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Sample records for adult articular chondrocytes

  1. Comparative potential of juvenile and adult human articular chondrocytes for cartilage tissue formation in three-dimensional biomimetic hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Behn, Anthony W; Goodman, Stuart B; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human articular cartilage is inherently limited and extensive efforts have focused on engineering the cartilage tissue. Various cellular sources have been studied for cartilage tissue engineering including adult chondrocytes, and embryonic or adult stem cells. Juvenile chondrocytes (from donors below 13 years of age) have recently been reported to be a promising cell source for cartilage regeneration. Previous studies have compared the potential of adult and juvenile chondrocytes or adult and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. To comprehensively characterize the comparative potential of young, old, and diseased chondrocytes, here we examined cartilage formation by juvenile, adult, and OA chondrocytes in three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogels composed of poly(ethylene glycol) and chondroitin sulfate. All three human articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels and cultured for 3 or 6 weeks to allow maturation and extracellular matrix formation. Outcomes were analyzed using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. After 3 and 6 weeks, juvenile chondrocytes showed a greater upregulation of chondrogenic gene expression than adult chondrocytes, while OA chondrocytes showed a downregulation. Aggrecan and type II collagen deposition and glycosaminoglycan accumulation were high for juvenile and adult chondrocytes but not for OA chondrocytes. Similar trend was observed in the compressive moduli of the cartilage constructs generated by the three different chondrocytes. In conclusion, the juvenile, adult and OA chondrocytes showed differential responses in the 3D biomimetic hydrogels. The 3D culture model described here may also provide a useful tool to further study the molecular differences among chondrocytes from different stages, which can help elucidate the mechanisms for age-related decline in the intrinsic capacity for cartilage repair. PMID:25054343

  2. Growth factor transgenes interactively regulate articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuiliang; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2013-04-01

    Adult articular chondrocytes lack an effective repair response to correct damage from injury or osteoarthritis. Polypeptide growth factors that stimulate articular chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage matrix synthesis may augment this response. Gene transfer is a promising approach to delivering such factors. Multiple growth factor genes regulate these cell functions, but multiple growth factor gene transfer remains unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that multiple growth factor gene transfer selectively modulates articular chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. We tested the hypothesis by delivering combinations of the transgenes encoding insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and bone morphogenetic protien-7 (BMP-7) to articular chondrocytes and measured changes in the production of DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen. The transgenes differentially regulated all these chondrocyte activities. In concert, the transgenes interacted to generate widely divergent responses from the cells. These interactions ranged from inhibitory to synergistic. The transgene pair encoding IGF-I and FGF-2 maximized cell proliferation. The three-transgene group encoding IGF-I, BMP-2, and BMP-7 maximized matrix production and also optimized the balance between cell proliferation and matrix production. These data demonstrate an approach to articular chondrocyte regulation that may be tailored to stimulate specific cell functions, and suggest that certain growth factor gene combinations have potential value for cell-based articular cartilage repair.

  3. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair. PMID:25869133

  4. Autophagy modulates articular cartilage vesicle formation in primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Gohr, Claudia M; Mitton-Fitzgerald, Elizabeth; Grewal, Rupinder; Ninomiya, James; Coyne, Carolyn B; Jackson, William T

    2015-05-22

    Chondrocyte-derived extracellular organelles known as articular cartilage vesicles (ACVs) participate in non-classical protein secretion, intercellular communication, and pathologic calcification. Factors affecting ACV formation and release remain poorly characterized; although in some cell types, the generation of extracellular vesicles is associated with up-regulation of autophagy. We sought to determine the role of autophagy in ACV production by primary articular chondrocytes. Using an innovative dynamic model with a light scatter nanoparticle counting apparatus, we determined the effects of autophagy modulators on ACV number and content in conditioned medium from normal adult porcine and human osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Healthy articular chondrocytes release ACVs into conditioned medium and show significant levels of ongoing autophagy. Rapamycin, which promotes autophagy, increased ACV numbers in a dose- and time-dependent manner associated with increased levels of autophagy markers and autophagosome formation. These effects were suppressed by pharmacologic autophagy inhibitors and short interfering RNA for ATG5. Caspase-3 inhibition and a Rho/ROCK inhibitor prevented rapamycin-induced increases in ACV number. Osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which are deficient in autophagy, did not increase ACV number in response to rapamycin. SMER28, which induces autophagy via an mTOR-independent mechanism, also increased ACV number. ACVs induced under all conditions had similar ecto-enzyme specific activities and types of RNA, and all ACVs contained LC3, an autophagosome-resident protein. These findings identify autophagy as a critical participant in ACV formation, and augment our understanding of ACVs in cartilage disease and repair.

  5. Morphological, genetic and phenotypic comparison between human articular chondrocytes and cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Mata-Miranda, Mónica Maribel; Martinez-Martinez, Claudia María; Noriega-Gonzalez, Jesús Emmanuel; Paredes-Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Vázquez-Zapién, Gustavo Jesús

    2016-08-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and aneural tissue with limited capacity for regeneration. On large articular lesions, it is recommended to use regenerative medicine strategies, like autologous chondrocyte implantation. There is a concern about morphological changes that chondrocytes suffer once they have been isolated and cultured. Due to the fact that there is little evidence that compares articular cartilage chondrocytes with cultured chondrocytes, in this research we proposed to obtain chondrocytes from human articular cartilage, compare them with themselves once they have been cultured and characterize them through genetic, phenotypic and morphological analysis. Knee articular cartilage samples of 10 mm were obtained, and each sample was divided into two fragments; a portion was used to determine gene expression, and from the other portion, chondrocytes were obtained by enzymatic disaggregation, in order to be cultured and expanded in vitro. Subsequently, morphological, genetic and phenotypic characteristics were compared between in situ (articular cartilage) and cultured chondrocytes. Obtained cultured chondrocytes were rounded in shape, possessing a large nucleus with condensed chromatin and a clear cytoplasm; histological appearance was quite similar to typical chondrocyte. The expression levels of COL2A1 and COL10A1 genes were higher in cultured chondrocytes than in situ chondrocytes; moreover, the expression of COL1A1 was almost undetectable on cultured chondrocytes; likewise, COL2 and SOX9 proteins were detected by immunofluorescence. We concluded that chondrocytes derived from adult human cartilage cultured for 21 days do not tend to dedifferentiate, maintaining their capacity to produce matrix and also retaining their synthesis capacity and morphology.

  6. Articular chondrocyte metabolism and osteoarthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Leipold, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    The three main objectives of this study were: (1) to determine if depletion of proteoglycans from the cartilage matrix that occurs during osteoarthritis causes a measurable increase of cartilage proteoglycan components in the synovial fluid and sera, (2) to observe what effect intracellular cAMP has on the expression of matrix components by chondrocytes, and (3) to determine if freshly isolated chondrocytes contain detectable levels of mRNA for fibronectin. Canine serum keratan sulfate and hyaluronate were measured to determine if there was an elevation of these serum glycosaminoglycans in a canine model of osteoarthritis. A single intra-articular injection of chymopapain into a shoulder joint increased serum keratan sulfate 10 fold and hyaluronate less than 2 fold in 24 hours. Keratan sulfate concentrations in synovial fluids of dogs about one year old were unrelated to the presence of spontaneous cartilage degeneration in the joints. High keratan sulfate in synovial fluids correlated with higher keratan sulfate in serum. The mean keratan sulfate concentration in sera of older dogs with osteoarthritis was 37% higher than disease-free controls, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Treatment of chondrocytes with 0.5 millimolar (mM) dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) caused the cells to adopt a more rounded morphology. There was no difference between the amount of proteins synthesized by cultures treated with DBcAMP and controls. The amount of fibronectin (FN) in the media of DBcAMP treated cultures detected by an ELISA was specifically reduced, and the amount of {sup 35}S-FN purified by gelatin affinity chromatography decreased. Moreover, the percentage of FN containing the extra domain. A sequence was reduced. Concomitant with the decrease in FN there was an increase in the concentration of keratan sulfate.

  7. Lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rathakrishnan, C; Tiku, M L

    1993-08-01

    We were recently able to measure intracellular levels of hydrogen peroxide within normal articular chondrocytes using the trapped indicator 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Further studies have shown that stimulated chondrocytes produce luminol-dependent chemiluminescence, suggesting that these cells produce hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen. In the present study, we have investigated the lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence response in normal articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes either in suspension or adhered to cover slips showed lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. There was a dose-dependent increase in chemiluminescence response when chondrocytes were incubated with soluble stimuli like phorbol-myristate-acetate, concanavalin A, and f-met-leu-phe. Catalase and the metabolic inhibitor, sodium azide, which inhibits the enzyme myeloperoxidase, had no inhibitory effect on lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence production. Only the antioxidant, superoxide dismutase, prevented lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence, indicating that this assay measures the production of superoxide anions by chondrocytes. We confirmed that chondrocytes release superoxide radicals using the biochemical assay of ferricytochrome c reduction. Since cartilage tissue is semi-transparent, we were able to measure chemiluminescence response in live cartilage tissue, showing that chondrocytes which are embedded within the matrix can also generate superoxide anion radicals. Reactive oxygen intermediates have been shown to play a significant role in the degradation of matrix in arthritis. Our previous and present studies suggest that oxygen radicals produced by chondrocytes may be an important mechanism by which chondrocytes induce cartilage matrix degradation.

  8. Telomerase Activity in Articular Chondrocytes Is Lost after Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brooke; Novakofski, Kira D.; Donocoff, Rachel Sacher; Liang, Yan-Xiang Amber

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Telomere length and telomerase activity are important indicators of cellular senescence and replicative ability. Loss of telomerase is associated with ageing and the development of osteoarthritis. Implantation of telomerase-positive cells, chondrocytes, or stem cells expressing a normal chondrocyte phenotype is desired for cartilage repair procedures. The objective of this study was to identify at what age chondrocytes and at what passage bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) become senescent based on telomerase activity. The effect of osteogenic protein–1 (OP-1) or interleukin-1α (IL-1α) treatment on telomerase activity in chondrocytes was also measured to determine the response to anabolic or catabolic stimuli. Methods: Articular cartilage was collected from horses (n = 12) aged 1 month to 18 years. Chondrocytes from prepubescent horses (<15 months) were treated with OP-1 or IL-1α. Bone marrow aspirate from adult horses was collected and cultured for up to 10 days to isolate MSCs. Telomerase activity was measured using the TeloTAGGG Telomerase PCR ELISA kit. Results: Chondrocytes from prepubescent horses were positive for telomerase activity. Treatment with IL-1α resulted in a decrease in chondrocyte telomerase activity; however, treatment with OP-1 did not change telomerase activity. One MSC culture sample was positive for telomerase activity on day 2; all samples were negative for telomerase activity on day 10. Conclusions: These results suggest that chondrocytes from prepubescent donors are potentially more suitable for cartilage repair procedures and that telomerase activity is diminished by anabolic and catabolic cytokine stimulation. If MSCs are utilized in cartilage repair, minimal passaging should be performed prior to implantation. PMID:26069700

  9. ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of human articular chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Emi; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Kanazawa, Tomoko; Tamura, Masanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor stimulates chondrogenic gene expression of articular chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor enhances the redifferentiation of cultured chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor is useful for preparation of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROCK inhibitor may be a useful reagent for chondrocyte-based regeneration therapy. -- Abstract: Chondrocytes lose their chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro. The Rho family GTPase ROCK, involved in organizing the actin cytoskeleton, modulates the differentiation status of chondrocytic cells. However, the optimum method to prepare a large number of un-dedifferentiated chondrocytes is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi) on the chondrogenic property of monolayer-cultured articular chondrocytes. Human articular chondrocytes were subcultured in the presence or absence of ROCKi (Y-27632). The expression of chondrocytic marker genes such as SOX9 and COL2A1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Cellular morphology and viability were evaluated. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential was examined by a pellet culture procedure. The expression level of SOX9 and COL2A1 was higher in ROCKi-treated chondrocytes than in untreated cells. Chondrocyte morphology varied from a spreading form to a round shape in a ROCKi-dependent manner. In addition, ROCKi treatment stimulated the proliferation of chondrocytes. The deposition of safranin O-stained proteoglycans and type II collagen was highly detected in chondrogenic pellets derived from ROCKi-pretreated chondrocytes. Our results suggest that ROCKi prevents the dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes, and may be a useful reagent to maintain chondrocytic phenotypes in vitro for chondrocyte

  10. Chondrocyte distribution in the articular cartilage of human femoral condyles.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, R S; Palfrey, A J

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of chondrocytes throughout the total thickness of articular cartilage from the femoral condyles of infants, children and adults has been studied using serial sections cut parallel as well as perpendicular to the articular surface. The thickness of the articular cartilage was estimated in fixed sections. In one of the adult specimens, the thickness of the articular cartilage was estimated firstly by direct measurement of the cut surfaces of a series of blocks cut from both condyles and then from the number of parallel sections of the cartilage prepared from those blocks. Cell density was highest in the superficial zone of all specimens examined, declining to lower values in the deep zone of the cartilage. Within this pattern the infant specimens had the highest values for cell density and the adults the lowest, with values for children in an intermediate range. There was no significant variation in cell density across the condyles of the selected adult specimen. The absolute values for cartilage thickness depended on the method used, but in general total thickness was found to approximately double from late gestation to maturity. In the selected adult specimen, the cartilage was thickest just anterior and posterior to the main weight-bearing area of the condyles. PMID:3198480

  11. Human Articular Chondrocytes Express Multiple Gap Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mayan, Maria D.; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Martinez-de-Ilarduya, Oskar; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and involves progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. The aim of this study was to investigate if chondrocytes from human articular cartilage express gap junction proteins called connexins (Cxs). We show that human chondrocytes in tissue express Cx43, Cx45, Cx32, and Cx46. We also find that primary chondrocytes from adults retain the capacity to form functional voltage-dependent gap junctions. Immunohistochemistry experiments in cartilage from OA patients revealed significantly elevated levels of Cx43 and Cx45 in the superficial zone and down through the next approximately 1000 μm of tissue. These zones corresponded with regions damaged in OA that also had high levels of proliferative cell nuclear antigen. An increased number of Cxs may help explain the increased proliferation of cells in clusters that finally lead to tissue homeostasis loss. Conversely, high levels of Cxs in OA cartilage reflect the increased number of adjacent cells in clusters that are able to interact directly by gap junctions as compared with hemichannels on single cells in normal cartilage. Our data provide strong evidence that OA patients have a loss of the usual ordered distribution of Cxs in the damaged zones and that the reductions in Cx43 levels are accompanied by the loss of correct Cx localization in the nondamaged areas. PMID:23416160

  12. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension. PMID:26616052

  13. Effects of vimentin disruption on the mechanoresponses of articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Yin, Li; Song, Xiongbo; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiang; Gong, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is subjected to repetitive mechanical loading during life time. As the only cellular component of articular cartilage, chondrocytes play a key role in the mechanotransduction within this tissue. The mechanoresponses of chondrocytes are largely determined by the cytoskeleton. Vimentin intermediate filaments, one of the major cytoskeletal components, have been shown to regulate chondrocyte phenotype. However, the contribution of vimentin in chondrocyte mechanoresponses remains less studied. In this study, we seeded goat articular chondrocytes on a soft polyacrylamide gel, and disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton using acrylamide. Then we applied a transient stretch or compression to the cells, and measured the changes of cellular stiffness and traction forces using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry and Traction Force Microscopy, respectively. In addition, to study the effects of vimentin disruption on the intracellular force generation, we treated the cells with a variety of reagents that are known to increase or decrease cytoskeletal tension. We found that, after a compression, the contractile moment and cellular stiffness were not affected in untreated chondrocytes, but were decreased in vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes; after a stretch, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes showed a lower level of fluidization-resolidification response compared to untreated cells. Moreover, vimentin-disrupted chondrocytes didn't show much difference to control cells in responding to reagents that target actin and ROCK pathway, but showed a weaker response to histamine and isoproterenol. These findings confirmed chondrocyte vimentin as a major contributor in withstanding compressive loading, and its minor role in regulating cytoskeletal tension.

  14. In vivo cartilage formation from growth factor modulated articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bradham, D M; Horton, W E

    1998-07-01

    Recent procedures for autologous repair of cartilage defects may be difficult in elderly patients because of the loss of stem cells and chondrocytes that occurs with age and the slow in vitro proliferation of chondrocytes from aged cartilage. In this study secondary chondroprogenitor cells were obtained by modulating the phenotype of articular chondrocytes with growth factors and stimulating the proliferation of these cells in culture. Chondrocytes isolated from the articular cartilage of mature New Zealand White rabbits were exposed to a combination of transforming growth factor beta and basic fibroblast growth factor treatment. These cells ceased the production of Collagen II (a marker for the chondrocyte phenotype) and underwent a 136-fold increase in cell number. Next, the cells were placed in high density culture and reexpressed the chondrocyte phenotype in vitro and formed hyaline cartilage in an in vivo assay. Primary chondrocytes obtained from articular cartilage of elderly humans could be manipulated in a similar fashion in vitro. These human secondary chondroprogenitor cells formed only cartilage tissue when assayed in vivo and in tissue bioreactors. This approach may be essential for autologous repair of degenerated articular cartilage in elderly patients with osteoarthritis.

  15. Basic calcium phosphate crystals activate human osteoarthritic synovial fibroblasts and induce matrix metalloproteinase-13 (collagenase-3) in adult porcine articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, G; Westfall, P; Masuda, I; Christopherson, P; Cheung, H; Mitchell, P

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the ability of basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals to induce (a) mitogenesis, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, and MMP-13 in human osteoarthritic synovial fibroblasts (HOAS) and (b) MMP-13 in cultured porcine articular chondrocytes.
METHODS—Mitogenesis of HOAS was measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation assay and counts of cells in monolayer culture. MMP messenger RNA (mRNA) accumulation was determined either by northern blot analysis or reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of RNA from chondrocytes or HOAS treated with BCP crystals. MMP-13 secretion was identified by immunoprecipitation and MMP-1 secretion by western blot of conditioned media.
RESULTS—BCP crystals caused a 4.5-fold increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation by HOAS within 20 hours compared with untreated control cultures (p⩽0.05). BCP crystals induced MMP-13 mRNA accumulation and MMP-13 protein secretion by articular chondrocytes. In contrast, in HOAS, MMP-13 mRNA induced by BCP crystals was detectable only by RT-PCR, and MMP-13 protein was undetectable. BCP crystals induced MMP-1 mRNA accumulation and MMP-1 protein secretion by HOAS. MMP-1 expression was further augmented when HOAS were co-incubated with either BCP and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα; threefold) or BCP and interleukin 1α (IL1α; twofold).
CONCLUSION—These data confirm the ability of BCP crystals to activate HOAS, leading to the induction of mitogenesis and MMP-1 production. MMP-13 production in response to BCP crystals is substantially more detectable in porcine articular chondrocytes than in HOAS. These data support the active role of BCP crystals in osteoarthritis and suggest that BCP crystals act synergistically with IL1α and TNFα to promote MMP production and subsequent joint degeneration.

 PMID:11247873

  16. Expression of Angiotensin II Receptor-1 in Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yuki; Matsuo, Kosuke; Murata, Minako; Yudoh, Kazuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Inaba, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Kato, Tomohiro; Masuko, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Besides its involvement in the cardiovascular system, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAS) system has also been suggested to play an important role in inflammation. To explore the role of this system in cartilage damage in arthritis, we investigated the expression of angiotensin II receptors in chondrocytes. Methods. Articular cartilage was obtained from patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and traumatic fractures who were undergoing arthroplasty. Chondrocytes were isolated and cultured in vitro with or without interleukin (IL-1). The expression of angiotensin II receptor types 1 (AT1R) and 2 (AT2R) mRNA by the chondrocytes was analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AT1R expression in cartilage tissue was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The effect of IL-1 on AT1R/AT2R expression in the chondrocytes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry. Results. Chondrocytes from all patient types expressed AT1R/AT2R mRNA, though considerable variation was found between samples. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed AT1R expression at the protein level. Stimulation with IL-1 enhanced the expression of AT1R/AT2R mRNA in OA and RA chondrocytes. Conclusions. Human articular chondrocytes, at least partially, express angiotensin II receptors, and IL-1 stimulation induced AT1R/AT2R mRNA expression significantly. PMID:23346400

  17. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Asmar, A; Barrett-Jolley, R; Werner, A; Kelly, R; Stacey, M

    2016-04-01

    Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca(2+) activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  18. Membrane channel gene expression in human costal and articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, A.; Barrett-Jolley, R.; Werner, A.; Kelly, R.; Stacey, M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chondrocytes are the uniquely resident cells found in all types of cartilage and key to their function is the ability to respond to mechanical loads with changes of metabolic activity. This mechanotransduction property is, in part, mediated through the activity of a range of expressed transmembrane channels; ion channels, gap junction proteins, and porins. Appropriate expression of ion channels has been shown essential for production of extracellular matrix and differential expression of transmembrane channels is correlated to musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoarthritis and Albers-Schönberg. In this study we analyzed the consistency of gene expression between channelomes of chondrocytes from human articular and costal (teenage and fetal origin) cartilages. Notably, we found 14 ion channel genes commonly expressed between articular and both types of costal cartilage chondrocytes. There were several other ion channel genes expressed only in articular (6 genes) or costal chondrocytes (5 genes). Significant differences in expression of BEST1 and KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) were observed between fetal and teenage costal cartilage. Interestingly, the large Ca2+ activated potassium channel (BKα, or KCNMA1) was very highly expressed in all chondrocytes examined. Expression of the gap junction genes for Panx1, GJA1 (Cx43) and GJC1 (Cx45) was also observed in chondrocytes from all cartilage samples. Together, this data highlights similarities between chondrocyte membrane channel gene expressions in cells derived from different anatomical sites, and may imply that common electrophysiological signaling pathways underlie cellular control. The high expression of a range of mechanically and metabolically sensitive membrane channels suggest that chondrocyte mechanotransduction may be more complex than previously thought. PMID:27116676

  19. Chondroprotective Effect of Kartogenin on CD44-Mediated Functions in Articular Cartilage and Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yohei; Ishizuka, Shinya; Knudson, Cheryl B.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A recent report identified the small molecule kartogenin as a chondrogenic and chondroprotective agent. Since changes in hyaluronan metabolism occur during cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis, we began studies to determine whether there was a connection between extracellular hyaluronan, CD44–hyaluronan interactions and the effects of kartogenin on articular chondrocytes. Methods: Chondrocytes cultured in monolayers, bioengineered neocartilages, or cartilage explants were treated with kartogenin with or without stimulation by IL-1β. Accumulation of matrix was visualized by a particle exclusion assay or by safranin O staining and release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans was determined. Production of aggrecanases and aggrecan G1-ITEGE neoepitope, fragmentation of CD44 and the SMAD1/5/8 signaling pathway were evaluated by western blotting. Results: Kartogenin treatment enhanced chondrocyte pericellular matrix assembly and retention in the presence of IL-1β. The chondroprotective effects of kartogenin on IL-1β-induced release of sulfated glycosaminoglycans from articular cartilage explants, reduction in safranin O staining of neocartilage discs as well as a reduction in aggrecan G1-ITEGE neoepitope in chondrocyte and explant cartilage cultures were observed. Kartogenin partially blocked the IL-1β-induced increased expression of ADAMTS-5. Additionally, kartogenin-treated articular chondrocytes exhibited a decrease in CD44 proteolytic fragmentation. However, kartogenin treatment did not enhance proteoglycan in control, non-IL-1β-treated cultures. Similarly, kartogenin enhanced the SMAD1 phosphorylation but only following pretreatment with IL-1β. Conclusion: These studies provide novel information on the chondroprotective function of kartogenin in adult articular cartilage. The effects of kartogenin are significant after activation of chondrocytic chondrolysis, which may occur following disruption of homeostasis maintained by hyaluronan–CD44

  20. DEXAMETHASONE PROMOTES CPPD CRYSTAL FORMATION BY ARTICULAR CHONDROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, Mark; Mitton, Elizabeth; Muth, Emily; Rosenthal, Ann K.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals (CPPD) are commonly found in osteoarthritic joints and correlate with a poor prognosis. Intra-articular corticosteroids, such as dexamethasone (Dxm), are commonly used therapies for osteoarthritis with or without CPPD deposition. Dxm has variable effects in mineralization models. We investigated the effects of Dxm on CPPD crystal formation in a well established tissue culture model. Methods Porcine articular chondrocytes were incubated with ATP to generate CPPD crystals. Chondrocytes incubated with or without ATP were exposed to 1–100 nM Dxm in the presence of 45Ca. Mineralization was measured by 45Ca uptake in the cell layer. We also investigated the effect of Dxm on mineralization-regulating enzymes such as alkaline phosphatase, NTPPPH and transglutaminase. Results Dxm significantly increased ATP-induced mineralization by articular chondrocytes. While alkaline phosphatase and NTPPPH activities were unchanged by Dxm, transglutaminase activity increased in a clear dose responsive manner. Levels of factor XIIIA mRNA and protein were increased by Dxm, while type II Tgase protein was unchanged. Transglutaminase inhibitors suppressed Dxm-induced increases in CPPD crystal formation. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential for Dxm to contribute to pathologic mineralization in cartilage and reinforce a central role for the transglutaminase enzymes in CPPD crystal formation. PMID:19132782

  1. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  2. Basic fibroblast growth factor induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 via ERK MAP kinase-altered phosphorylation and sumoylation of Elk-1 in human adult articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hee-Jeong; Sharrocks, Andrew D; Lin, Xia; Yan, Dongyao; Kim, Jaesung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Hipskind, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are principal aspects of the pathology of osteoarthritis (OA). ECM disruption leads to bFGF release, which activates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway and its downstream target the Ets-like transcription factor Elk-1. Previously we demonstrated that the bFGF-ERK-Elk-1 signaling axis is responsible for the potent induction of MMP-13 in human primary articular chondrocytes. Here we report that, in addition to phosphorylation of Elk-1, dynamic posttranslational modification of Elk-1 by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) serves as an important mechanism through which MMP-13 gene expression is regulated. We show that bFGF activates Elk-1 mainly through the ERK pathway and that increased phosphorylation of Elk-1 is accompanied by decreased conjugation of SUMO to Elk-1. Reporter gene assays reveal that phosphorylation renders Elk-1 competent for induction of MMP-13 gene transcription, while sumoylation has the opposite effect. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the SUMO-conjugase Ubc9 acts as a key mediator for Elk-1 sumoylation. Taken together, our results suggest that sumoylation antagonizes the phosphorylation-dependent transactivation capacity of Elk-1. This attenuates transcription of its downstream target gene MMP-13 to maintain the integrity of cartilage ECM homeostasis.

