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Sample records for adult antennal lobe

  1. The glial investment of the adult and developing antennal lobe of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Oland, Lynne A.; Biebelhausen, John P.; Tolbert, Leslie P.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the Drosophila olfactory system, with its unparalleled opportunities for genetic dissection of development and functional organization, has been used to study the development of central olfactory neurons and the molecular basis of olfactory coding. The results of these studies have been interpreted in the absence of a detailed understanding of the steps in maturation of glial cells in the antennal lobe. Here, we present a high-resolution study of the glia associated with olfactory glomeruli in adult and developing antennal lobes. The study provides a basis for comparison of findings in Drosophila with those in the moth Manduca sexta that indicate a critical role for glia in antennal lobe development. Using flies expressing GFP under a Nervana2 driver to visualize glia for confocal microscopy, and probing at higher resolution with the electron microscope, we find that glial development in Drosophila differs markedly from that in moths: glial cell bodies remain in a rind around the glomerular neuropil; glial processes ensheathe axon bundles in the nerve layer but likely contribute little to axonal sorting; their processes insinuate between glomeruli only very late and then form only a sparse, open network around each glomerulus; and glial processes invade the synaptic neuropil. Taking our results in the context of previous studies, we conclude that glial cells in the developing Drosophila antennal lobe are unlikely to play a strong role in either axonal sorting or glomerulus stabilization and that in the adult, glial processes do not electrically isolate glomeruli from their neighbors. PMID:18537134

  2. Early olfactory experience modifies neural activity in the antennal lobe of a social insect at the adult stage.

    PubMed

    Arenas, A; Giurfa, M; Farina, W M; Sandoz, J C

    2009-10-01

    In the antennal lobe (AL), the first olfactory centre of the insect brain, odorants are represented as spatiotemporal patterns of glomerular activity. Whether and how such patterns are modified in the long term after precocious olfactory experiences (i.e. in the first days of adulthood) remains unknown. To address this question, we used in vivo optical imaging of calcium activity in the antennal lobe of 17-day-old honeybees which either experienced an odorant associated with sucrose solution 5-8 days after emergence or were left untreated. In both cases, we imaged neural responses to the learned odor and to three novel odors varying in functional group and carbon-chain length. Two different odor concentrations were used. We also measured behavioral responses of 17-day-old honeybees, treated and untreated, to these stimuli. We show that precocious olfactory experience increased general odor-induced activity and the number of activated glomeruli in the adult AL, but also affected qualitative odor representations, which appeared shifted in the neural space of treated animals relative to control animals. Such effects were not limited to the experienced odor, but were generalized to other perceptually similar odors. A similar trend was found in behavioral experiments, in which increased responses to the learned odor extended to perceptually similar odors in treated bees. Our results show that early olfactory experiences have long-lasting effects, reflected in behavioral responses to odorants and concomitant neural activity in the adult olfactory system.

  3. The antennal lobe of Libellula depressa (Odonata, Libellulidae).

    PubMed

    Rebora, Manuela; Dell'otto, Alessandro; Rybak, Jürgen; Piersanti, Silvana; Gaino, Elda; Hansson, Bill S

    2013-08-01

    Here we describe the antennal lobe of Libellula depressa (Odonata, Libellulidae), identified on the basis of the projections of the afferent sensory neurons stemming from the antennal flagellum sensilla. Immunohistochemical neuropil staining as well as antennal backfills revealed sensory neuron terminal arborizations covering a large portion of the antennal lobe. No clear glomerular structure was identified, thus suggesting an aglomerular antennal lobe condition as previously reported in Palaeoptera. The terminal arbors of backfilled sensory neurons do, however, form spherical knots, probably representing the connections between the few afferent neurons and the antennal lobe interneurons. The reconstruction revealed that the proximal part of the antennal nerve is divided into two branches that innervate two spatially separated areas of the antennal lobe, an anterioventral lobe and a larger posteriodorsal lobe. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that one tract of the antennal nerve of L. depressa contains olfactory sensory neurons projecting into one of the sublobes, while the other tract contains thermo-hygroreceptive neurons projecting into the other sublobe.

  4. Glomerular interactions in olfactory processing channels of the antennal lobes

    PubMed Central

    Heinbockel, Thomas; Shields, Vonnie D. C.; Reisenman, Carolina E.

    2014-01-01

    An open question in olfactory coding is the extent of interglomerular connectivity: do olfactory glomeruli and their neurons regulate the odorant responses of neurons innervating other glomeruli? In the olfactory system of the moth Manduca sexta, the response properties of different types of antennal olfactory receptor cells are known. Likewise, a subset of antennal lobe glomeruli has been functionally characterized and the olfactory tuning of their innervating neurons identified. This provides a unique opportunity to determine functional interactions between glomeruli of known input, specifically, (1) glomeruli processing plant odors and (2) glomeruli activated by antennal stimulation with pheromone components of conspecific females. Several studies describe reciprocal inhibitory effects between different types of pheromone-responsive projection neurons suggesting lateral inhibitory interactions between pheromone component-selective glomerular neural circuits. Furthermore, antennal lobe projection neurons that respond to host plant volatiles and innervate single, ordinary glomeruli are inhibited during antennal stimulation with the female’s sex pheromone. The studies demonstrate the existence of lateral inhibitory effects in response to behaviorally significant odorant stimuli and irrespective of glomerular location in the antennal lobe. Inhibitory interactions are present within and between olfactory subsystems (pheromonal and non-pheromonal subsystems), potentially to enhance contrast and strengthen odorant discrimination. PMID:23893248

  5. Neural representation of olfactory mixtures in the honeybee antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Deisig, Nina; Giurfa, Martin; Lachnit, Harald; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2006-08-01

    Natural olfactory stimuli occur as mixtures of many single odors. We studied whether the representation of a mixture in the brain retains single-odor information and how much mixture-specific information it includes. To understand mixture representation in the honeybee brain, we used in vivo calcium imaging at the level of the antennal lobe, and systematically measured odor-evoked activity in 24 identified glomeruli in response to four single odorants and all their possible binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures. Qualitatively, mixture-induced activity patterns always contained glomeruli belonging to the pattern of at least one of the components, suggesting a high conservation of component information in olfactory mixtures. Quantitatively, glomerular activity saturated quickly and increasing the number of components resulted in an increase of cases in which the response of a glomerulus to the mixture was lower than that to the strongest component ('suppression'). This shows global inhibition in the antennal lobe, probably acting as overall gain control. Single components were not equally salient (in terms of number of active glomeruli) and mixture activity patterns were always more similar to the more salient components, in a way that could be predicted linearly. Thus, although a gain control system in the honeybee antennal lobe prevents saturation of the olfactory system, mixture representation follows essentially elemental rules.

  6. Representation of Thermal Information in the Antennal Lobe of Leaf-Cutting Ants

    PubMed Central

    Ruchty, Markus; Helmchen, Fritjof; Wehner, Rüdiger; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Insects are equipped with various types of antennal sensilla, which house thermosensitive neurons adapted to receive different parameters of the thermal environment for a variety of temperature-guided behaviors. In the leaf-cutting ant Atta vollenweideri, the physiology and the morphology of the thermosensitive sensillum coeloconicum (Sc) has been thoroughly investigated. However, the central projections of its receptor neurons are unknown. Here we selectively stained the three neurons found in single Sc and tracked their axons into the brain of Atta vollenweideri workers. Each of the three axons terminates in a single glomerulus of the antennal lobe (Sc-glomeruli). Two of the innervated glomeruli are adjacent to each other and are located laterally, while the third one is clearly separated and located medially in the antennal lobe. Using two-photon Ca2+ imaging of antennal lobe projection neurons, we studied where in the antennal lobe thermal information is represented. In the 11 investigated antennal lobes, we found up to 10 different glomeruli in a single specimen responding to temperature stimulation. Both, warm- and cold-sensitive glomeruli could be identified. The thermosensitive glomeruli were mainly located in the medial part of the antennal lobe. Based on the general representation of thermal information in the antennal lobe and functional data on the Sc-glomeruli we conclude that temperature stimuli received by Sc are processed in the medial of the three target glomeruli. The present study reveals an important role of the antennal lobe in temperature processing and links a specific thermosensitive neuron to its central target glomerulus. PMID:21120133

  7. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M; Schachtner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system.

  8. Inhibitory connections in the honeybee antennal lobe are spatially patchy.

    PubMed

    Girardin, Cyrille C; Kreissl, Sabine; Galizia, C Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The olfactory system is a classical model for studying sensory processing. The first olfactory brain center [the olfactory bulb of vertebrates and the antennal lobe (AL) of insects] contains spherical neuropiles called glomeruli. Each glomerulus receives the information from one olfactory receptor type. Interglomerular computation is accomplished by lateral connectivity via interneurons. However, the spatial and functional organization of these lateral connections is not completely understood. Here we studied the spatial logic in the AL of the honeybee. We combined topical application of neurotransmitters, olfactory stimulations, and in vivo calcium imaging to visualize the arrangement of lateral connections. Suppression of activity in a single glomerulus with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) while presenting an odor reveals the existence of inhibitory interactions. Stimulating a glomerulus with acetylcholine (ACh) activates inhibitory interglomerular connections that can reduce odor-evoked responses. We show that this lateral network is patchy, in that individual glomeruli inhibit other glomeruli with graded strength, but in a spatially discontinuous manner. These results suggest that processing of olfactory information requires combinatorial activity patterns with complex topologies across the AL.

  9. Variations on a Theme: Antennal Lobe Architecture across Coleoptera

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, Martin; Schmidt, Rovenna; Heuer, Carsten M.

    2016-01-01

    Beetles comprise about 400,000 described species, nearly one third of all known animal species. The enormous success of the order Coleoptera is reflected by a rich diversity of lifestyles, behaviors, morphological, and physiological adaptions. All these evolutionary adaptions that have been driven by a variety of parameters over the last about 300 million years, make the Coleoptera an ideal field to study the evolution of the brain on the interface between the basic bauplan of the insect brain and the adaptions that occurred. In the current study we concentrated on the paired antennal lobes (AL), the part of the brain that is typically responsible for the first processing of olfactory information collected from olfactory sensilla on antenna and mouthparts. We analyzed 63 beetle species from 22 different families and thus provide an extensive comparison of principal neuroarchitecture of the AL. On the examined anatomical level, we found a broad diversity including AL containing a wide range of glomeruli numbers reaching from 50 to 150 glomeruli and several species with numerous small glomeruli, resembling the microglomerular design described in acridid grasshoppers and diving beetles, and substructures within the glomeruli that have to date only been described for the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida. A first comparison of the various anatomical features of the AL with available descriptions of lifestyle and behaviors did so far not reveal useful correlations. In summary, the current study provides a solid basis for further studies to unravel mechanisms that are basic to evolutionary adaptions of the insect olfactory system. PMID:27973569

  10. Morphology and physiology of antennal lobe projection neurons in the hawkmoth Agrius convolvuli.

    PubMed

    Nirazawa, Takuya; Fujii, Takeshi; Seki, Yoichi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Kazawa, Tomoki; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Ishikawa, Yukio

    2017-04-01

    The neuronal pathways involved in the processing of sex pheromone information were investigated in the hawkmoth Agrius convolvuli (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), which uses (E,E)-11,13-hexadecadienal (E11,E13-16:Ald) as the single sex pheromone component. We first clarified the anatomical organization of the antennal lobe of A. convolvuli. Subsequently, central neurons in the antennal lobe that responded to E11,E13-16:Ald were identified. The dendritic processes of these neurons were confined within a specific glomerulus (cumulus) in the antennal lobe. The axons of these neurons projected to the inferior lateral protocerebrum and mushroom body calyx. Although the anatomical organization and morphology of individual neurons in A. convolvuli were similar to other species in the superfamily Bombycoidea, the use of cumulus as the single pathway for sex pheromone information processing was characteristic to this species.

  11. A 4-Dimensional Representation of Antennal Lobe Output Based on an Ensemble of Characterized Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Erich M.; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Daly, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    A central problem facing studies of neural encoding in sensory systems is how to accurately quantify the extent of spatial and temporal responses. In this study, we take advantage of the relatively simple and stereotypic neural architecture found in invertebrates. We combine standard electrophysiological techniques, recently developed population analysis techniques, and novel anatomical methods to form an innovative 4-dimensional view of odor output representations in the antennal lobe of the moth Manduca sexta. This novel approach allows quantification of olfactory responses of characterized neurons with spike time resolution. Additionally, arbitrary integration windows can be used for comparisons with other methods such as imaging. By assigning statistical significance to changes in neuronal firing, this method can visualize activity across the entire antennal lobe. The resulting 4-dimensional representation of antennal lobe output complements imaging and multi-unit experiments yet provides a more comprehensive and accurate view of glomerular activation patterns in spike time resolution. PMID:19464513

  12. Morphological characterization of the antennal lobes in the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Solari, Paolo; Corda, Valentina; Sollai, Giorgia; Kreissl, Sabine; Galizia, C Giovanni; Crnjar, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    The medfly Ceratitis capitata is one of the most important pests for horticulture worldwide. The knowledge about anatomy and function of the medfly olfactory system is still limited. The first brain structure to process olfactory information in insects is the antennal lobe (AL), which is composed of its functional and morphological units, the olfactory glomeruli. Here, we present a morphological three-dimensional reconstruction of AL glomeruli in adult brains. We used unilateral antennal backfills of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) with neural tracers, revealing the AL structure. We recorded confocal stacks acquired from whole-mount specimens, and analyzed them with the software AMIRA. The ALs in C. capitata are organized in glomeruli which are more tightly packed in the anterior part than the posterior one. Axons of ORNs bilaterally connect the ALs through a commissure between the two ALs. This commissure is formed by several distinct fascicles. Contralateral dye transfer suggests the presence of gap junctions connecting ORNs from both antennae. There was no statistical difference between the average volumes of female ALs (204,166 ± 12,554 μm(3)) and of male ALs (190,287 ± 11,823 μm(3)). In most specimens, we counted 53 glomeruli in each AL, seven of which were sexually dimorphic in size.

  13. Functional integration of a serotonergic neuron in the Drosophila antennal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Gaudry, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin plays a critical role in regulating many behaviors that rely on olfaction and recently there has been great effort in determining how this molecule functions in vivo. However, it remains unknown how serotonergic neurons that innervate the first olfactory relay respond to odor stimulation and how they integrate synaptically into local circuits. We examined the sole pair of serotonergic neurons that innervates the Drosophila antennal lobe (the first olfactory relay) to characterize their physiology, connectivity, and contribution to pheromone processing. We report that nearly all odors inhibit these cells, likely through connections made reciprocally within the antennal lobe. Pharmacological and immunohistochemical analyses reveal that these neurons likely release acetylcholine in addition to serotonin and that exogenous and endogenous serotonin have opposing effects on olfactory responses. Finally, we show that activation of the entire serotonergic network, as opposed to only activation of those fibers innervating the antennal lobe, may be required for persistent serotonergic modulation of pheromone responses in the antennal lobe. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16836.001 PMID:27572257

  14. Sexual dimorphism and phenotypic plasticity in the antennal lobe of a stingless bee, Melipona scutellaris.

    PubMed

    Roselino, Ana Carolina; Hrncir, Michael; da Cruz Landim, Carminda; Giurfa, Martin; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2015-07-01

    Among social insects, the stingless bees (Apidae, Meliponini), a mainly tropical group of highly eusocial bees, present an intriguing variety of well-described olfactory-dependent behaviors showing both caste- and sex-specific adaptations. By contrast, little is known about the neural structures underlying such behavioral richness or the olfactory detection and processing abilities of this insect group. This study therefore aimed to provide the first detailed description and comparison of the brains and primary olfactory centers, the antennal lobes, of the different members of a colony of the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris. Global neutral red staining, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and 3D reconstructions were used to compare the brain structures of males, workers, and virgin queens with a special emphasis on the antennal lobe. We found significant differences between both sexes and castes with regard to the relative volumes of olfactory and visual neuropils in the brain and also in the number and volume of the olfactory glomeruli. In addition, we identified one (workers, queens) and three or four (males) macroglomeruli in the antennal lobe. In both sexes and all castes, the largest glomerulus (G1) was located at a similar position relative to four identified landmark glomeruli, close to the entrance of the antennal nerve. This similarity in position suggests that G1s of workers, virgin queens, and males of M. scutellaris may correspond to the same glomerular entity, possibly tuned to queen-emitted volatiles since all colony members need this information.

  15. Calcium imaging of odor-evoked responses in the Drosophila antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Silbering, Ana F; Bell, Rati; Galizia, C Giovanni; Benton, Richard

    2012-03-14

    The antennal lobe is the primary olfactory center in the insect brain and represents the anatomical and functional equivalent of the vertebrate olfactory bulb. Olfactory information in the external world is transmitted to the antennal lobe by olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), which segregate to distinct regions of neuropil called glomeruli according to the specific olfactory receptor they express. Here, OSN axons synapse with both local interneurons (LNs), whose processes can innervate many different glomeruli, and projection neurons (PNs), which convey olfactory information to higher olfactory brain regions. Optical imaging of the activity of OSNs, LNs and PNs in the antennal lobe - traditionally using synthetic calcium indicators (e.g. calcium green, FURA-2) or voltage-sensitive dyes (e.g. RH414) - has long been an important technique to understand how olfactory stimuli are represented as spatial and temporal patterns of glomerular activity in many species of insects. Development of genetically-encoded neural activity reporters, such as the fluorescent calcium indicators G-CaMP and Cameleon, the bioluminescent calcium indicator GFP-aequorin, or a reporter of synaptic transmission, synapto-pHluorin has made the olfactory system of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, particularly accessible to neurophysiological imaging, complementing its comprehensively-described molecular, electrophysiological and neuroanatomical properties. These reporters can be selectively expressed via binary transcriptional control systems (e.g. GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop, Q system) in defined populations of neurons within the olfactory circuitry to dissect with high spatial and temporal resolution how odor-evoked neural activity is represented, modulated and transformed. Here we describe the preparation and analysis methods to measure odor-evoked responses in the Drosophila antennal lobe using G-CaMP. The animal preparation is minimally invasive and can be adapted to imaging using wide

  16. Coding of odors by temporal binding within a model network of the locust antennal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mainak J.; Rangan, Aaditya V.; Cai, David

    2013-01-01

    The locust olfactory system interfaces with the external world through antennal receptor neurons (ORNs), which represent odors in a distributed, combinatorial manner. ORN axons bundle together to form the antennal nerve, which relays sensory information centrally to the antennal lobe (AL). Within the AL, an odor generates a dynamically evolving ensemble of active cells, leading to a stimulus-specific temporal progression of neuronal spiking. This experimental observation has led to the hypothesis that an odor is encoded within the AL by a dynamically evolving trajectory of projection neuron (PN) activity that can be decoded piecewise to ascertain odor identity. In order to study information coding within the locust AL, we developed a scaled-down model of the locust AL using Hodgkin–Huxley-type neurons and biologically realistic connectivity parameters and current components. Using our model, we examined correlations in the precise timing of spikes across multiple neurons, and our results suggest an alternative to the dynamic trajectory hypothesis. We propose that the dynamical interplay of fast and slow inhibition within the locust AL induces temporally stable correlations in the spiking activity of an odor-dependent neural subset, giving rise to a temporal binding code that allows rapid stimulus detection by downstream elements. PMID:23630495

  17. Serotonergic Modulation Differentially Targets Distinct Network Elements within the Antennal Lobe of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sizemore, Tyler R.; Dacks, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulation confers flexibility to anatomically-restricted neural networks so that animals are able to properly respond to complex internal and external demands. However, determining the mechanisms underlying neuromodulation is challenging without knowledge of the functional class and spatial organization of neurons that express individual neuromodulatory receptors. Here, we describe the number and functional identities of neurons in the antennal lobe of Drosophila melanogaster that express each of the receptors for one such neuromodulator, serotonin (5-HT). Although 5-HT enhances odor-evoked responses of antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) and local interneurons (LNs), the receptor basis for this enhancement is unknown. We used endogenous reporters of transcription and translation for each of the five 5-HT receptors (5-HTRs) to identify neurons, based on cell class and transmitter content, that express each receptor. We find that specific receptor types are expressed by distinct combinations of functional neuronal classes. For instance, the excitatory PNs express the excitatory 5-HTRs, while distinct classes of LNs each express different 5-HTRs. This study therefore provides a detailed atlas of 5-HT receptor expression within a well-characterized neural network, and enables future dissection of the role of serotonergic modulation of olfactory processing. PMID:27845422

  18. Excitatory Local Circuits and Their Implications for Olfactory Processing in the Fly Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yuhua; Claridge-Chang, Adam; Sjulson, Lucas; Pypaert, Marc; Miesenböck, Gero

    2007-01-01

    Summary Conflicting views exist of how circuits of the antennal lobe, the insect equivalent of the olfactory bulb, translate input from olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) into projection neuron (PN) output. Synaptic connections between ORNs and PNs are one-to-one, yet PNs are more broadly tuned to odors than ORNs. The basis for this difference in receptive range remains unknown. Analyzing a Drosophila mutant lacking ORN input to one glomerulus, we show that some of the apparent complexity in the antennal lobe’s output arises from lateral, interglomerular excitation of PNs. We describe a previously unidentified population of cholinergic local neurons (LNs) with multiglomerular processes. These excitatory LNs respond broadly to odors but exhibit little glomerular specificity in their synaptic output, suggesting that PNs are driven by a combination of glomerulus-specific ORN afferents and diffuse LN excitation. Lateral excitation may boost PN signals and enhance their transmission to third-order neurons in a mechanism akin to stochastic resonance. PMID:17289577

  19. Species and sexual differences in antennal lobe architecture and glomerular organization in two parasitoids with different degree of host specificity, Microplitis croceipes and Cotesia marginiventris.

    PubMed

    Das, Prithwiraj; Fadamiro, Henry Y

    2013-05-01

    The endoparasitic wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), Microplitis croceipes (specialist) and Cotesia marginiventris (generalist), are parasitoids of lepidopteran larvae and differ in their degree of host specificity. Recent studies have reported key differences between the two species in the abundance of antennal olfactory sensilla and their response to host-related volatiles. Here, we have compared antennal lobe architecture and glomerular organization in the two parasitoid species by using a combination of axonal tract tracing techniques and confocal microscopy. In M. croceipes, the medial half of the antennal lobe is larger with a greater number of glomeruli compared with the lateral half, whereas in C. marginiventris, the lateral half is larger than the median half. The volume of the antennal lobe is approximately 2.5 times greater in M. croceipes than in C. marginiventris. However, the number of glomeruli per antennal lobe is only slightly higher in M. croceipes (females: 219-222; males: 220-224) than in C. marginiventris (females: 192-194; males: 193-196). A comparison of males and females within each species demonstrated a striking sexual difference in terms of an enlarged glomerulus (macroglomerulus or MG) at the entrance of the antennal nerve and of a complex of 3-4 MG (CMG) in the posterior region of the antennal lobe of males of both species. Being specific to males, both the MG and CMG might be involved in the detection of female-related odor.

  20. Olfactory pathway of the hornet Vespa velutina: New insights into the evolution of the hymenopteran antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Couto, Antoine; Lapeyre, Benoit; Thiéry, Denis; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2016-08-01

    In the course of evolution, eusociality has appeared several times independently in Hymenoptera, within different families such as Apidae (bees), Formicidae (ants), and Vespidae (wasps and hornets), among others. The complex social organization of eusocial Hymenoptera relies on sophisticated olfactory communication systems. Whereas the olfactory systems of several bee and ant species have been well characterized, very little information is as yet available in Vespidae, although this family represents a highly successful insect group, displaying a wide range of life styles from solitary to eusocial. Using fluorescent labeling, confocal microscopy, and 3D reconstructions, we investigated the organization of the olfactory pathway in queens, workers, and males of the eusocial hornet Vespa velutina. First, we found that caste and sex dimorphism is weakly pronounced in hornets, with regard to both whole-brain morphology and antennal lobe organization, although several male-specific macroglomeruli are present. The V. velutina antennal lobe contains approximately 265 glomeruli (in females), grouped in nine conspicuous clusters formed by afferent tract subdivisions. As in bees and ants, hornets display a dual olfactory pathway, with two major efferent tracts, the medial and the lateral antennal lobe tracts (m- and l-ALT), separately arborizing two antennal lobe hemilobes and projecting to partially different regions of higher order olfactory centers. Finally, we found remarkable anatomical similarities in the glomerular cluster organizations among hornets, ants, and bees, suggesting the possible existence of homologies in the olfactory pathways of these eusocial Hymenoptera. We propose a common framework for describing AL compartmentalization across Hymenoptera and discuss possible evolutionary scenarios. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2335-2359, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Individual Neurons Confined to Distinct Antennal-Lobe Tracts in the Heliothine Moth: Morphological Characteristics and Global Projection Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Ian, Elena; Zhao, Xin C.; Lande, Andreas; Berg, Bente G.

    2016-01-01

    To explore fundamental principles characterizing chemosensory information processing, we have identified antennal-lobe projection neurons in the heliothine moth, including several neuron types not previously described. Generally, odor information is conveyed from the primary olfactory center of the moth brain, the antennal lobe, to higher brain centers via projection neuron axons passing along several parallel pathways, of which the medial, mediolateral, and lateral antennal-lobe tract are considered the classical ones. Recent data have revealed the projections of the individual tracts more in detail demonstrating three main target regions in the protocerebrum; the calyces are innervated mainly by the medial tract, the superior intermediate protocerebrum by the lateral tract exclusively, and the lateral horn by all tracts. In the present study, we have identified, via iontophoretic intracellular staining combined with confocal microscopy, individual projection neurons confined to the tracts mentioned above, plus two additional ones. Further, using the visualization software AMIRA, we reconstructed the stained neurons and registered the models into a standard brain atlas, which allowed us to compare the termination areas of individual projection neurons both across and within distinct tracts. The data demonstrate a morphological diversity of the projection neurons within distinct tracts. Comparison of the output areas of the neurons confined to the three main tracts in the lateral horn showed overlapping terminal regions for the medial and mediolateral tracts; the lateral tract neurons, on the contrary, targeted mostly other output areas in the protocerebrum. PMID:27822181

  2. Modelling Odor Decoding in the Antennal Lobe by Combining Sequential Firing Rate Models with Bayesian Inference

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas Rivera, Dario; Bitzer, Sebastian; Kiebel, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory information that is received by the insect brain is encoded in the form of spatiotemporal patterns in the projection neurons of the antennal lobe. These dense and overlapping patterns are transformed into a sparse code in Kenyon cells in the mushroom body. Although it is clear that this sparse code is the basis for rapid categorization of odors, it is yet unclear how the sparse code in Kenyon cells is computed and what information it represents. Here we show that this computation can be modeled by sequential firing rate patterns using Lotka-Volterra equations and Bayesian online inference. This new model can be understood as an ‘intelligent coincidence detector’, which robustly and dynamically encodes the presence of specific odor features. We found that the model is able to qualitatively reproduce experimentally observed activity in both the projection neurons and the Kenyon cells. In particular, the model explains mechanistically how sparse activity in the Kenyon cells arises from the dense code in the projection neurons. The odor classification performance of the model proved to be robust against noise and time jitter in the observed input sequences. As in recent experimental results, we found that recognition of an odor happened very early during stimulus presentation in the model. Critically, by using the model, we found surprising but simple computational explanations for several experimental phenomena. PMID:26451888

  3. Synaptic organization of the Drosophila antennal lobe and its regulation by the Teneurins

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Timothy J; Luo, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    Understanding information flow through neuronal circuits requires knowledge of their synaptic organization. In this study, we utilized fluorescent pre- and postsynaptic markers to map synaptic organization in the Drosophila antennal lobe, the first olfactory processing center. Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) produce a constant synaptic density across different glomeruli. Each ORN within a class contributes nearly identical active zone number. Active zones from ORNs, projection neurons (PNs), and local interneurons have distinct subglomerular and subcellular distributions. The correct number of ORN active zones and PN acetylcholine receptor clusters requires the Teneurins, conserved transmembrane proteins involved in neuromuscular synapse organization and synaptic partner matching. Ten-a acts in ORNs to organize presynaptic active zones via the spectrin cytoskeleton. Ten-m acts in PNs autonomously to regulate acetylcholine receptor cluster number and transsynaptically to regulate ORN active zone number. These studies advanced our ability to assess synaptic architecture in complex CNS circuits and their underlying molecular mechanisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03726.001 PMID:25310239

  4. Distributed representation of social odors indicates parallel processing in the antennal lobe of ants.

    PubMed

    Brandstaetter, Andreas Simon; Kleineidam, Christoph Johannes

    2011-11-01

    In colonies of eusocial Hymenoptera cooperation is organized through social odors, and particularly ants rely on a sophisticated odor communication system. Neuronal information about odors is represented in spatial activity patterns in the primary olfactory neuropile of the insect brain, the antennal lobe (AL), which is analog to the vertebrate olfactory bulb. The olfactory system is characterized by neuroanatomical compartmentalization, yet the functional significance of this organization is unclear. Using two-photon calcium imaging, we investigated the neuronal representation of multicomponent colony odors, which the ants assess to discriminate friends (nestmates) from foes (nonnestmates). In the carpenter ant Camponotus floridanus, colony odors elicited spatial activity patterns distributed across different AL compartments. Activity patterns in response to nestmate and nonnestmate colony odors were overlapping. This was expected since both consist of the same components at differing ratios. Colony odors change over time and the nervous system has to constantly adjust for this (template reformation). Measured activity patterns were variable, and variability was higher in response to repeated nestmate than to repeated nonnestmate colony odor stimulation. Variable activity patterns may indicate neuronal plasticity within the olfactory system, which is necessary for template reformation. Our results indicate that information about colony odors is processed in parallel in different neuroanatomical compartments, using the computational power of the whole AL network. Parallel processing might be advantageous, allowing reliable discrimination of highly complex social odors.

  5. Neuronal Processing of Complex Mixtures Establishes a Unique Odor Representation in the Moth Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Kuebler, Linda S.; Olsson, Shannon B.; Weniger, Richard; Hansson, Bill S.

    2011-01-01

    Animals typically perceive natural odor cues in their olfactory environment as a complex mixture of chemically diverse components. In insects, the initial representation of an odor mixture occurs in the first olfactory center of the brain, the antennal lobe (AL). The contribution of single neurons to the processing of complex mixtures in insects, and in particular moths, is still largely unknown. Using a novel multicomponent stimulus system to equilibrate component and mixture concentrations according to vapor pressure, we performed intracellular recordings of projection and interneurons in an attempt to quantitatively characterize mixture representation and integration properties of single AL neurons in the moth. We found that the fine spatiotemporal representation of 2–7 component mixtures among single neurons in the AL revealed a highly combinatorial, non-linear process for coding host mixtures presumably shaped by the AL network: 82% of mixture responding projection neurons and local interneurons showed non-linear spike frequencies in response to a defined host odor mixture, exhibiting an array of interactions including suppression, hypoadditivity, and synergism. Our results indicate that odor mixtures are represented by each cell as a unique combinatorial representation, and there is no general rule by which the network computes the mixture in comparison to single components. On the single neuron level, we show that those differences manifest in a variety of parameters, including the spatial location, frequency, latency, and temporal pattern of the response kinetics. PMID:21772814

  6. Octopamine modulates activity of neural networks in the honey bee antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Rein, Julia; Mustard, Julie A; Strauch, Martin; Smith, Brian H; Galizia, C Giovanni

    2013-11-01

    Neuronal plasticity allows an animal to respond to environmental changes by modulating its response to stimuli. In the honey bee (Apis mellifera), the biogenic amine octopamine plays a crucial role in appetitive odor learning, but little is known about how octopamine affects the brain. We investigated its effect in the antennal lobe, the first olfactory center in the brain, using calcium imaging to record background activity and odor responses before and after octopamine application. We show that octopamine increases background activity in olfactory output neurons, while reducing average calcium levels. Odor responses were modulated both upwards and downwards, with more odor response increases in glomeruli with negative or weak odor responses. Importantly, the octopamine effect was variable across glomeruli, odorants, odorant concentrations and animals, suggesting that the octopaminergic network is shaped by plasticity depending on an individual animal's history and possibly other factors. Using RNA interference, we show that the octopamine receptor AmOA1 (homolog of the Drosophila OAMB receptor) is involved in the octopamine effect. We propose a network model in which octopamine receptors are plastic in their density and located on a subpopulation of inhibitory neurons in a disinhibitory pathway. This would improve odor-coding of behaviorally relevant, previously experienced odors.

  7. Pheromone responsiveness threshold depends on temporal integration by antennal lobe projection neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, Masashi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Minegishi, Ryo; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Tamura, Toshiki; Haupt, Stephan Shuichi; Nakatani, Kei; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The olfactory system of male moths has an extreme sensitivity with the capability to detect and recognize conspecific pheromones dispersed and greatly diluted in the air. Just 170 molecules of the silkmoth (Bombyx mori) sex pheromone bombykol are sufficient to induce sexual behavior in the male. However, it is still unclear how the sensitivity of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is relayed through the brain to generate high behavioral responsiveness. Here, we show that ORN activity that is subthreshold in terms of behavior can be amplified to suprathreshold levels by temporal integration in antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) if occurring within a specific time window. To control ORN inputs with high temporal resolution, channelrhodopsin-2 was genetically introduced into bombykol-responsive ORNs. Temporal integration in PNs was only observed for weak inputs, but not for strong inputs. Pharmacological dissection revealed that GABAergic mechanisms inhibit temporal integration of strong inputs, showing that GABA signaling regulates PN responses in a stimulus-dependent fashion. Our results show that boosting of the PNs’ responses by temporal integration of olfactory information occurs specifically near the behavioral threshold, effectively defining the lower bound for behavioral responsiveness. PMID:24006366

  8. Antennal lobe processing increases separability of odor mixture representations in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Deisig, Nina; Giurfa, Martin; Sandoz, Jean Christophe

    2010-04-01

    Local networks within the primary olfactory centers reformat odor representations from olfactory receptor neurons to second-order neurons. By studying the rules underlying mixture representation at the input to the antennal lobe (AL), the primary olfactory center of the insect brain, we recently found that mixture representation follows a strict elemental rule in honeybees: the more a component activates the AL when presented alone, the more it is represented in a mixture. We now studied mixture representation at the output of the AL by imaging a population of second-order neurons, which convey AL processed odor information to higher brain centers. We systematically measured odor-evoked activity in 22 identified glomeruli in response to four single odorants and all their possible binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures. By comparing input and output responses, we determined how the AL network reformats mixture representation and what advantage this confers for odor discrimination. We show that increased inhibition within the AL leads to more synthetic, less elemental, mixture representation at the output level than that at the input level. As a result, mixture representations become more separable in the olfactory space, thus allowing better differentiation among floral blends in nature.

  9. Optic glomeruli and their inputs in Drosophila share an organizational ground pattern with the antennal lobes

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Laiyong; Ito, Kei; Bacon, Jonathan P.; Strausfeld, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the insect visual system provides important data on the basic neural mechanisms underlying visual processing. Similar to vertebrates, the first step of visual processing in insects is through a series of retinotopic neurons. Recent studies on flies have found that these converge onto assemblies of columnar neurons in the lobula, the axons of which segregate to project to discrete optic glomeruli in the lateral protocerebrum. This arrangement is much like the fly’s olfactory system, in which afferents target uniquely identifiable olfactory glomeruli. Here, whole-cell patch recordings show that even though visual primitives are unreliably encoded by single lobula output neurons due to high synaptic noise, they are reliably encoded by the ensemble of outputs. At a glomerulus, local interneurons reliably code visual primitives, as do projection neurons conveying information centrally from the glomerulus. These observations demonstrate that in Drosophila, as in other dipterans, optic glomeruli are involved in further reconstructing the fly’s visual world. Optic glomeruli and antennal lobe glomeruli share the same ancestral anatomical and functional ground pattern enabling reliable responses to be extracted from converging sensory inputs. PMID:22553013

  10. Pheromone modulates plant odor responses in the antennal lobe of a moth.

    PubMed

    Chaffiol, Antoine; Dupuy, Fabienne; Barrozo, Romina B; Kropf, Jan; Renou, Michel; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Anton, Sylvia

    2014-06-01

    In nature, male moths are exposed to a complex plant odorant environment when they fly upwind to a sex pheromone source in their search for mates. Plant odors have been shown to affect responses to pheromone at various levels but how does pheromone affects plant odor perception? We recorded responses from neurons within the non-pheromonal "ordinary glome ruli" of the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL), to single and pulsed stimulations with the plant odorant heptanal, the pheromone, and their mixture in the male moth Agrotis ipsilon. We identified 3 physiological types of neurons according to their activity patterns combining excitatory and inhibitory phases. Both local and projection neurons were identified in each physiological type. Neurons with excitatory responses to heptanal responded also frequently to the pheromone and showed additive responses to the mixture. Moreover, the neuron's ability of resolving successive pulses generally improved with the mixture. Only some neurons with combined excitatory/inhibitory, or purely inhibitory responses to heptanal, also responded to the pheromone. Although individual mixture responses were not significantly different from heptanal responses in these neurons, pulse resolution was improved with the mixture as compared with heptanal alone. These results demonstrate that the pheromone and the general odorant subsystems interact more intensely in the moth AL than previously thought.

  11. Fast Odor Learning Improves Reliability of Odor Responses in the Locust Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Stopfer, Mark; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Laurent, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recordings in the locust antennal lobe (AL) reveal activity-dependent, stimulus-specific changes in projection neuron (PN) and local neuron response patterns over repeated odor trials. During the first few trials, PN response intensity decreases, while spike time precision increases, and coherent oscillations, absent at first, quickly emerge. We examined this “fast odor learning” with a realistic computational model of the AL. Activity-dependent facilitation of AL inhibitory synapses was sufficient to simulate physiological recordings of fast learning. In addition, in experiments with noisy inputs, a network including synaptic facilitation of both inhibition and excitation responded with reliable spatiotemporal patterns from trial to trial despite the noise. A network lacking fast plasticity, however, responded with patterns that varied across trials, reflecting the input variability. Thus, our study suggests that fast olfactory learning results from stimulus-specific, activity-dependent synaptic facilitation and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio for repeatedly encountered odor stimuli. PMID:15882647

  12. Apis mellifera octopamine receptor 1 (AmOA1) expression in antennal lobe networks of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Sinakevitch, Irina T.; Smith, Adrian N.; Locatelli, Fernando; Huerta, Ramon; Bazhenov, Maxim; Smith, Brian H.

    2013-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) underlies reinforcement during appetitive conditioning in the honey bee and fruit fly, acting via different subtypes of receptors. Recently, antibodies raised against a peptide sequence of one honey bee OA receptor, AmOA1, were used to study the distribution of these receptors in the honey bee brain (Sinakevitch et al., 2011). These antibodies also recognize an isoform of the AmOA1 ortholog in the fruit fly (OAMB, mushroom body OA receptor). Here we describe in detail the distribution of AmOA1 receptors in different types of neurons in the honey bee and fruit fly antennal lobes. We integrate this information into a detailed anatomical analysis of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), uni- and multi-glomerular projection neurons (uPNs, and mPNs) and local interneurons (LNs) in glomeruli of the antennal lobe. These neurons were revealed by dye injection into the antennal nerve, antennal lobe, medial and lateral antenno-protocerbral tracts (m-APT and l-APT), and lateral protocerebral lobe (LPL) by use of labeled cell lines in the fruit fly or by staining with anti-GABA. We found that ORN receptor terminals and uPNs largely do not show immunostaining for AmOA1. About seventeen GABAergic mPNs leave the antennal lobe through the ml-APT and branch into the LPL. Many, but not all, mPNs show staining for AmOA1. AmOA1 receptors are also in glomeruli on GABAergic processes associated with LNs. The data suggest that in both species one important action of OA in the antennal lobe involves modulation of different types of inhibitory neurons via AmOA1 receptors. We integrated this new information into a model of circuitry within glomeruli of the antennal lobes of these species. PMID:24187534

  13. Apis mellifera octopamine receptor 1 (AmOA1) expression in antennal lobe networks of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster).

    PubMed

    Sinakevitch, Irina T; Smith, Adrian N; Locatelli, Fernando; Huerta, Ramon; Bazhenov, Maxim; Smith, Brian H

    2013-01-01

    Octopamine (OA) underlies reinforcement during appetitive conditioning in the honey bee and fruit fly, acting via different subtypes of receptors. Recently, antibodies raised against a peptide sequence of one honey bee OA receptor, AmOA1, were used to study the distribution of these receptors in the honey bee brain (Sinakevitch et al., 2011). These antibodies also recognize an isoform of the AmOA1 ortholog in the fruit fly (OAMB, mushroom body OA receptor). Here we describe in detail the distribution of AmOA1 receptors in different types of neurons in the honey bee and fruit fly antennal lobes. We integrate this information into a detailed anatomical analysis of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), uni- and multi-glomerular projection neurons (uPNs, and mPNs) and local interneurons (LNs) in glomeruli of the antennal lobe. These neurons were revealed by dye injection into the antennal nerve, antennal lobe, medial and lateral antenno-protocerbral tracts (m-APT and l-APT), and lateral protocerebral lobe (LPL) by use of labeled cell lines in the fruit fly or by staining with anti-GABA. We found that ORN receptor terminals and uPNs largely do not show immunostaining for AmOA1. About seventeen GABAergic mPNs leave the antennal lobe through the ml-APT and branch into the LPL. Many, but not all, mPNs show staining for AmOA1. AmOA1 receptors are also in glomeruli on GABAergic processes associated with LNs. The data suggest that in both species one important action of OA in the antennal lobe involves modulation of different types of inhibitory neurons via AmOA1 receptors. We integrated this new information into a model of circuitry within glomeruli of the antennal lobes of these species.

  14. Inventory and distribution of synapses of identified uniglomerular projection neurons in the antennal lobe of Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Malun, D

    1991-03-08

    Uniglomerular projection neurons in the antennal lobe of Periplaneta americana, the axons of which connect the lobe to the protocerebrum, were labeled by intracellular injection of Lucifer Yellow or biocytin. The fine structure of individual neurons within the antennal lobe was examined after the injected substances had been converted (by immunohistochemical or histochemical treatment) to electron microscopically visible reaction products. Seven projection neurons were investigated, including attractant neurons, with dendritic arbors in the macroglomerulus, and projection neurons of normal-sized glomeruli. From reconstructions of thin serial sections and examination of additional processes present at various places in the arborization regions, the distribution of synapses within the glomeruli was inferred. Although the projection neurons differ from one another in their glomerular arborization patterns, they are very similar in the spatial segregation of their input and output synapses within the arborization. Output synapses are found on the thick part of the fiber near its site of entry into the glomerulus, as well as in regions within the glomerulus where the neuron has begun to ramify into thinner fibers. In the latter regions, the many output synapses are accompanied by occasional input synapses; hence these are regarded as transitional regions. At the terminal arbors only input synapses were found. This suggests that neurons with dense terminal arborizations receive particularly numerous inputs in these regions. The large number of input synapses reflects the high degree of convergence of afferents onto projection neurons previously demonstrated physiologically. However, the presence of numerous output synapses indicates that projection neurons not only transport sensory information into the protocerebrum but are also a major component of the neuronal circuitry within the antennal lobe.

  15. Toward a single-cell-based analysis of neuropeptide expression in Periplaneta americana antennal lobe neurons.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Susanne; Fusca, Debora; Schachtner, Joachim; Kloppenburg, Peter; Predel, Reinhard

    2012-03-01

    A multitude of potential neurotransmitters and neuromodulators, including peptides, have been detected in the antennal lobe (AL), the first synaptic relay of the central olfactory pathway in the insect brain. However, the functional role of neuropeptides in this system has yet to be revealed. An important prerequisite to understanding the role of neuropeptides is to match the functionally different cell types in the AL with their peptide profiles by using electrophysiological recordings combined with immunocytochemical studies and/or single-cell mass spectrometry. The olfactory system of Periplaneta americana is particularly well suited to accomplish this goal because several physiologically distinct neuron types can be unequivocally identified. With the aim to analyze the neuropeptide inventory of the P. americana AL, this study is an essential step in this direction. First, we systematically analyzed different parts of the AL by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to obtain the complete set of neuropeptides present. Altogether, 56 ion signals could be assigned to products of 10 neuropeptide genes (allatostatins A, B, C, SIFamide, allatotropin, FMRFamide-related peptides [myosuppressin, short neuropeptides F, extended FMRFamides], crustacean cardioactive peptide, tachykinin-related peptides). In a second step, a combination of immunocytochemistry and mass spectrometric profiling of defined AL compartments was used to reveal the spatial distribution of neuropeptide-containing cells. Finally, we demonstrated the feasibility of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric profiling of single AL neurons, which is an important precondition for combining electrophysiology with peptide profiling at the single-cell level.

  16. Histamine-immunoreactive local neurons in the antennal lobes of the Hymenoptera

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Andrew M.; Reisenman, Carolina E.; Paulk, Angelique C.; Nighorn, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    Neural networks receive input which is transformed before being sent as output to higher centers of processing. These transformations are often mediated by local interneurons (LNs) that influence output based on activity across the network. In primary olfactory centers, the LNs that mediate these lateral interactions are extremely diverse. For instance, the antennal lobes (ALs) of bumble bees possess both GABA and histamine-immunoreactive (HA-ir) LNs, and both are neurotransmitters associated with fast forms of inhibition. Although the GABAergic network of the AL has been extensively studied, we sought to examine the anatomical features of the HA-ir LNs in relation to the other cellular elements of the bumble bee AL. As a population, HA-ir LNs densely innervate the glomerular core while sparsely arborizing in the outer glomerular rind, overlapping with the terminals of olfactory receptor neurons. Individual fills of HA-ir LNs revealed heavy arborization of the outer ring of a single “principal” glomerulus and sparse arborization in the core of other glomeruli. In contrast, projection neurons, and GABA-immunoreactive LNs project throughout the glomerular volume. To provide insight as to the selective pressures that resulted in the evolution of HA-ir LNs, we determined the phylogenetic distribution of HA-ir LNs in the AL. HA-ir LNs were present in all but the most basal hymenopteran examined, although there were significant morphological differences between major groups within the Hymenoptera. The ALs of other insect taxa examined lacked HA-ir LNs, suggesting that this population of LNs arose within the Hymenoptera and underwent extensive morphological modification. PMID:20533353

  17. Three-dimensional antennal lobe atlas of male and female moths, Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and glomerular representation of plant volatiles in females.

    PubMed

    Masante-Roca, Ingwild; Gadenne, Christophe; Anton, Sylvia

    2005-03-01

    Spatiotemporal odour coding is thought to be linked closely with the specific glomerular anatomy of the primary olfactory centre. In most insects the number of the glomeruli within the antennal lobe is limited to fewer than 100, allowing their individual identification. In the grapevine moth, Lobesia botrana, a map of the antennal lobe glomeruli was reconstructed three-dimensionally, by comparing three different brains in males and females. The map of the antennal lobe of females served then as a basis to identify glomeruli containing dendritic arborisations of 14 physiologically characterised projection neurons. Projection neurons responding to the same plant compound did not always arborise in the same glomerulus and some neurons arborising in the same glomerulus responded to different compounds. Different zones of target glomeruli were, however, identified when pooling all neurons responding to one of two different compounds respectively (alpha-farnesene and nonatriene). All identified glomeruli of specifically responding projection neurons were situated close to the anterior surface of the antennal lobe. One broadly responding projection neuron arborised in a more posteriorly situated glomerulus. A local interneuron responding to only one compound was arborising densely in a neighbouring glomerulus and had sparse branches in all other glomeruli. These results are discussed with respect to plant odour processing and structure-function relations in antennal lobe neurons. The 3D AL atlas will, in the future, also be used to obtain a better understanding of coding mechanisms of grapevine odours in this pest insect.

  18. Intrinsic and Network Mechanisms Constrain Neural Synchrony in the Moth Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Hong; Yu, Yanxue; Zhu, Shuifang; Rangan, Aaditya V.

    2016-01-01

    Projection-neurons (PNs) within the antennal lobe (AL) of the hawkmoth respond vigorously to odor stimulation, with each vigorous response followed by a ~1 s period of suppression—dubbed the “afterhyperpolarization-phase,” or AHP-phase. Prior evidence indicates that this AHP-phase is important for the processing of odors, but the mechanisms underlying this phase and its function remain unknown. We investigate this issue. Beginning with several physiological experiments, we find that pharmacological manipulation of the AL yields surprising results. Specifically, (a) the application of picrotoxin (PTX) lengthens the AHP-phase and reduces PN activity, whereas (b) the application of Bicuculline-methiodide (BIC) reduces the AHP-phase and increases PN activity. These results are curious, as both PTX and BIC are inhibitory-receptor antagonists. To resolve this conundrum, we speculate that perhaps (a) PTX reduces PN activity through a disinhibitory circuit involving a heterogeneous population of local-neurons, and (b) BIC acts to hamper certain intrinsic currents within the PNs that contribute to the AHP-phase. To probe these hypotheses further we build a computational model of the AL and benchmark our model against our experimental observations. We find that, for parameters which satisfy these benchmarks, our model exhibits a particular kind of synchronous activity: namely, “multiple-firing-events” (MFEs). These MFEs are causally-linked sequences of spikes which emerge stochastically, and turn out to have important dynamical consequences for all the experimentally observed phenomena we used as benchmarks. Taking a step back, we extract a few predictions from our computational model pertaining to the real AL: Some predictions deal with the MFEs we expect to see in the real AL, whereas other predictions involve the runaway synchronization that we expect when BIC-application hampers the AHP-phase. By examining the literature we see support for the former, and we

  19. Mechanisms Underlying Population Response Dynamics in Inhibitory Interneurons of the Drosophila Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Katherine I.

    2016-01-01

    Local inhibitory neurons control the timing of neural activity in many circuits. To understand how inhibition controls timing, it is important to understand the dynamics of activity in populations of local inhibitory interneurons, as well as the mechanisms that underlie these dynamics. Here we describe the in vivo response dynamics of a large population of inhibitory local neurons (LNs) in the Drosophila melanogaster antennal lobe, the analog of the vertebrate olfactory bulb, and we dissect the network and intrinsic mechanisms that give rise to these dynamics. Some LNs respond to odor onsets (“ON” cells) and others to offsets (“OFF” cells), whereas still others respond at both times. Moreover, different LNs signal odor concentration fluctuations on different timescales. Some respond rapidly, and can track rapid concentration fluctuations. Others respond slowly, and are best at tracking slow fluctuations. We found a continuous spectrum of preferred stimulation timescales among LNs, as well as a continuum of ON–OFF behavior. Using in vivo whole-cell recordings, we show that the timing of an LN′s response (ON vs OFF) can be predicted from the interplay of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents that it receives. Meanwhile, the preferred timescale of an LN is related to its intrinsic properties. These results illustrate how a population of inhibitory interneurons can collectively encode bidirectional changes in stimulus intensity on multiple timescales, and how this can arise via an interaction between synaptic and intrinsic mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most neural circuits contain diverse populations of inhibitory interneurons. The way inhibition shapes network activity will depend on the spiking dynamics of the interneuron population. Here we describe the dynamics of activity in a large population of inhibitory interneurons in the first brain relay of the fruit fly olfactory system. Because odor plumes fluctuate on multiple timescales, the drive

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes neurite growth and survival of antennal lobe neurons in brain from the silk moth, Bombyx mori in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Sung, Dong Kyung; Park, Chan Woo; Park, Hun Hee; Park, Cheolin; Jeon, Soung-Hoo; Kang, Pil Don; Kwon, O-Yu; Lee, Bong Hee

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted to investigate effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on the neurite growth and the survival rate of antennal lobe neurons in vitro, and secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-like neuropeptide from brain into hemolymph in the silk moth, Bombyx mori. In primary culture of antennal lobe neurons with brain-derived neurotrophic factor, it promoted both a neurite extension of putative antennal lobe projection neurons and an outgrowth of branches from principal neurites of putative antennal interneurons with significance (p<0.05). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor also increased significantly a survival rate of antennal lobe neurons (p<0.05). Results from immunolabeling of brain and retrocerebral complex, and ELISA assay of hemolymph showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-like neuropeptide was synthesized by both median and lateral neurosecretory cells of brain, then transported to corpora allata for storage, and finally secreted into hemolymph for action. These results will provide valuable information for differentiation of invertebrate brain neurons with brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  1. A global-wide search for sexual dimorphism of glomeruli in the antennal lobe of female and male Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xin-Cheng; Ma, Bai-Wei; Berg, Bente G.; Xie, Gui-Ying; Tang, Qing-Bo; Guo, Xian-Ru

    2016-01-01

    By using immunostaining and three-dimensional reconstruction, the anatomical organization of the antennal lobe glomeruli of the female cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera was investigated. Eighty-one glomeruli were identified, 15 of which were not previously discovered. The general anatomical organization of the AL of female is similar to that of male and all glomeruli were classified into four sub-groups, including the female-specific glomerular complex, posterior complex, labial-palp pit organ glomerulus, and ordinary glomeruli. A global-wide comparison on the complete glomerular map of female and male was performed and for the first time the quantitative difference in volume for each individual homologous glomerulus was analyzed. We found that the sexual dimorphism includes not only the sex-specific glomeruli but also some of the other glomeruli. The findings in the present study may provide a reference to examine the antennal-lobe organization more in detail and to identify new glomeruli in other moth species. In addition, the complete identification and global-wide comparison of the sexes provide an important basis for mapping the function of distinct glomeruli and for understanding neural mechanisms underlying sexually dimorphic olfactory behaviors. PMID:27725758

  2. Developmental expression of cell recognition molecules in the mushroom body and antennal lobe of the locust Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Eickhoff, René; Bicker, Gerd

    2012-06-15

    We examined the development of olfactory neuropils in the hemimetabolous insect Locusta migratoria with an emphasis on the mushroom bodies, protocerebral integration centers implicated in memory formation. Using a marker of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling cascade and lipophilic dye labeling, we obtained new insights into mushroom body organization by resolving previously unrecognized accessory lobelets arising from Class III Kenyon cells. We utilized antibodies against axonal guidance cues, such as the cell surface glycoproteins Semaphorin 1a (Sema 1a) and Fasciclin I (Fas I), as embryonic markers to compile a comprehensive atlas of mushroom body development. During embryogenesis, all neuropils of the olfactory pathway transiently expressed Sema 1a. The immunoreactivity was particularly strong in developing mushroom bodies. During late embryonic stages, Sema 1a expression in the mushroom bodies became restricted to a subset of Kenyon cells in the core region of the peduncle. Sema 1a was differentially sorted to the Kenyon cell axons and absent in the dendrites. In contrast to Drosophila, locust mushroom bodies and antennal lobes expressed Fas I, but not Fas II. While Fas I immunoreactivity was widely distributed in the midbrain during embryogenesis, labeling persisted into adulthood only in the mushroom bodies and antennal lobes. Kenyon cells proliferated throughout the larval stages. Their neurites retained the embryonic expression pattern of Sema 1a and Fas I, suggesting a role for these molecules in developmental mushroom body plasticity. Our study serves as an initial step toward functional analyses of Sema 1a and Fas I expression during locust mushroom body formation.

  3. Cav3-type α1T calcium channels mediate transient calcium currents that regulate repetitive firing in Drosophila antennal lobe PNs.

    PubMed

    Iniguez, Jorge; Schutte, Soleil S; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2013-10-01

    Projection neurons (PNs), located in the antennal lobe region of the insect brain, play a key role in processing olfactory information. To explore how activity is regulated at the level of single PNs within this central circuit we have recorded from these neurons in adult Drosophila melanogaster brains. Our previous study demonstrated that PNs express voltage-gated calcium currents with a transient and sustained component. We found that the sustained component is mediated by cac gene-encoded Cav2-type channels involved in regulating action potential-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses. The function of the transient calcium current and the gene encoding the underlying channels, however, were unknown. Here we report that the transient current blocked by prepulse inactivation is sensitive to amiloride, a vertebrate Cav3-type channel blocker. In addition PN-specific RNAi knockdown of α1T, the Drosophila Cav3-type gene, caused a dramatic reduction in the transient current without altering the sustained component. These data demonstrate that the α1T gene encodes voltage-gated calcium channels underlying the amiloride-sensitive transient current. Alterations in evoked firing and spontaneous burst firing in the α1T knockdowns demonstrate that the Cav3-type calcium channels are important in regulating excitability in adult PNs.

  4. Antennal lobe representations are optimized when olfactory stimuli are periodically structured to simulate natural wing beat effects

    PubMed Central

    Houot, Benjamin; Burkland, Rex; Tripathy, Shreejoy; Daly, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Animals use behaviors to actively sample the environment across a broad spectrum of sensory domains. These behaviors discretize the sensory experience into unique spatiotemporal moments, minimize sensory adaptation, and enhance perception. In olfaction, behaviors such as sniffing, antennal flicking, and wing beating all act to periodically expose olfactory epithelium. In mammals, it is thought that sniffing enhances neural representations; however, the effects of insect wing beating on representations remain unknown. To determine how well the antennal lobe (AL) produces odor dependent representations when wing beating effects are simulated, we used extracellular methods to record neural units and local field potentials (LFPs) from moth AL. We recorded responses to odors presented as prolonged continuous stimuli or periodically as 20 and 25 Hz pulse trains designed to simulate the oscillating effects of wing beating around the antennae during odor guided flight. Using spectral analyses, we show that ~25% of all recorded units were able to entrain to “pulsed stimuli”; this includes pulsed blanks, which elicited the strongest overall entrainment. The strength of entrainment to pulse train stimuli was dependent on molecular features of the odorants, odor concentration, and pulse train duration. Moreover, units showing pulse tracking responses were highly phase locked to LFPs during odor stimulation, indicating that unit-LFP phase relationships are stimulus-driven. Finally, a Euclidean distance-based population vector analysis established that AL odor representations are more robust, peak more quickly, and do not show adaptation when odors were presented at the natural wing beat frequency as opposed to prolonged continuous stimulation. These results suggest a general strategy for optimizing olfactory representations, which exploits the natural rhythmicity of wing beating by integrating mechanosensory and olfactory cues at the level of the AL. PMID:24971052

  5. Odour-evoked responses to queen pheromone components and to plant odours using optical imaging in the antennal lobe of the honey bee drone Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2006-09-01

    The primordial functional role of honey bee males (drones) is to mate with virgin queens, a behaviour relying heavily on the olfactory detection of queen pheromone. In the present work I studied olfactory processing in the drone antennal lobe (AL), the primary olfactory centre of the insect brain. In drones, the AL consists of about 103 ordinary glomeruli and four enlarged glomeruli, the macroglomeruli (MG). Two macroglomeruli (MG1 and MG2) and approximately 20 ordinary glomeruli occupy the anterior surface of the antennal lobe and are thus accessible to optical recordings. Calcium imaging was used to measure odour-evoked responses to queen pheromonal components and plant odours. MG2 responded specifically to the main component of the queen mandibular pheromone, 9-ODA. The secondary components HOB and HVA each triggered activity in one, but not the same, ordinary glomerulus. MG1 did not respond to any of the tested stimuli. Plant odours induced signals only in ordinary glomeruli in a combinatorial manner, as in workers. This study thus shows that the major queen pheromonal component is processed in the most voluminous macroglomerulus of the drone antennal lobe, and that plant odours, as well as some queen pheromonal components, are processed in ordinary glomeruli.

  6. Effects of the static and ELF magnetic fields on the neuronal population activity in Morimus funereus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) antennal lobe revealed by wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Spasić, Sladjana; Kesić, Srdjan; Stojadinović, Gordana; Petković, Branka; Todorović, Dajana

    2015-03-01

    To study the influence of a static magnetic field (SMF, 2 mT) and extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF MF, 50 Hz, 2 mT) on the neuronal population activity, the experiments were performed on adult longhorn beetles Morimus funereus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae). Based on a wavelet analysis of the local field potentials (LFPs), our study showed for the first time that the effects of prolonged and repeated exposure to the ELF MF on the LFPs were irreversible within investigated time frame. The relative wavelet energy (RWE) of 4-8 Hz frequency band was significantly increased after sine ELF MF (SnMF)/square ELF MF (SqMF) in comparison to the control value. The RWE of slower oscillations (1-2Hz) was significantly decreased after the repeated exposures to either SnMF or SqMF. The SqMF induced decreasing of the faster waves in the range of 64-128 Hz. However, we did not prove with presented methods that exposure to the SMF for 5 min produces any effects on the neuronal population activity. This study has proved the wavelet transform as a valuable tool for measuring the effects of SMF and ELF MF on the neuronal population activity in M. funereus antennal lobe.

  7. Rapid and slow chemical synaptic interactions of cholinergic projection neurons and GABAergic local interneurons in the insect antennal lobe.

    PubMed

    Warren, Ben; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2014-09-24

    The antennal lobe (AL) of insects constitutes the first synaptic relay and processing center of olfactory information, received from olfactory sensory neurons located on the antennae. Complex synaptic connectivity between olfactory neurons of the AL ultimately determines the spatial and temporal tuning profile of (output) projection neurons to odors. Here we used paired whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in the cockroach Periplaneta americana to characterize synaptic interactions between cholinergic uniglomerular projection neurons (uPNs) and GABAergic local interneurons (LNs), both of which are key components of the insect olfactory system. We found rapid, strong excitatory synaptic connections between uPNs and LNs. This rapid excitatory transmission was blocked by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor blocker mecamylamine. IPSPs, elicited by synaptic input from a presynaptic LN, were recorded in both uPNs and LNs. IPSPs were composed of both slow, sustained components and fast, transient components which were coincident with presynaptic action potentials. The fast IPSPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor chloride channel blocker picrotoxin, whereas the slow sustained IPSPs were blocked by the GABAB receptor blocker CGP-54626. This is the first study to directly show the predicted dual fast- and slow-inhibitory action of LNs, which was predicted to be key in shaping complex odor responses in the AL of insects. We also provide the first direct characterization of rapid postsynaptic potentials coincident with presynaptic spikes between olfactory processing neurons in the AL.

  8. Data-driven inference of network connectivity for modeling the dynamics of neural codes in the insect antennal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Shlizerman, Eli; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The antennal lobe (AL), olfactory processing center in insects, is able to process stimuli into distinct neural activity patterns, called olfactory neural codes. To model their dynamics we perform multichannel recordings from the projection neurons in the AL driven by different odorants. We then derive a dynamic neuronal network from the electrophysiological data. The network consists of lateral-inhibitory neurons and excitatory neurons (modeled as firing-rate units), and is capable of producing unique olfactory neural codes for the tested odorants. To construct the network, we (1) design a projection, an odor space, for the neural recording from the AL, which discriminates between distinct odorants trajectories (2) characterize scent recognition, i.e., decision-making based on olfactory signals and (3) infer the wiring of the neural circuit, the connectome of the AL. We show that the constructed model is consistent with biological observations, such as contrast enhancement and robustness to noise. The study suggests a data-driven approach to answer a key biological question in identifying how lateral inhibitory neurons can be wired to excitatory neurons to permit robust activity patterns. PMID:25165442

  9. Plant odour processing in the antennal lobe of male and female grapevine moths, Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    PubMed

    Masante-Roca, I; Gadenne, C; Anton, S

    2002-12-01

    Moths of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are confronted with different volatiles emitted from the host plant during the different seasons. To test the hypothesis of plasticity of central plant odour processing in moths of different generations in the future, we first investigated the responses of antennal lobe (AL) interneurons of laboratory-reared virgin and mated males and females. We used intracellular recording and staining techniques while stimulating the antenna with a range of host and non-host plant odours. The AL structure of L. botrana is similar to that found in other Lepidoptera species studied. The most frequent physiological responses for all types of moths were obtained with (E)-2-hexenal, and with thujyl alcohol and beta-thujone, components of tansy, a behaviourally attractive non-host plant. Some broadly responding neurons were capable of distinguishing between different compounds through different response patterns (excitation/inhibition) and/or different dose-response characteristics. Response characteristics (response spectra, threshold and specificity) of neurons were similar, independent of sex or mating status of the moths. Significant differences between the groups were, however, found in the proportion of responding neurons for a few tested components.

  10. Long-term enhancement of synaptic transmission between antennal lobe and mushroom body in cultured Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kohei; Naganos, Shintaro; Hirano, Yukinori; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Saitoe, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is a critical brain structure for olfactory associative learning. During aversive conditioning, the MBs are thought to associate odour signals, conveyed by projection neurons (PNs) from the antennal lobe (AL), with shock signals conveyed through ascending fibres of the ventral nerve cord (AFV). Although synaptic transmission between AL and MB might play a crucial role for olfactory associative learning, its physiological properties have not been examined directly. Using a cultured Drosophila brain expressing a Ca(2+) indicator in the MBs, we investigated synaptic transmission and plasticity at the AL-MB synapse. Following stimulation with a glass micro-electrode, AL-induced Ca(2+) responses in the MBs were mediated through Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (dnAChRs), while AFV-induced Ca(2+) responses were mediated through Drosophila NMDA receptors (dNRs). AL-MB synaptic transmission was enhanced more than 2 h after the simultaneous 'associative-stimulation' of AL and AFV, and such long-term enhancement (LTE) was specifically formed at the AL-MB synapses but not at the AFV-MB synapses. AL-MB LTE was not induced by intense stimulation of the AL alone, and the LTE decays within 60 min after subsequent repetitive AL stimulation. These phenotypes of associativity, input specificity and persistence of AL-MB LTE are highly reminiscent of olfactory memory. Furthermore, similar to olfactory aversive memory, AL-MB LTE formation required activation of the Drosophila D1 dopamine receptor, DopR, along with dnAChR and dNR during associative stimulations. These physiological and genetic analogies indicate that AL-MB LTE might be a relevant cellular model for olfactory memory.

  11. Long-term enhancement of synaptic transmission between antennal lobe and mushroom body in cultured Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Kohei; Naganos, Shintaro; Hirano, Yukinori; Horiuchi, Junjiro; Saitoe, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is a critical brain structure for olfactory associative learning. During aversive conditioning, the MBs are thought to associate odour signals, conveyed by projection neurons (PNs) from the antennal lobe (AL), with shock signals conveyed through ascending fibres of the ventral nerve cord (AFV). Although synaptic transmission between AL and MB might play a crucial role for olfactory associative learning, its physiological properties have not been examined directly. Using a cultured Drosophila brain expressing a Ca2+ indicator in the MBs, we investigated synaptic transmission and plasticity at the AL–MB synapse. Following stimulation with a glass micro-electrode, AL-induced Ca2+ responses in the MBs were mediated through Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (dnAChRs), while AFV-induced Ca2+ responses were mediated through Drosophila NMDA receptors (dNRs). AL–MB synaptic transmission was enhanced more than 2 h after the simultaneous ‘associative-stimulation’ of AL and AFV, and such long-term enhancement (LTE) was specifically formed at the AL–MB synapses but not at the AFV–MB synapses. AL–MB LTE was not induced by intense stimulation of the AL alone, and the LTE decays within 60 min after subsequent repetitive AL stimulation. These phenotypes of associativity, input specificity and persistence of AL–MB LTE are highly reminiscent of olfactory memory. Furthermore, similar to olfactory aversive memory, AL–MB LTE formation required activation of the Drosophila D1 dopamine receptor, DopR, along with dnAChR and dNR during associative stimulations. These physiological and genetic analogies indicate that AL–MB LTE might be a relevant cellular model for olfactory memory. PMID:23027817

  12. Homomeric RDL and heteromeric RDL/LCCH3 GABA receptors in the honeybee antennal lobes: two candidates for inhibitory transmission in olfactory processing.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Julien Pierre; Bazelot, Michaël; Barbara, Guillaume Stéphane; Paute, Sandrine; Gauthier, Monique; Raymond-Delpech, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel receptors are abundant in the CNS, where their physiological role is to mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission. In insects, this inhibitory transmission plays a crucial role in olfactory information processing. In an effort to understand the nature and properties of the ionotropic receptors involved in these processes in the honeybee Apis mellifera, we performed a pharmacological and molecular characterization of GABA-gated channels in the primary olfactory neuropile of the honeybee brain-the antennal lobe (AL)-using whole cell patch-clamp recordings coupled with single-cell RT-PCR. Application of GABA onto AL cells at -110 mV elicited fast inward currents, demonstrating the existence of ionotropic GABA-gated chloride channels. Molecular analysis of the GABA-responding cells revealed that both subunits RDL and LCCH3 were expressed out of the three orthologs of Drosophila melanogaster GABA-receptor subunits encoded within the honeybee genome (RDL, resistant to dieldrin; GRD, GABA/glycine-like receptor of Drosophila; LCCH3, ligand-gated chloride channel homologue 3), opening the door to possible homo- and/or heteromeric associations. The resulting receptors were activated by insect GABA-receptor agonists muscimol and CACA and blocked by antagonists fipronil, dieldrin, and picrotoxin, but not bicuculline, displaying a typical RDL-like pharmacology. Interestingly, increasing the intracellular calcium concentration potentiated GABA-elicited currents, suggesting a modulating effect of calcium on GABA receptors possibly through phosphorylation processes that remain to be determined. These results indicate that adult honeybee AL cells express typical RDL-like GABA receptors whose properties support a major role in synaptic inhibitory transmission during olfactory information processing.

