greater extent in BBMV from labyrinth than those from the bladder. Detailed study of the labyrinth proline-transport processes revealed a specific dependence on NaCl, with negligible stimulatory effects by NaSCN, Na-gluconate, or KCl. A transmembrane proton gradient (o greater than i) was without stimulatory effect on proline transport. A transmembrane potential difference alone, in the presence of equilibrated NaCl and L-(3H)proline, led to net influx of the labeled amino acid, suggesting that the uptake process was electrogenic and capable of bringing about the net transfer of positive charge to the vesicle interior. Although a transmembrane Na gradient alone, in the presence of equilibrated Cl and L-(3H)proline, was able to bring about the net influx of the amino acid, a transmembrane Cl gradient alone under Na- and L-(3H)proline-equilibrated conditions was not, suggesting that only the Na gradient could energize the carrier process through cotransport, while the anion served an essential activating role. Proline influx by these vesicles occurred by the combination of at least one saturable Michaelis-Menten carrier system (apparent Kt = 0.37 mM; apparent JM = 1.19 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1) and apparent diffusion (P = 0.33 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1.mM-1). Static head analysis of the transport process suggested a cotransport stoichiometry of 2 Na:1 proline with essential activation by Cl ion.

  18. Southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis, antennal and behavioral responses to nonhost leaf and bark volatiles.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, William P; Sullivan, Brian T

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that bark beetles detect and avoid release points of volatile compounds associated with nonhost species, and thus such nonhost volatiles may have potential utility in the management of bark beetles. We used a coupled gas chromatograph-electroantennographic detector (GC-EAD) to assay the olfactory sensitivity of the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, to volatiles from leaves and bark of eight species of nonhost angiosperm trees that are common in the range of D. frontalis. Tree species sampled were red maple (Acer rubrum L.), mockernut hickory [Carya alba (L.) Nutt. ex Ell.], sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), black tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.), black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.), southern red oak (Quercus falcata Michx.), blackjack oak [Quercus marilandica (L.) Muenchh.], and water oak (Quercus nigra L.). Beetle antennae responded to a total of 28 identifiable compounds in these samples. The relative olfactory responsiveness to 14 of these, as well as to nonanoic acid and four additional volatiles reported to be associated with nonhost angiosperms, was assessed in GC-EAD analyses of synthetic dilutions spanning six orders of magnitude. The largest response voltage amplitudes were obtained with trans-conophthorin, nonanoic acid, terpinen-4-ol, phenylethyl alcohol, and eucalyptol, whereas the lowest response thresholds were to nonanoic acid, nonanal, linalool, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, and phenylethyl alcohol. Funnel traps baited with various combinations of eleven antennally-active angiosperm volatiles along with a standard attractant captured significantly fewer male and female D. frontalis than traps baited with the standard attractant alone. Our data suggest that a diversity of semiochemicals may be involved in host species discrimination by D. frontalis, and several may have utility in their management. PMID:23460417

  19. Characterization of an Antennal Carboxylesterase from the Pest Moth Spodoptera littoralis Degrading a Host Plant Odorant

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Nicolas; Carot-Sans, Gerard; Chertemps, Thomas; Bozzolan, Françoise; Party, Virginie; Renou, Michel; Debernard, Stéphane; Rosell, Gloria; Maïbèche-Coisne, Martine

    2010-01-01

    Background Carboxyl/cholinesterases (CCEs) are highly diversified in insects. These enzymes have a broad range of proposed functions, in neuro/developmental processes, dietary detoxification, insecticide resistance or hormone/pheromone degradation. As few functional data are available on purified or recombinant CCEs, the physiological role of most of these enzymes is unknown. Concerning their role in olfaction, only two CCEs able to metabolize sex pheromones have been functionally characterized in insects. These enzymes are only expressed in the male antennae, and secreted into the lumen of the pheromone-sensitive sensilla. CCEs able to hydrolyze other odorants than sex pheromones, such as plant volatiles, have not been identified. Methodology In Spodoptera littoralis, a major crop pest, a diversity of antennal CCEs has been previously identified. We have employed here a combination of molecular biology, biochemistry and electrophysiology approaches to functionally characterize an intracellular CCE, SlCXE10, whose predominant expression in the olfactory sensilla suggested a role in olfaction. A recombinant protein was produced using the baculovirus system and we tested its catabolic properties towards a plant volatile and the sex pheromone components. Conclusion We showed that SlCXE10 could efficiently hydrolyze a green leaf volatile and to a lesser extent the sex pheromone components. The transcript level in male antennae was also strongly induced by exposure to this plant odorant. In antennae, SlCXE10 expression was associated with sensilla responding to the sex pheromones and to plant odours. These results suggest that a CCE-based intracellular metabolism of odorants could occur in insect antennae, in addition to the extracellular metabolism occurring within the sensillar lumen. This is the first functional characterization of an Odorant-Degrading Enzyme active towards a host plant volatile. PMID:21124773

  20. Sustained lobe reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Jackman, C. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hospodarsky, G.; Kurth, W. S.; Hansen, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The degree to which solar wind driving may affect Saturn's magnetosphere is not yet fully understood. We present observations that suggest that under some conditions the solar wind does govern the character of the plasma sheet in Saturn's outer magnetosphere. On 16 September 2006, the Cassini spacecraft, at a radial distance of 37 Rs near local midnight, observed a sunward flowing ion population for ~5 h, which was accompanied by enhanced Saturn Kilometric Radiation emissions. We interpret this beam as the outflow from a long-lasting episode of Dungey-type reconnection, i.e., reconnection of previously open flux containing magnetosheath material. The beam occurred in the middle of a several-day interval of SKR activity and enhanced lobe magnetic field strength, apparently caused by the arrival of a solar wind compression region with significantly higher than average dynamic pressure. The arrival of the high-pressure solar wind also marked a change in the composition of the plasma-sheet plasma, from water-group-dominated material clearly of inner-magnetosphere origin to material dominated by light-ion composition, consistent with captured magnetosheath plasma. This event suggests that under the influence of prolonged high solar wind dynamic pressure, the tail plasma sheet, which normally consists of inner-magnetospheric plasma, is eroded away by ongoing reconnection that then involves open lobe field lines. This process removes open magnetic flux from the lobes and creates a more Earth-like, Dungey-style outer plasma sheet dominantly of solar wind origin. This behavior is potentially a recurrent phenomenon driven by repeating high-pressure streams (corotating interaction regions) in the solar wind, which also drive geomagnetic storms at Earth.

  1. Genetics of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Salzmann, Annick; Malafosse, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is usually regarded as a polygenic and complex disorder. To understand its genetic component, numerous linkage analyses of familial forms and association studies of cases versus controls have been conducted since the middle of the nineties. The present paper lists genetic findings for TLE from the initial segregation analysis to the most recent results published in May 2011. To date, no genes have been clearly related to TLE despite many efforts to do so. However, it is vital to continue replication studies and collaborative attempts to find significant results and thus determine which gene variant combination plays a definitive role in the aetiology of TLE. PMID:22957248

  2. Temporal lobe epilepsy surgery: definition of candidacy.

    PubMed

    Jones, M W; Andermann, F

    2000-05-01

    Medical intractability is one of the absolute indications for considering temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. This is a relative concept that has to be highly individualized. It is quite easy to determine when a patient's seizures are fully controlled. On the other hand, "continuing seizures are not necessarily a measure of intractability or disability". A positive decision to operate would be based on some of the following factors: assurance of a firm diagnosis, seizures that are frequent and disabling, and seizures occurring in patients who are drug refractory to optimal anti-epileptic medications and dosages.

  3. Forced mixer lobes in ejector designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, W. M., Jr.; Morin, B. L.; Gousy, R. G.

    1986-01-01

    Forced mixer lobes in augmentor primary ejectors obtain a 100-percent increase in pumping over conventional design, together with nearly complete mixing in very short mixing ducts, through the generation of large scale axial vorticity in the mixing duct. The vorticity causes rapid mixing of the primary and secondary flows with low losses; since mixing length is minimized, wall friction losses are reduced, allowing more secondary flow to be pumped for a given total pressure in the primary flow. Analytical results are presented that are judged to have significant implications for future ejector test work.

  4. Parapharyngeal and deep lobe parotid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kassel, E E

    1982-12-01

    Lesions in the parapharyngeal region are more difficult to evaluate or differentiate clinically. Conventional films are of limited use in studying this area because of its soft tissue composition. Alternatively, CT can display the soft tissue structures, including the fascial planes and deeper tissues of this region extremely well. Differentiation between parapharyngeal and deep lobe parotid tumors can be made. Patterns of enhancement and tumor location are noted. Size and extent of tumors, including operability, can be assessed. Probable pathology may be suggested. Parapharyngeal anatomy and pathology are illustrated and discussed.

  5. Plasma transport in the magnetotail lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaland, S.; Lybekk, B.; Svenes, K.; Pedersen, A.; Förster, M.; Vaith, H.; Torbert, R.

    2009-09-01

    The Earth's magnetosphere is populated by particles originating from the solar wind and the terrestrial ionosphere. A substantial fraction of the plasma from these sources are convected through the magnetotail lobes. In this paper, we present a statistical study of convective plasma transport through the Earth's magnetotail lobes for various geomagnetic conditions. The results are based on a combination of density measurements from the Electric Field and Waves Experiment (EFW) and convection velocities from the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) on board the Cluster spacecraft. The results show that variations in the plasma flow is primarily attributed to changes in the convection velocity, whereas the plasma density remains fairly constant and shows little correlation with geomagnetic activity. During disturbed conditions there is also an increased abundance of heavier ions, which combined with enhanced convection, cause an accentuation of the mass flow. The convective transport is much slower than the field aligned transport. A substantial amount of plasma therefore escape downtail without ever reaching the central plasma sheet.

  6. [Normal aging of frontal lobe functions].

    PubMed

    Calso, Cristina; Besnard, Jérémy; Allain, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Normal aging in individuals is often associated with morphological, metabolic and cognitive changes, which particularly concern the cerebral frontal regions. Starting from the "frontal lobe hypothesis of cognitive aging" (West, 1996), the present review is based on the neuroanatomical model developed by Stuss (2008), introducing four categories of frontal lobe functions: executive control, behavioural and emotional self-regulation and decision-making, energization and meta-cognitive functions. The selected studies only address the changes of one at least of these functions. The results suggest a deterioration of several cognitive frontal abilities in normal aging: flexibility, inhibition, planning, verbal fluency, implicit decision-making, second-order and affective theory of mind. Normal aging seems also to be characterised by a general reduction in processing speed observed during neuropsychological assessment (Salthouse, 1996). Nevertheless many cognitive functions remain preserved such as automatic or non-conscious inhibition, specific capacities of flexibility and first-order theory of mind. Therefore normal aging doesn't seem to be associated with a global cognitive decline but rather with a selective change in some frontal systems, conclusion which should be taken into account for designing caring programs in normal aging. PMID:27005339

  7. Hyperfamiliarity in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Amlerova, Jana; Cavanna, Andrea E; Bradac, Ondrej; Javurkova, Alena; Marusic, Petr

    2012-07-01

    Hyperfamiliarity is a type of paramnesia characterized by an increased feeling of familiarity to unfamiliar faces. This dysfunction has been associated with frontal and temporal lobe pathology. The study investigated hyperfamiliarity in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by assessing their ability to recognize both familiar and unfamiliar faces. We evaluated 61 patients with pharmacoresistant TLE (33 right-sided, 28 left-sided) and 16 controls. The ability to recognize familiar faces was similar in patients and controls, although patients with left-sided TLE showed poorer performance in familiar face naming compared to both right-sided TLE patients and controls. Hyperfamiliarity was observed in a significantly higher number of patients with TLE compared to controls; in subgroup analysis, only right-sided TLE patients expressed hyperfamiliarity. Overall, patients with right-sided TLE showed more severe impairment compared to patients with left-sided TLE. It is proposed that hyperfamiliarity can be a relatively common symptom in patients with treatment-refractory TLE and right-sided focus.

  8. Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis in two pairs of identical twins.

    PubMed

    Karatas, H; Dericioglu, N; Saygi, S

    2012-01-01

    The most common pathology in adult patients with temporal lobe epilepsy is hippocampal sclerosis (HS), the etiology of which is not clear. There is a conflicting evidence in literature regarding whether HS is genetic or acquired. Twin studies can help to clarify the mechanisms of HS, but limited numbers of twins have been studied. We describe two monozygotic pairs, in whom the affected twin had mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and HS. The unaffected twin remained seizure free on long-term follow-up. HS was confirmed pathologically in one of the affected twins. Our data and other limited twin studies indicate that HS occurs as a consequence of prolonged repeated seizures or other events during childhood. In other words, some acquired factors may be more important than genetic ones in the etiology of HS (Fig. 2, Ref. 16). PMID:22794520

  9. Antennal transcriptome and differential expression of olfactory genes in the yellow peach moth, Conogethes punctiferalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Hai-Xiang; Yan, Zeng-Guang; Zhang, Min-Zhao; Wei, Chun-Hua; Qin, Xiao-Chun; Ji, Wei-Rong; Falabella, Patrizia; Du, Yan-Li

    2016-01-01

    The yellow peach moth (YPM), Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée), is a multivoltine insect pest of crops and fruits. Antennal-expressed receptors are important for insects to detect olfactory cues for host finding, mate attraction and oviposition site selection. However, few olfactory related genes were reported in YPM until now. In the present study, we sequenced and characterized the antennal transcriptomes of male and female YPM. In total, 15 putative odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 46 putative odorant receptors (ORs) and 7 putative ionotropic receptors (IRs) were annotated and identified as olfactory-related genes of C. punctiferalis. Further analysis of RT-qPCR revealed that all these olfactory genes are primarily or uniquely expressed in male and female antennae. Among which, 3 OBPs (OBP4, OBP8 and PBP2) and 4 ORs (OR22, OR26, OR44 and OR46) were specially expressed in male antennae, whereas 4 ORs (OR5, OR16, OR25 and OR42) were primarily expressed in female antennae. The predicted protein sequences were compared with homologs in other lepidopteran species and model insects, which showed high sequence homologies between C. punctiferalis and O. furnacalis. Our work allows for further functional studies of pheromone and general odorant detection genes, which might be meaningful targets for pest management. PMID:27364081

  10. Identification and Expression Analysis of Candidate Odorant-Binding Protein and Chemosensory Protein Genes by Antennal Transcriptome of Sitobion avenae

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wenxin; Fan, Jia; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Qingxuan; Han, Zongli; Sun, Jingrui; Chen, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) of aphids are thought to be responsible for the initial molecular interactions during olfaction that mediate detection of chemical signals. Analysis of the diversity of proteins involved comprises critical basic research work that will facilitate the development of sustainable pest control strategies. To help us better understand differences in the olfactory system between winged and wingless grain aphids, we constructed an antennal transcriptome from winged and wingless Sitobion avenae (Fabricius), one of the most serious pests of cereal fields worldwide. Among the 133,331 unigenes in the antennal assembly, 13 OBP and 5 CSP putative transcripts were identified with 6 OBP and 3 CSP sequences representing new S. avenae annotations. We used qPCR to examine the expression profile of these genes sets across S. avenae development and in various tissues. We found 7 SaveOBPs and 1 SaveCSP were specifically or significantly elevated in antennae compared with other tissues, and that some transcripts (SaveOBP8, SaveCSP2 and SaveCSP5) were abundantly expressed in the legs of winged or wingless aphids. The expression levels of the SaveOBPs and SaveCSPs varied depending on the developmental stage. Possible physiological functions of these genes are discussed. Further molecular and functional studies of these olfactory related genes will explore their potential as novel targets for controlling S. avenae. PMID:27561107

  11. Enantioselective preference and high antennal sensitivity for (-)-Ipsdienol in scent-collecting male orchid bees, Euglossa cyanura.

    PubMed

    Schorkopf, Dirk Louis P; Mitko, Lukasz; Eltz, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Male neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) collect volatile chemicals from their environment, store them in tibial pouches, and later expose their "perfumes" during a courtship display. Here, we showed that enantiomeric selectivity plays an important role in the choice of volatiles by male Euglossa cyanura in southern Mexico, and that behavioral selectivity is linked to antennal sensitivity. In field bioassays with equal concentrations of (+)-ipsdienol, (-)-ipsdienol, and racemate, males preferred the (-)-isomer to the racemate, while neglecting the (+)-isomer. Correspondingly, antennae of male E. cyanura showed larger electroantennographic responses to the (-)-isomer than to the (+)-isomer. In comparison, antennae of male Euglossa mixta, which are not attracted to any form of ipsdienol, showed lower electroantennographic responses to (-)-ipsdienol than did antennae of E. cyanura, and also did not differ in sensitivity with respect to the (+)- or (-)-isomers. We suggest that (-)-ipsdienol is an important component of perfume signals in male E. cyanura, which have undergone selection in favor of increased antennal sensitivity to that enantiomer.

  12. Identification and Expression Analysis of Candidate Odorant-Binding Protein and Chemosensory Protein Genes by Antennal Transcriptome of Sitobion avenae.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wenxin; Fan, Jia; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Qingxuan; Han, Zongli; Sun, Jingrui; Chen, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) of aphids are thought to be responsible for the initial molecular interactions during olfaction that mediate detection of chemical signals. Analysis of the diversity of proteins involved comprises critical basic research work that will facilitate the development of sustainable pest control strategies. To help us better understand differences in the olfactory system between winged and wingless grain aphids, we constructed an antennal transcriptome from winged and wingless Sitobion avenae (Fabricius), one of the most serious pests of cereal fields worldwide. Among the 133,331 unigenes in the antennal assembly, 13 OBP and 5 CSP putative transcripts were identified with 6 OBP and 3 CSP sequences representing new S. avenae annotations. We used qPCR to examine the expression profile of these genes sets across S. avenae development and in various tissues. We found 7 SaveOBPs and 1 SaveCSP were specifically or significantly elevated in antennae compared with other tissues, and that some transcripts (SaveOBP8, SaveCSP2 and SaveCSP5) were abundantly expressed in the legs of winged or wingless aphids. The expression levels of the SaveOBPs and SaveCSPs varied depending on the developmental stage. Possible physiological functions of these genes are discussed. Further molecular and functional studies of these olfactory related genes will explore their potential as novel targets for controlling S. avenae. PMID:27561107

  13. Antennal uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glycosyltransferases in a pest insect: diversity and putative function in odorant and xenobiotics clearance.

    PubMed

    Bozzolan, F; Siaussat, D; Maria, A; Durand, N; Pottier, M-A; Chertemps, T; Maïbèche-Coisne, M

    2014-10-01

    Uridine diphosphate UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) are detoxification enzymes widely distributed within living organisms. They are involved in the biotransformation of various lipophilic endogenous compounds and xenobiotics, including odorants. Several UGTs have been reported in the olfactory organs of mammals and involved in olfactory processing and detoxification within the olfactory mucosa but, in insects, this enzyme family is still poorly studied. Despite recent transcriptomic analyses, the diversity of antennal UGTs in insects has not been investigated. To date, only three UGT cDNAs have been shown to be expressed in insect olfactory organs. In the present study, we report the identification of eleven putative UGTs expressed in the antennae of the model pest insect Spodoptera littoralis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these UGTs belong to five different families, highlighting their structural diversity. In addition, two genes, UGT40R3 and UGT46A6, were either specifically expressed or overexpressed in the antennae, suggesting specific roles in this sensory organ. Exposure of male moths to the sex pheromone and to a plant odorant differentially downregulated the transcription levels of these two genes, revealing for the first time the regulation of insect UGTs by odorant exposure. Moreover, the specific antennal gene UGT46A6 was upregulated by insecticide topical application on antennae, suggesting its role in the protection of the olfactory organ towards xenobiotics. This work highlights the structural and functional diversity of UGTs within this highly specialized tissue. PMID:24698447

  14. Evolution of herbivory in Drosophilidae linked to loss of behaviors, antennal responses, odorant receptors, and ancestral diet

    PubMed Central

    Goldman-Huertas, Benjamin; Mitchell, Robert F.; Lapoint, Richard T.; Faucher, Cécile P.; Hildebrand, John G.; Whiteman, Noah K.

    2015-01-01

    Herbivory is a key innovation in insects, yet has only evolved in one-third of living orders. The evolution of herbivory likely involves major behavioral changes mediated by remodeling of canonical chemosensory modules. Herbivorous flies in the genus Scaptomyza (Drosophilidae) are compelling species in which to study the genomic architecture linked to the transition to herbivory because they recently evolved from microbe-feeding ancestors and are closely related to Drosophila melanogaster. We found that Scaptomyza flava, a leaf-mining specialist on plants in the family (Brassicaceae), was not attracted to yeast volatiles in a four-field olfactometer assay, whereas D. melanogaster was strongly attracted to these volatiles. Yeast-associated volatiles, especially short-chain aliphatic esters, elicited strong antennal responses in D. melanogaster, but weak antennal responses in electroantennographic recordings from S. flava. We sequenced the genome of S. flava and characterized this species’ odorant receptor repertoire. Orthologs of odorant receptors, which detect yeast volatiles in D. melanogaster and mediate critical host-choice behavior, were deleted or pseudogenized in the genome of S. flava. These genes were lost step-wise during the evolution of Scaptomyza. Additionally, Scaptomyza has experienced gene duplication and likely positive selection in paralogs of Or67b in D. melanogaster. Olfactory sensory neurons expressing Or67b are sensitive to green-leaf volatiles. Major trophic shifts in insects are associated with chemoreceptor gene loss as recently evolved ecologies shape sensory repertoires. PMID:25624509

  15. Antennal transcriptome and differential expression of olfactory genes in the yellow peach moth, Conogethes punctiferalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Hai-Xiang; Yan, Zeng-Guang; Zhang, Min-Zhao; Wei, Chun-Hua; Qin, Xiao-Chun; Ji, Wei-Rong; Falabella, Patrizia; Du, Yan-Li

    2016-01-01

    The yellow peach moth (YPM), Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée), is a multivoltine insect pest of crops and fruits. Antennal-expressed receptors are important for insects to detect olfactory cues for host finding, mate attraction and oviposition site selection. However, few olfactory related genes were reported in YPM until now. In the present study, we sequenced and characterized the antennal transcriptomes of male and female YPM. In total, 15 putative odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 46 putative odorant receptors (ORs) and 7 putative ionotropic receptors (IRs) were annotated and identified as olfactory-related genes of C. punctiferalis. Further analysis of RT-qPCR revealed that all these olfactory genes are primarily or uniquely expressed in male and female antennae. Among which, 3 OBPs (OBP4, OBP8 and PBP2) and 4 ORs (OR22, OR26, OR44 and OR46) were specially expressed in male antennae, whereas 4 ORs (OR5, OR16, OR25 and OR42) were primarily expressed in female antennae. The predicted protein sequences were compared with homologs in other lepidopteran species and model insects, which showed high sequence homologies between C. punctiferalis and O. furnacalis. Our work allows for further functional studies of pheromone and general odorant detection genes, which might be meaningful targets for pest management. PMID:27364081

  16. Antennal uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glycosyltransferases in a pest insect: diversity and putative function in odorant and xenobiotics clearance.

    PubMed

    Bozzolan, F; Siaussat, D; Maria, A; Durand, N; Pottier, M-A; Chertemps, T; Maïbèche-Coisne, M

    2014-10-01

    Uridine diphosphate UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) are detoxification enzymes widely distributed within living organisms. They are involved in the biotransformation of various lipophilic endogenous compounds and xenobiotics, including odorants. Several UGTs have been reported in the olfactory organs of mammals and involved in olfactory processing and detoxification within the olfactory mucosa but, in insects, this enzyme family is still poorly studied. Despite recent transcriptomic analyses, the diversity of antennal UGTs in insects has not been investigated. To date, only three UGT cDNAs have been shown to be expressed in insect olfactory organs. In the present study, we report the identification of eleven putative UGTs expressed in the antennae of the model pest insect Spodoptera littoralis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these UGTs belong to five different families, highlighting their structural diversity. In addition, two genes, UGT40R3 and UGT46A6, were either specifically expressed or overexpressed in the antennae, suggesting specific roles in this sensory organ. Exposure of male moths to the sex pheromone and to a plant odorant differentially downregulated the transcription levels of these two genes, revealing for the first time the regulation of insect UGTs by odorant exposure. Moreover, the specific antennal gene UGT46A6 was upregulated by insecticide topical application on antennae, suggesting its role in the protection of the olfactory organ towards xenobiotics. This work highlights the structural and functional diversity of UGTs within this highly specialized tissue.

  17. Channel systems and lobe construction in the Mississippi Fan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, L. E.; Kenyon, Neil H.; Bouma, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Morphological features on the Mississippi Fan in the eastern Gulf of Mexico were mapped using GLORIA II, a long-range side-scan sonar system. Prominent is a sinuous channel flanked by well-developed levees and occasional crevasse splays. The channel follows the axis and thickest part of the youngest fan lobe; seismic-reflection profiles offer evidence that its course has remained essentially constant throughout lobe development. Local modification and possible erosion of levees by currents indicates a present state of inactivity. Superficial sliding has affected part of the fan lobe, but does not appear to have been a factor in lobe construction. ?? 1982 A. M. Dowden, Inc.

  18. Abnormal behavior in children with temporal lobe epilepsy and ganglioglioma.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Catarina A; Franzon, Renata C; Souza, Elisabete A P; Schmutzler, Kátia M R S; Montenegro, Maria Augusta; Queiroz, Luciano de S; Cendes, Fernando; Guerreiro, Marilisa M

    2004-10-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy in childhood is characterized by great clinical, electroencephalographic, and etiological diversity. The prognosis after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery in childhood is usually good, with most patients achieving complete seizure control. However, in some children behavior deteriorates postoperatively. We report two girls (2 and 6 years of age) with refractory seizures due to temporal lobe ganglioglioma. They exhibited aggression and hyperactivity since the beginning of their epilepsy. In both patients, behavioral disturbances worsened postoperatively, despite complete seizure control. Patients and parents should be advised about possible behavioral disturbances after epilepsy surgery, especially in the presence of a temporal lobe developmental tumor, even when seizure control is achieved postoperatively.

  19. Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus of Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qin; Ren, Bo-Xu; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2016-02-01

    The mobilization of endogenous neural stem cells in order to substitute lost neurons in the adult brain may reduce the negative effects of patients with chronic neurodegenerative diseases. However, abnormal neurogenesis may be harmful and could lead to the worsening of patients' symptoms. In the brains of patients and animal models with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), increased newly generated neurons in the subgranular zone (SGZ) at early stages after brain insults have been speculated to be involved in epileptogenesis. However, this argument is unsupported by evidence showing that (1) hippocampal neurogenesis is reduced at chronic stages of intractable TLE, (2) decreased neurogenesis is involved in epileptogenesis, and (3) spontaneous recurrent seizures occur before newly generated neurons are integrated into hippocampal neural pathways. Therefore, the hypothesis of increased neurogenesis in epileptogenesis may need to be re-evaluated. In this paper, we systemically reviewed brain neurogenesis and relevant molecules in the regulation of neurogenesis in SGZ. We aimed to update researchers and epileptologists on current progresses on pathophysiological changes of neurogenesis at different stages of TLE in patients and animal models of TLE. The interactions among neurogenesis, epileptogenesis and cognitive impairment, and molecules' mechanism involved in neurogenesis would also be discussed. Future research directions are proposed at the end of this paper.

  20. Clinical correlates of graph theory findings in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Zulfi; Chiang, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is considered a brain network disorder, additionally representing the most common form of pharmaco-resistant epilepsy in adults. There is increasing evidence that seizures in TLE arise from abnormal epileptogenic networks, which extend beyond the clinico-radiologically determined epileptogenic zone and may contribute to the failure rate of 30–50% following epilepsy surgery. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks using several neuroimaging and electrophysiologic modalities, and has potential to provide clinicians with clinically useful biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Methods We performed a review of the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain to localization of the epileptogenic zone, prediction of pre- and post-surgical seizure frequency and cognitive performance, and monitoring cognitive decline in TLE. Results Although different neuroimaging and electrophysiologic modalities have yielded occasionally conflicting results, several potential biomarkers have been characterized for identifying the epileptogenic zone, pre-/post-surgical seizure prediction, and assessing cognitive performance. For localization, graph theory measures of centrality have shown the most potential, including betweenness centrality, outdegree, and graph index complexity, whereas for prediction of seizure frequency, measures of synchronizability have shown the most potential. The utility of clustering coefficient and characteristic path length for assessing cognitive performance in TLE is also discussed. Conclusions Future studies integrating data from multiple modalities and testing predictive models are needed to clarify findings and develop graph theory for its clinical utility. PMID:25127370

  1. Middle Lobe Torsion after Unilateral Lung Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Chad S; Decker, Summer J; Rolfe, Mark; Hazelton, Todd R; Rojas, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Lobar torsion is well documented after pneumonectomy, but is very rare after lung transplant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the twelfth reported case of lobar torsion after lung transplant. In our case, bronchoscopies and chest radiographs were inconclusive; however, CT scan clearly demonstrated findings consistent with right middle lobe torsion. We review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. We also propose that if a clinical picture could be secondary to torsion and bronchoscopies and chest x ray are inconclusive that a CT scan should be obtained as soon as possible since early recognition increases the likelihood of being able to successfully detorse the lung and avoid lobectomy. PMID:27761176

  2. Psychosis in temporal lobe epilepsy: atypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Priya; Ogunyemi, Boluwaji; MacDonald, Andrea; Gadit, Amin

    2012-01-01

    A 55-year-old lady was admitted following a concern raised by family members who had noticed a change in behaviour in terms of declining mood, paranoia with expression of belief that she was being bugged, also reported smelling perfume and after shave lotion. She had a prior diagnosis of bipolar mood disorder and was on lithium but remained no-compliant with her prescribed medication in the 10 weeks before admission. Upon admission, necessary investigations were performed including CT scan and EEG. Her CT was normal but EEG was grossly abnormal. Neurology consultation was sought and a sleep deprived EEG and MRI was ordered. Meanwhile, carbamezipine was commenced in view of the change in diagnosis to that of temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient responded very well to this regime and improved in all spheres. She was finally discharged with follow-up appointments with both neurology and psychiatry clinics.

  3. The initial cooling of pahoehoe flow lobes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; Denlinger, R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new thermal model for the initial cooling of pahoehoe lava flows. The accurate modeling of this initial cooling is important for understanding the formation of the distinctive surface textures on pahoehoe lava flows as well as being the first step in modeling such key pahoehoe emplacement processes as lava flow inflation and lava tube formation. This model is constructed from the physical phenomena observed to control the initial cooling of pahoehoe flows and is not an empirical fit to field data. We find that the only significant processes are (a) heat loss by thermal radiation, (b) heat loss by atmospheric convection, (c) heat transport within the flow by conduction with temperature and porosity-dependent thermal properties, and (d) the release of latent heat during crystallization. The numerical model is better able to reproduce field measurements made in Hawai'i between 1989 and 1993 than other published thermal models. By adjusting one parameter at a time, the effect of each of the input parameters on the cooling rate was determined. We show that: (a) the surfaces of porous flows cool more quickly than the surfaces of dense flows, (b) the surface cooling is very sensitive to the efficiency of atmospheric convective cooling, and (c) changes in the glass forming tendency of the lava may have observable petrographic and thermal signatures. These model results provide a quantitative explanation for the recently observed relationship between the surface cooling rate of pahoehoe lobes and the porosity of those lobes (Jones 1992, 1993). The predicted sensitivity of cooling to atmospheric convection suggests a simple field experiment for verification, and the model provides a tool to begin studies of the dynamic crystallization of real lavas. Future versions of the model can also be made applicable to extraterrestrial, submarine, silicic, and pyroclastic flows.