  3. Alteration of viscoelastic properties is associated with a change in cytoskeleton components of ageing chondrocytes from rabbit knee articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wangping; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Juntao; Hao, Yongzhuang; Li, Chunjiang; Li, Hao; Li, Qi; Zhang, Quanyou; Chen, Weiyi; Wei, Xiaochun

    2011-12-01

    The cytoskeleton network is believed to play an important role in the biomechanical properties of the chondrocyte. Ours and other laboratories have demonstrated that chondrocytes exhibit a viscoelastic solid creep behavior in vitro and that viscoelastic properties decrease in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. In this study, we aimed to understand whether the alteration of viscoelastic properties is associated with changes in cytoskeleton components of ageing chondrocytes from rabbit knee articular cartilage. Three age groups were used for this study: young (2-months-old, N=23), adult (8-months-old, N=23), and old (31-months-old, N=23) rabbit groups. Cartilage structure and proteoglycan and type II collagen content were determined by H&E and Toluidine Blue staining, and type II collagen antibody. The detailed structure of the chondrocytes in all groups was visualized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Chondrocytes were isolated from full-thickness knee cartilage of rabbits from all groups and their viscoelastic properties were quantified within 2 hours of isolation using a micropipette aspiration technique combined with a standard linear viscoelastic solid model. The components and network of the cytoskeleton within the cells were analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) with immunofluorescence staining as well as real time PCR and western blotting. With ageing, articular cartilage contained less chondrocytes and less proteoglycans and type II collagen. TEM observations showed that the cell membranes were not clearly defined, organelles were fewer and the nuclei were deformed or shrunk in the old cells compared with the young and adult cells. In suspension, chondrocytes from all three age groups showed significant viscoelastic creep behavior, but the deformation rate and amplitude of old chondrocytes were increased under the same negative pressure when compared to young and adult chondrocytes. Viscoelastic properties of the old cells, including

  4. Increasing the Dose of Autologous Chondrocytes Improves Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Guillén-García, Pedro; Rodríguez-Iñigo, Elena; Guillén-Vicente, Isabel; Caballero-Santos, Rosa; Guillén-Vicente, Marta; Abelow, Stephen; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Background: We hypothesized that implanting cells in a chondral defect at a density more similar to that of the intact cartilage could induce them to synthesize matrix with the features more similar to that of the uninjured one. Methods: We compared the implantation of different doses of chondrocytes: 1 million (n = 5), 5 million (n = 5), or 5 million mesenchymal cells (n = 5) in the femoral condyle of 15 sheep. Tissue generated by microfracture at the trochlea, and normal cartilage from a nearby region, processed as the tissues resulting from the implantation, were used as references. Histological and molecular (expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan) studies were performed. Results: The features of the cartilage generated by implantation of mesenchymal cells and elicited by microfractures were similar and typical of a poor repair of the articular cartilage (presence of fibrocartilage, high expression of type I collagen and a low mRNA levels of type II collagen and aggrecan). Nevertheless, in the samples obtained from tissues generated by implantation of chondrocytes, hyaline-like cartilage, cell organization, low expression rates of type I collagen and high levels of mRNA corresponding to type II collagen and aggrecan were observed. These histological features, show less variability and are more similar to those of the normal cartilage used as control in the case of 5 million cells implantation than when 1 million cells were used. Conclusions: The implantation of autologous chondrocytes in type I/III collagen membranes at high density could be a promising tool to repair articular cartilage. PMID:26069691

  5. Chondrocyte death in mechanically injured articular cartilage--the influence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Amin, Anish K; Huntley, James S; Bush, Peter G; Simpson, A Hamish R W; Hall, Andrew C

    2009-06-01

    Calcium is thought to be an important regulator of chondrocyte death associated with articular cartilage injury. Our objective was to determine the influence of extracellular calcium on chondrocyte death following mechanical injury. Using a surgically relevant model of sharp mechanical injury (with a scalpel) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), in situ chondrocyte death was quantified within the full thickness of articular cartilage as a function of medium calcium concentration and time (2.5 h and 7 days). Exposure of articular cartilage to calcium-free media (approximately 0 mM) significantly reduced superficial zone chondrocyte death after mechanical injury compared with exposure to calcium-rich media (2-20 mM, ANOVA at 2.5 h, p = 0.002). In calcium-rich media, although the extent of chondrocyte death increased with increasing medium calcium concentration, cell death remained localized to the superficial zone of articular cartilage over 7 days (ANOVA, p < 0.05). However, in calcium-free media, there was an increase in chondrocyte death within deeper zones of articular cartilage over 7 days. The early (within hours) chondroprotective effect in calcium-free media suggests that the use of joint irrigation solutions without added calcium may decrease chondrocyte death from mechanical injury during articular surgery. The delayed (within days) increase in chondrocyte death in calcium-free media supports the use of calcium supplementation in media used during cartilage culture for tissue engineering or transplantation.

  6. Potassium channels of pig articular chondrocytes are blocked by propofol.

    PubMed

    Mozrzymas, J W; Visintin, M; Vittur, F; Ruzzier, F

    1994-07-15

    The effect of propofol on the voltage-activated potassium channels in pig articular chondrocytes was investigated. Propofol was found to reversibly block the potassium channels in a dose-dependent manner. The blocking effect was voltage-independent and the Hill coefficient was 1.85 +/- 0.18. No changes either in the slope conductance or in the single channel kinetics were observed. The half-blocking concentration (Ec50) was 6.0 +/- 0.49 microM which is much lower than the concentrations used to observe the scavenging effect of the drug in an artificial synovial fluid. Interestingly, Ec50 found in our experiments is also smaller than the blood concentration of propofol used in anaesthesia. These results show that propofol may strongly affect the potassium channels in some non-excitable cells.

  7. Chondrogenesis, chondrocyte differentiation, and articular cartilage metabolism in health and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Mary B

    2012-08-01

    Chondrogenesis occurs as a result of mesenchymal cell condensation and chondroprogenitor cell differentiation. Following chondrogenesis, the chondrocytes remain as resting cells to form the articular cartilage or undergo proliferation, terminal differentiation to chondrocyte hypertrophy, and apoptosis in a process termed endochondral ossification, whereby the hypertrophic cartilage is replaced by bone. Human adult articular cartilage is a complex tissue of matrix proteins that varies from superficial to deep layers and from loaded to unloaded zones. A major challenge to efforts to repair cartilage by stem cell-based and other tissue-engineering strategies is the inability of the resident chondrocytes to lay down a new matrix with the same properties as it had when it was formed during development. Thus, understanding and comparing the mechanisms of cartilage remodeling during development, osteoarthritis (OA), and aging may lead to more effective strategies for preventing cartilage damage and promoting repair. The pivotal proteinase that marks OA progression is matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13), the major type II collagen-degrading collagenase, which is regulated by both stress and inflammatory signals. We and other investigators have found that there are common mediators of these processes in human OA cartilage. We also observe temporal and spatial expression of these mediators in early through late stages of OA in mouse models and are analyzing the consequences of knockout or transgenic overexpression of critical genes. Since the chondrocytes in adult human cartilage are normally quiescent and maintain the matrix in a low turnover state, understanding how they undergo phenotypic modulation and promote matrix destruction and abnormal repair in OA may to lead to identification of critical targets for therapy to block cartilage damage and promote effective cartilage repair. PMID:22859926

  8. Heterotopic autologous chondrocyte transplantation--a realistic approach to support articular cartilage repair?

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Karym; Haisch, Andreas; John, Thilo; Marzahn, Ulrike; Lohan, Anke; Müller, Riccarda D; Kohl, Benjamin; Ertel, Wolfgang; Stoelzel, Katharina; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2010-12-01

    Injured articular cartilage is limited in its capacity to heal. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) is a suitable technique for cartilage repair, but it requires articular cartilage biopsies for sufficient autologous chondrocyte expansion in vitro. Hence, ACT is restricted by donor-site morbidity and autologous articular chondrocytes availability. The use of nonarticular heterotopic chondrocytes such as auricular, nasoseptal, or costal chondrocytes for ACT might overcome these limitations: heterotopic sources show lesser donor-site morbidity and a comparable extracellular cartilage matrix synthesis profile to articular cartilage. However, heterotopic (h)ACT poses a challenge. Particular tissue characteristics of heterotopic cartilage, divergent culturing peculiarities of heterotopic chondrocytes, and the advantages and drawbacks related to these diverse cartilage sources were critically discussed. Finally, available in vitro and in vivo experimental (h)ACT approaches were summarized. The quality of the cartilage engineered using heterotopic chondrocytes remains partly controversy due to the divergent methodologies and culture conditions used. While some encouraging in vivo results using (h)ACT have been demonstrated, standardized culturing protocols are strongly required. However, whether heterotopic chondrocytes implanted into joint cartilage defects maintain their particular tissue properties or can be adapted via tissue engineering strategies to fulfill regular articular cartilage functions requires further studies.

  9. Characterization of Chondrocyte Scaffold Carriers for Cell-based Gene Therapy in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wei; Yin, Liangjun; Luo, Jeffrey; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Jiye; Huang, Wei; Hu, Ning; Liang, Xi; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Zhenming; Shi, Lewis; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Ho, Sherwin

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the knee are common injuries. Chondrocyte transplant represents a promising therapeutic modality for articular cartilage injuries. Here, we characterize the viability and transgene expression of articular chondrocytes cultured in 3-D scaffolds provided by four types of carriers. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from rabbit knees and cultured in four types of scaffolds: type I collagen sponge, fibrin glue, hyaluronan, and Open-cell PolyLactic Acid (OPLA). The cultured cells are transduced with adenovirus expressing green fluorescence protein (AdGFP) and luciferase (AdGL3-Luc). The viability and gene expression in the chondrocytes are determined with fluorescence microscopy and luciferase assay. Cartilage matrix production is assessed by Alcian blue staining. Rabbit articular chondrocytes are effectively infected by AdGFP and exhibited sustained GFP expression. All tested scaffolds support the survival and gene expression of the infected chondrocytes. However, the highest transgene expression is observed in the OPLA carrier. At four weeks, Alcian blue-positive matrix materials are readily detected in OPLA cultures. Thus, our results indicate that, while all tested carriers can support the survival of chondrocytes, OPLA supports the highest transgene expression and is the most conductive scaffold for matrix production, suggesting that OPLA may be a suitable scaffold for cell-based gene therapy of articular cartilage repairs. PMID:23629940

  10. Articular chondrocyte culturing for cell-based cartilage repair: needs and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2006-01-01

    Articular cartilage displays a limited capacity of self-regeneration after injury. Thus, the biology of this tissue and its cellular components - the chondrocytes - has become the focus of several investigations, driven by tissue engineering and the basic and clinical research fields, aiming to ameliorate the present clinical approaches to cartilage repair. In this work, we present a brief recapitulation of the events that lead to cartilage development during the skeletal embryonal growth. The intrinsic phenotypic plasticity of the mesenchymal precursors and the adult chondrocytes is evaluated, dependent on the cell source, its physiopathological state, and as a function of the donor's age. The phenotypic changes induced by the basic culturing techniques are also taken into account, thus highlighting the phenotypic plasticity of the chondrocyte as the main property which could couple the differentiation process to the repair process. Chondrocyte proliferation and the contemporary maintenance of the chondrogenic differentiation potential are regarded as the two primary goals to be achieved in order to fulfill the quantitative needs of the clinical applications and the qualitative requirements of a properly repaired tissue. In this light, the effects of several growth factors and medium supplements are investigated. Finally, the latest improvements in culturing conditions and their possible clinical applications are presented as well.

  11. Optimal 3-D culture of primary articular chondrocytes for use in the Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, Liliana F.; Baker, Travis L.; Brown, Raquel J.; Catlin, Lindsey W.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Reliable culturing methods for primary articular chondrocytes are essential to study the effects of loading and unloading on joint tissue at the cellular level. Due to the limited proliferation capacity of primary chondrocytes and their tendency to dedifferentiate in conventional culture conditions, long-term culturing conditions of primary chondrocytes can be challenging. The goal of this study was to develop a suspension culturing technique that not only would retain the cellular morphology but also maintain gene expression characteristics of primary articular chondrocytes. METHODS Three-dimensional culturing methods were compared and optimized for primary articular chondrocytes in the rotating wall vessel bioreactor, which changes the mechanical culture conditions to provide a form of suspension culture optimized for low shear and turbulence. We performed gene expression analysis and morphological characterization of cells cultured in alginate beads, Cytopore-2 microcarriers, primary monolayer culture, and passaged monolayer cultures using reverse transcription-PCR and laser scanning confocal microscopy. RESULTS Primary chondrocytes grown on Cytopore-2 microcarriers maintained the phenotypical morphology and gene expression pattern observed in primary bovine articular chondrocytes, and retained these characteristics for up to 9 days. DISCUSSION Our results provide a novel and alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes suitable for studies that require suspension such as those using the rotating wall vessel bioreactor. In addition, we provide an alternative culturing technique for primary chondrocytes that can impact future mechanistic studies of osteoarthritis progression, treatments for cartilage damage and repair, and cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25199120

  12. Sclerostin Immunoreactivity Increases in Cortical Bone Osteocytes and Decreases in Articular Cartilage Chondrocytes in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2016-03-01

    Sclerostin is a 24-kDa secreted glycoprotein that has been identified as a negative modulator of new bone formation and may play a major role in age-related decline in skeletal function. Although serum levels of sclerostin markedly increase with age, relatively little is known about whether cells in the skeleton change their expression of sclerostin with aging. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we explored sclerostin immunoreactivity (sclerostin-IR) in the femurs of 4-, 9-, and 24-month-old adult C3H/HeJ male mice. In the femur, the only two cell types that expressed detectable levels of sclerostin-IR were bone osteocytes and articular cartilage chondrocytes. At three different sites along the diaphysis of the femur, only a subset of osteocytes expressed sclerostin-IR and the percentage of osteocytes that expressed sclerostin-IR increased from approximately 36% to 48% in 4- vs. 24-month-old mice. In marked contrast, in the same femurs, there were ~40% fewer hypertrophic chondrocytes of articular cartilage that expressed sclerostin-IR when comparing 24- vs. 4-month-old mice. Understanding the mechanism(s) that drive these divergent changes in sclerostin-IR may provide insight into understanding and treating the age-related decline of the skeleton.

  13. In vitro chondrocyte behavior on porous biodegradable poly(e-caprolactone)/polyglycolic acid scaffolds for articular chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, John B; Rivero, Iris V; Dertien, Janet S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, poly(e-caprolactone)/polyglycolic acid (PCL/PGA) scaffolds for repairing articular cartilage were fabricated via solid-state cryomilling along with compression molding and porogen leaching. Four distinct scaffolds were fabricated using this approach by four independent cryomilling times. These scaffolds were assessed for their suitability to promote articular cartilage regeneration with in vitro chondrocyte cell culture studies. The scaffolds were characterized for pore size, porosity, swelling ratio, compressive, and thermal properties. Cryomilling time proved to significantly affect the physical, mechanical, and morphological properties of the scaffolds. In vitro bovine chondrocyte culture was performed dynamically for 1, 7, 14, 28, and 35 days. Chondrocyte viability and adhesion were tested using MTT assay and scanning electron microscopy micrographs. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and DNA assays were performed to investigate the extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and cell proliferation, respectively. PCL/PGA scaffolds demonstrated high porosity for all scaffold types. Morphological analysis and poly(ethylene oxide) continuity demonstrated the existence of a co-continuous network of interconnected pores with pore sizes appropriate for tissue engineering and chondrocyte ingrowth. While mean pore size decreased, water uptake and compressive properties increased with increasing cryomilling times. Compressive modulus of 12, 30, and 60 min scaffolds matched the compressive modulus of human articular cartilage. Viable cells increased besides increase in cell proliferation and ECM formation with progress in culture period. Chondrocytes exhibited spherical morphology on all scaffold types. The pore size of the scaffold affected chondrocyte adhesion, proliferation, and GAG secretion. The results indicated that the 12 min scaffolds delivered promising results for applications in articular cartilage repair.

  14. Autologous chondrocyte repair of an articular defect in the humeral head.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Fox, Jeff A; Freeman, Kevin B; Joy, Edward

    2002-10-01

    Articular cartilage lesions remain a difficult problem for the patient and physician. A variety of procedures and treatments have been proposed to lessen symptoms and restore the articular surface. The knee joint has been the focus of the vast majority of these cartilage restoration procedures. Articular cartilage lesions of the humerus are significantly less common, and their management remains poorly defined. This paper presents a case report of a young athlete with a large full-thickness articular cartilage defect of the proximal humerus and subsequent treatment using autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  15. A Biphasic Multiscale Study of the Mechanical Microenvironment of Chondrocytes within Articular Cartilage under Unconfined Compression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongqiang; Maher, Suzanne A.; Torzilli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Computational analyses have been used to study the biomechanical microenvironment of the chondrocyte that cannot be assessed by in vitro experimental studies; yet all computational studies thus far have focused on the effect of zonal location (superficial, middle, and deep) on the mechanical microenvironment of chondrocytes. The aim of this paper was to study the effect of both zonal and radial locations on the biomechanical microenvironment of chondrocytes in inhomogeneous cartilage under unconfined stress relaxation. A biphasic multiscale approach was employed and nine chondrocytes in different locations were studied. Hyperelastic biphasic theory and depth-dependent aggregate modulus and permeability of articular cartilage were included in the models. It was found that both zonal and radial locations affected the biomechanical stresses and strains of the chondrocytes. Chondrocytes in the mid-radial location had increased volume during the early stage of the loading process. Maximum principal shear stress at the interface between the chondrocyte and the extracellular matrix (ECM) increased with depth, yet that at the ECM-pericellular matrix (PCM) interface had an inverse trend. Fluid pressure decreased with depth, while the fluid pressure difference between the top and bottom boundaries of the microscale model increased with depth. Regardless of location, fluid was exchanged between the chondrocyte, PCM, and ECM. These findings suggested that even under simple compressive loading conditions, the biomechanical microenvironment of the chondrocytes, PCM and ECM were spatially dependent. The current study provides new insight on chondrocyte biomechanics. PMID:24882738

  16. Effect of Heterotheca inuloides essential oil on rat cytoskeleton articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Flores-San Martin, Denise; Perea-Flores, María de Jesús; Morales-López, Javier; Centeno-Alvarez, Mónica María; Pérez-Ishiwara, Guillermo; Pérez-Hernández, Nury; Pérez-Hernández, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is characterised by progressive loss of articular cartilage through the increase of catabolic metalloproteinases, and chondrocyte cytoskeleton disruption has also been reported. In this regard, we studied the effect of Heterotheca inuloides essential oil (HIEO) on the distribution and immunolocalisation of actin, vimentin and tubulin of chondrocytes from cultured rat articular cartilage explants in the presence of the cytoskeleton disassembly agent acrylamide. After 48 h, chondrocytes treated with acrylamide showed changes in actin immunolocalisation and shrinkage, loss of tubulin compartmentalisation and vimentin collapse and redistribution. However, the immunostaining pattern of these three proteins in acrylamide- and HIEO-treated chondrocytes simultaneously retained their typical characteristics. These results suggest that HIEO promotes protein cytoskeleton reorganisation without providing a preventive effect of acrylamide-associated disassembly. However, it is also possible that HIEO prevents vimentin disorganisation by chemical interaction with acrylamide.

  17. The role of BKCa channels on hyperpolarization mediated by hyperosmolarity in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2011-03-01

    Chondrocytes, the only cell in cartilage, are subjected to hyperosmotic challenges continuously since extracellular osmolarity in articular cartilage increases in response to mechanical loads during joint movement. Hyperosmolarity can affect membrane transport, and it is possible that load modulates matrix synthesis through alterations in intracellular composition. In the present study, the effects of hyperosmotic challenges were evaluated using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, whole cell mode on freshly isolated human and bovine articular chondrocytes. In human chondrocytes, hypertonicity induced the activation of outward Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) currents, which were inhibited by iberiotoxin and TEA-Cl. The current induced by hypertonic switching (osmolarity from 300 to 400 mOsm/l) caused cell hyperpolarization (from -39 mV to -70 mV) with a reversal potential of -96 ± 7 mV. These results suggest a role for Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels in human articular chondrocytes, leading to hyperpolarization as a consequence of K(+) efflux through these channels. These channels could have a role in the articular chondrocyte's response to a hyperosmotic challenge and matrix metabolism regulation by load.

  18. Disruption of endogenous perlecan function improves differentiation of rat articular chondrocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Fumio; Fukunaga, Shigeharu

    2015-04-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) are necessary for normal cartilage development and chondrocyte differentiation. However, recent studies demonstrated that HSPG accelerate dedifferentiation and catabolism in chondrocytes from degenerative cartilage. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of HSPG on chondrocyte differentiation in vitro. Rat articular chondrocytes were cultured at low (0.3 × 10(4) cells/cm(2) ) and high (1.5 × 10(5) cells/cm(2) ) density in the presence or absence of heparitinase I, an HS degrading enzyme. Cells cultured at low density dedifferentiated and exhibited an elongated morphology, and treatment with heparitinase I precluded cell elongation. Conversely, populations of chondrocytes cultured at high density exhibited either a dedifferentiated or differentiated phenotype. Glycosaminoglycan accumulation increased in heparitinase I-treated cells. To determine the function of perlecan, an important HSPG for cartilage development, in chondrocyte differentiation, rat chondrocyte cultures were exposed to an anti-perlecan antiserum to inhibit perlecan function. Western blotting analysis indicated that preventing perlecan activity increased type II collagen synthesis. Our results suggest that HSPG are negative regulators of chondrocyte differentiation in vitro and that perlecan contributes to chondrocyte dedifferentiation in vitro.