  13. Synaptic relationships between GABA-immunoreactive neurons and an identified uniglomerular projection neuron in the antennal lobe of Periplaneta americana: a double-labeling electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Malun, D

    1991-01-01

    Two types of central neurons in the antennal lobe of the American cockroach Periplaneta americana were labeled with a combination of two specific markers. Their synaptic contacts were characterized and their distribution on the neurons examined. A uniglomerular pheromone-sensitive projection neuron with dendritic arbor in the male-specific macroglomerulus (attractant neuron) was characterized physiologically by intracellular recording and then filled with biocytin, which was converted to a marker for this individual neuron by a preembedding procedure. In a postembedding procedure local, multiglomerular interneurons were marked by immunogold labeling of GABA. Two kinds of synaptic contacts were found on the attractant neuron. (i) Input synapses from GABA-immunoreactive profiles. There were many of these, which (together with results of previous studies) suggests that local interneurons mediate polysynaptic transmission from antennal receptor fibers to the projection neuron. (ii) Output synapses onto GABA-immunoreactive profiles and onto non-identified neurons. These contacts indicate that signals generated by the projection neurons in a given glomerulus are passed back to multiglomerular interneurons and hence are also transmitted to other glomeruli.

  14. Ultrastructure and morphology of antennal sensilla of the adult diving beetle Cybister japonicus Sharp

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian-Ping; Zhu, Fang; Jiang, Xiang; Zhang, Shan-Gan; Ban, Li-Ping

    2017-01-01

    The morphology and distribution of the antennal sensilla of adult diving beetle Cybister japonicus Sharp (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera), have been examined. Five types of sensilla on the antennae were identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Sensilla placodea and elongated s. placodea are the most abundant types of sensilla, distributing only on the flagellum. Both these types of sensilla carry multiple pore systems with a typical function as chemoreceptors. Three types of s. coeloconica (Type I–III) were also identified, with the characterization of the pit-in-pit style, and carrying pegs externally different from each other. Our data indicated that both type I and type II of s. coleconica contain two bipolar neurons, while the type III of s. coleconica contains three dendrites in the peg. Two sensory dendrites in the former two sensilla are tightly embedded inside the dendrite sheath, with no space left for sensilla lymph. There are no specific morphological differences in the antennal sensilla observed between males and females, except that the males have longer antennae and more sensilla than the females. PMID:28358865

  15. Synchronous firing of antennal-lobe projection neurons encodes the behaviorally effective ratio of sex-pheromone components in male Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Joshua P.; Lei, Hong; Riffell, Jeffrey A.; Hildebrand, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory stimuli that are essential to an animal's survival and reproduction are often complex mixtures of volatile organic compounds in characteristic proportions. Here, we investigated how these proportions are encoded in the primary olfactory processing center, the antennal lobe (AL), of male Manduca sexta moths. Two key components of the female's sex pheromone, present in an approximately 2:1 ratio, are processed in each of two neighboring glomeruli in the macroglomerular complex (MGC) of males of this species. In wind-tunnel flight experiments, males exhibited behavioral selectivity for ratios approximating the ratio released by conspecific females. The ratio between components was poorly represented, however, in the firing-rate output of uniglomerular MGC projection neurons (PNs). PN firing rate was mostly insensitive to the ratio between components, and individual PNs did not exhibit a preference for a particular ratio. Recording simultaneously from pairs of PNs in the same glomerulus, we found that the natural ratio between components elicited the most synchronous spikes, and altering the proportion of either component decreased the proportion of synchronous spikes. The degree of synchronous firing between PNs in the same glomerulus thus selectively encodes the natural ratio that most effectively evokes the natural behavioral response to pheromone. PMID:24002682

  16. The Organization of the Antennal Lobe Correlates Not Only with Phylogenetic Relationship, But Also Life History: A Basal Hymenopteran as Exemplar

    PubMed Central

    Nighorn, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the brain is a consequence of selective pressures and the ancestral brain structures modified by those pressures. The Hymenoptera are one of the most behaviorally complex insect orders, and the olfactory system of honeybees (one of the most derived members) has been extensively studied. To understand the context in which the olfactory system of the Hymenoptera evolved, we performed a variety of immunocytochemical and anatomical labeling techniques on the antennal lobes (ALs) of one of its most primitive members, the sawflies, to provide a comparison between the honeybee and other insect model species. The olfactory receptor neurons project from the antennae to fill the entire glomerular volume but do not form distinct tracts as in the honeybee. Labeling of projection neurons revealed 5 output tracts similar to those in moths and immunolabeling for several transmitters revealed distinct populations of local interneurons and centrifugal neurons that were also similar to moths. There were, however, no histaminergic or dopaminergic AL neurons. The similarities between sawflies and moths suggest that along with the great radiation and increased complexity of behavioral repertoire of the Hymenoptera, there were extensive modifications of AL structure. PMID:21059697

  17. Ensemble Response in Mushroom Body Output Neurons of the Honey Bee Outpaces Spatiotemporal Odor Processing Two Synapses Earlier in the Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Strube-Bloss, Martin F.; Herrera-Valdez, Marco A.; Smith, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    Neural representations of odors are subject to computations that involve sequentially convergent and divergent anatomical connections across different areas of the brains in both mammals and insects. Furthermore, in both mammals and insects higher order brain areas are connected via feedback connections. In order to understand the transformations and interactions that this connectivity make possible, an ideal experiment would compare neural responses across different, sequential processing levels. Here we present results of recordings from a first order olfactory neuropile – the antennal lobe (AL) – and a higher order multimodal integration and learning center – the mushroom body (MB) – in the honey bee brain. We recorded projection neurons (PN) of the AL and extrinsic neurons (EN) of the MB, which provide the outputs from the two neuropils. Recordings at each level were made in different animals in some experiments and simultaneously in the same animal in others. We presented two odors and their mixture to compare odor response dynamics as well as classification speed and accuracy at each neural processing level. Surprisingly, the EN ensemble significantly starts separating odor stimuli rapidly and before the PN ensemble has reached significant separation. Furthermore the EN ensemble at the MB output reaches a maximum separation of odors between 84–120 ms after odor onset, which is 26 to 133 ms faster than the maximum separation at the AL output ensemble two synapses earlier in processing. It is likely that a subset of very fast PNs, which respond before the ENs, may initiate the rapid EN ensemble response. We suggest therefore that the timing of the EN ensemble activity would allow retroactive integration of its signal into the ongoing computation of the AL via centrifugal feedback. PMID:23209711

  18. Neuropsychological profile of adult patients with nonsymptomatic occipital lobe epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Leonilda; Santangelo, Gabriella; Improta, Ilaria; Vitale, Carmine; Meo, Roberta; Trojano, Luigi

    2013-02-01

    To explore the neuropsychological and neurobehavioral profile in adult patients affected by nonsymptomatic (cryptogenic and idiopathic) occipital lobe epilepsy (OLE), with normal intelligence, we enrolled 20 adult patients with nonsymptomatic OLE and 20 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent neuropsychiatric assessment scales, and standardized neuropsychological tests tapping memory, executive functions, constructional, visuospatial and visuoperceptual skills. After Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons, patients performed significantly worse than controls on several tests tapping complex visuospatial skills and frontal lobe functions. The analysis of single patients' performance revealed that a significantly higher number of OLE patients achieved age- and education-adjusted pathological scores on three tests (Benton Judgment of Line Orientation Test, Freehand Copying of Drawings Test, color-word interference task of Stroop test) with respect to controls. Patients did not differ from control subjects on neuropsychiatric aspects. The direct comparison between OLE subtypes showed that cryptogenetic OLE patients tended to achieve lower scores than idiopathic OLE patients on most tests, but no difference between the two groups was fully significant. In summary, patients with nonsymptomatic OLE can be affected by clinically relevant impairments in selected neuropsychological domains: complex visuospatial skills and executive functions. It could be speculated that frontal and visuospatial cognitive deficits might be the result of epileptic activity spreading within a neural network that includes structures far beyond the occipital lobe.

  19. Differential antennal proteome comparison of adult honeybee drone, worker and queen (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Fang, Yu; Song, Feifei; Zhang, Lan; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Feng, Mao; Li, Jianke

    2012-01-04

    To understand the olfactory mechanism of honeybee antennae in detecting specific volatile compounds in the atmosphere, antennal proteome differences of drone, worker and queen were compared using 2-DE, mass spectrometry and bioinformatics. Therefore, 107 proteins were altered their expressions in the antennae of drone, worker and queen bees. There were 54, 21 and 32 up-regulated proteins in the antennae of drone, worker and queen, respectively. Proteins upregulated in the drone antennae were involved in fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production, protein folding and cytoskeleton. Proteins upregulated in the antennae of worker and queen bees were related to carbohydrate metabolism and energy production while molecular transporters were upregulated in the queen antennae. Our results explain the role played by the antennae of drone is to aid in perceiving the queen sexual pheromones, in the worker antennae to assist for food search and social communication and in the queen antennae to help pheromone communication with the worker and the drone during the mating flight. This first proteomic study significantly extends our understanding of honeybee olfactory activities and the possible mechanisms played by the antennae in response to various environmental, social, biological and biochemical signals.

  20. New Approach to Evaluate the Antennal Response of an Adult Predator Insect to Different Volatile Chemical Compounds by using Electroantennogram Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonouda, Mourad L.

    The antennal response of adult syrphid flies to selected plant volatile chemical compounds was investigated in the present study. The main chemical classes and their chemical compounds were aldehydes (nonanal and benzaldehyde), monoterpene-alcohols (linalool and alpha-terpineol), ketones (6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one and 2-undecanone), hydrocarbons (tetradecane) and benzoids (methyl salicylate). Electroantennogram (EAG) records showed that the syrphid antennae were strongly responded to linalool, 6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one and methyl salicylate even at low concentrations, in addition to the high dose concentration of nonanal comparably to the other chemical compounds. The antennae of old syrphid adults were more responsive and elicited higher levels of responses to all compounds rather than young syrphid adults. The antennal sensitivity may differ from one compound to another according to the sex. The difference in responses could be attributed to the sensitivity of olfactory receptors and/or the characterization of binding protein(s). The quality of biocontrol agent could be improved if the chemical interaction between beneficial natural enemies and the surrounding environment is intensively studied and we clearly understand the chemical ecology of each natural enemy.

  1. Adult to adult right lobe living donor liver transplantation: does biological relationship matter?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Tan, Yifei; Shen, Shu; Jiang, Li; Yan, Lunan; Yang, Jiayin; Li, Bo; Wen, Tianfu; Zeng, Yong; Wang, WenTao; Xu, Mingqing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The influence of the biological relationship between the donor and the recipient is rarely discussed in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), although it is believed to be an important risk factor in other types of organ transplantations. A total of 272 consecutive patients undergoing adult to adult right lobe LDLT were retrospectively analyzed and stratified into a nonbiologically related (NBR) group (69 patients) and a biologically related (BR) group (203 patients). The preoperative data and postoperative outcomes of both recipients and donors were evaluated. More than two-thirds of the recipients had histories of HBV infection, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was the main reason for the patients undergoing LDLT in both groups. The percentage of female donors in the NBR group was more than the percentage in the BR group (P = 0.000). There were no differences between the groups in postoperative laboratory testing or daily immunosuppression dose, and the complication rates in both the recipient and donor surgeries showed no significant differences. For patients with benign diseases, the cumulative 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rate were 92.9% in the 4 periods in the NBR group and 89.1%, 87.6%, 83.7%, and 83.7%, respectively, in BR group, while for the patients diagnosed as HCC, if patients exceeding the Milan criteria were involved, the 5-year survival rate was 41.2%, compared to 82% for patients within the Milan criteria, which was nearly the same as for those with the benign disease. In conclusion, our findings suggested that the biological relationship between the donor and the recipient in adult to adult LDLT was not associated with the short- and long-term outcomes of recipients diagnosed with benign liver diseases and early stage HCC. Moreover, the criteria for patients diagnosed with HCC to undergo LDLT should be restrictively selected. PMID:28121912

  2. Deep processing activates the medial temporal lobe in young but not in old adults.

    PubMed

    Daselaar, Sander M; Veltman, Dick J; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Raaijmakers, Jeroen G W; Jonker, Cees

    2003-11-01

    Age-related impairments in episodic memory have been related to a deficiency in semantic processing, based on the finding that elderly adults typically benefit less than young adults from deep, semantic as opposed to shallow, nonsemantic processing of study items. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that elderly adults are not able to perform certain cognitive operations under deep processing conditions. We further hypothesised that this inability does not involve regions commonly associated with lexical/semantic retrieval processes, but rather involves a dysfunction of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory system. To this end, we used functional MRI on rather extensive groups of young and elderly adults to compare brain activity patterns obtained during a deep (living/nonliving) and a shallow (uppercase/lowercase) classification task. Common activity in relation to semantic classification was observed in regions that have been previously related to semantic retrieval, including mainly left-lateralised activity in the inferior prefrontal, middle temporal, and middle frontal/anterior cingulate gyrus. Although the young adults showed more activity in some of these areas, the finding of mainly overlapping activation patterns during semantic classification supports the idea that lexical/semantic retrieval processes are still intact in elderly adults. This received further support by the finding that both groups showed similar behavioural performances as well on the deep and shallow classification tasks. Importantly, though, the young revealed significantly more activity than the elderly adults in the left anterior hippocampus during deep relative to shallow classification. This finding is in line with the idea that age-related impairments in episodic encoding are, at least partly, due to an under-recruitment of the medial temporal lobe memory system.

  3. Intraparenchymal endodermal cyst with spontaneous intracystic hemorrhage in the temporal lobe of an adult

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xin-Jie; Li, Xue-Yuan; Wang, Qi-Pu; Ren, Xin-Yu; Liang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Wen-Bin; Wang, Ren-Zhi; Wei, Jun-Ji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endodermal cysts (EC) are rare but well-known congenial lesions of the central nervous system mainly located in the spinal subdural space. Intracranial ECs are rare and commonly encountered in the posterior cranial fossa as extra-axial lesions; an intraparenchymal location is exceedingly rare. A complete removal is the best surgical strategy and any residue can cause recurrence. It is necessary to exclude EC in patients with intracranial cystic lesions. We present a case of intraparenchymal EC with spontaneous intracystic hemorrhage in the temporal lobe of an adult. Methods: A 43-year-old man presented with headache and memory deterioration. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a slightly enhanced temporal lobe cystic lesion, which was homogenously hyperintense on T1-and T2-weighted images. There was a suspicion of brain abscess at admission. The lesion was totally removed with a left subtemporal craniotomy. Histological examination revealed an EC with intracystic hemorrhage. Results: The preoperative symptoms were relieved after surgery and 3-month follow-up magnetic resonance imaging found no cystic signs. Conclusion: This case suggests that EC should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intracranial cystic lesions and a complete removal is the best strategy of choice. PMID:27861331

  4. Retinal thinning is uniquely associated with medial temporal lobe atrophy in neurologically normal older adults.

    PubMed

    Casaletto, Kaitlin B; Ward, Michael E; Baker, Nicholas S; Bettcher, Brianne M; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Li, Yaqiao; Chen, Robert; Dutt, Shubir; Miller, Bruce; Kramer, Joel H; Green, Ari J

    2017-03-01

    Given the converging pathologic and epidemiologic data indicating a relationship between retinal integrity and neurodegeneration, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), we aimed to determine if retinal structure correlates with medial temporal lobe (MTL) structure and function in neurologically normal older adults. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, verbal and visual memory testing, and 3T-magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were performed in 79 neurologically normal adults enrolled in a healthy aging cohort study. Retinal nerve fiber thinning and reduced total macular and macular ganglion cell volumes were each associated with smaller MTL volumes (ps < 0.04). Notably, these markers of retinal structure were not associated with primary motor cortex or basal ganglia volumes (regions relatively unaffected in AD) (ps > 0.70), or frontal, precuneus, or temporoparietal volumes (regions affected in later AD Braak staging ps > 0.20). Retinal structure was not significantly associated with verbal or visual memory consolidation performances (ps > 0.14). Retinal structure was associated with MTL volumes, but not memory performances, in otherwise neurologically normal older adults. Given that MTL atrophy is a neuropathological hallmark of AD, retinal integrity may be an early marker of ongoing AD-related brain health.

  5. Candidate olfaction genes identified within the Helicoverpa armigera Antennal Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Guo, Yuyuan; Wang, Guirong

    2012-01-01

    Antennal olfaction is extremely important for insect survival, mediating key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. Multiple antennal proteins are involved in olfactory signal transduction pathways. Of these, odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs) confer specificity on olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, we identified the olfactory gene repertoire of the economically important agricultural pest moth, Helicoverpa armigera, by assembling the adult male and female antennal transcriptomes. Within the male and female antennal transcriptomes we identified a total of 47 OR candidate genes containing 6 pheromone receptor candidates. Additionally, 12 IR genes as well as 26 odorant-binding proteins and 12 chemosensory proteins were annotated. Our results allow a systematic functional analysis across much of conventional ORs repertoire and newly reported IRs mediating the key olfaction-mediated behaviors of H. armigera.

  6. Antennal neuropile in the brain of the crayfish: morphology of neurons.

    PubMed

    Tautz, J; Müller-Tautz, R

    1983-08-20

    The cellular composition of the antennal neuropile of the crayfish is described. As a context for this work the distribution of neuronal cell bodies throughout the supraoesophageal ganglion (brain) is also described. The neuronal cell bodies in the brain are concentrated in 19 distinct clusters. Three paired clusters are located on the dorsal side of the brain, four paired and one midline cluster bend around the brain laterally and frontally respectively. Fewer than ten somata lie outside of these clusters. The antennal neuropile is composed of primary afferent terminals, efferents, and projecting and local interneurons. The structures of individual neurons of all four types were determined by filling them with Lucifer yellow, and an overview of the neuropile structure was obtained with cobalt backfills of selected nerves. The antennal afferents are concentrated in four main tracts that run medially in the outer layer of the antennal neuropile. Up to 11 orthogonal side branches occur at equal distances (25-35 microns) along the main branches and penetrate the neuropile. The efferents contribute very thin dendrites to the antennal neuropile. The majority of the neuronal mass of the antennal lobe consists of projecting and local interneurons. The branching pattern of the interneurons within the antennal neuropile also shows an orthogonal arrangement of main branches and higher-order branches. Thus the antennal neuropile displays a strong geometrical regularity: Main processes of all four types of neurons run in bundles the length of the long axis of the neuropile (lateral to medial inside the brain) giving rise to orthogonal side branches at regular intervals. This branching pattern leads to a striped appearance of the antennal lobe.

  7. Left lobe living donor liver transplantation in adults: What is the safety limit?

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toru; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Sakata, Kazuhito; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Harimoto, Norifumi; Harada, Noboru; Itoh, Shinji; Nagatsu, Akihisa; Soejima, Yuji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Small-for-size syndrome (SFSS) is the most significant cause of graft loss after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), especially after left lobe (LL) LDLT in adults. The safety limit of applying LL-LDLT in adults without severe SFSS with a high rate of lethality needs to be determined. A total of 207 LL-LDLTs in adults since September 2005 were evaluated to analyze the risk factors for severe SFSS, defined as a serum total bilirubin concentration of ≥20.0 mg/dL after LDLT. Although there were no significant differences in cumulative graft survival after LDLT between medium grafts (graft volume [GV] to standard liver volume [SLV] ratio ≥ 40.0%), small grafts (35.0% ≤ GV/SLV < 40.0%), and extra small grafts (GV/SLV < 35.0%), patients with severe SFSS showed a significantly lower 5-year graft survival rate than those without (42.9% versus 94.3%, respectively; P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis for severe SFSS after LL-LDLT showed that donor age of ≥48 years (P = 0.01), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of ≥ 19 (P < 0.01), and end portal venous pressure of ≥19 mm Hg (P = 0.04) were the significant and independent factors for severe SFSS after LL-LDLT. Within such high-risk subgroups of patients with a donor age of ≥48 years or MELD score of ≥ 19 before LDLT, operative blood loss volume of ≥8.0 L was a risk factor for severe SFSS. LL-LDLT in adults could be indicated and provide acceptable outcomes for the combinations of donors aged < 48 years and recipients with a MELD score of <19. Smaller grafts might yield acceptable outcomes in appropriately selected donor-recipient combinations. Liver Transplantation 22 1666-1675 2016 AASLD.

  8. Risk Factors for Intractable Ascites After Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Using Left Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Shinichi; Ishizaki, Yoichi; Yoshimoto, Jiro; Fujiwara, Noriko; Kawasaki, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Background Intractable ascites is one of the causes of graft loss after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using a small graft. Identification of factors associated with increasing posttransplant ascites has important implications for prevention and treatment. Methods All 59 consecutive adult patients who underwent left lobe LDLT without portal inflow modulation between October 2002 and February 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Factors associated with the average daily amount of ascites for 2 weeks after LDLT were assessed. Results The median daily amount of ascites during the 2 weeks was 1052 mL (range, 52-3480 mL). Although 16 of the 59 patients developed intractable ascites, exceeding 1500 mL daily (massive ascites group), the remaining 43 patients produced less than 1500 mL of ascites daily (nonmassive ascites group). The presence of pretransplant ascites (P = 0.001), albumin (P = 0.011), albumin/globulin ratio (P = 0.026), cold ischemia time (P = 0.004), operation time (P = 0.022), and pretransplant portal vein pressure (PVP) (P = 0.047) differed significantly between the 2 groups. Neither posttransplant PVP nor portal vein flow differed between the 2 groups. The variables associated with intractable ascites that remained significant after logistic regression analysis were pretransplant PVP (P = 0.047) and cold ischemia time (P = 0.049). After appropriate fluid resuscitation for intractable ascites, 58 (98%) of the 59 recipients were discharged from hospital after removal of the indwelling drains. Conclusions It is important to shorten the scold ischemia time to reduce massive ascites after LDLT. Pretransplant portal hypertension is more closely associated with ascites production than posttransplant hemodynamic status. PMID:28361122

  9. [Hyperlexia in an adult patient with lesions in the left medial frontal lobe].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Yamadori, A; Kumabe, T; Endo, K; Fujii, T; Yoshimoto, T

    2000-04-01

    A 69-year-old right-handed woman developed a transcortical motor aphasia with hyperlexia following resection of a glioma in the left medial frontal lobe. Neurological examination revealed grasp reflex in the right hand and underutilization of the right upper extremity. An MRI demonstrated lesions in the left medial frontal lobe including the supplementary motor area and the anterior part of the cingulate gyrus, which extended to the anterior part of the body of corpus callosum. Neuropsychologically she was alert and cooperative. She demonstrated transcortical motor aphasia. Her verbal output began with echolalia. Furthermore hyperlexia was observed in daily activities and during examinations. During conversation she suddenly read words written on objects around her which were totally irrelevant to the talk. When she was walking in the ward with an examiner she read words written on a trash bag that passed by and signboards which indicated a name of a room. Her conversation while walking was intermingled with reading words, which was irrelevant to the conversation. She also read time on analog clocks, which were hung on a wall in a watch store. In a naming task, she read words written on objects first and named them upon repeated question about their names. When an examiner opened a newspaper in front of her without any instructions she began reading until the examiner prohibited it. Then she began reading again when an examiner turned the page, although she remembered that she should not read it aloud. She showed mild ideomotor apraxia of a left hand. Utilization behavior, imitation behavior, hypergraphia, or compulsive use of objects was not observed throughout the course. Hyperlexic tendency is a prominent feature of this patient's language output. Hyperlexia was often reported in children with pervasive developmental disorders including autism. There are only a few reports about hyperlexia in adults and some of them were related to diffuse brain dysfunction

  10. Antennal motor system of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshichika; Comer, Christopher M

    2008-03-01

    The organization of the antennal muscles, nerves, and motor neurons has been investigated in the cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Antennal movements have been observed by video analysis, muscle actions have been determined by dissection and direct mechanical testing, and the motor neurons innervating each muscle have been defined with a recently developed selective backfill method. A model of the antennomotor system of Periplaneta has thus been established and compared with that of crickets. Five muscles located within the head capsule insert on the most proximal antennal segment, the scape. By their action, they allow the scape to move in essentially any direction within the dorsoventral and anteroposterior planes. An additional pair of muscles, one dorsal and one ventral, are found within the scape. They insert on the pedicel and move the pedicel in the dorsal-ventral plane. These seven muscles are controlled by at least 17 motor neurons with somata located in the deutocerebrum. By their action, these motor neurons enable cockroaches to move the long flagellum of each antenna through a wide range of positions in the frontal space, medio-laterally, and also allow depression toward the substrate and elevation well above the level of the head. The antennal motor neurons have been classified into five morphological types based on soma and axon location. Each morphological type has been correlated with a particular pattern of muscle innervation and control. The neurites of all motor neurons are located along the medial aspect of the dorsal lobe of the deutocerebrum.

  11. Assessment of executive functioning in children and young adults treated for frontal lobe tumours using ecologically valid tests.

    PubMed

    Longaud-Valès, A; Chevignard, M; Dufour, C; Grill, J; Puget, S; Sainte-Rose, C; Valteau-Couanet, D; Dellatolas, G

    2016-08-01

    There is a lack of studies assessing executive functions (EF) using ecologically valid tests in children with frontal lobe lesions. This study aimed to (1) evaluate EF in children, adolescents and young adults treated for childhood frontal lobe tumours, (2) identify factors influencing performance, such as age at diagnosis or type of treatment, and (3) examine correlations between intellectual ability and classical and ecological tests of EF. Twenty-one patients, aged 8-27 years, treated for a childhood benign or malignant frontal lobe tumour, and 42 healthy controls (matched for gender, age and socio-economic status) were assessed using classical tests of EF, and the BADS-C ecological battery. Patients also underwent assessment of intellectual ability and parent and teacher ratings of the BRIEF questionnaire. IQ scores ranged from 45 to 125 (mean FSIQ = 84) and were lower in case of epilepsy, hydrocephalus and lower parental education. Patients displayed deficits in most, but not all measures of EF. Most classical and ecological measures of EF were strongly correlated to IQ. This study confirms the frequency of EF deficits in this population; it also highlights the utility of ecological measures of EF and some limitations of classical tests of EF in children.

  12. RBANS Memory Indices Are Related to Medial Temporal Lobe Volumetrics in Healthy Older Adults and Those with Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    England, Heather B.; Gillis, M. Meredith; Hampstead, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    The current study (i) determined whether NeuroQuant® volumetrics are reflective of differences in medial temporal lobe (MTL) volumes between healthy older adults and those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and (ii) examined the relationship between RBANS indices and MTL volumes. Forty-three healthy older adults and 57 MCI patients completed the RBANS and underwent structural MRI. Hippocampal and inferior lateral ventricle (ILV) volumes were obtained using NeuroQuant®. Results revealed significantly smaller hippocampal and larger ILV volumes in MCI patients. MTL volumes were significantly related to the RBANS Immediate and Delayed Memory and Language indices but not the Attention or Visuoconstruction indices; findings that demonstrate anatomical specificity. Following discriminant function analysis, we calculated a cutpoint that may prove clinically useful for integrating MTL volumes into the diagnosis of MCI. These findings demonstrate the potential clinical utility of NeuroQuant® and are the first to document the relationship between RBANS indices and MTL volumes. PMID:24709384

  13. Central Projection of Antennal Sensory Neurons in the Central Nervous System of the Mirid Bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Xin-Cheng; Ma, Bai-Wei; Guo, Pei; Li, Guo-Ping; Feng, Hong-Qiang; Wu, Guo-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The mirid bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür), a polyphagous pest, is dependent on olfactory cues to locate various host plant species and mates. In this study, we traced the projection pathway of the antennal sensory neurons and visualized their projection patterns in the central nervous system of A. lucorum through confocal microscopy and digital reconstructions. We also examined the glomerular organization of the primary olfactory center of the brain, the antennal lobe, and created a three-dimensional model of the glomeruli. We found that the axons of the sensory neurons project into the brain via the ipsilateral antennal nerve, and descend further into the gnathal ganglion, prothoracic ganglion, mesothoracic ganglion, and metathoracic ganglion, and reach as far as to the abdominal ganglion. Such a projection pattern indicates that antennal sensory neurons of A. lucorum may be potentially directly connected to motor neurons. The antennal lobe, however, is the major target area of antennal sensory neurons. The antennal lobe is composed of a large number of glomeruli, i.e. 70–80 glomeruli in one AL of A. lucorum. The results of this study which provide information about the basic anatomical arrangement of the brain olfactory center of A. lucorum, are important for further investigations of chemosensory encoding mechanisms of the mirid bug. PMID:27478892

  14. Prevalence of Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy in the Adult Population of Bologna and Modena, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Vignatelli, Luca; Bisulli, Francesca; Giovannini, Giada; Licchetta, Laura; Naldi, Ilaria; Mostacci, Barbara; Rubboli, Guido; Provini, Federica; Tinuper, Paolo; Meletti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) in the adults of two areas of the Emilia-Romagna region (northeast Italy) and to describe the clinical features from a population-based perspective. Design: Population-based retrospective cohort study including adults with NFLE. Setting: Two areas of the Emilia-Romagna region: the city of Bologna (330,901 adult residents) and five districts of the province of Modena (424,007). Prevalence day: December 31, 2010. Participants: Patients with NFLE collected from multiple databases of neurologic hub centers of the districts involved. Diagnostic criteria: clinical history of sleep related bizarre motor attacks and videopolysomnographic recording confirming the typical features of NFLE. Inclusion criteria for prevalence calculation: residence in one of the two geographic areas on the prevalence day and an “active” or “in remission with treatment” form of NFLE. Measurements and Results: Six subjects from Bologna and eight from Modena were included. Crude prevalence (per 100,000 residents) was 1.8 (95% confidence interval 0.7–4.0) in Bologna and 1.9 (0.8–3.7) in Modena. Similarly, the main clinical features were consistent: onset during adolescence (median age 11–13 y), mainly hyperkinetic seizures, nonlesional form in more than two-thirds of cases, an active form of epilepsy in more than two-thirds of cases. A family history of epilepsy was reported only for two patients. Conclusions: This epidemiologic study establishes that nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy is a rare epileptic condition, fulfilling the definition for rare disease. Because of methodological limitations of our case ascertainment, the estimates we disclose must be considered the minimum prevalence. Citation: Vignatelli L, Bisulli F, Giovannini G, Licchetta L, Naldi I, Mostacci B, Rubboli G, Provini F, Tinuper P, Meletti S. Prevalence of nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy in the adult population of Bologna and

  15. Antennal responses to floral scents in the butterfly Heliconius melpomene.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Susanna; Dobson, Heidi E M

    2003-10-01

    Floral scent, together with visual floral cues, are important signals to adult butterflies searching for food-rewarding plants. To identify which compounds in a floral scent are more attractive and, thus, of biological importance to foraging butterflies, we applied electrophysiological methods. Antennal responses of male and female adults of the tropical butterfly Heliconius melpomene L. (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Heliconiinae) to individual compounds of natural floral scents and synthetic floral scent mixtures were investigated using gas chromatography-electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD). The natural floral scents included those of two tropical plant species, Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae) and Warszewiczia coccinea (Vahl) Kl. (Rubiaceae), and two temperate species, Buddleja davidii Franchet (Loganiaceae) and Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. (Asteraceae). The two synthetic floral scent mixtures contained many of the compounds found in the natural scents, but all in equal quantities. Compounds both present in relatively high abundance in the floral scents and detected exclusively in the floral parts of the plant, such as linalool, linalool oxide (furanoid) I and II, oxoisophoroneoxide, and phenylacetaldehyde, elicited the strongest antennal responses, suggesting that they may reflect adaptations by the plant to attract butterfly pollinators. However, other compounds also present in high abundance in the floral scent, but detected in the vegetative as well as floral plant parts, either elicited strong antennal responses, such as trans-beta-ocimene and benzaldehyde, or failed to elicit antennal responses, such as the sesquiterpenes beta-caryophyllene and alpha-humulene from L. camara. The most volatile monoterpene alkenes in the synthetic scent mixtures elicited only low or no responses. Furthermore, the overall antennal responses were stronger in females than in males. The findings suggest that several floral scent volatiles, especially those of exclusively floral

  16. Morphological and developmental analysis of peripheral antennal chemosensory sensilla and central olfactory glomeruli in worker castes of Camponotus compressus (Fabricius, 1787).

    PubMed

    Mysore, Keshava; Shyamala, Baragur V; Rodrigues, Veronica

    2010-09-01

    The antennal lobes of different castes of the ant species Camponotus compressus show a marked diversity in the organization of their olfactory glomeruli. Notably, there is a significant difference in the number and size of glomeruli between the reproductives and the workers and among the different worker castes. In this report, we investigate the notion that these caste-specific differences in glomerular number might be accounted for, at least in part, by the differences in numbers of olfactory sensilla that target the antennal lobe. For this, we examine the number of sensilla on the antennal flagella of all the individual castes of C. compressus. This analysis reveals a striking correlation between sensillar number and the number of antennal glomeruli in a given caste. As a first step in investigating the causal mechanisms that might give raise to this correlation, we carry out an initial characterization of olfactory system development in the minor workers of C. compressus. We analyze the temporal pattern of innervations of the developing antennal lobe by olfactory sensory neuron axons. We document the development of the olfactory glomeruli in the antennal lobe during this process, which occurs during early pupal stages. Our findings provide the basis for future manipulative developmental studies on the role of sensory afferent number in glomerular development of different castes within the same species.

  17. Multimodal intervention in older adults improves resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Zhu, Xinyi; Yin, Shufei; Niu, Yanan; Zheng, Zhiwei; Huang, Xin; Wang, Baoxi; Li, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe are particularly vulnerable to the effects of aging. The disconnection between them is suggested to be an important cause of cognitive decline in normal aging. Here, using multimodal intervention training, we investigated the functional plasticity in resting-state connectivity of these two regions in older adults. The multimodal intervention, comprised of cognitive training, Tai Chi exercise, and group counseling, was conducted to explore the regional connectivity changes in the default-mode network, as well as changes in prefrontal-based voxel-wise connectivity in the whole brain. Results showed that the intervention selectively affected resting-state functional connectivity between the medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Moreover, the strength of resting-state functional connectivity between these regions correlated with individual cognitive performance. Our results suggest that multimodal intervention could postpone the effects of aging and improve the function of the regions that are most heavily influenced by aging, as well as play an important role in preserving the brain and cognition during old age.

  18. Antennal lobe organization and pheromone usage in bombycid moths

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Shigehiro; Daimon, Takaaki; Iwatsuki, Chika; Shimada, Toru; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the neuroanatomy of the macroglomerular complex (MGC), which is involved in sex pheromone processing, in five species in the subfamily Bombycinae, including Ernolatia moorei, Trilocha varians, Rondotia menciana, Bombyx mandarina and Bombyx mori. The glomerulus located at the dorsal-most part of the olfactory centre shows the largest volume in moth species examined to date. Such normal glomerular organization has been observed in E. moorei and T. varians, which use a two-component mixture and includes the compound bombykal as a mating signal. By contrast, the other three species, which use another component as a single attractant, exhibited a modified arrangement of the MGC. This correlation between pheromone usage and neural organization may be useful for understanding the process of speciation. PMID:24759369

  19. PERINATAL EXPOSURE TO ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS AND THE SUBSEQUENT EFFECTS ON THE PROSTRATE OF THE ADULT RAT: EVALUATION OF INFLAMMATION IN THE VENTRAL AND LATERAL LOBES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perinatal exposure to estrogenic compounds and the subsequent effects on the prostate of the adult rat: evaluation of inflammation in the ventral and lateral lobes.

    Stoker TE, Robinette CL, Cooper RL.

    Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National ...

  20. The Frontal Lobes and Theory of Mind: Developmental Concepts from Adult Focal Lesion Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuss, Donald T.; Anderson, Vicki

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective in this paper is to present a framework to understand the structure of consciousness. We argue that consciousness has been difficult to define because there are different kinds of consciousness, hierarchically organized, which need to be differentiated. Our framework is based on evidence from adult focal lesion research. The…

  1. [Olfactory perception and learning in the honey bee (Apis mellifera): calcium imaging in the antenna lobe].

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2003-01-01

    Honey bees are a key-model in the study of learning and memory, because they show considerable learning abilities, their brain is well described and is accessible to a wide range of physiological recordings and treatments. We use in vivo calcium imaging to study olfactory perception in the bee brain, and combine this method to appetitive olfactory conditioning to unravel the neural substrates of olfactory learning. Odours are detected by receptor neurons on the antennae. Each receptor neuron projects to the first-order neuropile of the olfactory pathway, the antennal lobe, connecting to projection neurons in one of its 160 functional units, the glomeruli. In calcium imaging experiments, each odour elicits a particular activity pattern of antennal lobe glomeruli, according to a code conserved between individuals. The antennal lobe is also a site where the olfactory memory is formed. Using optical imaging, two studies have shown modulations of odour representation in the antennal lobe after learning, with different effects depending on the type of conditioning used. While simple differential conditioning (A + B- training) showed an increased calcium response to the reinforced odour, side-specific conditioning (A + B-/B + A- training) decorrelated the calcium responses of odours between brain sides. This difference may owe to the formation of different memories, which will be addressed in future work. By specifically staining antennal lobe neuronal subpopulations, we hope to be able in the future to study synaptic plasticity in the honey bee.

  2. Occurrence of antennal glands in ants.

    PubMed

    Renthal, Robert; Velasquez, Daniel; Olmos, David; Vinson, S Bradleigh

    2008-11-01

    A previous report of the discovery of exocrine glands in the antennal club of queens and workers of Solenopsis invicta Buren, 1972 left open the question of the extent to which similar glands occur in the Formicidae family. We wanted to know if these antennal glands are unique to Solenopsis, or they are found in a wider taxonomic group. Using scanning electron microscopy, we examined the antennae of 41 ant species. Presence of the antennal glands was indicated by a characteristic circumferential ring of pores in a distal antennal segment of workers. Pores were found in the 9th antennal segment of all 26 species of Solenopsis examined. Pores were absent in the following: Monomorium minimum, M. pharaonis, Pheidole sp., Crematogaster sp., Linepithema humile, Forelius sp., Dorymyrmex sp., Paratrechina sp., Oecophylla smaragdina, Campanotus sp., Ectatomma ruidum, E. tuberlatum, and Pseudomyrmex ferruginea. However, pores were found in the antennal club of Tetramorium bicarinatum workers and queens. After KOH digestion of T. bicarinatum antennae, internal canals were observed in both workers and queens, and the canals are connected to spherical reservoirs in queens. T. bicarinatum was the only non-Solenopsis species examined, which showed evidence for antennal glands in the distal funiculus.

  3. The anatomical pathways for antennal sensory information in the central nervous system of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Yoritsune, Atsushi; Aonuma, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    Antennae are one of the major organs to detect chemo- and mechanosensory cue in crickets. Little is known how crickets process and integrate different modality of information in the brain. We thus used a number of different anatomical techniques to gain an understanding of the neural pathways extending from the antennal sensory neurons up to centers in the brain. We identified seven antennal sensory tracts (assigned as T1-7) utilizing anterograde dye filling from the antennal nerve. Tracts T1-T4 project into the antennal lobe (AL), while tracts T5 and T6 course into the dorsal region of the deutocerebrum or the suboesophageal ganglion, and finally, tract T7 terminates in the ventral area of flagellar afferent (VFA). By analyzing autofluorescence images of the AL, we identified 49 sexually isomorphic glomeruli on the basis of shape, relative position and size. On the basis of our sensory-tract data, we assigned the glomeruli into one of four separate groups. We then three-dimensionally reconstructed the internal structures in the AL (glomeruli) and the VFA (layers). Next in the protocerebrum, we identified both the tracts and their terminations from the AL and VFA. We found that 10 tracts originate in the AL, whereas there are at least eight tracts from the VFA. Several tracts from the AL share their routes with those from the VFA, but their termination areas are segregated. We now have a better anatomical understanding of the pathways for the antennal information in cricket.

  4. Multiple list learning in adults with autism spectrum disorder: parallels with frontal lobe damage or further evidence of diminished relational processing?

    PubMed

    Bowler, Dermot M; Gaigg, Sebastian B; Gardiner, John M

    2010-02-01

    To test the effects of providing relational cues at encoding and/or retrieval on multi-trial, multi-list free recall in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 16 adults with ASD and 16 matched typical adults learned a first followed by a second categorised list of 24 words. Category labels were provided at encoding, retrieval, both or not at all. Both groups showed enhanced recall when labels were available during encoding or throughout the task. ASD individuals showed reduced recall of the second list and reduced clustering. Clustering and recall were correlated in both groups, which also showed similar levels of subjective organisation. The findings are discussed in relation to theories of frontal and medial temporal lobe contributions to memory in ASD.

  5. Sensorimotor Integration of Antennal Positioning in Flying Insects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-02

    responsible for mediating antennal positioning in the hawk moth Daphnis nerii. Ablating these bristles resulted in mispositioning of the antenna, and...dendritic arbors of antennal muscle motor neurons. Antennal muscles respond to stimulation of the Böhm’s bristles at very short time scales (᝺ms...indicating that the connections between them may be monosynaptic. Our data thus suggested that the control of antennal positioning by the Böhm’s bristles via

  6. A retroactive spatial cue improved VSTM capacity in mild cognitive impairment and medial temporal lobe amnesia but not in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Rachel N; Duarte, Audrey; Pun, Carson; Smith, Victoria M; Ferber, Susanne; Barense, Morgan D

    2015-10-01

    Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is a vital cognitive ability, connecting visual input with conscious awareness. VSTM performance declines with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and medial temporal lobe (MTL) amnesia. Many studies have shown that providing a spatial retrospective cue ("retrocue") improves VSTM capacity estimates for healthy young adults. However, one study has demonstrated that older adults are unable to use a retrocue to inhibit irrelevant items from memory. It is unknown whether patients with MCI and MTL amnesia will be able to use a retrocue to benefit their memory. We administered a retrocue and a baseline (simultaneous cue, "simucue") task to young adults, older adults, MCI patients, and MTL cases. Consistent with previous findings, young adults showed a retrocue benefit, whereas healthy older adults did not. In contrast, both MCI patients and MTL cases showed a retrocue benefit--the use of a retrocue brought patient performance up to the level of age-matched controls. We speculate that the patients were able to use the spatial information from the retrocue to reduce interference and facilitate binding items to their locations.

  7. Antennal Sensilla in the Parasitoid Sclerodermus sp. (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chang-Xiang; Sun, Xiao; Mi, Feng; Chen, Jingyuan; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps of the genus Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) are an important natural enemy of the Japanese pine sawyer beetle Monochamus alternatus Hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). In this study, we used scanning electron microscopy to examine the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of Sclerodermus sp. Antennae of females and males comprised the scape, pedicel, and 11 flagellomere segments. Based on the morphology of the sensilla in each sex, seven types of sensillum were identified: sensilla trichodea (Tr.1, Tr.2 and Tr.3), sensilla basiconica (Ba.1, Ba.2, and Ba.3), sensilla styloconica (St.1 and St.2), sensilla placodea, sensilla coeloconica, sensilla squamiforma, and Bohm’s bristles. Tr.2, Ba.1, and St.1 were only found in females, whereas Ba.2, Ba.3, and St.2 were only observed in males. Sensilla placodea were the most common, given that they occur on the antennae of many parasitoid Hymenoptera, whereas sensilla Tr were the most abundant, being distributed over the entire antennal surface. These sensilla are likely to have roles in the host locating and habitat searching behavior of adult Sclerodermus wasps. Therefore, our findings provide a basis for further studies of the host location behavior of this and other species of parasitic wasp. PMID:25843589

  8. Antennal sensilla in the parasitoid Sclerodermus sp. (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chang-Xiang; Sun, Xiao; Mi, Feng; Chen, Jingyuan; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps of the genus Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) are an important natural enemy of the Japanese pine sawyer beetle Monochamus alternatus Hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). In this study, we used scanning electron microscopy to examine the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of Sclerodermus sp. Antennae of females and males comprised the scape, pedicel, and 11 flagellomere segments. Based on the morphology of the sensilla in each sex, seven types of sensillum were identified: sensilla trichodea (Tr.1, Tr.2 and Tr.3), sensilla basiconica (Ba.1, Ba.2, and Ba.3), sensilla styloconica (St.1 and St.2), sensilla placodea, sensilla coeloconica, sensilla squamiforma, and Bohm's bristles. Tr.2, Ba.1, and St.1 were only found in females, whereas Ba.2, Ba.3, and St.2 were only observed in males. Sensilla placodea were the most common, given that they occur on the antennae of many parasitoid Hymenoptera, whereas sensilla Tr were the most abundant, being distributed over the entire antennal surface. These sensilla are likely to have roles in the host locating and habitat searching behavior of adult Sclerodermus wasps. Therefore, our findings provide a basis for further studies of the host location behavior of this and other species of parasitic wasp.

  9. Antennal pathways in the central nervous system of a blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Barrozo, Romina B; Couton, Louise; Lazzari, Claudio R; Insausti, Teresita C; Minoli, Sebastian A; Fresquet, Nadine; Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Anton, Sylvia

    2009-03-01

    The haematophagous bug Rhodnius prolixus has been a model system in insect physiology for a long time. Recently, several studies have been devoted to its sensory systems, including olfaction. However, few data are available on the basic organisation of the nervous system in this species. By means of neuronal backfills, histology, confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction methods, we have characterized the projection patterns of antennal sensory neurons within the central nervous system of this disease-vector insect. We established the first partial three-dimensional map of the antennal lobe (AL) of a hemipteran insect. The ALs of this species are relatively diffuse structures, which nevertheless show a glomerular organisation. Based on computer reconstruction of the AL, 22 glomeruli with a radius of 8-25 microm could be identified. No obvious sexual dimorphism of the glomerular architecture was observed. Antennal afferents project not only into the deutocerebrum, but also some fibres descend through the ventral nerve cord to ganglia belonging to the abdominal segments.

  10. [Asymmetry of antennal grooming in the cockroach (Periplaneta americana)].

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the key features of antennal grooming of male American cockroaches in neutral circumstances. It was shown for the first time that the right antenna was cleaned significantly more often than the left one, which indicates the presence of functional asymmetry of antennal grooming in this insect species. At the same time, no statistically significant asymmetry was found for grooming of antennal bases and legs. Morphological asymmetries of antennae and legs and/or brain lateralization are the plausible sources of observed behavioral asymmetry in antennal grooming.

  11. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    Frontal lobe seizures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Frontal lobe seizures are a common form of epilepsy, a ... seizures originate in the front of the brain. Frontal lobe seizures may also be caused by abnormal brain ...

  12. Assessment of everyday memory functioning in temporal lobe epilepsy and healthy adults using the multifactorial memory questionnaire (MMQ).

    PubMed

    Illman, Nathan A; Moulin, Chris J A; Kemp, Steven

    2015-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is associated with differing degrees of objective and subjective memory impairment. Memory self-report is an important part of the assessment process but few reliable and valid measures have been researched with this group. We thus aimed to explore subjective impairments with a robust measure: the multifactorial memory questionnaire (MMQ; Troyer and Rich, 2002). This was administered to 82 people with TLE and an age and education matched control group of the same size. The questionnaire probes worries about memory (MMQ-contentment); subjective forgetfulness (MMQ-ability); and use of compensatory strategies (MMQ-strategy). The TLE group reported significantly more worries about their memory, more instances of forgetfulness and use of more strategies than control participants. Strategy use was related to demographic factors in controls but not in the TLE group. Analysis of epilepsy related factors indicated that hemispheric laterlisation subgroups did not differ from one another on any subscale, nor did participants grouped according to their use of one, several, or no anti-epileptic medications. Measures of chronicity including age of onset and illness duration also failed to correlate with the MMQ subscales. Because objective memory performance is often impaired in more chronic and intractable cases, the lack of difference in subjective complaint is surprising and warrants future research to examine the relationship between this questionnaire and standardized test scores. We conclude that the MMQ is a clinical measure that could be used either outside or in tandem with neuropsychological assessment to gauge everyday memory difficulties among epilepsy patients.

  13. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal < 100 pM). Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was reinitiated. Two months later, her hippocampal abnormalities had improved and 3 months later her VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  14. Spike-Wave Discharges in Adult Sprague-Dawley Rats and Their Implications for Animal Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Patrice S.; Friedman, Daniel; LaFrancois, John J.; Iyengar, Sloka S.; Fenton, André A.; MacLusky, Neil J.; Scharfman, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    Spike-wave discharges (SWDs) are thalamocortical oscillations that are often considered to be the EEG correlate of absence seizures. GAERS and Wag/Rij rat strains exhibit SWDs and are considered to be genetic animal models of absence epilepsy. However, it has been reported that other rat strains have SWDs, suggesting that SWDs may vary in their prevalence but all rats have a predisposition for them. This is important because many of these rat strains are used to study temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), where it is assumed that there is no seizure-like activity in controls. In the course of other studies about the Sprague-Dawley rat, a common rat strain for animal models of TLE, we found that approximately 19% of 2–3 month old naïve female Sprague-Dawley rats exhibited SWDs spontaneously during periods of behavioral arrest and they continued for months. Males exhibited SWDs only after 3 months of age, consistent with previous reports [1]. Housing in atypical lighting during early life appeared to facilitate the incidence SWDs. SWDs were often accompanied by behaviors similar to stage 1–2 limbic seizures. Therefore, additional analyses were made to address the similarity. We observed that the frequency of SWDs was similar to theta rhythm during exploration for a given animal, typically 7–8 Hz. Therefore, activity in the frequency of theta rhythm that occurs during frozen behavior may not reflect seizures necessarily. Hippocampal recordings exhibited high frequency oscillations (>250 Hz) during SWDs, suggesting neuronal activity in hippocampus occurs during SWDs, i.e., it is not a passive structure. The data also suggest that high frequency oscillations, if rhythmic, may reflect SWDs. We also confirmed that SWDs were present in a common animal model of TLE, the pilocarpine model, using female Sprague-Dawley rats. Therefore, damage and associated changes to thalamic, hippocampal and cortical neurons in does not prevent SWDs, at least in this animal model. The results

  15. Airflow and optic flow mediate antennal positioning in flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Roy Khurana, Taruni; Sane, Sanjay P

    2016-01-01

    To maintain their speeds during navigation, insects rely on feedback from their visual and mechanosensory modalities. Although optic flow plays an essential role in speed determination, it is less reliable under conditions of low light or sparse landmarks. Under such conditions, insects rely on feedback from antennal mechanosensors but it is not clear how these inputs combine to elicit flight-related antennal behaviours. We here show that antennal movements of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, are governed by combined visual and antennal mechanosensory inputs. Frontal airflow, as experienced during forward flight, causes antennae to actively move forward as a sigmoidal function of absolute airspeed values. However, corresponding front-to-back optic flow causes antennae to move backward, as a linear function of relative optic flow, opposite the airspeed response. When combined, these inputs maintain antennal position in a state of dynamic equilibrium. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14449.001 PMID:27097104

  16. Skin conductance biofeedback training in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and stress-triggered seizures: a proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur; Kotwas, Iliana; Lanteaume, Laura; Berthet, Christelle; Bastien, Mireille; Vion-Dury, Jean; McGonigal, Aileen; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2014-12-01

    The present proof-of-concept study investigated the feasibility of skin conductance biofeedback training in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), whose seizures are triggered by stress. Skin conductance biofeedback aims to increase levels of peripheral sympathetic arousal in order to reduce cortical excitability. This might seem somewhat counterintuitive, since such autonomic arousal may also be associated with increased stress and anxiety. Thus, this sought to verify that patients with TLE and stress-triggered seizures are not worsened in terms of stress, anxiety, and negative emotional response to this nonpharmacological treatment. Eleven patients with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress were treated with 12 sessions of biofeedback. Patients did not worsen on cognitive evaluation of attentional biases towards negative emotional stimuli (P>.05) or on psychometric evaluation with state anxiety inventory (P = .059); in addition, a significant improvement was found in the Negative Affect Schedule (P = .014) and in the Beck Depression Inventory (P = .009). Biofeedback training significantly reduced seizure frequency with a mean reduction of -48.61% (SD = 27.79) (P = .005). There was a correlation between the mean change in skin conductance activity over the biofeedback treatment and the reduction of seizure frequency (r(11) = .62, P = .042). Thus, the skin conductance biofeedback used in the present study, which teaches patients to achieve an increased level of peripheral sympathetic arousal, was a well-tolerated nonpharmacological treatment. Further, well-controlled studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic value of this nonpharmacological treatment in reducing seizures in adults with drug-resistant TLE with seizures triggered by stress.

  17. The life stories of adults with amnesia: Insights into the contribution of the medial temporal lobes to the organization of autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Matthew D; Wank, Aubrey A; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2017-03-10

    Autobiographical memories are not stored in isolation but rather are organized into life chapters, higher-order knowledge structures that represent major themes conveying the arc of one's life. Neuropsychological studies have revealed that both episodic memory and some aspects of personal semantic memory are impaired in adults with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage. However, whether such impairment compromises the retrieval and formation of life chapters is unknown. Therefore, we had 10 adults with MTL amnesia and 20 control participants narrate their life stories, and we extracted life chapters from these narratives using a novel scoring protocol. For the retrograde and anterograde time period separately, we evaluated the number of life chapters and assessed their quality, as indexed by measures of complexity and richness. Additionally, to investigate the idea that formation of life chapters occurs on a protracted time scale, we separated the amnesic participants into an early-life and a later-life onset subgroup. Results revealed that early-onset, but not later-onset, amnesic participants generated fewer retrograde life chapters than controls. The higher-order temporal relation among retrograde chapters, but not their thematic relation or the richness of individual life chapters, was impaired in both amnesic subgroups. The amnesic participants also generated fewer anterograde life chapters than controls, and the richness of their anterograde chapters was reduced in terms of content, but not self-reflection. Findings suggest that the organization of autobiographical content into life chapters is a protracted process that depends on the MTL, as does retrieval of higher order temporal relations among life chapters.

  18. Coarse topographic organization of pheromone-sensitive afferents from different antennal surfaces in the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Kamimura, Itsuro; Yokohari, Fumio; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-05-19

    In contrast to visual, auditory, taste, and mechanosensory neuropils, in which sensory afferents are topographically organized on the basis of their peripheral soma locations, axons of cognate sensory neurons from different locations of the olfactory sense organ converge onto a small spherical neuropil (glomerulus) in the first-order olfactory center. In the cockroach Periplaneta americana, sex pheromone-sensitive afferents with somata in the antero-dorsal and postero-ventral surfaces of a long whip-like antenna are biased toward the anterior and posterior regions of a macroglomerulus, respectively. In each region, afferents with somata in the more proximal antenna project to more proximal region, relative to the axonal entry points. However, precise topography of afferents in the macroglomerulus has remained unknown. Using single and multiple neuronal stainings, we showed that afferents arising from anterior, dorsal, ventral and posterior surfaces of the proximal regions of an antenna were biased progressively from the anterior to posterior region of the macroglomerulus, reflecting chiasmatic axonal re-arrangements that occur immediately before entering the antennal lobe. Morphologies of individual afferents originating from the proximal antenna matched results of mass neuronal stainings, but their three-dimensional origins in the antenna were hardly predictable on the basis of the projection patterns. Such projection biases made by neuronal populations differ from strict somatotopic projections of antennal mechanosensory neurons in the same species, suggesting a unique sensory mechanism to process information about odor location and direction on a single antenna.

  19. Antennal motor activity induced by pilocarpine in the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Okada, Jiro; Morimoto, Yusuke; Toh, Yoshihiro

    2009-04-01

    The antennal motor system is activated by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine in the American cockroach Periplaneta americana, and its output patterns were examined both in restrained intact animals and in isolated CNS preparations. The three-dimensional antennal movements induced by the hemocoelic drug injection were analyzed in in vivo preparations. Pilocarpine effectively induced prolonged rhythmic movements of both antennae. The antennae tended to describe a spatially patterned trajectory, forming loops or the symbol of infinity (infinity). Such spatial regularity is comparable to that during spontaneous tethered-walking. Rhythmic bursting activities of the antennal motor nerves in in vitro preparations were also elicited by bath application of pilocarpine. Cross-correlation analyses of the bursting spike activities revealed significant couplings among certain motor units, implying the spatial regularity of the antennal trajectory. The pilocarpine-induced rhythmic activity of antennal motor nerves was effectively suppressed by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. These results indicate that the activation of the antennal motor system is mediated by muscarinic receptors.

  20. The sox gene Dichaete is expressed in local interneurons and functions in development of the Drosophila adult olfactory circuit.

    PubMed

    Melnattur, Krishna V; Berdnik, Daniela; Rusan, Zeid; Ferreira, Christopher J; Nambu, John R

    2013-02-01

    In insects, the primary sites of integration for olfactory sensory input are the glomeruli in the antennal lobes. Here, axons of olfactory receptor neurons synapse with dendrites of the projection neurons that relay olfactory input to higher brain centers, such as the mushroom bodies and lateral horn. Interactions between olfactory receptor neurons and projection neurons are modulated by excitatory and inhibitory input from a group of local interneurons. While significant insight has been gleaned into the differentiation of olfactory receptor and projection neurons, much less is known about the development and function of the local interneurons. We have found that Dichaete, a conserved Sox HMG box gene, is strongly expressed in a cluster of LAAL cells located adjacent to each antennal lobe in the adult brain. Within these clusters, Dichaete protein expression is detected in both cholinergic and GABAergic local interneurons. In contrast, Dichaete expression is not detected in mature or developing projection neurons, or developing olfactory receptor neurons. Analysis of novel viable Dichaete mutant alleles revealed misrouting of specific projection neuron dendrites and axons, and alterations in glomeruli organization. These results suggest noncell autonomous functions of Dichaete in projection neuron differentiation as well as a potential role for Dichaete-expressing local interneurons in development of the adult olfactory circuitry.

  1. Human fetal brain-derived neural stem/progenitor cells grafted into the adult epileptic brain restrain seizures in rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejin; Yun, Seokhwan; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Won-Joo; Park, Kook In

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) because this can suppress spontaneous recurrent seizures in animal models. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of human neural stem/progenitor cells (huNSPCs) for treating TLE, we transplanted huNSPCs, derived from an aborted fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation and expanded in culture as neurospheres over a long time period, into the epileptic hippocampus of fully kindled and pilocarpine-treated adult rats exhibiting TLE. In vitro, huNSPCs not only produced all three central nervous system neural cell types, but also differentiated into ganglionic eminences-derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons and released GABA in response to the depolarization induced by a high K+ medium. NSPC grafting reduced behavioral seizure duration, afterdischarge duration on electroencephalograms, and seizure stage in the kindling model, as well as the frequency and the duration of spontaneous recurrent motor seizures in pilocarpine-induced animals. However, NSPC grafting neither improved spatial learning or memory function in pilocarpine-treated animals. Following transplantation, grafted cells showed extensive migration around the injection site, robust engraftment, and long-term survival, along with differentiation into β-tubulin III+ neurons (∼34%), APC-CC1+ oligodendrocytes (∼28%), and GFAP+ astrocytes (∼8%). Furthermore, among donor-derived cells, ∼24% produced GABA. Additionally, to explain the effect of seizure suppression after NSPC grafting, we examined the anticonvulsant glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels in host hippocampal astrocytes and mossy fiber sprouting into the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the epileptic brain. Grafted cells restored the expression of GDNF in host astrocytes but did not reverse the mossy fiber sprouting, eliminating the latter as potential mechanism. These results suggest that human fetal

  2. Human Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells Grafted into the Adult Epileptic Brain Restrain Seizures in Rat Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haejin; Yun, Seokhwan; Kim, Il-Sun; Lee, Il-Shin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Soo Chul; Kim, Won-Joo; Park, Kook In

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation has been suggested as an alternative therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) because this can suppress spontaneous recurrent seizures in animal models. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of human neural stem/progenitor cells (huNSPCs) for treating TLE, we transplanted huNSPCs, derived from an aborted fetal telencephalon at 13 weeks of gestation and expanded in culture as neurospheres over a long time period, into the epileptic hippocampus of fully kindled and pilocarpine-treated adult rats exhibiting TLE. In vitro, huNSPCs not only produced all three central nervous system neural cell types, but also differentiated into ganglionic eminences-derived γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons and released GABA in response to the depolarization induced by a high K+ medium. NSPC grafting reduced behavioral seizure duration, afterdischarge duration on electroencephalograms, and seizure stage in the kindling model, as well as the frequency and the duration of spontaneous recurrent motor seizures in pilocarpine-induced animals. However, NSPC grafting neither improved spatial learning or memory function in pilocarpine-treated animals. Following transplantation, grafted cells showed extensive migration around the injection site, robust engraftment, and long-term survival, along with differentiation into β-tubulin III+ neurons (∼34%), APC-CC1+ oligodendrocytes (∼28%), and GFAP+ astrocytes (∼8%). Furthermore, among donor-derived cells, ∼24% produced GABA. Additionally, to explain the effect of seizure suppression after NSPC grafting, we examined the anticonvulsant glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels in host hippocampal astrocytes and mossy fiber sprouting into the supragranular layer of the dentate gyrus in the epileptic brain. Grafted cells restored the expression of GDNF in host astrocytes but did not reverse the mossy fiber sprouting, eliminating the latter as potential mechanism. These results suggest that human fetal

  3. Stability of lobed balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagitz, M.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a computational study of the stability of simple lobed balloon structures. The particular structure that is investigated is a stack of pumpkin-shaped envelopes with a common axis of symmetry, and hence forming a kind of lobed cylinder. The number of the pumpkin envelopes is one of the variables that is investigated; a number of shape imperfections are also considered. This lobed cylinder is an axi-symmetric, idealised version of the lobed pumpkin balloons that have occasionally deployed into anomalous, clefted configurations. By studying in detail the behaviour of lobed cylinder we are able to draw some preliminary conclusions about general features of the behaviour of lobed pumpkin balloons.

  4. Projection neurons in Drosophila antennal lobes signal the acceleration of odor concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Anmo J; Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2015-05-14

    Temporal experience of odor gradients is important in spatial orientation of animals. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster exhibits robust odor-guided behaviors in an odor gradient field. In order to investigate how early olfactory circuits process temporal variation of olfactory stimuli, we subjected flies to precisely defined odor concentration waveforms and examined spike patterns of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and projection neurons (PNs). We found a significant temporal transformation between OSN and PN spike patterns, manifested by the PN output strongly signaling the OSN spike rate and its rate of change. A simple two-dimensional model admitting the OSN spike rate and its rate of change as inputs closely predicted the PN output. When cascaded with the rate-of-change encoding by OSNs, PNs primarily signal the acceleration and the rate of change of dynamic odor stimuli to higher brain centers, thereby enabling animals to reliably respond to the onsets of odor concentrations.

  5. Scanning electron microscopy of antennal sensory organs of the cattle grub, Hypoderma lineatum (Diptera: Oestridae).

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Liu, X H; Ge, Y Q; Zhang, D

    2015-10-01

    Hypoderma lineatum (Villers, 1789) (Diptera: Oestridae) is a hypodermosis fly that has resulted in great economic losses worldwide. The antennae of cattle grub males and females were examined through stereoscopic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to reveal the general morphology, combined with distribution, type, size, and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. All of the three antennal segments (antennal scape, pedicel, and funiculus) possess microtrichiae on their surface. Mechanoreceptors only exist on the antennal scape and pedicel. The antennal funiculus presents four types of antennal sensilla: trichoid, basiconic, coeloconic, and clavate sensilla. Three distinctive characters of H. lineatum are obvious: (1) the relatively slender, flexible, and equal-height mechanoreceptors; (2) the enlarged antennal pedicel, and numerous antennal sensory pits and pit sensilla on the antennal funiculus; and (3) all types of antennal sensilla clustered in sensory pits, respectively. Additionally, the enlarged antennal pedicel and abundant sensory pits and pit sensilla might facilitate odor detection, enhance olfactory sensitivity and accuracy, and also protect the fragile antennal sensilla from mechanical irritation or damage.

  6. De novo Sequencing, Assembly and Characterization of Antennal Transcriptome of Anomala corpulenta Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Rutelidae)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haoliang; Lin, Lulu; Xie, Minghui; Zhang, Guangling; Su, Weihua

    2014-01-01

    Background Anomala corpulenta is an important insect pest and can cause enormous economic losses in agriculture, horticulture and forestry. It is widely distributed in China, and both larvae and adults can cause serious damage. It is difficult to control this pest because the larvae live underground. Any new control strategy should exploit alternatives to heavily and frequently used chemical insecticides. However, little genetic research has been carried out on A. corpulenta due to the lack of genomic resources. Genomic resources could be produced by next generation sequencing technologies with low cost and in a short time. In this study, we performed de novo sequencing, assembly and characterization of the antennal transcriptome of A. corpulenta. Results Illumina sequencing technology was used to sequence the antennal transcriptome of A. corpulenta. Approximately 76.7 million total raw reads and about 68.9 million total clean reads were obtained, and then 35,656 unigenes were assembled. Of these unigenes, 21,463 of them could be annotated in the NCBI nr database, and, among the annotated unigenes, 11,154 and 6,625 unigenes could be assigned to GO and COG, respectively. Additionally, 16,350 unigenes could be annotated in the Swiss-Prot database, and 14,499 unigenes could map onto 258 pathways in the KEGG Pathway database. We also found 24 unigenes related to OBPs, 6 to CSPs, and in total 167 unigenes related to chemodetection. We analyzed 4 OBPs and 3CSPs sequences and their RT-qPCR results agreed well with their FPKM values. Conclusion We produced the first large-scale antennal transcriptome of A. corpulenta, which is a species that has little genomic information in public databases. The identified chemodetection unigenes can promote the molecular mechanistic study of behavior in A. corpulenta. These findings provide a general sequence resource for molecular genetics research on A. corpulenta. PMID:25461610

  7. Antennal sensillae of five stored-product psocids pests (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Fei; Zhang, Guo-Na; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Psocids are important pests of stored-products. In this study, the external morphology, types, and distribution of antennal sensillae in both male and female adults of five psocid species, Liposcelis bostrychophila, L. entomophila, L. tricolor, L. decolor, and L. paeta (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae) using scanning electron microscopy. The filiform antennae of the liposcelids are made up of the scape, pedicel, and a long flagellum composed of thirteen flagellomeres. Four morphological types of sensillae are recorded in both male and female species, including Böhm bristles, chaetal sensillae, microtrichial sensillae, and basiconic sensillae. The abundance and distribution of four of these sensilla types on the antennae of male and female are not significantly different in the five psocids species studied. In addition, the possible functions of the above sensilla types are discussed in light of previously published literature; mechanoreception (Böhm bristles and microtrichial sensillae) and olfaction (chaetal and basiconic sensillae). Future functional antennal morphology and electrophysiological studies are needed to confirm these proposed functions.

  8. Antennal Development in the Praying Mantis (Tenodera aridifolia) Highlights Multitudinous Processes in Hemimetabolous Insect Species

    PubMed Central

    Carle, Thomas; Yamawaki, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Yokohari, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    Insects possess antennae equipped with a large number of segments (flagellomeres) on which sensory organs (sensilla) are located. Hemimetabolous insects grow by molting until they reach adulthood. In these species, the sensory structures develop and mature during each stage of development; new flagellomeres are generated at each molt elongating the antennae, and new sensilla appear. The praying mantis (Tenodera aridifolia) is a hemimetabolous insect with 7 different instars before it reaches adulthood. Because their antennae are provided with an atypical sensillar distribution, we previously suggested that their antennae develop with a different mechanism to other hemimetaboulous insect species. In the present study, we measured the number, length and width of flagellomeres along the antennae in nymph and adult mantis Tenodera aridifolia. For this study, we developed a new and innovative methodology to reconstruct the antennal development based on the length of flagellomeres. We observed and confirmed that the antennae of mantises develop with the addition of new segments at two distinct sites. In addition, we constructed a complete database of the features of the flagellum for each stage of development. From our data, we found that sexual dimorphism appears from the 6 instar (larger number and wider flagellomeres in males) in accordance with the appearance of their genital apparatus. The antennal sexual dimorphism completes at adulthood with longer flagellomeres and the emergence of a huge number of grooved peg sensilla in males during the last molting, which suggests once again their function as sex-pheromone receptive sensilla. PMID:24896610

  9. Multiple List Learning in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Parallels with Frontal Lobe Damage or Further Evidence of Diminished Relational Processing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Dermot M.; Gaigg, Sebastian B.; Gardiner, John M.