  4. The effect of a foveal scotoma on the visual lobe.

    PubMed

    Foley-Fisher, J A; Murphy, K S

    1988-01-01

    One-dimensional visual lobes representing the detectability of a small bright target on an unstructured background were measured at several contrast levels, both with and without an artificial foveal scotoma. The effect of the scotoma on the lobe is shown to be restricted to the area of the retina covered by the scotoma, and detection ability is unaffected outside this area.

  5. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  6. The Role of Medial Temporal Lobe Regions in Incidental and Intentional Retrieval of Item and Relational Information in Aging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chun; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2016-06-01

    Considerable neuropsychological and neuroimaging work indicates that the medial temporal lobes are critical for both item and relational memory retrieval. However, there remain outstanding issues in the literature, namely the extent to which medial temporal lobe regions are differentially recruited during incidental and intentional retrieval of item and relational information, and the extent to which aging may affect these neural substrates. The current fMRI study sought to address these questions; participants incidentally encoded word pairs embedded in sentences and incidental item and relational retrieval were assessed through speeded reading of intact, rearranged, and new word-pair sentences, while intentional item and relational retrieval were assessed through old/new associative recognition of a separate set of intact, rearranged, and new word pairs. Results indicated that, in both younger and older adults, anterior hippocampus and perirhinal cortex indexed incidental and intentional item retrieval in the same manner. In contrast, posterior hippocampus supported incidental and intentional relational retrieval in both age groups and an adjacent cluster in posterior hippocampus was recruited during both forms of relational retrieval for older, but not younger, adults. Our findings suggest that while medial temporal lobe regions do not differentiate between incidental and intentional forms of retrieval, there are distinct roles for anterior and posterior medial temporal lobe regions during retrieval of item and relational information, respectively, and further indicate that posterior regions may, under certain conditions, be over-recruited in healthy aging. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Lung lobe modeling and segmentation with individualized surface meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaffert, Thomas; Barschdorf, Hans; von Berg, Jens; Dries, Sebastian; Franz, Astrid; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian; Renisch, Steffen; Wiemker, Rafael

    2008-03-01

    An automated segmentation of lung lobes in thoracic CT images is of interest for various diagnostic purposes like the quantification of emphysema or the localization of tumors within the lung. Although the separating lung fissures are visible in modern multi-slice CT-scanners, their contrast in the CT-image often does not separate the lobes completely. This makes it impossible to build a reliable segmentation algorithm without additional information. Our approach uses general anatomical knowledge represented in a geometrical mesh model to construct a robust lobe segmentation, which even gives reasonable estimates of lobe volumes if fissures are not visible at all. The paper describes the generation of the lung model mesh including lobes by an average volume model, its adaptation to individual patient data using a special fissure feature image, and a performance evaluation over a test data set showing an average segmentation accuracy of 1 to 3 mm.

  8. Mirror focus in a patient with intractable occipital lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Shin, Hae Kyung; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Choi, Su Jung; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Bong; Hong, Seung Chul; Seo, Dae-Won

    2014-06-01

    Mirror focus is one of the evidence of progression in epilepsy, and also has practical points for curative resective epilepsy surgery. The mirror foci are related to the kindling phenomena that occur through interhemispheric callosal or commissural connections. A mirror focus means the secondary epileptogenic foci develop in the contralateral hemispheric homotopic area. Thus mirror foci are mostly reported in patients with temporal or frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in occipital lobe epilepsy. We have observed occipital lobe epilepsy with mirror focus. Before epilepsy surgery, the subject's seizure onset zone was observed in the left occipital area by ictal studies. Her seizures abated for 10 months after the resection of left occipital epileptogenic focus, but recurred then. The recurred seizures were originated from the right occipital area which was in the homotopic contralateral area. This case can be an evidence that occipital lobe epilepsy may have mirror foci, even though each occipital lobe has any direct interhemispheric callosal connections between them.

  9. Quantitative increases in temporal lobe symptoms in human males are proportional to postnatal geomagnetic activity: verification by canonical correlation.

    PubMed

    Hodge, K A; Persinger, M A

    1991-04-29

    Enhanced geomagnetic activity during episodes of biochemical stress has been correlated with inferences of increased liability within deep temporal lobe structures. Because adult limbic epilepsy is frequently associated with perinatal hypoxia or metabolic disruption within this region, a weak positive correlation was expected between possible signs of mesiobasal temporal lobe lability in normal adults and perinatal geomagnetic activity. Canonical correlation demonstrated that young adult males (n = 243) displayed a positive (r = 0.31) relationship between the intensity of geomagnetic disturbance the day after birth only and a history of subjective depersonalization, anomalous visual and olfactory experiences. The effects was very clear when aa values exceeded 30 nT (gamma). Temporal lobe signs for these males were similar to those reported by normal young adult females (n = 313) who did not display any consistent correlation between these measures and perinatal geomagnetic disturbance. The results suggest that interactions between perinatal neurochemistry and the correlates of geomagnetic activity might permanently alter portions of the male limbic system. PMID:1881599

  10. The cognitive profile of occipital lobe epilepsy and the selective association of left temporal lobe hypometabolism with verbal memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Knopman, Alex A; Wong, Chong H; Stevenson, Richard J; Homewood, Judi; Mohamed, Armin; Somerville, Ernest; Eberl, Stefan; Wen, Lingfeng; Fulham, Michael; Bleasel, Andrew F

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the cognitive profile of structural occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE) and whether verbal memory impairment is selectively associated with left temporal lobe hypometabolism on [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Nine patients with OLE, ages 8-29 years, completed presurgical neuropsychological assessment. Composite measures were calculated for intelligence quotient (IQ), speed, attention, verbal memory, nonverbal memory, and executive functioning. In addition, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) was used as a specific measure of frontal lobe functioning. Presurgical FDG-PET was analyzed with statistical parametric mapping in 8 patients relative to 16 healthy volunteers. Mild impairments were evident for IQ, speed, attention, and executive functioning. Four patients demonstrated moderate or severe verbal memory impairment. Temporal lobe hypometabolism was found in seven of eight patients. Poorer verbal memory was associated with left temporal lobe hypometabolism (p = 0.002), which was stronger (p = 0.03 and p = 0.005, respectively) than the association of left temporal lobe hypometabolism with executive functioning or with performance on the WCST. OLE is associated with widespread cognitive comorbidity, suggesting cortical dysfunction beyond the occipital lobe. Verbal memory impairment is selectively associated with left temporal lobe hypometabolism in OLE, supporting a link between neuropsychological dysfunction and remote hypometabolism in focal epilepsy.

  11. Lateralization of the frontal lobe functions elicited by a cognitive bias task is a fundamental process. Lesion study.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Kakurou; Aihara, Masao; Goldberg, Elkhonon; Nakazawa, Shinpei

    2005-09-01

    Cognitive neuroscience researchers have hypothesized that context-dependent and context-independent response selection is associated with the left and right frontal lobe, respectively, in right-handed adult males. Patients with left frontal lobe lesions show context-independent reasoning in a cognitive bias task (CBT), while those with right frontal lesions show context-dependent reasoning. Young children show more context-independent responses in a modified CBT (mCBT), while adolescents and adults show more context-dependent responses. We investigated the cognitive bias of right-handed children with unilateral frontal lobe lesions/epileptic foci to explore the plasticity of lateralization in the frontal lobes. The study included eight children with left frontal lobe lesions/epileptic foci (LLF) and four children with right frontal lobe lesions/epileptic foci (RLF). Twenty-three right-handed age-matched males served as controls. A computer presented version of the original card-choice task that was simplified and modified for children was used (mCBT). Simple visual stimuli differed dichotomously in shape, color, number, and shading. A target object presented alone was followed by two choices from which subjects made selection based on preference. Considering all four characteristics, the degree of similarity between the target and the subjects' choice was scored for 30 trials. A high score indicated a context-dependent response selection bias and a low score indicated a context-independent bias. The RLF subjects had a higher converted score (mean: 26.8+/-2.2), while LLF subjects showed a lower converted score (mean: 7.75+/-6.3). There were highly significant differences between LLF subjects and the other groups (P<0.001 vs. controls or RLF subjects). No significant correlations were observed between the converted scores and the age at onset, time since insult, or IQ in either LLF or RLF subjects. These findings suggest that the lateralization of frontal lobe

  12. Non-invasive investigations successfully select patients for temporal lobe surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, C.; Cook, M.; Kaye, A.; Murphy, M.; Matkovic, Z.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—There is controversy regarding the need for invasive monitoring in the preoperative assessment of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The use of a series of non-invasive investigations in identifying the seizure focus is reported in 75 consecutive adults referred for epilepsy surgery.
METHODS—All had video-EEG monitoring using scalp electrodes, high resolution MRI, and neuropsychology assessment. Other investigations included volumetric MRI, PET, and ictal and interictal SPECT. The seizure focus was localised and surgery offered if MRI disclosed unilateral hippocampal atrophy or a foreign tissue lesion and other investigations were either concordant or not discordant.
RESULTS—In 68 patients the seizure focus was localised and three patients were inoperable. Sixty five patients have been offered surgery and 50 have undergone temporal lobe surgery and have a follow up of at least 12 months (mean 24 months). All had pathology: hippocampal sclerosis 34, dysembryoblastic neuroepithelial tumour six, cavernoma four, dysplasia two, low grade glioma two, ganglioglioma two. Thirty nine patients (78%) are seizure free postoperatively, 29/34 with hippocampal sclerosis and 10/16 with a foreign tissue lesion. Of the 11 patients with postoperative recurrent seizures, eight have a >90% reduction in seizure frequency and three have <90% reduction in seizure frequency but a worthwhile improvement.
CONCLUSIONS—Non-invasive investigations successfully select most patients for temporal lobe surgery.

 PMID:9328249

  13. Sex-specific antennal sensory system in the ant Camponotus japonicus: structure and distribution of sensilla on the flagellum.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Aki; Nishino, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yokohari, Fumio; Nishikawa, Michiko

    2009-10-01

    The antennae are a critically important component of the ant's highly elaborated chemical communication systems. However, our understanding of the organization of the sensory systems on the antennae of ants, from peripheral receptors to central and output systems, is poorly understood. Consequently, we have used scanning electron and confocal laser microscopy to create virtually complete maps of the structure, numbers of sensory neurons, and distribution patterns of all types of external sensilla on the antennal flagellum of all types of colony members of the carpenter ant Camponotus japonicus. Based on the outer cuticular structures, the sensilla have been classified into seven types: coelocapitular, coeloconic, ampullaceal, basiconic, trichoid-I, trichoid-II, and chaetic sensilla. Retrograde staining of antennal nerves has enabled us to count the number of sensory neurons housed in the different types of sensilla: three in a coelocapitular sensillum, three in a coeloconic sensillum, one in an ampullaceal sensillum, over 130 in a basiconic sensillum, 50-60 in a trichoid-I sensillum, and 8-9 in a trichoid-II sensillum. The basiconic sensilla, which are cuticular hydrocarbon-receptive in the ant, are present in workers and unmated queens but absent in males. Coelocapitular sensilla (putatively hygro- and thermoreceptive) have been newly identified in this study. Coelocapitular, coeloconic, and ampullaceal sensilla form clusters and show biased distributions on flagellar segments of antennae in all colony members. The total numbers of sensilla per flagellum are about 9000 in unmated queens, 7500 in workers, and 6000 in males. This is the first report presenting comprehensive sensillar maps of antennae in ants.

  14. Sex-specific antennal sensory system in the ant Camponotus japonicus: structure and distribution of sensilla on the flagellum.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Aki; Nishino, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yokohari, Fumio; Nishikawa, Michiko

    2009-10-01

    The antennae are a critically important component of the ant's highly elaborated chemical communication systems. However, our understanding of the organization of the sensory systems on the antennae of ants, from peripheral receptors to central and output systems, is poorly understood. Consequently, we have used scanning electron and confocal laser microscopy to create virtually complete maps of the structure, numbers of sensory neurons, and distribution patterns of all types of external sensilla on the antennal flagellum of all types of colony members of the carpenter ant Camponotus japonicus. Based on the outer cuticular structures, the sensilla have been classified into seven types: coelocapitular, coeloconic, ampullaceal, basiconic, trichoid-I, trichoid-II, and chaetic sensilla. Retrograde staining of antennal nerves has enabled us to count the number of sensory neurons housed in the different types of sensilla: three in a coelocapitular sensillum, three in a coeloconic sensillum, one in an ampullaceal sensillum, over 130 in a basiconic sensillum, 50-60 in a trichoid-I sensillum, and 8-9 in a trichoid-II sensillum. The basiconic sensilla, which are cuticular hydrocarbon-receptive in the ant, are present in workers and unmated queens but absent in males. Coelocapitular sensilla (putatively hygro- and thermoreceptive) have been newly identified in this study. Coelocapitular, coeloconic, and ampullaceal sensilla form clusters and show biased distributions on flagellar segments of antennae in all colony members. The total numbers of sensilla per flagellum are about 9000 in unmated queens, 7500 in workers, and 6000 in males. This is the first report presenting comprehensive sensillar maps of antennae in ants. PMID:19763622

  15. An antennal carboxylesterase from Drosophila melanogaster, esterase 6, is a candidate odorant-degrading enzyme toward food odorants.

    PubMed

    Chertemps, Thomas; Younus, Faisal; Steiner, Claudia; Durand, Nicolas; Coppin, Chris W; Pandey, Gunjan; Oakeshott, John G; Maïbèche, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Reception of odorant molecules within insect olfactory organs involves several sequential steps, including their transport through the sensillar lymph, interaction with the respective sensory receptors, and subsequent inactivation. Odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs) putatively play a role in signal dynamics by rapid degradation of odorants in the vicinity of the receptors, but this hypothesis is mainly supported by in vitro results. We have recently shown that an extracellular carboxylesterase, esterase-6 (EST-6), is involved in the physiological and behavioral dynamics of the response of Drosophila melanogaster to its volatile pheromone ester, cis-vaccenyl acetate. However, as the expression pattern of the Est-6 gene in the antennae is not restricted to the pheromone responding sensilla, we tested here if EST-6 could play a broader function in the antennae. We found that recombinant EST-6 is able to efficiently hydrolyse several volatile esters that would be emitted by its natural food in vitro. Electrophysiological comparisons of mutant Est-6 null flies and a control strain (on the same genetic background) showed that the dynamics of the antennal response to these compounds is influenced by EST-6, with the antennae of the null mutants showing prolonged activity in response to them. Antennal responses to the strongest odorant, pentyl acetate, were then studied in more detail, showing that the repolarization dynamics were modified even at low doses but without modification of the detection threshold. Behavioral choice experiments with pentyl acetate also showed differences between genotypes; attraction to this compound was observed at a lower dose among the null than control flies. As EST-6 is able to degrade various bioactive odorants emitted by food and plays a role in the response to these compounds, we hypothesize a role as an ODE for this enzyme toward food volatiles. PMID:26594178

  16. An antennal carboxylesterase from Drosophila melanogaster, esterase 6, is a candidate odorant-degrading enzyme toward food odorants

    PubMed Central

    Chertemps, Thomas; Younus, Faisal; Steiner, Claudia; Durand, Nicolas; Coppin, Chris W.; Pandey, Gunjan; Oakeshott, John G.; Maïbèche, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Reception of odorant molecules within insect olfactory organs involves several sequential steps, including their transport through the sensillar lymph, interaction with the respective sensory receptors, and subsequent inactivation. Odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs) putatively play a role in signal dynamics by rapid degradation of odorants in the vicinity of the receptors, but this hypothesis is mainly supported by in vitro results. We have recently shown that an extracellular carboxylesterase, esterase-6 (EST-6), is involved in the physiological and behavioral dynamics of the response of Drosophila melanogaster to its volatile pheromone ester, cis-vaccenyl acetate. However, as the expression pattern of the Est-6 gene in the antennae is not restricted to the pheromone responding sensilla, we tested here if EST-6 could play a broader function in the antennae. We found that recombinant EST-6 is able to efficiently hydrolyse several volatile esters that would be emitted by its natural food in vitro. Electrophysiological comparisons of mutant Est-6 null flies and a control strain (on the same genetic background) showed that the dynamics of the antennal response to these compounds is influenced by EST-6, with the antennae of the null mutants showing prolonged activity in response to them. Antennal responses to the strongest odorant, pentyl acetate, were then studied in more detail, showing that the repolarization dynamics were modified even at low doses but without modification of the detection threshold. Behavioral choice experiments with pentyl acetate also showed differences between genotypes; attraction to this compound was observed at a lower dose among the null than control flies. As EST-6 is able to degrade various bioactive odorants emitted by food and plays a role in the response to these compounds, we hypothesize a role as an ODE for this enzyme toward food volatiles. PMID:26594178

  17. The anatomy of semantic knowledge: medial vs. lateral temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Levy, D A; Bayley, P J; Squire, L R

    2004-04-27

    Semantic knowledge (e.g., long-established knowledge about objects, facts, and word meanings) is known to be severely impaired by damage to the anterolateral temporal lobe. For example, patients with semantic dementia have prominent atrophy in anterolateral temporal cortex and also have significant damage within the medial aspect of the temporal lobe. However, there is uncertainty about the contribution of medial temporal lobe damage, including perirhinal cortex damage, to impaired semantic knowledge. Drawing largely on published material from multiple sources, we compared the performance of severely amnesic patients with large medial temporal lobe lesions and patients with semantic dementia on nine tests of semantic knowledge and two tests of new learning ability. On the tests of semantic knowledge, the amnesic patients performed markedly better than the patients with semantic dementia. By contrast, on the tests of new learning, the patients with semantic dementia performed markedly better than the amnesic patients. We conclude that medial temporal lobe damage impairs the formation of declarative memory, and that semantic knowledge is impaired to the extent that damage extends laterally in the temporal lobe. Reports that the extent of atrophy in perirhinal cortex correlated with the severity of impaired semantic knowledge may be understood by supposing that the extent of damage in many temporal lobe areas is intercorrelated in this progressive disease, and that the extent of atrophy in perirhinal cortex is a proxy for the overall severity of dementia. PMID:15090653

  18. Submarine fan lobe models: Implications for reservoir properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J. )

    1990-09-01

    A multitude of submarine fan lobe models, advocating widely different reservoir properties, has been introduced into the sedimentologic literature. Four of these models are compared to show their differences in reservoir properties. Braided suprafan lobes are characterized by stacked sand bodies with good lateral and vertical communication, and they constitute excellent reservoir facies. The unchanneled depositional lobes, composed of sheetlike sand bodies with good lateral and moderate vertical communication, exhibit properties of good reservoir facies. Fanlobes, which refer to meandering channels and associated levee facies of large mud-rich submarine fans such as the Mississippi Fan in the Gulf of Mexico, are characterized by offset stacked sand bodies with poor lateral and vertical communication. These lenticular sands have the potential to be moderately good reservoir facies. Ponded lobes, which represent mud-rich slump facies of slope environments, comprise poor reservoir facies because of poor sand content and poor sand-body connectivity caused by chaotic bedding. Furthermore, the presence of slumped mud layers in ponded lobes is expected to hinder fluid flow. Because different lobe models vary significantly from one another in terms of reservoir properties, caution must be exercised to apply the proper lobe model to ancient fan sequences in hydrocarbon exploration and production.

  19. Grating lobe elimination in steerable parametric loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chuang; Gan, Woon-Seng

    2011-02-01

    In the past two decades, the majority of research on the parametric loudspeaker has concentrated on the nonlinear modeling of acoustic propagation and pre-processing techniques to reduce nonlinear distortion in sound reproduction. There are, however, very few studies on directivity control of the parametric loudspeaker. In this paper, we propose an equivalent circular Gaussian source array that approximates the directivity characteristics of the linear ultrasonic transducer array. By using this approximation, the directivity of the sound beam from the parametric loudspeaker can be predicted by the product directivity principle. New theoretical results, which are verified through measurements, are presented to show the effectiveness of the delay-and-sum beamsteering structure for the parametric loudspeaker. Unlike the conventional loudspeaker array, where the spacing between array elements must be less than half the wavelength to avoid spatial aliasing, the parametric loudspeaker can take advantage of grating lobe elimination to extend the spacing of ultrasonic transducer array to more than 1.5 wavelengths in a typical application.

  20. Voice cells in the primate temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Perrodin, Catherine; Kayser, Christoph; Logothetis, Nikos K; Petkov, Christopher I

    2011-08-23

    Communication signals are important for social interactions and survival and are thought to receive specialized processing in the visual and auditory systems. Whereas the neural processing of faces by face clusters and face cells has been repeatedly studied [1-5], less is known about the neural representation of voice content. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have localized voice-preferring regions in the primate temporal lobe [6, 7], but the hemodynamic response cannot directly assess neurophysiological properties. We investigated the responses of neurons in an fMRI-identified voice cluster in awake monkeys, and here we provide the first systematic evidence for voice cells. "Voice cells" were identified, in analogy to "face cells," as neurons responding at least 2-fold stronger to conspecific voices than to "nonvoice" sounds or heterospecific voices. Importantly, whereas face clusters are thought to contain high proportions of face cells [4] responding broadly to many faces [1, 2, 4, 5, 8-10], we found that voice clusters contain moderate proportions of voice cells. Furthermore, individual voice cells exhibit high stimulus selectivity. The results reveal the neurophysiological bases for fMRI-defined voice clusters in the primate brain and highlight potential differences in how the auditory and visual systems generate selective representations of communication signals. PMID:21835625

  1. Lobed Mixer Optimization for Advanced Ejector Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives are: 1) to pursue analytical, computational, and experimental studies that enhance basic understanding of forced mixing phenomena relevant to supersonic jet noise reduction, and 2) to integrate this enhanced understanding (analytical, computational, and empirical) into a design-oriented model of a mixer-ejector noise suppression system. The work is focused on ejector geometries and flow conditions typical of those being investigated in the NASA High Speed Research Program (HSRP). The research will be carried out in collaboration with the NASA HSRP Nozzle Integrated Technology Development (ITD) Team, and will both contribute to, and benefit from, the results of other HSRP research. The noise suppressor system model that is being developed under this grant is distinct from analytical tools developed by industry because it directly links details of lobe geometry to mixer-ejector performance. In addition, the model provides a 'technology road map to define gaps in the current understanding of various phenomena related to mixer-ejector design and to help prioritize research areas. This report describes research completed in the past year, as well as work proposed for the following year.

  2. Social Cognition and the Anterior Temporal Lobes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lars A.; Olson, Ingrid R.

    2009-01-01

    Two distinct literatures have emerged on the functionality of the anterior temporal lobes (ATL): in one field, the ATLs are conceived of as a repository for semantic or conceptual knowledge. In another field, the ATLs are thought to play some undetermined role in social-emotional functions such as Theory of Mind. Here we attempted to reconcile these distinct functions by assessing whether social semantic processing can explain ATL activation in other social cognitive tasks. Social semantic functions refer to knowledge about social concepts and rules. In a first experiment we tested the idea that social semantic representations can account for activations in the ATL to social attribution stimuli such as Heider and Simmel animations. Left ATL activations to Heider and Simmel stimuli overlapped with activations to social words. In a second experiment we assessed the putative roles of the ATLs in the processing of narratives and theory of mind content and found evidence for a role of the ATLs in the processing of theory of mind but not narrative per se. These findings indicate that the ATLs are part of a neuronal network supporting social cognition and that they are engaged when tasks demand access to social conceptual knowledge. PMID:19931397

  3. Controllable yawning expressed as focal seizures of frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wasade, Vibhangini S; Balki, Indranil; Bowyer, Susan M; Gaddam, Shaila; Mohammadi-Nejad, Ali-Reza; Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Zillgitt, Andrew; Spanaki-Varelas, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Excessive yawning was described in some neurological conditions as part of periictal or ictal manifestations of epilepsy, most commonly temporal lobe. We present the first case of controllable yawning as a primary seizure semiology with dominant frontal lobe involvement in a 20-year-old man. Video electroencephalography recorded 8 yawning episodes accompanied with right arm movement correlating with rhythmic diffuse theta range activity with left hemispheric predominance. Magnetoencephalography coherence source imaging was consistent with persistent neuronal networks with areas of high coherence reliably present over the left lateral orbitofrontal region. Epileptogenic areas may have widespread networks involving the dominant frontal lobe in unique symptomatogenic areas. PMID:27668178

  4. Controllable yawning expressed as focal seizures of frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wasade, Vibhangini S; Balki, Indranil; Bowyer, Susan M; Gaddam, Shaila; Mohammadi-Nejad, Ali-Reza; Nazem-Zadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Zillgitt, Andrew; Spanaki-Varelas, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    Excessive yawning was described in some neurological conditions as part of periictal or ictal manifestations of epilepsy, most commonly temporal lobe. We present the first case of controllable yawning as a primary seizure semiology with dominant frontal lobe involvement in a 20-year-old man. Video electroencephalography recorded 8 yawning episodes accompanied with right arm movement correlating with rhythmic diffuse theta range activity with left hemispheric predominance. Magnetoencephalography coherence source imaging was consistent with persistent neuronal networks with areas of high coherence reliably present over the left lateral orbitofrontal region. Epileptogenic areas may have widespread networks involving the dominant frontal lobe in unique symptomatogenic areas.

  5. Decreased frontal lobe function in people with Internet addiction disorder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Esmail, Fatema; Li, Lingjiang; Kou, Zhifeng; Li, Weihui; Gao, Xueping; Wang, Zhiyuan; Tan, Changlian; Zhang, Yan; Zhou, Shunke

    2013-01-01

    In our previous studies, we showed that frontal lobe and brainstem functions were abnormal in on-line game addicts. In this study, 14 students with Internet addiction disorder and 14 matched healthy controls underwent proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure cerebral function. Results demonstrated that the ratio of N-acetylaspartate to creatine decreased, but the ratio of cho-line-containing compounds to creatine increased in the bilateral frontal lobe white matter in people with Internet addiction disorder. However, these ratios were mostly unaltered in the brainstem, suggesting that frontal lobe function decreases in people with Internet addiction disorder. PMID:25206643

  6. LobeFinder: A Convex Hull-Based Method for Quantitative Boundary Analyses of Lobed Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Belteton, Samuel A; Pack, Jessica; Szymanski, Daniel B; Umulis, David M

    2016-08-01

    Dicot leaves are composed of a heterogeneous mosaic of jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells that vary greatly in size and the complexity of their shape. Given the importance of the epidermis and this particular cell type for leaf expansion, there is a strong need to understand how pavement cells morph from a simple polyhedral shape into highly lobed and interdigitated cells. At present, it is still unclear how and when the patterns of lobing are initiated in pavement cells, and one major technological bottleneck to addressing the problem is the lack of a robust and objective methodology to identify and track lobing events during the transition from simple cell geometry to lobed cells. We developed a convex hull-based algorithm termed LobeFinder to identify lobes, quantify geometric properties, and create a useful graphical output of cell coordinates for further analysis. The algorithm was validated against manually curated images of pavement cells of widely varying sizes and shapes. The ability to objectively count and detect new lobe initiation events provides an improved quantitative framework to analyze mutant phenotypes, detect symmetry-breaking events in time-lapse image data, and quantify the time-dependent correlation between cell shape change and intracellular factors that may play a role in the morphogenesis process. PMID:27288363

  7. LobeFinder: A Convex Hull-Based Method for Quantitative Boundary Analyses of Lobed Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Belteton, Samuel A; Pack, Jessica; Szymanski, Daniel B; Umulis, David M

    2016-08-01

    Dicot leaves are composed of a heterogeneous mosaic of jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells that vary greatly in size and the complexity of their shape. Given the importance of the epidermis and this particular cell type for leaf expansion, there is a strong need to understand how pavement cells morph from a simple polyhedral shape into highly lobed and interdigitated cells. At present, it is still unclear how and when the patterns of lobing are initiated in pavement cells, and one major technological bottleneck to addressing the problem is the lack of a robust and objective methodology to identify and track lobing events during the transition from simple cell geometry to lobed cells. We developed a convex hull-based algorithm termed LobeFinder to identify lobes, quantify geometric properties, and create a useful graphical output of cell coordinates for further analysis. The algorithm was validated against manually curated images of pavement cells of widely varying sizes and shapes. The ability to objectively count and detect new lobe initiation events provides an improved quantitative framework to analyze mutant phenotypes, detect symmetry-breaking events in time-lapse image data, and quantify the time-dependent correlation between cell shape change and intracellular factors that may play a role in the morphogenesis process.

  8. LobeFinder: A Convex Hull-Based Method for Quantitative Boundary Analyses of Lobed Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Belteton, Samuel A.; Szymanski, Daniel B.; Umulis, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Dicot leaves are composed of a heterogeneous mosaic of jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells that vary greatly in size and the complexity of their shape. Given the importance of the epidermis and this particular cell type for leaf expansion, there is a strong need to understand how pavement cells morph from a simple polyhedral shape into highly lobed and interdigitated cells. At present, it is still unclear how and when the patterns of lobing are initiated in pavement cells, and one major technological bottleneck to addressing the problem is the lack of a robust and objective methodology to identify and track lobing events during the transition from simple cell geometry to lobed cells. We developed a convex hull-based algorithm termed LobeFinder to identify lobes, quantify geometric properties, and create a useful graphical output of cell coordinates for further analysis. The algorithm was validated against manually curated images of pavement cells of widely varying sizes and shapes. The ability to objectively count and detect new lobe initiation events provides an improved quantitative framework to analyze mutant phenotypes, detect symmetry-breaking events in time-lapse image data, and quantify the time-dependent correlation between cell shape change and intracellular factors that may play a role in the morphogenesis process. PMID:27288363

  9. Hox proteins coordinate peripodial decapentaplegic expression to direct adult head morphogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Stultz, Brian G.; Park, Sung Yeon; Mortin, Mark A.; Kennison, James A.; Hursh, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    The Drosophila BMP, decapentaplegic (dpp), controls morphogenesis of the ventral adult head through expression limited to the lateral peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc by a 3.5 kb enhancer in the 5’ end of the gene. We recovered a 15 bp deletion mutation within this enhancer that identified a homeotic (Hox) response element that is a direct target of labial and the homeotic cofactors homothorax and extradenticle. Expression of labial and homothorax are required for dpp expression in the peripodial epithelium, while the Hox gene Deformed represses labial in this location, thus limiting its expression and indirectly that of dpp to the lateral side of the disc. The expression of these homeodomain genes is in turn regulated by the dpp pathway, as dpp signaling is required for labial expression but represses homothorax. This Hox-BMP regulatory network is limited to the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc, yet is crucial to the morphogenesis of the head, which fate maps suggest arises primarily from the disc proper, not the peripodial epithelium. Thus Hox/BMP interactions in the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc contribute inductively to the shape of the external form of the adult Drosophila head. PMID:22824425

  10. Hox proteins coordinate peripodial decapentaplegic expression to direct adult head morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Brian G; Park, Sung Yeon; Mortin, Mark A; Kennison, James A; Hursh, Deborah A

    2012-09-15

    The Drosophila BMP, decapentaplegic (dpp), controls morphogenesis of the ventral adult head through expression limited to the lateral peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc by a 3.5 kb enhancer in the 5' end of the gene. We recovered a 15 bp deletion mutation within this enhancer that identified a homeotic (Hox) response element that is a direct target of labial and the homeotic cofactors homothorax and extradenticle. Expression of labial and homothorax are required for dpp expression in the peripodial epithelium, while the Hox gene Deformed represses labial in this location, thus limiting its expression and indirectly that of dpp to the lateral side of the disc. The expression of these homeodomain genes is in turn regulated by the dpp pathway, as dpp signalling is required for labial expression but represses homothorax. This Hox-BMP regulatory network is limited to the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc, yet is crucial to the morphogenesis of the head, which fate maps suggest arises primarily from the disc proper, not the peripodial epithelium. Thus Hox/BMP interactions in the peripodial epithelium of the eye-antennal disc contribute inductively to the shape of the external form of the adult Drosophila head.