  19. In vitro effect of a synthesized sulfonamido-based gallate on articular chondrocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; Zheng, Li; Liu, Qin; Liu, Buming; Jiang, Bingli; Peng, Xiaoyu; Lin, Cuiwu

    2014-06-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a promising strategy for cartilage repair and reconstitution. However, limited cell numbers and the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes present major difficulties to the success of ACI therapy. Therefore, it is important to find effective pro-chondrogenic agents that restore these defects to ensure a successful therapy. In this study, we synthesized a sulfonamido-based gallate, namely N-[4-(4,6-dimethyl-pyrimidin-2-ylsulfamoyl)-phenyl]-3,4,5-trihydroxy-benzamide (EJTC), and investigated its effects on rabbit articular chondrocytes through an examination of its specific effects on cell proliferation, morphology, viability, GAG synthesis, and cartilage-specific gene expression. The results show that EJTC can effectively promote chondrocyte growth and enhance the secretion and synthesis of cartilage ECM by upregulating the expression levels of the aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes. The expression of the collagen I gene was effectively downregulated, which indicates that EJTC inhibits chondrocytes dedifferentiation. Chondrocyte hypertrophy, which may lead to chondrocyte ossification, was also undetectable in the EJTC-treated groups. The recommended dose of EJTC ranges from 3.125 μg/mL to 7.8125 μg/mL, and the most profound response was observed with 7.8125 μg/mL. This study may provide a basis for the development of a novel agent for the treatment of articular cartilage defects.

  20. Effects of osmotic challenges on membrane potential in human articular chondrocytes from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Julio C; López-Zapata, Diego F

    2010-01-01

    Changes in external osmolarity arise from variations in mechanical loads on joints and may affect the homeostasis of chondrocytes, which are the only cell type responsible for matrix turnover. Accordingly, variations in membrane potential may affect cartilage production. The present study assessed the effects of variations in external osmolarity on membrane potential and the possible mechanisms responsible for this response. Membrane potential was measured by the patch clamp whole-cell technique using human articular chondrocytes freshly isolated from healthy and osteoarthritic cartilage. The membrane potential was -39±4 mV in articular human chondrocytes from healthy cartilage and -26±4 mV in those from osteoarthritic cartilage. Increasing the osmolarity produced a reversible hyperpolarization mediated by K+ efflux through BKCa channels in both groups of chondrocytes, but the response in osteoarthritic cells was significantly reduced; no other K+ pathways were involved in this effect. Alternatively, decreasing the osmolarity elicited depolarization in healthy chondrocytes but did not produce any response in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage. The depolarization was dependent on Na+ influx through Gd3+-sensitive stretch-activated cation channels and was independent of external Ca2+. The differential responses observed in chondrocytes from osteoarthritic cartilage suggest that disregulation on the responses to external osmolarity may be involved in the process that leads to the alterations in the cartilage structure observed in osteoarthritis.

  1. The Regulatory Role of Signaling Crosstalk in Hypertrophy of MSCs and Human Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Leilei; Huang, Xiaobin; Karperien, Marcel; Post, Janine N.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes is a main barrier in application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for cartilage repair. In addition, hypertrophy occurs occasionally in osteoarthritis (OA). Here we provide a comprehensive review on recent literature describing signal pathways in the hypertrophy of MSCs-derived in vitro differentiated chondrocytes and chondrocytes, with an emphasis on the crosstalk between these pathways. Insight into the exact regulation of hypertrophy by the signaling network is necessary for the efficient application of MSCs for articular cartilage repair and for developing novel strategies for curing OA. We focus on articles describing the role of the main signaling pathways in regulating chondrocyte hypertrophy-like changes. Most studies report hypertrophic differentiation in chondrogenesis of MSCs, in both human OA and experimental OA. Chondrocyte hypertrophy is not under the strict control of a single pathway but appears to be regulated by an intricately regulated network of multiple signaling pathways, such as WNT, Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)/Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ), Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP), Indian hedgehog (IHH), Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin like growth factor (IGF) and Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). This comprehensive review describes how this intricate signaling network influences tissue-engineering applications of MSCs in articular cartilage (AC) repair, and improves understanding of the disease stages and cellular responses within an OA articular joint. PMID:26287176

  2. Opiates do not violate the viability and proliferative activity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chechik, Ofir; Arbel, Ron; Salai, Moshe; Gigi, Roy; Beilin, Mark; Flaishon, Ron; Sever, Ronen; Khashan, Morsi; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Yayon, Avner; Blumenstein, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries present a challenge for the clinician. Autologous chondrocyte implantation embedded in scaffolds are used to treat cartilage defects with favorable outcomes. Autologous serum is often used as a medium for chondrocyte cell culture during the proliferation phase of the process of such products. A previous report showed that opiate analgesics (fentanyl, alfentanil and diamorphine) in the sera have a significant inhibitory effect on chondrocyte proliferation. In order to determine if opiates in serum inhibit chondrocyte proliferation, twenty two patients who underwent knee arthroscopy and were anesthetized with either fentanyl or remifentanil were studied. Blood was drawn before and during opiate administration and up to 2 h after its discontinuation. The sera were used as medium for in vitro proliferation of both cryopreserved and freshly isolated chondrocytes, and the number and viability of cells were measured. There was no difference in the yield or cell viability between the serum samples of patients anesthetized with fentanyl when either fresh or cryopreserved human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were used. Some non-significant reduction in the yield of cells was observed in the serum samples of patients anesthetized with remifentanil when fresh hAC were used. We conclude that Fentanyl in human autologous serum does not inhibit in vitro hAC proliferation. Remifentanil may show minimal inhibitory effect on in vitro fresh hAC proliferation.

  3. Protocatechuic acid benefits proliferation and phenotypic maintenance of rabbit articular chondrocytes: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    LUO, LIKE; WEI, QINGJUN; LIU, LEI; LIN, XIAO; LIN, CUIWU; ZHENG, LI; ZHAO, JINMIN

    2015-01-01

    Numerous antioxidants exhibit antiarthritic effects due to their inhibitory effect on inflammatory factors. Certain antioxidants, such as protocatechuic acid (PCA) and its analogs, have been reported to be effective in the treatment of arthritis. However, the effect of PCA on chondro-protection may be alleviated due to the induction of apoptosis, as has been demonstrated in stomatocytes. To clearly determine the effect of PCA on the biological and cellular metabolism of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro, examinations of cytotoxicity, proliferation and morphology were performed, in addition to analyses of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis and the expression of cartilage-specific genes. The results revealed that PCA effectively promoted chondrocyte growth, the synthesis of the extracellular matrix and the mRNA expression of aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9, while downregulating the expression of the collagen I gene, a marker of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. In addition, hypertrophy, which may result in chondrocyte ossification, was not detected in the groups. Among the doses (range, 0.05–0.3 mmol/l) of PCA that promoted the proliferation of chondrocytes, a concentration of 0.125 mmol/l produced the optimum performance. The results indicated that PCA, particularly at a dose of 0.125 mmol/l, accelerated the proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and maintained their phenotype. This study may provide a basis for further research concerning the treatment of cartilage defects. PMID:26136906

  4. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p < 0.001), but Rho inhibitor-1 failed to suppress the membrane blebbing (p = 0.875). Lidocaine (30 mM) reduced the cell viability of isolated chondrocytes (p < 0.001) and in situ chondrocytes (p < 0.001). The chondrotoxicity was attenuated by pretreatment of cells with ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016.

  5. Hyperosmolarity protects chondrocytes from mechanical injury in human articular cartilage: an experimental report.

    PubMed

    Amin, A K; Huntley, J S; Patton, J T; Brenkel, I J; Simpson, A H R W; Hall, A C

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure of human articular cartilage to hyperosmotic saline (0.9%, 600 mOsm) reduces in situ chondrocyte death following a standardised mechanical injury produced by a scalpel cut compared with the same assault and exposure to normal saline (0.9%, 285 mOsm). Human cartilage explants were exposed to normal (control) and hyperosmotic 0.9% saline solutions for five minutes before the mechanical injury to allow in situ chondrocytes to respond to the altered osmotic environment, and incubated for a further 2.5 hours in the same solutions following the mechanical injury. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we identified a sixfold (p = 0.04) decrease in chondrocyte death following mechanical injury in the superficial zone of human articular cartilage exposed to hyperosmotic saline compared with normal saline. These data suggest that increasing the osmolarity of joint irrigation solutions used during open and arthroscopic articular surgery may reduce chondrocyte death from surgical injury and could promote integrative cartilage repair.

  6. Gold Nanoparticles of Diameter 13 nm Induce Apoptosis in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Quan, Ying-yao; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2016-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used in biomedical science including antiarthritic agents, drug loading, and photothermal therapy. In this report, we studied the effects of AuNPs with diameters of 3, 13, and 45 nm, respectively, on rabbit articular chondrocytes. AuNPs were capped with citrate and their diameter and zeta potential were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay after the rabbit articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with 3, 13, and 45 nm AuNPs, respectively, for 24 h. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and fluorescence imaging with Hoechst 33258 staining were used to determine the fashion of AuNPs-induced chondrocyte death. Further, 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) significantly induced chondrocyte death accompanying apoptotic characteristics including mitochondrial damage, externalization of phosphatidylserine and nuclear concentration. However, 3 nm AuNPs (2 nM) and 45 nm (0.02 nM) AuNPs did not induce cytotoxicity in chondrocytes. Although 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, pretreatment with Nacetyl cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, did not prevent the cytotoxicity induced by 13 nm AuNPs, indicating that 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) induced ROS-independent apoptosis in chondrocytes. These results demonstrate the size-dependent cytotoxicity of AuNPs in chondrocytes, which must be seriously considered when using AuNPs for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA).

  7. Gold Nanoparticles of Diameter 13 nm Induce Apoptosis in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Quan, Ying-Yao; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely used in biomedical science including antiarthritic agents, drug loading, and photothermal therapy. In this report, we studied the effects of AuNPs with diameters of 3, 13, and 45 nm, respectively, on rabbit articular chondrocytes. AuNPs were capped with citrate and their diameter and zeta potential were measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay after the rabbit articular chondrocytes were pre-incubated with 3, 13, and 45 nm AuNPs, respectively, for 24 h. Flow cytometry (FCM) analysis with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and fluorescence imaging with Hoechst 33258 staining were used to determine the fashion of AuNPs-induced chondrocyte death. Further, 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) significantly induced chondrocyte death accompanying apoptotic characteristics including mitochondrial damage, externalization of phosphatidylserine and nuclear concentration. However, 3 nm AuNPs (2 nM) and 45 nm (0.02 nM) AuNPs did not induce cytotoxicity in chondrocytes. Although 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, pretreatment with Nacetyl cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, did not prevent the cytotoxicity induced by 13 nm AuNPs, indicating that 13 nm AuNPs (2 nM) induced ROS-independent apoptosis in chondrocytes. These results demonstrate the size-dependent cytotoxicity of AuNPs in chondrocytes, which must be seriously considered when using AuNPs for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:27178054

  8. Effects of introducing cultured human chondrocytes into a human articular cartilage explant model.

    PubMed

    Secretan, Charles; Bagnall, Keith M; Jomha, Nadr M

    2010-02-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) heals poorly and effective host-tissue integration after reconstruction is a concern. We have investigated the ability of implanted chondrocytes to attach at the site of injury and to be incorporated into the decellularized host matrix adjacent to a defect in an in vitro human explant model. Human osteochondral dowels received a standardized injury, were seeded with passage 3 chondrocytes labelled with PKH 26 and compared with two control groups. All dowels were cultured in vitro, harvested at 0, 7, 14 and 28 days and assessed for chondrocyte adherence and migration into the region of decellularized tissue adjacent to the defects. Additional evaluation included cell viability, general morphology and collagen II production. Seeded chondrocytes adhered to the standardized defect and areas of lamina splendens disruption but did not migrate into the adjacent acellular region. A difference was noted in viable-cell density between the experimental group and one control group. A thin lattice-like network of matrix surrounded the seeded chondrocytes and collagen II was present. The results indicate that cultured human chondrocytes do indeed adhere to regions of AC matrix injury but do not migrate into the host tissue, despite the presence of viable cells. This human explant model is thus an effective tool for studying the interaction of implanted cells and host tissue. PMID:20012649

  9. Andrographolide Enhances Proliferation and Prevents Dedifferentiation of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li-ke; Wei, Qing-jun; Liu, Lei; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jin-min

    2015-01-01

    As the main active constituent of Andrographis paniculata that was applied in treatment of many diseases including inflammation in ancient China, andrographolide (ANDRO) was found to facilitate reduction of edema and analgesia in arthritis. This suggested that ANDRO may be promising anti-inflammatory agent to relieve destruction and degeneration of cartilage after inflammation. In this study, the effect of ANDRO on rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro was investigated. Results showed that not more than 8 μM ANDRO did no harm to chondrocytes (P < 0.05). DNA content and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) /DNA were, respectively, improved in ANDRO groups comparing to the control (P < 0.05). ANDRO could promote expression of aggrecan, collagen II, and Sox9 genes while downregulating expression of collagen I gene (P < 0.05). Furthermore, hypertrophy that may result in chondrocyte ossification could not be detected in all groups (P > 0.05). The viability assay, hematoxylin-eosin, safranin O, and immunohistochemical staining also showed better performances in ANDRO groups. As to the doses, 3 μM ANDRO showed the best performance. The results indicate that ANDRO can accelerate proliferation of rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro and meanwhile maintain the phenotype, which may provide valuable references for further exploration on arthritis. PMID:25802548

  10. Induction of vascular endothelial growth factor by nitric oxide in cultured human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Turpaev, K; Litvinov, D; Dubovaya, V; Panasyuk, A; Ivanov, D; Prassolov, V

    2001-06-01

    We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the control of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) gene expression in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Cell treatment with the NO-generating compound nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) caused a significant accumulation of 4.4 kb VEGF mRNA, a major VEGF mRNA isoform expressing in chondrocytes. This is the first demonstration that NO can induce VEGF mRNA expression in chondrocytes. VEGF mRNA level was not affected in cells exposed to dibutyryl cGMP, a non-hydrolyzable analog of cGMP, suggesting that the cGMP system is not involved in NO-dependent transcriptional activation of VEGF gene. The GSNO-stimulated induction of VEGF mRNA was slightly attenuated by MAP protein kinase inhibitors PD98058 and SB203580, but was completely blocked in cells incubated with GSNO in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase, enzymes scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), or in the presence of thiol-containing antioxidants, N-acetyl cysteine and reduced glutathione. These results suggest that in articular chondrocytes the GSNO-induced VEGF gene transcriptional activation is dependent on endogenous ROS production and oxidative thiol modifications.

  11. ROCK inhibition enhances aggrecan deposition and suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-3 production in human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Furumatsu, Takayuki; Matsumoto-Ogawa, Emi; Tanaka, Takaaki; Lu, Zhichao; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2014-04-01

    Homeostasis of articular cartilage is maintained by a balance between catabolism and anabolism. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) catabolism of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM), including aggrecan (AGN), is an important factor in osteoarthritis progression. We previously reported that inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase (ROCK), an effector of Rho family GTPases, activates the chondrogenic transcription factor SRY-type high-mobility-group box (SOX) 9 and prevents dedifferentiation of monolayer-cultured chondrocytes. We hypothesized that ROCK inhibition prevents chondrocyte dedifferentiation by altering the transcriptional balance between MMP-3 and AGN. Normal human articular chondrocytes were cultured in the presence or absence of ROCK inhibitor (ROCKi, Y-27632). Expression of MMP-3 and AGN during monolayer cultivation was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Chondrogenic redifferentiation potential of ROCKi-treated chondrocytes was evaluated by immunohistological analysis of pellet cultures. ROCKi treatment suppressed MMP-3 expression in monolayer- and pellet-cultured chondrocytes but increased AGN expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that the association between transcription factors E26 transformation specific (ETS)-1 and SOX9 and their target genes MMP-3 and AGN, respectively, was affected by ROCKi treatment. ROCKi decreased the association between ETS-1 and its binding sites on the MMP-3 promoter, whereas ROCKi promoted the interaction between SOX9 and the AGN promoter. Our results suggest that ROCK inhibition may have an important role in modulating the balance between degradation and synthesis of cartilaginous ECM, a finding that may facilitate development of techniques to prepare differentiated chondrocytes for cartilage regeneration therapy.

  12. Expression and cellular localization of human hyaluronidase-2 in articular chondrocytes and cultured cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chow, G.; Knudson, C. B.; Knudson, W.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Objective There is debate whether hyaluronan (HA) can be enzymatically degraded within the extracellular matrix of cartilage and other tissues or whether its catabolism occurs strictly within the lysosomal compartment of chondrocytes and other cell types. Previous studies have suggested that one of the lysosomal hyaluronidases (hyaluronidase-2) can be expressed as a functionally-active glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-linked protein at the surface of mammalian cells. If this form of hyaluronidase expression occurs in chondrocytes, this could represent a possible mechanism for extracellular HA cleavage. Thus, which hyaluronidases are expressed and where was the objective of this study. Methods mRNA for hyaluronidases was quantified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzymatic activity by HA zymograms. Recombinant forms of hyaluronidase-2 were generated and expressed in model cell lines. A peptide-specific polyclonal antiserum was prepared to localize endogenous human hyaluronidase-2 in human articular chondrocytes. Results Hyaluronidase-2 is the principal mRNA transcript expressed by primary human articular chondrocytes as well as various model cell lines. Recombinant hyaluronidase-2, containing N-terminal or C-terminal epitope tags, was strictly localized intracellularly and not released by treatment with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase. Endogenous hyaluronidase-2 expressed by human chondrocytes as well as HeLa cells could only be detected following detergent permeabilization of the plasma membranes. Conclusions These data suggest that on chondrocytes and other cell types examined, hyaluronidase-2 is not present or functional at the external plasma membrane. Thus, local turnover of HA is dependent on receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivery to low pH intracellular organelles for its complete degradation. PMID:16600643

  13. Periodic rewetting enhances the viability of chondrocytes in human articular cartilage exposed to air.

    PubMed

    Pun, S Y; Teng, M S; Kim, H T

    2006-11-01

    Desiccation of articular cartilage during surgery is often unavoidable and may result in the death of chondrocytes, with subsequent joint degeneration. This study was undertaken to determine the extent of chondrocyte death caused by exposure to air and to ascertain whether regular rewetting of cartilage could decrease cell death. Macroscopically normal human cartilage was exposed to air for 0, 30, 60 or 120 minutes. Selected samples were wetted in lactated Ringer's solution for ten seconds every ten or 20 minutes. The viability of chondrocytes was measured after three days by Live/Dead staining. Chondrocyte death correlated with the length of exposure to air and the depth of the cartilage. Drying for 120 minutes caused extensive cell death mainly in the superficial 500 microm of cartilage. Rewetting every ten or 20 minutes significantly decreased cell death. The superficial zone is most susceptible to desiccation. Loss of superficial chondrocytes likely decreases the production of essential lubricating glycoproteins and contributes to subsequent degeneration. Frequent wetting of cartilage during arthrotomy is therefore essential.

  14. The Morphology and Functions of Articular Chondrocytes on a Honeycomb-Patterned Surface

    PubMed Central

    Eniwumide, Joshua O.; Tanaka, Masaru; Nagai, Nobuhiro; Morita, Yuka; de Bruijn, Joost; Yamamoto, Sadaaki; Onodera, Shin; Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the potential of a novel micropatterned substrate for neocartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes were cultured on poly(ɛ-caprolactone) materials whose surfaces were either flat or honeycomb-patterned. The latter was prepared using a novel self-organization technique, while the former, was prepared by spin-coating. The chondrocytes attached and proliferated on both surfaces. On the honeycomb films, chondrocytes were found at the top surface and encased within the 10 μm pores. Meanwhile, chondrocytes on the spin-coated surface flattened out. Accumulation of DNA and keratin sulphate was comparatively higher on the honeycomb films within the first 7 days. At their respective peaks, DNA concentration increased on the honeycomb and flat surfaces by approximately 210% and 400% of their day 1 values, respectively. However, cultures on the flat surface took longer to peak. Extracellular Matrix (ECM) concentrations peaked at 900% and 320% increases for the honeycomb and flat cultures. Type II collagen was upregulated on the honeycomb and flat surfaces by as much as 28% and 25% of their day 1 values, while aggrecan was downregulated with time, by 3.4% and 7.4%. These initial results demonstrate the potential usefulness of honeycomb-based scaffolds during early cultures neocartilage and soft tissue engineering. PMID:24804237

  15. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengzhen; Zhang, Fengjie; He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  16. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiling; Wang, Jianqi; Shiu, Hoi Ting; Shu, Yinglan; Tsang, Wing Pui; Liang, Shuang; Zhao, Kai; Wan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10−6 M) increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1) and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic marker genes

  17. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  18. Deletion of IFT80 Impairs Epiphyseal and Articular Cartilage Formation Due to Disruption of Chondrocyte Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) play important roles in cilia formation and organ development. Partial loss of IFT80 function leads Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) or short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, displaying narrow thoracic cavity and multiple cartilage anomalies. However, it is unknown how IFT80 regulates cartilage formation. To define the role and mechanism of IFT80 in chondrocyte function and cartilage formation, we generated a Col2α1; IFT80f/f mouse model by crossing IFT80f/f mice with inducible Col2α1-CreER mice, and deleted IFT80 in chondrocyte lineage by injection of tamoxifen into the mice in embryonic or postnatal stage. Loss of IFT80 in the embryonic stage resulted in short limbs at birth. Histological studies showed that IFT80-deficient mice have shortened cartilage with marked changes in cellular morphology and organization in the resting, proliferative, pre-hypertrophic, and hypertrophic zones. Moreover, deletion of IFT80 in the postnatal stage led to mouse stunted growth with shortened growth plate but thickened articular cartilage. Defects of ciliogenesis were found in the cartilage of IFT80-deficient mice and primary IFT80-deficient chondrocytes. Further study showed that chondrogenic differentiation was significantly inhibited in IFT80-deficient mice due to reduced hedgehog (Hh) signaling and increased Wnt signaling activities. These findings demonstrate that loss of IFT80 blocks chondrocyte differentiation by disruption of ciliogenesis and alteration of Hh and Wnt signaling transduction, which in turn alters epiphyseal and articular cartilage formation. PMID:26098911

  19. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: integration of experimental and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Oreffo, R O C; Sengers, B G; Tare, R S

    2014-09-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a "scaffold-free" 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches.

  20. Expression of voltage dependent potassium currents in freshly dissociated rat articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Arturo

    2006-01-01

    The electrophysiological properties of voltage dependent potassium channels from freshly dissociated rat articular chondrocytes were studied. The resting membrane potential (-42.7+/-2.0 mV) was significantly depolarized by increasing concentrations of external potassium. No change was observed when external chloride concentration was varied. Addition of TEA, 4AP, alpha-Dendrotoxin and charybdotoxin depolarized resting membrane potential. Whole cell patch clamp studies revealed the presence of outwardly rectifying currents whose kinetic and pharmacological properties suggest the expression of voltage dependent potassium channels. Two kinds of currents were observed under the same experimental conditions. The first one, most frequently observed (80%), starts activating near -50 mV, with V(1/2)=-18 mV, G(max)=0.30 pS/pF. The second kind was observed in only 10% of cases; It activates near -40 mV, with(1/2)=+28.35 mV, G(max)=0.28 pS/pF pA/pF and does not inactivates. Inactivating currents were significantly inhibited by TEA (IC(50)=1.45 mM), 4AP (IC(50)=0.64 mM), CTX (IC(50) = 10 nM), alpha-Dendrotoxin (IC(50) < 100 nM) and Margatoxin (IC(50)=28.5 nM). These results show that rat chondrocytes express voltage dependent potassium currents and suggest a role of voltage-dependent potassium channels in regulating membrane potential of rat chondrocytes.