    2010-01-01

    To test the effects of providing relational cues at encoding and/or retrieval on multi-trial, multi-list free recall in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), 16 adults with ASD and 16 matched typical adults learned a first followed by a second categorised list of 24 words. Category labels were provided at encoding,…

  10. Collision avoidance by running insects: antennal guidance in cockroaches.

    PubMed

    Baba, Yoshichika; Tsukada, Akira; Comer, Christopher M

    2010-07-01

    Cockroaches were observed with videographic methods as escape running was initiated, but with obstacles in the path of their run. The goal was to determine the repertoire of possible responses to obstacles and the sensory cues used to trigger the responses. Intact cockroaches collided with obstacles on only about 10% of trials. The most common collision avoidance strategy was simply to stop running prior to impact. However, occasionally animals moved vertically and climbed over the barrier, or turned and navigated an edge of the obstacle, or completely reversed run direction. The avoidance strategies chosen depended on the size and configuration of the obstacle. Tests for the use of vision in detecting obstacles showed that its role, if any, is small. However, all manipulations that altered the antennal system changed behavior in a way consistent with the hypothesis that antennal mechanosensation plays a major role in collision avoidance. For example, reducing antennal length, or severing the main antennal nerve without altering the length produced significant increases in the frequency of collisions. Tests with tethered insects showed that (1) the antennae are preferentially directed forward as animals run, and (2) nearly simultaneous contact with both antennae is required to make the cockroach stop. Our data indicate that running cockroaches employ strategies that set their sensorimotor systems in a mode of readiness to deal with obstacles and they suggest that sensory information about the presence and configuration of obstacles is used to make choices, at very short latencies, about how to respond to obstructions.

  11. A functional genetic analysis in flour beetles (Tenebrionidae) reveals an antennal identity specification mechanism active during metamorphosis in Holometabola.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frank W; Angelini, David R; Jockusch, Elizabeth L

    2014-05-01

    The antenna was the first arthropod ventral appendage to evolve non-leg identity. Models of antennal evolution have been based on comparisons of antennal and leg identity specification mechanisms in Drosophila melanogaster, a species in which appendages develop from highly derived imaginal discs during the larval period. We test for conservation of the Drosophila antennal identity specification mechanism at metamorphosis in Tribolium castaneum and three other flour beetle species (Tribolium confusum, Tribolium brevicornis and Latheticus oryzae) in the family Tenebrionidae. In Drosophila, loss of function of four transcription factors-homothorax, extradenticle, Distal-less, and spineless-causes large-scale transformations of the antenna to leg identity. Distal-less and spineless function similarly during metamorphosis in T. castaneum. RNA interference (RNAi) targeting homothorax (hth) or extradenticle (exd) caused transformation of the proximal antenna to distal leg identity in flour beetles, but did not affect the identity of the distal antenna. This differs from the functional domain of these genes in early instar Drosophila, where they are required for identity specification throughout the antenna, but matches their functional domain in late instar Drosophila. The similarities between antennal identity specification at metamorphosis in flour beetles and in late larval Drosophila likely reflect the conservation of an ancestral metamorphic developmental mechanism. There were two notable differences in hth/exd loss of function phenotypes between flies and beetles. Flour beetles retained all of their primary segments in both the antenna and legs, whereas flies undergo reduction and fusion of primary segments. This difference in ground state appendage morphology casts doubt on interpretations of developmental ground states as evolutionary atavisms. Additionally, adult Tribolium eyes were transformed to elytron-like structures; we provide a developmental hypothesis for

  12. Regeneration of axotomized olfactory neurons in young and adult locusts quantified by fasciclin I immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wasser, Hannah; Biller, Alexandra; Antonopoulos, Georgios; Meyer, Heiko; Bicker, Gerd; Stern, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The olfactory pathway of the locust Locusta migratoria is characterized by a multiglomerular innervation of the antennal lobe (AL) by olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). After crushing the antenna and thereby severing ORN axons, changes in the AL were monitored. First, volume changes were measured at different times post-crush with scanning laser optical tomography in 5th instar nymphs. AL volume decreased significantly to a minimum volume at 4 days post-crush, followed by an increase. Second, anterograde labeling was used to visualize details in the AL and antennal nerve (AN) during de- and regeneration. Within 24 h post-crush (hpc) the ORN fragments distal to the lesion degenerated. After 48 hpc, regenerating fibers grew through the crush site. In the AL, labeled ORN projections disappeared completely and reappeared after a few days. A weak topographic match between ORN origin on the antenna and the position of innervated glomeruli that was present in untreated controls did not reappear after regeneration. Third, the cell surface marker fasciclin I that is expressed in ORNs was used for quantifying purposes. Immunofluorescence was measured in the AL during de- and regeneration in adults and 5th instar nymphs: after a rapid but transient, decrease, it reappeared. Both processes happen faster in 5th instar nymphs than in adults.

  13. A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Chronic Lead Effect on the Basal Ganglion and Frontal and Occipital Lobes in Middle-Age Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tsyh-Jyi; Chen, Yi-Chun; Li, Chun-Wei; Liu, Gin-Chang; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Chuang, Hung-Yi

    2009-01-01

    Background Lead is known to be a health hazard to the human brain and nervous system based on data from epidemiologic studies. However, few studies have examined the mechanism or biochemical changes caused by lead in the human brain, although recently some have used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to test brain metabolism in vivo. Objectives In this study, we used 3-T MRS to investigate brain metabolism in workers chronically exposed to lead and matched nonexposed controls. Materials Methods: Twenty-two workers at a lead paint factory served as chronically exposed subjects of this study. These workers did not have any clinical syndromes. Eighteen age- and sex-matched nonexposed healthy volunteers served as controls. We measured blood and bone lead and used a 3-T MRS to measure their levels of brain N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and total creatine (tCr). A structural questionnaire was used to collect demographic, work, and health histories and information about their life habits. Results All the MRS measures were lower in the lead-exposed group. Increased blood and bone lead levels correlated with declines in Cho:tCr ratios, especially in the occipital lobe, where changes in all gray, subcortical, and white matter were significant. Increases in blood and patella lead in every layer of the frontal lobe correlated with significant decreases in NAA:tCr ratios. One of the strongest regression coefficients was −0.023 (SE = 0.005, p < 0.001), which was found in the NAA:tCr ratio of frontal gray matter. Discussion We conclude that chronic exposure to lead might upset brain metabolism, especially NAA:tCr and Cho:tCr ratios. Brain NAA and Cho are negatively correlated to blood and bone lead levels, suggesting that lead induces neuronal and axonal damage or loss. The most significant changes occurred in frontal and occipital lobes, areas in which previous neurobehavioral studies have shown memory and visual performance to be adversely affected by lead

  14. Antennal phenotype of Mexican haplogroups of the Triatoma dimidiata complex, vectors of Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    May-Concha, Irving; Guerenstein, Pablo G; Ramsey, Janine M; Rojas, Julio C; Catalá, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille) is a species complex that spans North, Central, and South America and which is a key vector of all known discrete typing units (DTU) of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Morphological and genetic studies indicate that T. dimidiata is a species complex with three principal haplogroups (hg) in Mexico. Different markers and traits are still inconclusive regarding if other morphological differentiation may indicate probable behavioral and vectorial divergences within this complex. In this paper we compared the antennae of three Mexican haplogroups (previously verified by molecular markers ND4 and ITS-2) and discussed possible relationships with their capacity to disperse and colonized new habitats. The abundance of each type of sensillum (bristles, basiconics, thick- and thin-walled trichoids) on the antennae of the three haplogroups, were measured under light microscopy and compared using Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric and multivariate non-parametric analyses. Discriminant analyses indicate significant differences among the antennal phenotype of haplogroups either for adults and some nymphal stages, indicating consistency of the character to analyze intraspecific variability within the complex. The present study shows that the adult antennal pedicel of the T. dimidiata complex have abundant chemosensory sensilla, according with good capacity for dispersal and invasion of different habitats also related to their high capacity to adapt to conserved as well as modified habitats. However, the numerical differences among the haplogroups are suggesting variations in that capacity. The results here presented support the evidence of T. dimidiata as a species complex but show females and males in a different way. Given the close link between the bug's sensory system and its habitat and host-seeking behavior, AP characterization could be useful to complement genetic, neurological and ethological studies of the closely

  15. Extratemporal lobe circuits in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Edward H

    2014-09-01

    There is increasing interest in the functional anatomy of epilepsy with the goal to identify the critical nodes in the seizure circuits so that therapy can be directed at them. This goal is especially important because direct delivery of therapy, either through electrical stimulation, drug infusion, or molecular therapies such as optogenetics, has become increasingly possible. In this article, we will review the basic functional anatomy of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and its primary subcortical connection, the medial dorsal nucleus of the thalamus. Based on its anatomical connections and known physiological interactions, we propose a key role for this thalamic nucleus that is essential for the development of seizures, and this role suggests that this region is a potential therapeutic target.

  16. Antennal sensory structures in Scaphoideus titanus Ball (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    PubMed

    Stacconi, Marco Valerio Rossi; Romani, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Scaphoideus titanus Ball (Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha) is a leafhopper vector of a phytoplasma disease, the Flavescence dorée (FD), belonging to the vine yellows group. A scanning and transmission electron microscope study has been carried out to investigate the antennal sensory structures. The first two segments, the scape and the pedicel, are short, covered by cuticular scales and devoid of sensilla, with exception of some scattered hairs on the pedicel. The flagellum consists of a unique, elongated segment in which numerous subunits can be recognized, being separated by a sort of cuticular crown. The proximal five subunits bear most of the sensilla. We discovered the presence of single- and double-walled coeloconic sensilla, campaniform sensilla, basiconic sensilla, and trichoid sensilla. A scolopidium is located within the proximal region of the flagellum. Ultrastructural investigations suggest that the antennal sensilla could be involved in the perception of air-borne vibrations, temperature, and humidity variations. The most relevant feature is the extreme reduction of the olfactory sensilla, both in terms of number of sensory structures and sensory neurons per sensillum. The strong reduction in antennal olfactory sensilla to which this specie has undergone is discussed as possible consequence of the specificity toward the host plant.

  17. Antennal pointing at a looming object in the cricket Acheta domesticus.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, Yoshifumi; Ishibashi, Wakako

    2014-01-01

    Antennal pointing responses to approaching objects were observed in the house cricket Acheta domesticus. In response to a ball approaching from the lateral side, crickets oriented the antenna ipsilateral to the ball towards it. In response to a ball approaching from the front, crickets oriented both antennae forward. Response rates of antennal pointing were higher when the ball was approaching from the front than from behind. The antennal angle ipsilateral to the approaching ball was positively correlated with approaching angle of the ball. Obstructing the cricket's sight decreased the response rate of antennal pointing, suggesting that this response was elicited mainly by visual stimuli. Although the response rates of antennal pointing decreased when the object ceased its approach at a great distance from the cricket, antennal pointing appeared to be resistant to habituation and was not substantially affected by the velocity, size and trajectory of an approaching ball. When presented with computer-generated visual stimuli, crickets frequently showed the antennal pointing response to a darkening stimulus as well as looming and linearly-expanding stimuli. Drifting gratings rarely elicited the antennal pointing. These results suggest that luminance change is sufficient to elicit antennal pointing.

  18. Low cost lobed bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuller, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Separate sectors for each lobed area of the bearing are assembled into the bearing housing individually and bolted tightly against the housing inside diameter. The center of a grinding wheel and the center of the housing are offset, resulting in the desired inner radius and tilt of the sector.

  19. The functional organisation of glia in the adult brain of Drosophila and other insects

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Tara N.; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    This review annotates and categorises the glia of adult Drosophila and other model insects and describes the developmental origins of these in the Drosophila optic lobe. The functions of glia in the adult vary depending upon their sub-type and location in the brain. The task of annotating glia is essentially complete only for the glia of the fly's lamina, which comprise: two types of surface glia - the pseudocartridge and fenestrated glia; two types of cortex glia - the distal and proximal satellite glia; and two types of neuropile glia - the epithelial and marginal glia. We advocate that the term subretinal glia, as used to refer to both pseudocartridge and fenestrated glia, be abandoned. Other neuropiles contain similar glial subtypes, but other than the antennal lobes these have not been described in detail. Surface glia form the blood brain barrier, regulating the flow of substances into and out of the nervous system, both for the brain as a whole and the optic neuropiles in particular. Cortex glia provide a second level of barrier, wrapping axon fascicles and isolating neuronal cell bodies both from neighbouring brain regions and from their underlying neuropiles. Neuropile glia can be generated in the adult and a subtype, ensheathing glia, are responsible for cleaning up cellular debris during Wallerian degeneration. Both the neuropile ensheathing and astrocyte-like glia may be involved in clearing neurotransmitters from the extracellular space, thus modifying the levels of histamine, glutamate and possibly dopamine at the synapse to ultimately affect behaviour. PMID:20109517

  20. Reduplication of swine spleen lobes.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, S; Makita, T

    1996-04-01

    In a search for the reduplication of the spleen, a total of 227,513 swine from 130 breeders were surveyed at a slaughterhouse (Ozu Health Center, Ehime Prefecture, Japan) between October 1993 and June 1995. They were 6 to 7 months old and their body weight ranged from 95 to 120 kg. Twenty swine had two lobed spleens. Of these, nine were males and 11 were females. The second or sub-lobe was generally smaller than the main lobe but was variable in size. Large ones were similar in size to the main lobe and small ones were approximately 1/4 of the length of the main lobe. One very small lobe was just a protrusion of the main one across the greater omentum. The two lobes were always attached to each other in the central portion, and fat and the greater omentum were always found between the lobes. The splenic artery, vein and nerve were shared between the two lobes. The main lobe was covered with peritoneum from the parietal surface of the stomach while the sub-lobe was covered with visceral peritoneum. Both peritonea joined to the greater omentum at the hilus in ordinary spleens, but at short distance from the hilus in double lobed spleens.

  1. Standardized surgical techniques for adult living donor liver transplantation using a modified right lobe graft: a video presentation from bench to reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    After having experienced more than 2,000 cases of adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), we established the concepts of right liver graft standardization. Right liver graft standardization intends to provide hemodynamics-based and regeneration-compliant reconstruction of vascular inflow and outflow. Right liver graft standardization consists of the following components: Right hepatic vein reconstruction includes a combination of caudal-side deep incision and patch venoplasty of the graft right hepatic vein to remove the acute angle between the graft right hepatic vein and the inferior vena cava; middle hepatic vein reconstruction includes interposition of a uniform-shaped conduit with large-sized homologous or prosthetic grafts; if the inferior right hepatic vein is present, its reconstruction includes funneling and unification venoplasty for multiple short hepatic veins; if donor portal vein anomaly is present, its reconstruction includes conjoined unification venoplasty for two or more portal vein orifices. This video clip that shows the surgical technique from bench to reperfusion was a case presentation of adult LDLT using a modified right liver graft from the patient's son. Our intention behind proposing the concept of right liver graft standardization is that it can be universally applicable and may guarantee nearly the same outcomes regardless of the surgeon's experience. We believe that this reconstruction model would be primarily applied to a majority of adult LDLT cases.

  2. Mesial frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Unnwongse, Kanjana; Wehner, Tim; Foldvary-Schaefer, Nancy

    2012-10-01

    Mesial frontal lobe epilepsies can be divided into epilepsies arising from the anterior cingulate gyrus and those of the supplementary sensorimotor area. They provide diagnostic challenges because they often lack lateralizing or localizing features on clinical semiology and interictal and ictal scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. A number of unique semiologic features have been described over the last decade in patients with mesial frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE). There are few reports of applying advanced neurophysiologic techniques such as electrical source imaging, magnetoencephalography, EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging, or analysis of high-frequency oscillations in patients with mesial FLE. Despite these diagnostic challenges, it seems that patients with mesial FLE benefit from epilepsy surgery to the same extent or even better than patients with FLE do, as a whole.

  3. Antennal sensory organs of Scathophaga stercoraria (Linnaeus, 1758) (Diptera: Scathophagidae): ultramorphology and phylogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-Hui; Liu, Jia-Jia; Li, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Dong

    2016-01-21

    Scathophaga stercoraria (Linnaeus, 1758) is a well-established insect model species involved in numerous investigations on behavior, biology, phylogeny, genetics and evolution. The antennal sensilla of S. stercoraria are examined via scanning electron microscopy in order to emphasize their importance on taxonomy and phylogeny. On antennal scape and pedicel, both microtrichiae and several sharp-tipped mechanoreceptors are observed, while another two structures, setiferous plaques and pedicellar button, are also detected on antennal pedicel. One type of sensory pit and four types of antennal sensilla, including trichoid sensilla, basiconic sensilla, coeloconic sensilla and clavate sensilla, are observed on antennal funiculus. Similarity and disparity of setiferous plaques among different calyptrate groups are analyzed in terms of phylogeny. The phylogenetic results supported by morphology of setiferous plaques strongly accord with the cladistic relations based on known molecular tree, implying the potential taxonomic and phylogenetic implications of the plaques in Calyptratae.

  4. Dorsolateral frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ricky W; Worrell, Greg A

    2012-10-01

    Dorsolateral frontal lobe seizures often present as a diagnostic challenge. The diverse semiologies may not produce lateralizing or localizing signs and can appear bizarre and suggest psychogenic events. Unfortunately, scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often unsatisfactory. It is not uncommon that these traditional diagnostic studies are either unhelpful or even misleading. In some cases, SPECT and positron emission tomography imaging can be an effective tool to identify the origin of seizures. However, these techniques and other emerging techniques all have limitations, and new approaches are needed to improve source localization.

  5. Stability of Lobed Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Danny (Technical Monitor); Pagitz, M.; Pellegrino, Xu S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the stability of simple lobed balloon structures. Two approaches are presented, one based on a wrinkled material model and one based on a variable Poisson s ratio model that eliminates compressive stresses iteratively. The first approach is used to investigate the stability of both a single isotensoid and a stack of four isotensoids, for perturbations of in.nitesimally small amplitude. It is found that both structures are stable for global deformation modes, but unstable for local modes at su.ciently large pressure. Both structures are stable if an isotropic model is assumed. The second approach is used to investigate the stability of the isotensoid stack for large shape perturbations, taking into account contact between di.erent surfaces. For this structure a distorted, stable configuration is found. It is also found that the volume enclosed by this con.guration is smaller than that enclosed by the undistorted structure.

  6. Frontal lobe ataxia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Philip D

    2012-01-01

    The precise anatomy and physiology of human walking remains poorly understood. The frontal lobes appear crucial, and, on the basis of clinical observation, contribute to the control of truncal motion, postural responses, and the maintenance of equilibrium and locomotion. The rich repertoire of frontal gait disorders gives some indication of this complexity. Variable combinations of disequilibrium with a wide stance base, increased body sway and falls, loss of control of truncal motion, locomotor disability with gait ignition failure, start hesitation, shuffling, and freezing are encountered in diseases of the frontal lobes. Furthermore, the pattern of gait may change as the frontal disease progresses. The slowness of walking, lack of heel-shin or upper limb ataxia, dysarthria or nystagmus distinguishes the wide stance base from cerebellar gait ataxia. A lively facial expression, normal voluntary movements of the upper limbs, upper motor neuron signs, and the absence of a rest tremor distinguish the hypokinetic elements from Parkinson's disease. Poor truncal mobility, impaired postural responses, and falls after the slightest perturbation eventually make walking impossible even though simple leg movements may still be possible while seated or lying. One or more of these features usually predominates in the initial presentation of a frontal gait syndrome. Accordingly, there is considerable variation in the manner of presentation and evolution of frontal gait disorders. The gait syndrome is accompanied by frontal motor and cognitive changes, which may be subtle or overshadowed by the gait disorder. This complexity of clinical presentation accounts for the plethora of descriptions from "frontal ataxia" to "gait apraxia". As suggested in the original descriptions of frontal ataxia, the spectrum of gait disturbance is likely to be due to damage to frontal cortex and its connections with subcortical structures including the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and the brainstem.

  7. Torsion of Accessory Hepatic Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Saravanan; Jayasudha; Periasamy, Manikandhan; Rangasamy, Saminathan

    2017-01-01

    An accessory hepatic lobe is a rare congenital anomaly that can undergo torsion and present as an acute surgical emergency. A 5-year-old child admitted as acute abdomen, on laparotomy found to have torsion of accessory lobe of liver, is being reported. PMID:28082782

  8. Ultrastructure of the Antennal Sensillae of Male and Female Peach Fruit Fly, Bactrocera zonata

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Azza A.; Ali, Nashat A.; Mohamed, Hend O.

    2014-01-01

    Antennal morphology and funicular sensillae of male and female peach fruit flies, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) (Diptera: Tephritidae), were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). This study focused on the sensillae found on the antennal segments (scape, pedicel, and flagellum or funiculus that bears the arista) of B. zonata. Antennal segments of females tended to be larger than those of the males. The first two antennal segments, scape and pedicel, were heavily covered with microtrichia and bear bristles. Numerous microtrichia as well as trichoid (I, II), basiconic, clavate, and coeloconic sensillae were observed on the funiculus. SEM studies showed some differences in size and also in position of some sensillae on the antennae of the females of B. zonata. The sensillae found on the funiculus, such as trichoid and basiconic sensillae, were significantly larger in females. PMID:25373192

  9. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  10. Antennal and Abdominal Transcriptomes Reveal Chemosensory Genes in the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, He; Bin, Shuying; Chen, Lei; Han, Qunxin; Lin, Jintian

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri is the principal vector of the highly destructive citrus disease called Huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening, which is a major threat to citrus cultivation worldwide. More effective pest control strategies against this pest entail the identification of potential chemosensory proteins that could be used in the development of attractants or repellents. However, the molecular basis of olfaction in the Asian citrus psyllid is not completely understood. Therefore, we performed this study to analyze the antennal and abdominal transcriptome of the Asian citrus psyllid. We identified a large number of transcripts belonging to nine chemoreception-related gene families and compared their expression in male and female adult antennae and terminal abdomen. In total, 9 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 12 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 46 odorant receptors (ORs), 20 gustatory receptors (GRs), 35 ionotropic receptors (IRs), 4 sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs) and 4 different gene families encoding odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs): 80 cytochrome P450s (CYPs), 12 esterase (ESTs), and 5 aldehyde dehydrogenases (ADE) were annotated in the D. citri antennal and abdominal transcriptomes. Our results revealed that a large proportion of chemosensory genes exhibited no distinct differences in their expression patterns in the antennae and terminal abdominal tissues. Notably, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data and quantitative real time-PCR (qPCR) analyses showed that 4 DictOBPs, 4 DictCSPs, 4 DictIRs, 1 DictSNMP, and 2 DictCYPs were upregulated in the antennae relative to that in terminal abdominal tissues. Furthermore, 2 DictOBPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP9), 2 DictCSPs (DictOBP8 and DictOBP12), 4 DictIRs (DictIR3, DictIR6, DictIR10, and DictIR35), and 1 DictCYP (DictCYP57) were expressed at higher levels in the male antennae than in the female antennae. Our study provides the first insights into the molecular basis of chemoreception in this insect

  11. [Scanning electron microscopic observations of Monochamus alternatus antennal sensilla and their electroantennographic responses].

    PubMed

    Wang, Sibao; Zhou, Hongchun; Miao, Xuexia; Fan, Meizhen; Li, Zengzhi; Si, Shengli; Huang, Yongping

    2005-02-01

    With scanning electron microscope (SEM), this paper observed the shape, category, amount and distribution of the main antenna sensilla of adult Monochamus alternatus, and tested their electroantennographic (EAG) responses to the main volatiles of Pinus spp.. There were seven types of antennal sensilla, i. e., sensilla trichoid, sensilla basiconica, sensilla digit-like, sensilla rod-like, sensilla bottle-like, sensilla bud-like and sensilla chaetica, among which, sensilla trichoid and sensilla basiconica were the most abundant on the antenna surface, and each of them could be divided into three subtypes. Two subtypes of sensilla digit-like could also be observed. The II and III subtypes of sensilla trichoid and I and II subtypes of sensilla basiconica had deep longitudinal grooves on their surface, the typical characteristics of olfactory receptor. The comparison of the EAG response of different parts of Monochamus alternatus antennae to alpha-Pinene showed that each volatile and their compounds could provoke significant EAG responses of both females and males. The dose-response test showed that there was a certain rule in the EAG responses of M. alternatus.

  12. Antennal morphology and sensilla ultrastructure of the web-spinning sawfly Acantholyda posticalis Matsumura (Hymenoptera: Pamphiliidae).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiujie; Zhang, Sufang; Zhang, Zhen; Kong, Xiangbo; Wang, Hongbin; Shen, Gengchen; Zhang, Haijun

    2013-07-01

    Acantholyda posticalis (Hymenoptera: Pamphiliidae) is an important pine pest with a world-wide distribution. To clarify the olfactory receptive mechanism of A. posticalis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the morphology, ultrastructure, and distribution of antennal sensilla of adults from two sites in China. The antennae were filiform, and the flagella comprised 32-35 flagellomeres. Six sensillum types were found. Sensilla chaetica were straight setae with sharply pointed tips and without dendrites in the lumen. Sensilla trichodea were characterized by a parallel-grooved wall and one terminal pore and were innervated by four dendrites at the base. Sensilla basiconica I possessed longitudinally grooved surfaces and multiple terminal pores, with five dendrites in the lumen. Sensilla basiconica II not only had a distinct terminal pore but also had numerous tiny wall pores and many dendritic branches within the sensillum lymph. Sensilla coeloconica had deep longitudinal grooves, one terminal pore and six dendrites, while sensilla campaniformia were thick-walled with a terminal opening and sensory nerve bundles in the lumen. Sensilla chaetica and s. trichodea were most abundant and distributed over the entire antennae, while s. basiconica I and II, s. coeloconica, and s. campaniformia were restricted to the ventral flagellar surfaces. Although the shape and structure of antennae were similar in males and females, females had significantly longer antennae than males, and males had significantly more s. basiconica I than females. We compared the morphology and structure of these sensilla to other Hymenoptera and discussed their possible functions.

  13. Ultrastructure of antennal sensory organs of horse nasal-myiasis fly, Rhinoestrus purpureus (Diptera: Oestridae).

    PubMed

    Liu, X H; Li, X Y; Li, K; Zhang, D

    2015-07-01

    Rhinoestrus purpureus (Brauer, 1858) (Diptera: Oestridae) is an economically important parasite that can cause severe nasal myiasis in equids or even attacking humans. The antennae of R. purpureus were examined using stereoscopic microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The general morphology was provided detailedly, together with distribution, type, size, and ultrastructure of antennal sensilla. All the three antennal segments, antennal scape, pedicel, and funiculus, are interspersed by microtrichiae. Only mechanoreceptors are detected on antennal scape and pedicel. On antennal funiculus, three types of sensilla were observed, including basiconic sensilla, coeloconic sensilla and clavate sensilla. Two features are characterized of this host-specific bot fly: (1) numerous sensory pits with branched basiconic sensilla on antennal funiculus and (2) the absence of trichoid sensilla. The function of these distinctive traits are discussed in association with the life history. We suggest that more sensory pits with branched sensilla could increase the sensitivity of olfactory system for host orientation, while the capability of pheromone identification might be reduced due to the absence of trichoid sensilla. Besides, we support both thermo- and chemo-functions of coeloconic sensilla.

  14. Perirhinal cortex and temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Giuseppe; D'Antuono, Margherita; Benini, Ruba; de Guzman, Philip; Longo, Daniela; Avoli, Massimo

    2013-08-29

    The perirhinal cortex-which is interconnected with several limbic structures and is intimately involved in learning and memory-plays major roles in pathological processes such as the kindling phenomenon of epileptogenesis and the spread of limbic seizures. Both features may be relevant to the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that represents the most refractory adult form of epilepsy with up to 30% of patients not achieving adequate seizure control. Compared to other limbic structures such as the hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex, the perirhinal area remains understudied and, in particular, detailed information on its dysfunctional characteristics remains scarce; this lack of information may be due to the fact that the perirhinal cortex is not grossly damaged in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in models mimicking this epileptic disorder. However, we have recently identified in pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats the presence of selective losses of interneuron subtypes along with increased synaptic excitability. In this review we: (i) highlight the fundamental electrophysiological properties of perirhinal cortex neurons; (ii) briefly stress the mechanisms underlying epileptiform synchronization in perirhinal cortex networks following epileptogenic pharmacological manipulations; and (iii) focus on the changes in neuronal excitability and cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal cortex occurring in the pilocarpine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Overall, these data indicate that perirhinal cortex networks are hyperexcitable in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that this condition is associated with a selective cellular damage that is characterized by an age-dependent sensitivity of interneurons to precipitating injuries, such as status epilepticus.

  15. Perirhinal cortex and temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Biagini, Giuseppe; D'Antuono, Margherita; Benini, Ruba; de Guzman, Philip; Longo, Daniela; Avoli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The perirhinal cortex—which is interconnected with several limbic structures and is intimately involved in learning and memory—plays major roles in pathological processes such as the kindling phenomenon of epileptogenesis and the spread of limbic seizures. Both features may be relevant to the pathophysiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy that represents the most refractory adult form of epilepsy with up to 30% of patients not achieving adequate seizure control. Compared to other limbic structures such as the hippocampus or the entorhinal cortex, the perirhinal area remains understudied and, in particular, detailed information on its dysfunctional characteristics remains scarce; this lack of information may be due to the fact that the perirhinal cortex is not grossly damaged in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in models mimicking this epileptic disorder. However, we have recently identified in pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats the presence of selective losses of interneuron subtypes along with increased synaptic excitability. In this review we: (i) highlight the fundamental electrophysiological properties of perirhinal cortex neurons; (ii) briefly stress the mechanisms underlying epileptiform synchronization in perirhinal cortex networks following epileptogenic pharmacological manipulations; and (iii) focus on the changes in neuronal excitability and cytoarchitecture of the perirhinal cortex occurring in the pilocarpine model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Overall, these data indicate that perirhinal cortex networks are hyperexcitable in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy, and that this condition is associated with a selective cellular damage that is characterized by an age-dependent sensitivity of interneurons to precipitating injuries, such as status epilepticus. PMID:24009554

  16. The nature and development of sex attractant specificity in cockroaches of the genus Periplaneta. I. Sexual dimorphism in the distribution of antennal sense organs in five species.

    PubMed

    Schafer, R; Sanchez, T V

    1976-06-01

    Sexual dimorphism in the distribution of antennal sense organs is common among adults of the genus Periplaneta. In three out of the four strains of Periplaneta americana examined, adult males had more contact chemoreceptros than females. In the fourth strain of P. americana and in P. australasiae, P. brunnea, P. fuliginosa, and P. japonica, no statistically supportable sexual dimorphism of contact chemoreceptors was found. However, in all strains and species of Periplaneta examined, sexual dimorphism was found in the total number and/or density of olfactory sensilla. Male adults had nearly twice as many olfactory sensilla as female adults. These observations are consistent with the behavioral observation that males within the genus Periplaneta rely on the reception of an airborne pheromone for the initiation of courtship behavior. In P. americana, where sexual dimorphism was found in the contact chemoreceptors, contact stimuli release the full wing raising display and presentation in males during courtship.

  17. Charting the Maturation of the Frontal Lobe: An Electrophysiological Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segalowitz, S. J.; Davies, Patricia L.

    2004-01-01

    Tracking the functional development of specific regions of the prefrontal cortex in children using event-related potentials (ERPs) is challenging for both technical and conceptual reasons. In this paper we outline our strategy for studying frontal lobe development and present preliminary results from children aged 7-17 years and young adults using…

  18. Antennal proteome comparison of sexually mature drone and forager honeybees.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mao; Song, Feifei; Aleku, Dereje Woltedji; Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Li, Jianke

    2011-07-01

    Honeybees have evolved an intricate system of chemical communication to regulate their complex social interactions. Specific proteins involved in odorant detection most likely supported this chemical communication. Odorant reception takes place mainly in the antennae within hairlike structures called olfactory sensilla. Antennal proteomes of sexually mature drone and forager worker bees (an age group of bees assigned to perform field tasks) were compared using two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and bioinformatics. Sixty-one differentially expressed proteins were identified in which 67% were highly upregulated in the drones' antennae whereas only 33% upregulated in the worker bees' antennae. The antennae of the worker bees strongly expressed carbohydrate and energy metabolism and molecular transporters signifying a strong demand for metabolic energy and odorant binding proteins for their foraging activities and other olfactory responses, while proteins related to fatty acid metabolism, antioxidation, and protein folding were strongly upregulated in the drones' antennae as an indication of the importance for the detection and degradation of sex pheromones during queen identification for mating. On the basis of both groups of altered antenna proteins, carbohydrate metabolism and energy production and molecular transporters comprised more than 80% of the functional enrichment analysis and 45% of the constructed biological interaction networks (BIN), respectively. This suggests these two protein families play crucial roles in the antennal olfactory function of sexually mature drone and forager worker bees. Several key node proteins in the BIN were validated at the transcript level. This first global proteomic comparative analysis of antennae reveals sex-biased protein expression in both bees, indicating that odorant response mechanisms are sex-specific because of natural selection for different olfactory

  19. Prospective memory and frontal lobe function.

    PubMed

    Neulinger, Kerryn; Oram, Joanne; Tinson, Helen; O'Gorman, John; Shum, David H K

    2016-01-01

    The study sought to examine the role of frontal lobe functioning in focal prospective memory (PM) performance and its relation to PM deficit in older adults. PM and working memory (WM) differences were studied in younger aged (n = 21), older aged (n = 20), and frontal injury (n = 14) groups. An event-based focal PM task was employed and three measures of WM were administered. The younger aged group differed from the other two groups in showing significantly higher scores on PM and on one of the WM measures, but there were no differences at a statistically significant level between the older aged group and the frontal injury groups on any of the memory measures. There were, however, some differences in correlations with a WM measure between groups. It is concluded that there are similarities and differences in the deficits in PM between older adults and patients with frontal lobe injury on focal as well as nonfocal PM tasks.

  20. Salivary conditioning with antennal gustatory unconditioned stimulus in an insect.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Sato, Chihiro; Kuramochi, Tomokazu; Nishino, Hiroshi; Mizunami, Makoto

    2008-07-01

    Classical conditioning of olfactory conditioning stimulus (CS) with gustatory unconditioned stimulus (US) in insects has been used as a pertinent model for elucidation of neural mechanisms underlying learning and memory. However, a conditioning system in which stable intracellular recordings from brain neurons are feasibly obtained while monitoring the conditioning effect has remained to be established. Recently, we found classical conditioning of salivation in cockroaches Periplaneta americana, in which an odor was associated with sucrose solution applied to the mouth, and this conditioning could be monitored by activities of salivary neurons. Application of gustatory US to the mouth, however, leads to feeding movement accompanying a movement of the brain that prevents stable recordings from brain neurons. Here we investigated whether a gustatory stimulus presented to an antenna could serve as an effective US for producing salivary conditioning. Presentation of sucrose or sodium chloride solution to an antenna induced salivation and also increased activities of salivary neurons. A single pairing trial of an odor with antennal presentation of sucrose or sodium chloride solution produced conditioning of salivation or of activities of salivary neurons. Five pairing trials led to a conditioning effect that lasted for one day. Water or tactile stimulus presented to an antenna was not effective for producing conditioning. The results demonstrate that gustatory US presented to an antenna is as effective as that presented to the mouth for producing salivary conditioning. This conditioning system provides a useful model for studying the neural basis of learning at the level of singly identifiable neurons.

  1. Intracellular responses of antennal chordotonal sensilla of the American cockroach.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Suguru; Toh, Yoshihiro; Okamura, Jun-ya; Okada, Jiro

    2004-04-01

    The responses of mechanoreceptor neurons in the antennal chordotonal organ have been examined in cockroaches by intracellular recording methods. The chordotonal organ was mechanically stimulated by sinusoidal movement of the flagellum. Stimulus frequencies were varied between 0.5 and 150 Hz. Receptor neurons responded with spike discharges to mechanical stimulation, and were classed into two groups from plots of their average spike frequencies against stimulus frequency. Neurons in one group responded to stimulation over a wide frequency range (from 0.5 to 150 Hz), whereas those in a second group were tuned to higher frequency stimuli. The peak stimulus frequency at which receptor neurons showed maximum responses differed from cell to cell. Some had a peak response at a stimulus frequency given in the present study (from 0.5 to 150 Hz), whereas others were assumed to have peak responses beyond the highest stimulus frequency examined. The timing for the initiation of spikes or of a burst of spikes plotted against each stimulus cycle revealed that spike generation was phase-locked in most cells. Some cells showed phase-independent discharges to stimulation at lower frequency, but increasing stimulus frequencies spike initiation began to assemble at a given phase of the stimulus cycle. The response patterns observed are discussed in relation to the primary process of mechanoreception of the chordotonal organ.

  2. Antennal regulation of migratory flight in the neotropical moth Urania fulgens

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Sanjay P.; Srygley, Robert B.; Dudley, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Migrating insects use their sensory systems to acquire local and global cues about their surroundings. Previous research on tethered insects suggests that, in addition to vision and cephalic bristles, insects use antennal mechanosensory feedback to maintain their airspeeds. Owing to the large displacements of migratory insects and difficulties inherent in tracking single individuals, the roles of these sensory inputs have never been tested in freely migrating insects. We tracked individual uraniid moths (Urania fulgens) as they migrated diurnally over the Panama Canal, and measured airspeeds and orientation for individuals with either intact or amputated flagella. Consistent with prior observations that antennal input is necessary for flight control, 59 per cent of the experimental moths could not fly after flagella amputation. The remaining fraction (41%) was flight-capable and maintained its prior airspeeds despite severe reduction in antennal input. Thus, maintenance of airspeeds may not involve antennal input alone, and is probably mediated by other modalities. Moths with amputated flagella could not recover their proper migratory orientations, suggesting that antennal integrity is necessary for long-distance navigation. PMID:20181558

  3. Antennal regulation of migratory flight in the neotropical moth Urania fulgens.

    PubMed

    Sane, Sanjay P; Srygley, Robert B; Dudley, Robert

    2010-06-23

    Migrating insects use their sensory systems to acquire local and global cues about their surroundings. Previous research on tethered insects suggests that, in addition to vision and cephalic bristles, insects use antennal mechanosensory feedback to maintain their airspeeds. Owing to the large displacements of migratory insects and difficulties inherent in tracking single individuals, the roles of these sensory inputs have never been tested in freely migrating insects. We tracked individual uraniid moths (Urania fulgens) as they migrated diurnally over the Panama Canal, and measured airspeeds and orientation for individuals with either intact or amputated flagella. Consistent with prior observations that antennal input is necessary for flight control, 59 per cent of the experimental moths could not fly after flagella amputation. The remaining fraction (41%) was flight-capable and maintained its prior airspeeds despite severe reduction in antennal input. Thus, maintenance of airspeeds may not involve antennal input alone, and is probably mediated by other modalities. Moths with amputated flagella could not recover their proper migratory orientations, suggesting that antennal integrity is necessary for long-distance navigation.

  4. Lasers for median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Muschter, R; Gilling, A P

    2001-08-01

    Laser treatment encompases a variety of techniques using different laser wavelengths, application systems, and surgical techniques to achieve contrasting tissue effects such as incision, resection, vaporization, or coagulation. Many studies have proven the clinical efficacy of the various laser techniques for the treatment of benign prostatiuc hyperplasia, including randomized studies versus transurethral prostatectomy (TURP). Recently, long-term follow-up of up to 5 years has demonstrated the durability of the results, although in some of the studies, retreatment rates were higher than after TURP. Median lobes were never seen as a contraindication for treatment in the laser based procedures. Technically, laser treatment techniques such as side-firing transurethral coagulation, contact- and free-beam laser vaporization, interstitial laser coagulation, and the holmium laser-based resection and enucleation are fully suitable for treatment of median lobes. Surprisingly, no studies focussing specifically on laser treatment of median lobes have been published.

  5. Sexual dimorphism in antennal receptors of Phyllophaga ravida Blanchard (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Melolonthidae).

    PubMed

    Romero-López, Angel; Morón, Miguel; Valdez, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The external morphology of sensilla on the antennae of males and females of Phyllophaga ravida Blanchard is described using scanning electron microscopy. Sexual dimorphism in body and antennal dimensions and in antennal receptor types was found. The female's body is slightly larger than the male's, although male antennal lamellae are longer than in females. Sixteen types of sensilla were identified on the proximal and distal surfaces of lamellae from both sexes, most of them in males: three types of placodea sensilla, four types of auricilica sensilla, five types of basiconica sensilla, and four types of coeloconica sensilla. Also, two types of mechanoreceptor sensilla were present on the lamellae periphery. Furthermore, males had larger placodea, auricilica and some types of basiconica sensilla.

  6. Post-embryonic development of the antennal sensilla in Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides (Hymenoptera: Meliponini).

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Dihego de Oliveira; Matiello-Guss, Cirlei Pereira; Rönnau, Milton; Zanuncio, José Cola; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2008-03-01

    The sensilla are sensory organs formed by cuticular and cellular structures specialized in reception of chemical and physical stimuli from the environment and transmission to the insect's central nervous system. In function of the great concentration of sensilla, the antennae are the main organs for interaction between bees and with the environment. This work studied the presence of antennal sensilla in the different phases of pupal development of the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides by means of scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. The results showed that antennal sensilla begin their development in the transition of the prepupae to the white-eyed pupae and finish it in the pigmented-body pupae phase. The antennal sensilla were exposed to the environment in the black-eyed pupae when the old cuticle is completely digested, suggesting that only in the final pupal phases can these bees perceive the environmental stimuli.

  7. Post-embryonic development of circadian oscillations within and outside the optic lobe in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Uryu, Outa; Tomioka, Kenji

    2014-04-01

    The adult cricket Gryllus bimaculatus has a central clock in the optic lobe that regulates overt activity rhythms and secondary oscillators in the tissue outside the optic lobe. Here we investigated properties of the rhythmic expression of clock genes in the optic lobe and extra-optic lobe tissues in nymphs, and compared them with those of adults. In the optic lobe, mRNA of the clock genes period (per), timeless (tim), cycle (cyc) and Clock (Clk) were expressed in patterns similar to those in adult profiles, but at significantly lower levels. Among the extra-optic lobe tissues, the brain and TAG showed a rhythmic expression of per and tim, the mid-gut only in tim, and the anterior-stomach in none of the genes studied. The mRNA levels of clock genes were again significantly lower than those in adults. Unlike in adults, the brain and mid-gut lost their rhythms of clock gene expression in DD, and when the optic lobes were bilaterally removed. These results suggest that the rhythms outside the optic lobe are weak in nymphs, and may become robust after the imaginal molt.

  8. Antennal Regulation of Migratory Flight in the Neotropical Moth, Urania fulgens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Migrating insects use their sensory system to acquire local and global cues about their surroundings. Previous research on tethered insects has suggested that in addition to vision and bending of cephalic bristles, insects use antennal mechanosensory feedback to maintain their airspeeds. Due to larg...

  9. Differences in Antennal Sensillae of Male and Female Peach Fruit Flies in Relation to Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Azza A.; Mohamed, Hend O.; Ali, Nashat A.

    2015-01-01

    Antennal sensillae of male and female peach fruit flies, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) (Diptera: Tephritidae), obtained from three different host fruit species (guava, Psidium guajava L. (Myrtales: Myrtaceae); peach, Prunus persica (L.) Stokes (Rosales: Rosaceae); and orange, Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck (Sapindales: Rutaceae)), were studied with scanning electron microscopy. This study was carried out to describe the different types of sensillae present on the three antennal segments (scape, pedicel, and flagellum or funiculus) of both sexes of B. zonata on different host fruit. The antennal segments of females tended to be larger than those of males feeding on peach and guava fruit. On orange, both sexes were similar (no significant differences were found). The first two antennal segments, scape and pedicel, are reinforced by some bristles and have different types of sensillae, including trichoid I, II, S; basiconic II; and sensilla chaetica in different numbers on different host fruit species. Numerous microtrichia, as well as trichoid (I, II), basiconic (I), clavate, and coeloconic (I, II) sensillae were observed on the funiculus with a great variation in number and length. As a result of feeding on different hosts, differences were found between sexes and some plasticity in size, number, distribution, and position of some sensillae, including trichoid, basiconic, chaetica, and clavate on the antennae of the female B. zonata. These sensillae were significantly larger in females. Also, some morphological and morphemetric differences have been found according to their feeding on different host fruit. PMID:25688086

  10. Functional anatomy and ion regulatory mechanisms of the antennal gland in a semi-terrestrial crab, Ocypode stimpsoni

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jyuan-Ru; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Brachyuran crabs from diverse habitats show great differences in their osmoregulatory processes, especially in terms of the structural and physiological characteristics of the osmoregulatory organs. In crustaceans, the antennal glands are known to be important in osmoregulation, and they play a functional role analogous to that of the vertebrate kidney. Nevertheless, the detailed structure and function of the antennal glands in different species have rarely been described. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the antennal gland in ion regulation by examining the ultrastructure of the cells and the distribution of the ion regulatory proteins in each cell type in the antennal gland of a semi-terrestrial crab. The results showed that Na+, K+-ATPase activity significantly increased in the antennal gland after a 4-day acclimation in dilute seawater and returned to its original (day 0) level after 7 days. Three major types of cells were identified in the antennal gland, including coelomic cells (COEs), labyrinthine cells (LBRs) and end-labyrinthine cells (ELBRs). The proximal tubular region (PT) and distal tubular region (DT) of the antennal gland consist of LBRs and COEs, whereas the end tubular region (ET) consists of all three types of cells, with fewer COEs and more ELBRs. We found a non-uniform distribution of NKA immunoreactivity, with increasing intensity from the proximal to the distal regions of the antennal gland. We summarise our study with a proposed model for the urine reprocessing pathway and the role of each cell type or segment of the antennal gland. PMID:24795144

  11. Appetitive but not aversive olfactory conditioning modifies antennal movements in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Cholé, Hanna; Junca, Pierre; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe

    2015-12-01

    In honeybees, two olfactory conditioning protocols allow the study of appetitive and aversive Pavlovian associations. Appetitive conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) involves associating an odor, the conditioned stimulus (CS) with a sucrose solution, the unconditioned stimulus (US). Conversely, aversive conditioning of the sting extension response (SER) involves associating the odor CS with an electric or thermal shock US. Each protocol is based on the measure of a different behavioral response (proboscis versus sting) and both only provide binary responses (extension or not of the proboscis or sting). These limitations render the measure of the acquired valence of an odor CS difficult without testing the animals in a freely moving situation. Here, we studied the effects of both olfactory conditioning protocols on the movements of the antennae, which are crucial sensory organs for bees. As bees' antennae are highly mobile, we asked whether their movements in response to an odorant change following appetitive or aversive conditioning and if so, do odor-evoked antennal movements contain information about the acquired valence of the CS? We implemented a tracking system for harnessed bees' antennal movements based on a motion capture principle at a high frequency rate. We observed that differential appetitive conditioning had a strong effect on antennal movements. Bees responded to the reinforced odorant with a marked forward motion of the antennae and a strong velocity increase. Conversely, differential aversive conditioning had no associative effect on antennal movements. Rather than revealing the acquired valence of an odorant, antennal movements may represent a novel conditioned response taking place during appetitive conditioning and may provide a possible advantage to bees when foraging in natural situations.

  12. Appetitive but not aversive olfactory conditioning modifies antennal movements in honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Cholé, Hanna; Junca, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In honeybees, two olfactory conditioning protocols allow the study of appetitive and aversive Pavlovian associations. Appetitive conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) involves associating an odor, the conditioned stimulus (CS) with a sucrose solution, the unconditioned stimulus (US). Conversely, aversive conditioning of the sting extension response (SER) involves associating the odor CS with an electric or thermal shock US. Each protocol is based on the measure of a different behavioral response (proboscis versus sting) and both only provide binary responses (extension or not of the proboscis or sting). These limitations render the measure of the acquired valence of an odor CS difficult without testing the animals in a freely moving situation. Here, we studied the effects of both olfactory conditioning protocols on the movements of the antennae, which are crucial sensory organs for bees. As bees’ antennae are highly mobile, we asked whether their movements in response to an odorant change following appetitive or aversive conditioning and if so, do odor-evoked antennal movements contain information about the acquired valence of the CS? We implemented a tracking system for harnessed bees’ antennal movements based on a motion capture principle at a high frequency rate. We observed that differential appetitive conditioning had a strong effect on antennal movements. Bees responded to the reinforced odorant with a marked forward motion of the antennae and a strong velocity increase. Conversely, differential aversive conditioning had no associative effect on antennal movements. Rather than revealing the acquired valence of an odorant, antennal movements may represent a novel conditioned response taking place during appetitive conditioning and may provide a possible advantage to bees when foraging in natural situations. PMID:26572651

  13. Identification of Putative Olfactory Genes from the Oriental Fruit Moth Grapholita molesta via an Antennal Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiping; Wu, Junxiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta, is an extremely important oligophagous pest species of stone and pome fruits throughout the world. As a host-switching species, adult moths, especially females, depend on olfactory cues to a large extent in locating host plants, finding mates, and selecting oviposition sites. The identification of olfactory genes can facilitate investigation on mechanisms for chemical communications. Methodology/Principal Finding We generated transcriptome of female antennae of G.molesta using the next-generation sequencing technique, and assembled transcripts from RNA-seq reads using Trinity, SOAPdenovo-trans and Abyss-trans assemblers. We identified 124 putative olfactory genes. Among the identified olfactory genes, 118 were novel to this species, including 28 transcripts encoding for odorant binding proteins, 17 chemosensory proteins, 48 odorant receptors, four gustatory receptors, 24 ionotropic receptors, two sensory neuron membrane proteins, and one odor degrading enzyme. The identified genes were further confirmed through semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR for transcripts coding for 26 OBPs and 17 CSPs. OBP transcripts showed an obvious antenna bias, whereas CSP transcripts were detected in different tissues. Conclusion Antennal transcriptome data derived from the oriental fruit moth constituted an abundant molecular resource for the identification of genes potentially involved in the olfaction process of the species. This study provides a foundation for future research on the molecules involved in olfactory recognition of this insect pest, and in particular, the feasibility of using semiochemicals to control this pest. PMID:26540284

  14. Scanning electron microscopy studies of antennal sensilla of bruchid beetles, Callosobruchus chinensis (L.) and Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Fei; Zhang, Guo-Na; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2009-04-01

    The bruchid beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (L.) and C. maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), are important stored-product insects of stored legume seeds. In this study, the external morphologies of the antennal sensilla on the antennae of both female and male adults of these two species were described using scanning electron microscopy. Antennae of both species are made up of the scape, pedicel, and nine segments of flagellomeres. Antennae of female and male C. maculatus and female of C. chinensis are serrate in shape, while those of male C. chinensis are pectinate. Eight morphological sensilla types were recorded in both sexes, including Böhm bristles (BB), two types of sensilla trichoid (ST1, ST2), sensilla chaetica (SC), two types of sensilla basiconic (SB1, SB2), grooved pegs (GP), and sensilla cavity (SCa). The number of ST1 and SB1 of the male were significantly greater than those of the female of C. chinensis, and the number of ST2 and SB1 of the male were significantly more abundant than those of the female of C. maculatus. The possible functions of the above sensilla types are discussed in light of previously published literature.

  15. Antennal and behavioral responses of grapevine moth Lobesia botrana females to volatiles from grapevine.

    PubMed

    Tasin, Marco; Anfora, Gianfranco; Ioriatti, Claudio; Carlin, Silvia; De Cristofaro, Antonio; Schmidt, Silvia; Bengtsson, Marie; Versini, Giuseppe; Witzgall, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Grapevine moth Lobesia botrana is the economically most important insect of grapevine Vitis vinifera in Europe. Flower buds, flowers, and green berries of Chardonnay grapevine are known to attract L. botrana for oviposition. The volatile compounds collected from these phenological stages were studied by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the antennal response of L. botrana females to these headspace collections was recorded by gas chromatography-electroantennography. The compounds found in all phenological stages, which consistently elicited a strong antennal response, were pentadecane, nonanal, and alpha-farnesene. In a wind tunnel, gravid L. botrana females flew upwind to green grapes, as well as to headspace collections from these berries released by a piezoelectric sprayer release device. However, no females landed at the source of headspace volatiles, possibly due to inappropriate concentrations or biased ratios of compounds in the headspace extracts.

  16. Identification of candidate olfactory genes in Chilo suppressalis by antennal transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Depan; Liu, Yang; Wei, Jinjin; Liao, Xinyan; Walker, William B; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Guirong

    2014-01-01

    Antennal olfaction, which is extremely important for insect survival, mediates key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. In insects, odor detection is mediated by multiple proteins in the antenna, especially the odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs), which ensure the specificity of the olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, we identified the olfactory gene repertoire of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis, an economically important agricultural pest, which inflicts great damage to the rice yield in south and east part of Asia, especially in Southern China. By Illumina sequencing of male and female antennal transcriptomes, we identified 47 odorant receptors, 20 ionotropic receptors, 26 odorant binding proteins, 21 chemosensory proteins and 2 sensory neuron membrane proteins. Our findings make it possible for future research of the olfactory system of C. suppressalis at the molecular level.

  17. Antennal sensory receptors of Pteromalus puparum female (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a gregarious pupal endoparasitoid of Pieris rapae.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Hany K M

    2009-12-01

    The external morphology of the antennal sensilla of Pteromalus puparum females (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is described using scanning electron microscopy. The antennae of P. puparum females are geniculate in shape, formed from a large, cylindrical scape with a basal radicel fitting into the antennal socket, a shorter, barrel-shaped pedicel and a flagellum composed of 12 subsegments. Eight morphologically distinct types of sensilla were found on the female antennae. These are: nonporous sensilla trichodea types 1 and 2, which are putative mechanosensilla, nonporous sensilla chaetica, which may function as proprioceptors, uniporous sensilla trichodea types 3 and 4, which are presumably contact chemosensilla, basiconic capitate peg sensilla, which probably function in thermo-hygro reception, multiporous sensilla trichodea, and multiporous sensilla placodea which are all presumed to be olfactory sensilla.

  18. Gravity Perception in a Cladoceran-zooplankter: Anatomy of Antennal Socket Setae of Daphnia Magna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    Night orientation in Daphnia magna was recently associated with setae on the basal socket of the swimming antennae. Daphnids are suspected of maintaining nocturnal equilibrium by monitoring the gravity vector through upward setal deflections caused by sinking between antennal swimming strokes. Setae appear to be hydrodynamic rheoceptors that sense the gravity vector indirectly by mechanoreceptivity to the direction and velocity of water currents. Neuroanatomical stains have revealed cell bodies at the base of the setal shafts, dendritic connections through to the distal ends of the shafts, and axonal tracts around the antennal socket connecting with an additional cell body and continuing toward the brain. These anatomical observations combined with previous scanning electron microscopy studies suggest that the setae are similar to mechanoreceptors and propreceptors used by higher crustaceans to sense water currents and gravity, and maintained balance.

  19. Ultrastructure of antennal sensilla of four skipper butterflies in Parnara sp. and Pelopidas sp. (Lepidoptera, Hesperiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Xiangqun, Yuan; Ke, Gao; Feng, Yuan; Yalin, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Most species of Parnara and Pelopidas (Hesperiidae) are important pests of rice. In this study, the antennal morphology, types of sensilla, and their distribution of four skipper butterflies, including Parnara guttata (Bremer & Grey), Pa. bada (Moore), Pelopidas mathias (Fabricius) and Pe. agna (Moore), were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Six distinct morphological types of sensilla were found on the antennae of all of these species: sensilla squamiformia, sensilla trichodea, sensilla chaetica, sensilla auricillica, sensilla coeloconica, and Böhm sensilla. The sensilla trichodea are the most abundant sensilla among the four skipper butterflies, and the sensilla auricillica are confirmed on the antennae of butterflies for the second time. In addition, the possible functions of these sensilla are discussed in the light of previously reported lepidopteran insects, which may provide useful information for further study of the function of these antennal sensilla and for related pests control by applying sex pheromones. PMID:24843250

  20. Gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Machado, René Andrade; Astencio, Adriana Goicoechea

    2012-01-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a patient with gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe. Our patient, an 8-year-old girl, underwent interictal video/EEG monitoring and MRI. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic spikes and waves in the left parietal lobe. MRI revealed the characteristic features of focal cortical dysplasia. Our findings suggest that the left parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures.

  1. Antennal Transcriptome Analysis of Odorant Reception Genes in the Red Turpentine Beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shuang-Lin; Zhang, Long-Wa

    2015-01-01

    Background The red turpentine beetle (RTB), Dendroctonus valens LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae), is a destructive invasive pest of conifers which has become the second most important forest pest nationwide in China. Dendroctonus valens is known to use host odors and aggregation pheromones, as well as non-host volatiles, in host location and mass-attack modulation, and thus antennal olfaction is of the utmost importance for the beetles’ survival and fitness. However, information on the genes underlying olfaction has been lacking in D. valens. Here, we report the antennal transcriptome of D. valens from next-generation sequencing, with the goal of identifying the olfaction gene repertoire that is involved in D. valens odor-processing. Results We obtained 51 million reads that were assembled into 61,889 genes, including 39,831 contigs and 22,058 unigenes. In total, we identified 68 novel putative odorant reception genes, including 21 transcripts encoding for putative odorant binding proteins (OBP), six chemosensory proteins (CSP), four sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMP), 22 odorant receptors (OR), four gustatory receptors (GR), three ionotropic receptors (IR), and eight ionotropic glutamate receptors. We also identified 155 odorant/xenobiotic degradation enzymes from the antennal transcriptome, putatively identified to be involved in olfaction processes including cytochrome P450s, glutathione-S-transferases, and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Predicted protein sequences were compared with counterparts in Tribolium castaneum, Megacyllene caryae, Ips typographus, Dendroctonus ponderosae, and Agrilus planipennis. Conclusion The antennal transcriptome described here represents the first study of the repertoire of odor processing genes in D. valens. The genes reported here provide a significant addition to the pool of identified olfactory genes in Coleoptera, which might represent novel targets for insect management. The results from our study also will

  2. The adult head morphology of the hessian fly Mayetiola destructor (Diptera, Cecidomyiidae).

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Katharina; Polilov, Alexey; Harris, Marion O; Beutel, Rolf G

    2013-11-01

    The adult head of the Hessian fly Mayetiola destructor was examined and described in detail. Morphological features are evaluated with respect to phylogenetic implications and possible effects of miniaturisation. Preserved groundplan features of Diptera are the orthognathous orientation of the head, the vestiture of small microtrichia (possible autapomorphy), filiform antennae inserted frontally between the compound eyes, the presence of a clypeolabral muscle (possible autapomorphy), the presence of labellae (autapomorphy), and the presence of only one premental retractor. Potential synapomorphies of the groups assigned to Bibionomorpha are the origin of M. tentorioscapalis medialis on the frons and the loss of M. craniolacinialis. Further apomorphies of Cecidomyiidae identified in Mayetiola are the unusually massive anterior tentorial arm, the absence of the labro-epipharyngeal food channel, the absence of the lacinia, and the presence of antennal sensilla connected by a seta, a feature not known from any other group of Diptera. The very large size of the compound eyes (in relation to the entire head surface) and the complete loss of ocelli are possible effects of miniaturization. The large size of the brain (in relation to the cephalic lumen), the unusual shape of the optic lobes, and the absence of the frontal ganglion as a separate structure are probably also linked with size reduction.

  3. Spike voltage topography in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Asadollahi, Marjan; Shimamoto, Shoichi; Lorenzo, Matthew; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-07-15

    We investigated the voltage topography of interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) to see whether topography was related to etiology for TLE. Adults with TLE, who had epilepsy surgery for drug-resistant seizures from 2011 until 2014 at Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center were selected. Two groups of patients were studied: patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) on MRI and those with other MRI findings. The voltage topography maps of the interictal spikes at the peak were created using BESA software. We classified the interictal spikes as polar, basal, lateral, or others. Thirty-four patients were studied, from which the characteristics of 340 spikes were investigated. The most common type of spike orientation was others (186 spikes; 54.7%), followed by lateral (146; 42.9%), polar (5; 1.5%), and basal (3; 0.9%). Characteristics of the voltage topography maps of the spikes between the two groups of patients were somewhat different. Five spikes in patients with MTS had polar orientation, but none of the spikes in patients with other MRI findings had polar orientation (odds ratio=6.98, 95% confidence interval=0.38 to 127.38; p=0.07). Scalp topographic mapping of interictal spikes has the potential to offer different information than visual inspection alone. The present results do not allow an immediate clinical application of our findings; however, detecting a polar spike in a patient with TLE may increase the possibility of mesial temporal sclerosis as the underlying etiology.

  4. Asbestos exposure and upper lobe involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hillerdal, G.

    1982-12-01

    In a study of 1,251 persons with asbestos-related pleural and parenchymal changes, 16 had slowly progressive changes of the upper lobes, involving both pleura and parenchyma, with shrinkage of the lobes. In addition there were 41 cases with less advanced apical changes. Tuberculosis and other possible causes were excluded. It is hypothesized that the changes rate due to asbestos disease.

  5. Gelastic seizures involving the right parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee-Young; Hong, Seung Bong; Joo, Eun Yeon; Tae, Woo Suk; Han, Sun Jung; Cho, Jae Wook; Seo, Dae Won; Kim, Sun Hyung; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Sun I

    2006-09-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of an hypothalamic hamartoma. We report a patient with gelastic seizures involving the right parietal lobe. Our patient, a 32-year-old man, underwent video-EEG monitoring, interictal and ictal brain SPECTs during gelastic seizures. Subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), was performed to localize any ictal hyperperfusion during these gelastic seizures. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic sharp waves in the right parietal lobe. SISCOM showed ictal hyperperfusion in the right parietal lobe and medial portions of right cerebellum. Our findings suggest that the right parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures.

  6. Middle lobe syndrome in children today.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Vittorio; Priftis, Kostas N; de Benedictis, Fernando M

    2014-06-01

    Middle lobe syndrome in children is a distinct clinical and radiographic entity that has been well described in the pediatric literature. However, issues regarding its etiology, clinical presentation, and management continue to puzzle the clinical practitioner. Pathophysiologically, there are two forms of middle lobe syndrome, namely obstructive and nonobstructive. Middle lobe syndrome may present as symptomatic or asymptomatic, as persistent or recurrent atelectasis, or as pneumonitis or bronchiectasis of the middle lobe and/or lingula. A lower threshold of performing a chest radiograph is warranted in children with persistent or recurrent nonspecific respiratory symptoms, particularly if there is clinical deterioration, in order to detect middle lobe syndrome and to initiate a further diagnostic and therapeutic workup.

  7. Surgical treatment and radiation therapy of frontal lobe meningiomas in 7 dogs.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, Ane; Moissonnier, Pierre; Thibaud, Jean-Laurent; Reyes-Gomez, Edouard; Devauchelle, Patrick; Blot, Stéphane

    2011-07-01

    The cases of 7 adult dogs with generalized seizures managed by surgical excision and radiation therapy for frontal lobe meningiomas were reviewed. The neurological examination was unremarkable in 6 of the 7 dogs. Five dogs were operated on using a bilateral transfrontal sinus approach and 2 using a unilateral sinotemporal approach to the frontal lobe. One dog was euthanized 14 d after surgery; radiation therapy was initiated 3 wk after surgery in the remaining 6 dogs. Long-term follow-up consisted of neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or computed tomography (CT) scan after radiation therapy. The mean survival time for dogs that had surgery and radiation therapy was 18 mo after surgery. Frontal lobe meningiomas have been associated with poor prognosis. However, the surgical approaches used in these cases, combined with radiation therapy, allow a survival rate for frontal lobe meningiomas similar to that for meningiomas located over the cerebral convexities.

  8. Selective atrophy of left hemisphere and frontal lobe of the brain in old men.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zu Y; Liu, Jing Z; Sahgal, Vinod; Wang, Bin; Yue, Guang H

    2005-02-01

    In this study, volumes of the whole brain, hemispheres, and frontal lobes of young and elderly adults were quantified by an automated method. Effects of age, sex, and side on absolute and relative volumes of the brain structures were evaluated. Compared with the young group, elderly participants showed a 15% volume loss in the whole brain and hemispheres, and a 22% volume loss in the frontal lobes. The relative volume of the left hemisphere in the elderly group decreased more than that of the right hemisphere. Elderly men showed significantly greater left hemisphere and left frontal lobe volume losses than did elderly women, indicating that the larger left hemisphere relative volume reduction is largely contributed to by selective atrophy of the left frontal lobe volume in elderly men. These results may reflect age- and sex-related functional deterioration in the left brain.

  9. Medial temporal lobe volume predicts elders' everyday memory.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Zacks, Jeffrey M; Hambrick, David Z; Zacks, Rose T; Head, Denise; Kurby, Christopher A; Sargent, Jesse Q

    2013-07-01

    Deficits in memory for everyday activities are common complaints among healthy and demented older adults. The medial temporal lobes and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex are both affected by aging and early-stage Alzheimer's disease, and are known to influence performance on laboratory memory tasks. We investigated whether the volume of these structures predicts everyday memory. Cognitively healthy older adults and older adults with mild Alzheimer's-type dementia watched movies of everyday activities and completed memory tests on the activities. Structural MRI was used to measure brain volume. Medial temporal but not prefrontal volume strongly predicted subsequent memory. Everyday memory depends on segmenting activity into discrete events during perception, and medial temporal volume partially accounted for the relationship between performance on the memory tests and performance on an event-segmentation task. The everyday-memory measures used in this study involve retrieval of episodic and semantic information as well as working memory updating. Thus, the current findings suggest that during perception, the medial temporal lobes support the construction of event representations that determine subsequent memory.

  10. Medial Temporal Lobe Volume Predicts Elders' Everyday Memory

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Head, Denise; Kurby, Christopher A.; Sargent, Jesse Q.

    2013-01-01

    Deficits in memory for everyday activities are common complaints among healthy and demented older adults. The medial temporal lobes and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex are both affected by aging and early-stage Alzheimer's disease, and are known to influence performance on laboratory memory tasks. We investigated whether the volume of these structures predicts everyday memory. Cognitively healthy older adults and older adults with mild Alzheimer's-type dementia watched movies of everyday activities and completed memory tests on the activities. Structural MRI was used to measure brain volume. Medial temporal but not prefrontal volume strongly predicted subsequent memory. Everyday memory depends on segmenting activity into discrete events during perception, and medial temporal volume partially accounted for the relationship between performance on the memory tests and performance on an event-segmentation task. The everyday-memory measures used in this study involve retrieval of episodic and semantic information as well as working memory updating. Thus, the current findings suggest that during perception, the medial temporal lobes support the construction of event representations that determine subsequent memory. PMID:23630222

  11. Phylogenetic relationship of seven Dendrolimus (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) species based on the ultrastructure of male moths' antennae and antennal sensilla.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiong; Yan, Xiong-Fei; Wen, Jun-Bao; Li, Zhen-Yu

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and ultrastructure of the antennae and antennal sensilla of seven male Dendrolimus species and a male Trabala vishnou gigantina (Yang) (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) were examined by light microscope and scanning electron microscope. Six morphological types of antennal sensilla were identified: Sensilla trichodea, Sensilla chaetica, Sensilla styloconica, Sensilla coeloconica, Böhm bristles, and foot-like sensilla. Six of the Dendrolimus moths and Trabala vishnou gigantina Yang share the same antennal sensilla type, as do various geographic populations of the same species. The exception, Dendrolimus spectabilis Butler, has foot-like sensilla. However, the antennal sensilla subtypes were significantly different among species and/or populations. There were no remarkable differences in the width of the scape, pedicel, subflagellum, and the side-branches between the eight male species studied. However, we observed significant differences in the number of flagellomere and the length of scape, pedicel, subflagellums, and side-branches. The length and basal diameter of various types of antennal sensilla did not vary significantly among Dendrolimus moths. Beyond that, there were no differences among populations of the same kind of species. Hierarchical cluster analysis found two clusters: the first contained D. punctata punctata (Walker), D. punctata wenshanensis (Tsai et Liu), D. tabulaeformis (Tsai et Liu), and D. spectabilis and D. superans (Butler), and the second contained D. grisea (Moore) and D. kikuchii kikuchii (Matsumura). Trabala vishnou gigantina was placed separately from the two clusters. We conclude that D. punctata wenshanensis,D. tabulaeformis, and D. spectabilis are geographic subspecies of D. punctata punctata.