  11. Energies and acceleration mechanisms in parts of Centaurus A's lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feain, Ilana; Gaensler, Bryan; Norris, Ray; Nulsen, Paul; O'Sullivan, Shane; Hardcastle, Martin; Croston, Judith; Anderson, Craig; Jiraskova, Sarka; Kraft, Ralph

    2011-10-01

    Recently, the first high-resolution radio continuum image of the nearest radio galaxy, Centaurus A, was produced in its entirety using ATCA and Parkes (C1624, P655). In this image, we discovered a region in the giant southern lobe displaying high-surface brightness's compared to the intralobe plasma. We have named these features the vortex and vertex based on their morphology and similarity to features seen in other radio galaxies. Additionally, we found that the inner radio lobe is probably coincident with, rather than located wholly inside of, the well-known X-ray shock at the boundary of the south-west inner lobe. In this proposal we request 125 hrs to investigate the radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and Faraday rotation measures (RMs) across the shock in the southwest inner lobe, the vortex and the vertex. With these proposed CABB observations, we will be able to distinguish between emission models for the origin of these features.

  12. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and the frontal lobe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shue, K L; Douglas, V I

    1992-09-01

    The usefulness of frontal lobe (FL) dysfunction as a conceptual model for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) was investigated. Twenty-four ADHD and 24 normal control (NC) children were tested using two batteries of tasks. The first was sensitive to FL deficits in motor control and problem solving skills. The second consisted of memory tasks sensitive to temporal lobe dysfunction. ADHD children differed significantly from NCs on measures of FL function, but not on tests of temporal lobe functions. Where norms were available for normal children on the same FL tests, ADHDs performed like 6- to 7-year-olds, despite their mean age of 10 years and minimum age of 8 years. The differential performance of ADHDs on tasks sensitive to FL and temporal lobe dysfunction supports the hypothesis that ADHD deficits are analogous to FL dysfunction and demonstrates that the children's deficits do not reflect generalized cognitive impairment.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain are involved in many critical functions, including reasoning, planning, judgment, and problem-solving. It is unclear ... E, Montagna P. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. A clinical and polygraphic overview of 100 consecutive cases. Brain. ...

  14. Image guided audit of surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, N D; Cook, M J; Shorvon, S D; Fish, D R; Thomas, D G

    1994-01-01

    Studies on surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy are hampered by lack of information about the actual surgery that has taken place. A method is described for accurately measuring the volumes of resection by MRI after surgery. Ten cases of surgically treated temporal lobe epilepsy (nine non-tailored resections, one selective amygdalohippocampectomy) are presented to show the technique. Indices of extent of resection in both the mesiobasal and lateral temporal lobe compartments have been measured, compared, and evaluated. By comparison with identical preoperative volumetric MRI the hippocampal resections have been correlated with the demonstrated hippocampal volume loss, thought to be of relevance in the aetiology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Detailed postoperative audit in this manner is vital in providing a rational basis for follow up studies of outcome. Images PMID:7931384

  15. Luria's frontal lobe syndrome: psychological and anatomical considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Canavan, A G; Janota, I; Schurr, P H

    1985-01-01

    Luria has described a syndrome of disinhibited and impulsive behaviour, in which the patient is unable to follow sequential instructions. This he attributes to localised frontal lobe damage. However, group studies of patients with focal lesions of the frontal lobes fail to reveal such a syndrome. A patient is described who displayed a form of Luria's syndrome temporarily. Psychometric and post mortem evidence indicate that the syndrome arises only under conditions of more global cerebral dysfunction. Images PMID:4056806

  16. Topographic and Stochastic Influences on Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards, and interpreting the significance of lava morphology on Earth and other planetary surfaces. Active pahoehoe lobes on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, were examined on 21-26 February 2006 using oblique time-series stereo-photogrammetry and differential global positioning system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the local discharge rate for peripheral lava lobes was generally constant at 0.0061 +/- 0.0019 m3/s, but the areal coverage rate of the lobes exhibited a periodic increase every 4.13 +/- 0.64 minutes. This periodicity is attributed to the time required for the pressure within the liquid lava core to exceed the cooling induced strength of its margins. The pahoehoe flow advanced through a series of down slope and cross-slope breakouts, which began as approximately 0.2 m-thick units (i.e., toes) that coalesced and inflated to become approximately meter-thick lobes. The lobes were thickest above the lowest points of the initial topography and above shallow to reverse facing slopes, defined relative to the local flow direction. The flow path was typically controlled by high-standing topography, with the zone directly adjacent to the final lobe margin having an average relief that was a few centimeters higher than the lava inundated region. This suggests that toe-scale topography can, at least temporarily, exert strong controls on pahoehoe flow paths by impeding the lateral spreading of the lobe. Observed cycles of enhanced areal spreading and inflated lobe morphology are also explored using a model that considers the statistical likelihood of sequential breakouts from active flow margins and the effects of topographic barriers.

  17. The double-lobed blazar 3C 371

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Lind, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    High dynamic range VLA imaging reveals, for the first time, that the blazar 3C 371 exhibits very low surface brightness twin radio lobes. These lobes straddle the dominant compact core and have a projected extent of about 42/h kpc. A weak component located in the western lobe shares the morphology, size, and inferred magnetic field configuration of radio source hot spots. A continuous wiggling jet connects this hot spot with the compact core. Double lobes, hot spots, and one-sided jets are traits of extended, edge-brightened radio sources. The discovery of corresponding components in 3C 371's extended emission suggests that this emission is an edge-brightened double, viewed at a large enough angle to the line of sight that the radio lobes do not overlap. A moderate viewing angle is consistent with 3C 371's low bolometric luminosity for a blazar. The diffuse radio halo that surrounds the twin lobes may be related to the fat bridges or bridge distortions shown by edge-brightened doubles with similar radio powers.

  18. DCIS, cytokeratins, and the theory of the sick lobe.

    PubMed

    Tot, Tibor

    2005-07-01

    We postulate that ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), and consequently breast carcinoma in general, is a lobar disease, as the simultaneously or asynchronously appearing, often multiple, in situ tumor foci are localized within a single lobe. Although the whole lobe is sick, carrying some form of genetic instability, the malignant transformation of the epithelial cells may appear localized to a part or different parts of the sick lobe at the same time or with varying time difference. It may be confined to terminal ductal lobular units (TDLUs), to ducts or both. The malignant transformation is often associated with aberrant branching and/or aberrant lobularization within the sick lobe. Involvement of a single individual TDLU or of a group of adjacent TDLUs generates a unifocal lesion. Multifocal lesions appear if distant TDLUs are involved. Diffuse growth pattern in DCIS indicates involvement of the larger ducts. The extent of the involved area in multifocal or diffuse cases varies considerably. Diffuse growth pattern with or without evidence of aberrant arborisation within the sick lobe seems to characterize a subgroup of DCIS with unfavourable prognosis. In this paper, we discuss the anatomical, embryological and pathological background of the theory of the sick lobe and present supporting evidence from modern radiological breast imaging, long-term follow-up studies and from our own series of 108 DCIS cases.

  19. Identifying the magnetotail lobes with Cluster magnetometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coxon, J. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Freeman, M. P.; Forsyth, C.; Rae, I. J.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a novel method for identifying times when a spacecraft is in Earth's magnetotail lobes solely using magnetometer data. We propose that lobe intervals can be well identified as times when the magnetic field is strong and relatively invariant, defined using thresholds in the magnitude of BX and the standard deviation σ of the magnetic field magnitude. Using data from the Cluster spacecraft at downtail distances greater than 8 RE during 2001-2009, we find that thresholds of 30 nT and 3.5 nT, respectively, optimize agreement with a previous, independently derived lobe identification method that used both magnetic and plasma data over the same interval. Specifically, our method has a moderately high accuracy (66%) and a low probability of false detection (11%) in comparison to the other method. Furthermore, our method identifies the lobe on many other occasions when the previous method was unable to make any identification and yields longer continuous intervals in the lobe than the previous method, with intervals at the 90th percentile being triple the length. Our method also allows for analyses of the lobes outside the time span of the previous method.

  20. Near-death experiences and the temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Britton, Willoughby B; Bootzin, Richard R

    2004-04-01

    Many studies in humans suggest that altered temporal lobe functioning, especially functioning in the right temporal lobe, is involved in mystical and religious experiences. We investigated temporal lobe functioning in individuals who reported having transcendental "near-death experiences" during life-threatening events. These individuals were found to have more temporal lobe epileptiform electroencephalographic activity than control subjects and also reported significantly more temporal lobe epileptic symptoms. Contrary to predictions, epileptiform activity was nearly completely lateralized to the left hemisphere. The near-death experience was not associated with dysfunctional stress reactions such as dissociation, posttraumatic stress disorder, and substance abuse, but rather was associated with positive coping styles. Additional analyses revealed that near-death experiencers had altered sleep patterns, specifically, a shorter duration of sleep and delayed REM sleep relative to the control group. These results suggest that altered temporal lobe functioning may be involved in the near-death experience and that individuals who have had such experiences are physiologically distinct from the general population.

  1. Tail Lobe Revisited: Magnetic Field Modeling Based on Plasma Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, S. B. P.; Tsyganenko, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma data from the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft during 1977-1980 have been used to determine the distribution of data points in the magnetotail in the range of distances -20 < XGSM < --15, i.e. which of the records that were located in the current sheet, in the tail lobe, in the magnetosheath and in the boundary layers respectively. The ISEE-1 and -2 magnetic field data for the records in the tail lobe were then used to model the tail lobe magnetic field dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure, on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and on the Dst index. The tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be dependent on the square root of the dynamic pressure based on the balance between the total magnetic pressure in the tail lobes and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. The IMF dependent terms, added to the pressure term, were sought in many different forms while the Dst dependence of the tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be linear. The field shows a strong dependence on the square root of the dynamic pressure and the different IMF dependent terms all constitute a significant contribution to the total field. However, the dependence on the Dst index turned out to be very weak at those down-tail distances. The results of this study are intended to be used for parameterizing future versions of the data-based models of the global magnetospheric magnetic field.

  2. Versive seizures in occipital lobe epilepsy: lateralizing value and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Kondo, Akihiko; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2011-11-01

    To clarify the value of versive seizures in lateralizing and localizing the epileptogenic zone in patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, we studied 13 occipital lobe epilepsy patients with at least one versive seizure recorded during preoperative noninvasive video-EEG monitoring, who underwent occipital lobe resection, and were followed postoperatively for more than 2 years with Engel's class I outcome. The videotaped versive seizures were analyzed to compare the direction of version and the side of surgical resection in each patient. Moreover, we examined other motor symptoms (partial somatomotor manifestations such as tonic and/or clonic movements of face and/or limbs, automatisms, and eyelid blinking) associated with version. Forty-nine versive seizures were analyzed. The direction of version was always contralateral to the side of resection except in one patient. Among accompanying motor symptoms, partial somatomotor manifestations were observed in only five patients. In conclusion, versive seizure is a reliable lateralizing sign indicating contralateral epileptogenic zone in occipital lobe epilepsy. Since versive seizures were accompanied by partial somatomotor manifestations in less than half of the patients, it is suggested that the mechanism of version in occipital lobe epilepsy is different from that in frontal lobe epilepsy.

  3. Dendrocerus mexicali (Hymenoptera, Ceraphronoidea, Megaspilidae): Novel antennal morphology, first description of female, and expansion of known range into the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Kyle N.; Mikó, István; Deans, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dendrocerus mexicali has been described by Paul Dessart from a single male specimen collected in Mexico. Using 87 newly identified specimens we expand the known range to include the Southwestern United States and Florida, provide an expanded description of the species, and provide the first record of the female. We also use confocal laser scanning microscopy and in vitro hydrostatic pressure changes to investigate the functional morphology of apparently unique basally flexible antennal branches. PMID:27110150

  4. Antennal transcriptome analysis and comparison of olfactory genes in two sympatric defoliators, Dendrolimus houi and Dendrolimus kikuchii (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufang; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Hongbin; Kong, Xiangbo

    2014-09-01

    The Yunnan pine and Simao pine caterpillar moths, Dendrolimus houi Lajonquière and Dendrolimus kikuchii Matsumura (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), are two closely related and sympatric pests of coniferous forests in southwestern China, and olfactory communication systems of these two insects have received considerable attention because of their economic importance. However, there is little information on the molecular aspect of odor detection about these insects. Furthermore, although lepidopteran species have been widely used in studies of insect olfaction, few work made comparison between sister moths on the olfactory recognition mechanisms. In this study, next-generation sequencing of the antennal transcriptome of these two moths were performed to identify the major olfactory genes. After comparing the antennal transcriptome of these two moths, we found that they exhibit highly similar transcripts-associated GO terms. Chemosensory gene families were further analyzed in both species. We identified 23 putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSP), two sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 33 odorant receptors (OR), and 10 ionotropic receptors (IR) in D. houi; and 27 putative OBPs, 17 CSPs, two SNMPs, 33 ORs, and nine IRs in D. kikuchii. All these transcripts were full-length or almost full-length. The predicted protein sequences were compared with orthologs in other species of Lepidoptera and model insects, including Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta, Heliothis virescens, Danaus plexippus, Sesamia inferens, Cydia pomonella, and Drosophila melanogaster. The sequence homologies of the orthologous genes in D. houi and D. kikuchii are very high. Furthermore, the olfactory genes were classed according to their expression level, and the highly expressed genes are our target for further function investigation. Interestingly, many highly expressed genes are ortholog gene of D. houi and D. kikuchii. We also found that the Classic OBPs were

  5. Antennal transcriptome analysis and comparison of olfactory genes in two sympatric defoliators, Dendrolimus houi and Dendrolimus kikuchii (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufang; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Hongbin; Kong, Xiangbo

    2014-09-01

    The Yunnan pine and Simao pine caterpillar moths, Dendrolimus houi Lajonquière and Dendrolimus kikuchii Matsumura (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), are two closely related and sympatric pests of coniferous forests in southwestern China, and olfactory communication systems of these two insects have received considerable attention because of their economic importance. However, there is little information on the molecular aspect of odor detection about these insects. Furthermore, although lepidopteran species have been widely used in studies of insect olfaction, few work made comparison between sister moths on the olfactory recognition mechanisms. In this study, next-generation sequencing of the antennal transcriptome of these two moths were performed to identify the major olfactory genes. After comparing the antennal transcriptome of these two moths, we found that they exhibit highly similar transcripts-associated GO terms. Chemosensory gene families were further analyzed in both species. We identified 23 putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSP), two sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 33 odorant receptors (OR), and 10 ionotropic receptors (IR) in D. houi; and 27 putative OBPs, 17 CSPs, two SNMPs, 33 ORs, and nine IRs in D. kikuchii. All these transcripts were full-length or almost full-length. The predicted protein sequences were compared with orthologs in other species of Lepidoptera and model insects, including Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta, Heliothis virescens, Danaus plexippus, Sesamia inferens, Cydia pomonella, and Drosophila melanogaster. The sequence homologies of the orthologous genes in D. houi and D. kikuchii are very high. Furthermore, the olfactory genes were classed according to their expression level, and the highly expressed genes are our target for further function investigation. Interestingly, many highly expressed genes are ortholog gene of D. houi and D. kikuchii. We also found that the Classic OBPs were

  6. [The symptomatology of frontal and temporal lobe damages].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tomoyuki; Takeda, Katsuhiko

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, we review the symptoms associated with damages to the frontal and/or temporal lobes. Similarities and differences between the symptoms observed after a stroke and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration are also discussed. Frontal lobe damages may lead to various apraxic disorders, including limb-kinetic, ideomotor, gait, buccofacial, and ocular motor apraxia. Language dysfunction can arise from perisylvian lesions as well as from extra-perisylvian regions. Broca's aphasia, Wernicke's aphasia, pure word deafness, and aphemia are typical examples of disorders caused by damages to the perisylvian region. Transcortical motor and anomic aphasias are mostly associated with damages to the extra-perisylvian region. Although it has been reported that executive dysfunction is associated with damages to the frontal lobe, it remains to be determined whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship between the 2. A combination of memory, attention, emotional, and mood disorders may underlie executive dysfunction. Patients with lesions in the inferior temporal lobe often present with various types of agnosia. Visual agnosia is common in semantic dementia, but is infrequent after a stroke in the temporal lobe. Prosopagnosia is a rare consequence of damages to the temporal lobe. Bilateral and right-sided lesions are likely to cause this disorder than left-sided lesions. Although, prosopagnosia is less frequently observed than visual agnosia in semantic dementia, it still is one of the common features of the disease. Bilateral injuries to the mesial temporal lobes have been known to induce a marked amnesic syndrome. It is devastating in that the patient can remember virtually nothing new. However, memories acquired before the injuries are mostly conserved and the patient can still learn motor skills. PMID:19938677

  7. Electrophysiological entropy in younger adults, older controls and older cognitively declined adults.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Michael J; Kilmartin, Liam; Keane, Michael; Collins, Peter; Staff, Roger T; Kaiser, Jochen; Lai, Robert; Upton, Neil

    2012-03-22

    The current study examined electrophysiological entropy in younger adults, older adults, and older cognitively declined adults across four experimental conditions - eyes closed, eyes open, and during both encoding and recognition of words in a memory task. We hypothesised reduced entropy in older declined adults relative to both older controls and younger adults, with the largest group differences in entropy expected during the encoding and recognition phases of the experiment. We also hypothesised greater hemispheric asymmetry in younger adults compared with older controls and older declined adults. Results revealed significant increases in entropy from eyes closed to eyes open to task. Young adults showed higher entropy in the right relative to the left hemisphere in the temporal lobe and higher entropy in the left relative to the right hemisphere in the parietal lobe. Old cognitively declined adults showed no significant differences between right and left hemisphere entropy. There was a trend whereby older declined adults showed lower entropy than older controls in the frontal lobe, this difference being largest in the left hemisphere during the encoding phase of the experiment. Results indicate that measures of entropy are sensitive to information processing demands and that higher cognitive performance may not be a simple function of entropy level, but rather a combination of level and range, or differentiated range of entropy states across the brain.

  8. Neuropsychological deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fengqing; Kang, Hai; You, Libo; Rastogi, Priyanka; Venkatesh, D; Chandra, Mina

    2014-10-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most prevalent form of complex partial seizures with temporal lobe origin of electrical abnormality. Studies have shown that recurrent seizures affect all aspects of cognitive functioning, including memory, language, praxis, executive functions, and social judgment, among several others. In this article, we will review these cognitive impairments along with their neuropathological correlates in a comprehensive manner. We will see that neuropsychological deficits are prevalent in TLE. Much of the effort has been laid on memory due to the notion that temporal lobe brain structures involved in TLE play a central role in consolidating information into memory. It seems that damage to the mesial structure of the temporal lobe, particularly the amygdale and hippocampus, has the main role in these memory difficulties and the neurobiological plausibility of the role of the temporal lobe in different aspects of memory. Here, we will cover the sub-domains of working memory and episodic memory deficits. This is we will further proceed to evaluate the evidences of executive function deficits in TLE and will see that set-shifting among other EFs is specifically affected in TLE as is social cognition. Finally, critical components of language related deficits are also found in the form of word-finding difficulties. To conclude, TLE affects several of cognitive function domains, but the etiopathogenesis of all these dysfunctions remain elusive. Further well-designed studies are needed for a better understanding of these disorders. PMID:25506156

  9. Quantifying interictal metabolic activity in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, T.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, J. Jr.; Christenson, P.D.; Zhang, J.X.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The majority of patients with complex partial seizures of unilateral temporal lobe origin have interictal temporal hypometabolism on (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) studies. Often, this hypometabolism extends to ipsilateral extratemporal sites. The use of accurately quantified metabolic data has been limited by the absence of an equally reliable method of anatomical analysis of PET images. We developed a standardized method for visual placement of anatomically configured regions of interest on FDG PET studies, which is particularly adapted to the widespread, asymmetric, and often severe interictal metabolic alterations of temporal lobe epilepsy. This method was applied by a single investigator, who was blind to the identity of subjects, to 10 normal control and 25 interictal temporal lobe epilepsy studies. All subjects had normal brain anatomical volumes on structural neuroimaging studies. The results demonstrate ipsilateral thalamic and temporal lobe involvement in the interictal hypometabolism of unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Ipsilateral frontal, parietal, and basal ganglial metabolism is also reduced, although not as markedly as is temporal and thalamic metabolism.

  10. Evolution of the plasmoid-lobe interaction with downtail distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Owen, C. J.; Hesse, M.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the interaction between plasmoids moving anti-sunward at high speeds and the tail lobes which bound them to the north and south. Attention is focused on the influence of changing lobe conditions with downtail distance. It is shown using International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) measurements that the gradual filling of the lobes with mantle plasma and the decrease in magnetic field intensity reduces the average lobe MHD fast mode speed from 1200 km/s at X = -80 R(sub E) to 400 km/s at X = -220 R(sub E). This results in the ratio of the plasmoid speed to the fast mode speed increasing with downtail distance, from 0.3 at X = -80 R(sub E) to approx. 1 at X = -220 R(sub E). It is argued that the 'standard' traveling compression region (TCR) signature observed closer to the Earth will be distorted at large distances, where the fast mode transit time between the plasmoid and magnetopause becomes long compared to the time for the plasmoid to move past a given point in the tail. This change in the nature of the plasmoid-lobe interaction with downtail distance is offered as an explanation for why the reported rate of TCR occurrence peaks at X = -60 to -130 R(sub E) and decreases in the more distant fail.

  11. Identification of odorant-binding protein genes from antennal expressed sequence tags of the onion fly, Delia antiqua.

    PubMed

    Mitaka, Hayato; Matsuo, Takashi; Miura, Nami; Ishikawa, Yukio

    2011-03-01

    Insect odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are thought to play a crucial role in the chemosensation of hydrophobic molecules such as pheromones and host chemicals. The onion fly, Delia antiqua, is a specialist feeder of Allium plants, and utilizes a host odorant n-dipropyl disulfide as a cue for its oviposition. Because n-dipropyl disulfide is a highly hydrophobic compound, some OBPs might be indispensable for perception of it. However, no OBP gene has been identified in D. antiqua. Here, to obtain the DNA sequences of D. antiqua OBPs, we performed an analysis of antennal expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Among 288 EST clones, eight D. antiqua OBP genes were identified for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that each D. antiqua OBP gene is more closely related to its Drosophila orthologs than to the other D. antiqua OBP genes, suggesting that these OBP genes had emerged before the divergence of Delia and Drosophila species. All of the eight D. antiqua OBPs are expressed not only in the antennae but also in the legs, suggesting additional roles in the taste perception of non-volatile compounds. These findings serve as an important basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the host adaptations of D. antiqua. PMID:20848218

  12. Antennal RNA-sequencing analysis reveals evolutionary aspects of chemosensory proteins in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Hojo, Masaru K.; Ishii, Kenichi; Sakura, Midori; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2015-01-01

    Chemical communication is essential for the coordination of complex organisation in ant societies. Recent comparative genomic approaches have revealed that chemosensory genes are diversified in ant lineages, and suggest that this diversification is crucial for social organisation. However, how such diversified genes shape the peripheral chemosensory systems remains unknown. In this study, we annotated and analysed the gene expression profiles of chemosensory proteins (CSPs), which transport lipophilic compounds toward chemosensory receptors in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus. Transcriptome analysis revealed 12 CSP genes and phylogenetic analysis showed that 3 of these are lineage-specifically expanded in the clade of ants. RNA sequencing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that, among the ant specific CSP genes, two of them (CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13) were specifically expressed in the chemosensory organs and differentially expressed amongst ant castes. Furthermore, CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13 had a ratio of divergence at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dN/dS) greater than 1, and they were co-expressed with CjapCSP1, which is known to bind cuticular hydrocarbons. Our results suggested that CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13 were functionally differentiated for ant-specific chemosensory events, and that CjapCSP1, CjapCSP12, and CjapCSP13 work cooperatively in the antennal chemosensilla of worker ants. PMID:26310137

  13. Antennal RNA-sequencing analysis reveals evolutionary aspects of chemosensory proteins in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Masaru K; Ishii, Kenichi; Sakura, Midori; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2015-08-27

    Chemical communication is essential for the coordination of complex organisation in ant societies. Recent comparative genomic approaches have revealed that chemosensory genes are diversified in ant lineages, and suggest that this diversification is crucial for social organisation. However, how such diversified genes shape the peripheral chemosensory systems remains unknown. In this study, we annotated and analysed the gene expression profiles of chemosensory proteins (CSPs), which transport lipophilic compounds toward chemosensory receptors in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus. Transcriptome analysis revealed 12 CSP genes and phylogenetic analysis showed that 3 of these are lineage-specifically expanded in the clade of ants. RNA sequencing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that, among the ant specific CSP genes, two of them (CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13) were specifically expressed in the chemosensory organs and differentially expressed amongst ant castes. Furthermore, CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13 had a ratio of divergence at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dN/dS) greater than 1, and they were co-expressed with CjapCSP1, which is known to bind cuticular hydrocarbons. Our results suggested that CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13 were functionally differentiated for ant-specific chemosensory events, and that CjapCSP1, CjapCSP12, and CjapCSP13 work cooperatively in the antennal chemosensilla of worker ants.

  14. Antennal RNA-sequencing analysis reveals evolutionary aspects of chemosensory proteins in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Masaru K; Ishii, Kenichi; Sakura, Midori; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2015-01-01

    Chemical communication is essential for the coordination of complex organisation in ant societies. Recent comparative genomic approaches have revealed that chemosensory genes are diversified in ant lineages, and suggest that this diversification is crucial for social organisation. However, how such diversified genes shape the peripheral chemosensory systems remains unknown. In this study, we annotated and analysed the gene expression profiles of chemosensory proteins (CSPs), which transport lipophilic compounds toward chemosensory receptors in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus. Transcriptome analysis revealed 12 CSP genes and phylogenetic analysis showed that 3 of these are lineage-specifically expanded in the clade of ants. RNA sequencing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that, among the ant specific CSP genes, two of them (CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13) were specifically expressed in the chemosensory organs and differentially expressed amongst ant castes. Furthermore, CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13 had a ratio of divergence at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dN/dS) greater than 1, and they were co-expressed with CjapCSP1, which is known to bind cuticular hydrocarbons. Our results suggested that CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13 were functionally differentiated for ant-specific chemosensory events, and that CjapCSP1, CjapCSP12, and CjapCSP13 work cooperatively in the antennal chemosensilla of worker ants. PMID:26310137

  15. Behavioral and olfactory antennal responses of Solenopsis geminata (Fabricius) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) workers to their dufour gland secretion.

    PubMed

    Brindis, Yolanda; Lachaud, Jean P; Gómez Y Gómez, Benigno; Rojas, Julio C; Malo, Edi A; Cruz-López, Leopoldo

    2008-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological tests were performed to evaluate the responses of workers of the ant Solenopsis geminata (Fabricius) from different size categories to Dufour gland extracts. Morphometric measures based in head widths across eyes were used to determine worker sizes. Trail following response of different worker sizes to Dufour gland extract from workers of different sizes was assessed. For each worker size category olfactory responses to Dufour gland extracts were determined using electroantennography (EAG). Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to determine the chromatographic profile of Dufour gland secretion for each worker size. Morphometric measures permitted to classify the workers of S. geminata as large, medium and small workers. Medium S. geminata workers displayed a significantly higher behavioral response to Dufour gland extracts produced by medium size workers. Similarly, medium workers showed a significantly higher EAG response to Dufour gland extracts produced by medium sized workers. Chromatographic profile of Dufour gland secretions produced by workers showed that each size category exhibited a characteristic profile of the three main components considered as potential trail pheromone constituents. This work showed that medium workers of S. geminata exhibited a high trail-following behavior as well as a high antennal response to Dufour gland secretion. This and their relative abundance in field foraging areas, suggest that medium-sized workers are specialized in foraging activities. PMID:18506290

  16. Morphological characterization of the antennal sensilla of t he earwig Anisolabis maritima (Dermaptera: Carcinophoridae) with reference to their probable functions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dosary, Mona Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    The earwig, Anisolabis maritima (Dermaptera: Carcinophoridae), is one of the most significant insects in KSA because, it was recorded in Saudi Arabia as a beneficial predator on eggs and newly hatched larvae of the red palm weevil, Rhyncophorus ferrugineus. We examined the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of males and females of A. maritima using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The filiform antennae of A. maritima were of the conventional type comprising a basal scape, pedicle and a long, thread-like flagellum, which was composed of 12 flagellomeres of males and 16 flagellomeres of females. Six morphologically unique sensillar types were found and described on the antennae of males and females of A. maritima. Of those identified, there were three types of porous trichoid sensilla (long, curved and arcuate), and two types of basiconic sensilla (short and curved), and one type of aporous trichoid sensilla. The shape, external morphology and array of sensilla on the antennae of males and females of A. maritima were similar. PMID:23961038

  17. The evolution of body size, antennal size and host use in parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea): a phylogenetic comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Matthew R E; Elgar, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Chalcidoid wasps represent one of the most speciose superfamilies of animals known, with ca. 23,000 species described of which many are parasitoids. They are extremely diverse in body size, morphology and, among the parasitoids, insect hosts. Parasitic chalcidoids utilise a range of behavioural adaptations to facilitate exploitation of their diverse insect hosts, but how host use might influence the evolution of body size and morphology is not known in this group. We used a phylogenetic comparative analysis of 126 chalcidoid species to examine whether body size and antennal size showed evolutionary correlations with aspects of host use, including host breadth (specificity), host identity (orders of insects parasitized) and number of plant associates. Both morphological features and identity of exploited host orders show strong phylogenetic signal, but host breadth does not. Larger body size in these wasps was weakly associated with few plant genera, and with more specialised host use, and chalcidoid wasps that parasitize coleopteran hosts tend to be larger. Intriguingly, chalcidoid wasps that parasitize hemipteran hosts are both smaller in size in the case of those parasitizing the suborder Sternorrhyncha and have relatively larger antennae, particularly in those that parasitize other hemipteran suborders. These results suggest there are adaptations in chalcidoid wasps that are specifically associated with host detection and exploitation.

  18. Identification of honeybee antennal proteins/genes expressed in a sex- and/or caste selective manner.

    PubMed

    Kamikouchi, Azusa; Morioka, Mizue; Kubo, Takeo

    2004-01-01

    We identified three candidate proteins/genes involved in caste and/or sex-specific olfactory processing in the honeybee Apis mellifera L., that are differentially expressed between the antennae of the worker, queen, and drone honeybees using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or the differential display method. A protein was identified, termed D-AP1, that was expressed preferentially in drone antennae when compared to those of workers. cDNA cloning revealed that D-AP1 is homologous to carboxylesterases. Enzymatic carboxylesterase activity in the drone antennae was higher than in the workers, suggesting its dominant function in the drone antennae. In contrast, two proteins encoded by genes termed W-AP1 and Amwat were expressed preferentially in worker antennae when compared to those of queens. W-AP1 is homologous to insect chemosensory protein, and Amwat encodes a novel secretory protein. W-AP1 is expressed selectively in worker antennae, while Amwat is expressed both in the antennae and legs of the workers. These findings suggest that these proteins are involved in the antennal function characteristic to drone or worker honeybees.