  1. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial respiratory activity of human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Maneiro, E; Lopez-Armada, M; de Andres, M C; Carames, B; Martin, M; Bonilla, A; del Hoyo, P; Galdo, F; Arenas, J; Blanco, F

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on mitochondrial activity and its relation with the apoptosis of human articular chondrocytes. Materials and methods: Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analysing respiratory chain enzyme complexes, citrate synthase (CS) activities, and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). The activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and CS were measured in human articular chondrocytes isolated from normal cartilage. The Δψm was measured by 5,5',6,6'-tetracholoro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazole carbocyanide iodide (JC-1) using flow cytometry. Apoptosis was analysed by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of caspases was analysed by ribonuclease protection analysis and the detection of protein synthesis by western blotting. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as an NO compound donor. Results: SNP at concentrations higher than 0.5 mmol/l for 24 hours induced cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis. SNP elicited mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-7 and down regulated bcl-2 synthesis in a dose and time dependent manner. Furthermore, 0.5 mM SNP induced depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane at 5, 12, and 24 hours. Analysis of the MRC showed that at 5 hours, 0.5 mM SNP reduced the activity of complex IV by 33%. The individual inhibition of mitochondrial complex IV with azide modified the Δψm and induced apoptosis. Conclusions: This study suggests that the effect of NO on chondrocyte survival is mediated by its effect on complex IV of the MRC. PMID:15708893

  2. Human articular chondrocyte adhesion and proliferation on synthetic biodegradable polymer films.

    PubMed

    Ishaug-Riley, S L; Okun, L E; Prado, G; Applegate, M A; Ratcliffe, A

    1999-12-01

    The effect of polymer chemistry on adhesion, proliferation, and morphology of human articular cartilage (HAC) chondrocytes was evaluated on synthetic degradable polymer films and tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) as a control. Two-dimensional surfaces of poly(glycolide) (PGA), poly(L-lactide) (L-PLA), poly(D,L-lactide) (D,L-PLA), 85:15 poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (D,L-PLGA), poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), 90:10 (D,L-lactide-co-caprolactone) (D,L-PLCL), 9:91 D,L-PLCL, 40:60 L-PLCL, 67:33 poly(glycolide-co-trimethylene carbonate) (PGTMC), and poly(dioxanone) (PDO) were made by spin-casting into uniform thin films. Adhesion kinetics were studied using TCPS and PCL films and revealed that the rate of chondrocyte adhesion began to level off after 6 h. Degree of HAC chondrocyte adhesion was studied on all the substrates after 8 h, and ranged from 47 to 145% of the attachment found on TCPS. The greatest number of chondrocytes attached to PGA and 67:33 PGTMC polymer films, and attachment to PCL and L-PLA films was statistically lower than that found on PGA (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between amount of chondrocyte attachment to the substrates and the substrates' water contact angle. Chondrocytes proliferated equally well on all the substrates resulting in equivalent cell numbers on all the substrates at both day 4 and day 7 of the culture. However, these total cell numbers were reached as a result of a 88- and 42-fold expansion on PDO and PLA, respectively, which was significantly higher than the 11-fold expansion found on TCPS (p < 0.05). The greater fold expansion of the cells on PDO and L-PLA films may be attributed to the availability of space for cells to grow, since their numbers at the start of culture were fewer following the 8 h attachment period. This suggests that regardless of initial seeding density on these degradable polymer substrates (i.e., if some minimum number of cells are able to attach), they will eventually populate the surfaces of all

  3. Design of a chimeric promoter induced by pro-inflammatory mediators in articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Meynier de Salinelles, Véronique; Berenbaum, Francis; Jacques, Claire; Salvat, Colette; Olivier, Jean-Luc; Béréziat, Gilbert; Raymondjean, Michel; Massaad, Charbel

    2002-05-01

    We have designed a chimeric promoter that can be stimulated by various pro-inflammatory mediators and so drive the expression of therapeutic genes under inflammatory conditions. The promoter has two parts, the [-247/+20] fragment of the human type IIA secreted phospholipase A2 gene promoter, which is stimulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and a double peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor response element that is activated by some eicosanoids and by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Transfection experiments using rabbit articular chondrocytes in primary culture showed that this chimeric promoter produced a low basal activity and was induced by NSAIDs, WY-14643, IL-1beta, and 15-deoxy Delta12,14 prostaglandin J2. The latter two compounds stimulated the promoter synergistically.

  4. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3f/f; Col2a1-CreERT2 (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  5. Regulatory role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the swelling-activated chloride current in isolated rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Noriaki; Imai, Shinji; Toyoda, Futoshi; Isoya, Eiji; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2009-08-01

    Articular chondrocytes are exposed in vivo to the continually changing osmotic environment and thus require volume regulatory mechanisms. The present study was designed to investigate (i) the functional role of the swelling-activated Cl(-) current (I(Cl,swell)) in the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and (ii) the regulatory role of tyrosine phosphorylation in I(Cl,swell), in isolated rabbit articular chondrocytes. Whole-cell membrane currents were recorded from chondrocytes in isosmotic, hyposmotic and hyperosmotic external solutions under conditions where Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) currents were minimized. The cell surface area was also measured using microscope images from a separate set of chondrocytes and was used as an index of cell volume. The isolated chondrocytes exhibited a RVD during sustained exposure to hyposmotic solution, which was mostly inhibited by the I(Cl,swell) blocker 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichloro-2-cyclopentyl-indan-1-on-5-yl)oxobutyric acid (DCPIB) at 20 microM. Exposure to a hyposmotic solution activated I(Cl,swell), which was also largely inhibited by 20 microM DCPIB. I(Cl,swell) in rabbit articular chondrocytes had a relative taurine permeability (P(tau)/P(Cl)) of 0.21. Activation of I(Cl,swell) was significantly reduced by the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor genistein (30 microM) but was only weakly affected by its inactive analogue daidzein (30 microM). Intracellular application of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor sodium orthovanadate (250 and 500 microM) resulted in a gradual activation of a Cl(-) current even in isosmotic solutions. This Cl(-) current was almost completely inhibited by 4,4-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2-disulfonate (DIDS, 500 microM) and was also largely suppressed by exposure to hyperosmotic solution, thus indicating a close similarity to I(Cl,swell). Pretreatment of chondrocytes with genistein significantly prevented the activation of the Cl(-) current by sodium orthovanadate, suggesting that the basal

  6. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  7. The synovial microenvironment of osteoarthritic joints alters RNA-seq expression profiles of human primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Eric A; Bonin, Carolina A; Li, Xin; Smith, Jay; Karperien, Marcel; Larson, A Noelle; Lewallen, David G; Cool, Simon M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Krych, Aaron J; Leontovich, Alexey A; Im, Hee-Jeong; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-10-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling degenerative joint disease that prompts pain and has limited treatment options. To permit early diagnosis and treatment of OA, a high resolution mechanistic understanding of human chondrocytes in normal and diseased states is necessary. In this study, we assessed the biological effects of OA-related changes in the synovial microenvironment on chondrocytes embedded within anatomically intact cartilage from joints with different pathological grades by next generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We determined the transcriptome of primary articular chondrocytes derived from anatomically unaffected knees and ankles, as well as from joints affected by OA. The GALAXY bioinformatics platform was used to facilitate biological interpretations. Comparisons of patient samples by k-means, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses together reveal that primary chondrocytes exhibit OA grade-related differences in gene expression, including genes involved in cell-adhesion, ECM production and immune response. We conclude that diseased synovial microenvironments in joints with different histopathological OA grades directly alter gene expression in chondrocytes. One ramification of this finding is that anatomically intact cartilage from OA joints is not an ideal source of healthy chondrocytes, nor should these specimens be used to generate a normal baseline for the molecular characterization of diseased joints. PMID:27378743

  8. Histomorphometric Evaluation of Cartilage Degradation using Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes Cultured in Alginate Beads − Effects of Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuka, K.; Kurita, K.; Hayakawa, Taro; Nakashima, Katsuhito; Yamashita, Kyoko; Hoshino, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Kyosuke

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A 3-dimensional alginate bead culturing method using rabbit articular chondrocytes was studied for the screening of the effectiveness of drugs for articular diseases. Design: The beads cultured with IL-1β, TGF-β, and Hyaluronan (HA) were evaluated histochemically with Alecian blue and immunohistochemically with CS-56 antibody. Chondrocytes in alginate beads were arbitrarily classified into four groups: 1) chodrocyte surrounded with cell-associated matrix (CAM) in which proteoglycan (PG) was positively stained (PG-possitive chondrocyte); 2) chondrocyte with PG-negative CAM; 3) PG-positive CAM alone, and 4) PG-negative CAM alone. Total sulfated GAG concentrations in the culture media were quantitated by dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay. ProMMP-3, TIMP-1 and –2 concentrations in the culture media were determined by sandwich enzyme immunoassays. Results: Significant increase of PG-nagative cells were immunohistochemically found by IL-1β stimulation. The pretreatment with TGF-β almost fully suppressed those increase of PG-negative cells by IL-1β. Both GAG and proMMP-3 concentrations in the culture media were significantly increased after IL-1β stimulation. There were no significant differences in both TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 concentrations in the culture media with or without IL-1β stimulation. 800-kDa HA reduced significantly the number of PG-negative cells and proMMP-3 concentration in the culture media, but showed no effects on the concentrations of both TIMPs. Conclusions: Because this 3-dimensional chondrocyte culture in alginate beads is close to in vivo conditions, this method can be used for evaluation of the effectiveness of novel drugs for articular diseases. PMID:23675183

  9. Fibrin sealant promotes migration and proliferation of human articular chondrocytes: possible involvement of thrombin and protease-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Kirilak, Yaowanuj; Pavlos, Nathan J; Willers, Craig R; Han, Renzhi; Feng, Haotian; Xu, Jiake; Asokananthan, Nithiananthan; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Henry, Peter; Wood, David; Zheng, Ming H

    2006-04-01

    Fibrin sealant (FS), a biological adhesive material, has been recently recommended as an adjunct in autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). While FS has been shown to possess osteoinductive potential, little is known about its effects on chondrogenic cells. In this study, we assessed the bioactivity of FS (Tisseel) on the migration and proliferation of human articular chondrocytes in vitro. Using a co-culture assay to mimic matrix-induced ACI (MACI), chondrocytes were found to migrate from collagen membranes towards FS within 12 h of culture, with significant migratory activity evident by 24 h. In addition, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation experiments revealed that thrombin, the active component of the tissue glue, stimulated chondrocyte proliferation, with maximal efficacy observed at 48 h post-stimulation (1-10 U/ml). In an effort to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying these thrombin-induced effects, we examined the expression and activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs), established thrombin receptors. Using a combination of RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, all four PARs were detected in human chondrocytes, with PAR-1 being the major isoform expressed. Moreover, thrombin and a PAR-1, but not other PAR-isotype-specific peptide agonists, were found to induce rapid intracellular Ca2+ responses in human chondrocytes in calcium mobilization assays. Together, these data demonstrate that FS supports both the migration and proliferation of human chondrocytes. We propose that these effects are mediated, at least in part, via thrombin-induced PAR-1 signalling in human chondrocytes. PMID:16525709

  10. Articular chondrocyte redifferentiation in 3D co-cultures with mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meretoja, Ville V; Dahlin, Rebecca L; Wright, Sarah; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we evaluated the ability of 3D co-cultures with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to redifferentiate monolayer expanded articular chondrocytes (ACs) and produce cartilaginous extracellular matrix at varying stages of the dedifferentiation process and further examined the dependency of this effect on the culture medium composition. Primary bovine ACs were expanded in monolayers for up to nine population doublings to obtain seven cell stocks with gradually increasing levels of dedifferentiation. Culture expanded ACs were then seeded as monocultures and co-cultures with rabbit bone marrow-derived MSCs (30:70 ratio of ACs-to-MSCs) on porous scaffolds. Parallel cultures were established for each cell population in serum-containing growth medium and serum-free induction medium supplemented with dexamethasone and TGF-β3. After 3 weeks, all groups were analyzed for DNA content, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and hydroxyproline (HYP) production, and chondrogenic gene expression. Significant enhancements in cellularity, GAG content and GAG/HYP ratio, and chondrogenic phenotype were observed in the induction medium compared to growth medium at all levels of AC expansion. Furthermore, primary co-cultures showed similarly enhanced chondrogenesis compared to monocultures in both culture media, whereas passaged ACs benefitted from co-culturing only in the induction medium. We conclude that co-cultures of ACs and MSCs can produce superior in vitro engineered cartilage in comparison to pure AC cultures, due to both heterotypic cellular interactions and decreased need for monolayer expansion of biopsied chondrocytes. While the initial level of AC dedifferentiation affected the quality of the engineered constructs, co-culture benefits were realized at all stages of AC expansion when suitable chondroinductive culture medium was used.

  11. Chondrocyte-intrinsic Smad3 represses Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression to maintain articular cartilage and prevent osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Carol G.; Thuillier, Daniel; Chin, Emily N.; Alliston, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify mechanisms by which Smad3 maintains articular cartilage and prevents osteoarthritis. Methods A combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches was used to test the hypothesis that Smad3 represses Runx2-inducible gene expression to prevent articular cartilage degeneration. Col2-Cre;Smad3fl/fl mice allowed study of the chondrocyte-intrinsic role of Smad3, independently of its role in the perichondrium or other tissues. Primary Smad3fl/fl articular chondrocytes and ATDC5 chondroprogenitors were employed to evaluate Smad3 and Runx2 regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) mRNA and protein expression. Results Chondrocyte-specific reduction of Smad3 causes progressive articular cartilage degeneration due to imbalanced cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation. In addition to reduced collagen II mRNA expression, Col2-Cre;Smad3fl/fl articular cartilage is severely deficient in collagen II and aggrecan protein, due to excessive MMP-13-mediated proteolysis of these key cartilage matrix constituents. Normally, TGF-β signals through Smad3 to confer a rapid and dynamic repression of Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression. However, in the absence of Smad3, TGF-β signals through p38 and Runx2 to induce MMP-13 expression. Conclusion This work elucidates a mechanism by which Smad3 mutations in humans and mice cause cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. Specifically, Smad3 maintains the balance between cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation by inducing collagen II expression and repressing Runx2-inducible MMP-13 expression. Selective activation of TGF-β signaling through Smad3, rather than p38, may help to restore the balance between matrix synthesis and proteolysis that is lost in osteoarthritis. PMID:22674505

  12. Collagen VI regulates pericellular matrix properties, chondrocyte swelling, and mechanotransduction in articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zelenski, Nicole A.; Leddy, Holly A.; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Zhang, Jinzi; Bonaldo, Paolo; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Guilak, Farshid

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mechanical factors play a critical role in the physiology and pathology of articular cartilage, although the mechanisms of mechanical signal transduction are not fully understood. We examined the hypothesis that type VI collagen is necessary for mechanotransduction in articular cartilage, by determining the effects of type VI collagen knockout on the activation of the mechano-osmosensitive calcium-permeable channel, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), osmotically-induced chondrocyte swelling, and pericellular matrix (PCM) mechanical properties. Methods Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to image TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling and osmotically-induced cell swelling in intact femora from 2 and 9 month old wild type (WT) and type VI collagen deficient (Col6a1−/−) mice. Immunofluorescence-guided atomic force microscopy was used to map PCM mechanical properties based on the presence of perlecan. Results Hypo-osmotic stress induced TRPV4-mediated calcium signaling was increased in Col6a1−/− mice relative to WT controls at 2 months. Col6a1−/− mice exhibited significantly increased osmotically-induced cell swelling and decreased PCM moduli relative to WT controls at both ages. Conclusion In contrast to our original hypothesis, type VI collagen was not required for TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ signaling; however, knockout of type VI collagen altered the mechanical properties of the PCM, which in turn increased the extent of cell swelling and osmotically-induced TRPV4 signaling in an age-dependent manner. These findings emphasize the role of the PCM as a transducer of mechanical and physicochemical signals, and suggest that alterations in PCM properties, as may occur with aging or osteoarthritis, can influence mechanotransduction via TRPV4 or other ion channels. PMID:25604429

  13. 3D Dynamic Culture of Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes Encapsulated in Alginate Gel Beads Using Spinner Flasks for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feiyue; Xu, Lei; Wang, Qi; Ye, Zhaoyang; Zhou, Yan; Tan, Wen-Song

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based therapy using chondrocytes for cartilage repair suffers from chondrocyte dedifferentiation. In the present study, the effects of an integrated three-dimensional and dynamic culture on rabbit articular chondrocytes were investigated. Cells (passages 1 and 4) were encapsulated in alginate gel beads and cultured in spinner flasks in chondrogenic and chondrocyte growth media. Subcutaneous implantation of the cell-laden beads was performed to evaluate the ectopic chondrogenesis. It was found that cells remained viable after 35 days in the three-dimensional dynamic culture. Passage 1 cells demonstrated a proliferative growth in both media. Passage 4 cells showed a gradual reduction in DNA content in growth medium, which was attenuated in chondrogenic medium. Deposition of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) was found in all cultures. While passage 1 cells generally produced higher amounts of GAG than passage 4 cells, GAG/DNA became similar on day 35 for both cells in growth media. Interestingly, GAG/DNA in growth medium was greater than that in chondrogenic medium for both cells. Based on GAG quantification and gene expression analysis, encapsulated passage 1 cells cultured in growth medium displayed the best ectopic chondrogenesis. Taken together, the three-dimensional and dynamic culture for chondrocytes holds great potential in cartilage regeneration. PMID:25506593

  14. Surface Zone Articular Chondrocytes Modulate the Bulk and Surface Mechanical Properties of the Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Gordon; McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2014-01-01

    The central hypothesis of functional tissue engineering is that an engineered construct can serve as a viable replacement tissue in vivo by replicating the structure and function of native tissue. In the case of articular cartilage, this requires the reproduction of the bulk mechanical and surface lubrication properties of native hyaline cartilage. Cartilage tissue engineering has primarily focused on achieving the bulk mechanical properties of native cartilage such as the compressive aggregate modulus and tensile strength. A scaffold-free self-assembling process has been developed that produces engineered cartilage with compressive properties approaching native tissue levels. Thus, the next step in this process is to begin addressing the friction coefficient and wear properties of these engineered constructs. The superficial zone protein (SZP), also known as lubricin or PRG4, is a boundary mode lubricant that is synthesized by surface zone (SZ) articular chondrocytes. Under conditions of high loading and low sliding speeds, SZP reduces friction and wear at the articular surface. The objective of this investigation was to determine whether increasing the proportion of SZ chondrocytes in cartilage constructs, in the absence of external stimuli such as growth factors and mechanical loading, would enhance the secretion of SZP and improve their frictional properties. In this study, cartilage constructs were engineered through a self-assembling process with varying ratios of SZ and middle zone (MZ) chondrocytes (SZ:MZ): 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25, and 100:0. Constructs containing different ratios of SZ and MZ chondrocytes did not significantly differ in the glycosaminoglycan composition or compressive aggregate modulus. In contrast, tensile properties and collagen content were enhanced in nearly all constructs containing greater amounts of SZ chondrocytes. Increasing the proportion of SZ chondrocytes had the hypothesized effect of improving the synthesis and secretion

  15. Influence of intermittent pressure, fluid flow, and mixing on the regenerative properties of articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Carver, S E; Heath, C A

    1999-11-01

    Equine articular chondrocytes, embedded within a polyglycolic acid nonwoven mesh, were cultured with various combinations of intermittent pressure, fluid flow, and mixing to examine the effects of different physical stimuli on neochondrogenesis from young cells. The cell/polymer constructs were cultured first in 125 ml spinner flasks for 1, 2, or 4 weeks and then in a perfusion system with intermittent pressure for a total of up to 6 weeks. Additional constructs were either cultured for all 6 weeks in the spinner flasks or for 1 week in spinners followed by 5 weeks in the perfusion system without intermittent pressure. Tissue constructs cultivated for 2 or 4 weeks in spinner flasks followed by perfusion with intermittent pressure had significantly higher concentrations of both sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen than constructs cultured entirely in spinners or almost entirely in the pressure/perfusion system. Initial cultivation in the spinner flasks, with turbulent mixing, enhanced both cell attachment and early development of the extracellular matrix. Subsequent culture with perfusion and intermittent pressure appeared to accelerate matrix formation. While the correlation was much stronger in the pressurized constructs, the compressive modulus was directly proportional to the concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycan in all physically stressed constructs. Constructs that were not stressed beyond the 1-week seeding period lost mechanical integrity upon harvest, suggesting that physical stimulation, particularly with intermittent pressure, of immature tissue constructs during their development may contribute to their ultimate biomechanical functionality.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reshape and Provoke Proliferation of Articular Chondrocytes by Paracrine Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Wu, Yuxi; Xiong, Zhimiao; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-09-01

    Coculture between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) represents a promising strategy for cartilage regeneration. This study aimed at elaborating how ACs were regulated by MSCs. Rabbit ACs (rACs) and rabbit MSCs (rMSCs) were seeded separately in a Transwell system to initiate non-contact coculture in growth medium without chondrogenic factors. Cell morphology, cell proliferation, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and gene expression of rACs were characterized. Upon coculture, rACs underwent a morphological transition from a rounded or polygonal shape into a fibroblast-like one and proliferation was provoked simultaneously. Such effects were dependent on the amount of rMSCs. Along with these changes, ECM production and gene expression of rACs were also perturbed. Importantly, when a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) was supplemented to coculture, the effects except that on cell proliferation were inhibited, suggesting the involvement of RhoA/ROCK signaling. By applying an inhibitor (BIBF1120) of VEGFR1/2/3, FGFR1/2/3 and PDGFRα/β in coculture, or supplementing FGF-1, VEGF-A and PDGFbb in monoculture, it was confirmed that the paracrine factors by rMSCs mediated the compounding effects on rACs. These findings shed light on MSCs-ACs interactions and might confer an insight view on cell-based cartilage regeneration.