  12. Species Specificity of the Putative Male Antennal Aphrodisiac Pheromone in Leptopilina heterotoma, Leptopilina boulardi, and Leptopilina victoriae.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ingmar; Ruther, Joachim; Stökl, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Male antennal aphrodisiac pheromones have been suggested to elicit female receptiveness in several parasitic Hymenoptera, including Leptopilina boulardi. None of the proposed pheromones, however, has been fully identified to date. It is also unknown whether these antennal pheromones are species specific, because the species specificity of mate recognition and courtship elicitation in Leptopilina prevented such experiments. In this study we present an experimental design that allows the investigation of the species specificity of the putative male aphrodisiac pheromone of L. heterotoma, L. boulardi, and L. victoriae. This is achieved by chemical manipulation of the odour profile of heterospecific females, so that males perceive them as conspecifics and show antennal courtship behaviour. Males courted the manipulated heterospecific females and antennal contact between the male and the female was observed. However, males elicited receptiveness only in conspecific females, never in the manipulated heterospecific females. Chemical analysis showed the presence of species specific unsaturated hydrocarbons on the antennae of males. Only trace amounts of these hydrocarbons are found on the antennae of females. Our results are an important step towards the understanding and identification of antennal pheromones of parasitic wasps.

  13. Automated Lobe-Based Airway Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Suicheng; Wang, Zhimin; Siegfried, Jill M.; Wilson, David; Bigbee, William L.; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-01-01

    Regional quantitative analysis of airway morphological abnormalities is of great interest in lung disease investigation. Considering that pulmonary lobes are relatively independent functional unit, we develop and test a novel and efficient computerized scheme in this study to automatically and robustly classify the airways into different categories in terms of pulmonary lobe. Given an airway tree, which could be obtained using any available airway segmentation scheme, the developed approach consists of four basic steps: (1) airway skeletonization or centerline extraction, (2) individual airway branch identification, (3) initial rule-based airway classification/labeling, and (4) self-correction of labeling errors. In order to assess the performance of this approach, we applied it to a dataset consisting of 300 chest CT examinations in a batch manner and asked an image analyst to subjectively examine the labeled results. Our preliminary experiment showed that the labeling accuracy for the right upper lobe, the right middle lobe, the right lower lobe, the left upper lobe, and the left lower lobe is 100%, 99.3%, 99.3%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Among these, only two cases are incorrectly labeled due to the failures in airway detection. It takes around 2 minutes to label an airway tree using this algorithm. PMID:23093951

  14. Antennal Transcriptome and Differential Expression Analysis of Five Chemosensory Gene Families from the Asian Honeybee Apis cerana cerana

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huiting; Du, Yali; Gao, Pengfei; Wang, Shujie; Pan, Jianfang; Jiang, Yusuo

    2016-01-01

    Chemosensory genes play a central role in sensing chemical signals and guiding insect behavior. The Chinese honeybee, Apis cerana cerana, is one of the most important insect species in China in terms of resource production, and providing high-quality products for human consumption, and also serves as an important pollinator. Communication and foraging behavior of worker bees is likely linked to a complex chemosensory system. Here, we used transcriptome sequencing on adult A. c. cerana workers of different ages to identify the major chemosensory gene families and the differentially expressed genes(DEGs), and to investigate their expression profiles. A total of 109 candidate chemosensory genes in five gene families were identified from the antennal transcriptome assemblies, including 17 OBPs, 6 CSPs, 74 ORs, 10 IRs, and 2SNMPs, in which nineteen DEGs were screened and their expression values at different developmental stages were determined in silico. No chemosensory transcript was specific to a certain developmental period. Thirteen DEGs were upregulated and 6were downregulated. We created extensive expression profiles in six major body tissues using qRT-PCR and found that most DEGs were exclusively or primarily expressed in antennae. Others were abundantly expressed in the other tissues, such as head, thorax, abdomen, legs, and wings. Interestingly, when a DEG was highly expressed in the thorax, it also had a high level of expression in legs, but showed a lowlevel in antennae. This study explored five chemoreceptor superfamily genes using RNA-Seq coupled with extensive expression profiling of DEGs. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of odorant detection in the Asian honeybee and also serve as an extensive novel resource for comparing and investigating olfactory functionality in hymenopterans. PMID:27776190

  15. Human Frontal Lobes and AI Planning Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levinson, Richard; Lum, Henry Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Human frontal lobes are essential for maintaining a self-regulating balance between predictive and reactive behavior. This paper describes a system that integrates prediction and reaction based on neuropsychological theories of frontal lobe function. In addition to enhancing our understanding of deliberate action in humans' the model is being used to develop and evaluate the same properties in machines. First, the paper presents some background neuropsychology in order to set a general context. The role of frontal lobes is then presented by summarizing three theories which formed the basis for this work. The components of an artificial frontal lobe are then discussed from both neuropsychological and AI perspectives. The paper concludes by discussing issues and methods for evaluating systems that integrate planning and reaction.

  16. Increased temporal lobe gyrification in preterm children.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Shelli R; Vohr, Betty; Schneider, Karen C; Katz, Karol H; Makuch, Robert W; Reiss, Allan L; Ment, Laura R

    2006-01-01

    Preterm birth often results in significant learning disability, and previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of preterm children have demonstrated reduction in overall cortical tissue with particular vulnerability in the temporal lobe. We measured cortical gyrification in 73 preterm and 33 term control children at 8 years of age and correlated these findings with tests of language ability to determine the associations among preterm birth, neurodevelopment and functional outcome. Preterm children demonstrated significantly increased bilateral temporal lobe gyrification index compared to term controls. Left temporal gyrification index was significantly negatively correlated with left temporal lobe gray matter volume as well as reading recognition scores in the preterm group. Cortical development in the temporal lobe appears to be differentially vulnerable to preterm birth.

  17. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  18. Robust pulmonary lobe segmentation against incomplete fissures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Suicheng; Zheng, Qingfeng; Siegfried, Jill; Pu, Jiantao

    2012-03-01

    As important anatomical landmarks of the human lung, accurate lobe segmentation may be useful for characterizing specific lung diseases (e.g., inflammatory, granulomatous, and neoplastic diseases). A number of investigations showed that pulmonary fissures were often incomplete in image depiction, thereby leading to the computerized identification of individual lobes a challenging task. Our purpose is to develop a fully automated algorithm for accurate identification of individual lobes regardless of the integrity of pulmonary fissures. The underlying idea of the developed lobe segmentation scheme is to use piecewise planes to approximate the detected fissures. After a rotation and a global smoothing, a number of small planes were fitted using local fissures points. The local surfaces are finally combined for lobe segmentation using a quadratic B-spline weighting strategy to assure that the segmentation is smooth. The performance of the developed scheme was assessed by comparing with a manually created reference standard on a dataset of 30 lung CT examinations. These examinations covered a number of lung diseases and were selected from a large chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) dataset. The results indicate that our scheme of lobe segmentation is efficient and accurate against incomplete fissures.

  19. The antennal sensilla of Melipona quadrifasciata (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponini): a study of different sexes and castes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaiano, Samira Veiga; Ferreira, Ríudo de Paiva; Campos, Lucio Antonio de Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2014-08-01

    The sensilla of insects are integumental units that play a role as sensory structures and are crucial for the perception of stimuli and for communication. In this study, we compared the antennal sensilla of females (workers and queens), males (haploid (n) and diploid (2n)), and queen-like males (QLMs, resulting from 2n males after juvenile hormone (JH) treatment) in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata. Images of the dorsal antenna surfaces were acquired using a scanning electron microscope. As reported for other hymenopterans, this species exhibits a heterogeneous sensillar distribution along the antennae. Thirteen different types of sensilla were found in the antennae of M. quadrifasciata: trichodea (subtypes I to VI), chaetica (subtypes I and II), placodea, basiconica, ampullacea, coeloconica, and coelocapitula. Sensilla trichodea I were the most abundant, followed by sensilla placodea, which might function in olfactory perception. Sensilla basiconica, sensilla chaetica I, sensilla coeloconica, and sensilla ampullacea were found exclusively in females. In terms of the composition and size of the sensilla, the antennae of QLMs most closely resemble those of the 2n male, although QLMs exhibit a queen phenotype. This study represents the first comparative analysis of the antennal sensilla of M. quadrifasciata. The differences found in the type and amount of sensilla between the castes and sexes are discussed based on the presumed sensillary functions.

  20. Species-specific antennal responses to tibial fragrances by male orchid bees.

    PubMed

    Eltz, Thomas; Ayasse, Manfred; Lunau, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Male neotropical orchid bees (Euglossini) collect odoriferous substances from orchids and other sources and store them in tibial pouches, accumulating complex and species-specific bouquets. These fragrances are later exposed at display sites, presumably to attract females or conspecific males or both. We hypothesized that the necessity to detect and recognize specific fragrance bouquets has led to peripheral chemosensory specializations in different species of orchid bees. To test this, excised male antennae of four species of Euglossa were stimulated with complete tibial extracts of the same four species in a crosswise experiment. In the majority of the tested extracts, the amplitude of the electroantennogram (EAG) response was significantly different between species and always maximal in males of the extracted species. This effect did not appear to result from a given species' increased sensitivity toward certain attractive components: gas chromatography with electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) of one extract of Euglossa tridentata evoked similar and generalized response patterns in all four species, encompassing a total of 34 peaks that elicited antennal responses. Therefore, the species effect in EAG responses to complete extracts likely resulted from species-specific interactions of compounds at the receptor level. Antennal specialization to conspecific bouquets adds additional strength to the argument that specificity is an important evolutionary aspect of euglossine tibial fragrances.

  1. Antennal morphology of the endogean carabid genus typhlocharis (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Anillini): description of sensilla and taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, Sergio; Zaballos, Juan P

    2013-07-01

    The antennal morphology and chaetotaxy were studied in 52 species of the endogean carabid genus Typhlocharis, using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. The antennae are composed of 11 antennomeres (scape, pedicel, and nine flagellomeres). We found considerable variation between species in the third antennomere, with short-stem and long-stem forms, and flagellomere morphology, distinguishing two morphs: rounded (subovoid, subspheric and subquadrate, morph 1) and reniform shapes (morph 2). Antennal sensilla are grouped in six types of sensilla trichodea, three types of sensilla basiconica, one type of sensilla coeloconica, and one type of sensilla campaniformia. The distribution of sensilla along the antennomeres is described. The "rings" of trichoid sensilla in the antennomere body are affected by its shape and there is interspecific variation in the pattern of sensilla coeloconica in antennomere 11°, a novelty for the genus. The types of sensilla found in Typhlocharis are compared to those described in other Carabidae and the potential functionality and taxonomic interest of those variable antennal features are discussed. A correlation between the flagellomere morphology and the presence/absence of a stridulatory organ is suggested. The study also allowed comparing the observation of antennal features by SEM and light microscopy.

  2. Antennal and behavioral response of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) to degradation products of citrus volatiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) vectors the bacterial causal pathogen of the deadly citrus disease, Huanglongbing (citrus greening) which is a major threat to citrus industry worldwide. We studied antennal and behavioral responses to principal components of head...

  3. Mixing Enhancement in a Lobed Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. L.; Majamaki, A. J.; Lam, I. T.; Delabroy, O.; Karagozian, A. R.; Marble, F. E.; Smith, O. I.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the non-reactive mixing processes associated with a lobed fuel injector in a coflowing air stream is presented. The lobed fuel injector is a device which generates streamwise vorticity, producing high strain rates which can enhance the mixing of reactants while delaying ignition in a controlled manner. The lobed injectors examined in the present study consist of two corrugated plates between which a fuel surrogate, CO2, is injected into coflowing air. Acetone is seeded in the CO2 supply as a fuel marker. Comparison of two alternative lobed injector geometries is made with a straight fuel injector to determine net differences in mixing and strain fields due to streamwise vorticity generation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of the seeded acetone yields two-dimensional images of the scalar concentration field at various downstream locations, from which local mixing and scalar dissipation rates are computed. It is found that the lobed injector geometry can enhance molecular mixing and create a highly strained flowfield, and that the strain rates generated by scalar energy dissipation can potentially delay ignition in a reacting flowfield.

  4. Automated MRI parcellation of the frontal lobe.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Marin E; Chen, Min; Crocetti, Deana; Prince, Jerry L; Subramaniam, Krish; Fischl, Bruce; Kaufmann, Walter E; Mostofsky, Stewart H

    2014-05-01

    Examination of associations between specific disorders and physical properties of functionally relevant frontal lobe sub-regions is a fundamental goal in neuropsychiatry. Here, we present and evaluate automated methods of frontal lobe parcellation with the programs FreeSurfer(FS) and TOADS-CRUISE(T-C), based on the manual method described in Ranta et al. [2009]: Psychiatry Res 172:147-154 in which sulcal-gyral landmarks were used to manually delimit functionally relevant regions within the frontal lobe: i.e., primary motor cortex, anterior cingulate, deep white matter, premotor cortex regions (supplementary motor complex, frontal eye field, and lateral premotor cortex) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions (medial PFC, dorsolateral PFC, inferior PFC, lateral orbitofrontal cortex [OFC] and medial OFC). Dice's coefficient, a measure of overlap, and percent volume difference were used to measure the reliability between manual and automated delineations for each frontal lobe region. For FS, mean Dice's coefficient for all regions was 0.75 and percent volume difference was 21.2%. For T-C the mean Dice's coefficient was 0.77 and the mean percent volume difference for all regions was 20.2%. These results, along with a high degree of agreement between the two automated methods (mean Dice's coefficient = 0.81, percent volume difference = 12.4%) and a proof-of-principle group difference analysis that highlights the consistency and sensitivity of the automated methods, indicate that the automated methods are valid techniques for parcellation of the frontal lobe into functionally relevant sub-regions. Thus, the methodology has the potential to increase efficiency, statistical power and reproducibility for population analyses of neuropsychiatric disorders with hypothesized frontal lobe contributions.

  5. Les antennes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, P.; Pezzani, J.

    2011-04-01

    The antenna is the first element in the reception chain and makes the transition between free space and the receiver. Antenna types are virtually infinite. Antennae for radioastronomy, either single dishes, interferometers or arrays, do not differ much from antennae for other applications. The various terms and definitions used in the antenna field and necessary to specify an antenna or to correctly understand its characteristics are explained and detailed.

  6. The gyri of the octopus vertical lobe have distinct neurochemical identities.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-06-15

    The cephalopod vertical lobe is the largest learning and memory structure known in invertebrate nervous systems. It is part of the visual learning circuit of the central brain, which also includes the superior frontal and subvertical lobes. Despite the well-established functional importance of this system, little is known about neuropil organization of these structures and there is to date no evidence that the five longitudinal gyri of the vertical lobe, perhaps the most distinctive morphological feature of the octopus brain, differ in their connections or molecular identities. We studied the histochemical organization of these structures in hatchling and adult Octopus bimaculoides brains with immunostaining for serotonin, octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (oGNRH), and octopressin-neurophysin (OP-NP). Our major finding is that the five lobules forming the vertical lobe gyri have distinct neurochemical signatures. This is most prominent in the hatchling brain, where the median and mediolateral lobules are enriched in OP-NP fibers, the lateral lobule is marked by oGNRH innervation, and serotonin immunostaining heavily labels the median and lateral lobules. A major source of input to the vertical lobe is the superior frontal lobe, which is dominated by a neuropil of interweaving fiber bundles. We have found that this neuropil also has an intrinsic neurochemical organization: it is partitioned into territories alternately enriched or impoverished in oGNRH-containing fascicles. Our findings establish that the constituent lobes of the octopus superior frontal-vertical system have an intricate internal anatomy, one likely to reflect the presence of functional subsystems within cephalopod learning circuitry.

  7. Greater nucleic acids oxidation in the temporal lobe than the frontal lobe in SAMP8.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fei; Gan, Wei; Nie, Ben; Takagi, Yasumitsu; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Mutsuo; Cai, Jian-Ping

    2012-05-30

    Our previous studies have shown that substantial amounts of 8-oxoguanine are present in the DNA and RNA in the hippocampi of old senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP8); however, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA in the other regions of the brain from a month after birth to the onset of aging has not been examined completely. In this study, we analyzed the amount of 8-oxoguanine in DNA and RNA in the temporal and frontal lobes of SAMP8 during aging by the immunohistochemical method. Compared with age-matched control acceleration-resistant mice (SAMR1), 8- and 12-month-old SAMP8 had increased amounts of 8-oxoguanine in the DNA and RNA in the frontal lobe, whereas in the temporal lobe, this trend began to appear as early as 4 months. The levels of 8-oxoguanine in the temporal lobe were significantly higher than those in the frontal lobe. These results indicate that nucleic acid oxidative damage occurs as an age-associated phenomenon, and can occur more easily in the temporal lobe than in the frontal lobe of SAMP8.

  8. Graph theory findings in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Sharon; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLE is a disorder of abnormal epileptogenic networks, rather than focal sources. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks, and has potential to illuminate characteristics of brain topology conducive to TLE pathophysiology, including seizure initiation and spread. We review basic concepts which we believe will prove helpful in interpreting results rapidly emerging from graph theory research in TLE. In addition, we summarize the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain its pathophysiology. Several common findings have emerged from the many modalities which have been used to study TLE using graph theory, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, surface EEG, intracranial EEG, magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, cell cultures, simulated models, and mouse models, involving increased regularity of the interictal network configuration, altered local segregation and global integration of the TLE network, and network reorganization of temporal lobe and limbic structures. As different modalities provide different views of the same phenomenon, future studies integrating data from multiple modalities are needed to clarify findings and contribute to the formation of a coherent theory on the pathophysiology of TLE. PMID:24831083

  9. Graph theory findings in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Sharon; Haneef, Zulfi

    2014-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy. Accumulating evidence has shown that TLE is a disorder of abnormal epileptogenic networks, rather than focal sources. Graph theory allows for a network-based representation of TLE brain networks, and has potential to illuminate characteristics of brain topology conducive to TLE pathophysiology, including seizure initiation and spread. We review basic concepts which we believe will prove helpful in interpreting results rapidly emerging from graph theory research in TLE. In addition, we summarize the current state of graph theory findings in TLE as they pertain its pathophysiology. Several common findings have emerged from the many modalities which have been used to study TLE using graph theory, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, surface EEG, intracranial EEG, magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, cell cultures, simulated models, and mouse models, involving increased regularity of the interictal network configuration, altered local segregation and global integration of the TLE network, and network reorganization of temporal lobe and limbic structures. As different modalities provide different views of the same phenomenon, future studies integrating data from multiple modalities are needed to clarify findings and contribute to the formation of a coherent theory on the pathophysiology of TLE.

  10. Subregional Mesiotemporal Network Topology Is Altered in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Boris C; Bernasconi, Neda; Hong, Seok-Jun; Dery, Sebastian; Bernasconi, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most frequent drug-resistant epilepsy in adults and commonly associated with variable degrees of mesiotemporal atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Analyses of inter-regional connectivity have unveiled disruptions in large-scale cortico-cortical networks; little is known about the topological organization of the mesiotemporal lobe, the limbic subnetwork central to the disorder. We generated covariance networks based on high-resolution MRI surface-shape descriptors of the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and amygdala in 134 TLE patients and 45 age- and sex-matched controls. Graph-theoretical analysis revealed increased path length and clustering in patients, suggesting a shift toward a more regularized arrangement; findings were reproducible after split-half assessment and across 2 parcellation schemes. Analysis of inter-regional correlations and module participation showed increased within-structure covariance, but decreases between structures, particularly with regards to the hippocampus and amygdala. While higher clustering possibly reflects topological consequences of axonal sprouting, decreases in interstructure covariance may be a consequence of disconnection within limbic circuitry. Preoperative network parameters, specifically the segregation of the ipsilateral hippocampus, predicted long-term seizure freedom after surgery.

  11. Antennal malformations in light ocelli drones of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    PubMed

    Chaud-Netto, J

    2000-02-01

    Malformed antennae of Apis mellifera light ocelli drones were drawn, dissected and mounted permanently on slides containing Canada balsam, in order to count the olfactory discs present in each segment, in comparison with the number of those structures in normal antennae of their brothers. Some drones presented morphological abnormalities in a single segment of the right or left antenna, but others had two or more malformed segments in a same antenna. Drones with malformations in both antennae were also observed. The 4th and 5th flagellum segments were the most frequently affected. In a low number of cases the frequency of olfactory discs in malformed segments did not differ from that one recorded for normal segments. However, in most cases studied, the antennal malformations brought about a significant reduction in the number of olfactory discs from malformed segments.

  12. Antennal circadian clocks coordinate sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Christine; Gegear, Robert J; Reppert, Steven M

    2009-09-25

    During their fall migration, Eastern North American monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) use a time-compensated Sun compass to aid navigation to their overwintering grounds in central Mexico. It has been assumed that the circadian clock that provides time compensation resides in the brain, although this assumption has never been examined directly. Here, we show that the antennae are necessary for proper time-compensated Sun compass orientation in migratory monarch butterflies, that antennal clocks exist in monarchs, and that they likely provide the primary timing mechanism for Sun compass orientation. These unexpected findings pose a novel function for the antennae and open a new line of investigation into clock-compass connections that may extend widely to other insects that use this orientation mechanism.

  13. Gravity receptors in a microcrustacean water flea - Sensitivity of antennal-socket setae in Daphnia magna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. G.; Farmer, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Gravity receptors of Dephnia magna were discovered on the basal segment of the swimming antennae and were shown to respond to upward water currents that pass the animal as it sinks between swimming strokes. Sensitivity of the gravity perceiving mechanism was tested by subjecting daphnids to a series of five decreasingly dense aqueous solutions (neutral density to water) in darkness (to avoid visual cues). Three-dimensional, video analysis of body position (pitch, yaw and roll) and swimming path (hop and sink, vertical and horizontal patterns) revealed a gradual threshold that occurred near a density difference between the animal and its environment of less than 0.25%. Because daphnids do not sink but continue to slide after stroking in the increased density solutions, gravity perception appears to occur during a vertical swing of the longitudinal body axis to the vertical plane, about their center of gravity, and, thereby, implies a multidirectional sensitivity for the antennal-socket setae.

  14. The Ruff Figural Fluency Test: heightened right frontal lobe delta activity as a function of performance.

    PubMed

    Foster, Paul S; Williamson, John B; Harrison, David W

    2005-06-01

    Research has indicated that the Ruff Figural Fluency Test [RFFT; Ruff, R. M., Light, R. H., & Evans, R. W. (1987). The Ruff Figural Fluency Test: A normative study with adults. Developmental Neuropsychology, 3, 37-51] is sensitive to right frontal lobe functioning. Indeed, research has differentiated between patients with left or right frontal lobe lesions using performance on the RFFT [Ruff, R. M., Allen, C. C., Farrow, C. E., Niemann, H., & Wylie, T. (1994). Figural fluency: Differential impairment in patients with left versus right frontal lobe lesions. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 9, 41-55]. The present investigation used quantitative electroencephalography to test further whether the RFFT was sensitive to right frontal lobe functioning among a group of individuals with no history of head injury. To meet this objective, the RFFT was administered to a group of 45 right-handed men with no history of significant head injury or cerebral dysfunction. Delta magnitude (muV) at three right frontal electrode sites (FP2, F4, F8) was then used to compare those who performed the best (High Fluency) with those who performed the worst (Low Fluency) on the RFFT. The findings indicated heightened right frontal delta magnitude for the Low Fluency group relative to the High Fluency group at the F2 and F8 right frontal electrode sites. Thus, the present findings provide further support for the contention that the RFFT is sensitive to right frontal lobe functioning, even among those with no history of head injury.

  15. Antennal tactile learning in the honeybee: effect of nicotinic antagonists on memory dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dacher, M; Lagarrigue, A; Gauthier, M

    2005-01-01

    Restrained worker honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) are able to learn to associate antennal-scanning of a metal plate with a sucrose reinforcement delivered to the mouthparts. Learning occurs reliably in a single association of the two sensory stimuli. The involvement of nicotinic pathways in memory formation and retrieval processes was tested by injecting, into the whole brain through the median ocellus, either mecamylamine (0.6 microg per bee) or alpha-bungarotoxin (2.4 ng per bee). Saline served as a control. Mecamylamine injected 10 min before the retrieval test impairs the retention level tested 3 h and 24 h after single- or multi-trial learning. Retrieval tests performed at various times after the injection show that the blocking effect of mecamylamine lasts about 1 h. The drug has no effect on the reconsolidation or extinction processes. Mecamylamine injected 10 min before conditioning impairs single-trial learning but has no effect on five-trial learning and on the consolidation process. By contrast, alpha-bungarotoxin only impairs the formation of long-term memory (24 h) induced by the five-trial learning and has no effect on medium-term memory (3 h), on single-trial learning or on the retrieval process. Hence, owing to previous data, at least two kinds of nicotinic receptors seem to be involved in honeybee memory, an alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive and an alpha-bungarotoxin-insensitive receptor. Our results extend to antennal mechanosensory conditioning the role of the cholinergic system that we had previously described for olfactory conditioning in the honeybee. Moreover, we describe here in this insect a pharmacological dissociation between alpha-bungarotoxin sensitive long-term memory and alpha-bungarotoxin insensitive medium-term memory, the last one being affected by mecamylamine.

  16. Ultrastructure of antennal and posterior abdominal sensilla in Chlorophorus caragana females.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanru; Ren, Lili; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Youqing

    2015-08-01

    Chlorophorus caragana Xie & Wang is a destructive wood-boring beetle that damages Caragana spp. bushes and is distributed in desert areas in north-west China. Using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we observed the morphology and ultrastructure of antennal and posterior abdominal sensilla in C. caragana females, to discuss the putative functions of these sensilla in host location and oviposition behaviors. In total, seven types (24 subtypes) of sensilla were located on the antenna and posterior abdomen. On the antenna, there were Böhm's bristles (BB.); four subtypes of sensilla chaetica (Ch.1-Ch.4) characterized by non-porous surfaces and sensillum-lymph cavities without dendrites; two subtypes of sensilla trichodea (Tr.1 and Tr.2) with a tip pore and dendrites surrounded by dendritic sheaths; dome-shaped sensilla (Dom.) emerging from a deep cavity with one tip pore; four subtypes of sensilla basiconica (Ba.1-Ba.4) and one type of sensilla auricillica (Au.) with a porous cuticular surface and dendrites in the sensillum-lymph cavity; and one type of sensilla styloconica (Sty.) with grooves on the cuticular wall. On the posterior abdomen, there were four subtypes of sensilla chaetica (Ch.5-Ch.8); three subtypes of sensilla trichodea (Tr.3-Tr.5); and three subtypes of sensilla basiconica (Ba.5-Ba.7; Ba.5 had no groove in the cuticular wall, Ba.6 had one tip pore, and Ba.7 was located in a cuticular cavity). The antennal sensilla were believed to be mechanosensitive, chemosensitive, and sensitive to humidity and temperature, and to play roles in mating, host location and oviposition. The abdominal sensilla are believed to be related to oviposition behaviors.

  17. Morphology and Ultrastructure of Antennal Sensilla in Male and Female Agrilus mali (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhihao; Liu, Deguang; Cui, Xiaoning; Shang, Zheming

    2016-01-01

    The apple buprestid beetle, Agrilus mali Matsumura, is an invasive pest causing significant damages to rare wild apple forests of Xinjiang. The morphology, abundance and distribution of antennal sensilla in both sexes of this pest were examined. We found that the antennae of A. mali females were longer than those of males. Five types of antennal sensilla were characterized, including trichodea (subtypes Tr.1, Tr.2, and Tr.3), chaetica (subtypes Sc.1, Sc.2, Sc.3, and Sc.4), basiconica (subtypes Ba. 1, Ba. 2, Ba. 3 and Ba.4), Böhm bristles (subtypes BB. 1, and BB. 2), and multiporous grooved sensilla. The most abundant sensilla of Ba.2 tended to occur mainly on flagellomeres 5–8 in both sexes. The last three flagellomeres tended to have the most abundant Tr.1 in both sexes. Overall, the abundance and distribution of these sensilla appeared to be highly conserved in both sexes, and their olfactory organs seemed to cluster on flagellomeres 6–8. However, some sex dimorphisms were also observed. Tr.3 and BB.2 were found only in females. Sensilla of Sc.2 were found on the pedicel and first two flagellomeres only in males. When compared with males, females showed a higher number of Sc.3, but a lower number of Sc.4 on the pedicel. These results indicate that contact cues could be important in intersexual communication in A. mali. The functional roles of these sensilla and their implications in A. mali behaviors are discussed, and further studies of identified chemosensitive sensilla can provide a foundation for developing semiochemical-based management strategies. PMID:27620559

  18. A case of bilateral temporal lobe agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lang, C; Lehrl, S; Huk, W

    1981-01-01

    A 76-year-old man with bilateral temporal lobe agenesis producing clinical features resembling the Robinson syndrome is described. The malformation was discovered during a routine CT examination after the appearance of a homonymous visual field defect. The patient was examined by (neuro) psychological testing. The findings are compared with other reported cases and discussed with regard to cerebral localisation. Images PMID:7288451

  19. St Paul and temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed Central

    Landsborough, D

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is offered to suggest a neurological origin for Paul's ecstatic visions. Paul's physical state at the time of his conversion is discussed and related to these ecstatic experiences. It is postulated that both were manifestations of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:3302109

  20. Agenesis of right upper lobe of lung.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chiu-Ping; Lu, Yen-Ta; Lin, Rong-Luh

    2015-06-01

    Agenesis of the right upper lobe of the lung is a very uncommon congenital anomaly and may be referred to chest clinics in adulthood for an incidental finding of abnormal chest radiograph. The presentations of chest radiograph may imitate many common situations such as right upper lobe collapse presenting as an ipsilateral shifting of the mediastinum or elevation of the right hemidiaphragm due to eventration or subdiaphragmatic lesions. A chest computed tomography is considered the most conclusive examination used to diagnose lung agenesis. Three-dimensional reconstructed images can be particularly helpful in delineating abnormalities of the bronchi and associated arterial and venous structures. We describe here a young woman with allergic rhinitis and bronchial asthma since her early childhood. She was referred to our clinic for an incidental finding of abnormal chest radiograph after a school health checkup. Right upper lobe atelectasis or intra-abdominal lesions were initially suspected. After a thorough image study, she was diagnosed as a case of agenesis of the right upper lobe. Our report emphasizes the importance that a high index of suspicion and adequate image investigation are necessary to diagnose congenital lung anomalies.

  1. Medial temporal lobe memory in childhood: Developmental transitions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore MTL-dependent memory across middle childhood. Children (6 – 10 years old) and adults completed two computerized tasks, place learning (PL) and transitive inference (TI), that each examined relational memory, as well as the flexible use of relational learning. Findings suggest that the development of relational memory precedes the development of the ability to use relational knowledge flexibly in novel situations. Implications for the development of underlying brain areas and ideas for future neuroimaging investigations are discussed. PMID:20712740

  2. Peri-ictal vegetative symptoms in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Janszky, J; Fogarasi, A; Toth, V; Magalova, V; Gyimesi, C; Kovacs, N; Schulz, R; Ebner, A

    2007-08-01

    We investigated peri-ictal vegetative symptoms (PIVS) in 141 patients with adult temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and assessed frequency, gender effect, and lateralizing value of peri-ictal autonomic signs. We recorded abdominal auras in 62%, goosebumps in 3%, hypersalivation in 12%, spitting in 1%, cold shivering in 3%, urinary urge in 3%, water drinking in 7%, postictal nose wiping (PNW) in 44%, and postictal coughing in 16%. At least one vegetative sign appeared in 86% of the patients. The presence of PIVS did not have a significant lateralizing value. PNW occurred in 52% of women and in 33% of men, whereas any PIVS was present in 93% of women and 77% of men. In summary, contradictory to previous studies, the presence of PIVS has no lateralizing value, which may be linked to a low frequency of occurrence of PIVS. PIVS, especially PNW, occurred more frequently in women, supporting the gender differences in epilepsy.

  3. Rheoceptive mediators of graviperception in a water flea: Morphological implications of antennal-socket setae in daphnia magna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Aquatic microcrustaceans of the genus Daphnia are known to orient to light during the day. At night, in the absence of visual cues, daphnids were suspected of maintaining equilibrium by monitoring the direction of gravity through their swimming antennae. Recent investigations using simulated, weightlessness conditions coupled with absence of illumination revealed hair like structures or setae on the basal, articulating socket of the antennae that, when surgically removed, resulted in disorientation. Given the simulated weightlessness or neutrally buoyant condition that eliminated sinking of the normally negatively buoyant Daphnia, it was proposed that the antennal socket setae function as rheoceptors stimulated by the upward rush of water currents during gravity induced, sinking phase of daphnid swimming movements. This rheoceptively mediated, gravity perception hypothesis is further supported by morphological investigations. Scanning electron micrographs indicate that antennal socket setae are anatomically similar to proprioceptors used by higher crustaceans to monitor gravitational direction.

  4. The extratemporal lobe epilepsies in the epilepsy monitoring unit

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Deepa; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Extratemporal lobe epilepsies (ETLE) are characterized by the epileptogenic foci outside the temporal lobe. They have a wide spectrum of semiological presentation depending upon the site of origin. They can arise from frontal, parietal, occipital lobes and from hypothalamic hamartoma. We discuss in this review the semiology of different types of ETLE encountered in the epilepsy monitoring unit. PMID:24791090

  5. Tussive syncope in a pug with lung-lobe torsion.

    PubMed

    Davies, John A; Snead, Elisabeth C R; Pharr, John W

    2011-06-01

    The most common presenting clinical signs of lung-lobe torsion include dyspnea, tachypnea, lethargy, and anorexia. Tussive syncope secondary to lung-lobe torsion has not been documented. This article describes the presentation, diagnosis, management, and outcome of a pug with tussive syncope secondary to lung-lobe torsion.

  6. Cav2-type calcium channels encoded by cac regulate AP-independent neurotransmitter release at cholinergic synapses in adult Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huaiyu; Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Iniguez, Jorge; Su, Hailing; Hoang, Andy An; Lavian, Monica; Sun, Xicui; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels containing alpha1 subunits encoded by Ca(v)2 family genes are critical in regulating release of neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In Drosophila, cac is the only Ca(v)2-type gene. Cacophony (CAC) channels are localized in motor neuron terminals where they have been shown to mediate evoked, but not AP-independent, release of glutamate at the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Cultured embryonic neurons also express CAC channels, but there is no information about the properties of CAC-mediated currents in adult brain nor how these channels regulate transmission in central neural circuits where fast excitatory synaptic transmission is predominantly cholinergic. Here we report that wild-type neurons cultured from late stage pupal brains and antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) examined in adult brains, express calcium currents with two components: a slow-inactivating current sensitive to the spider toxin Plectreurys toxin II (PLTXII) and a fast-inactivating PLTXII-resistant component. CAC channels are the major contributors to the slow-inactivating PLTXII-sensitive current based on selective reduction of this component in hypomorphic cac mutants (NT27 and TS3). Another characteristic of cac mutant neurons both in culture and in whole brain recordings is a reduced cholinergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency that is mimicked in wild-type neurons by acute application of PLTXII. These data demonstrate that cac encoded Ca(v)2-type calcium channels regulate action potential (AP)-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses in the adult brain, a function not predicted from studies at the larval NMJ.

  7. Subcapsular hematoma after right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Mureo; Kozaki, Koichi; Yoshida, Toru; Yamamoto, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Kohei; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    Because right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation was introduced in adult-to-adult liver transplantation to mitigate the problems of small-for-size grafts, some technical controversies have been reported. This report describes a case of graft subcapsular hematoma due to parenchymal injury. A 53-year-old woman underwent a right-lobe living-donor liver transplantation for acute-on-chronic liver failure due to primary biliary cirrhosis. A huge subcapsular hematoma was discovered by routine Doppler echogram examination on the first posttransplantation day. Relaparotomy findings revealed that rotation of the graft for the hemostasis procedure during the transplant operation had induced a compression injury to the graft by the xiphoid process. It was speculated that a small laceration in the graft parenchyma led to the major subcapsular hematoma. This experience suggests that the graft liver must be handled with special care to prevent potential mechanical injury.

  8. Diverse Filters to Sense: Great Variability of Antennal Morphology and Sensillar Equipment in Gall-Wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae)

    PubMed Central

    Polidori, Carlo; Nieves-Aldrey, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies on antennal sensillar equipment in insects are largely lacking, despite their potential to provide insights into both ecological and phylogenetic relationships. Here we present the first comparative study on antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in female Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera), a large and diverse group of wasps, with special reference to the so-called gall-wasps (Cynipidae). A SEM analysis was conducted on 51 species from all extant cynipoid families and all cynipid tribes, and spanning all known life-histories in the superfamily (gall-inducers, gall-inquilines, and non-gall associated parasitoids). The generally filiform, rarely clavate, antennal flagellum of Cynipoidea harbours overall 12 types of sensilla: s. placoidea (SP), two types of s. coeloconica (SCo-A, SCo-B), s. campaniformia (SCa), s. basiconica (SB), five types of s. trichoidea (ST-A, B, C, D, E), large disc sensilla (LDS) and large volcano sensilla (LVS). We found a great variability in sensillar equipment both among and within lineages. However, few traits seem to be unique to specific cynipid tribes. Paraulacini are, for example, distinctive in having apical LVS; Pediaspidini are unique in having ≥3 rows of SP, each including 6–8 sensilla per flagellomere, and up to 7 SCo-A in a single flagellomere; Eschatocerini have by far the largest SCo-A. Overall, our data preliminarily suggest a tendency to decreased numbers of SP rows per flagellomere and increased relative size of SCo-A during cynipoid evolution. Furthermore, SCo-A size seems to be higher in species inducing galls in trees than in those inducing galls in herbs. On the other hand, ST seem to be more abundant on the antennae of herb-gallers than wood-gallers. The antennal morphology and sensillar equipment in Cynipoidea are the complex results of different interacting pressures that need further investigations to be clarified. PMID:25003514

  9. Criminal Responsibility of the Frontal Lobe Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sener, Mustafa Talip; Ozcan, Halil; Sahingoz, Sadik; Ogul, Hayri

    2015-10-01

    Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms might be detected due to damage of frontal lobes as detected in damages of many brain regions. Frontal lobe syndrome (FLS) occurs as a result of damage in prefrontal region due to various causes. Symptoms due to prefrontal region damage, varies according to the size and location of the lesion. In most of the cases; executive dysfunctions, attention deficits, inconsistencies in social life, impulse control problems, obsessive behaviors and violence behaviors are common clinical signs. Behavioral symptoms seen in FLS can be confused with personality disorders and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. FLS is a neuropsychiatric disorder rarely assessed in forensic psychiatry and in terms of detection of criminal responsibility. In this case report, criminal responsibility in FLS was assessed through a FLS case in which an offense of "threat" was committed and investigated in terms of criminal responsibility.

  10. Cephalic aura after frontal lobe resection.

    PubMed

    Kakisaka, Yosuke; Jehi, Lara; Alkawadri, Rafeed; Wang, Zhong I; Enatsu, Rei; Mosher, John C; Dubarry, Anne-Sophie; Alexopoulos, Andreas V; Burgess, Richard C

    2014-08-01

    A cephalic aura is a common sensory aura typically seen in frontal lobe epilepsy. The generation mechanism of cephalic aura is not fully understood. It is hypothesized that to generate a cephalic aura extensive cortical areas need to be excited. We report a patient who started to have cephalic aura after right frontal lobe resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed interictal spike and ictal change during cephalic aura, both of which were distributed in the right frontal region, and the latter involved much more widespread areas than the former on MEG sensors. The peculiar seizure onset pattern may indicate that surgical modification of the epileptic network was related to the appearance of cephalic aura. We hypothesize that generation of cephalic aura may be associated with more extensive cortical involvement of epileptic activity than that of interictal activity, in at least a subset of cases.

  11. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy in mucopolysaccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Bonanni, Paolo; Volzone, Anna; Randazzo, Giovanna; Antoniazzi, Lisa; Rampazzo, Angelica; Scarpa, Maurizio; Nobili, Lino

    2014-10-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is an epileptic syndrome that is primarily characterized by seizures with motor signs occurring almost exclusively during sleep. We describe 2 children with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) who were referred for significant sleep disturbance. Long term video-EEG monitoring (LT-VEEGM) demonstrated sleep-related hypermotor seizures consistent with NFLE. No case of sleep-related hypermotor seizures has ever been reported to date in MPS. However, differential diagnosis with parasomnias has been previously discussed. The high frequency of frontal lobe seizures causes sleep fragmentation, which may result in sleep disturbances observed in at least a small percentage of MPS patients. We suggest monitoring individuals with MPS using periodic LT-VEEGM, particularly when sleep disorder is present. Moreover, our cases confirm that NFLE in lysosomal storage diseases may occur, and this finding extends the etiologic spectrum of NFLE.

  12. Frontal lobe astrocytoma following radiotherapy for medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.S.; Kushner, M.J.; Dell, S.

    1981-05-01

    A young woman had a frontal lobe astrocytoma 14 years after successful treatment of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma by surgery and whole-neuraxis irradiation. The association of these two tumors is rare, and it is unlikely that the second tumor was the result of metastasis and differentiation of residual or recurrent medulloblastoma. We review the evidence supporting this view and also the likelihood that the astrocytoma was induced by the prior radiation.

  13. Dimorphic olfactory lobes in the arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas; Reisenman, Carolina E

    2009-07-01

    Specialized olfactory lobe glomeruli relating to sexual or caste differences have been observed in at least five orders of insects, suggesting an early appearance of this trait in insect evolution. Dimorphism is not limited to nocturnal species, but occurs even in insects that are known to use vision for courtship. Other than a single description, there is no evidence for similar structures occurring in the Crustacea, suggesting that the evolution of dimorphic olfactory systems may typify terrestrial arthropods.

  14. Responses of the antennal bimodal hygroreceptor neurons to innocuous and noxious high temperatures in the carabid beetle, Pterostichus oblongopunctatus.

    PubMed

    Nurme, Karin; Merivee, Enno; Must, Anne; Sibul, Ivar; Muzzi, Maurizio; Di Giulio, Andrea; Williams, Ingrid; Tooming, Ene

    2015-10-01

    Electrophysiological responses of thermo- and hygroreceptor neurons from antennal dome-shaped sensilla of the carabid beetle Pterostichus oblongopunctatus to different levels of steady temperature ranging from 20 to 35°C and rapid step-changes in it were measured and analysed at both constant relative and absolute ambient air humidity conditions. It appeared that both hygroreceptor neurons respond to temperature which means that they are bimodal. For the first time in arthropods, the ability of antennal dry and moist neurons to produce high temperature induced spike bursts is documented. Burstiness of the spike trains is temperature dependent and increases with temperature increase. Threshold temperatures at which the two neurons switch from regular spiking to spike bursting are lower compared to that of the cold neuron, differ and approximately coincide with the upper limit of preferred temperatures of the species. We emphasise that, in contrast to various sensory systems studied, the hygroreceptor neurons of P. oblongopunctatus have stable and continuous burst trains, no temporal information is encoded in the timing of the bursts. We hypothesise that temperature dependent spike bursts produced by the antennal thermo- and hygroreceptor neurons may be responsible for detection of noxious high temperatures important in behavioural thermoregulation of carabid beetles.

  15. N-lobe versus C-lobe complexation of bismuth by human transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, H; Li, H; Mason, A B; Woodworth, R C; Sadler, P J

    1999-01-01

    Interactions of recombinant N-lobe of human serum transferrin (hTF/2N) with Bi3+, a metal ion widely used in medicine, have been investigated by both UV and NMR spectroscopy. The bicarbonate-independent stability constant for Bi3+ binding (K*) to hTF/2N was determined to be log K* 18.9+/-0.2 in 5 mM bicarbonate/10 mM Hepes buffer at 310 K, pH7.4. The presence of Fe3+ in the C-lobe of intact hTF perturbed Bi3+ binding to the N-lobe, whereas binding of Bi3+ to the C-lobe was unaffected by the presence of Fe3+ in the N-lobe. Reactions of Bi3+ (as bismuth nitrilotriacetate or ranitidine bismuth citrate) with hTF/2N in solutions containing 10 mM bicarbonate induced specific changes to high-field 1H-NMR peaks. The 1H co-ordination shifts induced by Bi3+ were similar to those induced by Fe3+ and Ga3+, suggesting that Bi3+ binding causes similar structural changes to those induced by hTF/2N. 13C-NMR data showed that carbonate binds to hTF/2N concomitantly with Bi3+. PMID:9854031

  16. Postembryonic changes in circadian photo-responsiveness rhythms of optic lobe interneurons in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Hiroyuki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2006-08-01

    The photo-responsiveness of 2 groups of interneurons responding to light in the protocerebrum was investigated at 2 developmental stages, the last instar nymphs and adults, in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. The cricket is diurnally active during the nymphal stage but becomes nocturnal as an adult. In both adults and nymphs, light-induced responses of optic lobe light-responding interneurons that conduct light information from the optic medulla to the lobula and the cerebral lobe showed a circadian rhythm peaking during the subjective night. Amplitudes of the rhythms were not significantly different between adults and nymphs, but adults showed more stable day and night states than did nymphs. The medulla bilateral neurons that interconnect the bilateral medulla areas of the optic lobe also showed circadian rhythms in their light-induced responses in both adults and nymphs. The rhythm had a clear peak and a trough in adults, and its amplitude was significantly greater than that of nymphs. These results suggest that the 2 classes of interneurons are differentially controlled by the circadian clock. The difference might be related to their functional roles in the animal's circadian behavioral organization.

  17. Impaired Facial Expression Recognition in Children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Impact of Early Seizure Onset on Fear Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golouboff, Nathalie; Fiori, Nicole; Delalande, Olivier; Fohlen, Martine; Dellatolas, Georges; Jambaque, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    The amygdala has been implicated in the recognition of facial emotions, especially fearful expressions, in adults with early-onset right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study investigates the recognition of facial emotions in children and adolescents, 8-16 years old, with epilepsy. Twenty-nine subjects had TLE (13 right, 16 left) and…

  18. Optical emission in the radio lobes of radio galaxies. II - New observations of 21 radio lobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, P.; Tyson, J. A.; Saslaw, W. C.

    1983-02-01

    The authors report new identifications of optical emission associated with the radio lobes of double radio galaxies. Optical emission is present in the outer radio structure of the sources 3C 219, 3C 244.1, 3C 247, 3C 252, 3C 268.2, 3C 321, 3C 319, 3C 337, and possibly in 3C 330. The authors have not found emission to the detection limit of V ≡ 24 in the sources 3C 79, 3C 173.1, 3C 223, 3C 325, and 3C 381. Of the 21 separate sources in optical studies of extended lobes of radio galaxies reported to date, 16 radio sources observed so far show significant optical emission within one or both lobes, while in 11 of these the optical object is within 2arcsec of the radio peak.

  19. Frontal Lobe Morphometry with MRI in a Normal Age Group of 6-17 Year-Olds

    PubMed Central

    İlkay Koşar, M; Otağ, İlhan; Sabancıoğulları, Vedat; Atalar, Mehmet; Tetiker, Hasan; Otağ, Aynur; Çimen, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Background Morphometric data of the frontal lobe are important for surgical planning of lesions in the frontal lobe and its surroundings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide suitable data for this purpose. Objectives In our study, the morphometric data of mid-sagittal MRI of the frontal lobe in certain age and gender groups of children have been presented. Patients and Methods In a normal age group of 6-17-year-old participants, the length of the line passing through predetermined different points, including the frontal pole (FP), commissura anterior (AC), commissura posterior (PC), the outermost point of corpus callosum genu (AGCC), the innermost point of corpus callosum genu (IGCC), tuberculum sella (TS), AGCC and IGCC points parallel to AC-PC line and the point such line crosses at the frontal lobe surface (FCS) were measured in three age groups (6-9, 10-13 and 14-17 years) for each gender. Results The frontal lobe morphometric data were higher in males than females. Frontal lobe measurements peak at the age group of 10-13 in the male and at the age group of 6-13 in the female. In boys, the length of FP-AC increases 4.1% in the 10-13 age group compared with the 6-9-year-old group, while this increase is 2.3% in girls. Conclusion Differences in age and gender groups were determined. While the length of AGCC-IGCC increases 10.4% in adults, in children aged 6-17, the length of AC-PC is 11.5% greater than adults. These data will contribute to the preliminary assessment for developing a surgical plan in fine interventions in the frontal lobe and its surroundings in children. PMID:23599707

  20. Lateralized antennal control of aggression and sex differences in red mason bees, Osmia bicornis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L J; Frasnelli, E; Versace, E

    2016-07-08

    Comparison of lateralization in social and non-social bees tests the hypothesis that population-level, directional asymmetry has evolved as an adjunct to social behaviour. Previous research has supported this hypothesis: directional bias of antennal use in responding to odours and learning to associate odours with a food reward is absent in species that feed individually, such as mason bees, whereas it is clearly present in eusocial honeybees and stingless bees. Here we report that, when mason bees engage in agonistic interactions, a species-typical interactive behaviour, they do exhibit a directional bias according to which antenna is available to be used. Aggression was significantly higher in dyads using only their left antennae (LL) than it was in those using only their right antennae (RR). This asymmetry was found in both males and females but it was stronger in females. LL dyads of a male and a female spent significantly more time together than did other dyadic combinations. No asymmetry was present in non-aggressive contacts, latency to first contact or body wiping. Hence, population-level lateralization is present only for social interactions common and frequent in the species' natural behaviour. This leads to a refinement of the hypothesis linking directional lateralization to social behaviour.

  1. Morphology, Ultrastructure and Possible Functions of Antennal Sensilla of Sitodiplosis mosellana Géhin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Li, Dan; Liu, Yang; Li, Xue-Jiao; Cheng, Wei-Ning; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the olfactory receptive mechanisms involved in host selection and courtship behavior of Sitodiplosis mosellana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), one of the most important pests of wheat, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the external morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. The moniliform antennae exhibit obvious sexual dimorphism: antennae of the males are markedly longer than those of the females. Furthermore, each male flagellomere consists of two globular nodes, whereas each female flagellomere is cylindrical. Seven types of sensilla were identified in both sexes. Two types of s. chaetica have a lumen without dendrites and thick walls, suggesting that they are mechanoreceptors. S. trichodea and s. circumfila are typical chemoreceptors, possessing thin multiporous walls encircling a lumen with multiple dendrites. There are significantly more s. trichodea in female than in male, which may be related to host plant localization. In contrast, male s. circumfila are highly elongated compared to those of females, perhaps for pheromone detection. Peg-shaped s. coeloconica are innervated with unbranched dendrites extending from the base to the distal tip. Type 1 s. coeloconica, which have deep longitudinal grooves and finger-like projections on the surface, may serve as olfactory or humidity receptors, whereas type 2 s. coeloconica, smooth with a terminal pore, may be contact chemoreceptors. Also, this is the first report of Böhm’ bristles at proximal scape on antennae of Cecidomyiid species potentially functioning as mechanoreceptors. PMID:27623751

  2. Identification of candidate chemosensory genes in the antennal transcriptome of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Rao, Xiang-Jun; Li, Mao-Ye; Feng, Ming-Feng; He, Meng-Zhu; Li, Shi-Guang

    2015-03-01

    We present the first antennal transcriptome sequencing information for the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Analysis of the transcriptome dataset obtained 52,216,616 clean reads, from which 35,363 unigenes were assembled. Of these, 18,820 unigenes showed significant similarity (E-value <10(-5)) to known proteins in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Gene ontology (GO) and Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) analyses were used for functional classification of these unigenes. We identified 19 putative odorant-binding protein (OBP) genes, 12 chemosensory protein (CSP) genes, 20 olfactory receptor (OR) genes, 6 ionotropic receptor (IR) genes and 2 sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMP) genes. BLASTX best hit results indicated that these chemosensory genes were most identical to their respective orthologs from Tribolium castaneum. Phylogenetic analyses also revealed that the T. molitor OBPs and CSPs are closely related to those of T. castaneum. Real-time quantitative PCR assays showed that eight TmolOBP genes were antennae-specific. Of these, TmolOBP5, TmolOBP7 and TmolOBP16 were found to be predominantly expressed in male antennae, while TmolOBP17 was expressed mainly in the legs of males. Several other genes were identified that were neither tissue-specific nor sex-specific. These results establish a firm foundation for future studies of the chemosensory genes in T. molitor.

  3. Antennal responses of an oligolectic bee and its cleptoparasite to plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Dötterl, Stefan

    2008-05-01

    Cleptoparasitic or cuckoo bees lay their eggs in nests of other bees, and the parasitic larvae feed the food that had been provided for the host larvae. Nothing is known about the specific signals used by the cuckoo bees for host nest finding, but previous studies have shown that olfactory cues originating from the host bee alone, or the host bee and the larval provision are essential. Here, I compared by using gas chromatography coupled to electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) the antennal responses of the oligolectic oil-bee Macropis fulvipes and their cleptoparasite, Epeoloides coecutiens, to dynamic headspace scent samples of Lysimachia punctata, a pollen and oil host of Macropis. Both bee species respond to some scent compounds emitted by L. punctata, and two compounds, which were also found in scent samples collected from a Macropis nest entrance, elicited clear signals in the antennae of both species. These compounds may not only play a role for host plant detection by Macropis, but also for host nest detection by Epeoloides. I hypothesise that oligolectic bees and their cleptoparasites use the same compounds for host plant and host nest detection, respectively.

  4. Antennal sensilla of Eucryptorrhynchus chinensis (Olivier) and Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Harold) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian-Qian; Liu, Zhen-Kai; Chen, Chong; Wen, Junbao

    2013-09-01

    Eucryptorrhynchus chinensis (Olivier) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and E. brandti (Harold) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are the two most important pests of tree-of-heaven, Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle and its variety Ailanthus altissima var. Qiantouchun in China. They are also considered potential biological control agents for tree-of-heaven in North America. In this study, the external morphologies and antennal sensilla of both species were examined using scanning electron microscopy to better understand their host-finding mechanisms. Eleven morphological sensilla types were recorded, that is, Böhm bristles, six types of sensilla chaetica (Sch. 1-6), two types of sensilla basiconica (Sb. 1-2), and two types of sensilla trichodea (St. 1-2). Sch. 5 were absent from the antennae of E. chinensis, while Sch. 2 were absent from the antennae of E. brandti. Abundant cuticular pores were present on the antennae of both species. Three types of sensilla on the antennae of E. chinensis that were not found in a previous study, and ten different types of sensilla on the antennae of E. brandti were identified for the first time. The possible functions of the sensilla types are discussed based on a comparison with previous studies. Four types of sensilla (Sb. 1, Sb. 2, St. 2, and Sch. 6) on the antennae of both species indicate chemoreception may play a significant role in host location.

  5. Lateralized antennal control of aggression and sex differences in red mason bees, Osmia bicornis

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, L. J.; Frasnelli, E.; Versace, E.

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of lateralization in social and non-social bees tests the hypothesis that population-level, directional asymmetry has evolved as an adjunct to social behaviour. Previous research has supported this hypothesis: directional bias of antennal use in responding to odours and learning to associate odours with a food reward is absent in species that feed individually, such as mason bees, whereas it is clearly present in eusocial honeybees and stingless bees. Here we report that, when mason bees engage in agonistic interactions, a species-typical interactive behaviour, they do exhibit a directional bias according to which antenna is available to be used. Aggression was significantly higher in dyads using only their left antennae (LL) than it was in those using only their right antennae (RR). This asymmetry was found in both males and females but it was stronger in females. LL dyads of a male and a female spent significantly more time together than did other dyadic combinations. No asymmetry was present in non-aggressive contacts, latency to first contact or body wiping. Hence, population-level lateralization is present only for social interactions common and frequent in the species’ natural behaviour. This leads to a refinement of the hypothesis linking directional lateralization to social behaviour. PMID:27388686

  6. Morphology, Ultrastructure and Possible Functions of Antennal Sensilla of Sitodiplosis mosellana Géhin (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Li, Dan; Liu, Yang; Li, Xue-Jiao; Cheng, Wei-Ning; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the olfactory receptive mechanisms involved in host selection and courtship behavior of Sitodiplosis mosellana (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), one of the most important pests of wheat, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the external morphology and ultrastructure of the antennal sensilla. The moniliform antennae exhibit obvious sexual dimorphism: antennae of the males are markedly longer than those of the females. Furthermore, each male flagellomere consists of two globular nodes, whereas each female flagellomere is cylindrical. Seven types of sensilla were identified in both sexes. Two types of s. chaetica have a lumen without dendrites and thick walls, suggesting that they are mechanoreceptors. S. trichodea and s. circumfila are typical chemoreceptors, possessing thin multiporous walls encircling a lumen with multiple dendrites. There are significantly more s. trichodea in female than in male, which may be related to host plant localization. In contrast, male s. circumfila are highly elongated compared to those of females, perhaps for pheromone detection. Peg-shaped s. coeloconica are innervated with unbranched dendrites extending from the base to the distal tip. Type 1 s. coeloconica, which have deep longitudinal grooves and finger-like projections on the surface, may serve as olfactory or humidity receptors, whereas type 2 s. coeloconica, smooth with a terminal pore, may be contact chemoreceptors. Also, this is the first report of Böhm' bristles at proximal scape on antennae of Cecidomyiid species potentially functioning as mechanoreceptors.

  7. Tactile conditioning and movement analysis of antennal sampling strategies in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    PubMed

    Mujagić, Samir; Würth, Simon Michael; Hellbach, Sven; Dürr, Volker

    2012-12-12

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are eusocial insects and well known for their complex division of labor and associative learning capability(1, 2). The worker bees spend the first half of their life inside the dark hive, where they are nursing the larvae or building the regular hexagonal combs for food (e.g. pollen or nectar) and brood(3). The antennae are extraordinary multisensory feelers and play a pivotal role in various tactile mediated tasks(4), including hive building(5) and pattern recognition(6). Later in life, each single bee leaves the hive to forage for food. Then a bee has to learn to discriminate profitable food sources, memorize their location, and communicate it to its nest mates(7). Bees use different floral signals like colors or odors(7, 8), but also tactile cues from the petal surface(9) to form multisensory memories of the food source. Under laboratory conditions, bees can be trained in an appetitive learning paradigm to discriminate tactile object features, such as edges or grooves with their antennae(10, 11, 12, 13). This learning paradigm is closely related to the classical olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) in harnessed bees(14). The advantage of the tactile learning paradigm in the laboratory is the possibility of combining behavioral experiments on learning with various physiological measurements, including the analysis of the antennal movement pattern.

  8. Segmental mismatch in crustacean appendages: the naupliar antennal exopod of Artemia (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Anostraca).

    PubMed

    Maruzzo, Diego; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2009-03-01

    Based on traditional techniques and confocal laser scanning microscopy for external morphology, and immunohistochemistry for the muscular system, we describe here the segmental features of the antennal exopod of Artemia nauplii. Two kinds of serial elements are present, i.e. setae (with cuticular folds at their base) and ringlets (serially arranged sclerites separated by joint-like cuticular folds not extending to form complete rings around the appendage). The two series are usually not in register. The cuticular folds of the setae and of the ringlets are also sites of intermediate insertions of the three exopod muscles: as the two tegumentary structures are discordant in periodicity, this is also mirrored in the pattern of muscle insertions on the two sides of the appendage. Similar cases of segmental mismatch are known for the trunk of several arthropods, but segmental mismatch along the appendages has received very little attention. The occurrence of segmental mismatch in the naupliar appendages of both extant and fossil crustaceans is reviewed and it is suggested here to be a primitive feature of the exopods of both second antennae and mandibles. Problems in the interpretation of morphological evidence are discussed, also in relation to development and evolution of segmentation of naupliar appendages.

  9. Sexual dimorphism in antennal morphology and sensilla ultrastructure of Dendrolimus tabulaeformis Tsai et Liu (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufang; Zhang, Zhen; Kong, Xiangbo; Wang, Hongbin

    2013-01-01

    Insects rely heavily on olfaction to locate habitat, mates, and oviposition sites, while odorant molecules and the antennal olfactory sensory cells of insects are two indispensable components of olfactory response. Our previous work identified the sex pheromones and volatile compounds derived from host plant of Dendrolimus tabulaeformis Tsai et Liu, a serious economic pest of pines in northern China. However, little is known about the olfactory system of D. tabulaeformis, especially in females. To make a better understanding of the D. tabulaeformis olfactory response, we investigated the structure, innervation, numbers, and distribution of sensilla on the antennae of male and female moth, based on scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The pinniform antennae of this moth bear five types of sensilla: trichoid (TS), basiconica (BS), styloconic (StS), and chaetica (ChS) sensilla, and belt-type structures (BTSs). The BTSs are hollow and are not chemical sensilla. The ChSs occur on the scape. StS contain dendrite sheaths and four dendrites containing microtubules in their cores. The BS contents are continuous with that in the subsegments. The TSs were sexually dimorphic and could be divided into 12 subtypes based on dendrite number and form. TS1-4 contained two, three, or four dendrites and were similar in both sexes. TS 5-8 and TS 9-12 occurred only on male and female antenna, respectively. We discussed the possible functions of these sensilla.

  10. Tactile Conditioning And Movement Analysis Of Antennal Sampling Strategies In Honey Bees (Apis mellifera L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mujagić, Samir; Würth, Simon Michael; Hellbach, Sven; Dürr, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are eusocial insects and well known for their complex division of labor and associative learning capability1, 2. The worker bees spend the first half of their life inside the dark hive, where they are nursing the larvae or building the regular hexagonal combs for food (e.g. pollen or nectar) and brood3. The antennae are extraordinary multisensory feelers and play a pivotal role in various tactile mediated tasks4, including hive building5 and pattern recognition6. Later in life, each single bee leaves the hive to forage for food. Then a bee has to learn to discriminate profitable food sources, memorize their location, and communicate it to its nest mates7. Bees use different floral signals like colors or odors7, 8, but also tactile cues from the petal surface9 to form multisensory memories of the food source. Under laboratory conditions, bees can be trained in an appetitive learning paradigm to discriminate tactile object features, such as edges or grooves with their antennae10, 11, 12, 13. This learning paradigm is closely related to the classical olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) in harnessed bees14. The advantage of the tactile learning paradigm in the laboratory is the possibility of combining behavioral experiments on learning with various physiological measurements, including the analysis of the antennal movement pattern. PMID:23271329

  11. Antennal fine morphology of the threatened beetle Osmoderma eremita (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), revealed by scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zauli, Agnese; Maurizi, Emanuela; Carpaneto, Giuseppe M; Chiari, Stefano; Svensson, Glenn P; Di Giulio, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the antennal morphology of Osmoderma eremita, a threatened scarab beetle inhabiting tree hollows. O. eremita males produce a sex pheromone, (R)-(+)-γ-decalactone, responsible mainly for the attraction of females but also other males. Gross and fine morphology of microstructures including sensilla, microsculpture and pores were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The antenna of O. eremita showed the typical lamellicorn shape of scarab beetles, with a basal scape, a pedicel, a funicle composed of five antennomeres and a club composed of three lamellae. Six different subtypes of sensilla chaetica (Ch.1 - 6), Böhm sensilla (Bo), one subtype of sensilla basiconica (Ba.1), two subtypes of sensilla coeloconica (Co.1 - 2), two subtypes of sensilla placodea (Pl.1 - 2), pores and peculiar folds were described. The two sexes did not show any significant differences in the occurrence and number of the sensilla placodea, known to be responsible for the pheromone reception. Instead, some sexual differences were found on the occurrence and topology of three different microstructures: (1) one subtype of sensillum chaeticum (Ch.2) occurring on the pedicel only in males; (2) a characteristic pore occurring on the funicle only in males; (3) a peculiar fold occurring on different antennomeres of the funicle in the two sexes, on the fourth in males and on the fifth in females. A comparison between sensilla of O. eremita and those of other Scarabaeoidea is provided.

  12. Peri-ictal water drinking: a rare automatic behaviour in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pietrafusa, Nicola; Trivisano, Marina; de Palma, Luca; Serino, Domenico; Moavero, Romina; Benvenga, Antonella; Cappelletti, Simona; Boero, Giovanni; Vigevano, Federico; La Neve, Angela; Specchio, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Peri-ictal water drinking (PIWD) has been reported as the action of drinking during or within two minutes of an electroclinical seizure. It is considered a peri-ictal vegetative symptom, evident both during childhood and adulthood epilepsy. The aim of this paper was to describe the clinical and electroencephalographic features of two new adult subjects suffering from symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy with episodes of PIWD recorded by VIDEO-EEG and to review literature data in order to better define this peculiar event during seizures, a rare and probably underestimated semiological sign. To date, 51 cases with focal epilepsy and seizures associated with PIWD have been reported. All patients presented with temporal lobe epilepsy. All cases but one had symptomatic epilepsy. Most of the patients had an involvement of the right hemisphere. Water drinking was reported as an ictal sign in the majority of patients, and less frequently was reported as postictal. We believe that PIWD might be considered a rare automatic behaviour, like other automatisms. Automatisms are more frequently described in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. PIWD was reported also to have lateralizing significance in the non-dominant temporal lobe, however, because of its rarity, this finding remains unclear.

  13. Altered Structural Connectome in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    DeSalvo, Matthew N.; Douw, Linda; Tanaka, Naoaki; Reinsberger, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study differences in the whole-brain structural connectomes of patients with left temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and all individuals gave signed informed consent. Sixty-direction diffusion-tensor imaging and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MP-RAGE) magnetic resonance imaging volumes were analyzed in 24 patients with left TLE and in 24 healthy control subjects. MP-RAGE volumes were segmented into 1015 regions of interest (ROIs) spanning the entire brain. Deterministic white matter tractography was performed after voxelwise tensor calculation. Weighted structural connectivity matrices were generated by using the pairwise density of connecting fibers between ROIs. Graph theoretical measures of connectivity networks were compared between groups by using linear models with permutation testing. Results Patients with TLE had 22%–45% reduced (P < .01) distant connectivity in the medial orbitofrontal cortex, temporal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and precuneus, compared with that in healthy subjects. However, local connectivity, as measured by means of network efficiency, was increased by 85%–270% (P < .01) in the medial and lateral frontal cortices, insular cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, and occipital cortex in patients with TLE as compared with healthy subjects. Conclusion This study suggests that TLE involves altered structural connectivity in a network that reaches beyond the temporal lobe, especially in the default mode network. © RSNA, 2013 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24475828

  14. Metamemory for faces following frontal lobe damage.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Jasmeet K; Kaszniak, Alfred W; Rapcsak, Steven Z

    2005-10-01

    Previous research has provided evidence of metamemory impairments in patients with frontal lobe damage on verbal episodic memory tasks. In the present study, we employed metamemory paradigms to investigate whether patients with frontal lesions show monitoring deficits on semantic memory tasks involving facial stimuli. Patients with frontal lobe damage and healthy control subjects made memory decisions to famous faces in a retrospective confidence judgment task and in a prospective feeling-of-knowing (FOK) task. Results indicated that frontal patients performed worse than controls on the retrospective confidence task, but there were no differences between the groups on the FOK task. These findings suggest that metamemory deficits in frontal patients are not confined to specific stimulus domains (words vs. faces) or memory systems (episodic vs. semantic). In addition, the dissociation between retrospective confidence judgments and FOK accuracy documented in this study and also in a recent report by Schnyer et al. suggesting that metamemory should not be considered a unitary function with a single neuroanatomic substrate.

  15. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from chick optic lobe.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, R I; Mehraban, F; Barnard, E A; Dolly, J O

    1982-01-01

    An alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic cholinergic receptor from chick optic lobe has been completely purified. Its standard sedimentation coefficient is 9.1 S. The value near 12 S reported for the related component from other brain regions can be reproduced when the initial extraction is by Triton X-100 (rather than Lubrol PX), but other protein is then complexed with it. A single subunit of apparent molecular weight 54,000 is detected, and this subunit is specifically labeled by bromo-[3H]acetylcholine, but only after disulfide reduction. The same size subunit likewise is labeled in the protein (purified similarly) from the rest of the chick brain which can also bind alpha-bungarotoxin and nicotinic ligands. Immunological crossreactivity is demonstrated between both of these proteins with an antiserum to pure acetylcholine receptor from skeletal muscle. The acetylcholine receptor from chick optic lobe and the alpha-bungarotoxin-binding protein from the rest of the brain appear similar or identical by a series of criteria and are related to (but with differences from) peripheral acetylcholine receptors. Images PMID:6175967

  16. Global Generalized Smale Applications Using Lobe Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, F.; Wiggins, S.

    Many geophysical flows can be considered, in a first approximation, as two- dimensional flows. In addition, when they are quasi-laminar, many issues on transport and mixing can be addressed using the mathematical tools of chaotic advection. The theory of Lobe Dynamics has been shown to be a powerful tool for such flows (V.Rom Kedar, A.Leonard and S.Wiggins, JFM, 1990). Another major issue in chaotic 2-D maps is to find Smale horseshoe maps (a portion of fluid that comes back onto it- self after being stretched and folded) for some iterates of the Poincaré map of the flow. Such a model flow has been used recently on a unit square to analyze scalar variance decay in chaotic advection (D.R.Fereday, P.H.Haynes, A.Wonhas and J.C.Vassilicos, PRE,2001); however, searching such Smale applications in a real flow is difficult, and usually the domain where they occur is small compared to the large length scale asso- ciated with the velocity field. We propose here a new mathematical theory, where, thanks to Lobe Dynamics, we are able to construct global generalized Smale applications on a domain D of size com- parable with the length scale of the velocity field. Like in the model of the horseshoe map, we can get exact results on the stretching action of a given real flow-field on filaments of finite length.