  19. Elemental Spatial and Temporal Association Formation in Left Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Christopher F. A.; Saling, Michael M.; Wood, Amanda G.; Reutens, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The mesial temporal lobe (MTL) is typically understood as a memory structure in clinical settings, with the sine qua non of MTL damage in epilepsy being memory impairment. Recent models, however, understand memory as one of a number of higher cognitive functions that recruit the MTL through their reliance on more fundamental processes, such as “self-projection” or “association formation”. We examined how damage to the left MTL influences these fundamental processes through the encoding of elemental spatial and temporal associations. We used a novel fMRI task to image the encoding of simple visual stimuli, either rich or impoverished, in spatial or spatial plus temporal information. Participants included 14 typical adults (36.4 years, sd. 10.5 years) and 14 patients with left mesial temporal lobe damage as evidenced by a clinical diagnosis of left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and left MTL impairment on imaging (34.3 years, sd. 6.6 years). In-scanner behavioral performance was equivalent across groups. In the typical group whole-brain analysis revealed highly significant bilateral parahippocampal activation (right > left) during spatial associative processing and left hippocampal/parahippocampal deactivation in joint spatial-temporal associative processing. In the left TLE group identical analyses indicated patients used MTL structures contralateral to the seizure focus differently and relied on extra-MTL regions to a greater extent. These results are consistent with the notion that epileptogenic MTL damage is followed by reorganization of networks underlying elemental associative processes. In addition, they provide further evidence that task-related fMRI deactivation can meaningfully index brain function. The implications of these findings for clinical and cognitive neuropsychological models of MTL function in TLE are discussed. PMID:24978828

  20. Unusual Ictal Foreign Language Automatisms in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Soe, Naing Ko; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-01-01

    The distinct brain regions could be specifically involved in different languages and the differences in brain activation depending on the language proficiency and on the age of language acquisition. Speech disturbances are observed in the majority of temporal lobe complex motor seizures. Ictal verbalization had significant lateralization value: 90% of patients with this manifestation had seizure focus in the non-dominant temporal lobe. Although, ictal speech automatisms are usually uttered in the patient’s native language, ictal speech foreign language automatisms are unusual presentations of non-dominent temporal lobe epilepsy. The release of isolated foreign language area could be possible depending on the pattern of ictal spreading of non-dominant hemisphere. Most of the case reports in ictal speech foreign language automatisms were men. In this case report, we observed ictal foreign language automatisms in middle age Korean woman. PMID:25625093

  1. Multiple synchronous primary tumours in a single lobe

    PubMed Central

    Sepehripour, Amir H.; Nasir, Abdul; Shah, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 70-year-old man with three synchronous histologically different primary tumours in the same lobe. He initially presented with an intermittent productive cough, dyspnoea and non-specific abdominal pains. Radiological investigation revealed three areas of high-intensity fludeoxyglucose uptake of varying size within the right upper lobe. He underwent thoracoscopic right upper lobectomy. Histological analysis confirmed the three lesions to be undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. The reclassification of the T descriptors of the tumour–node–metastasis staging of a lung cancer has lead to the transition of classification of tumour nodules in the ipsilateral primary tumour lobe from T4 to T3. In the case of our patient, this has lead to the downstaging of the tumour allowing consideration for surgical management. PMID:22159234

  2. Medial temporal lobe dysgenesis in Muenke syndrome and hypochondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Salvatore; Farnetani, Maria Angela; Berardi, Rosario; Bartalini, Gabriella; Carpentieri, Marilisa; Galluzzi, Paolo; Mostardini, Rosa; Morgese, Guido; Balestri, Paolo

    2003-07-01

    Hypochondroplasia (HCH) and Muenke syndrome (MS) are caused by mutations on FGFR3 gene. FGFR3 is known to play a role in controlling nervous system development. We describe the clinical and neuroradiological findings of the first two patients, to our knowledge, affected by HCH and MS, respectively, in whom bilateral dysgenesis of the medial temporal lobe structures has been observed. In both patients diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis. They were mentally normal and showed similarities in early-onset temporal lobe-related seizures. In both patients EEG recorded bilateral temporal region discharges. MRI detected temporal lobe anomalies with inadequate differentiation between white and gray matter, defective gyri, and abnormally shaped hippocampus. PMID:12794698

  3. Unusual ictal foreign language automatisms in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Soe, Naing Ko; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-12-01

    The distinct brain regions could be specifically involved in different languages and the differences in brain activation depending on the language proficiency and on the age of language acquisition. Speech disturbances are observed in the majority of temporal lobe complex motor seizures. Ictal verbalization had significant lateralization value: 90% of patients with this manifestation had seizure focus in the non-dominant temporal lobe. Although, ictal speech automatisms are usually uttered in the patient's native language, ictal speech foreign language automatisms are unusual presentations of non-dominent temporal lobe epilepsy. The release of isolated foreign language area could be possible depending on the pattern of ictal spreading of non-dominant hemisphere. Most of the case reports in ictal speech foreign language automatisms were men. In this case report, we observed ictal foreign language automatisms in middle age Korean woman.

  4. Effect of lobe pumping on human albumin: development of a lobe pump simulator using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; Prakash, Mahesh; Hunt, Ben; Stokes, Nick; Cleary, Paul; Tatford, Owen C; Bertolini, Joseph

    2006-02-01

    Using SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), the motion of a lobe pump under load was simulated in order to predict the level of shear stress experienced by a protein solution. By varying the gap size between the lobes and pump housing, variations in pump efficiency and shear stress were determined. The simulations indicated that pump shear was dependent on gap size, with shear stress levels (0-40 Pa) correlating with those estimated in previous albumin-pumping studies. As gap size increased, the number of fluid particles experiencing low shear (<10 Pa) increased, whereas those experiencing high shear (>20 Pa) showed a decreasing trend. The pump efficiency, however, decreased with gap size, requiring more lobe revolutions to pass a unit volume. Taken together, these observations indicate that lobe pumps operated with increased gaps between the rotors and the housing result in larger number of particles within the fluid experiencing shear stresses. Moreover, the simulations indicate that it is best to use larger lobe pumps operated at high efficiency to transfer protein-containing solutions. PMID:16246177

  5. Improved Proper Name Recall in Aging after Electrical Stimulation of the Anterior Temporal Lobes

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lars A.; McCoy, David; Coslett, H. Branch; Olson, Ingrid R.; Wolk, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from neuroimaging and neuropsychology suggests that portions of the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs) play a critical role in proper name retrieval. We previously found that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the ATLs improved retrieval of proper names in young adults (Ross et al., 2010). Here we extend that finding to older adults who tend to experience greater proper-naming deficits than young adults. The task was to look at pictures of famous faces or landmarks and verbally recall the associated proper name. Our results show a numerical improvement in face naming after left or right ATL stimulation, but a statistically significant effect only after left-lateralized stimulation. The magnitude of the enhancing effect was similar in older and younger adults but the lateralization of the effect differed depending on age. The implications of these findings for the use of tDCS as tool for rehabilitation of age-related loss of name recall are discussed. PMID:22016735

  6. Stable Lobed Mixer With Combustion Demonstrated and Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center collaborated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on an experiment to study the use of lobed mixers to improve the fuel-air mixing process and increase combustion intensity in combustors with minimal pressure loss. This experiment is the first known stable combusting flow studied for this device, and the data show a much faster and much more uniform combustion process than for flat-plate mixers. Several potential benefits may be realized from this study in future combustors, including a reduction in NO_x emissions because of the more uniform temperature distribution. The experiment was done in Lewis' Planar Reacting Shear Layer facility, which was adapted to accept a lobed mixer in addition to the original planar tip. A graduate student at MIT provided the mixer design concept, and Lewis provided the engineering, operations, and research expertise. The experiment used hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures to react with vitiated hot air at 920 K. A flow speed of about 120 m/sec and a speed ratio of 0.5 were used. Flow diagnostics consisted of traversing fine-wire thermocouples and pitot probes for flow mapping. Supplementary fluorescence images were taken with a charged coupled device (CCD) camera to show the location and temporal behavior of the reaction zone. The data showed that the lobed mixer consumed the reactants between 3 to 10 times faster than a corresponding planar shear layer. The figure shows the dramatic difference in the measured temperature distribution with and without the lobed mixer. The increased mixing rate was due to a larger interfacial area as well as to the secondary flow from the streamwise vortices off the tips of the lobes. In addition, the fluorescence images showed that the lobes acted as flame stabilizers.

  7. Isolated Hyperreligiosity in a Patient with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Santibanez, Rocio; Sarva, Harini

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with history of temporal lobe epilepsy presented to the emergency department with hyperreligiosity after medication noncompliance. After medications were resumed, he returned to baseline. Many famous prophets are believed to have suffered epilepsy. Waxman and Geschwind described a group of traits in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy consisting of hyperreligiosity, hypergraphia, altered sexual behavior, aggressiveness, preoccupation with details, and circumstantiality. The incidence of religious experiences ranges from 0.3 to 3.1 percent in patients with epilepsy. Religious experiences can be ictal, interictal, or postictal. Treatment is aimed at the underlying seizure etiology. PMID:26351599

  8. [A Case of Musicophilia with Right Predominant Temporal Lobe Atrophy].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman exhibiting musicophilia with right predominant temporal lobe atrophy happened to visit our clinic. She had no musical background, but beginning two years ago, she acquired a strong preference for especially popular music and sometimes sang at home. She did not exhibit obvious semantic aphasia or facial agnosia, and showed only mild behavioral changes including apathy. Her musicophilia can be explained as an instance of stereotypical behavior. Her right temporal lobe atrophy may have caused changes in her emotional and reward systems, resulting in her music specific behaviors. PMID:26560960

  9. [A Case of Musicophilia with Right Predominant Temporal Lobe Atrophy].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Shunichiro; Nakayama, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old woman exhibiting musicophilia with right predominant temporal lobe atrophy happened to visit our clinic. She had no musical background, but beginning two years ago, she acquired a strong preference for especially popular music and sometimes sang at home. She did not exhibit obvious semantic aphasia or facial agnosia, and showed only mild behavioral changes including apathy. Her musicophilia can be explained as an instance of stereotypical behavior. Her right temporal lobe atrophy may have caused changes in her emotional and reward systems, resulting in her music specific behaviors.

  10. Occipital lobe epilepsy with fear as leading ictal symptom.

    PubMed

    Oehl, Bernhard; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Lanz, Michael; Brandt, Armin; Altenmüller, Dirk-Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Ictal fear is a semiological feature which is commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Here, we describe fear as a leading symptom in cryptogenic occipital lobe epilepsy. In a patient with negative MRI findings, intracranial EEG recordings documented a strict correlation between habitual ictal anxiety attacks and both spontaneous and stimulation-induced epileptic activity in a right occipital epileptogenic area with subsequent spreading to the symptomatogenic zone in the amygdala. Circumscribed occipital topectomy led to seizure freedom. Episodes of non-epileptic fear ceased shortly afterwards. This report provides insight into pathways of propagation of epileptic activity, illustrates different etiologies of pathologic fear and underlines the importance of ictal EEG recordings.

  11. Early seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures and its surgical implication.

    PubMed

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2008-12-01

    Intracranial EEG documentation of seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures is relatively rare. We retrospectively analyzed intracranial EEG recorded with electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe in patients who underwent occipital lobe surgery. Four patients with occipital lesions, who underwent intracranial EEG monitoring with intracerebral electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe prior to occipital lobe surgery, were studied. Subdural electrodes were placed over the occipital lobe and adjacent areas. Intracerebral electrodes were implanted into bilateral hippocampi and the amygdala in three patients, and in the hippocampus and amygdala ipsilateral to the lesion in one. In light of the intracranial EEG findings, the occipital lobe was resected but the medial temporal lobe was spared in all patients. The follow-up period ranged from six to 16 years, and seizure outcome was Engel Class I in all patients. Sixty six seizures were analyzed. The majority of the seizures originated from the occipital lobe. In complex partial seizures, ictal discharges propagated to the medial temporal lobe. No seizures originating from the temporal lobe were documented. In some seizures, the ictal-onset zone could not be identified. In these seizures, very early propagation to the medial temporal lobe was observed. Interictal spikes were recorded in the medial temporal lobe in all cases. Intracranial EEG revealed very early involvement of the medial temporal lobe in some seizures. Seizure control was achieved without resection of the medial temporal structures.

  12. Contributions of frontal and medial temporal lobe functioning to the errorless learning advantage.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nicole D; Guild, Emma B; Cyr, Andrée-Ann; Roberts, Judith; Clare, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Among individuals with episodic memory impairments, trial-and-error learning is less successful than when errors are avoided. This "errorless learning advantage" has been replicated numerous times, but its neurocognitive mechanism is uncertain, with existing evidence pointing to both medial temporal lobe (MTL) and frontal lobe (FL) involvement. To test the relative contribution of MTL and FL functioning to the errorless learning advantage, 51 healthy older adults were pre-experimentally assigned to one of four groups based on their neuropsychological test performance: Low MTL-Low FL, Low MTL-High FL, High MTL-Low FL, High MTL-High FL. Participants learned two word lists under errorless learning conditions, and two word lists under errorful learning conditions, and memory was tested via free recall, cued recall, and source recognition. Performance on all three tests was better for those with High relative to Low MTL functioning. An errorless learning advantage was found in free and cued recall, in cued recall marginally more so for those with Low than High MTL functioning. Participants with Low MTL functioning were also more likely to misclassify learning errors as target words. Overall, these results are consistent with a MTL locus of the errorless learning advantage. The results are discussed in terms of the multi-componential nature of neuropsychological tests and the impact of demographic and mood variables on cognitive functioning. PMID:22248376

  13. Factors affecting bilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism on 18F-FDG PET brain scan in unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Srikijvilaikul, Teeradej; Vasavid, Pataramon

    2013-11-01

    Bilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism (BTH) on (18)F-FDG PET brain scan is frequently seen in unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). This study aimed to identify the factors that influence BTH in patients with mTLE in order to minimize the significant factor(s) prior to performing a FDG-PET brain scan. Forty patients with unilateral mTLE who underwent (18)F-FDG PET scan for presurgical epilepsy workup were included. Bilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism of the anterior and medial parts of the temporal lobe was identified by a semiquantitative visual scale. Lateralization of TLE was identified by either intracranial EEG (22/40 cases) and/or improvement of seizure 2 years after temporal lobectomy (37/40 cases). The factors analyzed included basic demographic characteristics (age, sex, occupation, years of education, and handedness), history related to seizure (age at epilepsy onset and epilepsy duration, history of febrile seizure and head injury, frequency of seizure with impaired cognition in the last 3 months, presence of secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure, automatism side, presence of postictal confusion, and side of MRI temporal abnormality), information during video-EEG monitoring (clinical lateralization, interictal scalp EEG lateralization (interictal epileptiform discharge), and ictal scalp EEG lateralization), and information during the FDG-PET study (duration from the last seizure (≤2 days or >2 days), last seizure type, and the presence of slow waves or sharp waves during the FDG uptake period). Significant factors related to BTH were analyzed using multivariate analysis. Only the ≤2-day duration from the last seizure to the PET scan shows a significant effect (p=0.021) on BTH finding with 15 times greater incidence compared to a duration >2 days. Bilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism, which causes conflict in lateralizing the epileptogenic zone in temporal lobe epilepsy, can be avoided by performing PET scan more than 2 days

  14. Sub-Centimeter Language Organization in the Human Temporal Lobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinker, A.; Chang, E. F.; Barbaro, N. M.; Berger, M. S.; Knight, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The human temporal lobe is well known to be critical for language comprehension. Previous physiological research has focused mainly on non-invasive neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques with each approach requiring averaging across many trials and subjects. The results of these studies have implicated extended anatomical regions in…

  15. Reversible antisocial behavior in ventromedial prefrontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Trebuchon, Agnès; Bartolomei, Fabrice; McGonigal, Aileen; Laguitton, Virginie; Chauvel, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Frontal lobe dysfunction is known to be associated with impairment in social behavior. We investigated the link between severe pharmacoresistant frontal lobe epilepsy and antisocial trait. We studied four patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy involving the prefrontal cortex, presenting abnormal interictal social behavior. Noninvasive investigations (video-EEG, PET, MRI) and intracerebral recording (stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG)) were performed as part of a presurgical assessment. Comprehensive psychiatric and cognitive evaluation was performed pre- and postoperatively for frontal lobe epilepsy, with at least 7years of follow-up. All patients shared a characteristic epilepsy pattern: (1) chronic severe prefrontal epilepsy with daily seizures and (2) an epileptogenic zone as defined by intracerebral recording involving the anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial PFC, and the posterior part of the orbitofrontal cortex, with early propagation to contralateral prefrontal and ipsilateral medial temporal structures. All patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria (DSM-IV) of antisocial personality disorder, which proved to be reversible following seizure control. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy involving a prefrontal network is associated with antisocial personality. We hypothesize that the occurrence of frequent seizures in this region over a prolonged period produces functional damage leading to impaired prefrontal control of social behavior. This functional damage is reversible since successful epilepsy surgery markedly improved antisocial behavior in these patients. The results are in line with previous reports of impairment of social and moral behavior following ventromedial frontal lobe injury.

  16. NOx Emissions from a Lobed Fuel Injector/Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. G.; Smith, L. L.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.

    1996-01-01

    The present experimental study examines the performance of a novel fuel injector/burner configuration with respect to reduction in nitrogen oxide NOx emissions. The lobed injector/burner is a device in which very rapid initial mixing of reactants can occur through strong streamwise vorticity generation, producing high fluid mechanical strain rates which can delay ignition and thus prevent the formation of stoichiometric diffusion flames. Further downstream of the rapid mixing region. this flowfield produces a reduced effective strain rate, thus allowing ignition to occur in a premixed mode, where it is possible for combustion to take place under locally lean conditions. potentially reducing NOx emissions from the burner. The present experiments compare NO/NO2/NOx emissions from a lobed fuel injector configuration with emissions from a straight fuel injector to determine the net effect of streamwise vorticity generation. Preliminary results show that the lobed injector geometry can produce lean premixed flame structures. while for comparable flow conditions, a straight fuel injector geometry produces much longer. sooting diffusion flames or slightly rich pre-mixed flames. NO measurements show that emissions from a lobed fuel injector/burner can be made significantly lower than from a straight fuel injector under comparable flow conditions.

  17. Time Ordering in Frontal Lobe Patients: A Stochastic Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magherini, Anna; Saetti, Maria Cristina; Berta, Emilia; Botti, Claudio; Faglioni, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    Frontal lobe patients reproduced a sequence of capital letters or abstract shapes. Immediate and delayed reproduction trials allowed the analysis of short- and long-term memory for time order by means of suitable Markov chain stochastic models. Patients were as proficient as healthy subjects on the immediate reproduction trial, thus showing spared…

  18. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  19. The kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    The kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy has greatly contributed to the understanding of the molecular, cellular and pharmacological mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. This model presents with neuropathological and electroencephalographic features that are seen in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is also characterized by a latent period that follows the initial precipitating injury (i.e., status epilepticus) until the appearance of recurrent seizures, as observed in the human condition. Finally, the kainic acid model can be reproduced in a variety of species using either systemic, intrahippocampal or intra-amygdaloid administrations. In this review, we describe the various methodological procedures and evaluate their differences with respect to the behavioral, electroencephalographic and neuropathological correlates. In addition, we compare the kainic acid model with other animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy such as the pilocarpine and the kindling model. We conclude that the kainic acid model is a reliable tool for understanding temporal lobe epilepsy, provided that the differences existing between methodological procedures are taken into account.

  20. Medial Temporal Lobe Memory in Childhood: Developmental Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  1. Arousal Enhanced Memory Retention Is Eliminated Following Temporal Lobe Resection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahs, Fredrik; Kumlien, Eva; Fredrikson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    The amygdala, situated in the anterior medial temporal lobe (MTL), is involved in the emotional enhancement of memory. The present study evaluated whether anterior MTL-resections attenuated arousal induced memory enhancement for pictures. Also, the effect of MTL-resections on response latencies at retrieval was assessed. Thirty-one patients with…

  2. Memory Functions following Surgery for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jambaque, Isabelle; Dellatolas, Georges; Fohlen, Martine; Bulteau, Christine; Watier, Laurence; Dorfmuller, Georg; Chiron, Catherine; Delalande, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Surgical treatment appears to improve the cognitive prognosis in children undergoing surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The beneficial effects of surgery on memory functions, particularly on material-specific memory, are more difficult to assess because of potentially interacting factors such as age range, intellectual level,…

  3. Recurrent sinus pauses: an atypical presentation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Amor, Martin Miguel; Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Osofsky, Jeffrey; Holland, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction related to seizures may give rise to a broad spectrum of cardiovascular abnormalities. Among these, ictal bradycardia and conduction delays may be encountered. Failure to recognize these abnormalities may contribute to sudden, unexplained death in epilepsy patients. We report a case of a Haitian female with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with recurrent sinus pauses.

  4. The anterior temporal lobes support residual comprehension in Wernicke's aphasia.

    PubMed

    Robson, Holly; Zahn, Roland; Keidel, James L; Binney, Richard J; Sage, Karen; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2014-03-01

    Wernicke's aphasia occurs after a stroke to classical language comprehension regions in the left temporoparietal cortex. Consequently, auditory-verbal comprehension is significantly impaired in Wernicke's aphasia but the capacity to comprehend visually presented materials (written words and pictures) is partially spared. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of written word and picture semantic processing in Wernicke's aphasia, with the wider aim of examining how the semantic system is altered after damage to the classical comprehension regions. Twelve participants with chronic Wernicke's aphasia and 12 control participants performed semantic animate-inanimate judgements and a visual height judgement baseline task. Whole brain and region of interest analysis in Wernicke's aphasia and control participants found that semantic judgements were underpinned by activation in the ventral and anterior temporal lobes bilaterally. The Wernicke's aphasia group displayed an 'over-activation' in comparison with control participants, indicating that anterior temporal lobe regions become increasingly influential following reduction in posterior semantic resources. Semantic processing of written words in Wernicke's aphasia was additionally supported by recruitment of the right anterior superior temporal lobe, a region previously associated with recovery from auditory-verbal comprehension impairments. Overall, the results provide support for models in which the anterior temporal lobes are crucial for multimodal semantic processing and that these regions may be accessed without support from classic posterior comprehension regions.

  5. Confabulation and Delusional Denial: Frontal Lobe and Lateralized Influences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, R.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various forms of confabulation, and conditions that often give rise to these disorders. Asserts that confabulatory states frequently are associated with cerebral damage that involves the right hemisphere, notably, the frontal (often bilaterally) and parietal lobes - areas intimately involved in arousal, attention, information regulation,…

  6. "No Longer Gage": Frontal Lobe Dysfunction and Emotional Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuss, Donald T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews changes in emotional response and personality occurring after damage to frontal systems, proposes operational definitions, and analyzes reports according to these definitions. Summarizes neurological causes of frontal lobe damage and associations of frontal dysfunction with psychiatric disturbances. Proposes that primary change after…

  7. Medial Temporal Lobe Structures Contribute to On-Line Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, David

    2009-01-01

    For the last five decades, the medial temporal lobes have been generally understood to facilitate enduring representation of certain kinds of information. In particular, knowledge about the relations among items and concepts appears to rely on that region of the brain. Recent results suggest that those same structures also play a subtle role in…

  8. Memory, Metamemory and Their Dissociation in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Charlotte E.; Andres, Pilar; Broks, Paul; Noad, Rupert; Sadler, Martin; Coker, Debbie; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2010-01-01

    Patients with temporal-lobe epilepsy (TLE) present with memory difficulties. The aim of the current study was to determine to what extent these difficulties could be related to a metamemory impairment. Fifteen patients with TLE and 15 matched healthy controls carried out a paired-associates learning task. Memory recall was measured at intervals of…

  9. Fine Structure of Antennal Sensilla of Paysandisia archon and Electrophysiological Responses to Volatile Compounds Associated with Host Palms

    PubMed Central

    Ruschioni, Sara; Riolo, Paola; Verdolini, Elisa; Peri, Ezio; Guarino, Salvatore; Colazza, Stefano; Romani, Roberto; Isidoro, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    Paysandisia archon (Lepidoptera: Castniidae) is a serious pest of palm trees. A comprehensive knowledge of the insect olfactory system is essential for the development of efficient semiochemical-based control methods. The olfactory sensilla are located particularly on the antennae, and these can detect plant volatiles that provide important cues for the insects in the search for their host plants. To date, the fine structure of P. archon antennal sensilla studies and their role in host-plant perception have not been investigated in great detail. Using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the antennae of both sexes of P. archon are described here in detail, according to the different types, quantities and distributions of the sensilla. Six types of sensilla were identified. The most widespread are sensilla trichoidea, sensilla basiconica and sensilla auricilica, which are associated with olfactory function. These have cuticular shafts characterised by numerous pores, and they are innervated by two or three sensory neurons. Sensilla coeloconica, sensilla chaetica and sensilla ampullacea are associated with olfactory or olfactory-thermoreception, mechano-gustatory, and thermo-hygroreception functions, respectively. Moreover, the role of P. archon antennae in locating of the host palms was evaluated using electroantennograms, to monitor responses to ester and terpene compounds previously identified as volatiles of damaged/fermenting palm tissues. P. archon showed responses to all of the synthetic chemicals tested, with greater responses in the females, providing a significant sex*dose effect. Among the compounds tested, ethyl isobutyrate elicited the strongest antenna responses. The fine structure of the cuticular and cellular components of the P. archon antenna sensory equipment is described for the first time. The results of this study form an important starting point and complement physiological and behavioural studies, to provide

  10. Agonists and antagonists of antennal responses of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) to the pheromone (+)-disparlure and other odorants.

    PubMed

    Plettner, Erika; Gries, Regine

    2010-03-24

    Insects use the sense of smell to guide many behaviors that are important for their survival. The gypsy moth uses a pheromone to bring females and males together over long distances. Male moth antennae are equipped with innervated sensory hairs that selectively respond to pheromone components and other odors. Host plant odors, in particular, are detected by moths and sometimes cause an enhancement of the antennal and behavioral responses of the moths to their pheromone. Inspired by naturally occurring agonists and antagonists of insect pheromone responses, we have screened, by electroantennogram (EAG) recordings, a collection of compound sets and of individual compounds. We have detected interference of some compounds with the EAG responses of male gypsy moth antennae to the pheromone. We describe three activities: (1) short-term inhibition or enhancement of mixed compound + pheromone plumes, (2) long-term inhibition of pure pheromone plumes following a mixed compound + pheromone plume, and (3) inhibition of the recovery phase of mixed compound + pheromone plumes. Long-term inhibition was robust, decayed within 30 s, and correlated with the inhibition of recovery; for both activities clear structure-activity patterns were detected. The commercial repellent N,N-diethyltoluamide (DEET) was included for comparison. The most active and reproducible short-term inhibitor was a mixture of 1-allyl-2,4-dimethoxybenzene and 2-allyl-1,3-dimethoxybenzene. The most active long-term inhibitors were a set of 1-alkoxy-4-propoxybenzenes, DEET, and 1-ethoxy-4-propoxybenzene. DEET was more specific in the olfactory responses it inhibited than 1-ethoxy-4-propoxybenzene, and DEET did not inhibit recovery, whereas 1-ethoxy-4-propoxybenzene did. Target sites for the three activities are discussed.

  11. H-coil repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy: A case report.

    PubMed

    Gersner, R; Oberman, L; Sanchez, M J; Chiriboga, N; Kaye, H L; Pascual-Leone, A; Libenson, M; Roth, Y; Zangen, A; Rotenberg, A

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) of a cortical seizure focus is emerging as an antiepileptic treatment. While conventional rTMS stimulators activate only superficial cortical areas, reaching deep epileptic foci, for example in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), is possible using specially designed H-coils. We report the results of rTMS in a young adult with pharmacoresistant bilateral TLE who underwent three courses (of 10, 15, and 30 daily sessions) of unilateral rTMS over the hemisphere from which seizures originated most often. Seizure frequency was assessed before and after each block of rTMS sessions, as was the tolerability of the procedure. Seizure frequency declined significantly, by 50 to 70% following each rTMS course. All sessions were well-tolerated. PMID:27114902

  12. Grating lobes analysis based on blazed grating theory for liquid crystal optical-phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Cui, Guolong; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2013-09-01

    The grating lobes of the liquid crystal optical-phased array (LCOPA) based on blazed grating theory is studied. Using the Fraunhofer propagation principle, the analytical expressions of the far-field intensity distribution are derived. Subsequently, we can obtain both the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes. The derived analytical functions that provide an insight into single-slit diffraction and multislit interference effect on the grating lobes are discussed. Utilizing the conventional microwave-phased array technique, the intensities of the grating lobes and the main lobe are almost the same. Different from this, the derived analytical functions demonstrate that the intensities of the grating lobes are less than that of the main lobe. The computer simulations and experiments show that the proposed method can correctly estimate the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes for a LCOPA simultaneously.

  13. Seismic definition of fan lobe types of Mississippi Fan, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, P.; Buffler, R.T.

    1986-05-01

    Detailed seismic stratigraphic studies in the upper and middle Mississippi Fan identified 12 fan lobes. Three different types of fan lobes are present. The type 1 fan lobe consists of two seismic sequences. At the base of the lower sequence are mounded reflectors that change upward to hummocky reflectors. The upper sequence has stacked high-amplitude reflectors flanked on either side by low-amplitude, laterally continuous reflectors. These type 1 fan lobes are interpreted as mass transport deposits overlain by a single channel with extensive overbank deposits. The type 2 fan lobe has seismic and geologic facies similar to the upper sequence of type 1. Both type 1 and type 2 fan lobes have a single channel that is sinuous in the middle fan. The type 3 fan lobe is characterized by several stacked high-amplitude reflectors, flanked by laterally continuous low-amplitude reflectors. These represent a bifurcating channel system showing several episodes of deposition and abandonment. Most of the sediments in the Mississippi Fan were deposited in type 2 or the upper sequence of type 1 fan lobes. Sediments in the lower sequence of the type 1 lobe are areally and volumetrically limited. Of the 12 fan lobes, 7 are type 1, 4 are type 2, and 1 is type 3. Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 96 drilling penetrated only the modern lobe, which is a type 2 fan lobe.

  14. The Structural Plasticity of White Matter Networks Following Anterior Temporal Lobe Resection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogarajah, Mahinda; Focke, Niels K.; Bonelli, Silvia B.; Thompson, Pamela; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Duncan, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural consequences of such surgery in the white matter, and how these relate to language function after surgery remain unknown. We carried out a longitudinal study with diffusion tensor imaging in 26 left and 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy…

  15. Glycosylation patterns are sexually dimorphic throughout development of the olfactory system in Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Nicholas J; Hildebrand, John G; Tolbert, Leslie P

    2004-08-01

    In the moth Manduca sexta, development of the adult olfactory system depends on complex interactions between olfactory receptor neurons in the antenna, antennal-lobe neurons in the brain, and several classes of glial cells. As one approach to characterizing molecules that may play roles in these interactions, we used lectins to screen antennae and antennal lobes at different stages of adult development. We find that each of the major neural cell types has a distinct pattern of labeling by lectins. Effects of enzymatic and other treatments on lectin labeling lead us to conclude that the predominant lectin ligands are: glycosphingolipids and an O-linked, fucose-containing glycoprotein on axons of olfactory receptor neurons, O-linked glycoproteins on antennal-lobe neurons, and N-linked glycoproteins on all classes of glial cells in the primary olfactory pathway. Wheat germ agglutinin labels all olfactory axons uniformly during much of development, but labeling becomes restricted to the pheromone-responsive olfactory receptor neurons in the adult male. Succinylated WGA reveals differences in these axon classes earlier, as glomerului develop from protoglomeruli. The adult female displays a less pronounced difference in labeling of axons targeting ordinary and sexually dimorphic glomeruli. Differences in labeling of receptor axons targeted to ordinary and sexually dimorphic glomeruli may be correlated with differences in function or connectivity in different regions of the antennal lobe.