  17. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reshape and Provoke Proliferation of Articular Chondrocytes by Paracrine Secretion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Wu, Yuxi; Xiong, Zhimiao; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-01-01

    Coculture between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) represents a promising strategy for cartilage regeneration. This study aimed at elaborating how ACs were regulated by MSCs. Rabbit ACs (rACs) and rabbit MSCs (rMSCs) were seeded separately in a Transwell system to initiate non-contact coculture in growth medium without chondrogenic factors. Cell morphology, cell proliferation, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and gene expression of rACs were characterized. Upon coculture, rACs underwent a morphological transition from a rounded or polygonal shape into a fibroblast-like one and proliferation was provoked simultaneously. Such effects were dependent on the amount of rMSCs. Along with these changes, ECM production and gene expression of rACs were also perturbed. Importantly, when a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) was supplemented to coculture, the effects except that on cell proliferation were inhibited, suggesting the involvement of RhoA/ROCK signaling. By applying an inhibitor (BIBF1120) of VEGFR1/2/3, FGFR1/2/3 and PDGFRα/β in coculture, or supplementing FGF-1, VEGF-A and PDGFbb in monoculture, it was confirmed that the paracrine factors by rMSCs mediated the compounding effects on rACs. These findings shed light on MSCs-ACs interactions and might confer an insight view on cell-based cartilage regeneration. PMID:27596239

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reshape and Provoke Proliferation of Articular Chondrocytes by Paracrine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lei; Wu, Yuxi; Xiong, Zhimiao; Zhou, Yan; Ye, Zhaoyang; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-01-01

    Coculture between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and articular chondrocytes (ACs) represents a promising strategy for cartilage regeneration. This study aimed at elaborating how ACs were regulated by MSCs. Rabbit ACs (rACs) and rabbit MSCs (rMSCs) were seeded separately in a Transwell system to initiate non-contact coculture in growth medium without chondrogenic factors. Cell morphology, cell proliferation, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and gene expression of rACs were characterized. Upon coculture, rACs underwent a morphological transition from a rounded or polygonal shape into a fibroblast-like one and proliferation was provoked simultaneously. Such effects were dependent on the amount of rMSCs. Along with these changes, ECM production and gene expression of rACs were also perturbed. Importantly, when a ROCK inhibitor (Y27632) was supplemented to coculture, the effects except that on cell proliferation were inhibited, suggesting the involvement of RhoA/ROCK signaling. By applying an inhibitor (BIBF1120) of VEGFR1/2/3, FGFR1/2/3 and PDGFRα/β in coculture, or supplementing FGF-1, VEGF-A and PDGFbb in monoculture, it was confirmed that the paracrine factors by rMSCs mediated the compounding effects on rACs. These findings shed light on MSCs-ACs interactions and might confer an insight view on cell-based cartilage regeneration. PMID:27596239

  19. Studies on the hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycans purified from articular chondrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Sandy, J D; Plaas, A H

    1989-06-01

    Primary cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes have been maintained for 10 days and labeled with [35S]sulfate, [3H]leucine, and [35S]cysteine in pulse-chase protocols to study the structure and hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycan monomers. Radiolabeled monomers were purified from medium and cell-layer fractions by dissociative CsCl gradient centrifugation with bovine carrier monomer, and analyzed for hyaluronate binding affinity on Sepharose CL-2B in 0.5 M Na acetate, 0.1% Triton X-100, pH 6.8. Detergent was necessary to prevent self-association of newly synthesized monomers during chromatography. Monomers secreted during a 30-min pulse labeling with [35S]sulfate had a low affinity relative to carrier. Those molecules released into the medium during the first 12 h of chase (about 40% of the total) remained in the low affinity form whereas those retained by the cell layer rapidly acquired high affinity. In cultures where more than 90% of the preformed cell-layer proteoglycan was removed by hyaluronidase digestion before radiolabeling the newly synthesized low affinity monomers also rapidly acquired high affinity if retained in the cell layer. Cultures labeled with amino acid precursors were used to establish the purity of monomer preparations and to isolate core proteins for study. Leucine- or cysteine-labeled core proteins derived from either low or high affinity monomer preparations migrated as a single major species on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with electrophoretic mobility very similar to that of core protein derived from extracted proteoglycan monomer. Purified low affinity monomers were converted to the high affinity form by treatment at pH 8.6; however, this change was prevented by guanidinium-HCl at concentrations above 0.8 M. Conversion to high affinity was also achieved by incubation of monomers in aggregate with hyaluronic acid (HA) at pH 6.8 followed by dissociative reisolation of monomer

  20. Apigenin Regulates Interleukin-1β-Induced Production of Matrix Metalloproteinase Both in the Knee Joint of Rat and in Primary Cultured Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Sung; Kim, Dong Kyu; Shin, Hyun-Dae; Lee, Hyun Jae; Jo, Ho Seung; Jeong, Jin Hoon; Choi, Young Lac; Lee, Choong Jae; Hwang, Sun-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether apigenin affects the gene expression, secretion and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in primary cultured rabbit articular chondrocytes, as well as in vivo production of MMP-3 in the knee joint of rat to evaluate the potential chondroprotective effects of apigenin. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer, and reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-4 (ADAMTS-4), and ADAMTS-5. In rabbit articular chondrocytes, the effects of apigenin on IL-1β-induced secretion and proteolytic activity of MMP-3 were investigated using western blot analysis and casein zymography, respectively. The effect of apigenin on MMP-3 protein production was also examined in vivo. In rabbit articular chondrocytes, apigenin inhibited the gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5. Furthermore, apigenin inhibited the secretion and proteolytic activity of MMP-3 in vitro, and inhibited production of MMP-3 protein in vivo. These results suggest that apigenin can regulate the gene expression, secretion, and activity of MMP-3, by directly acting on articular chondrocytes. PMID:26902085

  1. Rough endoplasmic reticulum and fine intracytoplasmic filaments in articular cartilage chondrocytes of young rabbits; a stereological morphometric study using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Paukkonen, K; Helminen, H J

    1987-01-01

    Articular cartilage of eight young NZW rabbits was investigated by electron microscopy. A simple and rapid stereological method was designed for quantifying the synthetic activity of the chondrocytes in the different zones of uncalcified articular cartilage by measuring the amount of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) on electron micrographs. The surface area of RER per unit volume of chondrocyte cytoplasm, of cartilage, and per chondrocyte, were determined. In addition the volume density, and mean diameter, of RER cisternae were computed. The surface area of RER was least in the superficial zone (402 micron 2) and largest in the deep zone (879 micron 2) chondrocytes. The RER surface area per unit volume of tissue was, however, significantly (P less than 0.05) greater in the superficial zone (12.8 X 10(-2) micron2/micron3) than in the deep zone (8.5 X 10(-2) micron2/micron3) of the articular cartilage. Percentages of chondrocytes displaying masses of intracytoplasmic fine filaments were also registered. 8.5% of the chondrocytes in the superficial, 48.8% in the middle, and 53.5% in the deep zone contained intracytoplasmic fine filaments. Chondrocytes containing filaments are probably degenerating cells. They contained diminished amounts of RER. The altered nutritional status in the deeper zones of the cartilage might have caused these changes in the cells. The formation of the calcified zone of the cartilage in the young rabbits, contributing to the cessation of the nutritional supply of chondrocytes from the subchondral bone marrow spaces, may have affected the process. Since the proportion of RER can be regarded as indicating the synthetic activity, and that of filaments as indicating the degree of degeneration, these parameters can be used in the evaluation of the functional status of the uncalcified articular cartilage chondrocytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3654375

  2. Simvastatin induces differentiation of rabbit articular chondrocytes via the ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Han, Yohan; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-08-15

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl Coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, a key enzyme involved in the conversion of HMG-CoA to the cholesterol precursor mevalonate. Some statins, such as simvastatin (simvastatin), have been shown to have anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects, reducing cartilage degradation in osteoarthritic rabbits in vivo. However, the regulatory mechanisms undergirding simvastatin mediated chondrocyte differentiation have not been well elucidated. Thus, we investigated the action and mechanism of simvastatin on differentiation of rabbit articular chondrocytes through western blot analyses, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemical (IHC) and immunofluorescence (IF) staining. Simvastatin treatment was found to induce type II collagen expression and sulfated-proteoglycan synthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Indeed, RT-PCR revealed increased expression of type II collagen on treatment with simvastatin. Both IHC and IF staining indicated differentiation of chondrocytes. Simvastatin treatment reduced activation of ERK-1/2 and stimulated activation of p38 kinase. Inhibition of ERK-1/2 with PD98059 enhanced simvastatin induced differentiation, whereas inhibition of p38 kinase with SB203580 inhibited simvastatin induced differentiation. Simvastatin treatment also inhibits loss of type II collagen in serial monolayer culture. Collectively, our results indicate that ERK-1/2 and p38 kinase regulate simvastatin-induced differentiation of chondrocytes in opposing manners. Thus, these findings suggest that simvastatin may be a potential therapeutic drug for osteoarthritis.

  3. Studies on the hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycans purified from articular chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sandy, J.D.; Plaas, A.H.

    1989-06-01

    Primary cultures of rabbit articular chondrocytes have been maintained for 10 days and labeled with (35S)sulfate, (3H)leucine, and (35S)cysteine in pulse-chase protocols to study the structure and hyaluronate binding properties of newly synthesized proteoglycan monomers. Radiolabeled monomers were purified from medium and cell-layer fractions by dissociative CsCl gradient centrifugation with bovine carrier monomer, and analyzed for hyaluronate binding affinity on Sepharose CL-2B in 0.5 M Na acetate, 0.1% Triton X-100, pH 6.8. Detergent was necessary to prevent self-association of newly synthesized monomers during chromatography. Monomers secreted during a 30-min pulse labeling with (35S)sulfate had a low affinity relative to carrier. Those molecules released into the medium during the first 12 h of chase remained in the low affinity form whereas those retained by the cell layer rapidly acquired high affinity. In cultures where more than 90% of the preformed cell-layer proteoglycan was removed by hyaluronidase digestion before radiolabeling the newly synthesized low affinity monomers also rapidly acquired high affinity if retained in the cell layer. Cultures labeled with amino acid precursors were used to establish the purity of monomer preparations and to isolate core proteins for study. Leucine- or cysteine-labeled core proteins derived from either low or high affinity monomer preparations migrated as a single major species on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with electrophoretic mobility very similar to that of core protein derived from extracted proteoglycan monomer. Purified low affinity monomers were converted to the high affinity form by treatment at pH 8.6; however, this change was prevented by guanidinium-HCl at concentrations above 0.8 M.

  4. Microfluidics-based optimization of neuroleukin-mediated regulation of articular chondrocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, KANG; ZHONG, WEILIANG; ZHANG, YINGQIU; YIN, BAOSHENG; ZHANG, WEIGUO; LIU, HAN

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low proliferative and migratory capacities of chondrocytes, cartilage repair remains a challenging clinical problem. Current therapeutic strategies for cartilage repair result in unsatisfactory outcomes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) is a cell based therapy that relies on the in vitro expansion of healthy chondrocytes from the patient, during which proliferation-promoting factors are frequently used. Neuroleukin (NLK) is a multifunctional protein that possesses growth factor functions, and its expression has been associated with cartilage development and bone regeneration, however its direct role in chondrocyte proliferation remains to be fully elucidated. In the current study, the role of NLK in chondrocyte proliferation in vitro in addition to its potential to act as an exogenous factor during ACI was investigated. Furthermore, the concentration of NLK for in vitro chondrocyte culture was optimized using a microfluidic device. An NLK concentration of 12.85 ng/ml was observed to provide optimal conditions for the promotion of chondrocyte proliferation. Additionally, NLK stimulation resulted in an increase in type II collagen synthesis by chondrocytes, which is a cartilaginous secretion marker and associated with the phenotype of chondrocytes. Together these data suggest that NLK is able to promote cell proliferation and type II collagen synthesis during in vitro chondrocyte propagation, and thus may serve as an exogenous factor for ACI. PMID:26573126

  5. Chondrogenic Phenotype of Articular Chondrocytes in Monoculture and Co-Culture with Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Flow Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Meretoja, Ville V.; Ni, Mengwei; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2014-01-01

    This work investigated the effect of flow perfusion bioreactor culture with and without transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) supplementation on the proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) production, and chondrogenic gene expression of chondrocytes both in monoculture and in co-culture with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Both cell populations were cultured on electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds for 2 weeks in static or flow perfusion culture with and without TGF-β3. Overall, it was observed that without growth factors, flow perfusion culture resulted in increased cell proliferation and ECM with a more cartilage-like composition. While with TGF-β3 induction, flow perfusion constructs generally had lower chondrogenic gene expression than the corresponding static cultures, the growth factor still had an inductive effect on the cells with enhanced gene expression compared with the corresponding noninduced cultures. In addition, while flow perfusion cultures generally had reduced overall ECM content, the ECM distribution was more homogenous compared with the corresponding static cultures. These results are significant in that they indicate that while flow perfusion culture has some beneficial effects on the chondrogenic phenotype of articular chondrocytes, flow perfusion alone is not sufficient to maintain the chondrogenic phenotype of chondrocytes in either monoculture or co-culture, thus demonstrating the advantages of using exogenously added growth factors in flow perfusion culture. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the advantages of flow perfusion culture for the creation of large tissue engineered constructs and the potential of co-cultures of articular chondrocytes and MSCs to be used in flow perfusion culture. PMID:24745375

  6. Lead Induces an Osteoarthritis-like Phenotype in Articular Chondrocytes through Disruption of TGF-β Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Jonathan D.; Beier, Eric; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Ubayawardena, Resika; Wang, Meina; Sampson, Erik R.; Rosier, Randy N.; Zuscik, Michael; Puzas, J. Edward

    2013-01-01

    Lead remains a significant environmental toxin, and we believe we may have identified a novel target of lead toxicity in articular chondrocytes. These cells are responsible for the maintenance of joint matrix, and do so under the regulation of TGF-β signaling. As lead is concentrated in articular cartilage, we hypothesize that it can disrupt normal chondrocyte phenotype through suppression of TGF-β signaling. These experiments examine the effects of lead exposure in vivo and in vitro at biologically-relevant levels, from 1nM–10µM on viability, collagen levels, matrix degrading enzyme activity, TGF-β signaling, and articular surface morphology. Our results indicate that viability was unchanged at levels ≤100µM Pb, but low and high level lead in vivo exposure resulted in fibrillation and degeneration of the articular surface. Lead treatment also decreased levels of type II collagen and increased type X collagen, in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, MMP13 activity increased in a dose-dependent manner. Active caspase3 and 8 were dose-dependently elevated, and treatment with 10µM Pb resulted in increases of 30% and 500%, respectively. Increasing lead treatment resulted in a corresponding reduction in TGF-β reporter activity, with a 95% reduction at 10µM. Levels of phosphoSmad2 and 3 were suppressed in vitro and in vivo and lead dose-dependently increased Smurf2. These changes closely parallel those seen in osteoarthritis. Over time this phenotypic shift could compromise maintenance of the joint matrix. PMID:22517267

  7. Two-pore domain K⁺ channels regulate membrane potential of isolated human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert B; Kondo, Colleen; Belke, Darrell D; Giles, Wayne R

    2011-11-01

    Potassium channels that regulate resting membrane potential (RMP) of human articular chondrocytes (HACs) of the tibial joint maintained in short-term (0-3 days) non-confluent cell culture were studied using patch-clamp techniques. Quantitative PCR showed that transcripts of genes for two-pore domain K(+) channels (KCNK1, KCNK5 and KCNK6), and 'BK' Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCNMA1) were abundantly expressed. Immunocytological methods detected α-subunits for BK and K(2p)5.1 (TASK-2) K(+) channels. Electrophysiological recordings identified three distinct K(+) currents in isolated HACs: (i) a voltage- and time-dependent 'delayed rectifier', blocked by 100 nM α-dendrotoxin, (ii) a large 'noisy' voltage-dependent current that was blocked by low concentrations of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 50% blocking dose = 0.15 mM) and iberiotoxin (52% block, 100 nM) and (iii) a voltage-independent 'background' K(+) current that was blocked by acidic pH (5.5-6), was increased by alkaline pH (8.5), and was not blocked by TEA, but was blocked by the local anaesthetic bupivacaine (0.25 mM). The RMP of isolated HACs was very slightly affected by 5 mM TEA, which was sufficient to block both voltage-dependent K(+) currents, suggesting that these currents probably contributed little to maintaining RMP under 'resting' conditions (i.e. low internal [Ca(2+)]). Increases in external K(+) concentration depolarized HACs by 30 mV in response to a 10-fold increase in [K(+)], indicating a significant but not exclusive role for K(+) current in determining RMP. Increases in external [K(+)] in voltage-clamped HACs revealed a voltage-independent K(+) current whose inward current magnitude increased with external [K(+)]. Block of this current by bupivacaine (0.25-1 mM) in 5 and 25 mM external [K(+)] resulted in a large (8-25 mV) depolarization of RMP. The biophysical and pharmacological properties of the background K(+) current, together with expression of mRNA and α-subunit protein for TASK-2

  8. Mechanism of mechanically induced intercellular calcium waves in rabbit articular chondrocytes and in HIG-82 synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Grandolfo, M; Calabrese, A; D'Andrea, P

    1998-03-01

    Intercellular communication through gap junctions allows tissue coordination of cell metabolism and sensitivity to extracellular stimuli. Intercellular Ca2+ signaling was investigated with digital fluorescence video imaging in primary cultures of articular chondrocytes and in HIG-82 synovial cells. In both cell types, mechanical stimulation of a single cell induced a wave of increased Ca2+ that was communicated to surrounding cells. Intercellular Ca2+ spreading was inhibited by 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid, demonstrating the involvement of gap junctions in signal propagation. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, mechanical stimulation induced communicated Ca2+ waves similar to controls; however, the number of HIG-82 cells recruited decreased significantly. Mechanical stress induced Ca2+ influx both in the stimulated chondrocyte and HIG-82 cell, but not in the adjacent cells, as assessed by the Mn2+ quenching technique. Treatment of cells with thapsigargin and with the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 blocked mechanically induced signal propagation. These results provide evidence that in chondrocytes and in HIG-82 synovial cells, mechanical stimulation activates PLC, thus leading to an increase of intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. The second messenger, by permeating gap junctions, stimulates intracellular Ca2+ release in neighboring cells. It is concluded that intercellular Ca2+ waves may provide a mechanism to coordinate tissue responses in joint physiology.

  9. Epiphyseal abnormalities, trabecular bone loss and articular chondrocyte hypertrophy develop in the long bones of postnatal Ext1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Sgariglia, Federica; Candela, Maria Elena; Huegel, Julianne; Jacenko, Olena; Koyama, Eiki; Yamaguchi, Yu; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-11-01

    Long bones are integral components of the limb skeleton. Recent studies have indicated that embryonic long bone development is altered by mutations in Ext genes and consequent heparan sulfate (HS) deficiency, possibly due to changes in activity and distribution of HS-binding/growth plate-associated signaling proteins. Here we asked whether Ext function is continuously required after birth to sustain growth plate function and long bone growth and organization. Compound transgenic Ext1(f/f);Col2CreERT mice were injected with tamoxifen at postnatal day 5 (P5) to ablate Ext1 in cartilage and monitored over time. The Ext1-deficient mice exhibited growth retardation already by 2weeks post-injection, as did their long bones. Mutant growth plates displayed a severe disorganization of chondrocyte columnar organization, a shortened hypertrophic zone with low expression of collagen X and MMP-13, and reduced primary spongiosa accompanied, however, by increased numbers of TRAP-positive osteoclasts at the chondro-osseous border. The mutant epiphyses were abnormal as well. Formation of a secondary ossification center was significantly delayed but interestingly, hypertrophic-like chondrocytes emerged within articular cartilage, similar to those often seen in osteoarthritic joints. Indeed, the cells displayed a large size and round shape, expressed collagen X and MMP-13 and were surrounded by an abundant Perlecan-rich pericellular matrix not seen in control articular chondrocytes. In addition, ectopic cartilaginous outgrowths developed on the lateral side of mutant growth plates over time that resembled exostotic characteristic of children with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses, a syndrome caused by Ext mutations and HS deficiency. In sum, the data do show that Ext1 is continuously required for postnatal growth and organization of long bones as well as their adjacent joints. Ext1 deficiency elicits defects that can occur in human skeletal conditions including trabecular bone loss

  10. Allogeneic Articular Chondrocyte Transplantation Down Regulates IL-8 Gene Expression in the Degenerating Rabbit Intervertebral Disc in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yejia; Chee, Ana; Shi, Peng; Wang, Rui; Moss, Isaac; Chen, Er-Yun; He, Tong-Chuan; An, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate if repopulating the degenerating intervertebral disc (IVD) with articular chondrocytes (ACs) will decrease inflammation and restore disc structure. In this study, we aimed to determine if well-differentiated AC alone or transduced with adenovirus overexpressing BMP-7 gene may survive and inhibit inflammation or repair disc structure in the degenerating rabbit IVD. Design This was a biological study in a rabbit IVD-injury model in vivo. Dual cell tracking methods (IR dye-labeling and adenovirus transduction) were used to demonstrate the viability of allogeneic AC injected into degenerating rabbit IVDs. Interleukin (IL)-8 gene expression was determined via real-time PCR. Infiltrating inflammatory cells (macrophages, T-cells or neutrophils) were examined with immunohistochemistry. The IVDs were also examined by routine histology. Results ACs labeled with infrared (IR) dye were detected in the degenerating IVDs at both 2 and 8 weeks after injection. At the 2-week time point, IL-8 gene expression was comparable in IVDs injected with chondrocytes and in intact discs as control (P=0.647), while its expression in IVDs injected with saline increased 50fold (p=0.028). Transgene expression of red fluorescent protein, β-galactosidase, and BMP-7 diminished at 8 weeks post injection. IVDs injected with chondrocytes overexpressing hBMP-7 did not show lower IL-8 gene expression or improved histology. Macrophages were consistently detected by immunohistochemistry in the cartilage formation around the needle insertion sites in both the saline and chondrocyte groups, while neither T cells nor neutrophils were detected. Conclusions Allogeneic rabbit AC survived in the degenerating rabbit IVDs for at least 8 weeks. Cell treatment resulted in reduced IVD inflammation, but did not significantly improve IVD structure. PMID:25133623

  11. Stimulation of Superficial Zone Protein/Lubricin/PRG4 by Transforming Growth Factor-β in Superficial Zone Articular Chondrocytes and Modulation by Glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Araceli; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-07-01

    Superficial zone protein (SZP), also known as lubricin and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), plays an important role in the boundary lubrication of articular cartilage and is regulated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Here, we evaluate the role of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) during TGF-β1 stimulation of SZP/lubricin/PRG4 in superficial zone articular chondrocytes. We utilized primary monolayer superficial zone articular chondrocyte cultures and treated them with various concentrations of TGF-β1, in the presence or absence of heparan sulfate (HS), heparin, and chondroitin sulfate (CS). The cell surface GAGs were removed by pretreatment with either heparinase I or chondroitinase-ABC before TGF-β1 stimulation. Accumulation of SZP/lubricin/PRG4 in the culture medium in response to stimulation with TGF-β1 and various exogenous GAGs was demonstrated by immunoblotting and quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We show that TGF-β1 and exogenous HS enhanced SZP accumulation of superficial zone chondrocytes in the presence of surface GAGs. At the dose of 1 ng/mL of TGF-β1, the presence of exogenous heparin inhibited SZP accumulation whereas the presence of exogenous CS stimulated SZP accumulation in the culture medium. Enzymatic depletion of GAGs on the surface of superficial zone chondrocytes enhanced the ability of TGF-β1 to stimulate SZP accumulation in the presence of both exogenous heparin and CS. Collectively, these results suggest that GAGs at the surface of superficial zone articular chondrocytes influence the response to TGF-β1 and exogenous GAGs to stimulate SZP accumulation. Cell surface GAGs modulate superficial zone chondrocytes' response to TGF-β1 and exogenous HS.

  12. Stimulation of Superficial Zone Protein/Lubricin/PRG4 by Transforming Growth Factor-β in Superficial Zone Articular Chondrocytes and Modulation by Glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Cuellar, Araceli

    2015-01-01

    Superficial zone protein (SZP), also known as lubricin and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), plays an important role in the boundary lubrication of articular cartilage and is regulated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Here, we evaluate the role of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) during TGF-β1 stimulation of SZP/lubricin/PRG4 in superficial zone articular chondrocytes. We utilized primary monolayer superficial zone articular chondrocyte cultures and treated them with various concentrations of TGF-β1, in the presence or absence of heparan sulfate (HS), heparin, and chondroitin sulfate (CS). The cell surface GAGs were removed by pretreatment with either heparinase I or chondroitinase-ABC before TGF-β1 stimulation. Accumulation of SZP/lubricin/PRG4 in the culture medium in response to stimulation with TGF-β1 and various exogenous GAGs was demonstrated by immunoblotting and quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We show that TGF-β1 and exogenous HS enhanced SZP accumulation of superficial zone chondrocytes in the presence of surface GAGs. At the dose of 1 ng/mL of TGF-β1, the presence of exogenous heparin inhibited SZP accumulation whereas the presence of exogenous CS stimulated SZP accumulation in the culture medium. Enzymatic depletion of GAGs on the surface of superficial zone chondrocytes enhanced the ability of TGF-β1 to stimulate SZP accumulation in the presence of both exogenous heparin and CS. Collectively, these results suggest that GAGs at the surface of superficial zone articular chondrocytes influence the response to TGF-β1 and exogenous GAGs to stimulate SZP accumulation. Cell surface GAGs modulate superficial zone chondrocytes' response to TGF-β1 and exogenous HS. PMID:25398329

  13. Unique biomaterial compositions direct bone marrow stem cells into specific chondrocytic phenotypes corresponding to the various zones of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lonnissa H; Kudva, Abhijit K; Guckert, Nicole L; Linse, Klaus D; Roy, Krishnendu

    2011-02-01

    Numerous studies have reported generation of cartilage-like tissue from chondrocytes and stem cells, using pellet cultures, bioreactors and various biomaterials, especially hydrogels. However, one of the primary unsolved challenges in the field has been the inability to produce tissue that mimics the highly organized zonal architecture of articular cartilage; specifically its spatially varying mechanical properties and extra-cellular matrix (ECM) composition. Here we show that different combinations of synthetic and natural biopolymers create unique niches that can "direct" a single marrow stem cell (MSC) population to differentiate into the superficial, transitional, or deep zones of articular cartilage. Specifically, incorporating chondroitin sulfate (CS) and matrix metalloproteinase-sensitive peptides (MMP-pep) into PEG hydrogels (PEG:CS:MMP-pep) induced high levels of collagen II and low levels of proteoglycan expression resulting in a low compressive modulus, similar to the superficial zone. PEG:CS hydrogels produced intermediate-levels of both collagen II and proteoglycans, like the transitional zone, while PEG:hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels induced high proteoglycan and low collagen II levels leading to high compressive modulus, similar to the deep zone. Additionally, the compressive moduli of these zone-specific matrices following cartilage generation showed similar trend as the corresponding zones of articular cartilage, with PEG:CS:MMP-pep having the lowest compressive modulus, followed by PEG:CS while PEG:HA had the highest modulus. These results underscore the potential for composite scaffold structures incorporating these biomaterial compositions such that a single stem-progenitor cell population can give rise to zonally-organized, functional articular cartilage-like tissue. PMID:21067807

  14. Label-free proteomic analysis of the hydrophobic membrane protein complement in articular chondrocytes: a technique for identification of membrane biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Csaba; Zhang, Xiaofei; Liddell, Susan; Smith, Julia R.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Context: There is insufficient knowledge about the chondrocyte membranome and its molecular composition. Objective: To develop a Triton X-114 based separation technique using nanoLC-MS/MS combined with shotgun proteomics to identify chondrocyte membrane proteins. Materials and methods: Articular chondrocytes from equine metacarpophalangeal joints were separated into hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions; trypsin-digested proteins were analysed by nanoLC-MS/MS. Results: A total of 315 proteins were identified. The phase extraction method yielded a high proportion of membrane proteins (56%) including CD276, S100-A6 and three VDAC isoforms. Discussion: Defining the chondrocyte membranome is likely to reveal new biomarker targets for conventional and biological drug discovery. PMID:26864288

  15. Cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in human osteoarthritic articular chondrocytes by inhibiting expression of syndecan-1

    PubMed Central

    KONG, YING; WANG, WANCHUN; ZHANG, CHANGJIE; WU, YI; LIU, YANG; ZHOU, XIAORONG

    2016-01-01

    A central feature of osteoarthritis (OA) is the loss of articular cartilage, which is primarily attributed to cartilage breakdown. A group of metalloproteinases termed the A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) family are reported to be important in cartilage breakdown. Recent studies have suggested that ADAMTS-4 is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of OA and that syndecan-1 is closely associated with activation of ADAMTS-4 in human chondrocytes. Accumulating evidence also suggests that cannabinoids have chondroprotective effects. The current study explored the effects of synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55,212-2 mesylate (WIN-55) on the expression of syndecan-1 and ADAMTS-4, as well as ADAMTS-4 activity, in unstimulated and interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated OA chondrocytes. Primary human OA articular chondrocytes were treated with WIN-55 in the presence or absence of IL-1β and cannabinoid receptor antagonists. The results of the present study demonstrated that WIN-55 inhibited ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated primary human OA articular chondrocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) were constitutively expressed in human OA articular chondrocytes. Furthermore, selective CB2 antagonist, JTE907, but not selective CB1 antagonist, MJ15, abolished the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on ADAMTS-4 activity. WIN55 inhibited the expression of syndecan-1 but not ADAMTS-4, and overexpression of syndecan-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of WIN-55 on the ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1β-stimulated human OA articular chondrocytes. Despite having no significant effect on syndecan-1 gene promoter activity, WIN-55 markedly decreased the stability of syndecan-1 mRNA via CB2. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first in vitro evidence supporting that the synthetic cannabinoid WIN-55 inhibits ADAMTS-4 activity in unstimulated and IL-1

  16. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix.