  17. [Normal aging of frontal lobe functions].

    PubMed

    Calso, Cristina; Besnard, Jérémy; Allain, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    Normal aging in individuals is often associated with morphological, metabolic and cognitive changes, which particularly concern the cerebral frontal regions. Starting from the "frontal lobe hypothesis of cognitive aging" (West, 1996), the present review is based on the neuroanatomical model developed by Stuss (2008), introducing four categories of frontal lobe functions: executive control, behavioural and emotional self-regulation and decision-making, energization and meta-cognitive functions. The selected studies only address the changes of one at least of these functions. The results suggest a deterioration of several cognitive frontal abilities in normal aging: flexibility, inhibition, planning, verbal fluency, implicit decision-making, second-order and affective theory of mind. Normal aging seems also to be characterised by a general reduction in processing speed observed during neuropsychological assessment (Salthouse, 1996). Nevertheless many cognitive functions remain preserved such as automatic or non-conscious inhibition, specific capacities of flexibility and first-order theory of mind. Therefore normal aging doesn't seem to be associated with a global cognitive decline but rather with a selective change in some frontal systems, conclusion which should be taken into account for designing caring programs in normal aging.

  18. Incidence of a pyramidal lobe on thyroid scans

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, H.A.; Sziklas, J.J.; Rosenberg, R.J.; Spencer, R.P.

    1982-12-01

    Gamma camera pertechnetate and radioiodine thyroid scans were reviewed to determine the incidence of recognition of a pyramidal lobe. Ten to 17% of normals and of patients with various thyroid disease states had a pyramidal lobe on their scans. However, in patients with diffuse toxic goiter, 43% had a pyramidal lobe on the thyroid images. There appears to be a correlation between elevated thyroid function studies (likely in thyroid mass) and the incidence of a pyramidal lobe on thyroid scans in diffuse toxic goiter.

  19. Inhibitory attentional control in patients with frontal lobe damage

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Mariana; Nakic, Marina; Elpern-Waxman, Jordan; Granetz, Joy; O'Grady, Joy; Phipps, Michael; Milne, Elizabeth; Logan, Gordon D.; Hasher, Lynn; Grafman, Jordan

    2006-01-01

    The performance of a group of frontal lobe lesion and a group of frontal lobe dementia patients was compared with the performance of their respective matched normal control groups on two tests of inhibitory attentional control—the stop-signal reaction time task and a negative priming task. Both patient groups responded significantly slower than their respective normal control groups, but they showed only marginally significant selective impairments on the measures of inhibition. The data suggest that the specific inhibitory processes evaluated by these two tests are, in general, spared in patients with focal frontal lobe lesions or frontal lobe degeneration. PMID:12821109

  20. Analysis of the Antennal Transcriptome and Insights into Olfactory Genes in Hyphantria cunea (Drury)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian-Tian; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Long; Yang, Yun-Qiu; Huang, Chang-Chun; Jiang, Li-Ya; Ding, De-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Hyphantria cunea (Drury) (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) is an invasive insect pest which, in China, causes unprecedented damage and economic losses due to its extreme fecundity and wide host range, including forest and shade trees, and even crops. Compared to the better known lepidopteran species which use Type-I pheromones, little is known at the molecular level about the olfactory mechanisms of host location and mate choice in H. cunea, a species using Type-II lepidopteran pheromones. In the present study, the H. cunea antennal transcriptome was constructed by Illumina Hiseq 2500TM sequencing, with the aim of discovering olfaction-related genes. We obtained 64,020,776 clean reads, and 59,243 unigenes from the analysis of the transcriptome, and the putative gene functions were annotated using gene ontology (GO) annotation. We further identified 124 putative chemosensory unigenes based on homology searches and phylogenetic analysis, including 30 odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 17 chemosensory proteins (CSPs), 52 odorant receptors (ORs), 14 ionotropic receptors (IRs), nine gustatory receptors (GRs) and two sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs). We also found many conserved motif patterns of OBPs and CSPs using a MEME system. Moreover, we systematically analyzed expression patterns of OBPs and CSPs based on reverse transcription PCR and quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) with RNA extracted from different tissues and life stages of both sexes in H. cunea. The antennae-biased expression may provide a deeper further understanding of olfactory processing in H. cunea. The first ever identification of olfactory genes in H. cunea may provide new leads for control of this major pest. PMID:27741298

  1. Scanning electron microscopy studies of antennal sensilla of Pteromalus cerealellae (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Onagbola, Ebenezer O; Fadamiro, Henry Y

    2008-07-01

    Pteromalus cerealellae (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is an ectoparasitoid of several insect pests of stored products. In order to provide requisite background information to support our ongoing research on its host location mechanisms, we examined the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of this parasitoid using scanning electron microscopy. Antennae of male and female P. cerealellae are geniculate in shape, approximately 1300mum in length, and consist of 15 antennomeres. Eight morphological sensilla types were recorded in both sexes, including four types of the highly abundant and widely distributed sensilla trichodea (types I, II and IV are aporous while type III is multiporous), basiconic capitate peg sensilla, coeloconic sensilla, chaetica sensilla, and the most conspicuous plate-like placoid sensilla. Detailed examination of sensilla morphological features including pore presence and numbers suggest that the multiporous type III sensilla trichodea and the multiporous placoid sensilla may play a role in olfaction, whereas the uniporous chaetica sensilla may function as contact chemoreceptors. The types I and II sensilla trichodea are presumably mechanosensory, while the type IV sensilla trichodea may function as proprioceptors. The basiconic capitate peg sensilla and coeloconic sensilla probably function in thermo-hygro reception. Although the shape, structure, and size of antennae of males and female were basically similar, major differences were recorded between the sexes in the distribution of some sensilla types. The type II sensilla trichodea and the multiporous placoid sensilla are relatively more abundant in females, whereas males have greater number of the multiporous type III sensilla trichodea than females. These results are discussed in relation to the possible roles of the sensilla types in the host location behavior of P. cerealellae.

  2. Proline transport by brush-border membrane vesicles of lobster antennal glands

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, R.D.; Wong, R.K.; Huse, S.M.; Reshkin, S.J.; Ahearn, G.A. )

    1990-02-01

    Purified brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of lobster antennal gland labyrinth and bladder were separately formed by a magnesium precipitation technique. L-(3H)proline uptake was stimulated by a transmembrane NaCl gradient (outside (o) greater than inside (i)) to a greater extent in BBMV from labyrinth than those from the bladder. Detailed study of the labyrinth proline-transport processes revealed a specific dependence on NaCl, with negligible stimulatory effects by NaSCN, Na-gluconate, or KCl. A transmembrane proton gradient (o greater than i) was without stimulatory effect on proline transport. A transmembrane potential difference alone, in the presence of equilibrated NaCl and L-(3H)proline, led to net influx of the labeled amino acid, suggesting that the uptake process was electrogenic and capable of bringing about the net transfer of positive charge to the vesicle interior. Although a transmembrane Na gradient alone, in the presence of equilibrated Cl and L-(3H)proline, was able to bring about the net influx of the amino acid, a transmembrane Cl gradient alone under Na- and L-(3H)proline-equilibrated conditions was not, suggesting that only the Na gradient could energize the carrier process through cotransport, while the anion served an essential activating role. Proline influx by these vesicles occurred by the combination of at least one saturable Michaelis-Menten carrier system (apparent Kt = 0.37 mM; apparent JM = 1.19 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1) and apparent diffusion (P = 0.33 nmol.mg protein-1.10 s-1.mM-1). Static head analysis of the transport process suggested a cotransport stoichiometry of 2 Na:1 proline with essential activation by Cl ion.

  3. Southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis, antennal and behavioral responses to nonhost leaf and bark volatiles.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, William P; Sullivan, Brian T

    2013-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that bark beetles detect and avoid release points of volatile compounds associated with nonhost species, and thus such nonhost volatiles may have potential utility in the management of bark beetles. We used a coupled gas chromatograph-electroantennographic detector (GC-EAD) to assay the olfactory sensitivity of the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann, to volatiles from leaves and bark of eight species of nonhost angiosperm trees that are common in the range of D. frontalis. Tree species sampled were red maple (Acer rubrum L.), mockernut hickory [Carya alba (L.) Nutt. ex Ell.], sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), black tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica Marsh.), black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.), southern red oak (Quercus falcata Michx.), blackjack oak [Quercus marilandica (L.) Muenchh.], and water oak (Quercus nigra L.). Beetle antennae responded to a total of 28 identifiable compounds in these samples. The relative olfactory responsiveness to 14 of these, as well as to nonanoic acid and four additional volatiles reported to be associated with nonhost angiosperms, was assessed in GC-EAD analyses of synthetic dilutions spanning six orders of magnitude. The largest response voltage amplitudes were obtained with trans-conophthorin, nonanoic acid, terpinen-4-ol, phenylethyl alcohol, and eucalyptol, whereas the lowest response thresholds were to nonanoic acid, nonanal, linalool, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, and phenylethyl alcohol. Funnel traps baited with various combinations of eleven antennally-active angiosperm volatiles along with a standard attractant captured significantly fewer male and female D. frontalis than traps baited with the standard attractant alone. Our data suggest that a diversity of semiochemicals may be involved in host species discrimination by D. frontalis, and several may have utility in their management.

  4. Video electroencephalogram telemetry in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Jayanti

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most commonly encountered medically refractory epilepsy. It is also the substrate of refractory epilepsy that gives the most gratifying results in any epilepsy surgery program, with a minimum use of resources. Correlation of clinical behavior and the ictal patterns during ictal behavior is mandatory for success at epilepsy surgery. Video electroencephalogram (EEG) telemetry achieves this goal and hence plays a pivotal role in pre-surgical assessment. The role of telemetry is continuously evolving with the advent of digital EEG technology, of high-resolution volumetric magnetic resonance imaging and other functional imaging techniques. Most of surgical selection in patients with TLE can be done with a scalp video EEG monitoring. However, the limitations of the scalp EEG technique demand invasive recordings in a selected group of TLE patients. This subset of the patients can be a challenge to the epileptologist. PMID:24791089

  5. Social cognition in frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Farrant, Annette; Morris, Robin G; Russell, Tamara; Elwes, Robert; Akanuma, Nozomi; Alarcón, Gonzalo; Koutroumanidis, Michael

    2005-11-01

    This study investigated the social cognitive functioning of patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), using a range of procedures that have shown impairments in patients following focal prefrontal brain lesions. Fourteen participants with FLE were compared with 14 healthy controls on story tests of theory of mind (ToM), faux pas appreciation, mental and physical state cartoon humor appreciation, facial emotional recognition, and the ability to perceive eye gaze expression. They were not impaired on story tests of ToM and showed only a trend toward impairment on a test of faux pas appreciation. They were impaired on humor appreciation, with both mental and physical state cartoons, and on their recognition of facial emotion and perception of eye gaze expression. Hence the patients with FLE exhibited impairments on tests of social cognition following a distinct pattern, with relatively preserved ToM, but impaired humor appreciation and ability to detect emotional expression.

  6. The initial cooling of pahoehoe flow lobes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; Denlinger, R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new thermal model for the initial cooling of pahoehoe lava flows. The accurate modeling of this initial cooling is important for understanding the formation of the distinctive surface textures on pahoehoe lava flows as well as being the first step in modeling such key pahoehoe emplacement processes as lava flow inflation and lava tube formation. This model is constructed from the physical phenomena observed to control the initial cooling of pahoehoe flows and is not an empirical fit to field data. We find that the only significant processes are (a) heat loss by thermal radiation, (b) heat loss by atmospheric convection, (c) heat transport within the flow by conduction with temperature and porosity-dependent thermal properties, and (d) the release of latent heat during crystallization. The numerical model is better able to reproduce field measurements made in Hawai'i between 1989 and 1993 than other published thermal models. By adjusting one parameter at a time, the effect of each of the input parameters on the cooling rate was determined. We show that: (a) the surfaces of porous flows cool more quickly than the surfaces of dense flows, (b) the surface cooling is very sensitive to the efficiency of atmospheric convective cooling, and (c) changes in the glass forming tendency of the lava may have observable petrographic and thermal signatures. These model results provide a quantitative explanation for the recently observed relationship between the surface cooling rate of pahoehoe lobes and the porosity of those lobes (Jones 1992, 1993). The predicted sensitivity of cooling to atmospheric convection suggests a simple field experiment for verification, and the model provides a tool to begin studies of the dynamic crystallization of real lavas. Future versions of the model can also be made applicable to extraterrestrial, submarine, silicic, and pyroclastic flows.

  7. Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus of Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qin; Ren, Bo-Xu; Tang, Feng-Ru

    2016-02-01

    The mobilization of endogenous neural stem cells in order to substitute lost neurons in the adult brain may reduce the negative effects of patients with chronic neurodegenerative diseases. However, abnormal neurogenesis may be harmful and could lead to the worsening of patients' symptoms. In the brains of patients and animal models with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), increased newly generated neurons in the subgranular zone (SGZ) at early stages after brain insults have been speculated to be involved in epileptogenesis. However, this argument is unsupported by evidence showing that (1) hippocampal neurogenesis is reduced at chronic stages of intractable TLE, (2) decreased neurogenesis is involved in epileptogenesis, and (3) spontaneous recurrent seizures occur before newly generated neurons are integrated into hippocampal neural pathways. Therefore, the hypothesis of increased neurogenesis in epileptogenesis may need to be re-evaluated. In this paper, we systemically reviewed brain neurogenesis and relevant molecules in the regulation of neurogenesis in SGZ. We aimed to update researchers and epileptologists on current progresses on pathophysiological changes of neurogenesis at different stages of TLE in patients and animal models of TLE. The interactions among neurogenesis, epileptogenesis and cognitive impairment, and molecules' mechanism involved in neurogenesis would also be discussed. Future research directions are proposed at the end of this paper.

  8. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOEpatents

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  9. Infantile Autism and the Temporal Lobe of the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetzler, Bruce E.; Griffin, Judith L.

    1981-01-01

    Studies are reviewed that support the hypothesis that infantile autism results from a neuropathology of the temporal lobes of the brain. It is concluded that the main autistic symptoms are most consistent with a neurological model involving bilateral dysfunction of the temporal lobes. (Author)

  10. Lung lobe segmentation based on statistical atlas and graph cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Honma, Hirotoshi; Takabatake, Hirotsugu; Mori, Masaki; Natori, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method that can extract lung lobes by utilizing probability atlas and multilabel graph cuts. Information about pulmonary structures plays very important role for decision of the treatment strategy and surgical planning. The human lungs are divided into five anatomical regions, the lung lobes. Precise segmentation and recognition of lung lobes are indispensable tasks in computer aided diagnosis systems and computer aided surgery systems. A lot of methods for lung lobe segmentation are proposed. However, these methods only target the normal cases. Therefore, these methods cannot extract the lung lobes in abnormal cases, such as COPD cases. To extract lung lobes in abnormal cases, this paper propose a lung lobe segmentation method based on probability atlas of lobe location and multilabel graph cuts. The process consists of three components; normalization based on the patient's physique, probability atlas generation, and segmentation based on graph cuts. We apply this method to six cases of chest CT images including COPD cases. Jaccard index was 79.1%.

  11. Antennal transcriptome and differential expression of olfactory genes in the yellow peach moth, Conogethes punctiferalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiao-Jian; Wang, Hai-Xiang; Yan, Zeng-Guang; Zhang, Min-Zhao; Wei, Chun-Hua; Qin, Xiao-Chun; Ji, Wei-Rong; Falabella, Patrizia; Du, Yan-Li

    2016-01-01

    The yellow peach moth (YPM), Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenée), is a multivoltine insect pest of crops and fruits. Antennal-expressed receptors are important for insects to detect olfactory cues for host finding, mate attraction and oviposition site selection. However, few olfactory related genes were reported in YPM until now. In the present study, we sequenced and characterized the antennal transcriptomes of male and female YPM. In total, 15 putative odorant binding proteins (OBPs), 46 putative odorant receptors (ORs) and 7 putative ionotropic receptors (IRs) were annotated and identified as olfactory-related genes of C. punctiferalis. Further analysis of RT-qPCR revealed that all these olfactory genes are primarily or uniquely expressed in male and female antennae. Among which, 3 OBPs (OBP4, OBP8 and PBP2) and 4 ORs (OR22, OR26, OR44 and OR46) were specially expressed in male antennae, whereas 4 ORs (OR5, OR16, OR25 and OR42) were primarily expressed in female antennae. The predicted protein sequences were compared with homologs in other lepidopteran species and model insects, which showed high sequence homologies between C. punctiferalis and O. furnacalis. Our work allows for further functional studies of pheromone and general odorant detection genes, which might be meaningful targets for pest management. PMID:27364081

  12. Evolution of herbivory in Drosophilidae linked to loss of behaviors, antennal responses, odorant receptors, and ancestral diet.

    PubMed

    Goldman-Huertas, Benjamin; Mitchell, Robert F; Lapoint, Richard T; Faucher, Cécile P; Hildebrand, John G; Whiteman, Noah K

    2015-03-10

    Herbivory is a key innovation in insects, yet has only evolved in one-third of living orders. The evolution of herbivory likely involves major behavioral changes mediated by remodeling of canonical chemosensory modules. Herbivorous flies in the genus Scaptomyza (Drosophilidae) are compelling species in which to study the genomic architecture linked to the transition to herbivory because they recently evolved from microbe-feeding ancestors and are closely related to Drosophila melanogaster. We found that Scaptomyza flava, a leaf-mining specialist on plants in the family (Brassicaceae), was not attracted to yeast volatiles in a four-field olfactometer assay, whereas D. melanogaster was strongly attracted to these volatiles. Yeast-associated volatiles, especially short-chain aliphatic esters, elicited strong antennal responses in D. melanogaster, but weak antennal responses in electroantennographic recordings from S. flava. We sequenced the genome of S. flava and characterized this species' odorant receptor repertoire. Orthologs of odorant receptors, which detect yeast volatiles in D. melanogaster and mediate critical host-choice behavior, were deleted or pseudogenized in the genome of S. flava. These genes were lost step-wise during the evolution of Scaptomyza. Additionally, Scaptomyza has experienced gene duplication and likely positive selection in paralogs of Or67b in D. melanogaster. Olfactory sensory neurons expressing Or67b are sensitive to green-leaf volatiles. Major trophic shifts in insects are associated with chemoreceptor gene loss as recently evolved ecologies shape sensory repertoires.

  13. Identification and Expression Analysis of Candidate Odorant-Binding Protein and Chemosensory Protein Genes by Antennal Transcriptome of Sitobion avenae

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wenxin; Fan, Jia; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Qingxuan; Han, Zongli; Sun, Jingrui; Chen, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) of aphids are thought to be responsible for the initial molecular interactions during olfaction that mediate detection of chemical signals. Analysis of the diversity of proteins involved comprises critical basic research work that will facilitate the development of sustainable pest control strategies. To help us better understand differences in the olfactory system between winged and wingless grain aphids, we constructed an antennal transcriptome from winged and wingless Sitobion avenae (Fabricius), one of the most serious pests of cereal fields worldwide. Among the 133,331 unigenes in the antennal assembly, 13 OBP and 5 CSP putative transcripts were identified with 6 OBP and 3 CSP sequences representing new S. avenae annotations. We used qPCR to examine the expression profile of these genes sets across S. avenae development and in various tissues. We found 7 SaveOBPs and 1 SaveCSP were specifically or significantly elevated in antennae compared with other tissues, and that some transcripts (SaveOBP8, SaveCSP2 and SaveCSP5) were abundantly expressed in the legs of winged or wingless aphids. The expression levels of the SaveOBPs and SaveCSPs varied depending on the developmental stage. Possible physiological functions of these genes are discussed. Further molecular and functional studies of these olfactory related genes will explore their potential as novel targets for controlling S. avenae. PMID:27561107

  14. Antennal sensilla of female Encarsia guadeloupae Viggiani (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae), a nymphal parasitoid of the spiraling whitefly Aleurodicus dispersus (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Wu, Wei-Jian; Niu, Li-Ming; Fu, Yue-Guan

    2013-01-01

    Encarsia guadeloupae Viggiani (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) is a minute, obligate endoparasitoid against the spiraling whitefly Aleurodicus dispersus nymph. The external morphology and distribution of the antennal sensilla of female E. guadeloupae were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Antennae of female E. guadeloupae were geniculate in shape, which consist of scape with a radicula, pedicel, and flagellum. Eight morphological sensilla types were recorded in the females: nonporous sensilla chaetica (CH-NP) and nonporous sensilla trichodea (ST-NP); uniporous sensilla chaetica (CH-UP) and uniporous sensilla trichodea (ST-UP) with a tip pore, basiconic capitate peg sensilla with numerous pores open at the bottom of the grooves; multiporous sensilla placoid (MSP) with the multiporous cuticular structure; uniporous rod-like sensilla (RO-UP) with robust grooved surfaces and the tremendous apical hole; nonporous finger-like sensilla (FI-NP) with abundant pimples at the bulgy, mortar-shaped short stalk. In order to further explore the host location mechanisms and courtship behavior of E. guadeloupae, the possible roles of the antennal sensilla of this species were discussed.

  15. Lack of correspondence between histochemical and structural fiber typing in antennal muscles of the rock lobster Palinurus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, C

    1991-01-01

    1. Sarcomere lengths and fine structure were examined in three histochemical fiber types of antennal muscles of the rock lobster. 2. Sarcomere lengths are distributed over a continuum of values from 6.5 to 19 microns. 3. Although a correlation between ATPase activity and sarcomere length is demonstrated, fibers with high ATPase activity do not have the sarcomere length typical of fast contracting fibers. 4. These fibers deviated from the typical fast structure in having long sarcomeres (greater than 6.5 microns) and in having some unusual ultrastructural characteristics (absence of the H-band, presence of Z-tubules, high thin to thick ratio, 5:1) associated with other more classical features. 5. This finding demonstrates that sarcomere length measurements do not always accurately predict the physiological performance of a single muscle fiber. 6. The fiber type composition of two antagonistic antennal muscles is compared and the functional significance of the results is discussed with respect to their role in behavior.

  16. Mirror focus in a patient with intractable occipital lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Shin, Hae Kyung; Hwang, Kyoung Jin; Choi, Su Jung; Joo, Eun Yeon; Hong, Seung Bong; Hong, Seung Chul; Seo, Dae-Won

    2014-06-01

    Mirror focus is one of the evidence of progression in epilepsy, and also has practical points for curative resective epilepsy surgery. The mirror foci are related to the kindling phenomena that occur through interhemispheric callosal or commissural connections. A mirror focus means the secondary epileptogenic foci develop in the contralateral hemispheric homotopic area. Thus mirror foci are mostly reported in patients with temporal or frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in occipital lobe epilepsy. We have observed occipital lobe epilepsy with mirror focus. Before epilepsy surgery, the subject's seizure onset zone was observed in the left occipital area by ictal studies. Her seizures abated for 10 months after the resection of left occipital epileptogenic focus, but recurred then. The recurred seizures were originated from the right occipital area which was in the homotopic contralateral area. This case can be an evidence that occipital lobe epilepsy may have mirror foci, even though each occipital lobe has any direct interhemispheric callosal connections between them.

  17. Lung lobe modeling and segmentation with individualized surface meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaffert, Thomas; Barschdorf, Hans; von Berg, Jens; Dries, Sebastian; Franz, Astrid; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian; Renisch, Steffen; Wiemker, Rafael

    2008-03-01

    An automated segmentation of lung lobes in thoracic CT images is of interest for various diagnostic purposes like the quantification of emphysema or the localization of tumors within the lung. Although the separating lung fissures are visible in modern multi-slice CT-scanners, their contrast in the CT-image often does not separate the lobes completely. This makes it impossible to build a reliable segmentation algorithm without additional information. Our approach uses general anatomical knowledge represented in a geometrical mesh model to construct a robust lobe segmentation, which even gives reasonable estimates of lobe volumes if fissures are not visible at all. The paper describes the generation of the lung model mesh including lobes by an average volume model, its adaptation to individual patient data using a special fissure feature image, and a performance evaluation over a test data set showing an average segmentation accuracy of 1 to 3 mm.

  18. Heinrich Klüver and the temporal lobe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nahm, F K

    1997-08-01

    Heinrich Klüver and Paul Bucy described a constellation of symptoms in monkeys following large resections of the temporal lobe that they termed the "temporal lobe syndrome"; now commonly referred to as the Klüver-Bucy syndrome. The aim of this paper is threefold: (1) to review Heinrich Kluver's behavioral studies on monkeys that led up to his temporal lobe experiments with Paul Bucy; (2) to understand why Brown and Schäfer dismissed the behavioral changes in temporal lobe monkeys they had observed fifty years prior to the studies of Klüver and Bucy; and (3) to show that Klüver's phenomenologically motivated conceptual paradigm helped to unify both neuropsychological and neuroanatomical theories regarding the visual and emotive functions of the non-human primate temporal lobe.

  19. The Role of Medial Temporal Lobe Regions in Incidental and Intentional Retrieval of Item and Relational Information in Aging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Chun; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2016-06-01

    Considerable neuropsychological and neuroimaging work indicates that the medial temporal lobes are critical for both item and relational memory retrieval. However, there remain outstanding issues in the literature, namely the extent to which medial temporal lobe regions are differentially recruited during incidental and intentional retrieval of item and relational information, and the extent to which aging may affect these neural substrates. The current fMRI study sought to address these questions; participants incidentally encoded word pairs embedded in sentences and incidental item and relational retrieval were assessed through speeded reading of intact, rearranged, and new word-pair sentences, while intentional item and relational retrieval were assessed through old/new associative recognition of a separate set of intact, rearranged, and new word pairs. Results indicated that, in both younger and older adults, anterior hippocampus and perirhinal cortex indexed incidental and intentional item retrieval in the same manner. In contrast, posterior hippocampus supported incidental and intentional relational retrieval in both age groups and an adjacent cluster in posterior hippocampus was recruited during both forms of relational retrieval for older, but not younger, adults. Our findings suggest that while medial temporal lobe regions do not differentiate between incidental and intentional forms of retrieval, there are distinct roles for anterior and posterior medial temporal lobe regions during retrieval of item and relational information, respectively, and further indicate that posterior regions may, under certain conditions, be over-recruited in healthy aging. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Reduced odor responses from antennal neurons of G(q)alpha, phospholipase Cbeta, and rdgA mutants in Drosophila support a role for a phospholipid intermediate in insect olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Kain, Pinky; Chakraborty, Tuhin Subra; Sundaram, Susinder; Siddiqi, Obaid; Rodrigues, Veronica; Hasan, Gaiti

    2008-04-30

    Mechanisms by which G-protein-coupled odorant receptors transduce information in insects still need elucidation. We show that mutations in the Drosophila gene for G(q)alpha (dgq) significantly reduce both the amplitude of the field potentials recorded from the whole antenna in responses to odorants as well as the frequency of evoked responses of individual sensory neurons. This requirement for G(q)alpha is for adult function and not during antennal development. Conversely, brief expression of a dominant-active form of G(q)alpha in adults leads to enhanced odor responses. To understand signaling downstream of G(q)alpha in olfactory sensory neurons, genetic interactions of dgq were tested with mutants in genes known to affect phospholipid signaling. dgq mutant phenotypes were further enhanced by mutants in a PLCbeta (phospholipase Cbeta) gene, plc21C. Interestingly although, the olfactory phenotype of mutant alleles of diacylglycerol kinase (rdgA) was rescued by dgq mutant alleles. Our results suggest that G(q)alpha-mediated olfactory transduction in Drosophila requires a phospholipid second messenger the levels of which are regulated by a cycle of phosphatidylinositol 1,4-bisphosphate breakdown and regeneration.

  1. Grating lobe elimination in steerable parametric loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chuang; Gan, Woon-Seng

    2011-02-01

    In the past two decades, the majority of research on the parametric loudspeaker has concentrated on the nonlinear modeling of acoustic propagation and pre-processing techniques to reduce nonlinear distortion in sound reproduction. There are, however, very few studies on directivity control of the parametric loudspeaker. In this paper, we propose an equivalent circular Gaussian source array that approximates the directivity characteristics of the linear ultrasonic transducer array. By using this approximation, the directivity of the sound beam from the parametric loudspeaker can be predicted by the product directivity principle. New theoretical results, which are verified through measurements, are presented to show the effectiveness of the delay-and-sum beamsteering structure for the parametric loudspeaker. Unlike the conventional loudspeaker array, where the spacing between array elements must be less than half the wavelength to avoid spatial aliasing, the parametric loudspeaker can take advantage of grating lobe elimination to extend the spacing of ultrasonic transducer array to more than 1.5 wavelengths in a typical application.

  2. Lobed Mixer Optimization for Advanced Ejector Geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waitz, Ian A.

    1996-01-01

    The overall objectives are: 1) to pursue analytical, computational, and experimental studies that enhance basic understanding of forced mixing phenomena relevant to supersonic jet noise reduction, and 2) to integrate this enhanced understanding (analytical, computational, and empirical) into a design-oriented model of a mixer-ejector noise suppression system. The work is focused on ejector geometries and flow conditions typical of those being investigated in the NASA High Speed Research Program (HSRP). The research will be carried out in collaboration with the NASA HSRP Nozzle Integrated Technology Development (ITD) Team, and will both contribute to, and benefit from, the results of other HSRP research. The noise suppressor system model that is being developed under this grant is distinct from analytical tools developed by industry because it directly links details of lobe geometry to mixer-ejector performance. In addition, the model provides a 'technology road map to define gaps in the current understanding of various phenomena related to mixer-ejector design and to help prioritize research areas. This report describes research completed in the past year, as well as work proposed for the following year.

  3. Dust Temperatures in the Galactic Center Lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinchilla-Garcia, Luis G.; Morris, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The Galactic Center Lobe (GCL), located toward positive latitudes above the Galactic center and extending to a distance of ~150 pc, is apparently a bubble of hot gas that is manifested at all wavelengths from radio to X-rays. In mid- to far-infrared dust emission, the GCL shows several superposed, elongated structures oriented perpendicular to the Galactic plane. Among them are the dust ridge centered on AFGL5376 and another defining the Double Helix Nebula (DHN). Using temperature maps constructed from a combination of archival WISE and SPITZER data, we have found that these features exhibit dramatic spatial variations in their dust temperatures, with the DHN and the AFGL5376 ridge being much warmer, and therefore substantially brighter in the 20 - 25 µm range, than several other linear features. Furthermore, the cooler linear structures tend to have rather constant dust temperatures, in sharp contrast to the highly variable emission within the warmer features. We will summarize the implications of these results for the nature of the dust heating sources. The candidate heating mechanisms are direct photon heating by stars in the central cluster, thermal heating by exposure to a hot coronal gas, and the impact of ions driven by magnetosonic waves or shocks.

  4. Anterior temporal lobe degeneration produces widespread network-driven dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Christine C; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Gesierich, Benno; Henry, Maya; Trujillo, Andrew; Shany-Ur, Tal; Jovicich, Jorge; Robinson, Simon D; Kramer, Joel H; Rankin, Katherine P; Miller, Bruce L; Seeley, William W

    2013-10-01

    The neural organization of semantic memory remains much debated. A 'distributed-only' view contends that semantic knowledge is represented within spatially distant, modality-selective primary and association cortices. Observations in semantic variant primary progressive aphasia have inspired an alternative model featuring the anterior temporal lobe as an amodal hub that supports semantic knowledge by linking distributed modality-selective regions. Direct evidence has been lacking, however, to support intrinsic functional interactions between an anterior temporal lobe hub and upstream sensory regions in humans. Here, we examined the neural networks supporting semantic knowledge by performing a multimodal brain imaging study in healthy subjects and patients with semantic variant primary progressive aphasia. In healthy subjects, the anterior temporal lobe showed intrinsic connectivity to an array of modality-selective primary and association cortices. Patients showed focal anterior temporal lobe degeneration but also reduced physiological integrity throughout distributed modality-selective regions connected with the anterior temporal lobe in healthy controls. Physiological deficits outside the anterior temporal lobe correlated with scores on semantic tasks and with anterior temporal subregion atrophy, following domain-specific and connectivity-based predictions. The findings provide a neurophysiological basis for the theory that semantic processing is orchestrated through interactions between a critical anterior temporal lobe hub and modality-selective processing nodes.

  5. LobeFinder: A Convex Hull-Based Method for Quantitative Boundary Analyses of Lobed Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Belteton, Samuel A.; Szymanski, Daniel B.; Umulis, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Dicot leaves are composed of a heterogeneous mosaic of jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells that vary greatly in size and the complexity of their shape. Given the importance of the epidermis and this particular cell type for leaf expansion, there is a strong need to understand how pavement cells morph from a simple polyhedral shape into highly lobed and interdigitated cells. At present, it is still unclear how and when the patterns of lobing are initiated in pavement cells, and one major technological bottleneck to addressing the problem is the lack of a robust and objective methodology to identify and track lobing events during the transition from simple cell geometry to lobed cells. We developed a convex hull-based algorithm termed LobeFinder to identify lobes, quantify geometric properties, and create a useful graphical output of cell coordinates for further analysis. The algorithm was validated against manually curated images of pavement cells of widely varying sizes and shapes. The ability to objectively count and detect new lobe initiation events provides an improved quantitative framework to analyze mutant phenotypes, detect symmetry-breaking events in time-lapse image data, and quantify the time-dependent correlation between cell shape change and intracellular factors that may play a role in the morphogenesis process. PMID:27288363

  6. LobeFinder: A Convex Hull-Based Method for Quantitative Boundary Analyses of Lobed Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzu-Ching; Belteton, Samuel A; Pack, Jessica; Szymanski, Daniel B; Umulis, David M

    2016-08-01

    Dicot leaves are composed of a heterogeneous mosaic of jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells that vary greatly in size and the complexity of their shape. Given the importance of the epidermis and this particular cell type for leaf expansion, there is a strong need to understand how pavement cells morph from a simple polyhedral shape into highly lobed and interdigitated cells. At present, it is still unclear how and when the patterns of lobing are initiated in pavement cells, and one major technological bottleneck to addressing the problem is the lack of a robust and objective methodology to identify and track lobing events during the transition from simple cell geometry to lobed cells. We developed a convex hull-based algorithm termed LobeFinder to identify lobes, quantify geometric properties, and create a useful graphical output of cell coordinates for further analysis. The algorithm was validated against manually curated images of pavement cells of widely varying sizes and shapes. The ability to objectively count and detect new lobe initiation events provides an improved quantitative framework to analyze mutant phenotypes, detect symmetry-breaking events in time-lapse image data, and quantify the time-dependent correlation between cell shape change and intracellular factors that may play a role in the morphogenesis process.

  7. A Study of the Galacic Center Lobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, C. J.

    2005-12-01

    The Galactic center lobe (GCL) is a degree-scale (140 pc, assuming 8 kpc distance) shell that runs perpendicular away from the galactic plane at radio wavelengths. The GCL spans a region of the Galaxy that is home to a massive black hole, dense star clusters, supernova remnants, and massive star formation. Since it was discovered more than two decades ago, its coincidence with the Galactic center region has led to speculation that it may be a signature of mild starburst- or AGN-fuelled activity; evidence supporting the outflow hypothesis has been weak or contradictory. To further our understanding of the GCL, we have made the following observations of diffuse gas and dust using the GBT, VLA, and Spitzer/IRAC: \\begin{enumerate} A multi-wavelength radio continuum survey using the GBT shows that the GCL has a nonthermal spectral index that steepens at high Galactic latitudes. A radio recombination line study of the GCL also finds thermal gas within the GCL with line widths that constrain the electron temperature to be less than ˜3000 K, but with radial velocities near 0 km s-1. A linearly polarized radio continuum study using the VLA shows that the rotation measure in the GCL ranges from --800 to +400 rad m-2 with an unusual east-west gradient. The warm dust and PAH emission, studied with Spitzer/IRAC, is concentrated outside the radio continuum shell. We conclude that the GCL has a single origin and discuss the possibility that it was formed by the expulsion of gas from the Galactic center by stellar winds and supernovae during the last 10 Myr. We also present serendipitous discoveries from the large-area, multiwavelength observing campaign. This work was made possible by support from the NRAO.

  8. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF HOTSPOTS IN RADIO LOBES

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, Michael W.; Murphy, David W.; Livingston, John H.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jones, Dayton L.; Meier, David L.; Lawrence, Charles R.

    2012-11-10

    We have carried out a systematic search with Spitzer Warm Mission and archival data for infrared emission from the hotspots in radio lobes that have been described by Hardcastle et al. These hotspots have been detected with both radio and X-ray observations, but an observation at an intermediate frequency in the infrared can be critical to distinguish between competing models for particle acceleration and radiation processes in these objects. Between the archival and warm mission data, we report detections of 18 hotspots; the archival data generally include detections at all four IRAC bands, the Warm Mission data only at 3.6 {mu}m. Using a theoretical formalism adopted from Godfrey et al., we fit both archival and warm mission spectral energy distributions (SEDs)-including radio, X-ray, and optical data from Hardcastle as well as the Spitzer data-with a synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the X-rays are produced by Compton scattering of the radio frequency photons by the energetic electrons which radiate them. With one exception, an SSC model requires that the magnetic field be less or much less than the equipartition value which minimizes total energy and has comparable amounts of energy in the magnetic field and in the energetic particles. This conclusion agrees with those of comparable recent studies of hotspots, and with the analysis presented by Hardcastle et al. We also show that the infrared data rule out the simplest synchrotron-only models for the SEDs. We briefly discuss the implications of these results and of alternate interpretations of the data.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain are involved in many critical functions, including reasoning, planning, judgment, and problem-solving. It is unclear ... E, Montagna P. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. A clinical and polygraphic overview of 100 consecutive cases. Brain. ...

  10. Image guided audit of surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, N D; Cook, M J; Shorvon, S D; Fish, D R; Thomas, D G

    1994-10-01

    Studies on surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy are hampered by lack of information about the actual surgery that has taken place. A method is described for accurately measuring the volumes of resection by MRI after surgery. Ten cases of surgically treated temporal lobe epilepsy (nine non-tailored resections, one selective amygdalohippocampectomy) are presented to show the technique. Indices of extent of resection in both the mesiobasal and lateral temporal lobe compartments have been measured, compared, and evaluated. By comparison with identical preoperative volumetric MRI the hippocampal resections have been correlated with the demonstrated hippocampal volume loss, thought to be of relevance in the aetiology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Detailed postoperative audit in this manner is vital in providing a rational basis for follow up studies of outcome.

  11. CTP Synthase Is Required for Optic Lobe Homeostasis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tastan, Ömür Y.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2015-01-01

    CTP synthase (CTPsyn) is a metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of the nucleotide CTP. Several recent studies have shown that CTPsyn forms filamentous subcellular structures known as cytoophidia in bacteria, yeast, fruit flies and humans. However, it remains elusive whether and how CTPsyn and cytoophidia play a role during development. Here, we show that cytoophidia are abundant in the neuroepithelial stem cells in Drosophila optic lobes. Optic lobes are underdeveloped in CTPsyn mutants as well as in CTPsyn RNAi. Moreover, overexpressing CTPsyn impairs the development of optic lobes, specifically by blocking the transition from neuroepithelium to neuroblast. Taken together, our results indicate that CTPsyn is critical for optic lobe homeostasis in Drosophila. PMID:26059773

  12. The temporal lobes, reversed asymmetry and the genetics of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Honer, W G; Bassett, A S; Squires-Wheeler, E; Falkai, P; Smith, G N; Lapointe, J S; Canero, C; Lang, D J

    1995-12-29

    Mechanisms determining temporal lobe structural asymmetries may be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. To investigate the temporal lobes in familial schizophrenia, computed tomographic scans were obtained from 51 subjects (seven families). Enlargement of sylvian fissures and temporal lobe sulcal spaces was observed in family members with schizophrenia. The posterior one-third of the sylvian fissure was larger on the left side in subjects with schizophrenia, and larger on the right side in unaffected individuals. This disturbed pattern of posterior sylvian fissure asymmetry suggests that adjacent language regions may be affected in schizophrenia. An intermediate degree of disturbance in subjects who had schizophrenia-related illnesses or were obligate carriers suggests that genetic factors may be important determinants of temporal lobe asymmetries in familial schizophrenia.

  13. Topographic and Stochastic Influences on Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards, and interpreting the significance of lava morphology on Earth and other planetary surfaces. Active pahoehoe lobes on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, were examined on 21-26 February 2006 using oblique time-series stereo-photogrammetry and differential global positioning system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the local discharge rate for peripheral lava lobes was generally constant at 0.0061 +/- 0.0019 m3/s, but the areal coverage rate of the lobes exhibited a periodic increase every 4.13 +/- 0.64 minutes. This periodicity is attributed to the time required for the pressure within the liquid lava core to exceed the cooling induced strength of its margins. The pahoehoe flow advanced through a series of down slope and cross-slope breakouts, which began as approximately 0.2 m-thick units (i.e., toes) that coalesced and inflated to become approximately meter-thick lobes. The lobes were thickest above the lowest points of the initial topography and above shallow to reverse facing slopes, defined relative to the local flow direction. The flow path was typically controlled by high-standing topography, with the zone directly adjacent to the final lobe margin having an average relief that was a few centimeters higher than the lava inundated region. This suggests that toe-scale topography can, at least temporarily, exert strong controls on pahoehoe flow paths by impeding the lateral spreading of the lobe. Observed cycles of enhanced areal spreading and inflated lobe morphology are also explored using a model that considers the statistical likelihood of sequential breakouts from active flow margins and the effects of topographic barriers.

  14. An antennal carboxylesterase from Drosophila melanogaster, esterase 6, is a candidate odorant-degrading enzyme toward food odorants

    PubMed Central

    Chertemps, Thomas; Younus, Faisal; Steiner, Claudia; Durand, Nicolas; Coppin, Chris W.; Pandey, Gunjan; Oakeshott, John G.; Maïbèche, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Reception of odorant molecules within insect olfactory organs involves several sequential steps, including their transport through the sensillar lymph, interaction with the respective sensory receptors, and subsequent inactivation. Odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs) putatively play a role in signal dynamics by rapid degradation of odorants in the vicinity of the receptors, but this hypothesis is mainly supported by in vitro results. We have recently shown that an extracellular carboxylesterase, esterase-6 (EST-6), is involved in the physiological and behavioral dynamics of the response of Drosophila melanogaster to its volatile pheromone ester, cis-vaccenyl acetate. However, as the expression pattern of the Est-6 gene in the antennae is not restricted to the pheromone responding sensilla, we tested here if EST-6 could play a broader function in the antennae. We found that recombinant EST-6 is able to efficiently hydrolyse several volatile esters that would be emitted by its natural food in vitro. Electrophysiological comparisons of mutant Est-6 null flies and a control strain (on the same genetic background) showed that the dynamics of the antennal response to these compounds is influenced by EST-6, with the antennae of the null mutants showing prolonged activity in response to them. Antennal responses to the strongest odorant, pentyl acetate, were then studied in more detail, showing that the repolarization dynamics were modified even at low doses but without modification of the detection threshold. Behavioral choice experiments with pentyl acetate also showed differences between genotypes; attraction to this compound was observed at a lower dose among the null than control flies. As EST-6 is able to degrade various bioactive odorants emitted by food and plays a role in the response to these compounds, we hypothesize a role as an ODE for this enzyme toward food volatiles. PMID:26594178

  15. Encoding noxious heat by spike bursts of antennal bimodal hygroreceptor (dry) neurons in the carabid Pterostichus oblongopunctatus.

    PubMed

    Must, Anne; Merivee, Enno; Nurme, Karin; Sibul, Ivar; Muzzi, Maurizio; Di Giulio, Andrea; Williams, Ingrid; Tooming, Ene

    2016-12-28

    Despite thermosensation being crucial in effective thermoregulation behaviour, it is poorly studied in insects. Very little is known about encoding of noxious high temperatures by peripheral thermoreceptor neurons. In carabids, thermo- and hygrosensitive neurons innervate antennal dome-shaped sensilla (DSS). In this study, we demonstrate that several essential fine structural features of dendritic outer segments of the sensory neurons in the DSS and the classical model of insect thermo- and hygrosensitive sensilla differ fundamentally. Here, we show that spike bursts produced by the bimodal dry neurons in the antennal DSS may contribute to the sensation of noxious heat in P. oblongopunctatus. Our electrophysiological experiments showed that, at temperatures above 25 °C, these neurons switch from humidity-dependent regular spiking to temperature-dependent spike bursting. Five out of seven measured parameters of the bursty spike trains, the percentage of bursty dry neurons, the CV of ISIs in a spike train, the percentage of bursty spikes, the number of spikes in a burst and the ISIs in a burst, are unambiguously dependent on temperature and thus may precisely encode both noxious high steady temperatures up to 45 °C as well as rapid step-changes in it. The cold neuron starts to produce temperature-dependent spike bursts at temperatures above 30-35 °C. Thus, the two neurons encode different but largely overlapping ranges in noxious heat. The extent of dendritic branching and lamellation of the neurons largely varies in different DSS, which might be the structural basis for their variation in threshold temperatures for spike bursting.

  16. Antennes imprimées multicouches : choix des fonctions de base dans la méthode des moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennegueouche, J.; Damiano, J. P.; Papiernik, A.

    1993-03-01

    We present a theoretical method applied to the analysis of multilayered printed antennas with disc radiating elements, fed by coaxial probe. The method is based on a reaction integral equation solved in the spectral domain using the method of moments (Galerkin's method). The choice of the basis functions is crucial. We study the theoretical ponderation of these functions in a wide frequency band is done to yield more precise numerical results with a reduced computational time. Finally, it shows better agreement with the experimental data. Nous présentons une méthode théorique pour l'étude des antennes imprimées multicouches à éléments rayonnants de forme circulaire, alimentés par sonde coaxiale. La méthode est basée sur une équation intégrale de réaction, résolue dans le domaine spectral, à l'aide d'une méthode des moments (méthode de Galerkin). L'objectif est d'obtenir les caractéristiques radioélectriques de l'antenne : impédance d'entrée, diagrainme de rayonnement, gain, etc. Le choix des fonctions de base est un critère important. Nous avons réalisé une étude théorique de la pondération de ces fonctions sur une large bande de fréquence, d'où des résultats théoriques plus précis, un temps de calcul réduit et un accord théorie-expérience meilleur.

  17. Famous People Knowledge and the Right and Left Temporal Lobes

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Julie S.; Thompson, Jennifer C.; Neary, David

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the anterior temporal lobes support knowledge of famous people. The specific roles of the right and left temporal lobe remain a subject of debate, with some studies suggesting differential roles based on modality (visual versus verbal information) and others category (person knowledge versus general semantics). The present study re-examined performance of semantic dementia patients with predominantly right and predominantly left temporal lobe atrophy on famous face, famous name and general semantic tasks, with the specific aim of testing the hypothesis that the right temporal lobe has a privileged role for person knowledge and the left temporal lobe for general semantic knowledge. Comparisons of performance rankings across tasks showed no evidence to support this hypothesis. By contrast, there was robust evidence from naming, identification and familiarity measures for modality effects: right-sided atrophy being associated with relatively greater impairment for faces and visual tasks and left-sided atrophy for names and verbal tasks. A double dissociation in test scores in two patients reinforced these findings. The data present a challenge for the influential ‘semantic hub’ model, which views the anterior temporal lobes as an area of convergence in which semantic information is represented in amodal form. PMID:22207421

  18. Brain regions underlying word finding difficulties in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-10-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance. This evidence has highlighted a role for the anterior part of the dominant temporal lobe in oral word production. These conclusions contrast with findings from activation studies involving healthy speakers or acute ischaemic stroke patients, where the region most directly related to word retrieval appears to be the posterior part of the left temporal lobe. To clarify the neural basis of word retrieval in temporal lobe epilepsy, we tested forty-three drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients (28 left, 15 right). Comprehensive neuropsychological and language assessments were performed. Single spoken word production was elicited with picture or definition stimuli. Detailed analysis allowed the distinction of impaired word retrieval from other possible causes of naming failure. Finally, the neural substrate of the deficit was assessed by correlating word retrieval performance and resting-state brain metabolism in 18 fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose-Positron Emission Tomography. Naming difficulties often resulted from genuine word retrieval failures (anomic states), both in picture and in definition tasks. Left temporal lobe epilepsy patients showed considerably worse performance than right temporal lobe epilepsy patients. Performance was poorer in the definition than in the picture task. Across patients and the left temporal lobe epilepsy subgroup, frequency of anomic state was negatively correlated with resting-state brain metabolism in left posterior and basal temporal regions (Brodmann's area 20-37-39). These results show the involvement of posterior temporal regions, within a larger antero-posterior-basal temporal network, in

  19. Evolution of the plasmoid-lobe interaction with downtail distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Owen, C. J.; Hesse, M.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines the interaction between plasmoids moving anti-sunward at high speeds and the tail lobes which bound them to the north and south. Attention is focused on the influence of changing lobe conditions with downtail distance. It is shown using International Sun Earth Explorer 3 (ISEE 3) measurements that the gradual filling of the lobes with mantle plasma and the decrease in magnetic field intensity reduces the average lobe MHD fast mode speed from 1200 km/s at X = -80 R(sub E) to 400 km/s at X = -220 R(sub E). This results in the ratio of the plasmoid speed to the fast mode speed increasing with downtail distance, from 0.3 at X = -80 R(sub E) to approx. 1 at X = -220 R(sub E). It is argued that the 'standard' traveling compression region (TCR) signature observed closer to the Earth will be distorted at large distances, where the fast mode transit time between the plasmoid and magnetopause becomes long compared to the time for the plasmoid to move past a given point in the tail. This change in the nature of the plasmoid-lobe interaction with downtail distance is offered as an explanation for why the reported rate of TCR occurrence peaks at X = -60 to -130 R(sub E) and decreases in the more distant fail.

  20. Attentional inhibition in patients with focal frontal lobe lesions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Carrie R; Bauer, Russell M; Filoteo, J Vincent; Grande, Laura; Roper, Steven N; Gilmore, Robin

    2005-05-01

    Patients with unilateral, frontal lobe damage and matched controls performed an identity negative priming task as a measure of inhibition in selective attention. Control participants demonstrated a normal negative priming effect, as evidenced by slower reaction times when a previously to-be-ignored item became the target on a subsequent trial (distractor suppression). On the other hand, patients with left medial frontal lobe damage showed positive priming in the distractor suppression condition suggesting facilitation of distractor information. Patients with right frontal lobe damage showed an unreliable pattern of negative priming, some demonstrating an absence of negative priming and others demonstrating enhanced negative priming in the distractor suppression condition. Neither patient group nor controls demonstrated slower responses on a target-to-distractor condition included to evaluate a noninhibitory (i.e., episodic retrieval) account of negative priming. Taken together, our results suggest that (a) the negative priming effect represents active inhibition of a distractor representation, rather than a noninhibitory mismatch between retrieval episodes, and (b) that the frontal lobes, especially the left frontal lobes, contribute to this active inhibition.

  1. Wisconsin card sorting test in children with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Kazue; Oguni, Hirokazu; Osawa, Makiko; Awaya, Yutaka; Kato, Motoichiro; Mimura, Masaru; Kashima, Haruo

    2002-04-01

    To search for the origin of frontal lobe dysfunction identified by the Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients, we investigated the WCST performance among 19 children with TLE (with hippocampal atrophy (HA group N=12), without structural lesions (NSL group N=7)), 15 patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE group), and age-matched normal controls (N group). The paired verbal association learning test (PVALT) and Benton visual retention test (BVRT) were also performed. HA group and FLE groups achieved significantly fewer categories and demonstrated more perseverative errors on the WCST than NSL and N groups. In addition, category achievement in WCST showed significant inverse correlation to age at the initial status convulsivus in the HA group (P<0.05). The achievement on PVALT and BVRT did not show any significant differences between HA and FLE groups (P>0.05). Thus, the frontal lobe dysfunction in the HA group is found to exist as early as 7 years old, when they seem to have only a short seizure history or to receive a little electrical interference from the temporal lobe focus to the frontal region. These facts would underscore the importance of prefrontal dysfunction persisting from the early insults and only becoming apparent after maturation of the prefrontal region in patients with mesial TLE.

  2. Quantifying interictal metabolic activity in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, T.R.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, J. Jr.; Christenson, P.D.; Zhang, J.X.; Phelps, M.E.; Kuhl, D.E. )

    1990-09-01

    The majority of patients with complex partial seizures of unilateral temporal lobe origin have interictal temporal hypometabolism on (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) studies. Often, this hypometabolism extends to ipsilateral extratemporal sites. The use of accurately quantified metabolic data has been limited by the absence of an equally reliable method of anatomical analysis of PET images. We developed a standardized method for visual placement of anatomically configured regions of interest on FDG PET studies, which is particularly adapted to the widespread, asymmetric, and often severe interictal metabolic alterations of temporal lobe epilepsy. This method was applied by a single investigator, who was blind to the identity of subjects, to 10 normal control and 25 interictal temporal lobe epilepsy studies. All subjects had normal brain anatomical volumes on structural neuroimaging studies. The results demonstrate ipsilateral thalamic and temporal lobe involvement in the interictal hypometabolism of unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy. Ipsilateral frontal, parietal, and basal ganglial metabolism is also reduced, although not as markedly as is temporal and thalamic metabolism.

  3. Dendrocerus mexicali (Hymenoptera, Ceraphronoidea, Megaspilidae): Novel antennal morphology, first description of female, and expansion of known range into the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Kyle N.; Mikó, István; Deans, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dendrocerus mexicali has been described by Paul Dessart from a single male specimen collected in Mexico. Using 87 newly identified specimens we expand the known range to include the Southwestern United States and Florida, provide an expanded description of the species, and provide the first record of the female. We also use confocal laser scanning microscopy and in vitro hydrostatic pressure changes to investigate the functional morphology of apparently unique basally flexible antennal branches. PMID:27110150

  4. Mechanisms of polar lobe formation in fertilized eggs of molluscs.

    PubMed

    Conrad, G W; Schantz, A R; Patron, R R

    1990-01-01

    Polar lobe formation in the marine mudsnail, Ilyanassa obsoleta, involves formation of a microtubule-, microfilament-dependent furrow that constricts at two rates, then stops and relaxes. Some artificial seawater mixtures allow relatively normal development, facilitate insertion of microelectrode tips, and prevent artifactual bleb formation during such punctures. Membrane events may affect formation of polar lobe constrictions: (1) Brief treatment with digitonin prevents constrictions, but not cytokinesis per se, and the suppression of constrictions is permanent. Tomatine (but not tomatidine) and filipin act similarly, although filipin often also stops cytokinesis as well. (2) Responses to digitonin, tomatine, and filipin occur with little change in membrane potential. (3) Adhesion to substrata in response to brief treatment at low pH prevents both constrictions and cytokinesis. (4) Adhesion to substrata via polylysine allows both constrictions and cytokinesis, but embryos are smaller in volume and develop abnormally. Formation of lobe constrictions may be sensitive to perturbations of the plasma membrane.

  5. Unusual Ictal Foreign Language Automatisms in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Soe, Naing Ko; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-01-01

    The distinct brain regions could be specifically involved in different languages and the differences in brain activation depending on the language proficiency and on the age of language acquisition. Speech disturbances are observed in the majority of temporal lobe complex motor seizures. Ictal verbalization had significant lateralization value: 90% of patients with this manifestation had seizure focus in the non-dominant temporal lobe. Although, ictal speech automatisms are usually uttered in the patient’s native language, ictal speech foreign language automatisms are unusual presentations of non-dominent temporal lobe epilepsy. The release of isolated foreign language area could be possible depending on the pattern of ictal spreading of non-dominant hemisphere. Most of the case reports in ictal speech foreign language automatisms were men. In this case report, we observed ictal foreign language automatisms in middle age Korean woman. PMID:25625093

  6. Unusual ictal foreign language automatisms in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Soe, Naing Ko; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-12-01

    The distinct brain regions could be specifically involved in different languages and the differences in brain activation depending on the language proficiency and on the age of language acquisition. Speech disturbances are observed in the majority of temporal lobe complex motor seizures. Ictal verbalization had significant lateralization value: 90% of patients with this manifestation had seizure focus in the non-dominant temporal lobe. Although, ictal speech automatisms are usually uttered in the patient's native language, ictal speech foreign language automatisms are unusual presentations of non-dominent temporal lobe epilepsy. The release of isolated foreign language area could be possible depending on the pattern of ictal spreading of non-dominant hemisphere. Most of the case reports in ictal speech foreign language automatisms were men. In this case report, we observed ictal foreign language automatisms in middle age Korean woman.

  7. Chronic temporal lobe epilepsy: a neurodevelopmental or progressively dementing disease?

    PubMed

    Helmstaedter, C; Elger, C E

    2009-10-01

    To what degree does the so-called 'initial hit' of the brain versus chronic epilepsy contribute towards the memory impairment observed in chronic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients? We examined cross-sectional comparisons of age-related regressions of verbal learning and memory in 1156 patients with chronic TLE (age range 6-68 years, mean epilepsy onset 14 +/- 11 years) versus 1000 healthy control subjects (age range 6-80 years) and tested the hypothesis that deviations of age regressions (i.e. slowed rise, accelerated decline) will reveal critical phases during which epilepsy interferes with cognitive development. Patients were recruited over a 20-year period at the Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn. Healthy subjects were drawn from an updated normative population of the Verbaler Lern- und Merkfähigkeitstest, the German pendant to the Rey Auditory Verbal learning Test. A significant divergence of age regressions indicates that patients fail to build up adequate learning and memory performance during childhood and particularly during adolescence. The learning peak (i.e. crossover into decline) is seen earlier in patients (at about the age of 16-17 years) than for controls (at about the age of 23-24 years). Decline in performance with ageing in patients and controls runs in parallel, but due to the initial distance between the groups, patients reach very poor performance levels much earlier than controls. Patients with left and right TLEs performed worse in verbal memory than controls. In addition, patients with left TLE performed worse than those with right TLE. However, laterality differences were evident only in adolescent and adult patients, and not (or less so) in children and older patients. Independent of age, hippocampal sclerosis was associated with poorer performance than other pathologies. The results indicate developmental hindrance plus a negative interaction of cognitive impairment with mental ageing, rather than a progressively

  8. Effect of lobe pumping on human albumin: development of a lobe pump simulator using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gomme, Peter T; Prakash, Mahesh; Hunt, Ben; Stokes, Nick; Cleary, Paul; Tatford, Owen C; Bertolini, Joseph

    2006-02-01

    Using SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), the motion of a lobe pump under load was simulated in order to predict the level of shear stress experienced by a protein solution. By varying the gap size between the lobes and pump housing, variations in pump efficiency and shear stress were determined. The simulations indicated that pump shear was dependent on gap size, with shear stress levels (0-40 Pa) correlating with those estimated in previous albumin-pumping studies. As gap size increased, the number of fluid particles experiencing low shear (<10 Pa) increased, whereas those experiencing high shear (>20 Pa) showed a decreasing trend. The pump efficiency, however, decreased with gap size, requiring more lobe revolutions to pass a unit volume. Taken together, these observations indicate that lobe pumps operated with increased gaps between the rotors and the housing result in larger number of particles within the fluid experiencing shear stresses. Moreover, the simulations indicate that it is best to use larger lobe pumps operated at high efficiency to transfer protein-containing solutions.

  9. Primary and secondary mechanisms of epileptogenesis in the temporal lobe: there is a before and an after.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Dudek, F Edward

    2010-09-01

    Extensive data involving several animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy highlight synaptic alterations that likely act synergistically during acquired epileptogenesis. Most of this research has utilized experimental models in which intense electrical activity in adult animals, primarily involving status epilepticus, causes variable neuronal death in the hippocampus and other temporal lobe structures. Neuronal death, including principal cells and specific interneurons, likely has several roles in epileptogenesis after brain injury. Both reduction of GABA-mediated inhibition from selective interneuron loss and the progressive formation of new recurrent excitatory circuits after death of principal neurons enhance excitability and promote seizures during the development of epilepsy. These epileptogenic circuits hypothetically continue to undergo secondary epileptogenesis, which involves further modifications that contribute to a progressive, albeit variable, increase in the frequency and severity of spontaneous recurrent seizures.

  10. Stable Lobed Mixer With Combustion Demonstrated and Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center collaborated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) on an experiment to study the use of lobed mixers to improve the fuel-air mixing process and increase combustion intensity in combustors with minimal pressure loss. This experiment is the first known stable combusting flow studied for this device, and the data show a much faster and much more uniform combustion process than for flat-plate mixers. Several potential benefits may be realized from this study in future combustors, including a reduction in NO_x emissions because of the more uniform temperature distribution. The experiment was done in Lewis' Planar Reacting Shear Layer facility, which was adapted to accept a lobed mixer in addition to the original planar tip. A graduate student at MIT provided the mixer design concept, and Lewis provided the engineering, operations, and research expertise. The experiment used hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures to react with vitiated hot air at 920 K. A flow speed of about 120 m/sec and a speed ratio of 0.5 were used. Flow diagnostics consisted of traversing fine-wire thermocouples and pitot probes for flow mapping. Supplementary fluorescence images were taken with a charged coupled device (CCD) camera to show the location and temporal behavior of the reaction zone. The data showed that the lobed mixer consumed the reactants between 3 to 10 times faster than a corresponding planar shear layer. The figure shows the dramatic difference in the measured temperature distribution with and without the lobed mixer. The increased mixing rate was due to a larger interfacial area as well as to the secondary flow from the streamwise vortices off the tips of the lobes. In addition, the fluorescence images showed that the lobes acted as flame stabilizers.

  11. Isolated Hyperreligiosity in a Patient with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Santibanez, Rocio; Sarva, Harini

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with history of temporal lobe epilepsy presented to the emergency department with hyperreligiosity after medication noncompliance. After medications were resumed, he returned to baseline. Many famous prophets are believed to have suffered epilepsy. Waxman and Geschwind described a group of traits in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy consisting of hyperreligiosity, hypergraphia, altered sexual behavior, aggressiveness, preoccupation with details, and circumstantiality. The incidence of religious experiences ranges from 0.3 to 3.1 percent in patients with epilepsy. Religious experiences can be ictal, interictal, or postictal. Treatment is aimed at the underlying seizure etiology. PMID:26351599

  12. Ionospheric ions in the near earth geomagnetic tail plasma lobes

    SciTech Connect

    Orsini, S.; Candidi, M.; Balsiger, H.; Ghielmetti, A.

    1982-02-01

    By comparing data from the plasma experiment on ISEE-2 from the ion composition experiment on ISEE-1, composition and plasma properties of tailward flowing ions in the magnetotail lobes are assessed, in the 50 eV/Z to 11 keV/Z energy range. This population consists mainly of singly charged oxygen ions, with H/sup +/ ions contributing in general less than 10%, flowing roughly along magnetic field lines. Hence, it is concluded that these ions are of mainly ionospheric origin. They are detected only during magnetically disturbed periods. Estimates of the E/sub z/ electric field components in the lobes are given.

  13. Factors affecting bilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism on 18F-FDG PET brain scan in unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Srikijvilaikul, Teeradej; Vasavid, Pataramon

    2013-11-01

    Bilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism (BTH) on (18)F-FDG PET brain scan is frequently seen in unilateral medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). This study aimed to identify the factors that influence BTH in patients with mTLE in order to minimize the significant factor(s) prior to performing a FDG-PET brain scan. Forty patients with unilateral mTLE who underwent (18)F-FDG PET scan for presurgical epilepsy workup were included. Bilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism of the anterior and medial parts of the temporal lobe was identified by a semiquantitative visual scale. Lateralization of TLE was identified by either intracranial EEG (22/40 cases) and/or improvement of seizure 2 years after temporal lobectomy (37/40 cases). The factors analyzed included basic demographic characteristics (age, sex, occupation, years of education, and handedness), history related to seizure (age at epilepsy onset and epilepsy duration, history of febrile seizure and head injury, frequency of seizure with impaired cognition in the last 3 months, presence of secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure, automatism side, presence of postictal confusion, and side of MRI temporal abnormality), information during video-EEG monitoring (clinical lateralization, interictal scalp EEG lateralization (interictal epileptiform discharge), and ictal scalp EEG lateralization), and information during the FDG-PET study (duration from the last seizure (≤2 days or >2 days), last seizure type, and the presence of slow waves or sharp waves during the FDG uptake period). Significant factors related to BTH were analyzed using multivariate analysis. Only the ≤2-day duration from the last seizure to the PET scan shows a significant effect (p=0.021) on BTH finding with 15 times greater incidence compared to a duration >2 days. Bilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism, which causes conflict in lateralizing the epileptogenic zone in temporal lobe epilepsy, can be avoided by performing PET scan more than 2 days

  14. Eye and optic lobe metamorphosis in the sunburst diving beetle, Thermonectus marmoratus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae).

    PubMed

    Sbita, Sarah J; Morgan, Randy C; Buschbeck, Elke K

    2007-12-01

    Nearly nothing is known about the transition that visual brain regions undergo during metamorphosis, except for Drosophila in which larval eyes and the underlying neural structure are strongly reduced. We have studied the larvae of the sunburst diving beetle, Thermonectus marmoratus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae), which are sophisticated visually oriented predators characterized by six elaborate stemmata on each side of the head and an associated large optic lobe. We used general neurohistological staining and 3D reconstruction to determine how the eyes and optic lobe of T. marmoratus change morphologically during metamorphosis. We find that in third (last) instar larvae, the adult neuropils are already forming de novo dorsally and slightly anteriorly to the larval neuropils, while the latter rapidly degenerate. Larval eyes are eventually reduced to distinct areas with dark pigmentation. This complete reorganization, which may be an evolutionarily conserved trait in holometabolous insects, occurs despite the considerable costs that must apply to such a visually complex animal. Our findings are consistent with the concept that stemmata are homologous to the most posterior ommatidia of hemimetabolous insects, an idea also recently supported by molecular data.

  15. Distracted by relatives: Effects of frontal lobe damage on semantic distraction.

    PubMed

    Telling, Anna L; Meyer, Antje S; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2010-08-01

    When young adults carry out visual search, distractors that are semantically related, rather than unrelated, to targets can disrupt target selection (see Belke, Humphreys, Watson, Meyer, & Telling, 2008; Moores, Laiti, & Chelazzi, 2003). This effect is apparent on the first eye movements in search, suggesting that attention is sometimes captured by related distractors. Here we assessed effects of semantically related distractors on search in patients with frontal-lobe lesions and compared them to the effects in age-matched controls. Compared with the controls, the patients were less likely to make a first saccade to the target and they were more likely to saccade to distractors (whether related or unrelated to the target). This suggests a deficit in a first stage of selecting a potential target for attention. In addition, the patients made more errors by responding to semantically related distractors on target-absent trials. This indicates a problem at a second stage of target verification, after items have been attended. The data suggest that frontal lobe damage disrupts both the ability to use peripheral information to guide attention, and the ability to keep separate the target of search from the related items, on occasions when related items achieve selection.

  16. Impulsivity, frontal lobes and risk for addiction.

    PubMed

    Crews, Fulton Timm; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2009-09-01

    Alcohol and substance abuse disorders involve continued use of substances despite negative consequences, i.e. loss of behavioral control of drug use. The frontal-cortical areas of the brain oversee behavioral control through executive functions. Executive functions include abstract thinking, motivation, planning, attention to tasks and inhibition of impulsive responses. Impulsiveness generally refers to premature, unduly risky, poorly conceived actions. Dysfunctional impulsivity includes deficits in attention, lack of reflection and/or insensitivity to consequences, all of which occur in addiction [Evenden JL. Varieties of impulsivity. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 1999;146:348-361.; de Wit H. Impulsivity as a determinant and consequence of drug use: a review of underlying processes. Addict Biol 2009;14:22-31]. Binge drinking models indicate chronic alcohol damages in the corticolimbic brain regions [Crews FT, Braun CJ, Hoplight B, Switzer III RC, Knapp DJ. Binge ethanol consumption causes differential brain damage in young adolescent rats compared with adult rats. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2000;24:1712-1723] causing reversal learning deficits indicative of loss of executive function [Obernier JA, White AM, Swartzwelder HS, Crews FT. Cognitive deficits and CNS damage after a 4-day binge ethanol exposure in rats. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 2002b;72:521-532]. Genetics and adolescent age are risk factors for alcoholism that coincide with sensitivity to alcohol-induced neurotoxicity. Cortical degeneration from alcohol abuse may increase impulsivity contributing to the development, persistence and severity of alcohol use disorders. Interestingly, abstinence results in bursts of neurogenesis and brain regrowth [Crews FT, Nixon K. Mechanisms of neurodegeneration and regeneration in alcoholism. Alcohol Alcohol 2009;44:115-127]. Treatments for alcoholism, including naltrexone pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy may work through improving executive functions. This review will examine the

  17. Antennal transcriptomes of three tortricid moths reveal putative conserved chemosensory receptors for social and habitat olfactory cues

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Francisco; Witzgall, Peter; Walker, William B.