  16. Brain potentials implicate temporal lobe abnormalities in criminal psychopaths.

    PubMed

    Kiehl, Kent A; Bates, Alan T; Laurens, Kristin R; Hare, Robert D; Liddle, Peter F

    2006-08-01

    Psychopathy is associated with abnormalities in attention and orienting. However, few studies have examined the neural systems underlying these processes. To address this issue, the authors recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) while 80 incarcerated men, classified as psychopathic or nonpsychopathic via the Hare Psychopathy Checklist--Revised (R. D. Hare, 1991, 2003), completed an auditory oddball task. Consistent with hypotheses, processing of targets elicited larger frontocentral negativities (N550) in psychopaths than in nonpsychopaths. Psychopaths also showed an enlarged N2 and reduced P3 during target detection. Similar ERP modulations have been reported in patients with amygdala and temporal lobe damage. The data are interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that psychopathy may be related to dysfunction of the paralimbic system--a system that includes parts of the temporal and frontal lobes. PMID:16866585

  17. Oncocytoma of the Deep Lobe of the Parotid Gland

    PubMed Central

    Popovski, Vladimir; Benedetti, Alberto; Monevska, Danica Popovik; Grcev, Aleksandar; Serafimovski, Predrag; Pecanovski, Ruse; Stamatoski, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oncocytoma or oxyphilic adenoma is uncommon salivary gland tumour, occurs predominantly in the in patients older than 60 years of age. Clinically oncocytoma resemble other salivary tumours while histology is typically consisting of oncocytes with many hyperplastic mitochondria. It usually occurs in the parotid gland. Because the features of oncocytoma are similar to those of other benign and low-grade malignant salivary tumours, clinical diagnosis is often challenging. CASE PRESENTATION: This report presents the pathologic and imaging findings of an oncocytoma arising in the deep lobe of the right parotid gland in a 74-year-old male. Oncocytoma was diagnosed on the basis of histological, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), scintigraphic findings and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). CONCLUSION: This case was unique because in the literature there are few articles about the rare presentation and deep lobe location of this type of parotid oncocytoma. PMID:27335603

  18. Enhancement of breathing simulation using individual lobe segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lertrusdachakul, Intuon; Leni, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gschwind, Regine

    2016-09-01

    To tackle thorax movement from CT images, we have developed a platform to simulate a customized breathing cycle, where the pulmonary movement has been considered only at the rough border of the whole lung by artificial neural networks (ANN). The goal of this work is to include additional information of the lung lobe. Thus, more ANN will be used and future simulation will be able to take into consideration the impact of tumor on lobe movement. We present a new automatic segmentation algorithm that enables the extraction of lobar contour data using sliding mask and direction estimation. These improvements enhance the overall system performance in which higher precision and more accurate treatments can be expected.

  19. Visual interhemispheric communication and callosal connections of the occipital lobes.

    PubMed

    Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Callosal connections of the occipital lobes, coursing in the splenium of the corpus callosum, have long been thought to be crucial for interactions between the cerebral hemispheres in vision in both experimental animals and humans. Yet the callosal connections of the temporal and parietal lobes appear to have more important roles than those of the occipital callosal connections in at least some high-order interhemispheric visual functions. The partial intermixing and overlap of temporal, parietal and occipital callosal connections within the splenium has made it difficult to attribute the effects of splenial pathological lesions or experimental sections to splenial components specifically related to select cortical areas. The present review describes some current contributions from the modern techniques for the tracking of commissural fibers within the living human brain to the tentative assignation of specific visual functions to specific callosal tracts, either occipital or extraoccipital.

  20. Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Congenital Toxoplasmosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Kyo; Joo, Byung-Euk; Seo, Ji-hye; Mun, Jun Kyu; Kim, Juhyeon; Seo, Dae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a rare disease caused by intracellular protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Though most patients with toxoplasmosis are asymptomatic, congenital toxoplasmosis in the fetus can cause ocular involvement such as chorioretinitis and central nervous system disease including intracerebral calcification, nystagmus, hydrocephalus and microcephaly. Also, these brain lesions can cause seizure secondarily. Our patient was diagnosed with congenital toxoplasmosis, based on toxoplasma-specific serologic test with typical clinical symptoms, including chorioretinitis, nystagmus, hydrocephalus and cerebral palsy. Her brain imaging findings revealed not only the multifocal encephalomalacia, but also multifocal cerebral calcification including intracerebral calcification in left perihippocampal region. Her epileptogenic zone was defined as mesial temporal lobe including hippocampus on left side by seizure semiology, electroencephalogram and neuroimaging including single photon emission computed tomography and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography. Her seizures were refractory to multiple anti-epileptic drugs. We report a patient with congenital toxoplasmosis who showed intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:26157672

  1. Terrestrial ice streams-a view from the lobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    The glacial landforms of Minnesota are interpreted as the products of the lobate extensions of ice streams that issued from various ice sheds within the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Low-relief till plains, trough-shaped lowlands, boulder pavements, and streamlined forms make up the subglacial landsystem in Minnesota that is interpreted as having been formed by streaming ice. Extremely uniform tills are created subglacially in a way that remains somewhat mysterious. At the ice margins, thrust moraines and hummocky stagnation topography are more common than single-crested, simple moraines if the ice lobes had repeated advances. Subglacial drainage features are obscure up-ice but are present down-ice in the form of tunnel valleys, eskers, Spooner hills, and associated ice-marginal fans. Ice streaming may occur when basal shear stress is lowered as a result of high subglacial water pressure. Subglacial conditions that allow the retention of water will allow an ice lobe to extend far beyond the ice sheet as long as the ice shed also supports the advance by supplying adequate ice. Even with adequate ice flux, however, the advance of an ice lobe may be terminated, at least temporarily, if the subglacial water is drained, through tunnel valleys or perhaps a permeable substrate. Thrust moraines, and ice stagnation topography will result from sudden drainage. Although climate change is ultimately responsible for the accumulation of ice in the Laurentide Ice Sheet, the asynchronous advances and retreats of the ice lobes in the mid-continent are strongly overprinted by the internal dynamics of individual ice streams as well as the interaction of ice sheds, which obscure the climate signal. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The lateralising significance of hypergraphia in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, JKA; Robertson, MM; Trimble, MR

    1982-01-01

    Six patients with hypergraphia and epilepsy are presented and their clinical features compared with other patients reported in the literature. It is suggested that hypergraphia occurs more frequently in patients with right-sided non-dominant temporal lobe lesions, in contrast for example to the schizophreniform presentation of left-sided lesions. Other features of psychopathology possibly associated with non-dominant lesions, including elation, hypereligiosity and déjà vu experiences, are also discussed. PMID:7069424

  3. Temporal lobe deficits in murderers: EEG findings undetected by PET.

    PubMed

    Gatzke-Kopp, L M; Raine, A; Buchsbaum, M; LaCasse, L

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluates electroencephalography (EEG) and positron emission tomography (PET) in the same subjects. Fourteen murderers were assessed by using both PET (while they were performing the continuous performance task) and EEG during a resting state. EEG revealed significant increases in slow-wave activity in the temporal, but not frontal, lobe in murderers, in contrast to prior PET findings that showed reduced prefrontal, but not temporal, glucose metabolism. Results suggest that resting EEG shows empirical utility distinct from PET activation findings.

  4. A rare neoplastic growth on the ear lobe.

    PubMed

    Rovere, R K; Hilgert, S F; da Costa, P Camara; de Lima, A S

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of an 83-year-old previously healthy female patient presenting with a swiftly evolving erythematous violaceous, infiltrative, ulcerated onion like mass with hyperkeratotic surface on the left ear lobe. The lesion was excised and resulted as an atypical fibroxanthoma, an extremely rare neoplastic growth, being a superficial variant of pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma. A brief review of dia-gnosis, treatment and prognosis is discussed. PMID:25312715

  5. STIS optical spectroscopy of the lobes of CRL 618

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, A.; Raga, A. C.; Velázquez, P. F.; Haro-Corzo, S. A. R.; Kajdic, P.

    2011-09-01

    Context. Many proto-planetary nebulae show collimated structures sometimes showing multiple outflows. Aims: We present the results of new optical spectroscopic observations (both medium (with a dispersion of 0.56 Å pixel-1) and low (2.73 and 4.92 Å pixel-1 for the G430L and G750L gratings) spectral resolution) of the lobes of the proto-planetary nebula CRL 618 obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board of the Hubble Space Telescope. Methods: We analyse the density structure and the excitation conditions of the lobes of CRL 618. The spectra obtained at medium spectral resolution (~50 km s-1) allow us to quote the fraction of unscattered (intrinsic) Hα emission. We have also obtained de-reddened emission line ratios of several features from the low spectral resolution spectra. Results: We find that most of the analysed line ratios are reproduced by planar shocks moving through a dense medium (with pre-shock densities ~104 cm-3) with shock velocities from 30 to 40 km s-1 (except the [O III]/Hβ line ratios which require shock velocities of 80 to 90 km s-1). We find that the [S II]-weighted ionization fraction ranges from 0.015 to 0.06. The total densities derived from the electron density and the ionization fraction are ~105 to 106 cm-3. Conclusions: We conclude that the spectra of the lobes of CRL 618 can be margially reproduced by steady plane-parallel shock models for shock velocities which are significantly lower than the velocities at which the jet moves outwards (~200 km s-1). These results are consistent with the predictions of a jet with a variable ejection velocity. The mirror-symmetry, the luminosity asymmetry between both lobes and the ejection velocity variability suggest that its central source may host a binary system.

  6. Deficit of theory of mind after temporal lobe cerebral infarction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have indicated that the temporal lobe is involved in theory of mind (ToM). However, little attention has been paid to ToM in patients with cerebral infarction. In this study, we investigated the ability of ToM in patients with temporal lobe cerebral infarction (TLCI) using a variety of tests. Methods In the study, 19 patients with TLCI and 20 healthy controls (HC) were examined using the Recognition of faux pas and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RME) tasks, to assess their ability of ToM. Results The results of the study indicated that the TLCI group performed significantly worse compared with the HC group as revealed in the total faux pas-related score and in emotion recognition (Mind Reading). Conclusions Our results implied that patients with TLCI had difficulty in ToM. Our data provided new evidence that the temporal lobe may be involved in processing ToM inferences. PMID:23607361

  7. [A case of occipital lobe epilepsy following cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Iijima, M; Shibata, K; Murakami, H; Sasaki, S; Maruyama, S

    1994-09-01

    We report a rare case of occipital lobe epilepsy following cerebral infarction in bilateral occipital lobes. The patient is a seventeen-year-old female, who had cerebral infarction in bilateral occipital regions a few days after an open-heart surgery at 15 years of age. Thereafter she sometimes complained of visual field defects and ictal amaurosis. Seventeen months later, she developed a tonic seizure with ictal amaurosis, visual field defects and head deviation. On admission, results of the neurological examinations were all normal with the exception of peripheral visual field defects. Scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) findings showed paroxysmal discharges that were more prominent in the frontal to parietal leads than in the occipital leads. Sometimes the laterality of paroxysmal discharges changed. Her visual defects were diagnosed as psychogenic activity by the ophthalmological visual fields test. Simultaneous recordings of pattern reversal visual evoked potential (VEP) and electroretinograms (ERG) showed normal in 15 minute checks, but prolongation of bilateral P100 latency in 30 minute checks. These findings suggested that peripheral visual fields were disturbed. In this case, EEG findings and the initial symptoms of amaurosis and visual fields defect suggested occipital epilepsy following cerebral infarction in bilateral occipital lobes. We wish to emphasize that simultaneous VEP and ERG recording is a useful diagnostic tool for estimating visual functions.

  8. Executive function and fluid intelligence after frontal lobe lesions.

    PubMed

    Roca, María; Parr, Alice; Thompson, Russell; Woolgar, Alexandra; Torralva, Teresa; Antoun, Nagui; Manes, Facundo; Duncan, John

    2010-01-01

    Many tests of specific 'executive functions' show deficits after frontal lobe lesions. These deficits appear on a background of reduced fluid intelligence, best measured with tests of novel problem solving. For a range of specific executive tests, we ask how far frontal deficits can be explained by a general fluid intelligence loss. For some widely used tests, e.g. Wisconsin Card Sorting, we find that fluid intelligence entirely explains frontal deficits. When patients and controls are matched on fluid intelligence, no further frontal deficit remains. For these tasks too, deficits are unrelated to lesion location within the frontal lobe. A second group of tasks, including tests of both cognitive (e.g. Hotel, Proverbs) and social (Faux Pas) function, shows a different pattern. Deficits are not fully explained by fluid intelligence and the data suggest association with lesions in the right anterior frontal cortex. Understanding of frontal lobe deficits may be clarified by separating reduced fluid intelligence, important in most or all tasks, from other more specific impairments and their associated regions of damage.

  9. Phosphatized polar lobe-forming embryos from the Precambrian of southwest China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Yuan; Bottjer, David J; Davidson, Eric H; Dornbos, Stephen Q; Gao, Xiang; Yang, Yong-Hua; Li, Chia-Wei; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiu-Qiang; Xian, Ding-Chang; Wu, Hung-Jen; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Tafforeau, Paul

    2006-06-16

    In developing embryos of some extant spiralian animals, polar lobe formation is one of the symmetry-breaking mechanisms for segregation of maternal cytoplasmic substances to certain blastomeres and not others. Polar lobe formation leads to unique early cleavage morphologies that include trilobed, J-shaped, and five-lobed structures. Fossil embryos similar to modern lobeforming embryos are recognized from the Precambrian Doushantuo Formation phosphates, Weng'an, Guizhou Province, China. These embryos are abundant and form a developmental sequence comparable to different developing stages observed in lobe-forming embryos of extant spiralians. These data imply that lobe formation is an evolutionarily ancient process of embryonic specification.

  10. Non-diffracting super-airy beam with intensified main lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Remez, Roei; Tsur, Yuval; Arie, Ady

    2016-04-01

    We study, theoretically and experimentally, the concept of non-diffracting super-Airy beam, where the main lobe of the beam is observed to be nearly half in size and with increased intensity compared to the main lobe of the Airy beam. However, reducing the main lobe size does not affect the transverse acceleration and non-spreading features of the beam. Furthermore, we observed that during propagation, super Airy main lobe shows faster self-reconstruction after an obstruction than the Airy main lobe. Therefore, we envision that specifically, a beam with a smaller lobe size and higher intensity can out-perform the Airy beam for applications such as nonlinear optics, curved plasma generation, laser micromachining, and micro- particle manipulation, while the faster reconstruction property of the super-Airy main lobe can surpass the Airy beam in applications of scattering and turbulent media.

  11. White Matter Tracts Connected to the Medial Temporal Lobe Support the Development of Mnemonic Control

    PubMed Central

    Wendelken, Carter; Lee, Joshua K.; Pospisil, Jacqueline; Sastre, Marcos; Ross, Julia M.; Bunge, Silvia A.; Ghetti, Simona

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important factors driving the development of memory during childhood is mnemonic control, or the capacity to initiate and maintain the processes that guide encoding and retrieval operations. The ability to selectively attend to and encode relevant stimuli is a particularly useful form of mnemonic control, and is one that undergoes marked improvement over childhood. We hypothesized that structural integrity of white matter tracts, in particular those connecting medial temporal lobe memory regions to other cortical areas, and/or those connecting frontal and parietal control regions, should contribute to successful mnemonic control. To test this hypothesis, we examined the relationship between structural integrity of selected white matter tracts and an experimental measure of mnemonic control, involving enhancement of memory by attention at encoding, in 116 children aged 7–11 and 25 young adults. We observed a positive relationship between integrity of uncinate fasciculus and mnemonic enhancement across age groups. In adults, but not in children, we also observed an association between mnemonic enhancement and integrity of ventral cingulum bundle and ventral fornix/fimbria. Integrity of fronto-parietal tracts, including dorsal cingulum and superior longitudinal fasciculus, was unrelated to mnemonic enhancement. PMID:24675870

  12. Intrinsic controls on the range of volumes, morphologies, and dimensions of submarine lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prélat, A.; Covault, J. A.; Hodgson, D. M.; Fildani, A.; Flint, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    Submarine lobe dimensions from six different systems are compared: 1) the exhumed Permian Fan 3 lobe complex of the Tanqua Karoo, South Africa; 2) the modern Amazon fan channel-mouth lobe complex, offshore Brazil; 3) a portion of the modern distal Zaïre fan, offshore Angola/Congo; 4) a Pleistocene fan of the Kutai basin, subsurface offshore Indonesia; 5) the modern Golo system, offshore east Corsica, France; and 6) a shallow subsurface lobe complex , offshore Nigeria. These six systems have significantly different source-to-sink configurations (shelf dimension and slope topography), sediment supply characteristics (available grain size range and supply rate), tectonic settings, (palaeo) latitude, and delivery systems. Despite these differences, lobe deposits share similar geometric and dimensional characteristics. Lobes are grouped into two distinct populations of geometries that can be related to basin floor topography. The first population corresponds to areally extensive but thin lobes (average width 14 km × length 35 km × thickness 12 m) that were deposited onto low relief basin floor areas. Examples of such systems include the Tanqua Karoo, the Amazon, and the Zaïre systems. The second population corresponds to areally smaller but thicker lobes (average width 5 km × length 8 km × thickness 30 m) that were deposited into settings with higher amplitude of relief, like in the Corsican trough, the Kutai basin, and offshore Nigeria. The two populations of lobe types, however, share similar volumes (a narrow range around 1 or 2 km 3), which suggests that there is a control to the total volume of sediment that individual lobes can reach before they shift to a new locus of deposition. This indicates that the extrinsic processes control the number of lobes deposited per unit time rather than their dimensions. Two alternative hypotheses are presented to explain the similarities in lobe volumes calculated from the six very different systems. The first states that

  13. Decreased frontal lobe phosphocreatine levels in methamphetamine users

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Young-Hoon; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.; Shi, Xian-Feng; Kondo, Douglas G.; Lundberg, Kelly J.; McGlade, Erin C.; Hellem, Tracy L.; Huber, Rebekah S.; Fiedler, Kristen K.; Harrell, Renee E.; Nickerson, Bethany R.; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mitochondria-related mechanisms have been suggested to mediate methamphetamine (METH) toxicity. However, changes in brain energetics associated with highenergy phosphate metabolism have not been investigated in METH users. Phosphorus-31 (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate changes in mitochondrial high energy phosphates, including phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-nucleoside triphosphate (β-NTP, primarily ATP in brain) levels. We hypothesized that METH users would have decreased high-energy PCr levels in the frontal gray matter. METHODS Study participants consisted of 51 METH (age=32.8±6.7) and 23 healthy comparison (age=31.1±7.5) subjects. High-energy phosphate metabolite levels were compared between the groups and potential gender differences were explored. RESULTS METH users had lower ratios of PCr to total pool of exchangeable phosphate (PCr/TPP) in the frontal lobe as compared to the healthy subjects (p=0.001). The lower PCr levels in METH subjects were significantly associated with lifetime amount of METH use (p=0.003). A sub-analysis for gender differences revealed that female METH users, who had lower daily amounts (1.1±1.0 gram) of METH use than males (1.4±1.7 gram), had significantly lower PCr/TPP ratios than male METH users, controlling for the amount of METH use (p=0.02). CONCLUSIONS The present findings suggest that METH compromises frontal lobe high-energy phosphate metabolism in a dose-responsive manner. Our findings also suggest that the abnormality in frontal lobe high-energy phosphate metabolism might be more prominent in female than in male METH users. This is significant as decreased PCr levels have been associated with depressive symptoms, and poor responses to antidepressant treatment have been reported in those with decreased PCr levels. PMID:23084413

  14. Detailed analysis of methane hydrate concentrated zone of lobe type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Saeki, T.; Inamori, T.; Fujii, T.; Shimoda, N.

    2007-12-01

    Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (hereinafter called JOGMEC), as a member of MH21 Research Consortium, takes charge of a study of the Research for Resources Assessment, and is pursuing a possibility that methane hydrate, which is presumed to be distributed around ocean area of Japan, will be energy resources. JOGMEC is currently conducting analysis of seismic data which was acquired by 3D seismic survey conducted from Tokai-Oki to Kumano-nada in the eastern Nankai Trough by METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) in 2002 under the national program of assessment for methane hydrates as energy resources. It was understood that methane hydrate was correlated to high resistivity and high velocity based on the results of drilling surveys and velocity analysis, and that methane hydrate concentrated zones can be roughly classified into the channels and lobes in seismic geomorphology because they were characterized with reserves consisting turbidite sand bodies. In this study, the detailed analysis of the inner structure of the methane hydrate concentrated zone of lobe type was conducted to understand the occurrence configurations of methane hydrates. The reflected waves that construct the methane hydrate concentrated zones in the seismic data were extracted and those reflected waves were classified into some groups every one reflector. As the result, some reflectors that construct the methane hydrate concentrated zones were revealed. Those reflectors show the layers including methane hydrates, and the detailed distribution of the methane hydrates in those layers was revealed by the intensity distribution of the amplitude. This time, we introduce the example of the detailed analysis of the methane hydrate concentrated zone in the lobe of submarine fan.

  15. Distinct frontal lobe morphology in girls and boys with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Dirlikov, Benjamin; Shiels Rosch, Keri; Crocetti, Deana; Denckla, Martha B.; Mahone, E. Mark; Mostofsky, Stewart H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether frontal lobe cortical morphology differs for boys and girls with ADHD (ages 8–12 years) in comparison to typically developing (TD) peers. Method Participants included 226 children between the ages of 8–12 including 93 children with ADHD (29 girls) and 133 TD children (42 girls) for which 3T MPRAGE MRI scans were obtained. A fully automated frontal lobe atlas was used to generate functionally distinct frontal subdivisions, with surface area (SA) and cortical thickness (CT) assessed in each region. Analyses focused on overall diagnostic differences as well as examinations of the effect of diagnosis within boys and girls. Results Girls, but not boys, with ADHD showed overall reductions in total prefrontal cortex (PFC) SA. Localization revealed that girls showed widely distributed reductions in the bilateral dorsolateral PFC, left inferior lateral PFC, right medial PFC, right orbitofrontal cortex, and left anterior cingulate; and boys showed reduced SA only in the right anterior cingulate and left medial PFC. In contrast, boys, but not girls, with ADHD showed overall reductions in total premotor cortex (PMC) SA. Further localization revealed that in boys, premotor reductions were observed in bilateral lateral PMC regions; and in girls reductions were observed in bilateral supplementary motor complex. In line with diagnostic group differences, PMC and PFC SAs were inversely correlated with symptom severity in both girls and boys with ADHD. Conclusions These results elucidate sex-based differences in cortical morphology of functional subdivisions of the frontal lobe and provide additional evidence of associations among SA and symptom severity in children with ADHD. PMID:25610784

  16. Abnormal activation of the occipital lobes during emotion picture processing in major depressive disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianying; Xu, Cheng; Cao, Xiaohua; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yanfang; Peng, Juyi; Zhang, Kerang

    2013-06-25

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that depression patients have cognitive dysfunction. With recently developed brain functional imaging, studies have focused on changes in brain function to investigate cognitive changes. However, there is still controversy regarding abnormalities in brain functions or correlation between cognitive impairment and brain function changes. Thus, it is important to design an emotion-related task for research into brain function changes. We selected positive, neutral, and negative pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Patients with major depressive disorder were asked to judge emotion pictures. In addition, functional MRI was performed to synchronously record behavior data and imaging data. Results showed that the total correct rate for recognizing pictures was lower in patients compared with normal controls. Moreover, the consistency for recognizing pictures for depressed patients was worse than normal controls, and they frequently recognized positive pictures as negative pictures. The consistency for recognizing pictures was negatively correlated with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Functional MRI suggested that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, limbic lobe, and cerebellum was enhanced, but that the activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, parietal lobe and occipital lobe was weakened while the patients were watching positive and neutral pictures compared with normal controls. The activation of some areas in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, parietal lobe, and limbic lobe was enhanced, but the activation of some areas in the occipital lobe were weakened while the patients were watching the negative pictures compared with normal controls. These findings indicate that patients with major depressive disorder have negative cognitive disorder and extensive brain dysfunction. Thus, reduced activation of the occipital lobe may be an initiating factor for

  17. Severe amnesia following a unilateral temporal lobe stroke.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Raji P

    2003-01-01

    A 60 year old right-handed man developed severe amnesia following a left medial temporal stroke as documented by cerebral MRI, MRA and SPECT scans. Neuropsychological evaluation 13 weeks after the stroke showed a profound retrograde amnesia characterised by memory loss for public facts and events over the previous four decades. In addition, autobiographical memory showed selective loss of personal episodic memory with relative preservation of personal semantic memory. The development of this degree of amnesia with these features following a unilateral temporal lobe lesion is unusual. The possible neuroanatomical mechanisms underlying the amnesia and how they relate to current theories of memory loss are discussed. PMID:12464535

  18. Ear lobe crease: a marker of coronary artery disease?

    PubMed Central

    Agouridis, Aris P.; Elisaf, Moses S.; Nair, Devaki R.

    2015-01-01

    The ear lobe crease (ELC) has been defined as a deep wrinkle that extends backwards from the tragus to the auricle. It has been proposed that ELC is a predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this review, we consider the possible association between ELC and CAD. Our aim is to systematically address all the relevant evidence in this field. There are many studies that support an association between ELC and CAD. However, other studies did not find such an association. A recent meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that ELC could be a marker of CAD. However, several limitations raise doubts as to whether we should accept this link. PMID:26788075

  19. Cardiac Asystole Triggered by Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Amygdala Enlargement.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Junko; Nagai, Tomoo; Takasaki, Hiroshi; Sugano, Hidenori; Hamabe, Akira; Tahara, Mai; Mori, Hitoshi; Takase, Yoshiyuki; Gatate, Youdou; Togashi, Naohiko; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Ishigami, Norio; Tabata, Hirotsugu; Fukushima, Kouji; Katsushika, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    A 25-year-old previously healthy man was hospitalized for syncope. While standing, he suddenly lost consciousness, followed by a generalized tonic clonic seizure. An electrocardiogram demonstrated asystole. No cardiac abnormalities were detected on the echocardiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography, or a coronary angiogram. An electrophysiological study showed normal sinus node and atrioventricular node function. An electroencephalogram revealed small spike waves in the fronto-temporal region. Brain MRI demonstrated a left-sided amygdala enlargement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of temporal lobe epilepsy with an amygdala enlargement that induced cardiac asystole. PMID:27250053

  20. Anton's Syndrome due to Bilateral Ischemic Occipital Lobe Strokes.

    PubMed

    Zukić, Sanela; Sinanović, Osman; Zonić, Lejla; Hodžić, Renata; Mujagić, Svjetlana; Smajlović, Edina

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with Anton's syndrome (i.e., visual anosognosia with confabulations), who developed bilateral occipital lobe infarct. Bilateral occipital brain damage results in blindness, and patients start to confabulate to fill in the missing sensory input. In addition, the patient occasionally becomes agitated and talks to himself, which indicates that, besides Anton's syndrome, he might have had Charles Bonnet syndrome, characterized by both visual loss and hallucinations. Anton syndrome, is not so frequent condition and is most commonly caused by ischemic stroke. In this particular case, the patient had successive bilateral occipital ischemia as a result of massive stenoses of head and neck arteries.

  1. Are the dimensions of submarine lobe systems independent of allogenic factors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prélat, A.; Covault, J. A.; Hodgson, D. M.; Fildani, A.; Flint, S. S.

    2010-05-01

    Submarine lobe dimensions from six different systems are compared: 1) the exhumed Permian Fan 3 lobe complex of the Tanqua Karoo, South Africa; 2) the modern Amazon fan channel-mouth lobe complex, offshore Brazil; 3) a portion of the modern distal Zaïre fan, offshore Angola / Congo; 4) a Pleistocene fan of the Kutai Basin, subsurface offshore Indonesia; 5) the modern Golo system, offshore east Corsica, France; and 6) a lobe complex deposited in the shallow subsurface, offshore Nigeria. These six systems have significantly different source-to-sink configurations (shelf dimension and slope topography), sediment supply characteristics (calibre and rate), tectonic settings, (palaeo) latitude, and delivery systems. Despite these differences, the lobe deposits share similar geometric and dimensional characteristics. Lobes are grouped into two distinct populations of geometries that can be related to basin-floor topography. The first population corresponds to areally extensive but thin lobes (average width 14 km × length 35 km × thickness 12 m) that were deposited onto low relief basin floor areas, like the Tanqua Karoo, the Amazon and the Zaïre systems. The second population corresponds to areally smaller but thicker lobes (average width 5 km × length 8 km × thickness 30 m) that were deposited into settings with higher amplitude of relief, like in the Corsican trough, the Kutai basin, and offshore Nigeria. Basin floor topography confining the lobes can be very subtle, and only occur on one side of the system. The two populations of lobe types, however, share similar volumes, in the order of 1 or 2 km3. The largest lobes are observed in the Zaïre fan, where the average lobe volume reaches 3.3 km3 and the smallest lobes are observed in the Corsican trough where the average lobe volume is 0.4 km3. This variation in lobe volume is minor when compared to the variation observed in present-day up-dip drainage systems, which provide sediment to the deep-water depositional

  2. Right hippocampal pathology inhibits the Flynn effect in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Sallie; Smith, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    If brain pathology impedes the mechanisms that drive the Flynn effect, the gap between the mean IQ of patient groups and the general population will increase over successive generations. We examined the IQs of a large series of patients aged between 18 and 35 years, with homogenous underlying brain pathology tested over two decades, for evidence of a Flynn effect; 381 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and unilateral hippocampal sclerosis (n = 221 left hippocampal sclerosis, LHS; n = 160 right hippocampal sclerosis, RHS) completed the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales. Patients assessed between 1990 and 2000 were assessed on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R; n = 234). Patients assessed between 2001 and 2011 were assessed on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III; n = 147). The IQ scores were adjusted for the progressive obsolescence of norms using the following equation: adjusted IQ = recorded IQ - (estimated magnitude of Flynn effect in the normal population x years since test was normed, at the time of assessment). In the RHS group there was a significant negative correlation between the year of assessment and the adjusted Verbal IQ (r = -.18, p < .05) and adjusted Performance IQ (r = -.20, p < .01). There were no significant correlations between the adjusted IQ scores and the year of assessment in the LHS group. Our data suggest that the gap between the mean IQ in the general population and that in patients with right hippocampal pathology is widening in successive generations. The findings are discussed in relation to the current theories regarding the mechanisms that drive the Flynn effect. PMID:22897234

  3. Octopamine regulates antennal sensory neurons via daytime-dependent changes in cAMP and IP3 levels in the hawkmoth Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Thomas; Schirmer, Katja; Stolte, Paul; Stengl, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The biogenic amine octopamine (OA) mediates reward signals in olfactory learning and memory as well as circadian rhythms of sleep and activity. In the crepuscular hawkmoth Manduca sexta, OA changed pheromone detection thresholds daytime-dependently, suggesting that OA confers circadian control of olfactory transduction. Thus, with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays we searched hawkmoth antennae for daytime-dependent changes in the concentration of OA and its respective second messengers. Antennal stimulation with OA raised cAMP- and IP3 levels. Furthermore, antennae expressed daytime-dependent changes in the concentration of OA, with maxima at Zeitgebertime (ZT) 20 when moths were active and also maximal concentrations of cAMP occurred. Maximal IP3 levels at ZT 18 and 23 correlated with maximal flight activity of male moths, while minimal IP3 levels at dusk correlated with peaks of feeding activity. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) for activation of the OA-receptor decreased during the moth's activity phase suggesting daytime-dependent changes in OA receptor sensitivity. With an antiserum against tyramine, the precursor of OA, two centrifugal neurons were detected projecting out into the sensory cell layer of the antenna, possibly mediating more rapid stimulus-dependent OA actions. Indeed, in fast kinetic assays OA receptor stimulation increased cAMP concentrations within 50 msec. Thus, we hypothesize that fast, stimulus-dependent centrifugal control of OA-release in the antenna occurs. Additional slow systemic OA actions might be based upon circadian release of OA into the hemolymph mediating circadian rhythms of antennal second messenger levels. The resulting rhythms of odor sensitivity are suggested to underlie circadian rhythms in odor-mediated behavior. PMID:25785721

  4. Morphological characterization of the antennal sensilla of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), with reference to their probable functions.