  17. Species variability in the differentiation potential of in vitro-expanded articular chondrocytes restricts predictive studies on cartilage repair using animal models.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Crovace, Antonio; Malpeli, Mara; Maggi, Ettore; Arbicò, Rafaella; Cancedda, Ranieri; Dozin, Beatrice

    2005-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation is currently applied in clinics as an innovative tool for articular cartilage repair. Animal models have been and still are being used to validate and further improve the technique. However, in various species, the outcome varies from hyaline-like cartilage to fibrocartilage. This may be due partly to the spontaneous dedifferentiation of chondrocytes once cultured in vitro. Here we assessed whether the extent of dedifferentiation varies between species and we hypothesized that the level of chondrocyte phenotype stability during expansion may contribute to the maintenance of their chondrogenic commitment and redifferentiation potential. Condyle chondrocytes were harvested from sheep, dog, and human, and expanded for 1, 6, or 12 cell duplications. At each interval, cell phenotype was monitored (morphology and biosynthesis of cartilage markers) and redifferentiation was assessed by an in vitro assay of chondrogenesis in micromass pellet and an in vivo assay of ectopic cartilage formation in immunodeficient mice. Results indicate that, during culture, the sheep chondrocyte phenotype is maintained better than that of human chondrocytes, which in turn dedifferentiate to a lesser extent than dog chondrocytes Accordingly, after expansion, sheep chondrocytes spontaneously reform hyaline-like cartilage; human chondrocytes redifferentiate only under stimulation with chondrogenic inducers whereas, after a few passages, dog chondrocytes lose any capacity to redifferentiate regardless of the presence of inducers. Thus, conditions allowing cartilage formation in one species are not necessarily transposable to other species. Therefore, results with animal models should be cautiously applied to humans. In addition, for tissue-engineering purposes, the number of cell duplications must be, for each species, carefully monitored to remain in the range of amplification allowing redifferentiation and chondrogenesis.

  18. Effect of JJYMD-C, a novel synthetic derivative of gallic acid, on proliferation and phenotype maintenance in rabbit articular chondrocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xu, G.J.; Lu, Z.H.; Lin, X.; Lin, C.W.; Zheng, L.; Zhao, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering encapsulated cells such as chondrocytes in the carrier matrix have been widely used to repair cartilage defects. However, chondrocyte phenotype is easily lost when chondrocytes are expanded in vitro by a process defined as “dedifferentiation”. To ensure successful therapy, an effective pro-chondrogenic agent is necessary to overcome the obstacle of limited cell numbers in the restoration process, and dedifferentiation is a prerequisite. Gallic acid (GA) has been used in the treatment of arthritis, but its biocompatibility is inferior to that of other compounds. In this study, we modified GA by incorporating sulfamonomethoxine sodium and synthesized a sulfonamido-based gallate, JJYMD-C, and evaluated its effect on chondrocyte metabolism. Our results showed that JJYMD-C could effectively increase the levels of the collagen II, Sox9, and aggrecan genes, promote chondrocyte growth, and enhance secretion and synthesis of cartilage extracellular matrix. On the other hand, expression of the collagen I gene was effectively down-regulated, demonstrating inhibition of chondrocyte dedifferentiation by JJYMD-C. Hypertrophy, as a characteristic of chondrocyte ossification, was undetectable in the JJYMD-C groups. We used JJYMD-C at doses of 0.125, 0.25, and 0.5 µg/mL, and the strongest response was observed with 0.25 µg/mL. This study provides a basis for further studies on a novel agent in the treatment of articular cartilage defects. PMID:25003544

  19. Chondrocyte IGF-1 receptor expression and responsiveness to IGF-1 stimulation in mouse articular cartilage during various phases of experimentally induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Verschure, P J; van Marle, J; Joosten, L A; van den Berg, W B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the distribution of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptors and the biological response to IGF-1 stimulation in articular cartilage of normal mouse knee joints and arthritic joints taken at various stages of experimentally induced arthritis. METHODS--In situ IGF-1 receptor expression and responsiveness to IGF-1 stimulation were examined in murine articular cartilage at different phases in two models of experimentally induced arthritis. IGF-1 receptor expression was visualised in joint sections with the use of anti-IGF-1 receptor antibodies and quantified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Chondrocyte proteoglycan (PG) synthesis was measured by incorporation of 35S-sulphate. RESULTS--In control cartilage, the majority of IGF-1 receptors were found on chondrocytes localised in the middle and deeper zones of the cartilage, whereas receptor expression in surface zone chondrocytes was very low. During culture of normal articular cartilage, IGF-1 was able to maintain chondrocyte PG synthesis at the in vivo level. Concurrently with the development of arthritis, cartilage lost its capacity to react to IGF-1, but IGF-1 stimulation recovered when the inflammatory response waned. Shortly after induction of arthritis, IGF-1 receptor expression initially declined, but it had returned to normal levels by day 1 and remained increased thereafter. CONCLUSION--The distribution of IGF-1 receptor expression in the different zones of normal articular cartilage reflects IGF-1 stimulation and metabolic activity of chondrocytes in these layers. This correlation is disturbed in arthritic cartilage, suggesting inadequate or overruled signalling. Images PMID:7677441

  20. A suppressive effect of prostaglandin E2 on the expression of SERPINE1/plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human articular chondrocytes: An in vitro pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Masuko, Kayo; Murata, Minako; Suematsu, Naoya; Okamoto, Kazuki; Yudoh, Kazuo; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Kato, Tomohiro

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is expressed in articular joints with inflammatory arthropathy and may exert catabolic effects leading to cartilage degradation. As we observed in a preliminary experiment that PGE2 suppressed the expression of SERPINE1/plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 mRNA in chondrocytes, we focused on the effect of PGE2 on PAI-1 in a panel of cultured chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritic patients. Specifically, articular cartilage specimens were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent joint surgery. Isolated chondrocytes were cultured in vitro as a monolayer and stimulated with PGE2. Stimulated cells and culture supernatants were analyzed using Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results confirmed that the in vitro PGE2 stimulation suppressed the expression of PAI-1 in the tested chondrocyte samples. The inhibitory effect was partly abrogated by an antagonist of EP4 receptor of PGE2, but not by an EP2 antagonist. Although PGE2 induced activations of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), blocking of the MAPK did not abrogate the suppressive effect of PGE2, implying a distinct signaling pathway. In summary, prostaglandin is suggested to modulate the plasminogen system in chondrocytes. Further elucidation of the interaction might open a new avenue to understand the degradative process of cartilage.

  1. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  2. Influence of various alginate brands on the redifferentiation of dedifferentiated bovine articular chondrocytes in alginate bead culture under high and low oxygen tension.

    PubMed

    Domm, C; Schünke, M; Steinhagen, J; Freitag, S; Kurz, B

    2004-01-01

    We examined the influence of various alginates on the redifferentiation of dedifferentiated articular chondrocytes in alginate bead culture under low (5%) and (21%) high oxygen supply. Isolated bovine articular chondrocytes were dedifferentiated and multiplied by 2-week monolayer culture under 21% oxygen. They were subcultured at a density of 10(7) cells/mL in six different commercially available sodium alginates (1.2%, w/v) and held under 21 or 5% oxygen for 3 weeks. Proliferation (DNA measurement on days 0 and 21 of culture), collagen type II production (immunocytochemistry and Western blotting), and [(3)H]proline and [(35)S]sulfate incorporation were monitored. Collagen type II production was significantly stronger under 5% oxygen compared with 21% oxygen in two alginates (three other alginates nearly reached the significance level). However, alginate-based differences proved not to be significant. [(3)H]Proline incorporation was not influenced by alginate but showed strong oxygen dependency (up to 3-fold higher under 5% oxygen). For [(35)S]sulfate incorporation oxygen dependency was even stronger (up to 8-fold higher under 5% oxygen) and significant alginate-dependent differences were found for several alginates. The effects of the different alginates did not correlate with their pH, viscosity, or guluronic:mannuronic acid ratio. Thus, the type of alginate and even more, the oxygen supply, influence the redifferentiation and matrix production of dedifferentiated bovine articular chondrocytes. PMID:15684688

  3. Collagen VI enhances cartilage tissue generation by stimulating chondrocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Smeriglio, Piera; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Lai, Janice H; Goodman, Stuart B; Dragoo, Jason L; Smith, Robert L; Maloney, William J; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-02-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient. Current cell-based approaches for cartilage repair, including autologous chondrocytes, are limited by the paucity of cells, associated donor site morbidity, and generation of functionally inferior fibrocartilage rather than articular cartilage. Upon investigating the role of collagen VI (Col VI), a major component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix (PCM), we observe that soluble Col VI stimulates chondrocyte proliferation. Interestingly, both adult and osteoarthritis chondrocytes respond to soluble Col VI in a similar manner. The proliferative effect is, however, strictly due to the soluble Col VI as no proliferation is observed upon exposure of chondrocytes to immobilized Col VI. Upon short Col VI treatment in 2D monolayer culture, chondrocytes maintain high expression of characteristic chondrocyte markers like Col2a1, agc, and Sox9 whereas the expression of the fibrocartilage marker Collagen I (Col I) and of the hypertrophy marker Collagen X (Col X) is minimal. Additionally, Col VI-expanded chondrocytes show a similar potential to untreated chondrocytes in engineering cartilage in 3D biomimetic hydrogel constructs. Our study has, therefore, identified soluble Col VI as a biologic that can be useful for the expansion and utilization of scarce sources of chondrocytes, potentially for autologous chondrocyte implantation. Additionally, our results underscore the importance of further investigating the changes in chondrocyte PCM with age and disease and the subsequent effects on chondrocyte growth and function.

  4. Octacalcium phosphate crystals directly stimulate expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase through p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinases in articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Uzan, Benjamin; Rey, Christian; Lioté, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals, including hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and carbonate-apatite, have been associated with severe osteoarthritis and several degenerative arthropathies. Most studies have considered the chondrocyte to be a bystander in the pathogenesis of calcium crystal deposition disease, assuming that synovial cell cytokines were the only triggers of chondrocyte activation. In the present study we identified direct activation of articular chondrocytes by OCP crystals, which are the BCP crystals with the greatest potential for inducing inflammation. OCP crystals induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA expression by isolated articular chondrocytes and cartilage fragments, in a dose-dependent manner and with variations over time. OCP crystals also induced IL-1β mRNA expression. Using pharmacological and cytokine inhibitors, we observed that OCP crystals induced NO production and inducible NOS mRNA activation were regulated at both the transcriptional and the translational levels; were independent from IL-1β gene activation; and involved p38 and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, as further confirmed by OCP crystal-induced p38 and JNK MAPK phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that the transcriptional inducible NOS response to OCP crystals involved both the p38 and the JNK MAPK pathways, probably under the control of activator protein-1. NO, a major mediator of cartilage degradation, can be directly produced by BCP crystals in chondrocytes. Together with synovial activation, this direct mechanism may be important in the pathogenesis of destructive arthropathies triggered by microcrystals. PMID:16207333

  5. Measuring microscale strain fields in articular cartilage during rapid impact reveals thresholds for chondrocyte death and a protective role for the superficial layer

    PubMed Central

    Bartell, Lena R.; Fortier, Lisa A.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a heterogeneous soft tissue that dissipates and distributes loads in mammalian joints. Though robust, cartilage is susceptible to damage from loading at high rates or magnitudes. Such injurious loads have been implicated in degenerative changes, including chronic osteoarthritis (OA), which remains a leading cause of disability in developed nations. Despite decades of research, mechanisms of OA initiation after trauma remain poorly understood. Indeed, although bulk cartilage mechanics are measurable during impact, current techniques cannot access microscale mechanics at those rapid time scales. We aimed to address this knowledge gap by imaging the microscale mechanics and corresponding acute biological changes of cartilage in response to rapid loading. In this study, we utilized fast-camera and confocal microscopy to achieve roughly 85 μm spatial resolution of the cartilage deformation during a rapid (~3 ms), localized impact and the chondrocyte death following impact. Our results showed that, at these high rates, strain and chondrocyte death were highly correlated (p<0.001) with a threshold of 8% microscale strain norm before any cell death occurred. Additionally, chondrocyte death had developed by two hours after impact, suggesting a time frame for clinical therapeutics. Moreover, when the superficial layer was removed, strain – and subsequently chondrocyte death – penetrated deeper into the samples (p<0.001), suggesting a protective role for the superficial layer of articular cartilage. Combined, these results provide insight regarding the detailed biomechanics that drive early chondrocyte damage after trauma and emphasize the importance of understanding cartilage and its mechanics on the microscale. PMID:26150096

  6. Berberine induces dedifferentiation by actin cytoskeleton reorganization via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase pathways in rabbit articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Cho, Hongsik; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Chung, Ki-Wha; Seo, Sung-Yum

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a nonrheumatologic joint disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid used in traditional Chinese medicine, the majority of which is extracted from Huang Lian (Coptis chinensis). Although numerous studies have revealed the anticancer activity of BBR, its effects on normal cells, such as chondrocytes, and the molecular mechanisms underlying its actions remain elusive. Therefore, we examined the effects of BBR on rabbit articular chondrocytes, and the underlying molecular mechanisms, focusing on actin cytoskeletal reorganization. BBR induced dedifferentiation by inhibiting activation of phosphoinositide-3(PI3)-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 kinase and PI3-kinase/Akt with SB203580 and LY294002, respectively, accelerated the BBR-induced dedifferentiation. BBR also caused actin cytoskeletal architecture reorganization and, therefore, we investigated if these effects were involved in the dedifferentiation. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D reversed the BBR-induced dedifferentiation by activating PI3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase. In contrast, the induction of actin filament aggregation by jasplakinolide accelerated the BBR-induced dedifferentiation via PI3-kinase/Akt inhibition and p38 kinase activation. Taken together, these data suggest that BBR strongly induces dedifferentiation, and actin cytoskeletal reorganization is a crucial requirement for this effect. Furthermore, the dedifferentiation activity of BBR appears to be mediated via PI3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase pathways in rabbit articular chondrocytes. PMID:26851252

  7. Considerations on the use of ear chondrocytes as donor chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Van Osch, Gerjo J V M; Mandl, Erik W; Jahr, Holger; Koevoet, Wendy; Nolst-Trenité, Gilbert; Verhaar, Jan A N

    2004-01-01

    Articular cartilage is often used for research on cartilage tissue engineering. However, ear cartilage is easier to harvest, with less donor-site morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adult human ear chondrocytes were capable of producing cartilage after expansion in monolayer culture. Cell yield per gram of cartilage was twice as high for ear than for articular cartilage. Moreover, ear chondrocytes proliferated faster. Cell proliferation could be further stimulated by the use of serum-free medium with Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) in stead of medium with 10% serum. To evaluate chondrogenic capacity, multiplied chondrocytes were suspended in alginate and implanted subcutaneously in athymic mice. After 8 weeks the constructs demonstrated a proteoglycan-rich matrix that contained collagen type II. Constructs of ear chondrocytes showed a faint staining for elastin. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that expression of collagen type II was 2-fold upregulated whereas expression of collagen type I was 2-fold down regulated in ear chondrocytes expanded in serum-free medium with FGF2 compared to serum-containing medium. Expression of alkaline phosphatase and collagen type X were low indicating the absence of terminal differentiation. We conclude that ear chondrocytes can be used as donor chondrocytes for cartilage tissue engineering. Furthermore, it may proof to be a promising alternative cell source to engineer cartilage for articular repair.

  8. Passaged Adult Chondrocytes Can Form Engineered Cartilage with Functional Mechanical Properties: A Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kenneth W.; Lima, Eric G.; Bian, Liming; O'Conor, Christopher J.; Jayabalan, Prakash S.; Stoker, Aaron M.; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Cook, James L.

    2010-01-01

    It was hypothesized that previously optimized serum-free culture conditions for juvenile bovine chondrocytes could be adapted to generate engineered cartilage with physiologic mechanical properties in a preclinical, adult canine model. Primary or passaged (using growth factors) adult chondrocytes from three adult dogs were encapsulated in agarose, and cultured in serum-free media with transforming growth factor-β3. After 28 days in culture, engineered cartilage formed by primary chondrocytes exhibited only small increases in glycosaminoglycan content. However, all passaged chondrocytes on day 28 elaborated a cartilage matrix with compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan content in the range of native adult canine cartilage values. A preliminary biocompatibility study utilizing chondral and osteochondral constructs showed no gross or histological signs of rejection, with all implanted constructs showing excellent integration with surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. This study demonstrates that adult canine chondrocytes can form a mechanically functional, biocompatible engineered cartilage tissue under optimized culture conditions. The encouraging findings of this work highlight the potential for tissue engineering strategies using adult chondrocytes in the clinical treatment of cartilage defects. PMID:19845465

  9. Passaged adult chondrocytes can form engineered cartilage with functional mechanical properties: a canine model.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth W; Lima, Eric G; Bian, Liming; O'Conor, Christopher J; Jayabalan, Prakash S; Stoker, Aaron M; Kuroki, Keiichi; Cook, Cristi R; Ateshian, Gerard A; Cook, James L; Hung, Clark T

    2010-03-01

    It was hypothesized that previously optimized serum-free culture conditions for juvenile bovine chondrocytes could be adapted to generate engineered cartilage with physiologic mechanical properties in a preclinical, adult canine model. Primary or passaged (using growth factors) adult chondrocytes from three adult dogs were encapsulated in agarose, and cultured in serum-free media with transforming growth factor-beta3. After 28 days in culture, engineered cartilage formed by primary chondrocytes exhibited only small increases in glycosaminoglycan content. However, all passaged chondrocytes on day 28 elaborated a cartilage matrix with compressive properties and glycosaminoglycan content in the range of native adult canine cartilage values. A preliminary biocompatibility study utilizing chondral and osteochondral constructs showed no gross or histological signs of rejection, with all implanted constructs showing excellent integration with surrounding cartilage and subchondral bone. This study demonstrates that adult canine chondrocytes can form a mechanically functional, biocompatible engineered cartilage tissue under optimized culture conditions. The encouraging findings of this work highlight the potential for tissue engineering strategies using adult chondrocytes in the clinical treatment of cartilage defects.

  10. Adult equine bone marrow stromal cells produce a cartilage-like ECM mechanically superior to animal-matched adult chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kopesky, P W; Lee, H-Y; Vanderploeg, E J; Kisiday, J D; Frisbie, D D; Plaas, A H K; Ortiz, C; Grodzinsky, A J

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the age-dependent mechanical phenotype of bone marrow stromal cell- (BMSC-) and chondrocyte-produced cartilage-like neo-tissue and to elucidate the matrix-associated mechanisms which generate this phenotype. Cells from both immature (2-4 month-old foals) and skeletally-mature (2-5 year-old adults) mixed-breed horses were isolated from animal-matched bone marrow and cartilage tissue, encapsulated in self-assembling-peptide hydrogels, and cultured with and without TGF-beta1 supplementation. BMSCs and chondrocytes from both donor ages were encapsulated with high viability. BMSCs from both ages produced neo-tissue with higher mechanical stiffness than that produced by either young or adult chondrocytes. Young, but not adult, chondrocytes proliferated in response to TGF-beta1 while BMSCs from both age groups proliferated with TGF-beta1. Young chondrocytes stimulated by TGF-beta1 accumulated ECM with 10-fold higher sulfated-glycosaminoglycan content than adult chondrocytes and 2-3-fold higher than BMSCs of either age. The opposite trend was observed for hydroxyproline content, with BMSCs accumulating 2-3-fold more than chondrocytes, independent of age. Size-exclusion chromatography of extracted proteoglycans showed that an aggrecan-like peak was the predominant sulfated proteoglycan for all cell types. Direct measurement of aggrecan core protein length and chondroitin sulfate chain length by single molecule atomic force microscopy imaging revealed that, independent of age, BMSCs produced longer core protein and longer chondroitin sulfate chains, and fewer short core protein molecules than chondrocytes, suggesting that the BMSC-produced aggrecan has a phenotype more characteristic of young tissue than chondrocyte-produced aggrecan. Aggrecan ultrastructure, ECM composition, and cellular proliferation combine to suggest a mechanism by which BMSCs produce a superior cartilage-like neo-tissue than either young or adult chondrocytes. PMID:20153827

  11. Bone-forming capacity of adult human nasal chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pippenger, Benjamin E; Ventura, Manuela; Pelttari, Karoliina; Feliciano, Sandra; Jaquiery, Claude; Scherberich, Arnaud; Walboomers, X Frank; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Nasal chondrocytes (NC) derive from the same multipotent embryological segment that gives rise to the majority of the maxillofacial bone and have been reported to differentiate into osteoblast-like cells in vitro. In this study, we assessed the capacity of adult human NC, appropriately primed towards hypertrophic or osteoblastic differentiation, to form bone tissue in vivo. Hypertrophic induction of NC-based micromass pellets formed mineralized cartilaginous tissues rich in type X collagen, but upon implantation into subcutaneous pockets of nude mice remained avascular and reverted to stable hyaline-cartilage. In the same ectopic environment, NC embedded into ceramic scaffolds and primed with osteogenic medium only sporadically formed intramembranous bone tissue. A clonal study could not demonstrate that the low bone formation efficiency was related to a possibly small proportion of cells competent to become fully functional osteoblasts. We next tested whether the cues present in an orthotopic environment could induce a more efficient direct osteoblastic transformation of NC. Using a nude rat calvarial defect model, we demonstrated that (i) NC directly participated in frank bone formation and (ii) the efficiency of survival and bone formation by NC was significantly higher than that of reference osteogenic cells, namely bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. This study provides a proof-of-principle that NC have the plasticity to convert into bone cells and thereby represent an easily available cell source to be further investigated for craniofacial bone regeneration. PMID:25689393

  12. Synoviocyte Derived-Extracellular Matrix Enhances Human Articular Chondrocyte Proliferation and Maintains Re-Differentiation Capacity at Both Low and Atmospheric Oxygen Tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Thomas J.; Dennis, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current tissue engineering methods are insufficient for total joint resurfacing, and chondrocytes undergo de-differentiation when expanded on tissue culture plastic. De-differentiated chondrocytes show poor re-differentiation in culture, giving reduced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen matrix accumulation. To address this, porcine synoviocyte-derived extracellular matrix and low (5%) oxygen tension were assessed for their ability to enhance human articular chondrocyte expansion and maintain re-differentiation potential. Methods Porcine synoviocyte matrices were devitalized using 3 non-detergent methods. These devitalized synoviocyte matrices were compared against tissue culture plastic for their ability to support human chondrocyte expansion. Expansion was further compared at both low (5%), and atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension on all surfaces. Expanded cells then underwent chondrogenic re-differentiation in aggregate culture at both low and atmospheric oxygen tension. Aggregates were assessed for their GAG and collagen content both biochemically and histologically. Results Human chondrocytes expanded twice as fast on devitalized synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic, and cells retained their re-differentiation capacity for twice the number of population doublings. There was no significant difference in growth rate between low and atmospheric oxygen tension. There was significantly less collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan and more MMP13 expression in cells expanded on synoviocyte matrix vs. tissue culture plastic. There were also significant effects due to oxygen tension on gene expression, wherein there was greater collagen type I, collagen type II, SOX9 and less MMP13 expression on tissue culture plastic compared to synoviocyte matrix. There was a significant increase in GAG, but not collagen, accumulation in chondrocyte aggregates re-differentiated at low oxygen tension over that achieved in atmospheric oxygen conditions. Conclusions

  13. A Review of the Combination of Experimental Measurements and Fibril-Reinforced Modeling for Investigation of Articular Cartilage and Chondrocyte Response to Loading

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Wouter; Isaksson, Hanna; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Herzog, Walter; Korhonen, Rami K.