    2017-01-01

    Insects use chemical signals to find mates, food and oviposition sites. The main chemoreceptor gene families comprise odorant receptors (ORs), ionotropic receptors (IRs) and gustatory receptors (GRs). Understanding the evolution of these receptors as well as their function will assist in advancing our knowledge of how chemical stimuli are perceived and may consequently lead to the development of new insect management strategies. Tortricid moths are important pests in horticulture, forestry and agriculture around the globe. Here, we characterize chemoreceptors from the three main gene families of three economically important tortricids, based on male antennal transcriptomes using an RNA-Seq approach. We identified 49 ORs, 11 GRs and 23 IRs in the green budworm moth, Hedya nubiferana; 49 ORs, 12 GRs and 19 IRs in the beech moth, Cydia fagiglandana; and 48 ORs, 11 GRs and 19 IRs in the pea moth, Cydia nigricana. Transcript abundance estimation, phylogenetic relationships and molecular evolution rate comparisons with deorphanized receptors of Cydia pomonella allow us to hypothesize conserved functions and therefore candidate receptors for pheromones and kairomones. PMID:28150741

  18. Resisting majesty: Apis cerana, has lower antennal sensitivity and decreased attraction to queen mandibular pheromone than Apis mellifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shihao; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinyu; Tan, Ken; Nieh, James

    2017-03-01

    In highly social bees, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) is vital for colony life. Both Apis cerana (Ac) and Apis mellifera (Am) share an evolutionarily conserved set of QMP compounds: (E)-9-oxodec-2-enoic acid (9-ODA), (E)-9-hydroxydec-2-enoic acid (9-HDA), (E)-10-hydroxy-dec-2-enoic acid (10-HDA), 10-hydroxy-decanoic acid (10-HDAA), and methyl p–hydroxybenzoate (HOB) found at similar levels. However, evidence suggests there may be species-specific sensitivity differences to QMP compounds because Ac workers have higher levels of ovarian activation than Am workers. Using electroantennograms, we found species-specific sensitivity differences for a blend of the major QMP compounds and three individual compounds (9-HDA, 10-HDAA, and 10-HDA). As predicted, Am was more sensitive than Ac in all cases (1.3- to 2.7- fold higher responses). There were also species differences in worker retinue attraction to three compounds (9-HDA, HOB, and 10-HDA). In all significantly different cases, Am workers were 4.5- to 6.2-fold more strongly attracted than Ac workers were. Thus, Ac workers responded less strongly to QMP than Ac workers, and 9-HDA and 10-HDA consistently elicited stronger antennal and retinue formation responses.

  19. Is the number of antennal plate organs (sensilla placodea) greater in hygienic than in non-hygienic Africanized honey bees?

    PubMed

    Gramacho, Kátia Peres; Gonçalves, Lionel Segui; Stort, Antônio Carlos; Noronha, Adriana Backx

    2003-09-30

    Hygienic behavior is a desirable trait in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.), as hygienic bees quickly remove diseased brood, interrupting the infectious cycle. Hygienic lines of honey bees appear to be more sensitive to the odors of dead and diseased honey bee brood, and Africanized honey bees are generally more hygienic than are European honey bees. We compared the number of sensilla placodea, antennal sensory structures involved in the perception of odor, in 10 bees from each of six hygienic and four non-hygienic colonies of Africanized honey bees. The sensilla placodea of three of the terminal segments (flagellomeres) of the right antenna of each bee were counted with a scanning electron microscope. There were no significant differences in the mean numbers of sensilla placodea between the hygienic and non-hygienic bees, though the variance was higher in the hygienic group. Flagellomere 4 had significantly more sensilla placodea than flagellomeres 6 and 8. However, there was no significant difference between the other two flagellomeres. As hygienic bees are capable of identifying dead, injured, or infested brood inside a capped brood cell, sensilla placodea probably have an important role in enabling worker bees to sense sick brood. However, we did not find greater numbers of this sensory structure in the antennae of hygienic, compared to non-hygienic Africanized honey bees.

  20. Morphological characterization of the antennal sensilla of t he earwig Anisolabis maritima (Dermaptera: Carcinophoridae) with reference to their probable functions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dosary, Mona Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    The earwig, Anisolabis maritima (Dermaptera: Carcinophoridae), is one of the most significant insects in KSA because, it was recorded in Saudi Arabia as a beneficial predator on eggs and newly hatched larvae of the red palm weevil, Rhyncophorus ferrugineus. We examined the external morphology of the antennal sensilla of males and females of A. maritima using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The filiform antennae of A. maritima were of the conventional type comprising a basal scape, pedicle and a long, thread-like flagellum, which was composed of 12 flagellomeres of males and 16 flagellomeres of females. Six morphologically unique sensillar types were found and described on the antennae of males and females of A. maritima. Of those identified, there were three types of porous trichoid sensilla (long, curved and arcuate), and two types of basiconic sensilla (short and curved), and one type of aporous trichoid sensilla. The shape, external morphology and array of sensilla on the antennae of males and females of A. maritima were similar. PMID:23961038

  1. Resisting majesty: Apis cerana, has lower antennal sensitivity and decreased attraction to queen mandibular pheromone than Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shihao; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinyu; Tan, Ken; Nieh, James

    2017-01-01

    In highly social bees, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) is vital for colony life. Both Apis cerana (Ac) and Apis mellifera (Am) share an evolutionarily conserved set of QMP compounds: (E)-9-oxodec-2-enoic acid (9-ODA), (E)-9-hydroxydec-2-enoic acid (9-HDA), (E)-10-hydroxy-dec-2-enoic acid (10-HDA), 10-hydroxy-decanoic acid (10-HDAA), and methyl p–hydroxybenzoate (HOB) found at similar levels. However, evidence suggests there may be species-specific sensitivity differences to QMP compounds because Ac workers have higher levels of ovarian activation than Am workers. Using electroantennograms, we found species-specific sensitivity differences for a blend of the major QMP compounds and three individual compounds (9-HDA, 10-HDAA, and 10-HDA). As predicted, Am was more sensitive than Ac in all cases (1.3- to 2.7- fold higher responses). There were also species differences in worker retinue attraction to three compounds (9-HDA, HOB, and 10-HDA). In all significantly different cases, Am workers were 4.5- to 6.2-fold more strongly attracted than Ac workers were. Thus, Ac workers responded less strongly to QMP than Ac workers, and 9-HDA and 10-HDA consistently elicited stronger antennal and retinue formation responses. PMID:28294146

  2. The evolution of body size, antennal size and host use in parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea): a phylogenetic comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Symonds, Matthew R E; Elgar, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Chalcidoid wasps represent one of the most speciose superfamilies of animals known, with ca. 23,000 species described of which many are parasitoids. They are extremely diverse in body size, morphology and, among the parasitoids, insect hosts. Parasitic chalcidoids utilise a range of behavioural adaptations to facilitate exploitation of their diverse insect hosts, but how host use might influence the evolution of body size and morphology is not known in this group. We used a phylogenetic comparative analysis of 126 chalcidoid species to examine whether body size and antennal size showed evolutionary correlations with aspects of host use, including host breadth (specificity), host identity (orders of insects parasitized) and number of plant associates. Both morphological features and identity of exploited host orders show strong phylogenetic signal, but host breadth does not. Larger body size in these wasps was weakly associated with few plant genera, and with more specialised host use, and chalcidoid wasps that parasitize coleopteran hosts tend to be larger. Intriguingly, chalcidoid wasps that parasitize hemipteran hosts are both smaller in size in the case of those parasitizing the suborder Sternorrhyncha and have relatively larger antennae, particularly in those that parasitize other hemipteran suborders. These results suggest there are adaptations in chalcidoid wasps that are specifically associated with host detection and exploitation.

  3. The Evolution of Body Size, Antennal Size and Host Use in Parasitoid Wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea): A Phylogenetic Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, Matthew R. E.; Elgar, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Chalcidoid wasps represent one of the most speciose superfamilies of animals known, with ca. 23,000 species described of which many are parasitoids. They are extremely diverse in body size, morphology and, among the parasitoids, insect hosts. Parasitic chalcidoids utilise a range of behavioural adaptations to facilitate exploitation of their diverse insect hosts, but how host use might influence the evolution of body size and morphology is not known in this group. We used a phylogenetic comparative analysis of 126 chalcidoid species to examine whether body size and antennal size showed evolutionary correlations with aspects of host use, including host breadth (specificity), host identity (orders of insects parasitized) and number of plant associates. Both morphological features and identity of exploited host orders show strong phylogenetic signal, but host breadth does not. Larger body size in these wasps was weakly associated with few plant genera, and with more specialised host use, and chalcidoid wasps that parasitize coleopteran hosts tend to be larger. Intriguingly, chalcidoid wasps that parasitize hemipteran hosts are both smaller in size in the case of those parasitizing the suborder Sternorrhyncha and have relatively larger antennae, particularly in those that parasitize other hemipteran suborders. These results suggest there are adaptations in chalcidoid wasps that are specifically associated with host detection and exploitation. PMID:24205189

  4. Resisting majesty: Apis cerana, has lower antennal sensitivity and decreased attraction to queen mandibular pheromone than Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shihao; Wen, Ping; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinyu; Tan, Ken; Nieh, James

    2017-03-15

    In highly social bees, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) is vital for colony life. Both Apis cerana (Ac) and Apis mellifera (Am) share an evolutionarily conserved set of QMP compounds: (E)-9-oxodec-2-enoic acid (9-ODA), (E)-9-hydroxydec-2-enoic acid (9-HDA), (E)-10-hydroxy-dec-2-enoic acid (10-HDA), 10-hydroxy-decanoic acid (10-HDAA), and methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB) found at similar levels. However, evidence suggests there may be species-specific sensitivity differences to QMP compounds because Ac workers have higher levels of ovarian activation than Am workers. Using electroantennograms, we found species-specific sensitivity differences for a blend of the major QMP compounds and three individual compounds (9-HDA, 10-HDAA, and 10-HDA). As predicted, Am was more sensitive than Ac in all cases (1.3- to 2.7- fold higher responses). There were also species differences in worker retinue attraction to three compounds (9-HDA, HOB, and 10-HDA). In all significantly different cases, Am workers were 4.5- to 6.2-fold more strongly attracted than Ac workers were. Thus, Ac workers responded less strongly to QMP than Ac workers, and 9-HDA and 10-HDA consistently elicited stronger antennal and retinue formation responses.

  5. Antennal RNA-sequencing analysis reveals evolutionary aspects of chemosensory proteins in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Hojo, Masaru K.; Ishii, Kenichi; Sakura, Midori; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2015-01-01

    Chemical communication is essential for the coordination of complex organisation in ant societies. Recent comparative genomic approaches have revealed that chemosensory genes are diversified in ant lineages, and suggest that this diversification is crucial for social organisation. However, how such diversified genes shape the peripheral chemosensory systems remains unknown. In this study, we annotated and analysed the gene expression profiles of chemosensory proteins (CSPs), which transport lipophilic compounds toward chemosensory receptors in the carpenter ant, Camponotus japonicus. Transcriptome analysis revealed 12 CSP genes and phylogenetic analysis showed that 3 of these are lineage-specifically expanded in the clade of ants. RNA sequencing and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that, among the ant specific CSP genes, two of them (CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13) were specifically expressed in the chemosensory organs and differentially expressed amongst ant castes. Furthermore, CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13 had a ratio of divergence at non-synonymous and synonymous sites (dN/dS) greater than 1, and they were co-expressed with CjapCSP1, which is known to bind cuticular hydrocarbons. Our results suggested that CjapCSP12 and CjapCSP13 were functionally differentiated for ant-specific chemosensory events, and that CjapCSP1, CjapCSP12, and CjapCSP13 work cooperatively in the antennal chemosensilla of worker ants. PMID:26310137

  6. Coming apart at the seams: morphological evidence for pregnathal head capsule borders in adult Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Haas, Merrilee Susan; Beeman, Richard W

    2012-04-01

    Cephalization and seamless fusion of the anterior body segments during development obscure the segmental boundaries of the insect head. Most of the visible seams are thought to reflect cuticular infolding for structural reinforcement rather than a merger of cuticular plate borders. Incomplete fusions and other modifications of the adult head found in eight Tribolium mutations indicate that the frontal and gular sutures likely are true sutures that mark borders between adjacent cuticular plates, and suggest that the anterior facial shelf is a composite of three independent cuticular surfaces: ocular, antennal, and clypeo-labral. Additionally, midline splits of the clypeo-labrum and gula, and membranous lesions on the lateral head capsule reveal probable borders of adjacent cuticular plates where visible sutures are normally absent. The anterior lateral lesions seen in the Lucifer mutation mark a border between ocular and antennal plates and appear to identify part of the postfrontal sutures. While revealing or clarifying possible intersegmental borders between ocular, antennal, and clypeo-labral plates, the various modified or unfused surfaces of the head neither reveal an additional acronal plate nor support the view that the clypeo-labrum is segmentally associated with ocular cuticle.

  7. [Kumagusu Minakata with temporal lobe epilepsy: a pathographic study].

    PubMed

    Sengoku, Akira

    2006-01-01

    Kumagusu Minakata (1867-1941), a Japanese genius devoted to natural history and folklore, is famous for his immense range of works (including 50 monographs in 'Nature') and his discovery of several varieties of mycetozoa. His diary and the observations of other persons reveal that he was affected by several grand mal epileptic seizures, and he complained himself of frequent déjà vu experiences which he called promnesia according to Myers. Promnesia means, for example, "I have lived through all this before, and I know what will happen this next minute." Minakata also had this rare type of aural sign. MRI analysis of his postmortem brain found evidence of right hippocampal atrophy. This result showed that he had temporal lobe epilepsy with focus of the right side, and this coincides with his déjà vu experiences which were the aura of the loss of consciousness. However, he did not notice that these were aural signs, and he also complained of memory disturbances due to frequent déjà vu. His behavioral characteristics were peculiar, and those of Dostoyevsky who also had temporal lobe epilepsy were similar. Temporal lobe epilepsies may influence behavioral patterns which control the emotions. As a positive point, some patients with temporal lobe epilepsy can exhibit their primordial mental actions and perform persistent works.

  8. Disinhibition of sequential actions following right frontal lobe damage.

    PubMed

    Niki, Chiharu; Maruyama, Takashi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Kumada, Takatsune

    2009-05-01

    Action disorganization syndrome (ADS) is a frontal lobe neuropsychological syndrome characterized by deficits in the performance of familiar sequential tasks such as making a cup of tea. In this study, we examined the performance of familiar sequential tasks by 3 patients with right frontal brain tumours and no other areas of brain damage. When task-irrelevant objects were presented as distractors in addition to the target objects, all patients used the distractors in accordance with the target task. These patients showed few of the sequential and omission errors that had been previously reported in patients with ADS. Although normal participants could suppress the activation of task-irrelevant objects, these patients had difficulty with this process, which would normally be carried out by the right frontal lobe to determine the most suitable action behaviour. The intact left frontal lobe may receive bottom-up activation from the distractors and modify this schema to match the behavioural context. Our findings suggest that patients with only right frontal lobe damage may be characterized more by action disinhibition than by disorganization.

  9. Reversible antisocial behavior in ventromedial prefrontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Trebuchon, Agnès; Bartolomei, Fabrice; McGonigal, Aileen; Laguitton, Virginie; Chauvel, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Frontal lobe dysfunction is known to be associated with impairment in social behavior. We investigated the link between severe pharmacoresistant frontal lobe epilepsy and antisocial trait. We studied four patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy involving the prefrontal cortex, presenting abnormal interictal social behavior. Noninvasive investigations (video-EEG, PET, MRI) and intracerebral recording (stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG)) were performed as part of a presurgical assessment. Comprehensive psychiatric and cognitive evaluation was performed pre- and postoperatively for frontal lobe epilepsy, with at least 7years of follow-up. All patients shared a characteristic epilepsy pattern: (1) chronic severe prefrontal epilepsy with daily seizures and (2) an epileptogenic zone as defined by intracerebral recording involving the anterior cingulate cortex, ventromedial PFC, and the posterior part of the orbitofrontal cortex, with early propagation to contralateral prefrontal and ipsilateral medial temporal structures. All patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria (DSM-IV) of antisocial personality disorder, which proved to be reversible following seizure control. Pharmacoresistant epilepsy involving a prefrontal network is associated with antisocial personality. We hypothesize that the occurrence of frequent seizures in this region over a prolonged period produces functional damage leading to impaired prefrontal control of social behavior. This functional damage is reversible since successful epilepsy surgery markedly improved antisocial behavior in these patients. The results are in line with previous reports of impairment of social and moral behavior following ventromedial frontal lobe injury.

  10. Sub-Centimeter Language Organization in the Human Temporal Lobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinker, A.; Chang, E. F.; Barbaro, N. M.; Berger, M. S.; Knight, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The human temporal lobe is well known to be critical for language comprehension. Previous physiological research has focused mainly on non-invasive neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques with each approach requiring averaging across many trials and subjects. The results of these studies have implicated extended anatomical regions in…

  11. Brain Regions Underlying Word Finding Difficulties in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trebuchon-Da Fonseca, Agnes; Guedj, Eric; Alario, F-Xavier; Laguitton, Virginie; Mundler, Olivier; Chauvel, Patrick; Liegeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Word finding difficulties are often reported by epileptic patients with seizures originating from the language dominant cerebral hemisphere, for example, in temporal lobe epilepsy. Evidence regarding the brain regions underlying this deficit comes from studies of peri-operative electro-cortical stimulation, as well as post-surgical performance.…

  12. The kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Lévesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The kainic acid model of temporal lobe epilepsy has greatly contributed to the understanding of the molecular, cellular and pharmacological mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. This model presents with neuropathological and electroencephalographic features that are seen in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. It is also characterized by a latent period that follows the initial precipitating injury (i.e., status epilepticus) until the appearance of recurrent seizures, as observed in the human condition. Finally, the kainic acid model can be reproduced in a variety of species using either systemic, intrahippocampal or intra-amygdaloid administrations. In this review, we describe the various methodological procedures and evaluate their differences with respect to the behavioral, electroencephalographic and neuropathological correlates. In addition, we compare the kainic acid model with other animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy such as the pilocarpine and the kindling model. We conclude that the kainic acid model is a reliable tool for understanding temporal lobe epilepsy, provided that the differences existing between methodological procedures are taken into account. PMID:24184743

  13. Recurrent sinus pauses: an atypical presentation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Amor, Martin Miguel; Eltawansy, Sherif Ali; Osofsky, Jeffrey; Holland, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction related to seizures may give rise to a broad spectrum of cardiovascular abnormalities. Among these, ictal bradycardia and conduction delays may be encountered. Failure to recognize these abnormalities may contribute to sudden, unexplained death in epilepsy patients. We report a case of a Haitian female with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with recurrent sinus pauses.

  14. Double Lobed Radio Sources in Cl1604 at z .9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirisky, Stephen; Gal, R.

    2010-05-01

    We present findings from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) super cluster survey. The super cluster Cl1604 residing at z 9 is one of only a few such large scale structures discovered at high redshift. The structure has been imaged in a variety of wavelengths, including radio, optical, infrared, and x-ray, and spectroscopic measurements have been taken using DEIMOS and LRIS on Keck. Using the 1.4 GHz VLA maps and HST optical imaging of Cl 1604 to visually inspect for double radio sources with associated optical host galaxies, we have confirmed three double lobed radio sources within the large scale structure. From the observations of these sources, we calculate radio luminosities and lobe separations using data from previously discovered double lobes at similar redshifts in the VVDS and FIRST surveys. Furthermore, we examine the host galaxy properties, including optical colors, morphologies, spectra, and each of their specific locations within the constituent cluster and the broader super cluster. Although the low number of sources limits statistical analysis, we find that the double lobes only appear in the large scale structure, and within the large scale structure only in areas of high galactic density.

  15. Medial Temporal Lobe Memory in Childhood: Developmental Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  16. Medial Temporal Lobe Structures Contribute to On-Line Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, David

    2009-01-01

    For the last five decades, the medial temporal lobes have been generally understood to facilitate enduring representation of certain kinds of information. In particular, knowledge about the relations among items and concepts appears to rely on that region of the brain. Recent results suggest that those same structures also play a subtle role in…

  17. Memory, Metamemory and Their Dissociation in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Charlotte E.; Andres, Pilar; Broks, Paul; Noad, Rupert; Sadler, Martin; Coker, Debbie; Mazzoni, Giuliana

    2010-01-01

    Patients with temporal-lobe epilepsy (TLE) present with memory difficulties. The aim of the current study was to determine to what extent these difficulties could be related to a metamemory impairment. Fifteen patients with TLE and 15 matched healthy controls carried out a paired-associates learning task. Memory recall was measured at intervals of…

  18. Time Ordering in Frontal Lobe Patients: A Stochastic Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magherini, Anna; Saetti, Maria Cristina; Berta, Emilia; Botti, Claudio; Faglioni, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    Frontal lobe patients reproduced a sequence of capital letters or abstract shapes. Immediate and delayed reproduction trials allowed the analysis of short- and long-term memory for time order by means of suitable Markov chain stochastic models. Patients were as proficient as healthy subjects on the immediate reproduction trial, thus showing spared…

  19. Memory Functions following Surgery for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jambaque, Isabelle; Dellatolas, Georges; Fohlen, Martine; Bulteau, Christine; Watier, Laurence; Dorfmuller, Georg; Chiron, Catherine; Delalande, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Surgical treatment appears to improve the cognitive prognosis in children undergoing surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The beneficial effects of surgery on memory functions, particularly on material-specific memory, are more difficult to assess because of potentially interacting factors such as age range, intellectual level,…

  20. NOx Emissions from a Lobed Fuel Injector/Burner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, M. G.; Smith, L. L.; Karagozian, A. R.; Smith, O. I.

    1996-01-01

    The present experimental study examines the performance of a novel fuel injector/burner configuration with respect to reduction in nitrogen oxide NOx emissions. The lobed injector/burner is a device in which very rapid initial mixing of reactants can occur through strong streamwise vorticity generation, producing high fluid mechanical strain rates which can delay ignition and thus prevent the formation of stoichiometric diffusion flames. Further downstream of the rapid mixing region. this flowfield produces a reduced effective strain rate, thus allowing ignition to occur in a premixed mode, where it is possible for combustion to take place under locally lean conditions. potentially reducing NOx emissions from the burner. The present experiments compare NO/NO2/NOx emissions from a lobed fuel injector configuration with emissions from a straight fuel injector to determine the net effect of streamwise vorticity generation. Preliminary results show that the lobed injector geometry can produce lean premixed flame structures. while for comparable flow conditions, a straight fuel injector geometry produces much longer. sooting diffusion flames or slightly rich pre-mixed flames. NO measurements show that emissions from a lobed fuel injector/burner can be made significantly lower than from a straight fuel injector under comparable flow conditions.

  1. Temporal lobe arteriovenous malformations: anatomical subtypes, surgical strategy, and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Young, William L.; Lawton, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Object Descriptions of temporal lobe arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are inconsistent. To standardize reporting, the authors blended existing descriptions in the literature into an intuitive classification with 5 anatomical subtypes: lateral, medial, basal, sylvian, and ventricular. The authors’ surgical experience with temporal lobe AVMs was reviewed according to these subtypes. Methods Eighty-eight patients with temporal lobe AVMs were treated surgically. Results Lateral temporal lobe AVMs were the most common (58 AVMs, 66%). Thirteen AVMs (15%) were medial, 9 (10%) were basal, and 5 (6%) were sylvian. Ventricular AVMs were least common (3 AVMs, 3%). A temporal craniotomy based over the ear was used in 64%. Complete AVM resection was achieved in 82 patients (93%). Four patients (5%) died in the perioperative period (6 in all were lost to follow-up); 71 (87%) of the remaining 82 patients had good outcomes (modified Rankin Scale scores 0–2); and 68 (83%) were unchanged or improved after surgery. Conclusions Categorization of temporal AVMs into subtypes can assist with surgical planning and also standardize reporting. Lateral AVMs are the easiest to expose surgically, with circumferential access to feeding arteries and draining veins at the AVM margins. Basal AVMs require a subtemporal approach, often with some transcortical dissection through the inferior temporal gyrus. Medial AVMs are exposed tangentially with an orbitozygomatic craniotomy and transsylvian dissection of anterior choroidal artery and posterior cerebral artery feeders in the medial cisterns. Medial AVMs posterior to the cerebral peduncle require transcortical approaches through the temporooccipi tal gyrus. Sylvian AVMs require a wide sylvian fissure split and differentiation of normal arteries, terminal feeding arteries, and transit arteries. Ventricular AVMs require a transcortical approach through the inferior temporal gyrus that avoids the Meyer loop. Surgical results with temporal lobe

  2. Seizures beget seizures in temporal lobe epilepsies: the boomerang effects of newly formed aberrant kainatergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Crepel, Valérie; Represa, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    Do temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) seizures in adults promote further seizures? Clinical and experimental data suggest that new synapses are formed after an initial episode of status epilepticus, however their contribution to the transformation of a naive network to an epileptogenic one has been debated. Recent experimental data show that newly formed aberrant excitatory synapses on the granule cells of the fascia dentate operate by means of kainate receptor-operated signals that are not present on naive granule cells. Therefore, genuine epileptic networks rely on signaling cascades that differentiate them from naive networks. Recurrent limbic seizures generated by the activation of kainate receptors and synapses in naive animals lead to the formation of novel synapses that facilitate the emergence of further seizures. This negative, vicious cycle illustrates the central role of reactive plasticity in neurological disorders.

  3. Characterization of PDF-immunoreactive neurons in the optic lobe and cerebral lobe of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Abdelsalam, Salaheldin; Uemura, Hiroyuki; Umezaki, Yujiro; Saifullah, A S M; Shimohigashi, Miki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2008-07-01

    Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is a neuropeptide playing important roles in insect circadian systems. In this study, we morphologically and physiologically characterized PDF-immunoreactive neurons in the optic lobe and the brain of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. PDF-immunoreactivity was detected in cells located in the proximal medulla (PDFMe cells) and those in the dorsal and ventral regions of the outer chiasma (PDFLa cells). The PDFMe cells had varicose processes spread over the frontal surface of the medulla and the PDFLa cells had varicose mesh-like innervations in almost whole lamina, suggesting their modulatory role in the optic lobe. Some of PDFMe cells had a hairpin-shaped axonal process running toward the lamina then turning back to project into the brain where they terminated at various protocerebral areas. The PDFMe cells had a low frequency spontaneous spike activity that was higher during the night and was often slightly increased by light pulses. Six pairs of PDF-immunoreactive neurons were also found in the frontal ganglion. Competitive ELISA with anti-PDF antibodies revealed daily cycling of PDF both in the optic lobe and cerebral lobe with an increase during the night that persisted in constant darkness. The physiological role of PDF is discussed based on these results.

  4. A Neuropsychological Examination of the Underlying Deficit in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Frontal Lobe Versus Right Parietal Lobe Theories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Christine J.; Roberts, Ralph J., Jr.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    1998-01-01

    Examined front and right parietal lobe theories of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); subjects were 10- to 14-year-old boys with or without ADHD. Found that non-ADHD boys performed better on frontal- and parietal-domain tasks than unmedicated ADHD boys, unmedicated AHDH boys had greater impairments on frontal than parietal tasks, and…

  5. Grating lobes analysis based on blazed grating theory for liquid crystal optical-phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Cui, Guolong; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2013-09-01

    The grating lobes of the liquid crystal optical-phased array (LCOPA) based on blazed grating theory is studied. Using the Fraunhofer propagation principle, the analytical expressions of the far-field intensity distribution are derived. Subsequently, we can obtain both the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes. The derived analytical functions that provide an insight into single-slit diffraction and multislit interference effect on the grating lobes are discussed. Utilizing the conventional microwave-phased array technique, the intensities of the grating lobes and the main lobe are almost the same. Different from this, the derived analytical functions demonstrate that the intensities of the grating lobes are less than that of the main lobe. The computer simulations and experiments show that the proposed method can correctly estimate the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes for a LCOPA simultaneously.

  6. The Structural Plasticity of White Matter Networks Following Anterior Temporal Lobe Resection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yogarajah, Mahinda; Focke, Niels K.; Bonelli, Silvia B.; Thompson, Pamela; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.; Duncan, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural consequences of such surgery in the white matter, and how these relate to language function after surgery remain unknown. We carried out a longitudinal study with diffusion tensor imaging in 26 left and 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy…

  7. Changes associated with laboratory rearing in antennal sensilla patterns of Triatoma infestans, Rhodnius prolixus, and Rhodnius pallescens (Hemiptera, Reduviidae, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Catalá, S S; Maida, D M; Caro-Riaño, H; Jaramillo, N; Moreno, J

    2004-02-01

    We examined changes in the array of antennal sensilla of three species of Triatominae (Triatoma infestans, Rhodnius prolixus, and R. pallescens) following their establishment for different periods in laboratory culture. In each case, the laboratory colonies were compared with conspecific samples taken directly from the field, by quantitative analysis of the sensilla arrays on the three distal segments of the antenna in terms of the densities of three types of chemoreceptors (basiconics and thick and thin walled trichoids) and one type of mechanoreceptor (bristles). Sensilla densities were compared by ANOVA or non-parametric tests, and by multivariate discriminant analysis. Strains of the same species reared in different laboratories showed significant differences in their sensilla arrays, especially when compared to field-collected material from the same geographic origin. A Bolivian strain of T. infestans reared in the laboratory for 15 years and fed at monthly intervals, showed greatest differences from its conspecific wild forms, especially in terms of reductions in the number of chemoreceptors. By contrast, an Argentine strain of T. infestans reared for 25 years in the laboratory and fed weekly, showed a relative increase in the density of mechanoreceptors. A Colombian strain of R. prolixus reared for 20 years and fed weekly or fortnightly, showed only modest differences in the sensilla array when compared to its wild populations from the same area. However, a Colombian strain of R. pallescens reared for 12 years and fed fortnightly, did show highly significant reductions in one form of chemoreceptor compared to its conspecific wild populations. For all populations, multivariate analysis clearly discriminated between laboratory and field collected specimens, suggesting that artificial rearing can lead to modifications in the sensory array. This not only supports the idea of morphological plasticity in these species, but also suggests caution in the use of long

  8. Fine Structure of Antennal Sensilla of Paysandisia archon and Electrophysiological Responses to Volatile Compounds Associated with Host Palms

    PubMed Central

    Ruschioni, Sara; Riolo, Paola; Verdolini, Elisa; Peri, Ezio; Guarino, Salvatore; Colazza, Stefano; Romani, Roberto; Isidoro, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    Paysandisia archon (Lepidoptera: Castniidae) is a serious pest of palm trees. A comprehensive knowledge of the insect olfactory system is essential for the development of efficient semiochemical-based control methods. The olfactory sensilla are located particularly on the antennae, and these can detect plant volatiles that provide important cues for the insects in the search for their host plants. To date, the fine structure of P. archon antennal sensilla studies and their role in host-plant perception have not been investigated in great detail. Using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the antennae of both sexes of P. archon are described here in detail, according to the different types, quantities and distributions of the sensilla. Six types of sensilla were identified. The most widespread are sensilla trichoidea, sensilla basiconica and sensilla auricilica, which are associated with olfactory function. These have cuticular shafts characterised by numerous pores, and they are innervated by two or three sensory neurons. Sensilla coeloconica, sensilla chaetica and sensilla ampullacea are associated with olfactory or olfactory-thermoreception, mechano-gustatory, and thermo-hygroreception functions, respectively. Moreover, the role of P. archon antennae in locating of the host palms was evaluated using electroantennograms, to monitor responses to ester and terpene compounds previously identified as volatiles of damaged/fermenting palm tissues. P. archon showed responses to all of the synthetic chemicals tested, with greater responses in the females, providing a significant sex*dose effect. Among the compounds tested, ethyl isobutyrate elicited the strongest antenna responses. The fine structure of the cuticular and cellular components of the P. archon antenna sensory equipment is described for the first time. The results of this study form an important starting point and complement physiological and behavioural studies, to provide

  9. Bilingualism alters children's frontal lobe functioning for attentional control.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Maria M; Hu, Xiao-Su; Satterfield, Teresa; Kovelman, Ioulia

    2016-01-06

    Bilingualism is a typical linguistic experience, yet relatively little is known about its impact on children's cognitive and brain development. Theories of bilingualism suggest that early dual-language acquisition can improve children's cognitive abilities, specifically those relying on frontal lobe functioning. While behavioral findings present much conflicting evidence, little is known about its effects on children's frontal lobe development. Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), the findings suggest that Spanish-English bilingual children (n = 13, ages 7-13) had greater activation in left prefrontal cortex during a non-verbal attentional control task relative to age-matched English monolinguals. In contrast, monolinguals (n = 14) showed greater right prefrontal activation than bilinguals. The present findings suggest that early bilingualism yields significant changes to the functional organization of children's prefrontal cortex for attentional control and carry implications for understanding how early life experiences impact cognition and brain development.

  10. Amusia After Right Temporoparietal Lobe Infarction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Which brain regions participate in musical processing remains controversial. During singing and listening a familiar song, it is necessary to retrieve information from the long-term memory. However, the precise mechanism involved in musical processing is unclear. Amusia is impaired perception, understanding, or production of music not attributable to disease of the peripheral auditory pathways or motor system. We report a case of a 36-year-old right-handed man who lost the ability to discriminate or reproduce rhythms after a right temporoparietal lobe infarction. We diagnosed him as an amusic patient using the online version of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA). This case report suggests that amusia could appear after right temporoparietal lobe infarction. Further research is needed to elucidate the dynamic musical processing mechanism and its associated neural structures. PMID:27847724

  11. Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in Congenital Toxoplasmosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Kyo; Joo, Byung-Euk; Seo, Ji-hye; Mun, Jun Kyu; Kim, Juhyeon; Seo, Dae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a rare disease caused by intracellular protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Though most patients with toxoplasmosis are asymptomatic, congenital toxoplasmosis in the fetus can cause ocular involvement such as chorioretinitis and central nervous system disease including intracerebral calcification, nystagmus, hydrocephalus and microcephaly. Also, these brain lesions can cause seizure secondarily. Our patient was diagnosed with congenital toxoplasmosis, based on toxoplasma-specific serologic test with typical clinical symptoms, including chorioretinitis, nystagmus, hydrocephalus and cerebral palsy. Her brain imaging findings revealed not only the multifocal encephalomalacia, but also multifocal cerebral calcification including intracerebral calcification in left perihippocampal region. Her epileptogenic zone was defined as mesial temporal lobe including hippocampus on left side by seizure semiology, electroencephalogram and neuroimaging including single photon emission computed tomography and 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography. Her seizures were refractory to multiple anti-epileptic drugs. We report a patient with congenital toxoplasmosis who showed intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:26157672

  12. Oncocytoma of the Deep Lobe of the Parotid Gland

    PubMed Central

    Popovski, Vladimir; Benedetti, Alberto; Monevska, Danica Popovik; Grcev, Aleksandar; Serafimovski, Predrag; Pecanovski, Ruse; Stamatoski, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oncocytoma or oxyphilic adenoma is uncommon salivary gland tumour, occurs predominantly in the in patients older than 60 years of age. Clinically oncocytoma resemble other salivary tumours while histology is typically consisting of oncocytes with many hyperplastic mitochondria. It usually occurs in the parotid gland. Because the features of oncocytoma are similar to those of other benign and low-grade malignant salivary tumours, clinical diagnosis is often challenging. CASE PRESENTATION: This report presents the pathologic and imaging findings of an oncocytoma arising in the deep lobe of the right parotid gland in a 74-year-old male. Oncocytoma was diagnosed on the basis of histological, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), scintigraphic findings and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). CONCLUSION: This case was unique because in the literature there are few articles about the rare presentation and deep lobe location of this type of parotid oncocytoma. PMID:27335603

  13. Visual interhemispheric communication and callosal connections of the occipital lobes.

    PubMed

    Berlucchi, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Callosal connections of the occipital lobes, coursing in the splenium of the corpus callosum, have long been thought to be crucial for interactions between the cerebral hemispheres in vision in both experimental animals and humans. Yet the callosal connections of the temporal and parietal lobes appear to have more important roles than those of the occipital callosal connections in at least some high-order interhemispheric visual functions. The partial intermixing and overlap of temporal, parietal and occipital callosal connections within the splenium has made it difficult to attribute the effects of splenial pathological lesions or experimental sections to splenial components specifically related to select cortical areas. The present review describes some current contributions from the modern techniques for the tracking of commissural fibers within the living human brain to the tentative assignation of specific visual functions to specific callosal tracts, either occipital or extraoccipital.

  14. Enhancement of breathing simulation using individual lobe segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lertrusdachakul, Intuon; Leni, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gschwind, Regine

    2016-09-01

    To tackle thorax movement from CT images, we have developed a platform to simulate a customized breathing cycle, where the pulmonary movement has been considered only at the rough border of the whole lung by artificial neural networks (ANN). The goal of this work is to include additional information of the lung lobe. Thus, more ANN will be used and future simulation will be able to take into consideration the impact of tumor on lobe movement. We present a new automatic segmentation algorithm that enables the extraction of lobar contour data using sliding mask and direction estimation. These improvements enhance the overall system performance in which higher precision and more accurate treatments can be expected.

  15. Grating Lobe Characteristics of Arrays with Uniformly Illuminated Contiguous Subarrays,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    TR-S3-290 Own smbsr 1963 q~mGRA TING L OBE CHA RA CTER/S T/CS OF SARRA YS WITH UNIFORMLY ILL UMINA TED SCONTIGUOUS SUBA RRA YS Robert J. Mailloux...given by Eq. (10) with u s = u 0 and Af = 0. For arrays with more than 4 subarrays, the grating lobe is so narrow that the sine in the numerator of 10 is

  16. Refractory Lesional Parietal Lobe Epilepsy: Clinical, Electroencephalographic and Neurodiagnostic Findings

    PubMed Central

    KURŞUN, Oğuzhan; KARATAŞ, Hülya; DERİCİOĞLU, Neşe; SAYGI, Serap

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Specialized centers, in the management and surgical treatment of medically refractory epilepsy, emphasize the importance of differentiating the varieties of localization related epilepsies. There has been considerable recent interest in temporal and frontal lobe epileptic syndromes and less attention has been paid to parietal and occipital lobe epilepsies. Methods Here we report the clinical, electroencephalographic and neuroimaging characteristics of 46 patients with medically refractory lesional parietal lobe epilepsy who have been followed up for 1–10 years. Results In this study auras were reported in 78.3% of the patients and included sensory symptoms (72.2%), headache (36.1%), nausea and vomiting (36.1%), psychic symptoms (36.1%) and visual symptoms (16.6%). The most common ictal behavioral changes were paresthesia (69.6%) and focal clonic activity (39.1%). Tonic posture, various automatisms, head deviation, staring, sensation of pain and speech disturbances occurred to a lesser extent. Simple partial seizures were present in 69.6%. Complex partial seizures occurred in 43.5% and secondary generalized tonic clonic seizures were reported in 58.7% of the patients. Interictal routine EEG disclosed abnormal background activity in 1/3 of the patients. Nonlocalising epileptiform abnormalities were found in 34.8% of the patients. EEG findings were normal in 34.8% of the patients. The most common presumed etiologic factors were as follows: posttraumatic encephalomalacia, stroke, tumor, malformation of cortical development, atrophy, and arteriovenous malformation. Conclusion Clinical, electrophysiological and neuroimaging features of the lesional symptomatic partial epilepsy patients may help us to localize the seizure focus in some patients with cryptogenic partial epilepsy. So that, the timing decision of the parietal lobe sampling with more invasive techniques like intracranial electrodes prior to epilepsy surgery would be easier. PMID:28373797

  17. Terrestrial ice streams-a view from the lobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    The glacial landforms of Minnesota are interpreted as the products of the lobate extensions of ice streams that issued from various ice sheds within the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Low-relief till plains, trough-shaped lowlands, boulder pavements, and streamlined forms make up the subglacial landsystem in Minnesota that is interpreted as having been formed by streaming ice. Extremely uniform tills are created subglacially in a way that remains somewhat mysterious. At the ice margins, thrust moraines and hummocky stagnation topography are more common than single-crested, simple moraines if the ice lobes had repeated advances. Subglacial drainage features are obscure up-ice but are present down-ice in the form of tunnel valleys, eskers, Spooner hills, and associated ice-marginal fans. Ice streaming may occur when basal shear stress is lowered as a result of high subglacial water pressure. Subglacial conditions that allow the retention of water will allow an ice lobe to extend far beyond the ice sheet as long as the ice shed also supports the advance by supplying adequate ice. Even with adequate ice flux, however, the advance of an ice lobe may be terminated, at least temporarily, if the subglacial water is drained, through tunnel valleys or perhaps a permeable substrate. Thrust moraines, and ice stagnation topography will result from sudden drainage. Although climate change is ultimately responsible for the accumulation of ice in the Laurentide Ice Sheet, the asynchronous advances and retreats of the ice lobes in the mid-continent are strongly overprinted by the internal dynamics of individual ice streams as well as the interaction of ice sheds, which obscure the climate signal. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Executive function and fluid intelligence after frontal lobe lesions.

    PubMed

    Roca, María; Parr, Alice; Thompson, Russell; Woolgar, Alexandra; Torralva, Teresa; Antoun, Nagui; Manes, Facundo; Duncan, John

    2010-01-01

    Many tests of specific 'executive functions' show deficits after frontal lobe lesions. These deficits appear on a background of reduced fluid intelligence, best measured with tests of novel problem solving. For a range of specific executive tests, we ask how far frontal deficits can be explained by a general fluid intelligence loss. For some widely used tests, e.g. Wisconsin Card Sorting, we find that fluid intelligence entirely explains frontal deficits. When patients and controls are matched on fluid intelligence, no further frontal deficit remains. For these tasks too, deficits are unrelated to lesion location within the frontal lobe. A second group of tasks, including tests of both cognitive (e.g. Hotel, Proverbs) and social (Faux Pas) function, shows a different pattern. Deficits are not fully explained by fluid intelligence and the data suggest association with lesions in the right anterior frontal cortex. Understanding of frontal lobe deficits may be clarified by separating reduced fluid intelligence, important in most or all tasks, from other more specific impairments and their associated regions of damage.

  19. Temporal lobe epilepsy: where do the seizures really begin?

    PubMed

    Bertram, Edward H

    2009-01-01

    Defining precisely the site of seizure onset has important implications for our understanding of the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as for the surgical treatment of the disorder. Removal of the limbic areas of the medial temporal lobe has led to a high rate of seizure control, but the relatively large number of patients for whom seizure control is incomplete, as well as the low rate of surgical cure, suggests that the focus extends beyond the usual limits of surgical resection. Reevaluation of the extent of the pathology, as well as new data from animal models, suggests that the seizure focus extends, at least in some cases, beyond the hippocampus and amygdala, which are usually removed at the time of surgery. In this review, we examine current information about the pathology and physiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy syndrome, with special emphasis on the distribution of the changes and patterns of seizure onset. We then propose a hypothesis for the nature of the seizure focus in this disorder and discuss its clinical implications, with the ultimate goal of improving surgical outcomes and developing nonsurgical therapies that may improve seizure control.

  20. Phosphatized polar lobe-forming embryos from the Precambrian of southwest China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Yuan; Bottjer, David J; Davidson, Eric H; Dornbos, Stephen Q; Gao, Xiang; Yang, Yong-Hua; Li, Chia-Wei; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiu-Qiang; Xian, Ding-Chang; Wu, Hung-Jen; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Tafforeau, Paul

    2006-06-16

    In developing embryos of some extant spiralian animals, polar lobe formation is one of the symmetry-breaking mechanisms for segregation of maternal cytoplasmic substances to certain blastomeres and not others. Polar lobe formation leads to unique early cleavage morphologies that include trilobed, J-shaped, and five-lobed structures. Fossil embryos similar to modern lobeforming embryos are recognized from the Precambrian Doushantuo Formation phosphates, Weng'an, Guizhou Province, China. These embryos are abundant and form a developmental sequence comparable to different developing stages observed in lobe-forming embryos of extant spiralians. These data imply that lobe formation is an evolutionarily ancient process of embryonic specification.

  1. Relation of callosal structure to cognitive abilities in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Christine; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Luders, Eileen; Thompson, Paul M; Toga, Arthur W; Elger, Christian; Weber, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to analyze the influence of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) on the morphology of the corpus callosum (CC) and its relation to cognitive abilities. More specifically, we investigated correlations between intellectual abilities and callosal morphology, while additionally exploring the modulating impact of (a) side of seizure onset (b) age of disease onset. For this reason a large representative sample of patients with hippocampal sclerosis (n = 79; 35 males; 44 females; age: 18-63 years) with disease onset ranging from 0 to 50 years of age, and consisting of 46 left and 33 right mTLE-patients was recruited. Intelligence was measured using the Wechsler-Adult Intelligence Scale Revised. To get localizations of correlations with high anatomic precision, callosal morphology was examined using computational mesh-based modeling methods, applied to anatomical brain MRI scans. Intellectual performance was positively associated with callosal thickness in anterior and midcallosal callosal regions, with anterior parts being slightly more affected by age of disease onset and side of seizure onset than posterior parts. Earlier age at onset of epilepsy was associated with lower thickness in anterior and midcallosal regions. In addition, laterality of seizure onset had a significant influence on anterior CC morphology, with left hemispheric origin having stronger effects. We found that in mTLE, anterior and midcallosal CC morphology are related to cognitive performance. The findings support recent findings of detrimental effects of early onset mTLE on anterior brain regions and of a distinct effect particularly of left mTLE on frontal lobe functioning and structure. The causal nature of the relationship remains an open question, i.e., whether CC morphology impacts IQ development or whether IQ development impacts CC morphology, or both.

  2. Complete prefrontal lobe isolation surgery for recurrent epilepsy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shaoya; Jin, Weipeng; Li, Qingyun; Feng, Mei; Feng, Keke; Shao, Hui; Zhang, Xueqing; Wang, Shimin

    2016-01-01

    Epileptogenic focus resection is less effective for the treatment of frontal lobe epilepsy compared with temporal lobe epilepsy. However, there is currently a lack of effective therapeutic options for patients with frontal lobe epilepsy who are unsuitable for epileptogenic focus resection (such patients with epileptogenic foci in one frontal lobe in which the precise epileptic foci cannot be determined), or who experience recurrent epilepsy following epileptogenic focus resection. The present study reports a patient with frontal lobe epilepsy who underwent successful frontal lobe isolation surgery following a previous unsuccessful epileptogenic focus resection surgery. To ensure complete isolation of the prefrontal lobe, the surgery included division of the anterior commissure and the anterior part of the corpus callosum. The patient was followed-up for 16 months. Although the follow-up electroencephalogram presented a number of sharp waves on the affected side, the patient did not experience any seizures. The results suggest that prefrontal lobe isolation is an effective method of treating frontal lobe epilepsy, as division of the anterior commissure and the anterior part of the corpus callosum ensures disconnection of the prefrontal lobe from other regions of the brain. PMID:27882111

  3. Lithium therapy in comorbid temporal lobe epilepsy and cycloid psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Paul; Kashiviswanath, Sridhar; Huynh, Alison; Allha, Naveen; Piaggio, Ken; Sahoo, Saddichha; Gupta, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of post-ictal psychosis has foundered on uncertainty in diagnosis of psychotic phenotypes, and equivocal efficacy of first and second generation antipsychotics. This article presents a case history of comorbid temporal lobe epilepsy and psychosis, suggests the applicability of the continental, cycloid psychosis diagnostic conceptualization to post-ictal psychoses, and demonstrates the efficacy of lithium in their treatment. Clinical studies of comorbidity of epilepsy and psychosis offer great potential as a basis for modelling brain–mind relationships, and neuropsychiatric nosology, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:28031853

  4. Temporal lobe abscess in a patient with isolated sphenoiditis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Thomas A; Carter, Cody S; Seiberling, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old immunocompetent man admitted for severe retro-orbital headache was diagnosed with isolated sphenoiditis. At the time of scheduled surgery, the patient was mildly obtunded, and a head CT revealed a temporal lobe abscess. The patient underwent a left temporal craniectomy and a bilateral endoscopic sphenoid sinusotomy, which revealed gross fungal debris. The patient made a full recovery with resolution of abscess and sinus findings. Suspicion for intracranial infection should be raised in any sinus patient with neurological changes. Early diagnosis with imaging studies is extremely important for surgical drainage before permanent neurological sequelae.

  5. Ear lobe crease: a marker of coronary artery disease?

    PubMed Central

    Agouridis, Aris P.; Elisaf, Moses S.; Nair, Devaki R.

    2015-01-01

    The ear lobe crease (ELC) has been defined as a deep wrinkle that extends backwards from the tragus to the auricle. It has been proposed that ELC is a predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD). In this review, we consider the possible association between ELC and CAD. Our aim is to systematically address all the relevant evidence in this field. There are many studies that support an association between ELC and CAD. However, other studies did not find such an association. A recent meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that ELC could be a marker of CAD. However, several limitations raise doubts as to whether we should accept this link. PMID:26788075

  6. Clinical insights into pragmatic theory: frontal lobe deficits and sarcasm.

    PubMed

    McDonald, S; Pearce, S

    1996-04-01

    The validity of psycholinguistic theories of sarcasm was explored by examining subjects with mainly frontal lobe (FL) damage and concomitant concreteness of thought. The majority of FL subjects could interpret consistent verbal exchanges but not literally contradictory (sarcastic) verbal exchanges which implied that the literal meaning of a sarcastic comment needs to be rejected in order for the inference to be detected. Subsidiary analyses confirmed that failure on sarcasm tasks was associated with poor conceptual skills. Ability to process attitude was not associated with success at recognizing sarcasm. This suggested that attitude is not pivotal to the detection of sarcastic inference.

  7. Clinical characteristics of papillary thyroid carcinoma arising from the pyramidal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Gab; Yi, Jin Wook; Seong, Chan-Yong; Kim, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Su-Jin; Chai, Young Jun; Choi, June Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) arising from the pyramidal lobe is rare; therefore, clinicopathologic evaluation is lacking. In addition, the rate of occult malignancy in the pyramidal lobe after thyroid surgery is unclear. This study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics of PTCs that involve the pyramidal lobe. Methods The study enrolled 1,107 patients who underwent thyroid surgery for PTC at Seoul National University Hospital from 2006 to 2015. Pyramidal lobe status in pathologic reports was clear in all cases. “Pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC” was defined as single pyramidal lobe cancer or multifocal cancer with larger pyramidal lobe tumor. “Incidental pyramidal lobe PTC” was defined as occult cancer identified after thyroidectomy or as multifocal cancer with smaller pyramidal lobe tumor. Results Ten patients were included in the pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC group. The mean age was 58 ± 12.5 years, and the mean tumor size was 0.7 ± 0.7 cm. Cervical lymph node metastasis was found in 5 patients (50%). Three patients had microscopic lymphatic invasion, and 7 had advanced American Joint Comitee on Cancer (AJCC) stage disease (5 with stage III and 2 with stage IV). Compared with conventional PTC (n = 1,058), pyramidal lobe-dominant PTC was significantly associated with lymphatic invasion (P = 0.031) and advanced AJCC stage (P = 0.022). The prevalence of incidental pyramidal lobe PTC was 3.56%. Conclusion Pyramidal lobe PTC is relatively small in size; however, the rate of extrathyroidal extension and lymph node metastasis is high. Preoperative evaluation of nodal status is important, and the extent of surgery should be determined in accordance with the preoperative diagnosis. PMID:28289665

  8. Are the dimensions of submarine lobe systems independent of allogenic factors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prélat, A.; Covault, J. A.; Hodgson, D. M.; Fildani, A.; Flint, S. S.

    2010-05-01

    Submarine lobe dimensions from six different systems are compared: 1) the exhumed Permian Fan 3 lobe complex of the Tanqua Karoo, South Africa; 2) the modern Amazon fan channel-mouth lobe complex, offshore Brazil; 3) a portion of the modern distal Zaïre fan, offshore Angola / Congo; 4) a Pleistocene fan of the Kutai Basin, subsurface offshore Indonesia; 5) the modern Golo system, offshore east Corsica, France; and 6) a lobe complex deposited in the shallow subsurface, offshore Nigeria. These six systems have significantly different source-to-sink configurations (shelf dimension and slope topography), sediment supply characteristics (calibre and rate), tectonic settings, (palaeo) latitude, and delivery systems. Despite these differences, the lobe deposits share similar geometric and dimensional characteristics. Lobes are grouped into two distinct populations of geometries that can be related to basin-floor topography. The first population corresponds to areally extensive but thin lobes (average width 14 km × length 35 km × thickness 12 m) that were deposited onto low relief basin floor areas, like the Tanqua Karoo, the Amazon and the Zaïre systems. The second population corresponds to areally smaller but thicker lobes (average width 5 km × length 8 km × thickness 30 m) that were deposited into settings with higher amplitude of relief, like in the Corsican trough, the Kutai basin, and offshore Nigeria. Basin floor topography confining the lobes can be very subtle, and only occur on one side of the system. The two populations of lobe types, however, share similar volumes, in the order of 1 or 2 km3. The largest lobes are observed in the Zaïre fan, where the average lobe volume reaches 3.3 km3 and the smallest lobes are observed in the Corsican trough where the average lobe volume is 0.4 km3. This variation in lobe volume is minor when compared to the variation observed in present-day up-dip drainage systems, which provide sediment to the deep-water depositional

  9. Widespread temporo-occipital lobe dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Loewe, Kristian; Machts, Judith; Kaufmann, Jörn; Petri, Susanne; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Borgelt, Christian; Harris, Joseph Allen; Vielhaber, Stefan; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) lie on a single clinical continuum. However, previous neuroimaging studies have found only limited involvement of temporal lobe regions in ALS. To better delineate possible temporal lobe involvement in ALS, the present study aimed to examine changes in functional connectivity across the whole brain, particularly with regard to extra-motor regions, in a group of 64 non-demented ALS patients and 38 healthy controls. To assess between-group differences in connectivity, we computed edge-level statistics across subject-specific graphs derived from resting-state functional MRI data. In addition to expected ALS-related decreases in functional connectivity in motor-related areas, we observed extensive changes in connectivity across the temporo-occipital cortex. Although ALS patients with comorbid FTD were deliberately excluded from this study, the pattern of connectivity alterations closely resembles patterns of cerebral degeneration typically seen in FTD. This evidence for subclinical temporal dysfunction supports the idea of a common pathology in ALS and FTD. PMID:28067298

  10. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000).

  11. Mirror agnosia and mirror ataxia constitute different parietal lobe disorders.

    PubMed

    Binkofski, F; Buccino, G; Dohle, C; Seitz, R J; Freund, H J

    1999-07-01

    We describe two new clinical syndromes, mirror agnosia and mirror ataxia, both characterized by the deficit of reaching for an object through a mirror in association with a lesion of either parietal lobe. Clinical investigation of 13 patients demonstrated that the impairments affected both sides of the body. In mirror agnosia, the patients always reached toward the virtual object in the mirror and they were not capable of changing their behavior even after presentation of the position of the object in real visual space. In mirror ataxia (resembling optic ataxia) although some patients initially tended to reach for the virtual object in the mirror, they soon learned to guide their arms toward the real object, all of them producing many directional errors. Both patient groups performed poorly on mental rotation, but only the patients with mirror agnosia were impaired in line orientation. Only 1 of the patients suffered from neglect and 3 from apraxia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that in mirror agnosia the common zone of lesion overlap was scattered around the posterior angular gyrus/superior temporal gyrus and in mirror ataxia around the postcentral sulcus. We propose that both these clinical syndromes may represent different types of dissociation of retinotopic space and body scheme, or likewise, of allocentric and egocentric space normally adjusted in the parietal lobe.

  12. Bottom-up Visual Integration in the Medial Parietal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Nösberger, Myriam; Gutbrod, Klemens; Weber, Konrad P; Linnebank, Michael; Brugger, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Largely based on findings from functional neuroimaging studies, the medial parietal lobe is known to contribute to internally directed cognitive processes such as visual imagery or episodic memory. Here, we present 2 patients with behavioral impairments that extend this view. Both had chronic unilateral lesions of nearly the entire medial parietal lobe, but in opposite hemispheres. Routine neuropsychological examination conducted >4 years after the onset of brain damage showed little deficits of minor severity. In contrast, both patients reported persistent unusual visual impairment. A comprehensive series of tachistoscopic experiments with lateralized stimulus presentation and comparison with healthy participants revealed partial visual hemiagnosia for stimuli presented to their contralesional hemifield, applying inferential single-case statistics to evaluate deficits and dissociations. Double dissociations were found in 4 experiments during which participants had to integrate more than one visual element, either through comparison or formation of a global gestalt. Against the background of recent neuroimaging findings, we conclude that of all medial parietal structures, the precuneus is the most likely candidate for a crucial involvement in such bottom-up visual integration.

  13. Frontal lobe alterations in schizophrenia: neuroimaging and neuropsychological findings.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Juan Carlos Sanz; Barrios, Maite; Junqué, Carme

    2005-08-01

    Functional neuroimaging and neuropsychological performance indicate a prefrontal dysfunction in schizophrenia patients. Frontal morphological brain abnormalities are also evident in these patients, but the relationship between neuropsychology and neuroimaging findings remains unclear. In this study, thirty patients with schizophrenia and 30 control participants were assessed using a neuropsychological test battery sensitive to fronto-striatal system dysfunction. Computed tomography (CT) scans were used to calculate the distance from the corpus callosum to the frontal pole corrected for brain size (anterioposterior length) in the group of patients and in a group of control participants with negative radiological findings. Schizophrenia patients performed significantly worse than controls in all frontal lobe tests. Corrected length from the corpus callosum to the frontal pole was reduced in patients with schizophrenia. This easy-to-perform measurement has not been used in previous studies, and indicates that schizophrenia patients have structural frontal abnormalities. However, correlations between structural and functional measures fail to show a clear relationship between the prefrontal performance and the main CT measures. As a rule, the trend observed in the correlation matrix pointed towards a relationship between CT parameters and a dysfunction on neuropsychological tests sensitive to frontal lobe damage.

  14. Forgetting in temporal lobe epilepsy: When does it become accelerated?

    PubMed

    Cassel, Anneli; Morris, Robin; Koutroumanidis, Michael; Kopelman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The notion of 'accelerated long-term forgetting' has often been attributed to disrupted 'late' memory consolidation. Nevertheless, methodological issues in the literature have left this theory unproven, leading some to suggest such findings may be reflective of subtle acquisition or early retention deficits. This study attempts to address such issues, and also to explore which pathophysiological variables are associated with forgetting rates. Eighteen participants with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and eighteen matched controls completed background neuropsychological measurement of immediate and short-delay memory that showed comparable performance, both on verbal and visual tests. Using two novel experimental tasks to measure long-term forgetting, cued recall of verbal and visuospatial material was tested 30 sec, 10 min, one day, and one week after learning. Forgetting of verbal material was found to be progressively faster during the course of a week in the TLE group. For visuospatial memory, participants in the TLE group exhibited faster early forgetting in the first 10 min after learning, as indicated by planned comparisons, with comparable forgetting rates thereafter. Our findings provide evidence for two patterns of disruption to 'early' memory consolidation in this population, occurring either at the initial delay only or continuing progressively through time. Differences in how soon after learning accelerated forgetting was detectable were related to factors associated with greater severity of epilepsy, such as presence of medial temporal lobe sclerosis (MTS) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and use of multiple anti-epileptic agents.

  15. An additional manifestation in acrocallosal syndrome: temporal lobe hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Aykut, A; Cogulu, O; Ekmekci, A Y; Ozkinay, F

    2008-01-01

    Acrocallosal Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder which is characterized by moderate to severe mental retardation, agenesis or hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and polydactyly of fingers and toes. The spectrum of this syndrome is very variable. Prominent forehead, broad nasal bridge, short nose and mandible, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, large anterior fontanelle and tapered fingers, omphalocele and inguinal hernia are some other common findings in this syndrome. Twenty percent of the patients have associated brain abnormalities such as cerebral atrophy, hypothalamic dysfunction, small cerebrum, micropolygyria, hypoplasia of pons, hypoplasia of cerebellar hemispheres, hypoplasia of medulla oblongata, agenesis or hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis and corpus callosum abnormalities. Here we present a 10-month-old female infant with clinical and radiological findings indicative of acrocallosal syndrome. She was noted to have craniofacial abnormalities suggestive of acrocallosal syndrome, optic atrophy and polydactyly. MRI revealed cerebral atrophy, corpus callosum agenesis, dilated lateral ventricules and unilateral right temporal lobe hypoplasia, the latter not previously reported in the spectrum of this syndrome. Based on this observation we conclude the importance of screening brain abnormalities and present temporal lobe hypoplasia as a new additional anomaly in this syndrome.

  16. Sensitivity to effective relational complexity in the occipitoparietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Steven; Niki, Kazuhisa

    2006-05-01

    Previous work identified bilateral regions in the occipitoparietal lobe sensitive to the complexity of relational information [Phillips, S., Niki, K., 2003. Increased bilateral occipitoparietal activity for retention of binary versus unary indexed lists in pair recognition. NeuroImage 20 (2), 1226-1235]. Here, we investigate the effect of learning on sensitivity to relational complexity. Eight subjects were scanned on a pair recognition task before, during and after a 2-week training period when subjects learned to recognize a set of shape pairs. For each trial of the pair recognition task, subjects determined whether a probe pair appeared in a list of learned or novel pairs. In the low/high relational complexity condition, every pair in list AB CD EF/AB AD CB was uniquely identifiable by an item in either/both the first or/and second position. Whole-brain and region of interest contrasts revealed a significant interaction between complexity and learning in the occipitoparietal lobe. The increase in activity for the retention of high versus low complexity lists was greater for learned than novel pair lists. Subjects were more likely to respond to low complexity lists as though they were high complexity prior to training. The results suggest that this region provides a window into effective relational complexity, that is, complexity of relational information as processed by the subject, not as presumed by task design.

  17. Alzheimer's disease: the downside of a highly evolved parietal lobe?

    PubMed

    Bruner, Emiliano; Jacobs, Heidi I L

    2013-01-01

    Clinical grade Alzheimer's disease (AD) is only described in humans. Recent imaging studies in early AD patients showed that the parietal areas display the most prominent metabolic impairments. So far, neuroimaging studies have not been able to explain why the medial parietal regions possess this hub characteristic in AD. Paleoneurological and neuroanatomical studies suggest that our species, Homo sapiens, has a unique and derived organization of the parietal areas, which are involved in higher cognitive functions. Combining evidence from neuroimaging, paleontology, and comparative anatomy, we suggest that the vulnerability of the parietal lobe to neurodegenerative processes may be associated with the origin of our species. The species-specific parietal morphology in modern humans largely influenced the brain spatial organization, and it involved changes in vascularization and energy management, which may underlie the sensitivity of these areas to metabolic impairment. Metabolic constraints and anatomical evolutionary changes in the medial parietal regions of modern humans may be important in early AD onset. Taking into account the species-specific adaptations of the modern human parietal areas and their association with AD, we hypothesize that AD can be the evolutionary drawback of the specialized structure of our parietal lobes. The cognitive advantage is associated with increased sensitivity to neurodegenerative processes which, being limited to the post-reproductive period, have a minor effect on the overall genetic fitness. The changes of energy requirements associated with form and size variations at the parietal areas may support the hypothesis of AD as a metabolic syndrome.

  18. Imaging structural and functional brain networks in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, Boris C.; Hong, SeokJun; Bernasconi, Andrea; Bernasconi, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Early imaging studies in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) focused on the search for mesial temporal sclerosis, as its surgical removal results in clinically meaningful improvement in about 70% of patients. Nevertheless, a considerable subgroup of patients continues to suffer from post-operative seizures. Although the reasons for surgical failure are not fully understood, electrophysiological and imaging data suggest that anomalies extending beyond the temporal lobe may have negative impact on outcome. This hypothesis has revived the concept of human epilepsy as a disorder of distributed brain networks. Recent methodological advances in non-invasive neuroimaging have led to quantify structural and functional networks in vivo. While structural networks can be inferred from diffusion MRI tractography and inter-regional covariance patterns of structural measures such as cortical thickness, functional connectivity is generally computed based on statistical dependencies of neurophysiological time-series, measured through functional MRI or electroencephalographic techniques. This review considers the application of advanced analytical methods in structural and functional connectivity analyses in TLE. We will specifically highlight findings from graph-theoretical analysis that allow assessing the topological organization of brain networks. These studies have provided compelling evidence that TLE is a system disorder with profound alterations in local and distributed networks. In addition, there is emerging evidence for the utility of network properties as clinical diagnostic markers. Nowadays, a network perspective is considered to be essential to the understanding of the development, progression, and management of epilepsy. PMID:24098281

  19. Graded specialization within and between the anterior temporal lobes

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Grace E.; Hoffman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence from different methodologies has identified the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs) as key regions for the representation of semantic knowledge. Research interest is now shifting to investigate the roles of different ATL subregions in semantic representation, with particular emphasis on the functions of the left versus right ATLs. In this review, we provide evidence for graded specializations both between and within the ATLs. We argue (1) that multimodal, pan‐category semantic representations are supported jointly by both left and right ATLs, yet (2) that the ATLs are not homogeneous in their function. Instead, subtle functional gradations both between and within the ATLs emerge as a consequence of differential connectivity with primary sensory/motor/limbic regions. This graded specialization account of semantic representation provides a compromise between theories that posit no differences between the functions of the left and right ATLs and those that posit that the left and right ATLs are entirely segregated in function. Evidence for this graded account comes from converging sources, and its benefits have been exemplified in formal computational models. We propose that this graded principle is not only a defining feature of the ATLs but is also a more general neurocomputational principle found throughout the temporal lobes. PMID:26502375

  20. High-frequency oscillations and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Maxime; Shiri, Zahra; Chen, Li-Yuan; Avoli, Massimo

    2017-01-20

    The interest of epileptologists has recently shifted from the macroscopic analysis of interictal spikes and seizures to the microscopic analysis of short events in the EEG that are not visible to the naked eye but are observed once the signal has been filtered in specific frequency bands. With the use of new technologies that allow multichannel recordings at high sampling rates and the development of computer algorithms that permit the automated analysis of extensive amounts of data, it is now possible to extract high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) between 80 and 500Hz from the EEG; HFOs have been further categorised as ripples (80-200Hz) and fast ripples (250-500Hz). Within the context of epileptic disorders, HFOs should reflect the pathological activity of neural networks that sustain seizure generation, and could serve as biomarkers of epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. We review here the presumptive cellular mechanisms of ripples and fast ripples in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We also focus on recent findings regarding the occurrence of HFOs during epileptiform activity observed in in vitro models of epileptiform synchronization, in in vivo models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in epileptic patients. Finally, we address the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on HFOs and raise some questions and issues related to the definition of HFOs.

  1. Memory Rehabilitation Strategies in Nonsurgical Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Del Felice, Alessandra; Alderighi, Marzia; Martinato, Matteo; Grisafi, Davide; Bosco, Anna; Thompson, Pamela J; Sander, Josemir W; Masiero, Stefano

    2017-02-15

    People with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who have not undergone epilepsy surgery often complain of memory deficits. Cognitive rehabilitation is employed as a remedial intervention in clinical settings, but research is limited and findings concerning efficacy and the criteria for choosing different approaches have been inconsistent. We aimed to appraise existing evidence on memory rehabilitation in nonsurgical individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy and to ascertain the effectiveness of specific strategies. A scoping review was preferred given the heterogeneous nature of the interventions. A comprehensive literature search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, Scholars Portal/PSYCHinfo, Proceedings First, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses identified articles published in English before February 2016. The search retrieved 372 abstracts. Of 25 eligible studies, six were included in the final review. None included pediatric populations. Strategies included cognitive training, external memory aids, brain training, and noninvasive brain stimulation. Selection criteria tended to be general. Overall, there was insufficient evidence to make definitive conclusions regarding the efficacy of traditional memory rehabilitation strategies, brain training, and noninvasive brain stimulation. The review suggests that cognitive rehabilitation in nonsurgical TLE is underresearched and that there is a need for a systematic evaluation in this population.