    PubMed

    Onagbola, Ebenezer O; Meyer, Wendy L; Boina, Dhana Raj; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2008-12-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), is one of the most significant economic pests of citrus worldwide. This insect vectors three phloem-restricted bacteria in the genus Candidatus Liberibacter that cause huanglongbing (citrus greening), the most severe disease limiting citrus production worldwide. We examined the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of male and female D. citri using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and determined the putative functions of the identified sensilla using transmission electron microscopic (TEM) techniques. The filiform antennae of D. citri were of the conventional type comprised of a basal scape, pedicel and a long, thread-like flagellum, which is composed of eight flagellomeres. Eleven morphologically unique sensillar types were found and described on the antennae of male and female D. citri. Of those identified, the two apical setae, multiporous types I and II sensilla trichoidea, and the antennal rhinaria were porous and may be involved in perception of host- and mate-related volatile chemicals. However, the aporous types I, II and III sensilla trichoidea may have mechanosensory functions and the chaetica sensilla, cavity sensilla and unidentified uniporous sensilla may be involved in proprioception, thermo-hygroreception and cold detection, respectively. The shape, external morphology and array of sensilla on the antennae of male and female D. citri were similar. The only major difference observed was in the morphology of the short apical setae, whose tips were recessed inward in females but not so in males. The results are discussed in relation to plausible roles of the identified sensilla in mate and host location by this species.

  5. Structure and Function of the Superior Temporal Plane in Adult Males with Cleft Lip and Palate: Pathologic Enlargement with No Relationship to Childhood Hearing Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriver, A. S.; Canady, J.; Richman, L.; Andreasen, N. C.; Nopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In a previous study from our lab, adult males with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCLP) were shown to have significantly lower temporal lobe gray matter volume than matched controls. The current study was designed to begin a regional analysis of specific subregions of the temporal lobe. The superior temporal plane (STP) is a…

  6. Adult Books for Young Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    1997-01-01

    Considers the differences between young adult and adult books and maintains that teachers must be familiar with young adults' tastes for both. Suggests that traffic between these publishing divisions is a two-way street, with young adults reading adult books and adults reading young adult books. (TB)

  7. Novel assessment of global metabolism by 18F-FDG-PET for localizing affected lobe in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Peter, Jonah; Houshmand, Sina; Werner, Thomas J; Rubello, Domenico; Alavi, Abass

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel method of global quantitative analysis for use in the diagnosis and treatment evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We studied 16 patients diagnosed with TLE who underwent fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (F-FDG-PET) and MRI at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. To quantify temporal lobe hypometabolism, we averaged the mean standardized uptake value across regions of interest (ROIs) encompassing each lobe in its entirety and calculated the metabolic ratios and lateralization indices for each patient on the basis of global measurements. For comparison, we carried out a traditional 'punch biopsy' ROI analysis by averaging the mean standardized uptake value within 1 cm diameter ROIs across select slices. Both techniques were performed twice by the same rater to test intraobserver variability. An expert observer carried out visual analyses of both F-FDG-PET and MRI for reference. The global quantitative analysis identified a seizure focus lateralization in agreement with clinical evaluations for 91% of patients on both trials, with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 and 0.92 for metabolic ratios and lateralization indices, respectively. The punch biopsy analysis was in agreement for 91 and 82% of patients on respective trials, with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.90 and 0.75. Expert visual analyses carried out on F-FDG-PET and MRI were in agreement for 64 and 9% of patients, respectively. The global quantitative analysis proved to be the most accurate and reliable of the methods tested. This technique has the potential to improve metabolic analysis in TLE and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27092666

  8. [Circulatory disturbance of middle lobe by bending of lobar pedicle after right upper lobectomy].

    PubMed

    Yurugi, Yohei; Maeta, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Takashi; Hosoya, Keiko; Matsumura, Azumi; Nishimura, Kengo; Miyasaka, Shigeto; Morimoto, Keisuke

    2013-11-01

    A 66-year-old man was diagnosed as lung cancer. We performed right upper lobectomy and lymphnode dissection. On the 1st postoperative day, a chest radiograph showed an opacification in the right upper lung field. Computed tomography (CT) showed a stenosis of the middle lobe bronchus and infiltrative shadow of the middle lobe on the 3rd postoperative day. Fiber optic bronchoscopic examination also revealed a bend and stenosis of the middle lobe bronchus, but tortion was not demonstrated. On the 6th postoperative day, chest radiographic findings was worsened. Torsion of the middle lobe was suspected, and rethoracotomy was performed on the 7th postoperative day. The right middle lobe was not rotated, but the lobar pedicle bend toward cranial. The middle lobe was highly congested necessitating lobectomy. PMID:24322317

  9. [Affective disorders and dementia of the frontal lobe type. Hypothesis of a pathogenic relationship].

    PubMed

    Luauté, J P; Favel, P; Rémy, C; Sanabria, E; Bidault, E

    1994-01-01

    The evolution of some dysthymic states towards dementia is now rarely considered whereas it was well known at the beginning of the century. In French the final stage of this evolution was known as "démence vésanique". In recent years it has been noted that a proportion of patients with presenile dementia do not have Alzheimer's disease (AD) but a particular type of cognitive impairment., called dementia of the frontal lobe type (DFT), characterised by clinical and neuropsychological signs of frontal lobe disorder as well as an anterior defect of cerebral perfusion or metabolism. The onset of DFT is insiduous and marked by personality changes and inappropriate affect. It has not yet been reported as starting with true dysthymic disorders. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Ten right handed patients (F/M = 9/1) became dysthymic in their fifties (m = 49.8 + 7.6 yr). All initially met the DSM III-R criteria for mood disorders. They were all treated with the standard drugs or ECT. Although initially responsive all the patients relapsed and their dysthymic disorders became less typical in presentation. At a mean age of 63.6 +/- 2.9 yrs a particular type of dementia became evident. None of the patients had a previous history of mood disorder or a family history of dementia. The demented patients received thorough clinical examinations and 8/10 were tested with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). All had XCT and HMPAO-SPECT scans using a rotating gamma camera. Three patients had a MRI Scan. RESULTS. The main symptoms were apathy and a lack of spontaneity as a result of which the patients were no longer able to live alone. HMPAO-SPECT: All the patients had clear hypoperfusion of the frontal and temporal lobes with seven showing a left predominance. XCT: A moderate degree of cortical atrophy, more pronounced in the frontal lobes, was observed in 6 patients. In 3 of them a previous XCT scan had been normal. MRI: Subcortical white matter hyperintensities were seen in the 3

  10. Cryptococcosis, silicosis, and tuberculous pseudotumor in the same pulmonary lobe*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geruza Alves; Brandão, Daniel Ferracioli; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; de Sá, João Batista Carlos; Baddini-Martinez, José

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis and cryptococcosis are infectious diseases that can result in the formation of single or multiple nodules in immunocompetent patients. Exposure to silica is known to raise the risk of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report the case of an elderly man with no history of opportunistic infections and no clinical evidence of immunodeficiency but with a six-month history of dry cough and nocturnal wheezing. A chest X-ray revealed a mass measuring 5.0 × 3.5 cm in the right upper lobe. The diagnostic approach of the mass revealed tuberculosis. The histopathological analysis of the surrounding parenchyma reveled silicosis and cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis was also found in masses identified in the mediastinal lymph nodes. The surgical approach was indicated because of the degree of pleuropulmonary involvement, the inconclusive results obtained with the invasive and noninvasive methods applied, and the possibility of malignancy. This case illustrates the difficulty inherent to the assessment of infectious or inflammatory pulmonary pseudotumors, the differential diagnosis of which occasionally requires a radical surgical approach. Despite the presence of respiratory symptoms for six months, the first chest X-ray was performed only at the end of that period. We discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms that might have led to the combination of three types of granulomatous lesions in the same lobe, and we emphasize the need for greater awareness of atypical presentations of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24310636

  11. Childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting as a middle lobe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is infrequently documented in children with asthma. Although collapse is not uncommon, middle lobe syndrome (MLS) as a presentation of ABPA is rather a rarity. A 9-year-old female child with asthma presented with increase in intensity of symptoms along with a right midzone patchy consolidation on a chest radiograph. In addition, an ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border with loss of cardiac silhouette was noted. A right lateral view confirmed a MLS, which was further corroborated by high resolution computed tomography. Central bronchiectasis was also observed, which prompted a work-up for ABPA. The child met 7/8 major diagnostic criteria for ABPA. She was then initiated on oral prednisolone that resulted in a marked clinical improvement within a fortnight. Radiological clearance occurred at 3 months with inflation of the middle lobe. ABPA presenting with MLS in a child is yet to be reported. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis of ABPA in a child presenting with MLS. This would obviate the invasive investigations usually done to ascertain the cause of MLS.

  12. Lobe dynamics and homoclinic tangles in atmospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, S.; Ross, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, dynamical system theorists have been developing methods to study structures that govern the dynamics of atmospheric and oceanic flows. The primary concern for these flows are the finite time nature and the arbitrary time dependence in contrast to classical dynamical systems. Recent work on 2D quasi-horizontal approximations of atmospheric motion have demonstrated that there are aperiodic, finite-time analogs of homoclinic tangles and lobe dynamics, e.g., around hurricane boundaries. The tools used have been coherent structure boundaries based on ridges of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field calculated from integrated particle trajectories. There are some ambiguities in the FTLE-based approach which suggests other methods should be attempted. In this work, we apply methods based on Lagrangian descriptors (due to Mancho and co-workers) to locate distinguished hyperbolic trajectories (DHTs) and generate corresponding finite-time stable and unstable manifolds to study lobe dynamics, as applied to atmospheric flow as well as fluid experiments. We compare the Lagrangian descriptor approach with the FTLE-based approach.

  13. Childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting as a middle lobe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is infrequently documented in children with asthma. Although collapse is not uncommon, middle lobe syndrome (MLS) as a presentation of ABPA is rather a rarity. A 9-year-old female child with asthma presented with increase in intensity of symptoms along with a right midzone patchy consolidation on a chest radiograph. In addition, an ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border with loss of cardiac silhouette was noted. A right lateral view confirmed a MLS, which was further corroborated by high resolution computed tomography. Central bronchiectasis was also observed, which prompted a work-up for ABPA. The child met 7/8 major diagnostic criteria for ABPA. She was then initiated on oral prednisolone that resulted in a marked clinical improvement within a fortnight. Radiological clearance occurred at 3 months with inflation of the middle lobe. ABPA presenting with MLS in a child is yet to be reported. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis of ABPA in a child presenting with MLS. This would obviate the invasive investigations usually done to ascertain the cause of MLS. PMID:26844222

  14. Déjà Experiences in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Illman, Nathan A.; Butler, Chris R.; Souchay, Celine; Moulin, Chris J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, déjà vu has been linked to seizure activity in temporal lobe epilepsy, and clinical reports suggest that many patients experience the phenomenon as a manifestation of simple partial seizures. We review studies on déjà vu in epilepsy with reference to recent advances in the understanding of déjà vu from a cognitive and neuropsychological standpoint. We propose a decoupled familiarity hypothesis, whereby déjà vu is produced by an erroneous feeling of familiarity which is not in keeping with current cognitive processing. Our hypothesis converges on a parahippocampal dysfunction as the locus of déjà vu experiences. However, several other temporal lobe structures feature in reports of déjà vu in epilepsy. We suggest that some of the inconsistency in the literature derives from a poor classification of the various types of déjà experiences. We propose déjà vu/déjà vécu as one way of understanding déjà experiences more fully. This distinction is based on current models of memory function, where déjà vu is caused by erroneous familiarity and déjà vécu by erroneous recollection. Priorities for future research and clinical issues are discussed. PMID:22957231

  15. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes.

  16. Graded specialization within and between the anterior temporal lobes

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Grace E.; Hoffman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence from different methodologies has identified the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs) as key regions for the representation of semantic knowledge. Research interest is now shifting to investigate the roles of different ATL subregions in semantic representation, with particular emphasis on the functions of the left versus right ATLs. In this review, we provide evidence for graded specializations both between and within the ATLs. We argue (1) that multimodal, pan‐category semantic representations are supported jointly by both left and right ATLs, yet (2) that the ATLs are not homogeneous in their function. Instead, subtle functional gradations both between and within the ATLs emerge as a consequence of differential connectivity with primary sensory/motor/limbic regions. This graded specialization account of semantic representation provides a compromise between theories that posit no differences between the functions of the left and right ATLs and those that posit that the left and right ATLs are entirely segregated in function. Evidence for this graded account comes from converging sources, and its benefits have been exemplified in formal computational models. We propose that this graded principle is not only a defining feature of the ATLs but is also a more general neurocomputational principle found throughout the temporal lobes. PMID:26502375

  17. Temporal lobe regions engaged during normal speech comprehension.

    PubMed

    Crinion, Jennifer T; Lambon-Ralph, Matthew A; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Howard, David; Wise, Richard J S

    2003-05-01

    Processing of speech is obligatory. Thus, during normal speech comprehension, the listener is aware of the overall meaning of the speaker's utterance without the need to direct attention to individual linguistic and paralinguistic (intonational, prosodic, etc.) features contained within the speech signal. However, most functional neuroimaging studies of speech perception have used metalinguistic tasks that required the subjects to attend to specific features of the stimuli. Such tasks have demanded a forced-choice decision and a motor response from the subjects, which will engage frontal systems and may include unpredictable top-down modulation of the signals observed in one or more of the temporal lobe neural systems engaged during speech perception. This study contrasted the implicit comprehension of simple narrative speech with listening to reversed versions of the narratives: the latter are as acoustically complex as speech but are unintelligible in terms of both linguistic and paralinguistic information. The result demonstrated that normal comprehension, free of task demands that do not form part of everyday discourse, engages regions distributed between the two temporal lobes, more widely on the left. In particular, comprehension is dependent on anterolateral and ventral left temporal regions, as suggested by observations on patients with semantic dementia, as well as posterior regions described in studies on aphasic stroke patients. The only frontal contribution was confined to the ventrolateral left prefrontal cortex, compatible with observations that comprehension of simple speech is preserved in patients with left posterior frontal infarction. PMID:12690058

  18. Graded specialization within and between the anterior temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Rice, Grace E; Hoffman, Paul; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2015-11-01

    Considerable evidence from different methodologies has identified the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs) as key regions for the representation of semantic knowledge. Research interest is now shifting to investigate the roles of different ATL subregions in semantic representation, with particular emphasis on the functions of the left versus right ATLs. In this review, we provide evidence for graded specializations both between and within the ATLs. We argue (1) that multimodal, pan-category semantic representations are supported jointly by both left and right ATLs, yet (2) that the ATLs are not homogeneous in their function. Instead, subtle functional gradations both between and within the ATLs emerge as a consequence of differential connectivity with primary sensory/motor/limbic regions. This graded specialization account of semantic representation provides a compromise between theories that posit no differences between the functions of the left and right ATLs and those that posit that the left and right ATLs are entirely segregated in function. Evidence for this graded account comes from converging sources, and its benefits have been exemplified in formal computational models. We propose that this graded principle is not only a defining feature of the ATLs but is also a more general neurocomputational principle found throughout the temporal lobes. PMID:26502375

  19. Left inferior parietal lobe engagement in social cognition and language.

    PubMed

    Bzdok, Danilo; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Reid, Andrew; Laird, Angela R; Fox, Peter T; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2016-09-01

    Social cognition and language are two core features of the human species. Despite distributed recruitment of brain regions in each mental capacity, the left parietal lobe (LPL) represents a zone of topographical convergence. The present study quantitatively summarizes hundreds of neuroimaging studies on social cognition and language. Using connectivity-based parcellation on a meta-analytically defined volume of interest (VOI), regional coactivation patterns within this VOI allowed identifying distinct subregions. Across parcellation solutions, two clusters emerged consistently in rostro-ventral and caudo-ventral aspects of the parietal VOI. Both clusters were functionally significantly associated with social-cognitive and language processing. In particular, the rostro-ventral cluster was associated with lower-level processing facets, while the caudo-ventral cluster was associated with higher-level processing facets in both mental capacities. Contrarily, in the (less stable) dorsal parietal VOI, all clusters reflected computation of general-purpose processes, such as working memory and matching tasks, that are frequently co-recruited by social or language processes. Our results hence favour a rostro-caudal distinction of lower- versus higher-level processes underlying social cognition and language in the left inferior parietal lobe. PMID:27241201

  20. Confabulation and delusional denial: frontal lobe and lateralized influences.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R

    1986-05-01

    Various forms of confabulation, including denial of illness (e.g., paralysis, blindness), and conditions that often give rise to these disorders, such as cerebral disconnection, disinhibitory states, incomplete information reception, and "gap filling" are discussed. On the basis of clinical observation and a review of a number of studies, it appears that confabulatory states frequently are associated with cerebral damage that involves the right hemisphere, notably, the frontal (often bilaterally) and parietal lobes--areas intimately involved in arousal, attention, information regulation, and integration. With certain forms of injury, initially there appear disturbances in the organization, integration, and assimilation of ideas and associations, such that large gaps appear in the information transmitted to and received by the language axis of the left hemisphere. It is argued that in these instances, the language areas act so as to fill these "gaps" with information that, although inappropriate, is linked in some manner to the fragments received. In contrast, frontal lobe damage sometimes results in gross disinhibition and cortical overresponsiveness and, thus, speech release due to the flooding of the language axis (and other cortical regions) with tangential, fantastical, and grandiose associations. Other forms of confabulation also are reviewed briefly. PMID:3519686

  1. Bottom-up Visual Integration in the Medial Parietal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Nösberger, Myriam; Gutbrod, Klemens; Weber, Konrad P; Linnebank, Michael; Brugger, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Largely based on findings from functional neuroimaging studies, the medial parietal lobe is known to contribute to internally directed cognitive processes such as visual imagery or episodic memory. Here, we present 2 patients with behavioral impairments that extend this view. Both had chronic unilateral lesions of nearly the entire medial parietal lobe, but in opposite hemispheres. Routine neuropsychological examination conducted >4 years after the onset of brain damage showed little deficits of minor severity. In contrast, both patients reported persistent unusual visual impairment. A comprehensive series of tachistoscopic experiments with lateralized stimulus presentation and comparison with healthy participants revealed partial visual hemiagnosia for stimuli presented to their contralesional hemifield, applying inferential single-case statistics to evaluate deficits and dissociations. Double dissociations were found in 4 experiments during which participants had to integrate more than one visual element, either through comparison or formation of a global gestalt. Against the background of recent neuroimaging findings, we conclude that of all medial parietal structures, the precuneus is the most likely candidate for a crucial involvement in such bottom-up visual integration.

  2. Graded specialization within and between the anterior temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Rice, Grace E; Hoffman, Paul; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2015-11-01

    Considerable evidence from different methodologies has identified the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs) as key regions for the representation of semantic knowledge. Research interest is now shifting to investigate the roles of different ATL subregions in semantic representation, with particular emphasis on the functions of the left versus right ATLs. In this review, we provide evidence for graded specializations both between and within the ATLs. We argue (1) that multimodal, pan-category semantic representations are supported jointly by both left and right ATLs, yet (2) that the ATLs are not homogeneous in their function. Instead, subtle functional gradations both between and within the ATLs emerge as a consequence of differential connectivity with primary sensory/motor/limbic regions. This graded specialization account of semantic representation provides a compromise between theories that posit no differences between the functions of the left and right ATLs and those that posit that the left and right ATLs are entirely segregated in function. Evidence for this graded account comes from converging sources, and its benefits have been exemplified in formal computational models. We propose that this graded principle is not only a defining feature of the ATLs but is also a more general neurocomputational principle found throughout the temporal lobes.

  3. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes. PMID:23702414

  4. Forgetting in temporal lobe epilepsy: When does it become accelerated?

    PubMed

    Cassel, Anneli; Morris, Robin; Koutroumanidis, Michael; Kopelman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The notion of 'accelerated long-term forgetting' has often been attributed to disrupted 'late' memory consolidation. Nevertheless, methodological issues in the literature have left this theory unproven, leading some to suggest such findings may be reflective of subtle acquisition or early retention deficits. This study attempts to address such issues, and also to explore which pathophysiological variables are associated with forgetting rates. Eighteen participants with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and eighteen matched controls completed background neuropsychological measurement of immediate and short-delay memory that showed comparable performance, both on verbal and visual tests. Using two novel experimental tasks to measure long-term forgetting, cued recall of verbal and visuospatial material was tested 30 sec, 10 min, one day, and one week after learning. Forgetting of verbal material was found to be progressively faster during the course of a week in the TLE group. For visuospatial memory, participants in the TLE group exhibited faster early forgetting in the first 10 min after learning, as indicated by planned comparisons, with comparable forgetting rates thereafter. Our findings provide evidence for two patterns of disruption to 'early' memory consolidation in this population, occurring either at the initial delay only or continuing progressively through time. Differences in how soon after learning accelerated forgetting was detectable were related to factors associated with greater severity of epilepsy, such as presence of medial temporal lobe sclerosis (MTS) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and use of multiple anti-epileptic agents. PMID:27010834

  5. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000). PMID:10900427

  6. Connectome Reorganization Associated With Surgical Outcome in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ji, Gong-Jun; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Qiang; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhengge; Yang, Fang; Sun, Kangjian; Jiao, Qing; Liao, Wei; Lu, Guangming

    2015-10-01

    To identify the distinct pattern of anatomical network reorganization in surgically refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients using a longitudinal design. We collected longitudinal diffusion-weighted images of 19 MTLE patients before and after anterior temporal lobectomy. Patients were classified as seizure-free (SF) or nonseizure-free (NSF) at least 1 year after surgery. We constructed whole-brain anatomical networks derived from white matter tractography and evaluated network connectivity measures by graph theoretical analysis. The reorganization trajectories of network measures in SF and NSF patients were investigated by two-way mixed analysis of variance, with factors "group" (SF vs NSF) and "treatment" (presurgery vs postsurgery). Widespread brain structures showed opposite reorganization trajectories in FS and NSF groups (interaction effect). Most of them showed group difference before surgery and then converge after surgery, suggesting that surgery remodeled these structures into a similar status. Conversly, contralateral amygdala-planum-temporale and thalamic-parietal tracts showed higher connectivity strength in NSF than in SF patients after surgery, indicating maladaptive neuroplastic responses to surgery in NSF patients. Our findings suggest that surgical outcomes are associated not only with the preoperative pattern of anatomical connectivity, but also with connectome reconfiguration following surgery. The reorganization of contralateral temporal lobe and corticothalamic tracts may be particularly important for seizure control in MTLE. PMID:26448031

  7. Emotion recognition in temporal lobe epilepsy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Monti, Giulia; Meletti, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    There is increasing interest in the understanding of emotion recognition deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of focal epilepsies. There are conflicting reports about impairments for different emotions in right and left temporal lobe epilepsy patients. A systematic review and a narrative synthesis was conducted for studies investigating emotion recognition (ER) in TLE. Embase, MEDLINE, PsychINFO and Pubmed were searched from 1990 to March 2015 and reference lists were reviewed. 996 citations were identified and 43 studies were finally included. ER deficits are consistently observed across studies. A fear recognition deficit is always reported, followed by deficits in sadness and disgust recognition. Deficits are observed across visual and auditory domains. Conflicting evidence is present concerning the severity of ER deficits in right and left TLE. Studies on anterior temporal lobectomy report data similar to that observed in pre-surgical patients. Current evidence supports the conclusion that recognition of negative emotions is commonly impaired in TLE, particularly for fear, and in the visual domain. Future work should focus on more ecologically valid test, on longitudinal studies to assess the role of anterior temporal lobectomy, and to correlate ER measures to social functioning in everyday life.

  8. Abnormal expression and spatiotemporal change of Slit2 in neurons and astrocytes in temporal lobe epileptic foci: A study of epileptic patients and experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Liu, Guang-Wei; Pan, Yu-Min; Shen, Lan; Li, Cheng-Shan; Xi, Zhi-Qin; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Liang; Chen, Dan; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2010-04-01

    Repellent guidance molecules provide targeting information to outgrowing axons along predetermined pathways during development. These molecules may also play a role in synaptic reorganization in the adult brain and thereby promote epileptogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the expression of Slit2, one of repellent guidance molecules, in temporal lobe epileptic foci from epileptic patients and experimental animals. Thirty-five temporal neocortex tissue samples from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and fifteen histological normal temporal lobes from controls were selected. Fifty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into six groups, including five groups with epilepsy induced by lithium-pilocarpine administration and one control group. Temporal lobe tissue samples were taken from rats at 1, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days post-seizure and from controls. Expression of Slit2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. Slit2 was mainly expressed in neurons in human controls and in both neurons and astrocytes in TLE patients. Slit2 expression was significantly higher in TLE patients as compared with the controls. Slit2-positive cells were mainly neurons in the rat temporal lobe tissues of the control group, the acute period group, and the latent period group, while the Slit2-positive cells were mainly astrocytes in chronic phase. Compared with controls, Slit2 expression in animals in the TLE group gradually decreased from days 1 to 14 post-seizure, but then increased over the levels seen in controls, to peak levels at days 30 and 60. These results suggest that Slit2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of TLE.

  9. A case report: right upper lobectomy with middle lobe preservation after right lower lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Igai, Hitoshi; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Kawatani, Natsuko; Ibe, Takashi; Shimizu, Kimihiro

    2015-12-01

    Few reports have described right upper and lower lobectomy with preservation of the middle lobe because of the risk of middle lobe torsion or emphysematous change. Herein we describe a successful result following lobectomy with preservation of the middle lobe for metachronous pulmonary metastasis originating from colon cancer in the right upper lobe after initial right lower lobectomy. A 69-year-old man who had undergone right lower lobectomy for pulmonary metastasis originating from colon cancer 3 years earlier was diagnosed as having suspected metachronous pulmonary metastasis in the right upper lobe. Because preoperative computed tomography (CT) indicated that the distance between the tumor and the entrance of the upper bronchus was 20 mm, it was considered difficult to achieve complete resection by a wedge resection or segmentectomy. Furthermore, preoperative CT demonstrated compensatory hypertrophy of the middle lobe and elevation of the right diaphragm, thus reducing the size of the thorax. Therefore, right upper lobectomy with middle lobe preservation was planned. The operation was performed using a totally thoracoscopic approach. Adhesion of the upper lobe to the chest wall was easily detached. As the middle lobe adhered to the chest wall, this served to prevent middle lobe torsion. The fissure between the upper and middle lobes had fused because of adhesion resulting from the initial lower lobectomy. Therefore, an 'anterior fissureless approach' was adopted to avoid any postoperative air leakage. There were no intraoperative problems, and the postoperative course was uneventful. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. Pathological examination of the specimen confirmed that the tumor was a metachronous pulmonary metastasis originating from the colon cancer. Four months after the operation, he had no requirement for additional oxygen support, and postoperative CT demonstrated a sufficiently expanded residual middle lobe without emphysematous

  10. Medial Occipital Lobe Hyperperfusion Identified by Arterial Spin-Labeling: A Poor Prognostic Sign in Patients with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    de Havenon, A; Sultan-Qurraie, A; Tirschwell, D; Cohen, W; Majersik, J; Andre, J B

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy carries an uncertain prognosis. We sought to retrospectively assess the prognostic value of arterial spin-labeling MR imaging in 22 adult patients diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Quantitative CBF maps were generated from the M0 map, and arterial spin-labeling data on a per-voxel basis were regionally interrogated via visual inspection and ROI placement. Hyperperfusion was defined as regional increases in CBF of >20% (relative to global CBF) and/or >100 mL/100 g/min. Eleven of 22 patients had prominent bilateral medial occipital lobe hyperperfusion, all of whom died before hospital discharge. One patient who had nondistinct arterial spin-labeling hyperperfusion and restricted diffusion survived. Medial occipital lobe hyperperfusion is a distinctive pattern that merits prospective investigation in a cohort of patients with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy to determine its predictive ability in patients with a higher likelihood of survival.

  11. Development of external surfaces of human cerebellar lobes in the fetal period.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska-Kotas, Marta; Kędzia, Alicja; Dudek, Krzysztof

    2014-10-01

    In the fetal period, development of cerebellar lobes may proceed dissimilarly due to possible differentiated origins of the cells and diversified times of their migration to certain cerebellum regions. This can cause various growth trajectories for the external surfaces of cerebellar lobes. The goal of the study was to describe the development of the external surface of cerebellum lobes and fissures delineating them in the fetal period. The material consisted of 101 fetuses (48 males and 53 females)-crown rump length 89-229 mm corresponding to 15-28 weeks of fetal life. The methods were based on anthropometric measurements and preparation techniques combined with elicited image computer analysis. At the largest values of the cerebellum posterior lobe surface, the most dynamic growth rate was observed in the case of the anterior lobe. Among the cerebellar lobes, proportional change was observed as well as a gradual increase in anterior lobe surface area and a simultaneous decrease in the surface area of the flocculonodular lobe part of the cerebellum total external surface. This paper presents the different growth trajectories of cerebellar lobes and demonstrates the importance of the primary fissure as a delineating mark for two regions with different dynamics of development.