    2013-01-01

    The function of articular cartilage depends on its structure and composition, sensitively impaired in disease (e.g. osteoarthritis, OA). Responses of chondrocytes to tissue loading are modulated by the structure. Altered cell responses as an effect of OA may regulate cartilage mechanotransduction and cell biosynthesis. To be able to evaluate cell responses and factors affecting the onset and progression of OA, local tissue and cell stresses and strains in cartilage need to be characterized. This is extremely challenging with the presently available experimental techniques and therefore computational modeling is required. Modern models of articular cartilage are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, and they include many aspects of the real tissue structure and composition. In this paper, we provide an overview of the computational applications that have been developed for modeling the mechanics of articular cartilage at the tissue and cellular level. We concentrate on the use of fibril-reinforced models of cartilage. Furthermore, we introduce practical considerations for modeling applications, including also experimental tests that can be combined with the modeling approach. At the end, we discuss the prospects for patient-specific models when aiming to use finite element modeling analysis and evaluation of articular cartilage function, cellular responses, failure points, OA progression, and rehabilitation. PMID:23653665

  14. Withaferin A-Caused Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species Modulates Apoptosis via PI3K/Akt and JNKinase in Rabbit Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Withaferin A (WFA) is known as a constituent of Ayurvedic medicinal plant, Withania somnifera, and has been used for thousands of years. Although WFA has been used for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) and has a wide range of biochemical and pharmacologic activities, there are no findings suggesting its properties on chondrocytes or cartilage. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of WFA on apoptosis with focus on generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we showed that WFA significantly increased the generation of intracellular ROS in a dose-dependent manner. We also determined that WFA markedly leads to apoptosis as evidenced by accumulation of p53 by Western blot analysis. N-Acetyl-L-Cystein (NAC), an antioxidant, prevented WFA-caused expression of p53 and inhibited apoptosis of chondrocytes. We also found that WFA causes the activation of PI3K/Akt and JNKinase. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt and JNKinase with LY294002 (LY)/triciribine (TB) or SP600125 (SP) in WFA-treated cells reduced accumulation of p53 and inhibited fragmented DNA. Our findings suggested that apoptosis caused by WFA-induced intracellular ROS generation is regulated through PI3K/Akt and JNKinase in rabbit articular chondrocytes. Graphical Abstract PMID:25120312

  15. Effects of hexosamines and omega-3/omega-6 fatty acids on pH regulation by interleukin 1-treated isolated bovine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Amanda L; Wilkins, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Previous work has shown that interleukin 1 (IL-1) increases the activity of acid extruders in articular chondrocytes, while the H+-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) inhibitor bafilomycin can prevent aggrecanase-mediated cartilage degradation. The H+ transport induced by IL-1 may therefore be required for proteinase activity. In the present study, the effects of hexosamines and fish oils on H+-ATPase activity have been characterised for isolated bovine articular chondrocytes. Cells isolated in the presence of IL-1 were acidified, and the fraction of acid extrusion mediated by Na+-H+ exchange and an H+-ATPase were determined using specific inhibitors. Exposure to IL-1 significantly enhanced both components of acid extrusion. Co-incubation with glucosamine or mannosamine attenuated the H+-ATPase fraction of efflux. The addition of glucosamine at 9 h after exposure to IL-1--when H+-ATPase activation is already apparent--was also able to abolish H+-ATPase activity, implying that hexosamines do not exert effects at the level of protein synthesis. Co-incubation with the glucose transport inhibitor phloretin elicited similar effects to the hexosamines, suggesting that modulation of adenosine triphosphate levels may underlie their effects on H+-ATPase function. The omega-3 fish oil linolenic acid but not the omega-6 fish oil linoleic acid reduced H+-ATPase activity to levels seen in IL-1-untreated cells, although total efflux remained elevated, as a result of an enhanced H+ leak. These observations support a model whereby IL-1 stimulates an H+-ATPase-dependent system, possibly involved in aggrecanase activation, which appears to be one of the target mechanisms interrupted by dietary supplements reported to have symptom-modifying effects on osteoarthritis.

  16. Human stem cells and articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Inui, Atsuyuki; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-11-05

    The regeneration of articular cartilage damaged due to trauma and posttraumatic osteoarthritis is an unmet medical need. Current approaches to regeneration and tissue engineering of articular cartilage include the use of chondrocytes, stem cells, scaffolds and signals, including morphogens and growth factors. Stem cells, as a source of cells for articular cartilage regeneration, are a critical factor for articular cartilage regeneration. This is because articular cartilage tissue has a low cell turnover and does not heal spontaneously. Adult stem cells have been isolated from various tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose, synovial tissue, muscle and periosteum. Signals of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily play critical roles in chondrogenesis. However, adult stem cells derived from various tissues tend to differ in their chondrogenic potential. Pluripotent stem cells have unlimited proliferative capacity compared to adult stem cells. Chondrogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells has been studied for more than a decade. However, establishment of ES cells requires embryos and leads to ethical issues for clinical applications. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated by cellular reprogramming of adult cells by transcription factors. Although iPS cells have chondrogenic potential, optimization, generation and differentiation toward articular chondrocytes are currently under intense investigation.

  17. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset Still's disease.

    PubMed

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes.

  18. Depth-varying density and organization of chondrocytes in immature and mature bovine articular cartilage assessed by 3d imaging and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadin, Kyle D.; Wong, Benjamin L.; Bae, Won C.; Li, Kelvin W.; Williamson, Amanda K.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Price, Jeffrey H.; Sah, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a heterogeneous tissue, with cell density and organization varying with depth from the surface. The objectives of the present study were to establish a method for localizing individual cells in three-dimensional (3D) images of cartilage and quantifying depth-associated variation in cellularity and cell organization at different stages of growth. Accuracy of nucleus localization was high, with 99% sensitivity relative to manual localization. Cellularity (million cells per cm3) decreased from 290, 310, and 150 near the articular surface in fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, to 120, 110, and 50 at a depth of 1.0 mm. The distance/angle to the nearest neighboring cell was 7.9 microm/31 degrees , 7.1 microm/31 degrees , and 9.1 microm/31 degrees for cells at the articular surface of fetal, calf, and adult samples, respectively, and increased/decreased to 11.6 microm/31 degrees , 12.0 microm/30 degrees , and 19.2 microm/25 degrees at a depth of 0.7 mm. The methodologies described here may be useful for analyzing the 3D cellular organization of cartilage during growth, maturation, aging, degeneration, and regeneration.

  19. Calcium input potentiates the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-dependent signaling to promote the export of inorganic pyrophosphate by articular chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Cailotto, Frederic; Reboul, Pascal; Sebillaud, Sylvie; Netter, Patrick; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Bianchi, Arnaud

    2011-06-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 stimulates extracellular PP(i) (ePP(i)) generation and promotes chondrocalcinosis, which also occurs secondary to hyperparathyroidism-induced hypercalcemia. We previously demonstrated that ANK was up-regulated by TGF-β1 activation of ERK1/2 and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C (PKCα). Thus, we investigated mechanisms by which calcium could affect ePP(i) metabolism, especially its main regulating proteins ANK and PC-1 (plasma cell membrane glycoprotein-1). We stimulated articular chondrocytes with TGF-β1 under extracellular (eCa(2+)) or cytosolic Ca(2+) (cCa(2+)) modulations. We studied ANK, PC-1 expression (quantitative RT-PCR, Western blotting), ePP(i) levels (radiometric assay), and cCa(2+) input (fluorescent probe). Voltage-operated Ca(2+)-channels (VOC) and signaling pathways involved were investigated with selective inhibitors. Finally, Ank promoter activity was evaluated (gene reporter). TGF-β1 elevated cCa(2+) and ePP(i) levels (by up-regulating Ank and PC-1 mRNA/proteins) in an eCa(2+) dose-dependent manner. TGF-β1 effects were suppressed by cCa(2+) chelation or L- and T-VOC blockade while being mostly reproduced by ionomycin. In the same experimental conditions, the activation of Ras, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PKCα, and the stimulation of Ank promoter activity were affected similarly. Activation of SP1 (specific protein 1) and ELK-1 (Ets-like protein-1) transcription factors supported the regulatory role of Ca(2+). SP1 or ELK-1 overexpression or blockade experiments demonstrated a major contribution of ELK-1, which acted synergistically with SP1 to activate Ank promoter in response to TGF-β1. TGF-β1 promotes input of eCa(2+) through opening of L- and T-VOCs, to potentiate ERK1/2 and PKCα signaling cascades, resulting in an enhanced activation of Ank promoter and ePP(i) production in chondrocyte.

  20. Epidemiology and outcome of articular complications in adult onset still's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoudhi, Madiha; Shimi, Rafik; Turki, Sami; Kheder, Adel

    2015-01-01

    The adult onset Still's disease is a rare inflammatory pathology of unknown pathogeny. The clinical features are variable. The diagnosis is difficult since exclusion of infectious, systemic and tumoral pathologies should be done. The articular complications are frequent and can be revelatory of this pathology. The articular prognosis depends on the diagnosis delay and the treatment efficiency. Our study aims to analyze different aspects of articular manifestations complicating adult onset Still disease to define epidemiological, clinical and evolving characteristics of these complications. It was a cross-sectional study concerning 18 cases of adult onset Still disease diagnosed from 1990 to 2014 in the internal medicine A department of Charles Nicolle Hospital in Tunis, meeting Yamaguchi criteria. We identified clinical, radiological, evolving and therapeutic profile of the articular manifestations occurred in these patients. There were 11 women and 7 men. The average age was 27 years. The arthralgias were reported in all cases; while, the arthritis interested thirteen patients. A hand deformation was found in four patients. A wrist ankylosis was noted in one case and a flexion elbow in one patient. The Standard articular radiographs were normal in ten cases. The treatment associated essentially non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and/or corticosteroids and/or methotrexate. Concerning the evolving profile, the monocyclic form was present in 25% of the cases, the intermittent form in 40% and the chronic articular form in 35% of our patients. The adult onset Still's disease is rare and heterogeneous. The articular disturbances are frequent and have various outcomes. PMID:26834930

  1. PEO-PPO-PEO Carriers for rAAV-Mediated Transduction of Human Articular Chondrocytes in Vitro and in a Human Osteochondral Defect Model.

    PubMed

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Frisch, Janina; Venkatesan, Jagadesh Kumar; Schmitt, Gertrud; Rial-Hermida, Isabel; Taboada, Pablo; Concheiro, Angel; Madry, Henning; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-08-17

    Gene therapy is an attractive strategy for the durable treatment of human osteoarthritis (OA), a gradual, irreversible joint disease. Gene carriers based on the small human adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibit major efficacy in modifying damaged human articular cartilage in situ over extended periods of time. Yet, clinical application of recombinant AAV (rAAV) vectors remains complicated by the presence of neutralizing antibodies against viral capsid elements in a majority of patients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of delivering rAAV vectors to human OA chondrocytes in vitro and in an experimental model of osteochondral defect via polymeric micelles to protect gene transfer from experimental neutralization. Interaction of rAAV with micelles of linear (poloxamer PF68) or X-shaped (poloxamine T908) poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) copolymers (PEO-PPO-PEO micelles) was characterized by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. Micelle encapsulation allowed an increase in both the stability and bioactivity of rAAV vectors and promoted higher levels of safe transgene (lacZ) expression both in vitro and in experimental osteochondral defects compared with that of free vector treatment without detrimental effects on the biological activity of the cells or their phenotype. Remarkably, protection against antibody neutralization was also afforded when delivering rAAV via PEO-PPO-PEO micelles in all systems evaluated, especially when using T908. Altogether, these findings show the potential of PEO-PPO-PEO micelles as effective tools to improve current gene-based treatments for human OA.

  2. The SOD mimic MnTM-2-PyP(5+) reduces hyaluronan degradation-induced inflammation in mouse articular chondrocytes stimulated with Fe (II) plus ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Campo, Giuseppe M; Avenoso, Angela; D'Ascola, Angela; Scuruchi, Michele; Nastasi, Giancarlo; Micali, Antonio; Puzzolo, Domenico; Pisani, Antonina; Calatroni, Alberto; Campo, Salvatore

    2013-08-01

    In pathological conditions, oxidative burst generates hyaluronan (HA) fragmentation with a consequent increase in the number of small HA oligosaccharides. These fragments are able to stimulate an inflammatory response in different cell types by activating the CD44 and the toll-like receptors 4 (TLR-4) and 2 (TLR-2). The stimulation of CD44 and TLRs in turn activates the NF-kB which induces the production of several pro-inflammatory mediators that amplify and perpetuate inflammation. We aimed to study the antioxidant effect of the SOD mimic, synthetic manganese porphyrin, Mn(III) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-2-yl)porphyrin (MnTM-2-PyP(5+)) on preventing HA degradation in mouse articular chondrocytes stimulated with Fe (II) plus ascorbate. Fe (II) plus ascorbate stimulation induced oxidative burst confirmed by high levels of hydroxyl radical/peroxynitrite production, increased lipid peroxidation and HA degradation. HA fragments highly induced mRNA expression and the related protein production of CD44, TLR-4 and TLR-2, NF-kB activation and significantly up-regulated the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and other pro-inflammatory mediators, i.e. matrix metalloprotease 13 (MMP-13) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Treatment of cells with MnTM-2-PyP(5+)was able to attenuate oxidative burst, HA degradation and NF-kB activation, and markedly decreased mRNA expression of CD44, and TLRs and the related protein synthesis, as well as the levels of up-regulated inflammatory mediators. Adding a specific HA-blocking peptide (PEP-1) to cells significantly reduced all the inflammatory parameters up-regulated by Fe (II) plus ascorbate, and increased MnTM-2-PyP(5+) activity. These findings suggest that HA degradation plays a key role in the initial inflammatory response of cartilage and antioxidants and could be a useful tool to prevent the propagation of this mechanism. PMID:23692848

  3. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina), Willow Bark (Salix alba), and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica) Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Allaway, David; Nebrich, Simone; Mobasheri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina), willow bark (Salix alba), and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG), β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles. PMID:22474508

  4. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina), Willow Bark (Salix alba), and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica) Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Allaway, David; Nebrich, Simone; Mobasheri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina), willow bark (Salix alba), and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG), β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles.

  5. Development of high-throughput perfusion-based microbioreactor platform capable of providing tunable dynamic tensile loading to cells and its application for the study of bovine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Hsin-Yao; Liu, Heng-Liang; Wang, Shih-Siou; Liu, Yen-Ting; Chen, Yan-Ming; Tsai, Shiao-Wen; Lin, Chun-Li

    2011-08-01

    Mammalian cells are sensitive to extracellular microenvironments. In order to precisely explore the physiological responses of cells to tensile loading, a stable and well-defined culture condition is required. In this study, a high-throughput perfusion-based microbioreactor platform capable of providing dynamic equibiaxial tensile loading to the cultured cells under a steady culture condition was proposed. The mechanism of generating tensile stimulation to cells is based on the pneumatically-driven deformation of an elastic polydimethylsiloxan (PDMS) membrane which exerts tensile loading to the attached cells. By modulating the magnitude and frequency of the applied pneumatic pressure, various tensile loading can be generated in a controllable manner. In this study, the microbioreactor platform was designed with the aid of the experimentally-validated finite element (FE) analysis to ensure the loading of tensile strain to cells is uniform and definable. Based on this design, the quantitative relationship between the applied pneumatic pressure and the generated tensile strain on the PDMS membrane was established via FE analysis. Results demonstrated that the proposed device was able to generate the tensile strain range (0~0.12), which covers the physiological condition that articular chondrocytes experience tensile strain under human walking condition. In this study, moreover, the effect of tensile loading on the metabolic, biosynthetic and proliferation activities of articular chondrocytes was investigated. Results disclosed that the dynamic tensile loading of 0.12 strain at 1 Hz might significantly up-regulate the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans while such stimulation was found no significant influence on the metabolic activity, the synthesis of collagen, and the proliferation of chondrocytes. Overall, this study has presented a high throughput perfusion micro cell culture device that is suitable for precisely exploring the effect of tensile loading on cell

  6. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jieun; Taylor, Sarah E. B.; Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice; Maloney, William J.; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of human cartilage is inherently inefficient; an abundant autologous source, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), is therefore attractive for engineering cartilage. We report a growth factor-based protocol for differentiating hiPSCs into articular-like chondrocytes (hiChondrocytes) within 2 weeks, with an overall efficiency >90%. The hiChondrocytes are stable and comparable to adult articular chondrocytes in global gene expression, extracellular matrix production, and ability to generate cartilage tissue in vitro and in immune-deficient mice. Molecular characterization identified an early SRY (sex-determining region Y) box (Sox)9low cluster of differentiation (CD)44lowCD140low prechondrogenic population during hiPSC differentiation. In addition, 2 distinct Sox9-regulated gene networks were identified in the Sox9low and Sox9high populations providing novel molecular insights into chondrogenic fate commitment and differentiation. Our findings present a favorable method for generating hiPSC-derived articular-like chondrocytes. The hiChondrocytes are an attractive cell source for cartilage engineering because of their abundance, autologous nature, and potential to generate articular-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage. In addition, hiChondrocytes can be excellent tools for modeling human musculoskeletal diseases in a dish and for rapid drug screening.—Lee, J., Taylor, S. E. B., Smeriglio, P., Lai, J., Maloney, W. J., Yang, F., Bhutani, N. Early induction of a prechondrogenic population allows efficient generation of stable chondrocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25911615

  7. The Chondrogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Cells and Chondrocytes from Osteoarthritic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Agar, Gabriel; Blumenstein, Sara; Bar-Ziv, Yaron; Kardosh, Rami; Schrift-Tzadok, Michal; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Fischler, Tali; Goldschmid, Revital; Yayon, Avner

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The multipotential nature of stem or progenitor cells apparently makes them the ideal choice for any cell therapy, but this as yet remains to be proven. This study (30 subjects) was designed to compare the potential to repair articular cartilage of chondrocytes taken from different regions in osteoarthritic cartilage with that of mesenchymal stem cells prepared from bone marrow of the same subject. Design: Cartilage biopsies, bone marrow, and blood samples were taken from each of 30 individuals with chronic osteoarthritis (aged 62-85 years) undergoing total knee replacement. The chondrogenic potential of chondrocytes isolated from cartilage biopsies taken from different regions of osteoarthritic cartilage was compared with that of mesenchymal cells by quantitative analysis of several chondrocyte specific markers and an ex vivo cartilage differentiation assay. Results: Cartilage-derived articular chondrocytes are superior to bone marrow–derived cells when compared for their ex vivo chondrogenic potential. Interestingly, there was marked and significant difference in the expression of chondrocytic markers between chondrocytes derived from adjacent, visually distinct regions of the diseased cartilage. When cultured in the presence of a fibroblast growth factor 2 variant, all cell samples from both tissues showed a high degree of chondrogenic potential. Conclusions: Although bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, when supplemented with the appropriate chondrogenic factors, are a suitable source for autologous cartilage implantation, adult chondroprogenitor cells, particularly those from moderately affected regions of the osteoarthritic joints, demonstrate superior chondrogenic potential. PMID:26069568

  8. Chondrocyte Apoptosis in the Pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Hyun Sook; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a highly-regulated, active process of cell death involved in development, homeostasis and aging. Dysregulation of apoptosis leads to pathological states, such as cancer, developmental anomalies and degenerative diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common chronic joint disease in the elderly population, is characterized by progressive destruction of articular cartilage, resulting in significant disability. Because articular cartilage depends solely on its resident cells, the chondrocytes, for the maintenance of extracellular matrix, the compromising of chondrocyte function and survival would lead to the failure of the articular cartilage. The role of subchondral bone in the maintenance of proper cartilage matrix has been suggested as well, and it has been proposed that both articular cartilage and subchondral bone interact with each other in the maintenance of articular integrity and physiology. Some investigators include both articular cartilage and subchondral bone as targets for repairing joint degeneration. In late-stage OA, the cartilage becomes hypocellular, often accompanied by lacunar emptying, which has been considered as evidence that chondrocyte death is a central feature in OA progression. Apoptosis clearly occurs in osteoarthritic cartilage; however, the relative contribution of chondrocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of OA is difficult to evaluate, and contradictory reports exist on the rate of apoptotic chondrocytes in osteoarthritic cartilage. It is not clear whether chondrocyte apoptosis is the inducer of cartilage degeneration or a byproduct of cartilage destruction. Chondrocyte death and matrix loss may form a vicious cycle, with the progression of one aggravating the other, and the literature reveals that there is a definite correlation between the degree of cartilage damage and chondrocyte apoptosis. Because current treatments for OA act only on symptoms and do not prevent or cure OA, chondrocyte apoptosis would be a valid

  9. Native Chondrocyte Viability during Cartilage Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Kumkum; McRury, Ian D.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Morgan, Roy E.; Augé, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Early surgical intervention for articular cartilage disease is desirable before full-thickness lesions develop. As early intervention treatments are designed, native chondrocyte viability at the treatment site before intervention becomes an important parameter to consider. The purpose of this study is to evaluate native chondrocyte viability in a series of specimens demonstrating the progression of articular cartilage lesions to determine if the chondrocyte viability profile changes during the evolution of articular cartilage disease to the level of surface fibrillation. Design: Osteochondral specimens demonstrating various degrees of articular cartilage damage were obtained from patients undergoing knee total joint replacement. Three groups were created within a patient harvest based on visual and tactile cues commonly encountered during surgical intervention: group 1, visually and tactilely intact surfaces; group 2, visually intact, tactilely soft surfaces; and group 3, surface fibrillation. Confocal laser microscopy was performed following live/dead cell viability staining. Results: Groups 1 to 3 demonstrated viable chondrocytes in all specimens, even within the fibrillated portions of articular cartilage, with little to no evidence of dead chondrocytes. Chondrocyte viability profile in articular cartilage does not appear to change as disease lesion progresses from normal to surface fibrillation. Conclusions: Fibrillated partial-thickness articular cartilage lesions are a good therapeutic target for early intervention. These lesions retain a high profile of viable chondrocytes and are readily diagnosed by visual and tactile cues during surgery. Early intervention should be based on matrix failure rather than on more aggressive procedures that further corrupt the matrix and contribute to chondrocyte necrosis of contiguous untargeted cartilage. PMID:26069561

  10. Articular-cartilage matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein. Characterization and immunolocalization.