  2. Widespread temporo-occipital lobe dysfunction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewe, Kristian; Machts, Judith; Kaufmann, Jörn; Petri, Susanne; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Borgelt, Christian; Harris, Joseph Allen; Vielhaber, Stefan; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) lie on a single clinical continuum. However, previous neuroimaging studies have found only limited involvement of temporal lobe regions in ALS. To better delineate possible temporal lobe involvement in ALS, the present study aimed to examine changes in functional connectivity across the whole brain, particularly with regard to extra-motor regions, in a group of 64 non-demented ALS patients and 38 healthy controls. To assess between-group differences in connectivity, we computed edge-level statistics across subject-specific graphs derived from resting-state functional MRI data. In addition to expected ALS-related decreases in functional connectivity in motor-related areas, we observed extensive changes in connectivity across the temporo-occipital cortex. Although ALS patients with comorbid FTD were deliberately excluded from this study, the pattern of connectivity alterations closely resembles patterns of cerebral degeneration typically seen in FTD. This evidence for subclinical temporal dysfunction supports the idea of a common pathology in ALS and FTD.

  3. Cryptococcosis, silicosis, and tuberculous pseudotumor in the same pulmonary lobe*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geruza Alves; Brandão, Daniel Ferracioli; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; de Sá, João Batista Carlos; Baddini-Martinez, José

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis and cryptococcosis are infectious diseases that can result in the formation of single or multiple nodules in immunocompetent patients. Exposure to silica is known to raise the risk of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report the case of an elderly man with no history of opportunistic infections and no clinical evidence of immunodeficiency but with a six-month history of dry cough and nocturnal wheezing. A chest X-ray revealed a mass measuring 5.0 × 3.5 cm in the right upper lobe. The diagnostic approach of the mass revealed tuberculosis. The histopathological analysis of the surrounding parenchyma reveled silicosis and cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis was also found in masses identified in the mediastinal lymph nodes. The surgical approach was indicated because of the degree of pleuropulmonary involvement, the inconclusive results obtained with the invasive and noninvasive methods applied, and the possibility of malignancy. This case illustrates the difficulty inherent to the assessment of infectious or inflammatory pulmonary pseudotumors, the differential diagnosis of which occasionally requires a radical surgical approach. Despite the presence of respiratory symptoms for six months, the first chest X-ray was performed only at the end of that period. We discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms that might have led to the combination of three types of granulomatous lesions in the same lobe, and we emphasize the need for greater awareness of atypical presentations of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24310636

  4. Roche lobe sizes in deep-MOND gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong Sheng

    2005-12-01

    MOdified Newtonian Dynamics survived the test over two decades, fitting the ups and downs of a variety of galaxy velocity curves without fine tuning (Sanders & McGaugh 2002, ARA&A, 40, 263). MOND is also evolving from an empirical to a decent theory respecting fundamental physics after Bekenstein (2004, Phys. Rev. D, 70, 3509) showed that lensing and Hubble expansion can be modeled rigourously in a Modified Relativity. However, many properties of MOND are obscured by its non-linear Poisson's equation. Here we study the effect of tides for a binary stellar system or a baryonic satellite-host galaxy system. We show that the Roche lobe is more squashed than the Newtonian case due to the anisotropic dilation effect in deep-MOND. We prove analytically that the Roche lobe volume scales linearly with the "true" baryonic mass ratio in both Newtonian and deep-MOND regimes, insensitive to the modification to the inertia mass. Hence accurate Roche radii of satellites can break the degeneracy of MOND and dark matter theory. Globular clusters and dwarf galaxies of comparable luminosities and distances show a factor of ten scatter in limiting radii; this is difficult to explain in any "mass-tracing-light" universe.

  5. Emotion recognition in temporal lobe epilepsy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Monti, Giulia; Meletti, Stefano

    2015-08-01

    There is increasing interest in the understanding of emotion recognition deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the most common form of focal epilepsies. There are conflicting reports about impairments for different emotions in right and left temporal lobe epilepsy patients. A systematic review and a narrative synthesis was conducted for studies investigating emotion recognition (ER) in TLE. Embase, MEDLINE, PsychINFO and Pubmed were searched from 1990 to March 2015 and reference lists were reviewed. 996 citations were identified and 43 studies were finally included. ER deficits are consistently observed across studies. A fear recognition deficit is always reported, followed by deficits in sadness and disgust recognition. Deficits are observed across visual and auditory domains. Conflicting evidence is present concerning the severity of ER deficits in right and left TLE. Studies on anterior temporal lobectomy report data similar to that observed in pre-surgical patients. Current evidence supports the conclusion that recognition of negative emotions is commonly impaired in TLE, particularly for fear, and in the visual domain. Future work should focus on more ecologically valid test, on longitudinal studies to assess the role of anterior temporal lobectomy, and to correlate ER measures to social functioning in everyday life.

  6. Rare Presentation of Left Lower Lobe Pulmonary Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Hako, René; Fedačko, Ján; Morochovič, Radoslav; Kristian, Pavol; Pekárová, Tímea; Tuomainen, Petri; Pella, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background. Pulmonary arterial dissection with chronic pulmonary arterial hypertension as its major cause is a very rare but life-threatening condition. In most cases the main pulmonary trunk is the affected site usually without involvement of its branches. Segmental or lobar pulmonary artery dissection is extremely rare. Case Presentation. We report a unique case of left lower lobe pulmonary artery dissection in a 70-year-old male, with confirmed chronic pulmonary hypertension. To confirm dissection MDCT pulmonary angiography was used. Multiplanar reformation (MPR) images in sagittal, coronal, oblique sagittal, and curved projections were generated. This case report presents morphologic CT features of rare chronic left lobar pulmonary artery dissection associated with chronic pulmonary hypertension at a place of localised pulmonary artery calcification. CT pulmonary angiography excluded signs of thromboembolism and potential motion or flow artefacts. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, no case of lower lobe pulmonary artery dissection with flap calcification has been reported yet. CT imaging of the chest is a key diagnostic tool that is able to detect an intimal flap and a false lumen within the pulmonary arterial tree and is preferred in differential diagnosis of rare complications of sustained pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:28154579

  7. Obsessions appear after the removal a brain tumor in the right frontal lobe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinhua; Liu, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    A series of case reports and neuroimaging research points to the underlying neuropathological substrate for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and the underlying associations between OCD and areas of the frontal lobe. We report a patient wherein the onset of OCD occurred after resection of meningioma of the right frontal lobe and who was treated successfully with paroxetine hydrochloride. We suggest that the onset of secondary (organic) OCD is associated with the frontal lobe, and we propose that the origin of obsessions is located in the right frontal lobe.

  8. Concurrent torsion of the right cranial and right middle lung lobes in a whippet.

    PubMed

    White, R N; Corzo-Menendez, N

    2000-12-01

    A four-year-old, entire male whippet was presented with a three-day history of lethargy, inappetence, occasional retching, a soft cough and intermittent episodes of haemoptysis. Clinical and laboratory findings, and thoracic radiographic and ultrasonographic studies suggested a diagnosis of lung lobe torsion. A concurrent lung lobe torsion of the right cranial and right middle lung lobes was confirmed at exploratory thoracotomy. Management included resection of both the affected lung lobes. No obvious underlying aetiology for the condition was apparent. The dog made a full recovery from the procedure and at the time of writing (11 months postoperatively) was reported to be well, exercising normally and showing no breathing abnormalities.

  9. Effects of duloxetine on microRNA expression profile in frontal lobe and hippocampus in a mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Liu, Yamei

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a major mood disorder affecting people worldwide. The posttranscriptional gene regulation mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) which may have critical roles in the pathogenesis of depression. However, to date, little is known about the effects of the antidepressant drug duloxetine on miRNA expression profile in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced depression model in mice. Healthy adult male Kunming mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group, model group and duloxetine group. Sucrose preference test and open field test were used to represent the behavioral change. MiRNAs levels in frontal lobe and hippocampus of mice were analyzed using miRNA microarrays assay. We observed that long-term treatment with duloxetine significantly ameliorated the CUMS procedure-induced sucrose preference decreases and mice treated with duloxetine demonstrated a reversal of the number of crossings, and rearings reduced by CUMS. A significant upregulation of miR-132 and miR-18a in hippocampus in the duloxetine treatment group compared with model group, whereas the levels of miR-134 and miR-124a were significantly downregulated. Furthermore, miR-18a showed significant upregulation in frontal lobe in the duloxetine treatment group relative to model group. Our data showed that miRNA expression profile in frontal lobe and hippocampus was affected by duloxetine in mice model of depression. The effect was especially pronounced in the hippocampus, suggesting that hippocampus might be the action site of duloxetine, which presumably worked by regulating the expression of miRNA levels.

  10. A Prediction Algorithm for Drug Response in Patients with Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Based on Clinical and Genetic Information

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Benilton S.; Bilevicius, Elizabeth; Alvim, Marina K. M.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia

    2017-01-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of adult epilepsy in surgical series. Currently, the only characteristic used to predict poor response to clinical treatment in this syndrome is the presence of hippocampal sclerosis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in genes encoding drug transporter and metabolism proteins could influence response to therapy. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate whether combining information from clinical variables as well as SNPs in candidate genes could improve the accuracy of predicting response to drug therapy in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. For this, we divided 237 patients into two groups: 75 responsive and 162 refractory to antiepileptic drug therapy. We genotyped 119 SNPs in ABCB1, ABCC2, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP1B1, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 genes. We used 98 additional SNPs to evaluate population stratification. We assessed a first scenario using only clinical variables and a second one including SNP information. The random forests algorithm combined with leave-one-out cross-validation was used to identify the best predictive model in each scenario and compared their accuracies using the area under the curve statistic. Additionally, we built a variable importance plot to present the set of most relevant predictors on the best model. The selected best model included the presence of hippocampal sclerosis and 56 SNPs. Furthermore, including SNPs in the model improved accuracy from 0.4568 to 0.8177. Our findings suggest that adding genetic information provided by SNPs, located on drug transport and metabolism genes, can improve the accuracy for predicting which patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy are likely to be refractory to drug treatment, making it possible to identify patients who may benefit from epilepsy surgery sooner. PMID:28052106

  11. Cassini observations of ionospheric plasma in Saturn's magnetotail lobes.

    PubMed

    Felici, M; Arridge, C S; Coates, A J; Badman, S V; Dougherty, M K; Jackman, C M; Kurth, W S; Melin, H; Mitchell, D G; Reisenfeld, D B; Sergis, N

    2016-01-01

    Studies of Saturn's magnetosphere with the Cassini mission have established the importance of Enceladus as the dominant mass source for Saturn's magnetosphere. It is well known that the ionosphere is an important mass source at Earth during periods of intense geomagnetic activity, but lesser attention has been dedicated to study the ionospheric mass source at Saturn. In this paper we describe a case study of data from Saturn's magnetotail, when Cassini was located at ≃ 2200 h Saturn local time at 36 RS from Saturn. During several entries into the magnetotail lobe, tailward flowing cold electrons and a cold ion beam were observed directly adjacent to the plasma sheet and extending deeper into the lobe. The electrons and ions appear to be dispersed, dropping to lower energies with time. The composition of both the plasma sheet and lobe ions show very low fluxes (sometimes zero within measurement error) of water group ions. The magnetic field has a swept-forward configuration which is atypical for this region, and the total magnetic field strength is larger than expected at this distance from the planet. Ultraviolet auroral observations show a dawn brightening, and upstream heliospheric models suggest that the magnetosphere is being compressed by a region of high solar wind ram pressure. We interpret this event as the observation of ionospheric outflow in Saturn's magnetotail. We estimate a number flux between (2.95 ± 0.43) × 10(9) and (1.43 ± 0.21) × 10(10) cm(-2) s(-1), 1 or about 2 orders of magnitude larger than suggested by steady state MHD models, with a mass source between 1.4 ×10(2) and 1.1 ×10(3) kg/s. After considering several configurations for the active atmospheric regions, we consider as most probable the main auroral oval, with associated mass source between 49.7 ±13.4 and 239.8 ±64.8 kg/s for an average auroral oval, and 10 ±4 and 49 ±23 kg/s for the specific auroral oval morphology found during this event. It is not clear how

  12. Structure and Function of the Superior Temporal Plane in Adult Males with Cleft Lip and Palate: Pathologic Enlargement with No Relationship to Childhood Hearing Deficits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriver, A. S.; Canady, J.; Richman, L.; Andreasen, N. C.; Nopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Background: In a previous study from our lab, adult males with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate (NSCLP) were shown to have significantly lower temporal lobe gray matter volume than matched controls. The current study was designed to begin a regional analysis of specific subregions of the temporal lobe. The superior temporal plane (STP) is a…

  13. Antennal electrophysiological responses of three parasitic wasps to caterpillar-induced volatiles from maize (Zea mays mays), cotton (Gossypium herbaceum), and cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    PubMed

    Gouinguené, Sandrine; Pickett, John A; Wadhams, Lester J; Birkett, Michael A; Turlings, Ted C J

    2005-05-01

    Many parasitic wasps are attracted to volatiles that are released by plants when attacked by potential hosts. The attractiveness of these semiochemicals from damaged plants has been demonstrated in many tritrophic systems, but the physiological mechanisms underlying the insect responses are poorly understood. We recorded the antennal perception by three parasitoids (Cotesia marginiventris, Microplitis rufiventris, and Campoletis sonorensis) to volatiles emitted by maize, cowpea, and cotton plants after attack by the common caterpillar pest Spodoptera littoralis. Gas chromatography-electroantennography (GC-EAG) recordings showed that wasps responded to many, but not all, of the compounds present at the physiologically relevant levels tested. Interestingly, some minor compounds, still unidentified, elicited strong responses from the wasps. These results indicate that wasps are able to detect many odorant compounds released by the plants. It remains to be determined how this information is processed and leads to the specific behavior of the parasitoids.

  14. Octopamine Regulates Antennal Sensory Neurons via Daytime-Dependent Changes in cAMP and IP3 Levels in the Hawkmoth Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Schendzielorz, Thomas; Schirmer, Katja; Stolte, Paul; Stengl, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The biogenic amine octopamine (OA) mediates reward signals in olfactory learning and memory as well as circadian rhythms of sleep and activity. In the crepuscular hawkmoth Manduca sexta, OA changed pheromone detection thresholds daytime-dependently, suggesting that OA confers circadian control of olfactory transduction. Thus, with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays we searched hawkmoth antennae for daytime-dependent changes in the concentration of OA and its respective second messengers. Antennal stimulation with OA raised cAMP- and IP3 levels. Furthermore, antennae expressed daytime-dependent changes in the concentration of OA, with maxima at Zeitgebertime (ZT) 20 when moths were active and also maximal concentrations of cAMP occurred. Maximal IP3 levels at ZT 18 and 23 correlated with maximal flight activity of male moths, while minimal IP3 levels at dusk correlated with peaks of feeding activity. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50) for activation of the OA-receptor decreased during the moth’s activity phase suggesting daytime-dependent changes in OA receptor sensitivity. With an antiserum against tyramine, the precursor of OA, two centrifugal neurons were detected projecting out into the sensory cell layer of the antenna, possibly mediating more rapid stimulus-dependent OA actions. Indeed, in fast kinetic assays OA receptor stimulation increased cAMP concentrations within 50 msec. Thus, we hypothesize that fast, stimulus-dependent centrifugal control of OA-release in the antenna occurs. Additional slow systemic OA actions might be based upon circadian release of OA into the hemolymph mediating circadian rhythms of antennal second messenger levels. The resulting rhythms of odor sensitivity are suggested to underlie circadian rhythms in odor-mediated behavior. PMID:25785721

  15. Ventromedial frontal lobe damage disrupts value maximization in humans.

    PubMed

    Camille, Nathalie; Griffiths, Cathryn A; Vo, Khoi; Fellows, Lesley K; Kable, Joseph W

    2011-05-18

    Recent work in neuroeconomics has shown that regions in orbitofrontal and medial prefrontal cortex encode the subjective value of different options during choice. However, these electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies cannot demonstrate whether such signals are necessary for value-maximizing choices. Here we used a paradigm developed in experimental economics to empirically measure and quantify violations of utility theory in humans with damage to the ventromedial frontal lobe (VMF). We show that people with such damage are more likely to make choices that violate the generalized axiom of revealed preference, which is the one necessary and sufficient condition for choices to be consistent with value maximization. These results demonstrate that the VMF plays a critical role in value-maximizing choice.

  16. Divided representation of concurrent goals in the human frontal lobes.

    PubMed

    Charron, Sylvain; Koechlin, Etienne

    2010-04-16

    The anterior prefrontal cortex (APC) confers on humans the ability to simultaneously pursue several goals. How does the brain's motivational system, including the medial frontal cortex (MFC), drive the pursuit of concurrent goals? Using brain imaging, we observed that the left and right MFC, which jointly drive single-task performance according to expected rewards, divide under dual-task conditions: While the left MFC encodes the rewards driving one task, the right MFC concurrently encodes those driving the other task. The same dichotomy was observed in the lateral frontal cortex, whereas the APC combined the rewards driving both tasks. The two frontal lobes thus divide for representing simultaneously two concurrent goals coordinated by the APC. The human frontal function seems limited to driving the pursuit of two concurrent goals simultaneously.

  17. Characterizing nonlinearity in invasive EEG recordings from temporal lobe epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casdagli, M. C.; Iasemidis, L. D.; Sackellares, J. C.; Roper, S. N.; Gilmore, R. L.; Savit, R. S.

    Invasive electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from depth and subdural electrodes, performed in eight patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, are analyzed using a variety of nonlinear techniques. A surrogate data technique is used to find strong evidence for nonlinearities in epileptogenic regions of the brain. Most of these nonlinearities are characterized as “spiking” by a wavelet analysis. A small fraction of the nonlinearities are characterized as “recurrent” by a nonlinear prediction algorithm. Recurrent activity is found to occur in spatio-temporal patterns related to the location of the epileptogenic focus. Residual delay maps, used to characterize “lag-one nonlinearity”, are remarkably stationary for a given electrode, and exhibit striking variations among electrodes. The clinical and theoretical implications of these results are discussed.

  18. Left upper lobe mass and diffuse reticular-nodular infiltrate.

    PubMed

    Jackson, H D; Carney, K J; Knautz, M A; Tenholder, M F

    1994-06-01

    We encountered a clinical problem in a young man who presented with a left upper lobe mass and a diffuse reticular-nodular infiltrate. We thought we had appropriately applied Murphy's Law (the famed bank robber who "went where the money is"), and Ockham's Razor (the philosopher William of Ockham [1285 to 1349]-"Entities are not to be multiplied beyond necessity") as we rapidly diagnosed the lung mass with computed tomography, scintigraphy, and fine-needle aspiration. However, when his invaluable previous chest radiographs arrived, bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage, brushings, and postbronchoscopy sputum revealed the more ominous diagnosis in this patient. This case illustrates the complementary nature of current imaging and bronchoscopy techniques; but, even more importantly, it demonstrates the value of the history coupled with the previous radiograph. Even an unusual case can provide lessons in cost containment.

  19. Coherent concepts are computed in the anterior temporal lobes

    PubMed Central

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.; Sage, Karen; Jones, Roy W.; Mayberry, Emily J.

    2010-01-01

    In his Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein famously noted that the formation of semantic representations requires more than a simple combination of verbal and nonverbal features to generate conceptually based similarities and differences. Classical and contemporary neuroscience has tended to focus upon how different neocortical regions contribute to conceptualization through the summation of modality-specific information. The additional yet critical step of computing coherent concepts has received little attention. Some computational models of semantic memory are able to generate such concepts by the addition of modality-invariant information coded in a multidimensional semantic space. By studying patients with semantic dementia, we demonstrate that this aspect of semantic memory becomes compromised following atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes and, as a result, the patients become increasingly influenced by superficial rather than conceptual similarities. PMID:20133780

  20. Genetic heterogeneity in familial nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) was the first epilepsy in humans that could be linked to specific mutations. It had been initially described as a channelopathy due to the fact that for nearly two decades mutations were exclusively found in subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. However, newer findings demonstrate that the molecular pathology of ADNFLE is much more complex insofar as this rare epilepsy can also be caused by genes coding for non-ion channel proteins. It is becoming obvious that the different subtypes of focal epilepsies are not strictly genetically separate entities but that mutations within the same gene might cause a clinical spectrum of different types of focal epilepsies.

  1. Coherent concepts are computed in the anterior temporal lobes.

    PubMed

    Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Sage, Karen; Jones, Roy W; Mayberry, Emily J

    2010-02-09

    In his Philosophical Investigations, Wittgenstein famously noted that the formation of semantic representations requires more than a simple combination of verbal and nonverbal features to generate conceptually based similarities and differences. Classical and contemporary neuroscience has tended to focus upon how different neocortical regions contribute to conceptualization through the summation of modality-specific information. The additional yet critical step of computing coherent concepts has received little attention. Some computational models of semantic memory are able to generate such concepts by the addition of modality-invariant information coded in a multidimensional semantic space. By studying patients with semantic dementia, we demonstrate that this aspect of semantic memory becomes compromised following atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes and, as a result, the patients become increasingly influenced by superficial rather than conceptual similarities.

  2. Mississippi delta-lobe switching during holocene eustatic fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Fairbridge, R.W.; Lowrie, A.

    1988-01-01

    Delta formation plays an integral role in basin development at a passive continental margin, with depocenters under eustatic control shifting alternately landward and seaward during time frames ranging from decades to 10/sup 8/ years. The classic Gilbert delta model was hydraulic and climatogenetic, based on his Lake Bonneville experience. The authors challenge the Gilbert model applied to the Mississippi delta, in that the model requires synchronous climatic fluctuations over a 3,327,000 km/sup 2/ drainage basin. From the Mississippi delta apex to the Gulf of Mexico, the dynamic gradient is 1:55,000, although the direct slope, over approx. = 110 km, is 1:20,000. Holocene sea levels fluctuated 1-2 m. During cool periods, as in the Little Ice Age (Maximum AD 1650-1750), sea level dropped 0.5-1 m, changing the dynamic and direct gradients to 1:50,000 and 1:18,000, respectively. During warm periods, as in the Viking times 1,000 years ago, sea level rose 0.5-0.6 m, changing the gradients to 1:78,000 and 1:28,000, respectively. Such large gradient changes increase the opportunities for river entrenchment and stream stability during cool periods and delta-lobe switching during warm periods. Available radiometric dates for the 16 individual delta lobes developed since 6,000 Ma concentrated in six delta complexes and revealed that the 1,000-1,500 yr delta-switching cyclicity roughly coincides with concurrent glacial advances and retreats. C/sub 14/ dates of peats indicate regressions, comparable to those of the North SEa. Gaps in peat-derived dates indicate transgressions.

  3. "Tectonic" hippocampal malformations in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sloviter, Robert S; Kudrimoti, Hemant S; Laxer, Kenneth D; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Chan, Stephen; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Goodman, Robert R; Pedley, Timothy A

    2004-01-01

    Histological analysis of hippocampi removed en bloc during surgical treatment of temporal lobe epilepsy revealed a subgroup of patients with bulbous expansions of the CA1 pyramidal cell/subicular layers that were consistently accompanied by "tectonic" invaginations of the adjacent dentate gyrus. Most hippocampi containing the CA1/subicular anomaly and the tectonically deformed dentate gyrus exhibited minor cell loss compared to hippocampi with typical hippocampal sclerosis, and retrospective analysis revealed that conventional imaging methods usually failed to detect subtle hippocampal atrophy or abnormal signal characteristics in patients with this anomaly. Cells within the anomaly exhibited the spherical appearance of undifferentiated pyramidal layer neurons, and were immunopositive for the neuronal marker NeuN. Immunostaining for the synaptic marker beta-synuclein suggested abnormal dentate gyrus lamination in segments containing the pyramidal cell layer anomaly, but not in unaffected areas of the same specimens. Despite differences in the extent of neuronal loss between patients with hippocampal sclerosis and those with the CA1/subicular anomaly, the incidence of antecedent febrile seizures was similar in both groups. In a comparison group of hippocampi obtained at autopsy, structural irregularities were evident, but were consistently less disruptive to hippocampal architecture than the anomalies observed in epilepsy patients. We hypothesize that developmental malformation of the CA1 pyramidal cell/subicular layers may adversely influence the subsequent development of the adjacent dentate gyrus, and may render temporal lobe structures hyperexcitable and more vulnerable to relatively innocuous seizures and injuries. Thus, these presumably developmental hippocampal anomalies may serve as substrates for early febrile seizures and subsequent epilepsy.

  4. Space to ground sequential lobe tracking of aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, P. D.; Kwon, D. W.; Polites, M.

    Growing demand for satellite communications capability coupled with shrinking government budgets, has spurred acquisition and repurposing of commercial satellite systems for government missions. One subset of these satellites provides high bandwidth communication with aerial vehicles from geosynchronous orbit. Automated tracking by these satellites of aerial vehicles improves link margin, but is not a typical function of commercial product lines. Additional tracking hardware and flight software development are required to give these commercial products tracking capability. This leads to an inefficient design from a cost and mass standpoint for a large number of slow flying aerial vehicles. Therefore, a need was identified to design a low cost tracking system that minimizes tracking specific spacecraft hardware and flight software development. This paper outlines a sequential lobe tracking system to auto track aerial vehicles and analyzes the algorithm's accuracy and sensitivity in tracking aerial vehicles using their pre-existing uplink signal. The tracking scheme consists of a satellite based RF power meter, automated ground based control of antenna pointing, and ground based processing of the tracking telemetry. The aerial vehicle was modeled as a high altitude, relatively slow moving Ka-band aircraft. To identify and evaluate a feasible design, a MATLAB model was developed to simulate an aerial vehicle, the vehicle's primary uplink signal and its variance, communication and processing latency in the design, and tracking telemetry processing. In addition, the effect on the spacecraft antenna actuators was modeled. The primary output of the model is tracking accuracy and Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine 1, 2, and 3 sigma results. Overall, this paper demonstrates the viability of a sequential lobe scheme with ground based processing as a low cost alternative for Space-to-Ground tracking of slow flying aerial vehicles.

  5. Subcortical mapping of calculation processing in the right parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Della Puppa, Alessandro; De Pellegrin, Serena; Lazzarini, Anna; Gioffrè, Giorgio; Rustemi, Oriela; Cagnin, Annachiara; Scienza, Renato; Semenza, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Preservation of calculation processing in brain surgery is crucial for patients' quality of life. Over the last decade, surgical electrostimulation was used to identify and preserve the cortical areas involved in such processing. Conversely, subcortical connectivity among different areas implicated in this function remains unclear, and the role of surgery in this domain has not been explored so far. The authors present the first 2 cases in which the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation were identified during right parietal lobe surgery. Two patients affected by a glioma located in the right parietal lobe underwent surgery with the aid of MRI neuronavigation. No calculation deficits were detected during preoperative assessment. Cortical and subcortical mapping were performed using a bipolar stimulator. The current intensity was determined by progressively increasing the amplitude by 0.5-mA increments (from a baseline of 1 mA) until a sensorimotor response was elicited. Then, addition and multiplication calculation tasks were administered. Corticectomy was performed according to both the MRI neuronavigation data and the functional findings obtained through cortical mapping. Direct subcortical electrostimulation was repeatedly performed during tumor resection. Subcortical functional sites for multiplication and addition were detected in both patients. Electrostimulation interfered with calculation processing during cortical mapping as well. Functional sites were spared during tumor removal. The postoperative course was uneventful, and calculation processing was preserved. Postoperative MRI showed complete resection of the tumor. The present preliminary study shows for the first time how functional mapping can be a promising method to intraoperatively identify the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation processing. This report therefore supports direct electrical stimulation as a promising tool to improve the current knowledge on

  6. Multimodality medical image database for temporal lobe epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siadat, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Fotouhi, Farshad A.; Elisevich, Kost

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a human brain multi-modality database for surgical candidacy determination in temporal lobe epilepsy. The focus of the paper is on content-based image management, navigation and retrieval. Several medical image-processing methods including our newly developed segmentation method are utilized for information extraction/correlation and indexing. The input data includes T1-, T2-Weighted and FLAIR MRI and ictal/interictal SPECT modalities with associated clinical data and EEG data analysis. The database can answer queries regarding issues such as the correlation between the attribute X of the entity Y and the outcome of a temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. The entity Y can be a brain anatomical structure such as the hippocampus. The attribute X can be either a functionality feature of the anatomical structure Y, calculated with SPECT modalities, such as signal average, or a volumetric/morphological feature of the entity Y such as volume or average curvature. The outcome of the surgery can be any surgery assessment such as non-verbal Wechsler memory quotient. A determination is made regarding surgical candidacy by analysis of both textual and image data. The current database system suggests a surgical determination for the cases with relatively small hippocampus and high signal intensity average on FLAIR images within the hippocampus. This indication matches the neurosurgeons expectations/observations. Moreover, as the database gets more populated with patient profiles and individual surgical outcomes, using data mining methods one may discover partially invisible correlations between the contents of different modalities of data and the outcome of the surgery.

  7. Methylphenidate enhances working memory by modulating discrete frontal and parietal lobe regions in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M A; Owen, A M; Sahakian, B J; Mavaddat, N; Pickard, J D; Robbins, T W

    2000-03-15

    The indirect catecholamine agonist methylphenidate (Ritalin) is the drug treatment of choice in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), one of the most common behavioral disorders of childhood (DSM-IV), although symptoms may persist into adulthood. Methylphenidate can enhance cognitive performance in adults and children diagnosed with AD/HD (Kempton et al., 1999; Riordan et al., 1999) and also in normal human volunteers on tasks sensitive to frontal lobe damage, including aspects of spatial working memory (SWM) performance (Elliott et al., 1997). The present study investigated changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) induced by methylphenidate during performance of a self-ordered SWM task to define the neuroanatomical loci of the beneficial effect of the drug. The results show that the methylphenidate-induced improvements in working memory performance occur with task-related reductions in rCBF in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. The beneficial effects of methylphenidate on working memory were greatest in the subjects with lower baseline working memory capacity. This is to our knowledge the first demonstration of a localization of a drug-induced improvement in SWM performance in humans and has relevance for understanding the treatment of AD/HD.

  8. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Alters Auditory-motor Integration For Voice Control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weifeng; Chen, Ziyi; Yan, Nan; Jones, Jeffery A.; Guo, Zhiqiang; Huang, Xiyan; Chen, Shaozhen; Liu, Peng; Liu, Hanjun

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common drug-refractory focal epilepsy in adults. Previous research has shown that patients with TLE exhibit decreased performance in listening to speech sounds and deficits in the cortical processing of auditory information. Whether TLE compromises auditory-motor integration for voice control, however, remains largely unknown. To address this question, event-related potentials (ERPs) and vocal responses to vocal pitch errors (1/2 or 2 semitones upward) heard in auditory feedback were compared across 28 patients with TLE and 28 healthy controls. Patients with TLE produced significantly larger vocal responses but smaller P2 responses than healthy controls. Moreover, patients with TLE exhibited a positive correlation between vocal response magnitude and baseline voice variability and a negative correlation between P2 amplitude and disease duration. Graphical network analyses revealed a disrupted neuronal network for patients with TLE with a significant increase of clustering coefficients and path lengths as compared to healthy controls. These findings provide strong evidence that TLE is associated with an atypical integration of the auditory and motor systems for vocal pitch regulation, and that the functional networks that support the auditory-motor processing of pitch feedback errors differ between patients with TLE and healthy controls. PMID:27356768

  9. Structural and functional correlates of behavioral pattern separation in the hippocampus and medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Doxey, Christopher R; Kirwan, C Brock

    2015-04-01

    Structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) are known to be involved in declarative memory processes. However, little is known about how age-related changes in MTL structures, white matter integrity, and functional connectivity affect pattern separation processes in the MTL. In this study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the volumes of MTL regions of interest, including hippocampal subfields (dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum) in healthy older and younger adults. Additionally, we used diffusion tensor imaging to measure white matter integrity for both groups. Finally, we used functional MRI to acquire resting functional connectivity measures for both groups. We show that, along with age, the volume of left CA3/dentate gyrus predicts memory performance. Differences in fractional anisotropy and the strength of resting functional connections between the hippocampus and other cortical structures implicated in memory processing were not significant predictors of performance. As previous studies have only hinted, it seems that the size of left CA3/dentate gyrus contributes more to successful discrimination between similar mnemonic representations than other hippocampal sub-fields, MTL structures, and other neuroimaging correlates. Accordingly, the implications of aging and atrophy on lure discrimination capacities are discussed.

  10. Correlations between Limbic White Matter and Cognitive Function in Temporal-Lobe Epilepsy, Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Ryan P. D.; Concha, Luis; Snyder, Thomas J.; Beaulieu, Christian; Gross, Donald William

    2014-01-01

    The limbic system is presumed to have a central role in cognitive performance, in particular memory. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between limbic white matter microstructure and neuropsychological function in temporal-lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty-one adult TLE patients, including 7 non-lesional (nlTLE) and 14 with unilateral mesial temporal sclerosis (uTLE), were studied with both DTI and hippocampal T2 relaxometry. Correlations were performed between fractional anisotropy (FA) of the bilateral fornix and cingulum, hippocampal T2, neuropsychological tests. Positive correlations were observed in the whole group for the left fornix and processing speed index. In contrast, memory tests did not show significant correlations with DTI findings. Subgroup analysis demonstrated an association between the left fornix and processing speed in nlTLE but not uTLE. No correlations were observed between hippocampal T2 and test scores in either the TLE group as a whole or after subgroup analysis. Our findings suggest that integrity of the left fornix specifically is an important anatomical correlate of cognitive function in TLE patients, in particular patients with nlTLE. PMID:25071551

  11. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy: a continuous wave type based system for human frontal lobe studies

    PubMed Central

    Venclove, Sigita; Daktariunas, Algis; Ruksenas, Osvaldas

    2015-01-01

    Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an optical non-invasive brain monitoring technology that registers changes in hemodynamic responses within the cortex of the human brain. Over the last decades fNIRS became a promising method in neurosciences: it is non-invasive, portable and can be used in long term studies. All these advantages make it suitable for educational purposes as well. This paper presents basic methodological concept of optical engineering principles and suitable applications of fNIRS. We represent a continuous wave (cw-fNIRS) system that could be used for frontal lobe studies in human adults or as demonstration equipment for physiological measurements. This system has been validated by comparing it with commercial device fNIR400 from Biopac. A comparison of geometry, data and statistical analyses suggests similar hemodynamic responses recorded by both devices. Our study suggests that this system can be used for further development and as a guideline for researchers to develop a specific tool for applications in human brain studies. PMID:26869869

  12. Noise Reduction with Lobed Mixers: Nozzle-Length and Free-Jet Speed Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Bridges, James C.; Boyd, Kathy C.

    1997-01-01

    Acoustic test results are presented for 1/4th-scaled nozzles with internal lobed mixers used for reduction of subsonic jet noise of turbofan engines with bypass ratio above 5 and jet speeds up to 830 ft/s. One coaxial and three forced lobe mixers were tested with variations in lobe penetration, cut-outs in lobe-sidewall, lobe number and nozzle-length. Measured exit flow profiles and thrusts are used to assist the inferences from acoustic data. It is observed that lobed mixers reduce the low-frequency noise due to more uniformly mixed exit flow; but they may also increase the high-frequency noise at peak perceived noise (PNL) angle and angles upstream of it due to enhanced mixing inside the nozzle. Cut-outs and low lobe penetration reduce the annoying portion of the spectrum but lead to less uniform exit flow. Due to the dominance of internal duct noise in unscalloped, high-penetration mixers their noise is not reduced as much with increase in free-jet speed as that of coaxial or cut-out lobed mixers. The latter two mixers also show no change in PNL over the wide range of nozzle-lengths tested because most of their noise sources are outside the nozzle; whereas, the former show an increase in noise with decrease in nozzle-length.

  13. Floating of the lobes of mosquito (Aedes togoi) larva for respiration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Chul; Kim, Jun Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-02-20

    Mosquito (Aedes togoi) larva has to float its siphon on the water surface to breathe air. To elucidate the floating mechanism of the siphon, morphological structures, especially the flap-like lobes and spiracle of the siphon, were observed. Wettability and dynamic behavior of the lobes on the water surface were also experimentally examined. The lobes formed a hollow cone shape under water and expanded on the water surface. The spiracle was located at the base of the cone. The lobes exhibited hydrophobic wettability. During floating process, the lobes were spread into a triangular shape in apical view, and the spiracle was exposed to air. When they were submerged in water, the lobes were folded into a cone shape to seal the spiracle and protect it from water penetration. These dynamic processes occurred at the water surface. In this study, the floating mechanism of the lobes for respiration was described based on the cross-sectional morphology of the lobes with the pressure induced by surface tension and the hydrostatic pressure proportional to depth. This study would be helpful in elucidating the behavior of mosquito larvae near the water surface and may facilitate the formulation of methods to control mosquito larvae.

  14. Intermittent torsion of accessory hepatic lobe: An unusual cause of recurrent right upper quadrant pain.

    PubMed

    Jambhekar, Kedar; Pandey, Tarun; Kaushik, Chhavi; Shah, Hemendra R

    2010-05-01

    An accessory lobe of the liver is a rare congenital anomaly that can undergo torsion and present as an acute surgical emergency. It is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. We report the preoperative utility of CT scan and MRI in the diagnosis and surgical planning of a case of intermittent accessory hepatic lobe torsion.

  15. Determinants of Autobiographical Memory in Patients with Unilateral Temporal Lobe Epilepsy or Excisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Laurent, Marie; Moscovitch, Morris; Levine, Brian; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2009-01-01

    Patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy from hippocampal origin and patients with unilateral surgical excision of an epileptic focus located in the medial temporal lobe were compared to healthy controls on a version of the Autobiographical Interview (AI) adapted to assess memory for event-specific and generic personal episodes. For both…

  16. Clinothem Lobe Growth and Possible Ties to Downslope Processes in the Gulf of Papua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, E. A. Y.; Driscoll, N. W.; Milliman, J. D.; Slingerland, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Gulf of Papua is fed by the large-floodplain Fly River and small mountainous rivers to the north, thus creating an ideal environment where end-member cases of river systems and their deltas (e.g. the large-floodplain Brazos River and the narrow-shelved Eel River) can be studied. Input from five rivers into the gulf has constructed a three-dimensional mid-shelf clinothem composed of three depositional lobes, with a central lobe downlapped by two younger lobes to the north and south. This geometry suggests that the three lobes are not syndepositional but rather that clinoform depocenters have shifted 60 km, thus bypassing adjacent accommodation. Newly examined CHIRP (Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse) seismic lines and XRF analysis of piston cores from the 2004 NSF MARGINS program reveal distinct lobes offshore that exhibit increased complexity moving shoreward. Evidence of shoreward complexity and lobe interfingering cause us to question the originally proposed mechanism for depocenter shift involving circulation changes. An alternative hypothesis that stems from distinct lobe architecture farther offshore suggests that channelized downslope processes and nearshore storage may play important roles in lobe growth.

  17. Purkinje Cell Activity in the Cerebellar Anterior Lobe after Rabbit Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, John T.; Steinmetz, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    The cerebellar anterior lobe may play a critical role in the execution and proper timing of learned responses. The current study was designed to monitor Purkinje cell activity in the rabbit cerebellar anterior lobe after eyeblink conditioning, and to assess whether Purkinje cells in recording locations may project to the interpositus nucleus.…

  18. Hypothesis on two different functionalities co-existing in frontal lobe of human brains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue

    2013-09-01

    Human frontal lobe is a key area from where our cognition, memory and emotion display or function. In medical case study, there are patients with social dysfunctions, lack of passion or emotion as result of their frontal lobe damage caused by pathological changes, traumatic damage, and brain tumor remove operations. The syndrome of frontal lobe damage remains at large unanswered medically. From early stage of pregnancy, there exists lobe layers, nerve combine, and neurons synaptic, indicating a completion of growth of functionality inside frontal lobe. However, this completion of growth does not match the growth of human intelligence. Human infants only start and complete their cognition and memory functionality one full year after their birth which is marked by huge amount of neurons synaptic inside their frontal lobe, which is not part of a continual growth of originally developed functions. By reasoning on pathological changes of frontal lobe, a hypothesis was established that two individually functional mechanisms co-existed inside one frontal lobe. This neuron system is particularly for human beings.

  19. Frontal Lobe Involvement in a Task of Time-Based Prospective Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Craig P.; Glisky, Elizabeth L.

    2009-01-01

    Time-based prospective memory (PM) has been found to be negatively affected by aging, possibly as a result of declining frontal lobe (FL) function. Despite a clear retrospective component to PM tasks, the medial temporal lobes (MTL) are thought to play only a secondary role in successful task completion. The present study investigated the role of…

  20. Material-Specific Lateralization of Working Memory in the Medial Temporal Lobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Dylan D.; Sziklas, Viviane; Garver, Krista E.; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    Mnemonic deficits in patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage arising from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are traditionally constrained to long-term episodic memory, sparing short-term and working memory (WM). This view of WM as being independent of MTL structures has recently been challenged by a small number of patient and neuroimaging…

  1. Floating of the lobes of mosquito (Aedes togoi) larva for respiration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Chul; Kim, Jun Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-01-01

    Mosquito (Aedes togoi) larva has to float its siphon on the water surface to breathe air. To elucidate the floating mechanism of the siphon, morphological structures, especially the flap-like lobes and spiracle of the siphon, were observed. Wettability and dynamic behavior of the lobes on the water surface were also experimentally examined. The lobes formed a hollow cone shape under water and expanded on the water surface. The spiracle was located at the base of the cone. The lobes exhibited hydrophobic wettability. During floating process, the lobes were spread into a triangular shape in apical view, and the spiracle was exposed to air. When they were submerged in water, the lobes were folded into a cone shape to seal the spiracle and protect it from water penetration. These dynamic processes occurred at the water surface. In this study, the floating mechanism of the lobes for respiration was described based on the cross-sectional morphology of the lobes with the pressure induced by surface tension and the hydrostatic pressure proportional to depth. This study would be helpful in elucidating the behavior of mosquito larvae near the water surface and may facilitate the formulation of methods to control mosquito larvae. PMID:28216635

  2. North-south and dawn-dusk plasma asymmetries in the distant tail lobes - ISEE 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Smith, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    ISEE 3 plasma measurements made in the distant geomagnetic tail during rapid traversals of the current sheet from one lobe to the other show that the lobe densities on opposite sides of the current sheet often differ by a factor of approximately 3-10 or more. On the dawnside of the tail the north lobe plasma has the higher density when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) has a +By component, and the south lobe plasma has the higher density when the IMF has a -By component. The sense of this asymmetry is reversed on the dusk-side of the tail. Such IMF-controlled asymmetries in lobe plasma density are consistent with earlier observations made much closer to earth and can be interpreted most simply as a consequence of an 'open' geomagnetic tail.

  3. Increased expression of interleukin 17 in the cortex and hippocampus from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    He, Jiao-Jiang; Sun, Fei-Ji; Wang, Yu; Luo, Xiao-Qin; Lei, Peng; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Di; Li, Zhi-Yun; Yang, Hui

    2016-09-15

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most common form of focal epilepsies in adults and proinflammatory cytokines have long been thought to play an important role in pathogenesis and epileptogenicity. In the present study, we investigated the levels and expression patterns of the interleukin 17 (IL-17) system in temporal neocortex and hippocampus from 24 patients with MTLE and 8 control (Ctr) samples. We found that IL-17 and IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) were clearly upregulated in MTLE at both mRNA and protein levels, compared with Ctr. Immunostaining indicated that neurons, astrocytes, microglia and endothelial cells of blood vessels are the major sources of IL-17. These findings suggest that IL-17 system may be involved in the pathogenesis and epileptogenicity of MTLE.

  4. First evidence of the use of olfaction in Odonata behaviour.

    PubMed

    Piersanti, Silvana; Frati, Francesca; Conti, Eric; Gaino, Elda; Rebora, Manuela; Salerno, Gianandrea

    2014-03-01

    Dragonflies and damselflies are among the most ancient winged insects. Adults belonging to this order are visually oriented and are considered anosmic on the basis of neuroanatomical investigations. As a consequence, the chemical ecology of these predatory insects has long been neglected. Morphological and electrophysiological data demonstrated that dragonfly antennae possess olfactory sensilla. Additionally, a neuroanatomical study revealed the presence of spherical knots in the aglomerular antennal lobe that could allow for the perception of odour. However, the biological role of the antennal olfactory sensilla remains unknown, and no bioassay showing the use of olfaction in Odonata has been performed thus far. Here, we demonstrate through behavioural assays that adults of Ischnura elegans are attracted by olfactory cues emitted by prey; furthermore, using electrophysiological single-cell recordings, we prove that the antennal olfactory sensilla of I. elegans respond to prey odour. Our results clearly demonstrate the involvement of antennal olfactory sensilla in Odonata predation, thus showing, for the first time, the use of olfaction in Odonata biology. This finding indicates that the nervous system of Odonata is able to receive and process olfactory information, suggesting that the simple organisation of the antennal lobe does not prevent the use of olfaction in insects.

  5. Executive Functions in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Danielle I.; Saklofske, Donald H.; Schwean, Vicki L.; Montgomery, Janine M.; Thorne, Keoma J.; McCrimmon, Adam W.

    2017-01-01

    Researchers have proposed that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized, at least in part, by executive function (EF) difficulties associated with the integrity of the frontal lobe. Given the paucity of research regarding EFs in young adults with high functioning ASD (HF-ASD), this research involves an examination of various indices of EF…

  6. The Necessity of the Medial Temporal Lobe for Statistical Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schapiro, Anna C.; Gregory, Emma; Landau, Barbara; McCloskey, Michael; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    The sensory input that we experience is highly patterned, and we are experts at detecting these regularities. Although the extraction of such regularities, or statistical learning (SL), is typically viewed as a cortical process, recent studies have implicated the medial temporal lobe (MTL), including the hippocampus. These studies have employed fMRI, leaving open the possibility that the MTL is involved but not necessary for SL. Here, we examined this issue in a case study of LSJ, a patient with complete bilateral hippocampal loss and broader MTL damage. In Experiments 1 and 2, LSJ and matched control participants were passively exposed to a continuous sequence of shapes, syllables, scenes, or tones containing temporal regularities in the co-occurrence of items. In a subsequent test phase, the control groups exhibited reliable SL in all conditions, successfully discriminating regularities from recombinations of the same items into novel foil sequences. LSJ, however, exhibited no SL, failing to discriminate regularities from foils. Experiment 3 ruled out more general explanations for this failure, such as inattention during exposure or difficulty following test instructions, by showing that LSJ could discriminate which individual items had been exposed. These findings provide converging support for the importance of the MTL in extracting temporal regularities. PMID:24456393

  7. The timing of anterior temporal lobe involvement in semantic processing.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rebecca L; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Pobric, Gorana

    2015-07-01

    Despite indications that regions within the anterior temporal lobe (ATL) might make a crucial contribution to pan-modal semantic representation, to date there have been no investigations of when during semantic processing the ATL plays a critical role. To test the timing of the ATL involvement in semantic processing, we studied the effect of double-pulse TMS on behavioral responses in semantic and difficulty-matched control tasks. Chronometric TMS was delivered over the left ATL (10 mm from the tip of the temporal pole along the middle temporal gyrus). During each trial, two pulses of TMS (40 msec apart) were delivered either at baseline (before stimulus presentation) or at one of the experimental time points 100, 250, 400, and 800 msec poststimulus onset. A significant disruption to performance was identified from 400 msec on the semantic task but not on the control assessment. Our results not only reinforce the key role of the left ATL in semantic representation but also indicate that its contribution is especially important around 400 msec poststimulus onset. Together, these facts suggest that the ATL may be one of the neural sources of the N400 ERP component.

  8. Medial temporal lobe roles in human path integration.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Philbeck, John W; Woods, Adam J; Gajewski, Daniel A; Arthur, Joeanna C; Potolicchio, Samuel J; Levy, Lucien; Caputy, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Path integration is a process in which observers derive their location by integrating self-motion signals along their locomotion trajectory. Although the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is thought to take part in path integration, the scope of its role for path integration remains unclear. To address this issue, we administered a variety of tasks involving path integration and other related processes to a group of neurosurgical patients whose MTL was unilaterally resected as therapy for epilepsy. These patients were unimpaired relative to neurologically intact controls in many tasks that required integration of various kinds of sensory self-motion information. However, the same patients (especially those who had lesions in the right hemisphere) walked farther than the controls when attempting to walk without vision to a previewed target. Importantly, this task was unique in our test battery in that it allowed participants to form a mental representation of the target location and anticipate their upcoming walking trajectory before they began moving. Thus, these results put forth a new idea that the role of MTL structures for human path integration may stem from their participation in predicting the consequences of one's locomotor actions. The strengths of this new theoretical viewpoint are discussed.

  9. Body and movement: consciousness in the parietal lobes.

    PubMed

    Daprati, Elena; Sirigu, Angela; Nico, Daniele

    2010-02-01

    A critical issue related to the notion of identity concerns our ability to discriminate between internally and externally generated stimuli. This basic mechanism likely relies on perceptual and motor information, and requires that both motor plans and the resulting activity be continuously mapped on a reliable body representation. It has been widely demonstrated that the parietal cortices of the two hemispheres play a crucial role, albeit differently specialized, in both monitoring internal representation of our own actions and sustaining body representation. Ample neuropsychological evidence indicates that while damage to the left parietal cortex affects the ability to generate and/or monitor an internal model of one's own movement, lesions of the right parietal lobe are largely responsible for severe perturbations of the internal representation of one's own body. In the present paper, we discuss the processes involved in body perception and self-recognition and propose a tentative model describing how the right and left parietal cortices contribute in integrating various sources of information to produce the unique, elementary experience of one's own body in motion. The ecological value of this process in constructing identity and autobiographical experience will be discussed.

  10. Increased temporolimbic cortical folding complexity in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Voets, N.L.; Bernhardt, B.C.; Kim, H.; Yoon, U.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Converging evidence suggests that abnormalities of brain development may play a role in the pathogenesis of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). As sulco-gyral patterns are thought to be a footprint of cortical development, we set out to quantitatively map folding complexity across the neocortex in TLE. Additionally, we tested whether there was a relationship between cortical complexity and features of hippocampal maldevelopment, commonly referred to as malrotation. Methods: To quantify folding complexity, we obtained whole-brain surface-based measures of absolute mean cortical curvature from MRI scans acquired in 43 drug-resistant patients with TLE with unilateral hippocampal atrophy, and 40 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. In patients, we correlated changes in cortical curvature with 3-dimensional measures of hippocampal positioning. Results: We found increased folding complexity in the temporolimbic cortices encompassing parahippocampal, temporopolar, insular, and fronto-opercular regions. Increased complexity was observed ipsilateral to the seizure focus in patients with left TLE (LTLE), whereas these changes were bilateral in patients with right TLE (RTLE). In both TLE groups, increased temporolimbic complexity was associated with increased hippocampal malrotation. We found tendencies for increased complexity in bilateral posterior temporal cortices in LTLE and contralateral parahippocampal cortices in RTLE to be predictive of unfavorable seizure outcome after surgery. Conclusion: The anatomic distribution of increased cortical complexity overlapping with limbic seizure networks in TLE and its association with hippocampal maldevelopment further imply that neurodevelopmental factors may play a role in the epileptogenic process of TLE. PMID:21148116

  11. First bite syndrome after deep lobe parotidectomy: case report.

    PubMed

    Houle, Ashley; Mandel, Louis

    2014-08-01

    First bite syndrome (FBS) has recently been recognized in published medical studies; however, only 2 cases have been reported in dental studies. The syndrome was defined by Netterville and Civantos and Netterville et al as originating from a postoperative complication after parapharyngeal space (PPS) surgery. The most frequent reason for PPS surgery is the presence of a deep lobe parotid gland (PG) neoplasm, with cervical schwannoma the second most common lesion mandating surgery in this space. Surgical therapeutic procedures in the PPS for these tumors can inadvertently ablate the sympathetic nerve supply to the PG. Subsequently, with the first introduction of food into the mouth, severe intense and debilitating pain will develop and radiate through the upper neck, PG, and auricular regions on the ipsilateral surgical side. The intense pain will last approximately 5 seconds.With continued mastication, the pain will subside, but not totally abate. After the meal, the pain will gradually disappear, only to return with the next masticatory period. The pain is initiated by salivation, whether by food or the thought of food and will be accentuated by acidic sialogogic foods. Usually, with the passage of time, some gradual improvement in the intensity and frequency of the pain episodes can be anticipated.

  12. Decoding Representations of Scenes in the Medial Temporal Lobes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnici, Heidi M; Kumaran, Dharshan; Chadwick, Martin J; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Hassabis, Demis; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2012-01-01

    Recent theoretical perspectives have suggested that the function of the human hippocampus, like its rodent counterpart, may be best characterized in terms of its information processing capacities. In this study, we use a combination of high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, multivariate pattern analysis, and a simple decision making task, to test specific hypotheses concerning the role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in scene processing. We observed that while information that enabled two highly similar scenes to be distinguished was widely distributed throughout the MTL, more distinct scene representations were present in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in performing pattern separation. As well as viewing the two similar scenes, during scanning participants also viewed morphed scenes that spanned a continuum between the original two scenes. We found that patterns of hippocampal activity during morph trials, even when perceptual inputs were held entirely constant (i.e., in 50% morph trials), showed a robust relationship with participants' choices in the decision task. Our findings provide evidence for a specific computational role for the hippocampus in sustaining detailed representations of complex scenes, and shed new light on how the information processing capacities of the hippocampus may influence the decision making process. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21656874

  13. Medial temporal lobe damage impairs representation of simple stimuli.

    PubMed

    Warren, David E; Duff, Melissa C; Tranel, Daniel; Cohen, Neal J

    2010-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage in humans is typically thought to produce a circumscribed impairment in the acquisition of new enduring memories, but recent reports have documented deficits even in short-term maintenance. We examined possible maintenance deficits in a population of MTL amnesics, with the goal of characterizing their impairments as either representational drift or outright loss of representation over time. Patients and healthy comparisons performed a visual search task in which the similarity of various lures to a target was varied parametrically. Stimuli were simple shapes varying along one of several visual dimensions. The task was performed in two conditions, one presenting a sample target simultaneously with the search array and the other imposing a delay between sample and array. Eye-movement data collected during search revealed that the duration of fixations to items varied with lure-target similarity for all participants, i.e., fixations were longer for items more similar to the target. In the simultaneous condition, patients and comparisons exhibited an equivalent effect of similarity on fixation durations. However, imposing a delay modulated the effect differently for the two groups: in comparisons, fixation duration to similar items was exaggerated; in patients, the original effect was diminished. These findings indicate that MTL lesions subtly impair short-term maintenance of even simple stimuli, with performance reflecting not the complete loss of the maintained representation but rather a degradation or progressive drift of the representation over time.

  14. Crucial role of astrocytes in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Steinhäuser, C; Grunnet, M; Carmignoto, G

    2016-05-26

    Astrocytes sense and respond to synaptic activity through activation of different neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Astrocytes are also coupled by gap junctions, which allow these cells to redistribute through the glial network the K(+) ions excessively accumulated at sites of intense neuronal activity. Work over the past two decades has revealed important roles for astrocytes in brain physiology, and it is therefore not surprising that recent studies unveiled their involvement in the etiology of neurological disorders such as epilepsy. Investigation of specimens from patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy and epilepsy models revealed alterations in expression, localization and function of astrocytic connexins, K(+) and water channels. In addition, disturbed gliotransmission as well as malfunction of glutamate transporters and of the astrocytic glutamate- and adenosine-converting enzymes - glutamine synthetase and adenosine kinase, respectively - have been observed in epileptic tissues. Accordingly, increasing evidence indicates that dysfunctional astrocytes are crucially involved in processes leading to epilepsy. These new insights might foster the search for new targets for the development of new, more efficient anti-epileptogenic therapies.

  15. Single-cell recordings in the human medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Hernan G; Ison, Matias J; Pedreira, Carlos; Valentin, Antonio; Alarcon, Gonzalo; Selway, Richard; Richardson, Mark P; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Recordings from individual neurons in patients who are implanted with depth electrodes for clinical reasons have opened the possibility to narrow down the gap between neurophysiological studies in animals and non-invasive (e.g. functional magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalogram, magnetoencephalography) investigations in humans. Here we provide a description of the main procedures for electrode implantation and recordings, the experimental paradigms used and the main steps for processing the data. We also present key characteristics of the so-called ‘concept cells’, neurons in the human medial temporal lobe with selective and invariant responses that represent the meaning of the stimulus, and discuss their proposed role in declarative memory. Finally, we present novel results dealing with the stability of the representation given by these neurons, by studying the effect of stimulus repetition in the strength of the responses. In particular, we show that, after an initial decay, the response strength reaches an asymptotic value after approximately 15 presentations that remains above baseline for the whole duration of the experiment. PMID:25163775

  16. Functional Connectivity Homogeneity Correlates with Duration of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Zulfi; Chiang, Sharon; Yeh, Hsiang J.; Engel, Jerome; Stern, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) often is associated with progressive changes to seizures, memory, and mood during its clinical course. However, the cerebral changes related to this progression are not well understood. Because the changes may be related to changes in brain networks, we used functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) to determine whether brain network parameters relate to the duration of TLE. Graph theory based analysis of the sites of reported regions of TLE abnormality, was performed on resting state fMRI data in 48 subjects: 24 controls, 13 patients with left TLE, and 11 patients with right TLE. Various network parameters were analyzed including betweenness centrality (BC), clustering coefficient (CC), path length (PL), small-world index (SWI), global efficiency (GE), connectivity strength (CS), and connectivity diversity (CD). These were compared for TLE as a group, compared to controls, and for left and right TLE separately. Association of changes in network parameters with epilepsy duration was also evaluated. We found that CC, CS and CD were decreased in TLE, compared to control subjects. Analyzed according to epilepsy duration, TLE showed a progressive reduction in CD. In conclusion, we found that several network parameters were decreased in TLE compared to controls, which suggested reduced connectivity in TLE. Reduction in CD associated with epilepsy duration suggests a homogenization of connections over time in TLE, indicating a reduction of the normal repertoire of stronger and weaker connections to other brain regions. PMID:25873437

  17. Influence of anxiety on memory performance in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Franklin C.; Westerveld, Michael; Langfitt, John T.; Hamberger, Marla; Hamid, Hamada; Shinnar, Shlomo; Sperling, Michael R.; Devinsky, Orrin; Barr, William; Tracy, Joseph; Masur, David; Bazil, Carl W.; Spencer, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which anxiety contributed to inconsistent material-specific memory difficulties among 243 temporal lobe epilepsy patients from the Multisite Epilepsy Study. Visual memory performance on the Rey Complex Figure Test (RCFT) was lower for those with high versus low level of anxiety, but was not found to be related to side of TLE. Verbal memory on the California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT) was significantly lower for left than right TLE patients with low anxiety, but equally impaired for those with high anxiety. These results suggest that we can place more confidence in the ability of verbal memory tests like the CVLT to lateralize to left TLE for those with low anxiety, but that verbal memory will be less likely to produce lateralizing information for those with high anxiety. This suggests that more caution is needed when interpreting verbal memory tests for those with high anxiety. These results indicated that RCFT performance was significantly affected by anxiety and did not lateralize to either side, regardless of anxiety level. This study adds to the existing literature which suggests that drawing-based visual memory tests do not lateralize among TLE patients, regardless of anxiety level. PMID:24291525

  18. Impaired recognition of scary music following unilateral temporal lobe excision.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nathalie; Peretz, Isabelle; Noulhiane, Marion; Hasboun, Dominique; Beckett, Christine; Baulac, Michel; Samson, Séverine

    2005-03-01

    Music constitutes an ideal means to create a sense of suspense in films. However, there has been minimal investigation into the underlying cerebral organization for perceiving danger created by music. In comparison, the amygdala's role in recognition of fear in non-musical contexts has been well established. The present study sought to fill this gap in exploring how patients with amygdala resection recognize emotional expression in music. To this aim, we tested 16 patients with left (LTR; n = 8) or right (RTR; n = 8) medial temporal resection (including amygdala) for the relief of medically intractable seizures and 16 matched controls in an emotion recognition task involving instrumental music. The musical selections were purposely created to induce fear, peacefulness, happiness and sadness. Participants were asked to rate to what extent each musical passage expressed these four emotions on 10-point scales. In order to check for the presence of a perceptual problem, the same musical selections were presented to the participants in an error detection task. None of the patients was found to perform below controls in the perceptual task. In contrast, both LTR and RTR patients were found to be impaired in the recognition of scary music. Recognition of happy and sad music was normal. These findings suggest that the anteromedial temporal lobe (including the amygdala) plays a role in the recognition of danger in a musical context.

  19. Rotational polarities of sudden impulses in the magnetotail lobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Lepping, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    A sudden impulse (SI) is a sudden change in the magnetic field strength which is caused by a change in the solar wind pressure and is observed throughout the magnetosphere. In this report we have examined the rotations of the magnetic field vectors at times of SIs in the magnetotail lobe, by using IMP 6, 7, and 8 magnetometer data. The following properties have been found: (1) at the time of SI the arrowhead of the magnetic vector tends to rotate in one plane; (2) the plane of rotation tends to include the unperturbed magnetic field vector; (3) the plane of rotation tends to be aligned with the radial direction from the magnetotail axis; and (4) the magnetic vectors have a particular rotational polarity: when the plane of rotation is viewed so that the Sun is to the right of the viewed plane and the magnetotail axis is to the bottom, the arrowhead of the vector tends to rotate counterclockwise in this plane. These magnetic vector properties are consistent with those expected when part of an increase in solar wind lateral pressure squeezes the magnetotail axisymmetrically while moving tailward.

  20. Hush sign: a new clinical sign in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Gulnihal; Bilir, Erhan; Erdem, Atilla; Gomceli, Yasemin B; Kurt, G Semiha; Serdaroglu, Ayse

    2005-05-01

    Neurologists have been analyzing the clinical behaviors that occur during seizures for many years. Several ictal behaviors have been defined in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Ictal behaviors are especially important in the evaluation of epilepsy surgery candidates. We propose a new lateralizing sign in TLE originating from the nondominant hemisphere-the "hush" sign. Our patients were 30- and 21-year old women (Cases 1 and 2, respectively). Their epileptogenic foci were localized to the right mesial temporal region after noninvasive presurgical investigations. Case 1 had no cranial MRI abnormality, whereas cranial MRI revealed right hippocampal atrophy in Case 2. These women repeatedly moved their right index fingers to their mouth while puckering their lips during complex partial seizures. We have named this ictal behavior the "hush" sign. Anterior temporal lobectomy with amygdalohippocampectomy was performed in both patients, and pathological examinations revealed hippocampal sclerosis. The "hush" sign no longer occurred after seizures were controlled. They were seizure free as of 30 and 31 months of follow-up, respectively. We believe that the "hush" sign may be supportive of a diagnosis of TLE originating from the nondominant hemisphere. This sign may occur as a result of ictal activation of a specific brain region in this hemisphere.

  1. Semantic Processing Impairment in Patients with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes-Bautista, Amanda G.; Rodríguez-Camacho, Mario; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E.; Rodríguez-Agudelo, Yaneth

    2015-01-01

    The impairment in episodic memory system is the best-known cognitive deficit in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recent studies have shown evidence of semantic disorders, but they have been less studied than episodic memory. The semantic dysfunction in TLE has various cognitive manifestations, such as the presence of language disorders characterized by defects in naming, verbal fluency, or remote semantic information retrieval, which affects the ability of patients to interact with their surroundings. This paper is a review of recent research about the consequences of TLE on semantic processing, considering neuropsychological, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging findings, as well as the functional role of the hippocampus in semantic processing. The evidence from these studies shows disturbance of semantic memory in patients with TLE and supports the theory of declarative memory of the hippocampus. Functional neuroimaging studies show an inefficient compensatory functional reorganization of semantic networks and electrophysiological studies show a lack of N400 effect that could indicate that the deficit in semantic processing in patients with TLE could be due to a failure in the mechanisms of automatic access to lexicon. PMID:26257956

  2. On-line, voluntary control of human temporal lobe neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Moran; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Mormann, Florian; Kraskov, Alexander; Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    Daily life continually confronts us with an exuberance of external, sensory stimuli competing with a rich stream of internal deliberations, plans and ruminations. The brain must select one or more of these for further processing. How this competition is resolved across multiple sensory and cognitive regions is not known; nor is it clear how internal thoughts and attention regulate this competition1–4. Recording from single neurons in patients implanted with intracranial electrodes for clinical reasons5–9, here we demonstrate that humans can regulate the activity of their neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) to alter the outcome of the contest between external images and their internal representation. Subjects looked at a hybrid superposition of two images representing familiar individuals, landmarks, objects or animals and had to enhance one image at the expense of the other, competing one. Simultaneously, the spiking activity of their MTL neurons in different subregions and hemispheres was decoded in real time to control the content of the hybrid. Subjects reliably regulated, often on the first trial, the firing rate of their neurons, increasing the rate of some while simultaneously decreasing the rate of others. They did so by focusing onto one image, which gradually became clearer on the computer screen in front of their eyes, and thereby overriding sensory input. On the basis of the firing of these MTL neurons, the dynamics of the competition between visual images in the subject's mind was visualized on an external display. PMID:20981100

  3. On-line, voluntary control of human temporal lobe neurons.

    PubMed

    Cerf, Moran; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Mormann, Florian; Kraskov, Alexander; Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2010-10-28

    Daily life continually confronts us with an exuberance of external, sensory stimuli competing with a rich stream of internal deliberations, plans and ruminations. The brain must select one or more of these for further processing. How this competition is resolved across multiple sensory and cognitive regions is not known; nor is it clear how internal thoughts and attention regulate this competition. Recording from single neurons in patients implanted with intracranial electrodes for clinical reasons, here we demonstrate that humans can regulate the activity of their neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) to alter the outcome of the contest between external images and their internal representation. Subjects looked at a hybrid superposition of two images representing familiar individuals, landmarks, objects or animals and had to enhance one image at the expense of the other, competing one. Simultaneously, the spiking activity of their MTL neurons in different subregions and hemispheres was decoded in real time to control the content of the hybrid. Subjects reliably regulated, often on the first trial, the firing rate of their neurons, increasing the rate of some while simultaneously decreasing the rate of others. They did so by focusing onto one image, which gradually became clearer on the computer screen in front of their eyes, and thereby overriding sensory input. On the basis of the firing of these MTL neurons, the dynamics of the competition between visual images in the subject's mind was visualized on an external display.

  4. Seizure-Induced Oxidative Stress in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An insult to the brain (such as the first seizure) causes excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, and production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). ROS and RNS produced during status epilepticus (SE) overwhelm the mitochondrial natural antioxidant defense mechanism. This leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and damage to the mitochondrial DNA. This in turn affects synthesis of various enzyme complexes that are involved in electron transport chain. Resultant effects that occur during epileptogenesis include lipid peroxidation, reactive gliosis, hippocampal neurodegeneration, reorganization of neural networks, and hypersynchronicity. These factors predispose the brain to spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS), which ultimately establish into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This review discusses some of these issues. Though antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are beneficial to control/suppress seizures, their long term usage has been shown to increase ROS/RNS in animal models and human patients. In established TLE, ROS/RNS are shown to be harmful as they can increase the susceptibility to SRS. Further, in this paper, we review briefly the data from animal models and human TLE patients on the adverse effects of antiepileptic medications and the plausible ameliorating effects of antioxidants as an adjunct therapy. PMID:25650148

  5. Kiloparsec-scale Jets in Lobe-dominated Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hough, David; Jones, Gareth

    2011-10-01

    We are investigating the physics of kiloparsec-scale jets in a complete sample of lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs). Previously, Bridle et al. (1994, AJ, 108,766) reported results for 13 of the 25 LDQs in a well-defined 3CR complete sample. Here, we add results for 8 more LDQs, and present new analyses for all 21 sources (84% completeness). Two key, but tentative, results in Bridle et al. are confirmed here: (1) the prominences (normalized brightnesses) of the parsec-scale and kiloparsec-scale jets are strongly correlated (99.9% confidence), and (2) the prominence of the kpc jet terminal hot spots is anti-correlated with jet bending angle (99% confidence, but this result is highly dependent on just 3 sources). Because relativistic motion has been directly observed in Doppler-boosted pc jets, the first result strongly suggests relativistic motion on kpc scales. The second result suggests that highly-bent kpc jets are less able to form powerful hot spots. Future work will explore longitudinal and transverse velocity fields in the kpc jets, as well as inverse Compton models for their X-ray emission.

  6. The morphology and formation of flow-lobe tumuli on Icelandic shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M. J.; Gudmundsson, A.