  12. Usefulness of CT imaging for segmental lung lobe torsion without typical radiographic imaging in a Pomeranian.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mihyun; Lee, Namsoon; Keh, Seoyeon; Choi, Heeyeon; Yim, Yoonji; Kim, Hyunwook; Jung, Joohyun; Choi, Mincheol

    2015-02-01

    A 3-year-old, intact female Pomeranian presented with a 1-month history of coughing. Thoracic radiography showed focal infiltration of the left cranial lung lobe and widening of the cranial mediastinum. Subsequent computed tomography revealed torsion of the caudal segment of the left cranial lung lobe, which was confirmed by exploratory thoracotomy. There was no apparent underlying etiology for the condition. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of lung lobe torsion in this breed and the first detailed CT imaging report for segmental lung lobe torsion. PMID:25728251

  13. Cassini observations of ionospheric plasma in Saturn's magnetotail lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felici, M.; Arridge, C. S.; Coates, A. J.; Badman, S. V.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jackman, C. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Melin, H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Reisenfeld, D. B.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Studies of Saturn's magnetosphere with the Cassini mission have established the importance of Enceladus as the dominant mass source for Saturn's magnetosphere. It is well known that the ionosphere is an important mass source at Earth during periods of intense geomagnetic activity, but lesser attention has been dedicated to study the ionospheric mass source at Saturn. In this paper we describe a case study of data from Saturn's magnetotail, when Cassini was located at ≃ 2200 h Saturn local time at 36 RS from Saturn. During several entries into the magnetotail lobe, tailward flowing cold electrons and a cold ion beam were observed directly adjacent to the plasma sheet and extending deeper into the lobe. The electrons and ions appear to be dispersed, dropping to lower energies with time. The composition of both the plasma sheet and lobe ions show very low fluxes (sometimes zero within measurement error) of water group ions. The magnetic field has a swept-forward configuration which is atypical for this region, and the total magnetic field strength is larger than expected at this distance from the planet. Ultraviolet auroral observations show a dawn brightening, and upstream heliospheric models suggest that the magnetosphere is being compressed by a region of high solar wind ram pressure. We interpret this event as the observation of ionospheric outflow in Saturn's magnetotail. We estimate a number flux between (2.95 ± 0.43) × 109 and (1.43 ± 0.21) × 1010 cm-2 s-1, 1 or about 2 orders of magnitude larger than suggested by steady state MHD models, with a mass source between 1.4 ×102 and 1.1 ×103 kg/s. After considering several configurations for the active atmospheric regions, we consider as most probable the main auroral oval, with associated mass source between 49.7 ±13.4 and 239.8 ±64.8 kg/s for an average auroral oval, and 10 ±4 and 49 ±23 kg/s for the specific auroral oval morphology found during this event. It is not clear how much of this mass is

  14. Frontal lobe dysfunction and everyday problem-solving: social and non-social contributions.

    PubMed

    Channon, Shelley

    2004-01-01

    Everyday problem-solving involves both non-social executive processes, social and emotional processes, and draws upon social and practical knowledge. A series of studies including both adult-acquired lesions and neurodevelopmental disorders is reviewed examining problem-solving on a real-life-type task that involves generating a range of solutions to brief problem scenarios and selecting preferred solutions to solve the problems. Impairments in problem-solving are described in groups of participants with left anterior frontal lobe lesions, Tourette's syndrome and Asperger's syndrome. By contrast, healthy older people did not show problem-solving deficits on the same task. The possible contributions of non-social executive skills, social and emotional skills, and knowledge acquired from experience are each considered in relation to everyday performance. Multiple cognitive/emotional routes to the development of everyday life difficulties pose a complex challenge both in understanding the nature of the relevant processes and in developing adequate methods for management and rehabilitation. PMID:14962402

  15. Role of cortisol in mood and memory in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, T.; Chapin, J.S.; Hamrahian, A.H.; Diehl, B.; Alexopoulos, A.; Unnwongse, K.; Naugle, R.I.; Kubu, C.S.; Tesar, G.E.; Najm, I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study prospectively examined the relationships among late night salivary cortisol (NSC) levels and depressive symptoms, memory performance, and hippocampal volumes in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and the potential mediating effects of cortisol in the relationships between these variables. Methods: Participants included 24 adults with well-characterized medically refractory TLE (right = 11; left = 12; bitemporal = 1). All patients provided saliva samples and completed measures of mood, anxiety, and memory (objective and subjective). MRI-based volumetric analyses of the hippocampi were also conducted. Results: As hypothesized, cortisol was found to be negatively related to several memory measures such that patients with higher cortisol levels demonstrated lower memory performance. However, unexpectedly, cortisol was not related to current symptoms of depression or anxiety, subjective memory ratings, or hippocampal volumes. Consistent with previous findings in the literature, a number of other relationships among the study variables were observed (objective memory and hippocampal volume; subjective memory and mood/anxiety). Results of mediator analyses suggested that cortisol does not mediate the relationship between depression and memory dysfunction or the relationship between depression and hippocampal atrophy. Conclusions: While cortisol may play a role in memory performance in patients with TLE, it does not fully explain the relationship between depression and mesial temporal dysfunction, likely reflecting the complex and multifactorial relationships among these variables. Results confirm the relationship between memory performance and structural brain integrity and provide further support for a role of depression in subjective memory complaints. PMID:22442430

  16. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Alters Auditory-motor Integration For Voice Control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weifeng; Chen, Ziyi; Yan, Nan; Jones, Jeffery A.; Guo, Zhiqiang; Huang, Xiyan; Chen, Shaozhen; Liu, Peng; Liu, Hanjun

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common drug-refractory focal epilepsy in adults. Previous research has shown that patients with TLE exhibit decreased performance in listening to speech sounds and deficits in the cortical processing of auditory information. Whether TLE compromises auditory-motor integration for voice control, however, remains largely unknown. To address this question, event-related potentials (ERPs) and vocal responses to vocal pitch errors (1/2 or 2 semitones upward) heard in auditory feedback were compared across 28 patients with TLE and 28 healthy controls. Patients with TLE produced significantly larger vocal responses but smaller P2 responses than healthy controls. Moreover, patients with TLE exhibited a positive correlation between vocal response magnitude and baseline voice variability and a negative correlation between P2 amplitude and disease duration. Graphical network analyses revealed a disrupted neuronal network for patients with TLE with a significant increase of clustering coefficients and path lengths as compared to healthy controls. These findings provide strong evidence that TLE is associated with an atypical integration of the auditory and motor systems for vocal pitch regulation, and that the functional networks that support the auditory-motor processing of pitch feedback errors differ between patients with TLE and healthy controls. PMID:27356768

  17. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Alters Auditory-motor Integration For Voice Control.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Chen, Ziyi; Yan, Nan; Jones, Jeffery A; Guo, Zhiqiang; Huang, Xiyan; Chen, Shaozhen; Liu, Peng; Liu, Hanjun

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common drug-refractory focal epilepsy in adults. Previous research has shown that patients with TLE exhibit decreased performance in listening to speech sounds and deficits in the cortical processing of auditory information. Whether TLE compromises auditory-motor integration for voice control, however, remains largely unknown. To address this question, event-related potentials (ERPs) and vocal responses to vocal pitch errors (1/2 or 2 semitones upward) heard in auditory feedback were compared across 28 patients with TLE and 28 healthy controls. Patients with TLE produced significantly larger vocal responses but smaller P2 responses than healthy controls. Moreover, patients with TLE exhibited a positive correlation between vocal response magnitude and baseline voice variability and a negative correlation between P2 amplitude and disease duration. Graphical network analyses revealed a disrupted neuronal network for patients with TLE with a significant increase of clustering coefficients and path lengths as compared to healthy controls. These findings provide strong evidence that TLE is associated with an atypical integration of the auditory and motor systems for vocal pitch regulation, and that the functional networks that support the auditory-motor processing of pitch feedback errors differ between patients with TLE and healthy controls. PMID:27356768

  18. A Medial Temporal Lobe Division of Labor: Insights from Memory in Aging and Early Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, David A.; Dunfee, Kathryn L.; Dickerson, Bradford C.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; DeKosky, Steven T.

    2010-01-01

    Dual process theories of recognition memory posit that recollection and familiarity represent dissociable processes. Animal studies and human functional imaging experiments support an anatomic dissociation of these processes in the medial temporal lobes (MTL). By this hypothesis, recollection may be dependent on the hippocampus; while familiarity appears to rely on extrahippocampal MTL (ehMTL) structures, particularly perirhinal and lateral entorhinal cortices. Despite these findings, the dual process model and these anatomic mappings remain controversial, in part because the study of patients with lesions to the MTL has been limited and has revealed predominantly single dissociations. We examined measures of recollection and familiarity in three groups (normal older adults, amnesic-Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer’s Disease) in which these memory measures and the relative integrity of MTL structures are variable, thus enhancing our power to detect MTL-memory relationships. Recollection and familiarity and volumes of hippocampus and ehMTL, defined as a region including entorhinal/perirhinal cortices and parahippocampus, were measured. Regression analyses revealed a stronger relationship of recollection with the hippocampus compared to ehMTL, while familiarity was more highly related to ehMTL compared to hippocampus. These results are consistent with a division of labor in the MTL and the dual process model. PMID:20232383

  19. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy: a continuous wave type based system for human frontal lobe studies

    PubMed Central

    Venclove, Sigita; Daktariunas, Algis; Ruksenas, Osvaldas

    2015-01-01

    Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an optical non-invasive brain monitoring technology that registers changes in hemodynamic responses within the cortex of the human brain. Over the last decades fNIRS became a promising method in neurosciences: it is non-invasive, portable and can be used in long term studies. All these advantages make it suitable for educational purposes as well. This paper presents basic methodological concept of optical engineering principles and suitable applications of fNIRS. We represent a continuous wave (cw-fNIRS) system that could be used for frontal lobe studies in human adults or as demonstration equipment for physiological measurements. This system has been validated by comparing it with commercial device fNIR400 from Biopac. A comparison of geometry, data and statistical analyses suggests similar hemodynamic responses recorded by both devices. Our study suggests that this system can be used for further development and as a guideline for researchers to develop a specific tool for applications in human brain studies. PMID:26869869

  20. Plasmonic Roche lobe in metal-dielectric-metal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shiu, Ruei-Cheng; Lan, Yung-Chiang

    2013-07-15

    This study investigates a plasmonic Roche lobe that is based on a metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) structure using finite-difference time-domain simulations and theoretical analyses. The effective refractive index of the MDM structure has two centers and is inversely proportional to the distance from the position of interest to the centers, in a manner that is analogous to the gravitational potential in a two-star system. The motion of surface plasmons (SPs) strongly depends on the ratio of permittivities at the two centers. The Lagrange point is an unstable equilibrium point for SPs that propagate in the system. After the SPs have passed through the Lagrange point, their spread drastically increases.

  1. Converging language streams in the human temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Spitsyna, Galina; Warren, Jane E; Scott, Sophie K; Turkheimer, Federico E; Wise, Richard J S

    2006-07-12

    There is general agreement that, after initial processing in unimodal sensory cortex, the processing pathways for spoken and written language converge to access verbal meaning. However, the existing literature provides conflicting accounts of the cortical location of this convergence. Most aphasic stroke studies localize verbal comprehension to posterior temporal and inferior parietal cortex (Wernicke's area), whereas evidence from focal cortical neurodegenerative syndromes instead implicates anterior temporal cortex. Previous functional imaging studies in normal subjects have failed to reconcile these opposing positions. Using a functional imaging paradigm in normal subjects that used spoken and written narratives and multiple baselines, we demonstrated common activation during implicit comprehension of spoken and written language in inferior and lateral regions of the left anterior temporal cortex and at the junction of temporal, occipital, and parietal cortex. These results indicate that verbal comprehension uses unimodal processing streams that converge in both anterior and posterior heteromodal cortical regions in the left temporal lobe. PMID:16837579

  2. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis of the Parietal Lobe: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Lara; Moisi, Marc; Rostad, Steven; Umeh, Randle; Zwillman, Michael E; Tubbs, R. Shane; Page, Jeni; Newell, David W.; Delashaw, Johnny B

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old female with a history of breast cancer and hypertension presented with a rare case of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) isolated to her left parietal lobe. The patient’s first biopsy was negative for herpes simplex virus (HSV) I/II antigens, but less than two weeks later, the patient tested positive on repeat biopsy. This initial failure to detect the virus and the similarities between HSE and symptoms of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) suggests repeat testing for HSV in the presence of ICH. Due to the frequency of patients with extra temporal HSE, a diagnosis of HSE should be more readily considered, particularly when a patient may not be improving and a concrete diagnosis has not been solidified. PMID:27774355

  3. Coherent concepts are computed in the anterior temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Sage, Karen; Jones, Roy W; Mayberry, Emily J

    2010-02-01

    In his Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein famously noted that the formation of semantic representations requires more than a simple combination of verbal and nonverbal features to generate conceptually based similarities and differences. Classical and contemporary neuroscience has tended to focus upon how different neocortical regions contribute to conceptualization through the summation of modality-specific information. The additional yet critical step of computing coherent concepts has received little attention. Some computational models of semantic memory are able to generate such concepts by the addition of modality-invariant information coded in a multidimensional semantic space. By studying patients with semantic dementia, we demonstrate that this aspect of semantic memory becomes compromised following atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes and, as a result, the patients become increasingly influenced by superficial rather than conceptual similarities.

  4. Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy Presenting as Excessive Daytime Sleepiness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jocelyn Y.; Wallace, Douglas M.; Lopez, Maria R.; Carrazana, Enrique J.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is common in the general population. Etiologies include insufficient sleep and primary sleep disorders. Due to its high prevalence, physicians often overlook EDS as a significant problem. However, EDS may also be the presenting symptom of seizures, in particular Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy (NFLE). Due to the clinical similarity between the nocturnal behaviors of NFLE and parasomnias, and poor patient-related history, NFLE remains a challenging diagnosis. We report the case of a patient with NFLE who presented with a primary complaint of EDS, and discuss the differential diagnosis and evaluation of patients with EDS associated with nocturnal behaviors. In the context of a patient presenting with EDS and stereotyped nocturnal events, clinical suspicion should be high for NFLE. PMID:24479058

  5. Coherent concepts are computed in the anterior temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Sage, Karen; Jones, Roy W; Mayberry, Emily J

    2010-02-01

    In his Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein famously noted that the formation of semantic representations requires more than a simple combination of verbal and nonverbal features to generate conceptually based similarities and differences. Classical and contemporary neuroscience has tended to focus upon how different neocortical regions contribute to conceptualization through the summation of modality-specific information. The additional yet critical step of computing coherent concepts has received little attention. Some computational models of semantic memory are able to generate such concepts by the addition of modality-invariant information coded in a multidimensional semantic space. By studying patients with semantic dementia, we demonstrate that this aspect of semantic memory becomes compromised following atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes and, as a result, the patients become increasingly influenced by superficial rather than conceptual similarities. PMID:20133780

  6. Occipital lobe epilepsy presenting as Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown-Vargas, Damaris; Cienki, John J

    2012-11-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome describes visual field or acuity loss with complex hallucinations. This typically occurs in the elderly with preexisting visual impairment. We describe a patient who presented to the emergency department with acute hemianopsia and intermittent complex hallucinations. A 57-year-old man was referred for visual field loss and hallucinations. Chief complaint was “seeing little heads of people” and a right-sided visual loss. The patient was alert, oriented, and able to repeat and name and had fluent speech. On cranial nerve examination, he had 20/20 visual acuity and right homonymous hemianopsia. The patient had normal laboratory examination and electrocardiogram results. Results of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head with contrast were negative. Standard 30-minute electroencephalography revealed near-continuous epileptiform discharges in the left occipital lobe. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of new-onset seizure presenting as Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  7. Disorders of the optic tract, radiation, and occipital lobe.

    PubMed

    Fraser, J Alexander; Newman, Nancy J; Biousse, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    Disorders of the optic tract, lateral geniculate nucleus, optic radiation, and occipital lobe - collectively called the retrochiasmal visual pathways - are commonly encountered in neurological practice, and may result from a number of causes. The major visual morbidity of retrochiasmal disease is the homonymous visual field defect, which is found in approximately 8% of stroke patients. A homonymous visual field defect may have profound legal, occupational, and financial consequences for patients, with many patients unable to read, drive, or return to work after sustaining retrochiasmal damage. Some homonymous hemianopias may improve, usually within days of a cerebral infarction, but remain stable after 3 months. Although treatment options are limited to those of the underlying cause, appropriate counseling and low-vision rehabilitation may be helpful.

  8. Epileptiform transients of the occipital lobe in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Differentiating between benign occipital transients and epileptic discharges from the occipital lobes is imperative. Focal occipital spikes and sharp waves are not always associated with benign disorders. The occurrence of occipital spikes and spike and wave complexes depends on the child's age, the maturation of the occipital cortex, and the cortex's connection with other structures (Beaumanoir et al. 1993). Clinical manifestations also evolve as the patient ages. Seizure semiology is due to the maturation of the visual system and its connections. An infant from birth to twelve months of age could experience autonomic symptoms such as pallor and vomiting with possible minor motor movements. Visual symptoms and/or headaches are usually not noticed until between five and seven years of age. These visual phenomena can continue into adulthood.

  9. Double Lobed Radio Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W H; Becker, R H; White, R L

    2005-11-10

    We have combined a sample of 44 984 quasars, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3, with the FIRST radio survey. Using a novel technique where the optical quasar position is matched to the complete radio environment within 450'', we are able to characterize the radio morphological make-up of what is essentially an optically selected quasar sample, regardless of whether the quasar (nucleus) itself has been detected in the radio. About 10% of the quasar population have radio cores brighter than 0.75 mJy at 1.4 GHz, and 1.7% have double lobed FR2-like radio morphologies. About 75% of the FR2 sources have a radio core (> 0.75mJy). A significant fraction ({approx}40%) of the FR2 quasars are bent by more than 10 degrees, indicating either interactions of the radio plasma with the ICM or IGM. We found no evidence for correlations with redshift among our FR2 quasars: radio lobe flux densities and radio source diameters of the quasars have similar distributions at low (mean 0.77) and high (mean 2.09) redshifts. Using a smaller high reliability FR2 sample of 422 quasars and two comparison samples of radio-quiet and non-FR2 radio-loud quasars, matched in their redshift distributions, we constructed composite optical spectra from the SDSS spectroscopic data. Based on these spectra we can conclude that the FR2 quasars have stronger high-ionization emission lines compared to both the radio quiet and non-FR2 radio loud sources. This is consistent with the notion that the emission lines are brightened by ongoing shock ionization of ambient gas in the quasar host as the radio source expands.

  10. Ionic conductances of squid giant fiber lobe neurons

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The cell bodies of the neurons in the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of the squid stellate ganglion give rise to axons that fuse and thereby form the third-order giant axon, whose initial portion functions as the postsynaptic element of the squid giant synapse. We have developed a preparation of dissociated, cultured cells from this lobe and have studied the voltage-dependent conductances using patch-clamp techniques. This system offers a unique opportunity for comparing the properties and regional differentiation of ionic channels in somatic and axonal membranes within the same cell. Some of these cells contain a small inward Na current which resembles that found in axon with respect to tetrodotoxin sensitivity, voltage dependence, and inactivation. More prominent is a macroscopic inward current, carried by Ca2+, which is likely to be the result of at least two kinetically distinct types of channels. These Ca channels differ in their closing kinetics, voltage range and time course of activation, and the extent to which their conductance inactivates. The dominant current in these GFL neurons is outward and is carried by K+. It can be accounted for by a single type of voltage-dependent channel. This conductance resembles the K conductance of the axon, except that it partially inactivates during relatively short depolarizations. Ensemble fluctuation analysis of K currents obtained from excised outside-out patches is consistent with a single type of K channel and yields estimates for the single channel conductance of approximately 13 pS, independently of membrane potential. A preliminary analysis of single channel data supports the conclusion that there is a single type of voltage-dependent, inactivating K channel in the GFL neurons. PMID:2431097

  11. [Diagnosis, treatment and progress after frontal lobe injury].

    PubMed

    Quester, R; Klug, N

    2003-06-01

    The comprehensive assessment of a frontal lobe injury is one of the most complex problems in diagnosis and treatment due to the variability of nature, extent and effect of various disorders of higher cerebral functions, i. e. impairment of the ability to act systematically, attention, motivation and emotionality. This brings about considerable differences in assessing and judging the effects of frontal lobe syndromes. Impairments of initiation, planning and carrying out of actions, of impulse control, attention, memory and self-perception often manifest in disorganised and dissocial behaviour which brings about serious effects in many fields of social adaptability. Deeper neurological insights in nature and effects of these deficiencies and improved diagnostical methods and concepts of intensive-care treatment as well as the improved understanding in the necessity of a longterm rehabilitation program have led to the development of specific strategies concerning the dealing with the patient, the counseling of the social environment, especially of the relatives, and the treatment of the patient's symptoms. In the course of acute and rehabilitative treatment the patient normally has to develop strategies of habituation and adaptation to his social environment, furthermore techniques of compensation as well as an improvement of personal resources including attention, memory and planning of actions. The ability of self-control ought to be improved by training of behavioural strategies leading to an increased independence. The success of treatment varies distinctly from individual to individual. As a rule, basic capabilities in the scope of higher brain functions as well as executive and behavioural abilities can be improved. However, a restitutio ad integrum of all dysfunctions is very rare. PMID:12796850

  12. [Microtumor presenting with temporal lobe epilepsy--a case report].

    PubMed

    Ide, M; Jimbo, M; Yamamoto, M; Tanaka, N; Takeyama, E; Kubo, O

    1988-04-01

    A 15-year-old girl was admitted to our clinic on July 16, 1985 with the epilepsy which had been resistant to various anticonvulsant therapies. At the age of 10 years automatism seizure, characterized by purposeless movement of arms and head of which the patient was unaware, began to occur and became as frequent as two to three times each day. From the age of 13 years, there were also grand mal seizures several times a year in spite of medical treatment. She had normal delivery and no history of febrile convulsion. There was no family history of epilepsy or mental disease. When examined on admission, she had normal personality and intelligence. There was no neurological abnormality. She complained of sleepiness and hirsutiness. Fit of automatism occurred two to three times a day during admission, though the blood levels of anticonvulsant drugs such as phenobarbital, phenytoin and carbamazepine reached to therapeutic concentration. EEG examination including infratemporal lead recording showed right temporal spike focus. But all the neuroradiological studies such as skull X-rays, CT, cerebral angiography and magnetic resonance imaging failed to show abnormal finding. Right temporal lobectomy was carried out under general anesthesia on Aug 22, 1985, and anterior two-thirds of the middle and the inferior temporal gyri were resected deeply to anterior hippocampus. To the naked eye, no abnormal finding was noted during the operation. In the surgical specimen, macroscopically nothing abnormal was found. Microscopically, serial sections of the lobe revealed clusters of oligodendroglial cells in cortical to subcortical region of the medial basal part of the temporal lobe.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Multimodality medical image database for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multi-modality database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted and FLAIR MRI and ictal/interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as non-verbal Wechsler memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication matches the neurosurgeons expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  14. Ionic conductances of squid giant fiber lobe neurons.

    PubMed

    Llano, I; Bookman, R J

    1986-10-01

    The cell bodies of the neurons in the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of the squid stellate ganglion give rise to axons that fuse and thereby form the third-order giant axon, whose initial portion functions as the postsynaptic element of the squid giant synapse. We have developed a preparation of dissociated, cultured cells from this lobe and have studied the voltage-dependent conductances using patch-clamp techniques. This system offers a unique opportunity for comparing the properties and regional differentiation of ionic channels in somatic and axonal membranes within the same cell. Some of these cells contain a small inward Na current which resembles that found in axon with respect to tetrodotoxin sensitivity, voltage dependence, and inactivation. More prominent is a macroscopic inward current, carried by Ca2+, which is likely to be the result of at least two kinetically distinct types of channels. These Ca channels differ in their closing kinetics, voltage range and time course of activation, and the extent to which their conductance inactivates. The dominant current in these GFL neurons is outward and is carried by K+. It can be accounted for by a single type of voltage-dependent channel. This conductance resembles the K conductance of the axon, except that it partially inactivates during relatively short depolarizations. Ensemble fluctuation analysis of K currents obtained from excised outside-out patches is consistent with a single type of K channel and yields estimates for the single channel conductance of approximately 13 pS, independently of membrane potential. A preliminary analysis of single channel data supports the conclusion that there is a single type of voltage-dependent, inactivating K channel in the GFL neurons.

  15. Complex brain and optic lobes in an early Cambrian arthropod.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoya; Hou, Xianguang; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Strausfeld, Nicholas J

    2012-10-11

    The nervous system provides a fundamental source of data for understanding the evolutionary relationships between major arthropod groups. Fossil arthropods rarely preserve neural tissue. As a result, inferring sensory and motor attributes of Cambrian taxa has been limited to interpreting external features, such as compound eyes or sensilla decorating appendages, and early-diverging arthropods have scarcely been analysed in the context of nervous system evolution. Here we report exceptional preservation of the brain and optic lobes of a stem-group arthropod from 520 million years ago (Myr ago), Fuxianhuia protensa, exhibiting the most compelling neuroanatomy known from the Cambrian. The protocerebrum of Fuxianhuia is supplied by optic lobes evidencing traces of three nested optic centres serving forward-viewing eyes. Nerves from uniramous antennae define the deutocerebrum, and a stout pair of more caudal nerves indicates a contiguous tritocerebral component. Fuxianhuia shares a tripartite pre-stomodeal brain and nested optic neuropils with extant Malacostraca and Insecta, demonstrating that these characters were present in some of the earliest derived arthropods. The brain of Fuxianhuia impacts molecular analyses that advocate either a branchiopod-like ancestor of Hexapoda or remipedes and possibly cephalocarids as sister groups of Hexapoda. Resolving arguments about whether the simple brain of a branchiopod approximates an ancestral insect brain or whether it is the result of secondary simplification has until now been hindered by lack of fossil evidence. The complex brain of Fuxianhuia accords with cladistic analyses on the basis of neural characters, suggesting that Branchiopoda derive from a malacostracan-like ancestor but underwent evolutionary reduction and character reversal of brain centres that are common to hexapods and malacostracans. The early origin of sophisticated brains provides a probable driver for versatile visual behaviours, a view that accords

  16. Subcortical mapping of calculation processing in the right parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Della Puppa, Alessandro; De Pellegrin, Serena; Lazzarini, Anna; Gioffrè, Giorgio; Rustemi, Oriela; Cagnin, Annachiara; Scienza, Renato; Semenza, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Preservation of calculation processing in brain surgery is crucial for patients' quality of life. Over the last decade, surgical electrostimulation was used to identify and preserve the cortical areas involved in such processing. Conversely, subcortical connectivity among different areas implicated in this function remains unclear, and the role of surgery in this domain has not been explored so far. The authors present the first 2 cases in which the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation were identified during right parietal lobe surgery. Two patients affected by a glioma located in the right parietal lobe underwent surgery with the aid of MRI neuronavigation. No calculation deficits were detected during preoperative assessment. Cortical and subcortical mapping were performed using a bipolar stimulator. The current intensity was determined by progressively increasing the amplitude by 0.5-mA increments (from a baseline of 1 mA) until a sensorimotor response was elicited. Then, addition and multiplication calculation tasks were administered. Corticectomy was performed according to both the MRI neuronavigation data and the functional findings obtained through cortical mapping. Direct subcortical electrostimulation was repeatedly performed during tumor resection. Subcortical functional sites for multiplication and addition were detected in both patients. Electrostimulation interfered with calculation processing during cortical mapping as well. Functional sites were spared during tumor removal. The postoperative course was uneventful, and calculation processing was preserved. Postoperative MRI showed complete resection of the tumor. The present preliminary study shows for the first time how functional mapping can be a promising method to intraoperatively identify the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation processing. This report therefore supports direct electrical stimulation as a promising tool to improve the current knowledge on

  17. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi) and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Conejo Bayón, Francisco; Maese, Jesús; Fernandez Oliveira, Aníbal; Mesas, Tamara; Herrera de la Llave, Estibaliz; Álvarez Avellón, Tania; Menéndez-González, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi), 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA), yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA) and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA) are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTLD) and correlation with cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD), formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: A series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65–85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT) plus one experienced tracer (ET) traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: Learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA. Conclusion: Our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA) have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest. PMID:25414666

  18. Purkinje Cell Activity in the Cerebellar Anterior Lobe after Rabbit Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John T.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    The cerebellar anterior lobe may play a critical role in the execution and proper timing of learned responses. The current study was designed to monitor Purkinje cell activity in the rabbit cerebellar anterior lobe after eyeblink conditioning, and to assess whether Purkinje cells in recording locations may project to the interpositus nucleus.…

  19. Characteristics and treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy with a history of complicated febrile convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Kanemoto, K.; Takuji, N.; Kawasaki, J.; Kawai, I.

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the close correlation between complicated febrile convulsions (CFC) and medial temporal lobe epilepsy and to delineate characteristics of temporal lobe epilepsy with CFC. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy were divided into those with a prior episode of CFC (n=52), those with febrile convulsions other than CFC, and those witout either (n=345). Clinical constellations, neuroimaging, drug resistance, and effects of temporal lobectomy of the three groups were compared. A close association between CFC and temporal lobe epilepsy was confirmed. The salient features of temporal lobe epilepsy with CFC were early age at onset of habitual seizures (about 10 years), the predominance of autonomic auras, and a high incidence of MRI evidence of unilateral medial temporal sclerosis. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with prior CFC had an excellent outcome after surgery, by contrast with an unfavourable response to drug therapy. The surgical results were discouraging in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy without history of any febrile convulsions and without solid brain tumours. These results indicate surgical intervention as the choice of therapy in a substantial number of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy with a history of CFC.

 PMID:9489540

  20. Differential Growth in Periclinal and Anticlinal Walls during Lobe Formation in Arabidopsis Cotyledon Pavement Cells.

    PubMed

    Armour, William J; Barton, Deborah A; Law, Andrew M K; Overall, Robyn L

    2015-09-01

    Lobe development in the epidermal pavement cells of Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledons and leaves is thought to take place via tip-like growth on the concave side of lobes driven by localized concentrations of actin filaments and associated proteins, with a predicted role for cortical microtubules in establishing the direction of restricted growth at the convex side. We used homologous landmarks fixed to the outer walls of pavement cells and thin-plate spline analysis to demonstrate that lobes form by differential growth of both the anticlinal and periclinal walls. Most lobes formed within the first 24 h of the cotyledons unfurling, during the period of rapid cell expansion. Cortical microtubules adjacent to the periclinal wall were persistently enriched at the convex side of lobes during development where growth was anisotropic and were less concentrated or absent at the concave side where growth was promoted. Alternating microtubule-enriched and microtubule-free zones at the periclinal wall in neighboring cells predicted sites of new lobes. There was no particular arrangement of cortical actin filaments that could predict where lobes would form. However, drug studies demonstrate that both filamentous actin and microtubules are required for lobe formation. PMID:26296967

  1. Noise Reduction with Lobed Mixers: Nozzle-Length and Free-Jet Speed Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James C.; Boyd, Kathy C.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic test results are presented for 1/4th-scaled nozzles with internal lobed mixers used for reduction of subsonic jet noise of turbofan engines with bypass ratio above 5 and jet speeds up to 830 ft/s. One coaxial and three forced lobe mixers were tested with variations in lobe penetration, cut-outs in lobe-sidewall, lobe number and nozzle-length. Measured exit flow profiles and thrusts are used to assist the inferences from acoustic data. It is observed that lobed mixers reduce the low-frequency noise due to more uniformly mixed exit flow; but they may also increase the high-frequency noise at peak perceived noise (PNL) angle and angles upstream of it due to enhanced mixing inside the nozzle. Cut-outs and low lobe penetration reduce the annoying portion of the spectrum but lead to less uniform exit flow. Due to the dominance of internal duct noise in unscalloped, high-penetration mixers their noise is not reduced as much with increase in free-jet speed as that of coaxial or cut-out lobed mixers. The latter two mixers also show no change in PNL over the wide range of nozzle-lengths tested because most of their noise sources are outside the nozzle; whereas, the former show an increase in noise with decrease in nozzle-length.

  2. Differential Growth in Periclinal and Anticlinal Walls during Lobe Formation in Arabidopsis Cotyledon Pavement Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Deborah A.; Law, Andrew M.K.; Overall, Robyn L.

    2015-01-01

    Lobe development in the epidermal pavement cells of Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledons and leaves is thought to take place via tip-like growth on the concave side of lobes driven by localized concentrations of actin filaments and associated proteins, with a predicted role for cortical microtubules in establishing the direction of restricted growth at the convex side. We used homologous landmarks fixed to the outer walls of pavement cells and thin-plate spline analysis to demonstrate that lobes form by differential growth of both the anticlinal and periclinal walls. Most lobes formed within the first 24 h of the cotyledons unfurling, during the period of rapid cell expansion. Cortical microtubules adjacent to the periclinal wall were persistently enriched at the convex side of lobes during development where growth was anisotropic and were less concentrated or absent at the concave side where growth was promoted. Alternating microtubule-enriched and microtubule-free zones at the periclinal wall in neighboring cells predicted sites of new lobes. There was no particular arrangement of cortical actin filaments that could predict where lobes would form. However, drug studies demonstrate that both filamentous actin and microtubules are required for lobe formation. PMID:26296967

  3. Clinothem Lobe Growth and Possible Ties to Downslope Processes in the Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, E. A. Y.; Driscoll, N. W.; Milliman, J. D.; Slingerland, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Gulf of Papua is fed by the large-floodplain Fly River and small mountainous rivers to the north, thus creating an ideal environment where end-member cases of river systems and their deltas (e.g. the large-floodplain Brazos River and the narrow-shelved Eel River) can be studied. Input from five rivers into the gulf has constructed a three-dimensional mid-shelf clinothem composed of three depositional lobes, with a central lobe downlapped by two younger lobes to the north and south. This geometry suggests that the three lobes are not syndepositional but rather that clinoform depocenters have shifted 60 km, thus bypassing adjacent accommodation. Newly examined CHIRP (Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse) seismic lines and XRF analysis of piston cores from the 2004 NSF MARGINS program reveal distinct lobes offshore that exhibit increased complexity moving shoreward. Evidence of shoreward complexity and lobe interfingering cause us to question the originally proposed mechanism for depocenter shift involving circulation changes. An alternative hypothesis that stems from distinct lobe architecture farther offshore suggests that channelized downslope processes and nearshore storage may play important roles in lobe growth.

  4. Brief Report: Medial Temporal Lobe and Autism: A Putative Animal Model in Primates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    1996-01-01

    Research on humans and monkeys is reviewed that supports the view that the medial temporal lobe, and, perhaps more specifically the amygdala, is the neural substrate underlying social deficits in autism. The relationship of early medial temporal lobe lesions to memory and socioemotional behavior is reviewed, as are the roles of the amygdala and…

  5. Material-Specific Lateralization of Working Memory in the Medial Temporal Lobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Dylan D.; Sziklas, Viviane; Garver, Krista E.; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    Mnemonic deficits in patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage arising from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are traditionally constrained to long-term episodic memory, sparing short-term and working memory (WM). This view of WM as being independent of MTL structures has recently been challenged by a small number of patient and neuroimaging…

  6. Determinants of Autobiographical Memory in Patients with Unilateral Temporal Lobe Epilepsy or Excisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Laurent, Marie; Moscovitch, Morris; Levine, Brian; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2009-01-01

    Patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy from hippocampal origin and patients with unilateral surgical excision of an epileptic focus located in the medial temporal lobe were compared to healthy controls on a version of the Autobiographical Interview (AI) adapted to assess memory for event-specific and generic personal episodes. For both…

  7. Frontal Lobe Involvement in a Task of Time-Based Prospective Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Craig P.; Glisky, Elizabeth L.

    2009-01-01

    Time-based prospective memory (PM) has been found to be negatively affected by aging, possibly as a result of declining frontal lobe (FL) function. Despite a clear retrospective component to PM tasks, the medial temporal lobes (MTL) are thought to play only a secondary role in successful task completion. The present study investigated the role of…

  8. Differential Growth in Periclinal and Anticlinal Walls during Lobe Formation in Arabidopsis Cotyledon Pavement Cells.

    PubMed

    Armour, William J; Barton, Deborah A; Law, Andrew M K; Overall, Robyn L

    2015-09-01

    Lobe development in the epidermal pavement cells of Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledons and leaves is thought to take place via tip-like growth on the concave side of lobes driven by localized concentrations of actin filaments and associated proteins, with a predicted role for cortical microtubules in establishing the direction of restricted growth at the convex side. We used homologous landmarks fixed to the outer walls of pavement cells and thin-plate spline analysis to demonstrate that lobes form by differential growth of both the anticlinal and periclinal walls. Most lobes formed within the first 24 h of the cotyledons unfurling, during the period of rapid cell expansion. Cortical microtubules adjacent to the periclinal wall were persistently enriched at the convex side of lobes during development where growth was anisotropic and were less concentrated or absent at the concave side where growth was promoted. Alternating microtubule-enriched and microtubule-free zones at the periclinal wall in neighboring cells predicted sites of new lobes. There was no particular arrangement of cortical actin filaments that could predict where lobes would form. However, drug studies demonstrate that both filamentous actin and microtubules are required for lobe formation.

  9. Increased expression of interleukin 17 in the cortex and hippocampus from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao-Jiang; Sun, Fei-Ji; Wang, Yu; Luo, Xiao-Qin; Lei, Peng; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Di; Li, Zhi-Yun; Yang, Hui

    2016-09-15

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most common form of focal epilepsies in adults and proinflammatory cytokines have long been thought to play an important role in pathogenesis and epileptogenicity. In the present study, we investigated the levels and expression patterns of the interleukin 17 (IL-17) system in temporal neocortex and hippocampus from 24 patients with MTLE and 8 control (Ctr) samples. We found that IL-17 and IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) were clearly upregulated in MTLE at both mRNA and protein levels, compared with Ctr. Immunostaining indicated that neurons, astrocytes, microglia and endothelial cells of blood vessels are the major sources of IL-17. These findings suggest that IL-17 system may be involved in the pathogenesis and epileptogenicity of MTLE. PMID:27609289

  10. Image processing analysis of vortex dynamics of lobed jets from three-dimensional diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastase, Ilinca; Meslem, Amina; El Hassan, Mouhammad

    2011-12-01

    The passive control of jet flows with the aim to enhance mixing and entrainment is of wide practical interest. Our purpose here is to develop new air diffusers for heating ventilating air conditioning systems by using lobed geometry nozzles, in order to ameliorate the users' thermal comfort. Two turbulent six-lobed air jets, issued from a lobed tubular nozzle and an innovative hemispherical lobed nozzle, were studied experimentally. It was shown that the proposed innovative concept of a lobed jet, which can be easily integrated in air diffusion devices, is very efficient regarding induction capability. A vortical dynamics analysis for the two jets is performed using a new method of image processing, namely dynamic mode decomposition. A validation of this method is also proposed suggesting that the dynamical mode decomposition (DMD) image processing method succeeds in capturing the most dominant frequencies of the flow dynamics, which in our case are related to the quite special dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices.

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonographic findings in three dogs with lung lobe torsion

    PubMed Central

    CAIVANO, Domenico; BIRETTONI, Francesco; BUFALARI, Antonello; DE MONTE, Valentina; ANGELI, Giovanni; GIORGI, Maria Elena; PATATA, Valentina; PORCIELLO, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Lung lobe torsion is rare but life-threatening condition in the dog. Thoracic radiographs and conventional ultrasonography cannot be conclusive for the diagnosis, and computed tomography is useful but is limited by cost and availability. This report describes the findings of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in 3 dogs with lung lobe torsion. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography showed the absence or reduction of pulmonary vascularization secondary to twisting of the lung lobe around its bronchovascular pedicle in all three dogs. Moreover, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography distinguished partial pulmonary atelectasis from a lung lobe torsion. These preliminary results suggest that contrast-enhanced ultrasonography can improve the accuracy of conventional ultrasonography for detection of pulmonary blood flow compromise in dogs with lung lobe torsion. PMID:26498403

  12. Simultaneous occurrence of an aberrant right subclavian artery and accessory lobe of the liver.

    PubMed

    Kaidoh, Toshiyuki; Inoué, Takao

    2011-09-01

    We herein report a case showing the simultaneous occurrence of an aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) and accessory lobe of the liver in a 75-year-old female cadaver. In the thorax, the left aortic arch branched into the right common carotid artery, left common carotid artery, left subclavian artery, and ARSA, in that order. The ARSA was dilated at its origin to form Kommerell's diverticulum and coursed behind the esophagus. This diverticulum seemed to press the esophagus. A right-sided thoracic duct was identified that emptied into the angulus venosus. In the right-sided neck, a nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve was found. In the abdominal cavity, an accessory lobe protruded from the anterior margin of the left liver lobe. The accessory lobe was separated from the left lobe by a transverse furrow on the anterior side. We discuss possible common causes of these anomalies during development.

  13. Brain mapping of epileptic activity in a case of idiopathic occipital lobe epilepsy (Panayiotopoulos syndrome).

    PubMed

    Leal, Alberto J R; Nunes, Sofia; Martins, António; Secca, Mário Forjaz; Jordão, Constança

    2007-06-01

    The Panayiotopoulos type of occipital lobe epilepsy has generated great interest, but the particular brain areas involved in the peculiar seizure manifestations have not been established. We studied a patient with the syndrome, using high-resolution EEG and simultaneous EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Resolution of the scalp EEG was improved using a realistic spline Laplacian algorithm, and produced a complex distribution of current sinks and sources over the occipital lobe. The spike-related blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) effect was multifocal, with clusters in lateral and inferior occipital lobe and lateral and anterior temporal lobe. We also performed regional dipole seeding in BOLD clusters to determine their relative contribution to generation of scalp spikes. The integrated model of the neurophysiologic and vascular data strongly suggests that the epileptic activity originates in the lateral occipital area, spreading to the occipital pole and lateral temporal lobe.

  14. Temporal-lobe morphology differs between healthy adolescents and those with early-onset of depression.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mahdi; Johnsrude, Ingrid; Rasoulian, Abtin; Bosma, Rachael; Tong, Ryan; Hollenstein, Tom; Harkness, Kate; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has previously been linked to structural changes in several brain regions, particularly in the medial temporal lobes (Bellani, Baiano, Brambilla, 2010; Bellani, Baiano, Brambilla, 2011). This has been determined using voxel-based morphometry, segmentation algorithms, and analysis of shape deformations (Bell-McGinty et al., 2002; Bergouignan et al., 2009; Posener et al., 2003; Vasic et al., 2008; Zhao et al., 2008): these are methods in which information related to the shape and the pose (the size, and anatomical position and orientation) of structures is lost. Here, we incorporate information about shape and pose to measure structural deformation in adolescents and young adults with and without depression (as measured using the Beck Depression Inventory and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria). As a hypothesis-generating study, a significance level of p < 0.05, uncorrected for multiple comparisons, was used, so that subtle morphological differences in brain structures between adolescent depressed individuals and control participants could be identified. We focus on changes in cortical and subcortical temporal structures, and use a multi-object statistical pose and shape model to analyze imaging data from 16 females (aged 16-21) and 3 males (aged 18) with early-onset MDD, and 25 female and 1 male normal control participants, drawn from the same age range. The hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, putamen, and superior, inferior and middle temporal gyri in both hemispheres of the brain were automatically segmented using the LONI Probabilistic Brain Atlas (Shattuck et al., 2008) in MNI space. Points on the surface of each structure in the atlas were extracted and warped to each participant's structural MRI. These surface points were analyzed to extract the pose and shape features. Pose differences were detected between the two groups, particularly in the left and right putamina, right hippocampus, and left and

  15. Constraining the sedimentology and stratigraphy of submarine intraslope lobe deposits using exhumed examples from the Karoo Basin, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spychala, Y. T.; Hodgson, D. M.; Flint, S. S.; Mountney, N. P.

    2015-06-01

    Intraslope lobe deposits provide a process record of the infill of accommodation on submarine slopes and their recognition enables the accurate reconstruction of the stratigraphic evolution of submarine slope systems. Extensive exposures of discrete sand-prone packages in Units D/E and E, Fort Brown Formation, Karoo Basin, South Africa, permit analysis of the sedimentology and stacking patterns of three intraslope lobe complexes and their palaeogeographic reconstruction via bed-scale analysis and physical correlation of key stratal surfaces. The sand-prone packages comprise tabular, aggradationally to slightly compensationally stacked lobe deposits with constituent facies associations that can be attributed to lobe axis, lobe off-axis, lobe-fringe and distal lobe-fringe environments. Locally, intraslope lobe deposits are incised by low aspect ratio channels that mark basinward progradation of the deepwater system. The origin of accommodation on the slope for lobe deposition is interpreted to be due to differential compaction or healing of scars from mass wasting processes. The stacking patterns and sedimentary facies arrangement identified in this study are distinct from those of more commonly recognized basin-floor lobe deposits, thereby enabling the establishment of recognition criteria for intraslope lobe deposits in other less well exposed and studied fine-grained systems. Compared to basin floor lobes, intraslope lobes are smaller in volume, influenced by higher degrees of confinement, and tend to show aggradational stacking patterns.

  16. Neuropsychological status in older adults influences susceptibility to false memories.

    PubMed

    Meade, Michelle L; Geraci, Lisa D; Roediger, Henry L

    2012-01-01

    In 2 experiments we examined the influence of frontal lobe function on older adults' susceptibility to false memory in a categorized list paradigm. Using a neuropsychological battery of tests developed by Glisky, Polster, and Routhieaux (1995), we designated older adults as having high- or low-frontal function. Young and older adults studied and were tested on categorized lists using free report cued recall and forced report cued recall instructions, with the latter requiring participants to produce responses even if they had to guess. Under free report cued recall instructions, frontal lobe function was a strong predictor of false memories in older adults: Older adults who scored low on tests of frontal functioning demonstrated much higher levels of false recall than younger adults, whereas levels of false recall in high-frontal older adults were more similar to those of young adults. However, after forced report cued recall, high- and low-frontal older adults performed similarly to each other, and both demonstrated higher levels of false recall than young adults. On a final recognition test, high-frontal older adults in both the free report cued recall and forced report cued recall conditions were more successful than low-frontal older adults in using source information to reduce memory errors. The results indicate that older adults show higher levels of false recall than younger adults, but type of test (free report or forced report) and neuropsychological status of older adults mediate these effects. Low-frontal older adults are particularly susceptible to producing false memories on free report tests that entail source monitoring. PMID:23350303

  17. Distribution of APGWamide-immunoreactivity in the brain and reproductive organs of adult pygmy squid, Idiosepius pygmaeus.

    PubMed

    Sirinupong, P; Suwanjarat, J; van Minnen, J

    2011-12-01

    The neuropeptide APGWamide is involved in the control of the reproductive behavior in molluscs. Using immunocytochemistry, we investigated the distribution of APGWa-immunoreactive neurons in the brain and reproductive organs of adult male and female specimen of Idiosepius pygmaeus. The study showed that the APGWamide-immunoreactive neurons and fibers are localized in the dorsal basal and vertical lobes of the supraesophageal mass, the palliovisceral lobe of the posterior subesophageal mass and olfactory lobe of the optic tract in male brains, with the highest number of APGWamide-immunoreactive neurons in the palliovisceral and olfactory lobes. In females, only the palliovisceral and olfactory lobes contained APGWa-immunoreactive neurons. The number of APGWamide-immunoreactive neurons in male I. pygmaeus brain is significantly higher than in females. Furthermore, APGWamide-immunoreactive fibers are localized exclusively in male reproductive organs and mantle muscles. Together these data suggest a role for APGW-amide in the control of male reproduction.

  18. Developmental trajectories of the fronto-temporal lobes from infancy to early adulthood in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Chiaki; Matsui, Mie; Uematsu, Akiko; Noguchi, Kyo; Miyawaki, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Brain development during early life in healthy individuals is rapid and dynamic, indicating that this period plays a very important role in neural and functional development. The frontal and temporal lobes are known to play a particularly important role in cognition. The study of healthy frontal and temporal lobe development in children is therefore of considerable importance. A better understanding of how these brain regions develop could also aid in the diagnosis and treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. Some developmental studies have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine infant brains, but it remains the case that relatively little is known about cortical brain development in the first few years of life. In the present study we examined whole brain, temporal lobe and frontal lobe developmental trajectories from infancy to early adulthood in healthy individuals, considering gender and brain hemisphere differences. We performed a cross-sectional, longitudinal morphometric MRI study of 114 healthy individuals (54 females and 60 males) aged 1 month to 25 years old (mean age ± SD 8.8 ± 6.9). We measured whole brain, temporal and frontal lobe gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM) volumes, following previously used protocols. There were significant non-linear age-related volume changes in all regions. Peak ages of whole brain, temporal lobe and frontal lobe development occurred around pre-adolescence (9-12 years old). GM volumes for all regions increased significantly as a function of age. Peak age was nevertheless lobe specific, with a pattern of earlier peak ages for females in both temporal and frontal lobes. Growth change in whole brain GM volume was larger in males than in females. However, GM volume growth changes for the temporal and frontal lobes showed a somewhat different pattern. GM volume for both temporal and frontal lobes showed a greater increase in females until around 5-6 years old, at which point this tendency reversed (GM volume

  19. Intrinsic controls on the range of volumes, morphologies, and dimensions of submarine lobes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prelat, A.; Covault, J.A.; Hodgson, D.M.; Fildani, A.; Flint, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Submarine lobe dimensions from six different systems are compared: 1) the exhumed Permian Fan 3 lobe complex of the Tanqua Karoo, South Africa; 2) the modern Amazon fan channel-mouth lobe complex, offshore Brazil; 3) a portion of the modern distal Za??re fan, offshore Angola/Congo; 4) a Pleistocene fan of the Kutai basin, subsurface offshore Indonesia; 5) the modern Golo system, offshore east Corsica, France; and 6) a shallow subsurface lobe complex , offshore Nigeria. These six systems have significantly different source-to-sink configurations (shelf dimension and slope topography), sediment supply characteristics (available grain size range and supply rate), tectonic settings, (palaeo) latitude, and delivery systems. Despite these differences, lobe deposits share similar geometric and dimensional characteristics. Lobes are grouped into two distinct populations of geometries that can be related to basin floor topography. The first population corresponds to areally extensive but thin lobes (average width 14km??length 35km??thickness 12m) that were deposited onto low relief basin floor areas. Examples of such systems include the Tanqua Karoo, the Amazon, and the Za??re systems. The second population corresponds to areally smaller but thicker lobes (average width 5km??length 8km??thickness 30m) that were deposited into settings with higher amplitude of relief, like in the Corsican trough, the Kutai basin, and offshore Nigeria. The two populations of lobe types, however, share similar volumes (a narrow range around 1 or 2km3), which suggests that there is a control to the total volume of sediment that individual lobes can reach before they shift to a new locus of deposition. This indicates that the extrinsic processes control the number of lobes deposited per unit time rather than their dimensions. Two alternative hypotheses are presented to explain the similarities in lobe volumes calculated from the six very different systems. The first states that the wide range of

  20. On the Origin of Fanaroff-Riley Classification of Radio Galaxies: Deceleration of Supersonic Radio Lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakatu, Nozomu; Kino, Motoki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2009-06-01

    We argue that the origin of "FRI/FRII dichotomy"—the division between Fanaroff-Riley class I (FRI) with subsonic lobes and class II (FRII) radio sources with supersonic lobes is sharp in the radio-optical luminosity plane (Owen-White diagram)—can be explained by the deceleration of advancing radio lobes. The deceleration is caused by the growth of the effective cross-sectional area of radio lobes. We derive the condition in which an initially supersonic lobe turns into a subsonic lobe, combining the ram pressure equilibrium between the hot spots and the ambient medium with the relation between "the hot spot radius" and "the linear size of radio sources" obtained from the radio observations. We find that the dividing line between the supersonic lobes and subsonic ones is determined by the ratio of the jet power L j to the number density of the ambient matter at the core radius of the host galaxy \\bar{n}_a. It is also found that the maximal ratio of (L_j/\\bar{n}_a) exists and its value resides in (L_j/\\bar{n}_a)_max≈ 10^{44-47} erg s^{-1} cm^{3}, taking into account considerable uncertainties. This suggests that the maximal value (L_j/\\bar{n}_a)_max separates between FRIs and FRIIs.

  1. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 1: Experimental and analytical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.; Paterson, R. W.; Skebe, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A joint analytical and experimental investigation of three-dimensional flowfield development within the lobe region of turbofan forced mixer nozzles is described. The objective was to develop a method for predicting the lobe exit flowfield. In the analytical approach, a linearized inviscid aerodynamical theory was used for representing the axial and secondary flows within the three-dimensional convoluted mixer lobes and three-dimensional boundary layer analysis was applied thereafter to account for viscous effects. The experimental phase of the program employed three planar mixer lobe models having different waveform shapes and lobe heights for which detailed measurements were made of the three-dimensional velocity field and total pressure field at the lobe exit plane. Velocity data was obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and total pressure probing and hot wire anemometry were employed to define exit plane total pressure and boundary layer development. Comparison of data and analysis was performed to assess analytical model prediction accuracy. As a result of this study a planar mixed geometry analysis was developed. A principal conclusion is that the global mixer lobe flowfield is inviscid and can be predicted from an inviscid analysis and Kutta condition.

  2. Temporal lobe structures and facial emotion recognition in schizophrenia patients and nonpsychotic relatives.

    PubMed

    Goghari, Vina M; Macdonald, Angus W; Sponheim, Scott R

    2011-11-01

    Temporal lobe abnormalities and emotion recognition deficits are prominent features of schizophrenia and appear related to the diathesis of the disorder. This study investigated whether temporal lobe structural abnormalities were associated with facial emotion recognition deficits in schizophrenia and related to genetic liability for the disorder. Twenty-seven schizophrenia patients, 23 biological family members, and 36 controls participated. Several temporal lobe regions (fusiform, superior temporal, middle temporal, amygdala, and hippocampus) previously associated with face recognition in normative samples and found to be abnormal in schizophrenia were evaluated using volumetric analyses. Participants completed a facial emotion recognition task and an age recognition control task under time-limited and self-paced conditions. Temporal lobe volumes were tested for associations with task performance. Group status explained 23% of the variance in temporal lobe volume. Left fusiform gray matter volume was decreased by 11% in patients and 7% in relatives compared with controls. Schizophrenia patients additionally exhibited smaller hippocampal and middle temporal volumes. Patients were unable to improve facial emotion recognition performance with unlimited time to make a judgment but were able to improve age recognition performance. Patients additionally showed a relationship between reduced temporal lobe gray matter and poor facial emotion recognition. For the middle temporal lobe region, the relationship between greater volume and better task performance was specific to facial emotion recognition and not age recognition. Because schizophrenia patients exhibited a specific deficit in emotion recognition not attributable to a generalized impairment in face perception, impaired emotion recognition may serve as a target for interventions.

  3. Identification of putative odorant binding protein genes in Asecodes hispinarum, a parasitoid of coconut leaf beetle (Brontispa longissima) by antennal RNA-Seq analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Keming; Yang, Xiangbing; Xu, Guiying; Cao, Yang; Lu, Baoqian; Peng, Zhengqiang

    2015-11-20

    Asecodes hispinarum (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is an endoparasitoid and an efficient biological control agent which attacks larvae of Brontispa longissima, a serious insect pest of Palmae plants in China. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are believed to be important for transporting semiochemicals through the aqueous sensillar lymph to the olfactory receptor cells within the insect antennal sensilla. No previous study has reported on OBPs in A. hispinarum. In this study, we conducted the large-scale identification of OBP genes from the antennae of A. hispinarum by using transcriptome sequencing. Approximately 28.4 million total raw reads and about 27.3 million total clean reads were obtained, and then 46,363 unigenes were assembled. Of these unigenes, a total of 21,263 can be annotated in the NCBI non-redundant database. Among the annotated unigenes, 16,623 of them can be assigned to GO (Gene Ontology). Furthermore, we identified 8 putative OBP genes, and a phylogenetic tree analysis was performed to characterize the 8 OBP genes. In addition, the expression of the 8 OBP genes in different A. hispinarum body tissues was analyzed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results indicated that the 8 OBP genes were expressed accordingly to sexes and tissues, but all highly expressed in antennae. The finding of this study will lay the foundation for unraveling molecular mechanisms of A. hispinarum chemoperception. PMID:26454175

  4. Anatomy of the antennal dorsal organ in female of Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae): A peculiar sensory structure possibly involved in perception of host vibration.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Paola; Isidoro, Nunzio; Ruschioni, Sara; Minuz, Roxana L; Bin, Ferdinando; Romani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae) is a natural enemy of the planthopper Metcalfa pruinosa, which was introduced from North America into Europe and has become established in various regions as a pest species. Vibrational signals play a crucial role in the communication of M. pruinosa, which appears to be exploited by N. typhlocybae. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy have shown that the antennae of N. typhlocybae females have peculiar and complex sensory structures: deep longitudinal grooves that house long sensilla trichodea, termed here "Antennal Dorsal Organs." Such structures were not present on male antennae. These sensilla extend for the length of the grooves, without contact with the groove cuticle. Their hair shaft is empty and aporous, and inserted into a specialized socket, underneath which there is a cuticular ampulla-like chamber. Each sensillum is associated with two sensory neurons: one terminates at the proximal end of the dendritic sheath; the other continues into the sensillum sinus and is enclosed in the dendritic sheath. This second sensory neuron then enters the ampulla-like chamber through the circular opening, and then terminates with a conspicuous tubular body at the shaft base. The possible involvement of this peculiar structure in the context of host recognition mechanism is discussed.

  5. On-line, voluntary control of human temporal lobe neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Moran; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Mormann, Florian; Kraskov, Alexander; Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    Daily life continually confronts us with an exuberance of external, sensory stimuli competing with a rich stream of internal deliberations, plans and ruminations. The brain must select one or more of these for further processing. How this competition is resolved across multiple sensory and cognitive regions is not known; nor is it clear how internal thoughts and attention regulate this competition1–4. Recording from single neurons in patients implanted with intracranial electrodes for clinical reasons5–9, here we demonstrate that humans can regulate the activity of their neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) to alter the outcome of the contest between external images and their internal representation. Subjects looked at a hybrid superposition of two images representing familiar individuals, landmarks, objects or animals and had to enhance one image at the expense of the other, competing one. Simultaneously, the spiking activity of their MTL neurons in different subregions and hemispheres was decoded in real time to control the content of the hybrid. Subjects reliably regulated, often on the first trial, the firing rate of their neurons, increasing the rate of some while simultaneously decreasing the rate of others. They did so by focusing onto one image, which gradually became clearer on the computer screen in front of their eyes, and thereby overriding sensory input. On the basis of the firing of these MTL neurons, the dynamics of the competition between visual images in the subject's mind was visualized on an external display. PMID:20981100

  6. Influence of anxiety on memory performance in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Franklin C.; Westerveld, Michael; Langfitt, John T.; Hamberger, Marla; Hamid, Hamada; Shinnar, Shlomo; Sperling, Michael R.; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William; Tracy, Joseph; Masur, David; Bazil, Carl W.; Spencer, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety contributed to inconsistent material-specific memory difficulties among 243 temporal lobe epilepsy patients from the Multisite Epilepsy Study. Visual memory performance on the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT) was lower for those with high versus low level of anxiety, but was not found to be related to side of TLE. Verbal memory on the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was significantly lower for left than right TLE patients with low anxiety, but equally impaired for those with high anxiety. These results suggest that we can place more confidence in the ability of verbal memory tests like the CVLT to lateralize to left TLE for those with low anxiety, but that verbal memory will be less likely to produce lateralizing information for those with high anxiety. This suggests that more caution is needed when interpreting verbal memory tests for those with high anxiety. These results indicated that RCFT performance was significantly affected by anxiety and did not lateralize to either side, regardless of anxiety level. This study adds to the existing literature which suggests that drawing-based visual memory tests do not lateralize among TLE patients, regardless of anxiety level. PMID:24291525

  7. Influence of anxiety on memory performance in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Franklin C; Westerveld, Michael; Langfitt, John T; Hamberger, Marla; Hamid, Hamada; Shinnar, Shlomo; Sperling, Michael R; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William; Tracy, Joseph; Masur, David; Bazil, Carl W; Spencer, Susan S

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety contributed to inconsistent material-specific memory difficulties among 243 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy from the Multisite Epilepsy Study. Visual memory performance on the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT) was poorer for those with high versus low levels of anxiety but was not found to be related to the TLE side. The verbal memory score on the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was significantly lower for patients with left-sided TLE than for patients with right-sided TLE with low anxiety levels but equally impaired for those with high anxiety levels. These results suggest that we can place more confidence in the ability of verbal memory tests like the CVLT to lateralize to left-sided TLE for those with low anxiety levels, but that verbal memory will be less likely to produce lateralizing information for those with high anxiety levels. This suggests that more caution is needed when interpreting verbal memory tests for those with high anxiety levels. These results indicated that RCFT performance was significantly affected by anxiety and did not lateralize to either side, regardless of anxiety levels. This study adds to the existing literature which suggests that drawing-based visual memory tests do not lateralize among patients with TLE, regardless of anxiety levels.

  8. Semantic Processing Impairment in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jaimes-Bautista, Amanda G; Rodríguez-Camacho, Mario; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth

    2015-01-01

    The impairment in episodic memory system is the best-known cognitive deficit in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recent studies have shown evidence of semantic disorders, but they have been less studied than episodic memory. The semantic dysfunction in TLE has various cognitive manifestations, such as the presence of language disorders characterized by defects in naming, verbal fluency, or remote semantic information retrieval, which affects the ability of patients to interact with their surroundings. This paper is a review of recent research about the consequences of TLE on semantic processing, considering neuropsychological, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging findings, as well as the functional role of the hippocampus in semantic processing. The evidence from these studies shows disturbance of semantic memory in patients with TLE and supports the theory of declarative memory of the hippocampus. Functional neuroimaging studies show an inefficient compensatory functional reorganization of semantic networks and electrophysiological studies show a lack of N400 effect that could indicate that the deficit in semantic processing in patients with TLE could be due to a failure in the mechanisms of automatic access to lexicon. PMID:26257956

  9. Impaired recognition of scary music following unilateral temporal lobe excision.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nathalie; Peretz, Isabelle; Noulhiane, Marion; Hasboun, Dominique; Beckett, Christine; Baulac, Michel; Samson, Séverine

    2005-03-01

    Music constitutes an ideal means to create a sense of suspense in films. However, there has been minimal investigation into the underlying cerebral organization for perceiving danger created by music. In comparison, the amygdala's role in recognition of fear in non-musical contexts has been well established. The present study sought to fill this gap in exploring how patients with amygdala resection recognize emotional expression in music. To this aim, we tested 16 patients with left (LTR; n = 8) or right (RTR; n = 8) medial temporal resection (including amygdala) for the relief of medically intractable seizures and 16 matched controls in an emotion recognition task involving instrumental music. The musical selections were purposely created to induce fear, peacefulness, happiness and sadness. Participants were asked to rate to what extent each musical passage expressed these four emotions on 10-point scales. In order to check for the presence of a perceptual problem, the same musical selections were presented to the participants in an error detection task. None of the patients was found to perform below controls in the perceptual task. In contrast, both LTR and RTR patients were found to be impaired in the recognition of scary music. Recognition of happy and sad music was normal. These findings suggest that the anteromedial temporal lobe (including the amygdala) plays a role in the recogni