    1996-08-01

    Three types of tumuli are recognized on monogenetic shield volcanoes in Iceland, namely (1) lava-coated tumuli, (2) upper-slope tumuli and (3) flow-lobe tumuli. Flow-lobe tumuli grade into lava rises, which are larger inflation structures, but both structures have a similar mode of emplacement. The areal distribution of flow-lobe tumuli in the flow field differs from that of lava-coated tumuli and upper-slope tumuli. Flow-lobe tumuli are frequent in the medial and distal parts of pahoehoe flow fields, whereas the other two tumulus types are more frequent in the proximal parts of the flow fields. The flow-lobe tumuli also differ from the two other tumulus types as regards their morphology: they are significantly larger, have shallower flanks, and do not have extensive outflows from the cracks. The vesicle distribution within the flow-lobe tumuli is similar to that of P-type flow lobes: a fairly dense zone is situated between the upper and lower vesicular zones. Each flow-lobe tumulus is an individual lobe that inflates and forms tension cracks in the lava crust. Major lava tubes are mostly absent from the areas where flow-lobe tumuli form and, therefore, the emplacement of flow-lobe tumuli must be related to secondary, short-lived pathways of lava. The flow-lobe tumuli inside the flow fields of Icelandic shield volcanoes are morphologically identical to those flow-lobe tumuli that are found in the margins of flow fields of other Icelandic volcanoes. These observations allow us to model the flow-lobe tumuli as morphological variants of P-type flow lobes forming along terminating secondary lava paths. Flow-lobe tumuli form at low lava-supply rates of the order of 10 -2 - 10 -5 m 3/s and are generated by inflation of the lava crust as a result of magmatic overpressure in the associated lava core. We model the tumulus as a circular elastic plate that becomes uplifted, inflated and fractured by a uniform magmatic overpressure at its bottom. We conclude that (1) the

  7. Intrinsic controls on the range of volumes, morphologies, and dimensions of submarine lobes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prelat, A.; Covault, J.A.; Hodgson, D.M.; Fildani, A.; Flint, S.S.

    2010-01-01

    Submarine lobe dimensions from six different systems are compared: 1) the exhumed Permian Fan 3 lobe complex of the Tanqua Karoo, South Africa; 2) the modern Amazon fan channel-mouth lobe complex, offshore Brazil; 3) a portion of the modern distal Za??re fan, offshore Angola/Congo; 4) a Pleistocene fan of the Kutai basin, subsurface offshore Indonesia; 5) the modern Golo system, offshore east Corsica, France; and 6) a shallow subsurface lobe complex , offshore Nigeria. These six systems have significantly different source-to-sink configurations (shelf dimension and slope topography), sediment supply characteristics (available grain size range and supply rate), tectonic settings, (palaeo) latitude, and delivery systems. Despite these differences, lobe deposits share similar geometric and dimensional characteristics. Lobes are grouped into two distinct populations of geometries that can be related to basin floor topography. The first population corresponds to areally extensive but thin lobes (average width 14km??length 35km??thickness 12m) that were deposited onto low relief basin floor areas. Examples of such systems include the Tanqua Karoo, the Amazon, and the Za??re systems. The second population corresponds to areally smaller but thicker lobes (average width 5km??length 8km??thickness 30m) that were deposited into settings with higher amplitude of relief, like in the Corsican trough, the Kutai basin, and offshore Nigeria. The two populations of lobe types, however, share similar volumes (a narrow range around 1 or 2km3), which suggests that there is a control to the total volume of sediment that individual lobes can reach before they shift to a new locus of deposition. This indicates that the extrinsic processes control the number of lobes deposited per unit time rather than their dimensions. Two alternative hypotheses are presented to explain the similarities in lobe volumes calculated from the six very different systems. The first states that the wide range of

  8. Réalisation d'un réseau de deux télescopes en tant qu'antenne synthétique d'émission pour les communications inter satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagne, J.; Delage, L.; Reynaud, F.

    2004-11-01

    Nous présentons une étude expérimentale préliminaire d'une antenne synthétique en émission composée d'un réseau de deux doublets de lentilles. Le flux lumineux émis par la source est acheminé jusqu'aux lentilles élémentaires constituant l'antenne par l'intermédiaire de fibres optiques. Nous réalisons expérimentalement le déplacement de l'ensemble de la figure de diffraction en champ lointain, ce qui correspond à un changement de la direction globale d'émission par l'action simultanée sur la direction d'émission des champs élémentaires (tilt) et de la différence de phase entre les champs élémentaires (piston différentiel). Nous obtenons expérimentalement un signal d'erreur destiné à l'asservissement du piston de l'antenne autour d'un point de fonctionnement donné.

  9. Turbofan forced mixer lobe flow modeling. 1: Experimental and analytical assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T.; Paterson, R. W.; Skebe, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    A joint analytical and experimental investigation of three-dimensional flowfield development within the lobe region of turbofan forced mixer nozzles is described. The objective was to develop a method for predicting the lobe exit flowfield. In the analytical approach, a linearized inviscid aerodynamical theory was used for representing the axial and secondary flows within the three-dimensional convoluted mixer lobes and three-dimensional boundary layer analysis was applied thereafter to account for viscous effects. The experimental phase of the program employed three planar mixer lobe models having different waveform shapes and lobe heights for which detailed measurements were made of the three-dimensional velocity field and total pressure field at the lobe exit plane. Velocity data was obtained using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and total pressure probing and hot wire anemometry were employed to define exit plane total pressure and boundary layer development. Comparison of data and analysis was performed to assess analytical model prediction accuracy. As a result of this study a planar mixed geometry analysis was developed. A principal conclusion is that the global mixer lobe flowfield is inviscid and can be predicted from an inviscid analysis and Kutta condition.

  10. Range side lobe inversion for chirp-encoded dual-band tissue harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Shen, Che-Chou; Peng, Jun-Kai; Wu, Chi

    2014-02-01

    Dual-band (DB) harmonic imaging is performed by transmitting and receiving at both fundamental band (f0) and second-harmonic band (2f0). In our previous work, particular chirp excitation has been developed to increase the signal- to-noise ratio in DB harmonic imaging. However, spectral overlap between the second-order DB harmonic signals results in range side lobes in the pulse compression. In this study, a novel range side lobe inversion (RSI) method is developed to alleviate the level of range side lobes from spectral overlap. The method is implemented by firing an auxiliary chirp to change the polarity of the range side lobes so that the range side lobes can be suppressed in the combination of the original chirp and the auxiliary chirp. Hydrophone measurements show that the RSI method reduces the range side lobe level (RSLL) and thus increases the quality of pulse compression in DB harmonic imaging. With the signal bandwidth of 60%, the RSLL decreases from -23 dB to -36 dB and the corresponding compression quality improves from 78% to 94%. B-mode images also indicate that the magnitude of range side lobe is suppressed by 7 dB when the RSI method is applied.

  11. 9 CFR 325.8 - Transportation and other transactions concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from official establishments or in commerce; provisions... transactions concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from official establishments or in commerce; provisions and restrictions. (a) Lungs or lung lobes, other than those condemned under § 310.16(b) of...

  12. 9 CFR 325.8 - Transportation and other transactions concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from official establishments or in commerce; provisions... transactions concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from official establishments or in commerce; provisions and restrictions. (a) Lungs or lung lobes, other than those condemned under § 310.16(b) of...

  13. 9 CFR 325.8 - Transportation and other transactions concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from official establishments or in commerce; provisions... transactions concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from official establishments or in commerce; provisions and restrictions. (a) Lungs or lung lobes, other than those condemned under § 310.16(b) of...

  14. 9 CFR 325.8 - Transportation and other transactions concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from official establishments or in commerce; provisions... transactions concerning certain undenatured lungs or lung lobes from official establishments or in commerce; provisions and restrictions. (a) Lungs or lung lobes, other than those condemned under § 310.16(b) of...

  15. Vortical and turbulent structure of planar and lobed mixer free-shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Duane Clark

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of the free-shear layer vortical and turbulent structure downstream of a lobed mixer has been conducted. Pulsed-laser flow visualization with smoke and three-dimensional velocity measurements with triple-sensor hot film anemometry were obtained for two lobed mixer configurations (symmetric and unsymmetric waveforms) and a baseline, planar configuration. Both laminar and turbulent initial boundary layer conditions were documented for each of the three configurations. The main result of this investigation is that a new vortex structure was found to exist for the lobed mixers in addition to the well-known streamwise vortex array. The normal vortex (due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) sheds periodically from the convoluted trailing edge of the lobed mixer and plays a major part in the enhanced mixing process in combination with the streamwise vorticity. The streamwise vorticity deforms the normal vortex into a pinched-off structure that creates intense turbulence and mixing. The scale of the normal vortex was approximately one fourth that of the planar case, thereby introducing a small-scale turbulence over a large cross-stream area of the flow that dominates the near-field Reynolds shear stress distribution. Thus, the lobed mixer free-shear layer provides enhanced mixing down to the molecular scale. The shear layer growth rate for the first 5-6 lobe heights was substantially greater than the planar free-shear layer due to the normal and streamwise vortex interaction. Downstream of six lobe heights, the growth rate slowed considerably to a rate below that of the planar configuration due to the reduced turbulent kinetic energy of a double-layered shear layer structure. The streamwise and normal vorticity were completely dissipated by 5-6 lobe heights. Also, the lobe mixer development was found to be surprisingly insensitive to initial laminar and turbulent boundary layer conditions (unlike the planar case).

  16. Vortical and Turbulent Structure of Planar and Lobed Mixer Free-Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, Duane Clark

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of the free-shear layer vortical and turbulent structure downstream of a lobed mixer has been conducted. Pulsed-laser flow visualization with smoke and three-dimensional velocity measurements with triple-sensor hot film anemometry were obtained for two lobed mixer configurations (symmetric and unsymmetric waveforms) and a baseline, planar configuration. Both laminar and turbulent initial boundary layer conditions were documented for each of the three configurations. The main result of this investigation is that a new vortex structure was found to exist for the lobed mixers in addition to the well-known streamwise vortex array. The normal vortex (due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability) sheds periodically from the convoluted trailing edge of the lobed mixer and plays a major part in the enhanced mixing process in combination with the streamwise vorticity. The streamwise vorticity deforms the normal vortex into a pinched -off structure that creates intense turbulence and mixing. The scale of the normal vortex was approximately one fourth that of the planar case, thereby introducing a small-scale turbulence over a large cross-stream area of the flow that dominates the near-field Reynolds shear stress distribution. Thus, the lobed mixer free-shear layer provides enhanced mixing down to the molecular scale. The shear layer growth rate for the first 5-6 lobe heights was substantially greater than the planar free-shear layer due to the normal and streamwise vortex interaction. Downstream of six lobe heights, the growth rate slowed considerably to a rate below that of the planar configuration due to the reduced turbulent kinetic energy of a double-layered shear layer structure. The streamwise and normal vorticity were completely dissipated by 5-6 lobe heights. Also, the lobed mixer development was found to be surprisingly insensitive to initial laminar and turbulent boundary layer conditions (unlike the planar case).

  17. The structural plasticity of white matter networks following anterior temporal lobe resection

    PubMed Central

    Yogarajah, Mahinda; Focke, Niels K.; Bonelli, Silvia B.; Thompson, Pamela; Vollmar, Christian; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Alexander, Daniel C.; Symms, Mark R.; Koepp, Matthias J.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior temporal lobe resection is an effective treatment for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. The structural consequences of such surgery in the white matter, and how these relate to language function after surgery remain unknown. We carried out a longitudinal study with diffusion tensor imaging in 26 left and 20 right temporal lobe epilepsy patients before and a mean of 4.5 months after anterior temporal lobe resection. The whole-brain analysis technique tract-based spatial statistics was used to compare pre- and postoperative data in the left and right temporal lobe epilepsy groups separately. We observed widespread, significant, mean 7%, decreases in fractional anisotropy in white matter networks connected to the area of resection, following both left and right temporal lobe resections. However, we also observed a widespread, mean 8%, increase in fractional anisotropy after left anterior temporal lobe resection in the ipsilateral external capsule and posterior limb of the internal capsule, and corona radiata. These findings were confirmed on analysis of the native clusters and hand drawn regions of interest. Postoperative tractography seeded from this area suggests that this cluster is part of the ventro-medial language network. The mean pre- and postoperative fractional anisotropy and parallel diffusivity in this cluster were significantly correlated with postoperative verbal fluency and naming test scores. In addition, the percentage change in parallel diffusivity in this cluster was correlated with the percentage change in verbal fluency after anterior temporal lobe resection, such that the bigger the increase in parallel diffusivity, the smaller the fall in language proficiency after surgery. We suggest that the findings of increased fractional anisotropy in this ventro-medial language network represent structural reorganization in response to the anterior temporal lobe resection, which may damage the more susceptible dorso-lateral language pathway

  18. Inverse-Compton Emission from the Lobes of 3C 353

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    v2.2) Inverse- Compton emission from the lobes of 3C 353 J.L. Goodger,1⋆ M.J. Hardcastle,1 J.H. Croston,1 N.E. Kassim2 and R.A. Perley3 1University of...Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801, USA ABSTRACT X-ray emission due to inverse- Compton scattering of microwave background photons...by electrons in the lobes of powerful radio galaxies has now been seen in a large number of objects. Combining an inverse- Compton model for the lobe

  19. Giant congenital diaphragmatic hernia in an adult

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bochdalek hernia is the most common type of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. It appears frequently in infants but rarely in adults. We present the case of a 50-year-old female han patient with tremendous left-sided congenital posterolateral diaphragmatic hernia (Bochdalek hernia) who also has a pair of supernumerary breasts and pulmonary hypoplasia of the lower-left lobe. The patient had an experience of misdiagnosis and she was treated for bronchitis for one year until being admitted to our hospital. This case study emphasizes the rare presentation of Bochdalek hernia in adults and the necessity of high clinical attention to similar cases. PMID:24512974

  20. Unstable Roche-Lobe Overflow of Gaseous Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Brian

    The discoveries of more than 100 roughly Earth-sized bodies with orbital periods less than 1 day, ultra-short-period planets or candidates (USPs), have challenged planet formation theories, and evidence suggests USPs may be the remnants of gaseous planets that shed their atmospheres. Indeed, many hot Jupiters are near Roche-Lobe overflow (RLO), and tidal decay can push them the rest of the way in. Recent work has shown stable RLO (atmospheres lost via a steady outflow and thin accretion disk) probably cannot produce USPs on its own but suggested unstable RLO (atmospheres quickly shed on dynamical timescales) may. In fact, stable RLO may drive overflowing hot Jupiters into unstable RLO, and by analogy with the common-envelope binaries, the core that remains can drive off the gaseous envelope at the cost of its orbital energy. Wellestablished mass-radius relations for gaseous planets, coupled to simple energy and angular momentum considerations, provide a connection between the observed masses and periods for USPs and their putative progenitor gaseous planets, with few free parameters. We propose to investigate the hypothesis that USPs originate through tidal decay and a combination of stable and unstable Roche-lobe overflow of short-period gaseous planets through the following studies: -We will explore the planetary masses, orbital periods, etc. that produce unstable RLO using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) suite. -We will relate the observed periods and masses of USPs to their putative progenitor masses and periods to see whether they are consistent with the unstable RLO hypothesis. This proposal is directly relevant to the Exoplanets Research Program since it seeks to "understand the ... physical processes of exoplanets" and "improve understanding of [their] origins" through "theoretical studies ... and modeling'". We also expect that it will have broad impacts on a variety of astrophysical topics: -Ultra-short period planets could

  1. Neuropsychological status in older adults influences susceptibility to false memories.

    PubMed

    Meade, Michelle L; Geraci, Lisa D; Roediger, Henry L

    2012-01-01

    In 2 experiments we examined the influence of frontal lobe function on older adults' susceptibility to false memory in a categorized list paradigm. Using a neuropsychological battery of tests developed by Glisky, Polster, and Routhieaux (1995), we designated older adults as having high- or low-frontal function. Young and older adults studied and were tested on categorized lists using free report cued recall and forced report cued recall instructions, with the latter requiring participants to produce responses even if they had to guess. Under free report cued recall instructions, frontal lobe function was a strong predictor of false memories in older adults: Older adults who scored low on tests of frontal functioning demonstrated much higher levels of false recall than younger adults, whereas levels of false recall in high-frontal older adults were more similar to those of young adults. However, after forced report cued recall, high- and low-frontal older adults performed similarly to each other, and both demonstrated higher levels of false recall than young adults. On a final recognition test, high-frontal older adults in both the free report cued recall and forced report cued recall conditions were more successful than low-frontal older adults in using source information to reduce memory errors. The results indicate that older adults show higher levels of false recall than younger adults, but type of test (free report or forced report) and neuropsychological status of older adults mediate these effects. Low-frontal older adults are particularly susceptible to producing false memories on free report tests that entail source monitoring.

  2. Dissociated multimodal hubs and seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Douw, Linda; DeSalvo, Matthew N; Tanaka, Naoaki; Cole, Andrew J; Liu, Hesheng; Reinsberger, Claus; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain connectivity at rest is altered in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), particularly in “hub” areas such as the posterior default mode network (DMN). Although both functional and anatomical connectivity are disturbed in TLE, the relationships between measures as well as to seizure frequency remain unclear. We aim to clarify these associations using connectivity measures specifically sensitive to hubs. Methods Connectivity between 1000 cortical surface parcels was determined in 49 TLE patients and 23 controls with diffusion and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two types of hub connectivity were investigated across multiple brain modules (the DMN, motor system, etcetera): (1) within-module connectivity (a measure of local importance that assesses a parcel's communication level within its own subnetwork) and (2) between-module connectivity (a measure that assesses connections across multiple modules). Results In TLE patients, there was lower overall functional integrity of the DMN as well as an increase in posterior hub connections with other modules. Anatomical between-module connectivity was globally decreased. Higher DMN disintegration (DD) coincided with higher anatomical between-module connectivity, whereas both were associated with increased seizure frequency. DD related to seizure frequency through mediating effects of anatomical connectivity, but seizure frequency also correlated with anatomical connectivity through DD, indicating a complex interaction between multimodal networks and symptoms. Interpretation We provide evidence for dissociated anatomical and functional hub connectivity in TLE. Moreover, shifts in functional hub connections from within to outside the DMN, an overall loss of integrative anatomical communication, and the interaction between the two increase seizure frequency. PMID:25909080

  3. Organization and control of epileptic circuits in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, A.; Maroso, M.; Soltesz, I.

    2016-01-01

    When studying the pathological mechanisms of epilepsy, there are a seemingly endless number of approaches from the ultrastructural level—receptor expression by EM—to the behavioral level—comorbid depression in behaving animals. Epilepsy is characterized as a disorder of recurrent seizures, which are defined as “a transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain” (Fisher et al., 2005). Such abnormal activity typically does not occur in a single isolated neuron; rather, it results from pathological activity in large groups—or circuits—of neurons. Here we choose to focus on two aspects of aberrant circuits in temporal lobe epilepsy: their organization and potential mechanisms to control these pathological circuits. We also look at two scales: microcircuits, ie, the relationship between individual neurons or small groups of similar neurons, and macrocircuits, ie, the organization of large-scale brain regions. We begin by summarizing the large body of literature that describes the stereotypical anatomical changes in the temporal lobe—ie, the anatomical basis of alterations in microcircuitry. We then offer a brief introduction to graph theory and describe how this type of mathematical analysis, in combination with computational neuroscience techniques and using parameters obtained from experimental data, can be used to postulate how microcircuit alterations may lead to seizures. We then zoom out and look at the changes which are seen over large whole-brain networks in patients and animal models, and finally we look to the future. PMID:27323941

  4. Loss of cholecystokinin-containing terminals in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengsan; Sun, Jianli; Erisir, Alev; Kapur, Jaideep

    2014-02-01

    Altered GABA-mediated inhibition is proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Previous studies have demonstrated a loss of somatostatin-containing GABAergic interneurons innervating granule cells in epileptic animals. However, the reorganization of synapses between interneurons and granule cells has not been investigated. We studied synapse organization in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) using continuous hippocampal stimulation. The distribution of axon terminals and inhibitory synapses on granule cell dendrites was studied using a combination of immunohistochemistry and pre-embedding electron microscopy techniques. A whole-cell patch-clamp technique was applied to study the functional changes in GABAergic input from different interneurons. In epileptic animals, the density of cholecystokinin (CCK)-immunoreactive (IR) fibers and α2 subunit containing GABAA receptors in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus was reduced. Quantitative immuno-electron microscopy study revealed that the ratio of CCK-containing symmetric synapses to the total symmetric synapses was reduced. The frequency of GABAergic synaptic currents (sIPSC) was decreased and their amplitude was increased. The inhibitory effect of the activation of cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors was also reduced in epileptic animals. Isolation of CCK- and parvalbumin (PV)-containing GABAergic inputs by N- and P/Q-type calcium channel blockers respectively suggested that GABA release from CCK-containing interneurons was selectively reduced in epileptic rats. This study found that there was a loss of CCK-containing GABAergic synapses to granule cells both morphologically and functionally. These studies add to our understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to altering GABAergic inhibition of granule cells in TLE.

  5. Subjective memory evaluation before and after temporal lobe epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chin-Wei; Hayman-Abello, Brent; Hayman-Abello, Susan; Derry, Paul; McLachlan, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    Subjective memory (SM), a self-evaluation of memory, in contrast to objective memory (OM) measured by neuropsychological testing, is less well studied in patients with epilepsy. We assessed SM before and after temporal lobectomy. The Frequency of Forgetting 10 scale (FOF-10), developed to evaluate SM in dementia, was given before and one year after temporal lobectomy. Reliability and validity for use in epilepsy were first assessed. Measures of depression (CES-D) and neuroticism (PANAS) were done before and after surgery as well as complete neuropsychological assessment of OM. Correlation analysis between FOF-10 results and all the other variables was implemented. In 48 patients the FOF-10 was reliable and valid showing high internal consistency in all items (Cronbach's alpha >0.82) and high reproducibility (p<0.01). The FOF-10 also correlated with the memory assessment clinics self rating scale (MAC-S) (p<0.01). FOF-10 scores improved or were unchanged postoperatively in 28 patients (58%) and worsened in 20 (42%). The FOF-10 did not significantly correlate with memory scores from neuropsychological testing but did correlate with perceived word finding difficulty (p<0.001) and postoperative depression (p<0.05). A reduction in number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) after surgery distinguished those with improved postoperative SM. No correlation was found between SM and neuroticism, side of surgery or number of seizures. The FOF-10 is a brief and reliable measure of subjective memory in patients with epilepsy. Perceived memory impairment reflects more emotional state, language problems and quantity of AEDs than actual defects in memory function. These results would potentially be useful in presurgical counselling and management of memory issues after temporal lobe surgery.

  6. Medial Temporal Lobe Activity Predicts Successful Relational Memory Binding

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, Deborah E.; Ranganath, Charan

    2009-01-01

    Previous neuropsychological findings have implicated medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures in retaining object-location relations over the course of short delays, but MTL effects have not always been reported in neuroimaging investigations with similar short-term memory requirements. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypothesis that the hippocampus and related MTL structures support accurate retention of relational memory representations, even across short delays. On every trial, four objects were presented, each in one of nine possible locations of a three-dimensional grid. Participants were to mentally rotate the grid and then maintain the rotated representation in anticipation of a test stimulus: a rendering of the grid, rotated 90° from the original viewpoint. The test stimulus was either a “match” display, in which object-location relations were intact, or a “mismatch” display, in which one object occupied a new, previously unfilled location (mismatch position), or two objects had swapped locations (mismatch swap). Encoding phase activation in anterior and posterior regions of the left hippocampus, and in bilateral perirhinal cortex, predicted subsequent accuracy on the short-term memory decision, as did bilateral posterior hippocampal activity after the test stimulus. Notably, activation in these posterior hippocampal regions was also sensitive to the degree to which object-location bindings were preserved in the test stimulus; activation was greatest for match displays, followed by mismatch-position displays, and finally mismatch-swap displays. These results indicate that the hippocampus and related MTL structures contribute to successful encoding and retrieval of relational information in visual short-term memory. PMID:18171929

  7. Minimally invasive surgical approaches for temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Edward F.; Englot, Dario J.; Vadera, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Surgery can be a highly effective treatment for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The emergence of minimally invasive resective and nonresective treatment options has led to interest in epilepsy surgery among patients and providers. Nevertheless, not all procedures are appropriate for all patients, and it is critical to consider seizure outcomes with each of these approaches, as seizure freedom is the greatest predictor of patient quality of life. Standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) remains the gold standard in the treatment of TLE, with seizure freedom resulting in 60–80% of patients. It is currently the only resective epilepsy surgery supported by randomized controlled trials and offers the best protection against lateral temporal seizure onset. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy techniques preserve the lateral cortex and temporal stem to varying degrees and can result in favorable rates of seizure freedom but the risk of recurrent seizures appears slightly greater than with ATL, and it is not clear whether neuropsychological outcomes are improved with selective approaches. Stereotactic radiosurgery presents an opportunity to avoid surgery altogether, with seizure outcomes now under investigation. Stereotactic laser thermo-ablation allows destruction of the mesial temporal structures with low complication rates and minimal recovery time, and outcomes are also under study. Finally, while neuromodulatory devices such as responsive neurostimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation have a role in the treatment of certain patients, these remain palliative procedures for those who are not candidates for resection or ablation, as complete seizure freedom rates are low. Further development and investigation of both established and novel strategies for the surgical treatment of TLE will be critical moving forward, given the significant burden of this disease. PMID:26017774

  8. Upregulation of adenosine kinase in astrocytes in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Aronica, Eleonora; Zurolo, Emanuele; Iyer, Anand; de Groot, Marjolein; Anink, Jasper; Carbonell, Caterina; van Vliet, Erwin A.; Baayen, Johannes C.; Boison, Detlev; Gorter, Jan A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Adenosine kinase (ADK) represents the key metabolic enzyme for the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels in the brain. In adult brain, ADK is primarily present in astrocytes. Several lines of experimental evidence support a critical role of ADK in different types of brain injury associated with astrogliosis, which is also a prominent morphological feature of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We hypothesized that dysregulation of ADK is an ubiquitous pathological hallmark of TLE. Methods Using immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis, we investigated ADK protein expression in a rat model of TLE during epileptogenesis and the chronic epileptic phase and compared those findings with tissue resected from TLE patients with mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Key findings In rat control hippocampus and cortex, a low baseline expression of ADK was found with mainly nuclear localization. One week after the electrical induction of status epilepticus (SE), prominent up-regulation of ADK became evident in astrocytes with a characteristic cytoplasmic localization. This increase in ADK persisted at least for 3-4 months after SE in rats developing a progressive form of epilepsy. In line with the findings from the rat model, expression of astrocytic ADK was also found to be increased in the hippocampus and temporal cortex of TLE patients. In addition, in vitro experiments in human astrocyte cultures showed that ADK expression was increased by several pro-inflammatory molecules (interleukin-1β and LPS). Significance These results suggest that dysregulation of ADK in astrocytes is a common pathological hallmark of TLE. Moreover, in vitro data suggest the existence of an additional layer of modulatory crosstalk between the astrocyte-based adenosine cycle and inflammation. Whether this interaction also can play role in vivo needs to be further investigated. PMID:21635241

  9. Nonlocal regularization for active appearance model: Application to medial temporal lobe segmentation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shiyan; Coupé, Pierrick; Pruessner, Jens C; Collins, D Louis

    2014-02-01

    The human medial temporal lobe (MTL) is an important part of the limbic system, and its substructures play key roles in learning, memory, and neurodegeneration. The MTL includes the hippocampus (HC), amygdala (AG), parahippocampal cortex (PHC), entorhinal cortex, and perirhinal cortex--structures that are complex in shape and have low between-structure intensity contrast, making them difficult to segment manually in magnetic resonance images. This article presents a new segmentation method that combines active appearance modeling and patch-based local refinement to automatically segment specific substructures of the MTL including HC, AG, PHC, and entorhinal/perirhinal cortex from MRI data. Appearance modeling, relying on eigen-decomposition to analyze statistical variations in image intensity and shape information in study population, is used to capture global shape characteristics of each structure of interest with a generative model. Patch-based local refinement, using nonlocal means to compare the image local intensity properties, is applied to locally refine the segmentation results along the structure borders to improve structure delimitation. In this manner, nonlocal regularization and global shape constraints could allow more accurate segmentations of structures. Validation experiments against manually defined labels demonstrate that this new segmentation method is computationally efficient, robust, and accurate. In a leave-one-out validation on 54 normal young adults, the method yielded a mean Dice κ of 0.87 for the HC, 0.81 for the AG, 0.73 for the anterior parts of the parahippocampal gyrus (entorhinal and perirhinal cortex), and 0.73 for the posterior parahippocampal gyrus.

  10. Real-Time Magnetic Resonance-Guided Stereotactic Laser Amygdalohippocampotomy for Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Jon T.; Laxpati, Nealen G.; Drane, Daniel L.; Gowda, Ashok; Appin, Christina; Hao, Chunhai; Brat, Daniel J.; Helmers, Sandra L.; Saindane, Amit; Nour, Sherif G.; Gross, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Open surgery effectively treats mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), but carries risks of neurocognitive deficits, which may be reduced with minimally invasive alternatives. Objective To describe technical and clinical outcomes of stereotactic laser amygdalohippocampotomy (SLAH) with real-time magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) guidance. Methods Under general anesthesia and utilizing standard stereotactic methods, 13 adult patients with intractable MTLE (with and without mesial temporal sclerosis, MTS) prospectively underwent insertion of a saline-cooled fiber-optic laser applicator into amygdalohippocampal structures from an occipital trajectory. Computer-controlled laser ablation was performed during continuous MRTI followed by confirmatory contrast-enhanced anatomic imaging and volumetric reconstruction. Clinical outcomes were determined from seizure diaries. Results A mean 60% volume of the amygdalohippocampal complex was ablated in 13 patients (9 with MTS) undergoing 15 procedures. Median hospitalization was one day. With follow-up ranging from 5-26 (median 14) months, 77% (10/13) of patients achieved meaningful seizure reduction, of which 54% (7/13) were free of disabling seizures. Of patients with preoperative MTS, 67% (6/9) achieved seizure freedom. All recurrences were observed by<6 months. Variances in ablation volume and length did not account for individual clinical outcomes. Whereas no complications of laser therapy itself were observed, one significant complication, a visual field defect, resulted from deviated insertion of a stereotactic aligning rod, which was corrected prior to ablation. Conclusion Real-time MR-guided SLAH is a technically novel, safe, and effective alternative to open surgery. Further evaluation with larger cohorts over time is warranted. PMID:24618797

  11. Mott lobes evolution of the spin-1 Bose-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapie-F, A. F.; Franco, R.; Silva-Valencia, J.

    2016-02-01

    We study spin-1 bosons confined in a one-dimensional optical lattice, taking into consideration both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interaction. Using the density matrix renormalization group, we determine the phase diagram for the two firsts lobes and report the evolution of the first and second Mott lobes with respect to the spin-exchange interaction parameter (U 2). We determine that for the antiferromagnetic case, the first lobe is suppressed while the second grows as |U 2| increases. For the ferromagnetic case, the first and second Mott lobes are suppressed by the spin-exchange interaction parameter. We propose an expresion to describe the evolution of the critical point with the increase in |U 2| for both cases.

  12. A Robust Range Grating Lobe Suppression Method Based on Image Contrast for Stepped-Frequency SAR

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wen-Bin; Long, Teng; Ding, Ze-Gang; Wu, Yi-Rong

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude error and phase error (MEPE) in the transfer function of a stepped-frequency synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system results in a periodic MEPE in the synthesized wideband waveform (SWW), which induces the grating lobes in the high-resolution range profile (HRRP). In this paper, a robust data-driven grating lobe suppression (GLS) method is proposed. Based on a contrast-based error estimation method and the grating lobes of the brightest scatterers in the SAR image, the periodic MEPE can be robustly estimated using the proposed method. By compensating the estimated periodic MEPE, the range grating lobes can be suppressed to the background level of the SAR image. Simulation results and real data processing have demonstrated the superiority of the proposed method. PMID:27929411

  13. Diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis with the right-to-left hepatic lobe ratio: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Shreiner, D.P.; Barlai-Kovach, M.

    1981-02-01

    Since scans of cirrhotic livers commonly show a reduction in size and colloid uptake of the right lobe, a quantitative measure of uptake was made using a minicomputer to determine total counts in regions of interest defined over each lobe. Right-to-left ratios were then compared in 103 patients. For normal paitents the mean ratio +- 1 s.d. was 2.85 +- 0.65, and the mean for patients with known cirrhosis was 1.08 +- 0.33. Patients with other liver diseases had ratios similar to the normal group. The normal range of the right-to-left lobe ratio was 1.55 to 4.15. The sensitivity of the ratio for alcoholic cirrhosis was 85.7% and the specificity was 100% in this patient population. The right-to-left lobe ratio was more sensitive and specific for alcoholic cirrhosis than any other criterion tested. An hypothesis is described to explain these results.

  14. Pulmonary lobe segmentation based on ridge surface sampling and shape model fitting

    PubMed Central

    Ross, James C.; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Okajima, Yuka; Hatabu, Hiroto; Díaz, Alejandro A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.; Dy, Jennifer; Estépar, Raúl San José

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Performing lobe-based quantitative analysis of the lung in computed tomography (CT) scans can assist in efforts to better characterize complex diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While airways and vessels can help to indicate the location of lobe boundaries, segmentations of these structures are not always available, so methods to define the lobes in the absence of these structures are desirable. Methods: The authors present a fully automatic lung lobe segmentation algorithm that is effective in volumetric inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT) datasets. The authors rely on ridge surface image features indicating fissure locations and a novel approach to modeling shape variation in the surfaces defining the lobe boundaries. The authors employ a particle system that efficiently samples ridge surfaces in the image domain and provides a set of candidate fissure locations based on the Hessian matrix. Following this, lobe boundary shape models generated from principal component analysis (PCA) are fit to the particles data to discriminate between fissure and nonfissure candidates. The resulting set of particle points are used to fit thin plate spline (TPS) interpolating surfaces to form the final boundaries between the lung lobes. Results: The authors tested algorithm performance on 50 inspiratory and 50 expiratory CT scans taken from the COPDGene study. Results indicate that the authors' algorithm performs comparably to pulmonologist-generated lung lobe segmentations and can produce good results in cases with accessory fissures, incomplete fissures, advanced emphysema, and low dose acquisition protocols. Dice scores indicate that only 29 out of 500 (5.85%) lobes showed Dice scores lower than 0.9. Two different approaches for evaluating lobe boundary surface discrepancies were applied and indicate that algorithm boundary identification is most accurate in the vicinity of fissures detectable on CT. Conclusions: The proposed

  15. Pulmonary lobe segmentation based on ridge surface sampling and shape model fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, James C.; Kindlmann, Gordon L.; Okajima, Yuka; Hatabu, Hiroto; Díaz, Alejandro A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.; Dy, Jennifer; Estépar, Raúl San José

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Performing lobe-based quantitative analysis of the lung in computed tomography (CT) scans can assist in efforts to better characterize complex diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). While airways and vessels can help to indicate the location of lobe boundaries, segmentations of these structures are not always available, so methods to define the lobes in the absence of these structures are desirable. Methods: The authors present a fully automatic lung lobe segmentation algorithm that is effective in volumetric inspiratory and expiratory computed tomography (CT) datasets. The authors rely on ridge surface image features indicating fissure locations and a novel approach to modeling shape variation in the surfaces defining the lobe boundaries. The authors employ a particle system that efficiently samples ridge surfaces in the image domain and provides a set of candidate fissure locations based on the Hessian matrix. Following this, lobe boundary shape models generated from principal component analysis (PCA) are fit to the particles data to discriminate between fissure and nonfissure candidates. The resulting set of particle points are used to fit thin plate spline (TPS) interpolating surfaces to form the final boundaries between the lung lobes. Results: The authors tested algorithm performance on 50 inspiratory and 50 expiratory CT scans taken from the COPDGene study. Results indicate that the authors' algorithm performs comparably to pulmonologist-generated lung lobe segmentations and can produce good results in cases with accessory fissures, incomplete fissures, advanced emphysema, and low dose acquisition protocols. Dice scores indicate that only 29 out of 500 (5.85%) lobes showed Dice scores lower than 0.9. Two different approaches for evaluating lobe boundary surface discrepancies were applied and indicate that algorithm boundary identification is most accurate in the vicinity of fissures detectable on CT. Conclusions: The proposed

  16. Progressive degeneration of the right temporal lobe studied with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed Central

    Tyrrell, P J; Warrington, E K; Frackowiak, R S; Rossor, M N

    1990-01-01

    A 79 year old man with a twelve year progressive history of prosopagnosia and recent naming difficulty, in whom other intellectual skills were preserved, is described. Positron emission tomography (PET) revealed an area of right temporal lobe hypometabolism, with an additional area of less severe hypometabolism at the left temporal pole. This may represent an example of progressive focal cortical degeneration similar to that associated with primary progressive dysphasia, but affecting the right temporal lobe. Images PMID:2292695

  17. Video-assisted thoracoscopic left upper lobe apical trisegmentectomy with the Harmonic scalpel.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Chen, Xin-Long; Mao, Xin; Wang, Hui-Ping; Liu, Jun; Ning, Xian-Gu

    2014-12-01

    Segmental resection is a useful procedure to preserve respiratory function. A 56-year-old woman presented with a finding of a left upper lobe lesion on CT scanning. She was performed video-assisted thoracoscopic left upper lobe apical trisegmentectomy with the Harmonic scalpel. Video-assisted thoracoscopy surgery (VATS) segmentectomy is associated with safe and feasible procedure. With the Harmonic scalpel dissection, blood loss is minimal and this speeds patient recovery.

  18. Resolution of the southern radio lobe of 3C 33 at 660 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Phillipe; Stiavelli, Massimo

    1992-01-01

    A strand of emission coincident with the peak in the radio emission at 2 and 6 cm was revealed by an HST planetary camera image of the southern radio lobe of 3C 33. The detailed morphological similarity between the optical and radio data conclusively confirms the common origin of the radio and optical emission. The question of whether or not the detailed correlations in emission seen in the jets can also be observed on the larger scales of radio lobes is addressed.

  19. Source location determination of Uranian kilometric radiation from ray tracing and emission lobe modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    We use an analytical fit to an emission lobe profile together with three-dimensional ray tracing to model the broad-banded smooth Uranian kilometric radiation (UKR). We assume the radiation is gyroemission from sources along magnetic field lines. Using an iterative technique that modifies the lobe function and source region, the results are compared to observations at a frequency of 481 kHz. The best-fit calculations are compared to previously published models and to recent ultraviolet (UV) observations.

  20. Anatomy of the antennal dorsal organ in female of Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae): A peculiar sensory structure possibly involved in perception of host vibration.

    PubMed

    Riolo, Paola; Isidoro, Nunzio; Ruschioni, Sara; Minuz, Roxana L; Bin, Ferdinando; Romani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Neodryinus typhlocybae (Hymenoptera: Dryinidae) is a natural enemy of the planthopper Metcalfa pruinosa, which was introduced from North America into Europe and has become established in various regions as a pest species. Vibrational signals play a crucial role in the communication of M. pruinosa, which appears to be exploited by N. typhlocybae. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy have shown that the antennae of N. typhlocybae females have peculiar and complex sensory structures: deep longitudinal grooves that house long sensilla trichodea, termed here "Antennal Dorsal Organs." Such structures were not present on male antennae. These sensilla extend for the length of the grooves, without contact with the groove cuticle. Their hair shaft is empty and aporous, and inserted into a specialized socket, underneath which there is a cuticular ampulla-like chamber. Each sensillum is associated with two sensory neurons: one terminates at the proximal end of the dendritic sheath; the other continues into the sensillum sinus and is enclosed in the dendritic sheath. This second sensory neuron then enters the ampulla-like chamber through the circular opening, and then terminates with a conspicuous tubular body at the shaft base. The possible involvement of this peculiar structure in the context of host recognition mechanism is discussed.

  1. Neuropsychiatry of frontal lobe dysfunction in violent and criminal behaviour: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Brower, M; Price, B

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To establish the link between frontal lobe dysfunction and violent and criminal behaviour, based on a review of relevant literature.
METHODS—Articles relating evidence of frontal lobe dysfunction with violence or crime were collected through a MEDLINE search using the keyword "frontal lobe" combined with the terms "aggression," "violence," "crime," "antisocial personality disorder," "psychopathy," "impulse control disorders", and "episodic dyscontrol." Reference lists were then searched for additional articles.
RESULTS—High rates of neuropsychiatric abnormalities reported in persons with violent and criminal behaviour suggest an association between aggressive dyscontrol and brain injury, especially involving the frontal lobes. The studies reviewed support an association between frontal lobe dysfunction and increased aggressive and antisocial behaviour. Focal orbitofrontal injury is specifically associated with increased aggression. Deficits in frontal executive function may increase the likelihood of future aggression, but no study has reliably demonstrated a characteristic pattern of frontal network dysfunction predictive of violent crime.
CONCLUSIONS—Clinically significant focal frontal lobe dysfunction is associated with aggressive dyscontrol, but the increased risk of violence seems less than is widely presumed. Evidence is strongest for an association between focal prefrontal damage and an impulsive subtype of aggressive behaviour.

 PMID:11723190

  2. Study on memories of temporal lobes and the principles of lateralization using near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakura, Katsutoshi

    2007-01-01

    In this study we measured the variation of brain blood quantity (Oxy-Hb, Deoxy-Hb and Total-Hb) in the temporal lobes using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) when the tasks of the memories were presented to the subjects. The memories are classified into the short-term memory (STM) and the long-term memory (LTM) including the episodic and semantic memories. The subjects joined in this study are 11 persons who are university students including graduate students. We used the language task of letter-number sequencing, also reverse sequencing to measure STM and the task of the episodic memory to measure LTM. As a result of analysis, concerning the episodic memory, the variation of Oxy-Hb in the left temporal lobe was larger than that of Oxy-Hb in the right temporal lobe. The result might suggest that the episodic memory has a relationship with cerebral dominance concerning language area in the left temporal lobe. It seems that the episodic memory meditated with the function of language used in this study is much stored in the left temporal lobe than in the right temporal lobe. This result coincides with the principles of lateralization. The variation of Oxy-Hb in the language task of letter-number sequencing was smaller than that of Oxy-Hb in the language task of the episodic memory.

  3. Numerical simulation of the flow field from a radially lobed nozzle and validation via HWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Noushin; Sekaran, Aarthi

    2014-11-01

    With a constant need for higher performance and efficiency in engineering (particularly aerospace) applications, lobed nozzles have experienced a regained interest in the recent past, owing to their superior mixing capabilities. Although previous experimental studies (Hu et al. 1999, Hu et al. 2008) have analyzed the flow field from lobed nozzles and made conjectures about the physics and flow mechanisms involved, the absence of a ``complete'' 3D dataset elicits unanswered questions. The present numerical study is intended as a complement to an existing experimental (single component hot wire anemometry) investigation, involving the analysis of the flow field downstream of a six lobed nozzle (N. Amini et al., 2012). A full 3D URANS simulation of the lobed nozzle is carried out, initially validated with experimental data, and then used to examine the stream-wise vortices and obtain a visual corroboration of the structure formation and breakup mechanism as described earlier (Hu et al., 2008). Further, the study takes a close look at the nature of the instabilities which trigger and enhance the mixing process in lobed nozzles in order to determine the precise role of the lobes and eventually obtain more effective mixing in industrial applications.

  4. A split-aperture transmit beamforming technique with phase coherence grating lobe suppression.

    PubMed

    Torbatian, Zahra; Adamson, Rob; Bance, Manohar; Brown, Jeremy A

    2010-11-01

    A small element-to-element pitch (~.5λ) is conventionally required for phased array ultrasound transducers to avoid large grating lobes. This constraint can introduce many fabrication difficulties, particularly in the development of highfrequency phased arrays at operating frequencies greater than 30 MHz. In this paper, a new transmit beamforming technique along with sign coherence factor (SCF) receive beamforming is proposed to suppress grating lobes in large-pitch phased-array transducers. It is based on splitting the transmit aperture (N elements) into N/K transmit elements and receive beamforming on all N elements to reduce the temporal length of the transmit grating lobe signal. Therefore, the use of synthetic aperture beamforming, which can introduce relative phase distortions between the echoes received over many transmit events, can be avoided. After each transmit-receive event, the received signals are weighted by the calculated SCF to suppress the grating lobes. After pulsing all sub-apertures, the RF signals are added to generate one line of the image. Simulated 2-way radiation patterns for different K values show that grating lobes can be suppressed significantly at different steering angles. Grating lobes can be suppressed by approximately 20 dB with K = 2 at steering angles greater than 25° and an element pitch greater than 0.75λ. A technique for determining the optimal transmit sub-apertures has been developed.

  5. argos Is required for projection of photoreceptor axons during optic lobe development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sawamoto, K; Okabe, M; Tanimura, T; Hayashi, S; Mikoshiba, K; Okano, H

    1996-02-01

    The Drosophila argos gene encodes a secreted protein with an epidermal growth factor (EGF) motif, which acts as an inhibitor of cell recruitment in the developing eye and wing. Here, we have analyzed the role of argos during optic lobe development. argos expression was observed in the optic lobes throughout the developmental stages. In argos mutants, neuropiles failed to develop normally during embryonic and larval stages, and photoreceptor axons did not project properly into the lamina. Ubiquitous expression of argos, under control of the hsp70 promoter, rescued the defects in optic lobes. We have found that glial cells failed to differentiate in the larval optic lobes of argos mutants. Correspondingly, in loss-of-function repo mutants, whose glial cells also fail to differentiate, photoreceptor axons showed the impaired projection pattern similar to the argos phenotype. These results suggest that glial cells play a role for guidance of photoreceptor axons. The loss-of-function Star mutation (StarX155) dominantly suppressed the defects in the argos optic lobes, suggesting that these two genes act in an antagonistic fashion during optic lobe development.

  6. Dissociation between Conceptual and Perceptual Implicit Memory: Evidence from Patients with Frontal and Occipital Lobe Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liang; Wang, JiHua; Yang, XuDong; Feng, Lei; Li, Xiu; Gu, Cui; Wang, MeiHong; Hu, JiaYun; Cheng, Huaidong

    2016-01-01

    The latest neuroimaging studies about implicit memory (IM) have revealed that different IM types may be processed by different parts of the brain. However, studies have rarely examined what subtypes of IM processes are affected in patients with various brain injuries. Twenty patients with frontal lobe injury, 25 patients with occipital lobe injury, and 29 healthy controls (HC) were recruited for the study. Two subtypes of IM were investigated by using structurally parallel perceptual (picture identification task) and conceptual (category exemplar generation task) IM tests in the three groups, as well as explicit memory (EM) tests. The results indicated that the priming of conceptual IM and EM tasks in patients with frontal lobe injury was poorer than that observed in HC, while perceptual IM was identical between the two groups. By contrast, the priming of perceptual IM in patients with occipital lobe injury was poorer than that in HC, whereas the priming of conceptual IM and EM was similar to that in HC. This double dissociation between perceptual and conceptual IM across the brain areas implies that occipital lobes may participate in perceptual IM, while frontal lobes may be involved in processing conceptual memory. PMID:26793093

  7. Localized reconnection in the magnetotail driven by lobe flow channels: Global MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.

    2016-02-01

    Recent ionospheric measurements suggest polar cap flow channels often trigger nightside auroral brightening. However, measurements were limited to the ionosphere, and it was not understood if such flow channels can exist in the lobe and can trigger magnetotail reconnection in a localized cross-tail extent. We examined if localized flow channels can form self-consistently in a global MHD regime, and if so, how such flow channels originate and relate to localized magnetotail reconnection. We show that lobe convection became nonuniform with azimuthally narrow flow channels (enhanced dawn-dusk electric fields) of ~3 RE cross-tail width. The flow channels propagated from the dayside toward the plasma sheet as an interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) discontinuity swept tailward. The plasma sheet around the lobe flow channels became thinner with a similar cross-tail extent and then localized reconnection occurred. These results suggest that localized flow channels can propagate tailward across the lobe and drive localized magnetotail reconnection, that the cross-tail width of reconnection and resulting plasma sheet flow channels and dipolarization fronts are related to the width of inflow from the lobe, and that IMF discontinuities drive lobe flow channels.

  8. Noise, Turbulence, and Thrust of Subsonic Free Jets from Lobed Nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Wang, F. Y.

    2002-01-01

    A study of noise benefit, vis-a-vis thrust penalty, and its correlation to turbulence intensities was conducted for free jets issuing from lobed nozzles. Four convergent nozzles with constant exit area were used in the experiments. Three of these were of rectangular lobed configuration having six, ten and fourteen lobes; the fourth was a circular nozzle. Increasing the number of lobes resulted in a progressive reduction in the turbulence intensities as well as in the overall radiated noise. The noise reduction was pronounced at the low frequency end of the spectrum. However, there was an increase in the high frequency noise that rendered the overall benefit less attractive when compared on a scaled-up A-weighted basis. A reduction in noise was accompanied by a commensurate reduction in the turbulent kinetic energy in the flow field. As expected, increasing the number of lobes involved progressive reduction in the thrust coefficient. Among the cases studied, the six-lobed nozzle had the optimum reduction in turbulence and noise with the least thrust penalty.

  9. Lobed Mixer Design for Noise Suppression Acoustic and Aerodynamic Test Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengle, Vinod G.; Dalton, William N.; Boyd, Kathleen (Technical Monitor); Bridges, James (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive database for the acoustic and aerodynamic characteristics of several model-scale lobe mixers of bypass ratio 5 to 6 has been created for mixed jet speeds up to 1080 ft/s at typical take-off (TO) conditions of small-to-medium turbofan engines. The flight effect was simulated for Mach numbers up to 0.3. The static thrust performance and plume data were also obtained at typical TO and cruise conditions. The tests were done at NASA Lewis anechoic dome and ASK's FluiDyne Laboratories. The effect of several lobe mixer and nozzle parameters, such as, lobe scalloping, lobe count, lobe penetration and nozzle length was examined in terms of flyover noise at constant altitude. Sound in the nozzle reference frame was analyzed to understand the source characteristics. Several new concepts, mechanisms and methods are reported for such lobed mixers, such as, "boomerang" scallops, "tongue" mixer, detection of "excess" internal noise sources, and extrapolation of flyover noise data from one flight speed to different flight speeds. Noise reduction of as much as 3 EPNdB was found with a deeply scalloped mixer compared to annular nozzle at net thrust levels of 9500 lb for a 29 in. diameter nozzle after optimizing the nozzle length.

  10. Bepridil opens the regulatory N-terminal lobe of cardiac troponin C

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Love, Michael L.; Putkey, John A.; Cohen, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is the calcium-dependent switch for contraction in heart muscle and a potential target for drugs in the therapy of congestive heart failure. This calmodulin-like protein consists of two lobes connected by a central linker; each lobe contains two EF-hand domains. The regulatory N-terminal lobe of cTnC, unlike that of skeletal troponin C (sTnC), contains only one functional EF-hand and does not open fully upon the binding of Ca2+. We have determined the crystal structure of cTnC, with three bound Ca2+ ions, complexed with the calcium-sensitizer bepridil, to 2.15-Å resolution. In contrast to apo- and 3Ca2+-cTnC, the drug-bound complex displays a fully open N-terminal lobe similar to the N-terminal lobes of 4Ca2+-sTnC and cTnC bound to a C-terminal fragment of cardiac troponin I (residues 147–163). The closing of the lobe is sterically hindered by one of the three bound bepridils. Our results provide a structural basis for the Ca2+-sensitizing effect of bepridil and reveal the details of a distinctive two-stage mechanism for Ca2+ regulation by troponin C in cardiac muscle. PMID:10792039

  11. Radiography, computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in four dogs and two cats with lung lobe torsion.

    PubMed

    Schultz, R M; Peters, J; Zwingenberger, A

    2009-07-01

    This report describes the imaging features of radiography, computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in dogs and cats with lung lobe torsions. The medical records, thoracic radiographs and computed tomography images of four dogs and two cats with confirmed lung lobe torsions were retrospectively reviewed. Computed tomography with virtual bronchoscopy showed bronchial narrowing, collapse or occlusion in all six animals, while this was only appreciated on one radiographic examination. A tapering terminating angle of the air-filled bronchus proximal or distal to the collapsed region was seen only on computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy in all six animals. The vesicular emphysema pattern typical of lung lobe torsion was seen on three computed tomographies but only on one radiographic examination. The lung lobe torsion-specific findings of vesicular emphysema and a proximally narrowed or occluded bronchus were more easily recognised on computed tomography and virtual bronchoscopy than with radiographs. Computed tomography slices acquired through the bronchus and lung lobe of interest in a cat or dog with possible lung lobe torsion can be reformatted into virtual bronchoscopic images that can be utilised along with computed tomography to help make a more definitive preoperative diagnosis.

  12. Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation: Operative techniques to optimize the recipient's outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Peng Soon; Chan, See Ching

    2017-01-01

    Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is widely accepted today with good outcomes and safety reported worldwide for both donor and recipient. Nonetheless, it remained a highly demanding technical and complex surgery if undertaken. The last two decades have seen an increased in adult-to-adult LDLT following our first report of right lobe LDLT in overcoming graft size limitation in adults. In this article, we discussed the operative techniques and challenges of adult right lobe LDLT incorporating the middle hepatic vein, which is practiced in our center for the recipient operation. The various issues and challenges faced by the transplant surgeon in ensuring good recipient outcome are explored and discussed here as well. Hence, it is important to understand that a successful recipient operation is dependent of multifactorial events starting at the preoperative stage of planning, understanding the intraoperative technical challenges and the physiology of flow modulation that goes hand-in-hand with the operation. Therefore, one needs to arm oneself with all the possible knowledge in overcoming these technical challenges and the ability to be flexible and adaptable during LDLT by tailoring the needs of each patient individually. PMID:28250667

  13. Pyramidal lobe of the thyroid gland and the thyroglossal duct remnant: a study using human fetal sections.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Yoshitaka; Honkura, Yohei; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Jose Francisco; Murakami, Gen; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Katori, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate developmental changes in the thyroglossal duct, we observed serial sagittal sections of eight embryos (crown-rump length (CRL) 6-12 mm; approximately 5-6 weeks of gestation) as well as serial horizontal or cross-sections of 70 embryos and fetuses (CRL 15-110 mm; 6-15 weeks). In the sagittal sections, the thyroglossal duct was identified as a small sheet or mass of relatively large cells with vacuolization anterior, superior or inferior to the fourth pharyngeal arch artery. However, we found no continuous duct-like structure that reached the thyroid gland. Thus, previous classical schemes might have overestimated the continuity of the duct. Among cross-sections of 70 specimens, we found the thyroglossal duct remnant in only two specimens (CRL 15 mm and 100 mm), in contrast to the pyramidal lobe, which was seen in one-third of the specimens. The duct remnant ran downward along the lateral edge of the hyoid body to reach the anterior aspect of the thyroid cartilage. However, the connection between the pyramidal lobe and the duct remnant was interrupted by the anterior cervical muscles. Therefore, it was unlikely that the thyroglossal duct remnant would more frequently be evident in fetuses than in adults. The highly tortuous course of the duct along the lingual aspect of the hyoid body, which has been reported previously, appeared to become established near term. Descent of the thyroid gland was not evident after the CRL 20 mm stage (6 weeks): the gland appeared to retain its position at the level of the third-sixth cervical vertebrae.

  14. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Induces Intrinsic Alterations in Na Channel Gating in Layer II Medial Entorhinal Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hargus, Nicholas J.; Merrick, Ellen C.; Nigam, Aradhya; Kalmar, Christopher L.; Baheti, Aparna R.; Bertram, Edward H.; Patel, Manoj K.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy involving the limbic structures of the temporal lobe. Layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex (EC) form the major excitatory input into the hippocampus via the perforant path and consist of non-stellate and stellate neurons. These neurons are spared and hyper-excitable in TLE. The basis for the hyper-excitability is likely multifactorial and may include alterations in intrinsic properties. In a rat model of TLE, medial EC (mEC) non-stellate and stellate neurons had significantly higher action potential (AP) firing frequencies than in control. The increase remained in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting intrinsic mechanisms. Since sodium (Na) channels play a critical role in AP generation and conduction we sought to determine if Na channel gating parameters and expression levels were altered in TLE. Na channel currents recorded from isolated mEC TLE neurons revealed increased Na channel conductances, depolarizing shifts in inactivation parameters and larger persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na currents. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed increased staining of Nav1.6 within the axon initial segment and Nav1.2 within the cell bodies of mEC TLE neurons. These studies provide support for additional intrinsic alterations within mEC layer II neurons in TLE and implicate alterations in Na channel activity and expression, in part, for establishing the profound increase in intrinsic membrane excitability of mEC layer II neurons in TLE. These intrinsic changes, together with changes in the synaptic network, could support seizure activity in TLE. PMID:20946956

  15. GABAA-current rundown of temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with repetitive activation of GABAA “phasic” receptors

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Eleonora; Roseti, Cristina; Maiolino, Francesca; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Aronica, Eleonora; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Miledi, Ricardo; Simonato, Michele; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2007-01-01

    A study was made of the “rundown” of GABAA receptors, microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes from surgically resected brain tissues of patients afflicted with drug-resistant human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). Cell membranes, isolated from mTLE neocortex specimens, were injected into frog oocytes that rapidly incorporated functional GABAA receptors. Upon repetitive activation with GABA (1 mM), “epileptic” GABAA receptors exhibited a GABAA-current (IGABA) rundown that was significantly enhanced by Zn2+ (≤250 μM), and practically abolished by the high-affinity GABAA receptor inverse agonist SR95531 (gabazine; 2.5–25 μM). Conversely, IGABA generated by “control” GABAA receptors microtransplanted from nonepileptic temporal lobe, lesional TLE, or authoptic disease-free tissues remained stable during repetitive stimulation, even in oocytes treated with Zn2+. We conclude that rundown of mTLE epileptic receptors depends on the presence of “phasic GABAA receptors” that have low sensitivity to antagonism by Zn2+. Additionally, we found that GABAA receptors, microtransplanted from the cerebral cortex of adult rats exhibiting recurrent seizures, caused by pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, showed greater rundown than control tissue, an event also occurring in patch-clamped rat pyramidal neurons. Rundown of epileptic rat receptors resembled that of human mTLE receptors, being enhanced by Zn2+ (40 μM) and sensitive to the antiepileptic agent levetiracetam, the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and the phosphatase blocker okadaic acid. Our findings point to the rundown of GABAA receptors as a hallmark of TLE and suggest that modulating tonic and phasic mTLE GABAA receptor activity may represent a useful therapeutic approach to the disease. PMID:18083839

  16. Morphology, ultrastructure and functional role of antennal sensilla in off-host aggregation by the bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    PubMed

    Olson, Joelle F; Moon, Roger D; Kells, Stephen A; Mesce, Karen A

    2014-03-01

    After blood feeding on a host, bed bugs, Cimex lectularius, assemble in aggregation sites away from the host. Off-host aggregation is mediated by a combination of mechanical and chemical stimuli associated with bug feces. Partial antennectomies indicated removal of flagellomeres did not affect aggregation, but removal of the whole pedicel or its distal half significantly reduced (P < 0.01) aggregation, suggesting that sensilla related to off-host aggregation occur on the distal half of the pedicel. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that serrated hairs were distributed throughout the pedicel, but newly described smooth hairs were present mainly on the distal half, and a distinct patch of grooved pegs, smooth pegs and immersed cones was present on the posterior edge of the distal half of the pedicel in adults, but not in nymphs. Numbers of different types of sensilla increased significantly during metamorphosis from first instar to adult (P < 0.05), but were similar between genders (P = 0.11) and between females from a laboratory and field strain of bugs (P = 0.19). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that cuticular pores were present in the two types of pegs, indicating that the pegs have an olfactory function. The smooth hairs resembled gustatory sensilla previously described in Cimex hemipterus F. The existence of both olfactory and gustatory sensilla on the distal half of the pedicel suggests those sensilla may be the sensory basis of off-host aggregation behavior.

  17. COG lobe B sub-complex engages v-SNARE GS15 and functions via regulated interaction with lobe A sub-complex

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Rose; Blackburn, Jessica Bailey; Climer, Leslie; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Kudlyk, Tetyana; Wang, Wei; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a peripheral membrane protein complex which orchestrates tethering of intra-Golgi vesicles. We found that COG1-4 (lobe A) and 5–8 (lobe B) protein assemblies are present as independent sub-complexes on cell membranes. Super-resolution microscopy demonstrates that COG sub-complexes are spatially separated on the Golgi with lobe A preferential localization on Golgi stacks and the presence of lobe B on vesicle-like structures, where it physically interacts with v-SNARE GS15. The localization and specific interaction of the COG sub-complexes with the components of vesicle tethering/fusion machinery suggests their different roles in the vesicle tethering cycle. We propose and test a novel model that employs association/disassociation of COG sub-complexes as a mechanism that directs vesicle tethering at Golgi membranes. We demonstrate that defective COG assembly or restriction of tethering complex disassembly by a covalent COG1-COG8 linkage is inhibitory to COG complex activity, supporting the model. PMID:27385402

  18. Biochemical Characterization of the Bi-lobe Reveals a Continuous Structural Network Linking the Bi-lobe to Other Single-copied Organelles in Trypanosoma brucei*

    PubMed Central

    Gheiratmand, Ladan; Brasseur, Anais; Zhou, Qing; He, Cynthia Y.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, a unicellular parasite, contains several single-copied organelles that duplicate and segregate in a highly coordinated fashion during the cell cycle. In the procyclic stage, a bi-lobed structure is found adjacent to the single ER exit site and Golgi apparatus, forming both stable and dynamic association with other cytoskeletal components including the basal bodies that seed the flagellum and the flagellar pocket collar that is critical for flagellar pocket biogenesis. To further understand the bi-lobe and its association with adjacent organelles, we performed proteomic analyses on the immunoisolated bi-lobe complex. Candidate proteins were localized to the flagellar pocket, the basal bodies, a tripartite attachment complex linking the basal bodies to the kinetoplast, and a segment of microtubule quartet linking the flagellar pocket collar and bi-lobe to the basal bodies. These results supported an extensive connection among the single-copied organelles in T. brucei, a strategy employed by the parasite for orderly organelle assembly and inheritance during the cell cycle. PMID:23235159

  19. Acoustic and Laser Doppler Anemometer Results for Confluent, 22-Lobed, and Unique-Lobed Mixer Exhaust Systems for Subsonic Jet Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salikuddin, M.; Martens, S.; Shin, H.; Majjigi, R. K.; Krejsa, Gene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this task was to develop a design methodology and noise reduction concepts for high bypass exhaust systems which could be applied to both existing production and new advanced engine designs. Special emphasis was given to engine cycles with bypass ratios in the range of 4:1 to 7:1, where jet mixing noise was a primary noise source at full power takeoff conditions. The goal of this effort was to develop the design methodology for mixed-flow exhaust systems and other novel noise reduction concepts that would yield 3 EPNdB noise reduction relative to 1992 baseline technology. Two multi-lobed mixers, a 22-lobed axisymmetric and a 21-lobed with a unique lobe, were designed. These mixers along with a confluent mixer were tested with several fan nozzles of different lengths with and without acoustic treatment in GEAE's Cell 41 under the current subtask (Subtask C). In addition to the acoustic and LDA tests for the model mixer exhaust systems, a semi-empirical noise prediction method for mixer exhaust system is developed. Effort was also made to implement flowfield data for noise prediction by utilizing MGB code. In general, this study established an aero and acoustic diagnostic database to calibrate and refine current aero and acoustic prediction tools.

  20. COG lobe B sub-complex engages v-SNARE GS15 and functions via regulated interaction with lobe A sub-complex.

    PubMed

    Willett, Rose; Blackburn, Jessica Bailey; Climer, Leslie; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Kudlyk, Tetyana; Wang, Wei; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2016-07-07

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a peripheral membrane protein complex which orchestrates tethering of intra-Golgi vesicles. We found that COG1-4 (lobe A) and 5-8 (lobe B) protein assemblies are present as independent sub-complexes on cell membranes. Super-resolution microscopy demonstrates that COG sub-complexes are spatially separated on the Golgi with lobe A preferential localization on Golgi stacks and the presence of lobe B on vesicle-like structures, where it physically interacts with v-SNARE GS15. The localization and specific interaction of the COG sub-complexes with the components of vesicle tethering/fusion machinery suggests their different roles in the vesicle tethering cycle. We propose and test a novel model that employs association/disassociation of COG sub-complexes as a mechanism that directs vesicle tethering at Golgi membranes. We demonstrate that defective COG assembly or restriction of tethering complex disassembly by a covalent COG1-COG8 linkage is inhibitory to COG complex activity, supporting the model.

  1. Mutagenesis of the aspartic acid ligands in human serum transferrin: lobe-lobe interaction and conformation as revealed by antibody, receptor-binding and iron-release studies.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, A; He, Q Y; Tam, B; MacGillivray, R A; Woodworth, R

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant non-glycosylated human serum transferrin and mutants in which the liganding aspartic acid (D) in one or both lobes was changed to a serine residue (S) were produced in a mammalian cell system and purified from the tissue culture media. Significant downfield shifts of 20, 30, and 45 nm in the absorption maxima were found for the D63S-hTF, D392S-hTF and the double mutant, D63S/D392S-hTF when compared to wild-type hTF. A monoclonal antibody to a sequential epitope in the C-lobe of hTF reported affinity differences between the apo- and iron-forms of each mutant and the control. Cell-binding studies performed under the same buffer conditions used for the antibody work clearly showed that the mutated lobe(s) had an open cleft. It is not clear whether the receptor itself may play a role in promoting the open conformation or whether the iron remains in the cleft. PMID:9461487

  2. Medial versus lateral frontal lobe contributions to voluntary saccade control as revealed by the study of patients with frontal lobe degeneration.

    PubMed

    Boxer, Adam L; Garbutt, Siobhan; Rankin, Katherine P; Hellmuth, Joanna; Neuhaus, John; Miller, Bruce L; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2006-06-07

    Deficits in the ability to suppress automatic behaviors lead to impaired decision making, aberrant motor behavior, and impaired social function in humans with frontal lobe neurodegeneration. We have studied patients with different patterns of frontal lobe dysfunction resulting from frontotemporal lobar degeneration or Alzheimer's disease, investigating their ability to perform visually guided saccades and smooth pursuit eye movements and to suppress visually guided saccades on the antisaccade task. Patients with clinical syndromes associated with dorsal frontal lobe damage had normal visually guided saccades but were impaired relative to other patients and control subjects in smooth pursuit eye movements and on the antisaccade task. The percentage of correct antisaccade responses was correlated with neuropsychological measures of frontal lobe function and with estimates of frontal lobe gray matter volume based on analyses of structural magnetic resonance images. After controlling for age, gender, cognitive status, and potential interactions between disease group and oculomotor function, an unbiased voxel-based morphometric analysis identified the volume of a segment of the right frontal eye field (FEF) as positively correlated with antisaccade performance (less volume equaled lower percentage of correct responses) but not with either pursuit performance or antisaccade or visually guided saccade latency or gain. In contrast, the volume of the presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and a portion of the supplementary eye fields correlated with antisaccade latency (less volume equaled shorter latency) but not with the percentage of correct responses. These results suggest that integrity of the presupplementary motion area/supplementary eye fields is critical for supervisory processes that slow the onset of saccades, facilitating voluntary saccade targeting decisions that rely on the FEF.

  3. Seismic stratigraphic comparison of DSDP Leg 96 results with older Mississippi fan lobes, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, P.; Buffler, R.T.

    1987-05-01

    DSDP Leg 96 drilled the youngest depositional lobe of the Mississippi fan at nine sites. These sites were designed to provide a set of reference cores to help explain the development of Quaternary and older submarine fans. The youngest fan lobe is dominated by a single, sinuous aggradational channel system, characterized by high-amplitude reflections that represent channel-lag gravels and sands, while adjacent laterally continuous reflections correspond to fine-grained overbank sediments. Analysis of 12,000 km of multifold seismic data from the Mississippi fan provides a method for comparing the drilling results with the seismic stratigraphy of the nine older Mississippi fan lobes. Sinuous channels and associated facies are present in all older lobes in the middle fan area, although there is a greater diversity in channel/overbank distribution and interpreted depositional processes. For example, four of the lobes have several coeval channels that are fed by separate submarine canyons in the slope, and a bifurcating channel pattern caused by channel avulsion is present in six different lobes along the middle and lower fan. In addition, an important seismic facies consisting of mounded, hummocky, and chaotic reflections is present at the base of six older lobes. This facies is more areally restricted than the overlying, well-developed channel/overbank deposits and is interpreted to represent coarse-grained channel sediments deposited during lowering sea level. Although Leg 96 drilling provides sedimentologic information that can be used for com