    PubMed Central

    Loeser, R; Carlson, C S; Tulli, H; Jerome, W G; Miller, L; Wallin, R

    1992-01-01

    Matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla)-containing protein (MGP) was found to be present in articular cartilage by Western-blot analysis of guanidinium chloride extracts of human and bovine cartilage and was further localized by immunohistochemical studies on human and monkey specimens. In newborn articular cartilage MGP was present diffusely throughout the matrix, whereas in growth-plate cartilage it was seen mainly in late hypertrophic and calcifying-zone chondrocytes. In adult articular cartilage MGP was present primarily in chondrocytes and the pericellular matrix. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed an association between MGP and vesicular structures with an appearance consistent with matrix vesicles. MGP may be an important regulator of cartilage calcification because of its localization in cartilage and the known affinity of Gla-containing proteins for Ca2+ and hydroxyapatite. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1540125

  11. E74-like Factor 3 (ELF3) Impacts on Matrix Metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13) Transcriptional Control in Articular Chondrocytes under Proinflammatory Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Miguel; Plumb, Darren A.; Tsuchimochi, Kaneyuki; Dragomir, Cecilia L.; Hashimoto, Ko; Peng, Haibing; Olivotto, Eleonora; Bevilacqua, Michael; Tan, Lujian; Yang, Zhiyong; Zhan, Yumei; Oettgen, Peter; Li, Yefu; Marcu, Kenneth B.; Goldring, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 has a pivotal, rate-limiting function in cartilage remodeling and degradation due to its specificity for cleaving type II collagen. The proximal MMP13 promoter contains evolutionarily conserved E26 transformation-specific sequence binding sites that are closely flanked by AP-1 and Runx2 binding motifs, and interplay among these and other factors has been implicated in regulation by stress and inflammatory signals. Here we report that ELF3 directly controls MMP13 promoter activity by targeting an E26 transformation-specific sequence binding site at position −78 bp and by cooperating with AP-1. In addition, ELF3 binding to the proximal MMP13 promoter is enhanced by IL-1β stimulation in chondrocytes, and the IL-1β-induced MMP13 expression is inhibited in primary human chondrocytes by siRNA-ELF3 knockdown and in chondrocytes from Elf3−/− mice. Further, we found that MEK/ERK signaling enhances ELF3-driven MMP13 transactivation and is required for IL-1β-induced ELF3 binding to the MMP13 promoter, as assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Finally, we show that enhanced levels of ELF3 co-localize with MMP13 protein and activity in human osteoarthritic cartilage. These studies define a novel role for ELF3 as a procatabolic factor that may contribute to cartilage remodeling and degradation by regulating MMP13 gene transcription. PMID:22158614

  12. Delphinidin inhibits IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB by modulating the phosphorylation of IRAK-1Ser376 in human articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haseeb, Abdul; Chen, Dongxing

    2013-01-01

    Objective. In OA, there is enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β in the affected joint. Delphinidin, an anthocyanidin found in pigmented fruits and vegetables, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. In the present study we determined whether delphinidin would inhibit the IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB in human chondrocytes and determined the mechanism of its action. Methods. PGE2 levels and activation of NF-κB p65 in human OA chondrocytes were determined by ELISA-based assays. Protein expression of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and phosphorylation of kinases was determined by western immunoblotting. Expression level of mRNAs was determined by TaqMan assays. Results. Delphinidin inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2 in human chondrocytes. Delphinidin also inhibited IL-1β-mediated phosphorylation of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-1Ser376, phosphorylation of IKKα/β, expression of IKKβ, degradation of IκBα, and activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB/p65. Phosphorylation of TGF-β-activated kinase 1 was not observed but NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK) was phosphorylated and phosphorylation of NIK was blocked by delphinidin in IL-1β-treated human chondrocytes. Conclusion. These data identify delphinidin as a novel inhibitor of IL-1β-induced production of cartilage-degrading molecule PGE2 via inhibition of COX-2 expression and provide new insight into the mechanism of its action. Our results also identify inhibition of IRAK1Ser376 phosphorylation by delphinidin in IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB in human chondrocytes. Given the important role played by IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation, COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in OA, our results may have important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of OA. PMID:23392593

  13. Changes in permeability of rabbit articular cartilage caused by joint contracture as revealed by the peroxidase method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Ohta, N; Kawaji, W; Takata, K; Hirano, H

    1984-11-01

    Changes in permeability of adult rabbit articular cartilage caused by joint contracture were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy, employing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as an indicator. The knee joint was plaster-immobilized for 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8 weeks in the flexion position. One ml of 4% HRP was administered in the articular cavity of the knee joint and allowed to diffuse and permeate into the articular cartilage. Distribution of the permeated HRP was visualized in the cartilage taken from the lateral condyle of the femur, utilizing the DAB-H2O2 reaction. In the normal and the non-immobilized joints, the permeated HRP reached to the matrix and chondrocytes situated in the deep layer of the articular cartilage. HRP was heavily deposited in the intercellular matrices, particularly around the chondrocytes, and was actively endocytosed by these cells. In the plaster-immobilized joints, especially after 4 weeks or longer of immobilization, the administered HRP had not permeated well and was restricted to the surface (lamina splendens) and the superficial layer of the cartilage. These results show that administered HRP diffuses into the deep layer of the articular cartilage and is actively endocytosed by chondrocytes and that the permeability of articular cartilage is remarkably reduced by joint contracture. PMID:6532371

  14. Simvastatin inhibits CD44 fragmentation in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Terabe, Kenya; Takahashi, Nobunori; Takemoto, Toki; Knudson, Warren; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-08-15

    In human osteoarthritic chondrocytes, the hyaluronan receptor CD44 undergoes proteolytic cleavage at the cell surface. CD44 cleavage is thought to require transit of CD44 into cholesterol-rich lipid rafts. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether statins exert a protective effect on articular chondrocytes due to diminution of cholesterol. Three model systems of chondrocytes were examined including human HCS-2/8 chondrosarcoma cells, human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and normal bovine articular chondrocytes. Treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M resulted in a substantial increase in CD44 fragmentation in each of the three chondrocyte models. Pre-incubation with simvastatin prior to treatment with IL-1β + Oncostatin M decreased the level of CD44 fragmentation, decreased the proportion of CD44 that transits into the lipid raft fractions, decreased ADAM10 activity and diminished the interaction between CD44 and ADAM10. In HCS-2/8 cells and bovine articular chondrocytes, fragmentation of CD44 was blocked by the knockdown of ADAM10. Inhibition of CD44 fragmentation by simvastatin also resulted in improved retention of pericellular matrix. Addition of cholesterol and farnesyl-pyrophosphate reversed the protective effects of simvastatin. Thus, the addition of simvastatin exerts positive effects on chondrocytes including reduced CD44 fragmentation and enhanced the retention of pericellular matrix.

  15. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats’ articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway. PMID:26639318

  16. Prenatal caffeine exposure induces a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring rats via cholesterol accumulation in cartilage.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hanwen; Li, Jing; Cao, Hong; Tan, Yang; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-07

    Epidemiological investigations indicate that osteoarthritis is associated with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Our previous studies showed that prenatal caffeine exposure (PCE) induced chondrogenesis retardation in IUGR offspring rats. The current study sought to investigate the effects of PCE on male IUGR offspring rats' articular cartilage, and the mechanisms associated with abnormal cholesterol metabolism. Based on the results from both male fetal and adult fed a high-fat diet (HFD) studies of rats that experienced PCE (120 mg/kg.d), the results showed a poor quality of articular cartilage and cholesterol accumulation in the adult PCE group. Meanwhile, the serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations were increased in adult PCE offspring. We also observed lower expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and impaired cholesterol efflux in adult articular cartilage. Furthermore, the expression of cartilage functional genes, components of the IGF1 signaling pathway and cholesterol efflux pathway related genes were decreased in PCE fetal cartilage. In conclusion, PCE induced a poor quality of articular cartilage in male adult offspring fed a HFD. This finding was shown to be due to cholesterol accumulation in the cartilage, which may have resulted from intrauterine reduced activity of the IGF1 signaling pathway.

  17. The repair of full-thickness articular cartilage defects. Immune responses to reparative tissue formed by allogeneic growth plate chondrocyte implants

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabe, N.; Yoshinao, M. )

    1991-07-01

    Growth plate cartilage cultivated in vitro was attached with a fibrin clot to a full-thickness articular cartilage defect on knee joints in allogeneic New Zealand rabbits. The healing of the defects was assessed by gross examination, light microscopy, and immunologic analysis for 24 weeks. Immunologic assessment of cell-mediated immunity, cytotoxicity of a humoral antibody by a 51 chromium release assay, and immunofluorescence studies were carried out. During the first two weeks following grafting, healing was excellent in 11 of the 17 defects. From three to 24 weeks, 11 of 42 defects examined had good results. Host lymphocytes had accumulated around the allograft at two to 12 weeks. Most of the implanted cartilage grown in vitro died and was replaced by fibrous tissue. The immunologic studies suggested that the implanted cartilage began to degenerate two to three weeks after implantation partially because of a humoral immune response but more importantly because of cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  18. Application of stem cells for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Nathaniel S; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly organized tissue lacking self-regeneration capacity upon lesion. Current surgical intervention by application of in vitro-expanded autologous chondrocytes transplantation procedure is associated with several disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity and inferior fibrocartilage formation at the defect site. However, recent advancements in tissue engineering have provided notable strategies for stem cell-based therapies and articular cartilage tissue engineering. In this review, we discuss the current strategies to engineer cartilage tissues from adult stem cells and human embryonic stem cell-derived cells. The characteristics of adult stem cells, the microenvironmental control of cell fate determination, and the limitation imposed by the intrinsic nature of stem cells are discussed. The strategy to commit the stem cells for functional cartilage tissues in vivo is also discussed.

  19. Metabolic characteristics of in vitro cultured human chondrocytes in relation to the histopathologic grade of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bulstra, S K; Buurman, W A; Walenkamp, G H; Van der Linden, A J

    1989-05-01

    Isolated human chondrocytes derived from healthy and osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage were cultured in high density in a newly designed microculture system. The severity of OA was graded according to a modified histopathologic score originally described by Mankin et al. Chondrocytes from adult patients with OA showed 35S-sulphate and 3H-thymidine incorporation in vitro, which increased with severity of the disease through Mankin 11-12. Incorporation rapidly declined after Mankin 11-12. Both matrix synthesis and cell proliferation were strongly reduced in the severe grades of OA. Histologic examination of the newly formed cartilage was only possible if the chondrocytes were derived from less severe grades of OA. Microscopy showed healthy chondrocytes surrounded by newly synthesized matrix, which stained well with specific dyes, indicating the ability of the cells to synthesize normal matrix components. The phenotype of human articular chondrocytes, derived from different grades of OA, was maintained in a high-density culture system. The data suggest dysregulation of the cell metabolism in OA cartilage. The increased cell metabolism was directly related to the histopathologic grade of OA. PMID:2706860

  20. Epigenetic regulation in chondrocyte phenotype maintenance for cell-based cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li; Liang, Yujie; Ma, Bin; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2015-01-01

    Loss of hyaline chondrocyte phenotype during the monolayer culture in vitro is a major obstacle for cell-based articular cartilage repair. Increasing evidence implicates an important role of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype. DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs have all been shown to contribute to chondrocyte dedifferentiation and hypertrophy. Moreover, the interplay among epigenetic regulators forms a complicated epigenetic network in regulating chondrocyte dedifferentiation. This review provides a detailed overview of the epigenetic regulation in maintaining the chondrocyte phenotype for chondrocyte-based cartilage repair. PMID:26807163

  1. Monolayer expansion induces an oxidative metabolism and ROS in chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heywood, H.K. Lee, D.A.

    2008-08-22

    This study tests the hypothesis that articular chondrocytes shift from a characteristically glycolytic to an oxidative energy metabolism during population expansion in monolayer. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer under standard incubator conditions for up to 14 days. Cellular proliferation, oxygen consumption, lactate production, protein content, ROS generation and mitochondrial morphology were examined. Lactate release increased {approx}5-fold within 1 week, but this was limited to {approx}2-fold increase when normalized to cellular protein content. By contrast, per cell oxidative phosphorylation increased 98-fold in 1 week. The increase in oxidative phosphorylation was evident within 24 h, preceding cell proliferation and was associated with augmented reactive oxygen species generation. The autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure requires 14-21 days for population expansion. The alterations in metabolic phenotype we report within 7 days in vitro are thus pertinent to autologous chondrocyte implantation with significant implications for the chondrocyte functionality.

  2. Prenatal nicotine exposure induces poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and the intrauterine programming mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tie, Kai; Tan, Yang; Deng, Yu; Li, Jing; Ni, Qubo; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) induces skeletal growth retardation and dyslipidemia in offspring displaying intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Cholesterol accumulation resulting from cholesterol efflux dysfunction may reduce the quality of articular cartilage through fetal programming. This study evaluated the quality of articular cartilage of female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet and explored the mechanisms using a rat IUGR model established by the administration of 2.0mg/kg/d of subcutaneous nicotine from gestational days 11-20. The results demonstrated an increased OARSI (Osteoarthritis Research Society International) score and total cholesterol content, decreased serum corticosterone, and increased IGF1 and dyslipidemia with catch-up growth in PNE adult offspring. Cartilage matrix, IGF1 and cholesterol efflux pathway expression were reduced in PNE fetuses and adult offspring. Therefore, PNE induced poor articular cartilage quality in female adult offspring fed a high-fat diet via a dual programming mechanism.

  3. The immunohistochemical localization of notch receptors and ligands in human articular cartilage, chondroprogenitor culture and ultrastructural characteristics of these progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ustunel, Ismail; Ozenci, Alpay Merter; Sahin, Zeliha; Ozbey, Ozlem; Acar, Nuray; Tanriover, Gamze; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Demir, Ramazan

    2008-01-01

    The presence of progenitor/stem cells in human articular cartilage remains controversial. Therefore, we attempted to isolate and culture progenitor/stem cells and to investigate their phenotypic characteristics. Biopsies were obtained (with consent) from patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery. Full depth explants were fixed and cryosectioned or enzymatically digested and the resulting cells cultured and plated on fibronectin-coated dishes. Chondrocytes were cultured until colonies of >32 cells were present. Colonies were trypsinized and expanded in monolayer for pellet culture. Immunolocalization of Notch and its ligands were detected in vivo and in vitro using immunocytochemistry. In vitro studies investigated differences in immunolocalization of Notch and its associated ligands in colony-forming cells and small clusters of non-colony-forming cells. The ultrastructure of the chondroprogenitors was examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Results revealed that the immunolocalization of Notch-1 and its ligand Delta were concentrated in regions closest to the articular surface. Notch-1 was also densely localized in the deeper zone of articular cartilage. Notch-2 immunolabeling was densely localized in all zones of articular cartilage. Jagged-1 was concentrated in the deeper regions of articular cartilage. Notch-1, Delta and Jagged-1 were more abundant in colony-forming cells than non-colony-forming chondrocytes in vitro. Notch-3, Notch-4 and Jagged-2 were absent from all regions of the articular cartilage tissues and cultured cartilage cells in vitro. Ultrastructurally, chondrocytes cultured in monolayer dedifferentiated to fibroblast-like cells with cell surface processes of varying lengths, pellet cultured cells varied in morphology, as flattened and rounded. In conclusion, we propose that adult human articular cartilage may contain cells having progenitor cell features. PMID:18272209

  4. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-09-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage.

  5. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage. PMID:26340619

  6. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage in Lizard Knee from Resident Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epiphysis of femur and tibia in the lizard Podarcis muralis can extensively regenerate after injury. The process involves the articular cartilage and metaphyseal (growth) plate after damage. The secondary ossification center present between the articular cartilage and the growth plate is replaced by cartilaginous epiphyses after about one month of regeneration at high temperature. The present study analyzes the origin of the chondrogenic cells from putative stem cells located in the growing centers of the epiphyses. The study is carried out using immunocytochemistry for the detection of 5BrdU-labeled long retaining cells and for the localization of telomerase, an enzyme that indicates stemness. The observations show that putative stem cells retaining 5BrdU and positive for telomerase are present in the superficial articular cartilage and metaphyseal growth plate located in the epiphyses. This observation suggests that these areas represent stem cell niches lasting for most of the lifetime of lizards. In healthy long bones of adult lizards, the addition of new chondrocytes from the stem cells population in the articular cartilage and the metaphyseal growth plate likely allows for slow, continuous longitudinal growth. When the knee is injured in the adult lizard, new populations of chondrocytes actively producing chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan are derived from these stem cells to allow for the formation of completely new cartilaginous epiphyses, possibly anticipating the re-formation of secondary centers in later stages. The study suggests that in this lizard species, the regenerative ability of the epiphyses is a pre-adaptation to the regeneration of the articular cartilage. PMID:26340619

  7. Towards Regeneration of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Ohta, Yoichi; Larmour, Colleen; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage is classified into permanent hyaline cartilage and has significant differences in structure, extracelluar matrix components, gene expression profile, and mechanical property from transient hyaline cartilage found in growth plate. In the process of synovial joint development, articular cartilage is originated from the interzone, developing at the edge of the cartilaginous anlagen, it establishes zonal structure over time and supports smooth movement of the synovial joint through life. The cascade actions of key regulators such as Wnts, GDF5, Erg, and PTHLH coordinate sequential steps of articular cartilage formation. Articular chondrocytes are restrictedly controlled not to differentiate into a hypertrophic stage by autocrine and paracrine factors and extracerllular matrix microenvironment, but retain potential to undergo hypertrophy. The basal calcified zone of articular cartilage is connected with subchondral bone, but not invaded by blood vessels nor replaced by bone, which is highly contrasted with the growth plate. Articular cartilage has limited regenerative capacity, but likely possesses and potentially uses intrinsic stem cell source in the superficial layer, Ranvier’s groove, the intra-articular tissues such as synovium and fat pad, and marrow below the subchondral bone. Considering the biological views on articular cartilage, several important points are raised for regeneration of articular cartilage. We should evaluate the nature of regenerated cartilage as permanent hyaline cartilage and not just hyaline cartilage. We should study how a hypertrophic phenotype of transplanted cells can be lastingly suppressed in regenerating tissue. Further, we should develop the methods and reagents to activate recruitment of intrinsic stem/progenitor cells into the damaged site. PMID:24078496

  8. Operative management of closed intra-articular fractures of distal end of humerus in adults.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Arunangsu; Jha, Amrish Kumar; Chatterjee, Debdutta; Ghosh, Bappaditya; Roy, Sandip Kumar; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2011-06-01

    This is a study of 60 patients with mean age of 30 years having intra-articular fracture of distal humerus of type C (AO classification). We treated these fractures by open reduction and internal fixation through transolecranon approach. Mean duration of operative time with that of injury was 10 days. In all the cases 1st the intracondylar fracture was fixed followed by reconstruction and stabilisation of medial and lateral pillar by 1/3 tubular plate and 3.5 mm dynamic compressent plate (DCP) or recon plate respectively. Minimum follow-up was of 1 year duration with average follow-up of 3 years. We could achieve 100% union with mean range of movement at the and of 1 year was 20 degree to 110 degree. Two fractures had delayed union, 5 patients had skin complications for which extended dressing was required. None of these patients required SSG or secondary suture.

  9. PTHrP and Indian hedgehog control differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Chung, Ung-Il; Schipani, Ernestina; Starbuck, Michael; Karsenty, Gerard; Katagiri, Takenobu; Goad, Dale L; Lanske, Beate; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2002-06-01

    In developing murine growth plates, chondrocytes near the articular surface (periarticular chondrocytes) proliferate, differentiate into flat column-forming proliferating cells (columnar chondrocytes), stop dividing and finally differentiate into hypertrophic cells. Indian hedgehog (Ihh), which is predominantly expressed in prehypertrophic cells, stimulates expression of parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide (PTHrP) which negatively regulates terminal chondrocyte differentiation through the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PPR). However, the roles of PTHrP and Ihh in regulating earlier steps in chondrocyte differentiation are unclear. We present novel mouse models with PPR abnormalities that help clarify these roles. In mice with chondrocyte-specific PPR ablation and mice with reduced PPR expression, chondrocyte differentiation was accelerated not only at the terminal step but also at an earlier step: periarticular to columnar differentiation. In these models, upregulation of Ihh action in the periarticular region was also observed. In the third model in which the PPR was disrupted in about 30% of columnar chondrocytes, Ihh action in the periarticular chondrocytes was upregulated because of ectopically differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes that had lost PPR. Acceleration of periarticular to columnar differentiation was also noted in this mouse, while most of periarticular chondrocytes retained PPR signaling. These data suggest that Ihh positively controls differentiation of periarticular chondrocytes independently of PTHrP. Thus, chondrocyte differentiation is controlled at multiple steps by PTHrP and Ihh through the mutual regulation of their activities. PMID:12050144

  10. External fixation of intra-articular fracture of the distal radius in young and old adults.

    PubMed

    Huch, K; Hünerbein, M; Meeder, P J

    1996-01-01

    Forty patients (18-89 years old, mean 58 years) with comminuted intra-articular fractures of the distal radial end (AO-type C 2 or C 3) treated with external fixation could be followed for an average of 2.3 years. After 3 weeks, the distraction was released, and after another 3 weeks, the device was removed. Complications seen were one malunion, one radial shaft fracture caused by excentric drilling of a Schanz screw, one Sudeck atrophy, and one subcutaneous pin-track infection. Radial and ulnar deviations were reduced to 52% and 71% of the untreated wrist, whereas the range of motion in the other planes reached about 80% or more of the healthy side. In all, 82.5% of the patients showed good or excellent radiological and functional results. This study demonstrates that external fixation of distal radial C 2 and 3 fractures for 6 weeks results in good recovery for young patients and elderly patients with osteoporosis. PMID:8775708

  11. Transcription Factor Erg Variants and Functional Diversification of Chondrocytes during Limb Long Bone Development

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masahiro; Higuchi, Yoshinobu; Koyama, Eiki; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Kurisu, Kojiro; Yeh, Helena; Abrams, William R.; Rosenbloom, Joel; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2000-01-01

    During limb development, chondrocytes located at the epiphyseal tip of long bone models give rise to articular tissue, whereas the more numerous chondrocytes in the shaft undergo maturation, hypertrophy, and mineralization and are replaced by bone cells. It is not understood how chondrocytes follow these alternative pathways to distinct fates and functions. In this study we describe the cloning of C-1-1, a novel variant of the ets transcription factor ch-ERG. C-1-1 lacks a short 27–amino acid segment located ∼80 amino acids upstream of the ets DNA binding domain. We found that in chick embryo long bone anlagen, C-1-1 expression characterizes developing articular chondrocytes, whereas ch-ERG expression is particularly prominent in prehypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate. To analyze the function of C-1-1 and ch-ERG, viral vectors were used to constitutively express each factor in developing chick leg buds and cultured chondrocytes. We found that virally driven expression of C-1-1 maintained chondrocytes in a stable and immature phenotype, blocked their maturation into hypertrophic cells, and prevented the replacement of cartilage with bone. It also induced synthesis of tenascin-C, an extracellular matrix protein that is a unique product of developing articular chondrocytes. In contrast, virally driven expression of ch-ERG significantly stimulated chondrocyte maturation in culture, as indicated by increases in alkaline phosphatase activity and deposition of a mineralized matrix; however, it had modest effects in vivo. The data show that C-1-1 and ch-ERG have diverse biological properties and distinct expression patterns during skeletogenesis, and are part of molecular mechanisms by which limb chondrocytes follow alternative developmental pathways. C-1-1 is the first transcription factor identified to date that appears to be instrumental in the genesis and function of epiphyseal articular chondrocytes. PMID:10893254

  12. Synovial joint morphogenesis requires the chondrogenic action of Sox5 and Sox6 in growth plate and articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Peter; Smits, Patrick; Silvester, Amber; Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Han, Yu; de la Motte, Carol A.; Kingsley, David M.; Lefebvre, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying synovial joint development remain poorly understood. Here we use complete and cell-specific gene inactivation to identify the roles of the redundant chondrogenic transcription factors Sox5 and Sox6 in this process. We show that joint development aborts early in complete mutants (Sox5−/−6−/−). Gdf5 and Wnt9a expression is punctual in articular progenitor cells, but Sox9 downregulation and cell condensation in joint interzones are late. Joint cell differentiation is unsuccessful, regardless of lineage, and cavitation fails. Sox5 and Sox6 restricted expression to chondrocytes in wild-type embryos and continued Erg expression and weak Ihh expression in Sox5−/−6−/− growth plates suggest that growth plate failure contribute to this Sox5−/−6−/− joint morphogenesis block. Sox5/6 inactivation in specified joint cells and chondrocytes (Sox5fl/fl6fl/flCol2Cre) also results in a joint morphogenesis block, whereas Sox5/6 inactivation in specified joint cells only (Sox5fl/fl6fl/flGdf5Cre) results in milder joint defects and normal growth plates. Sox5fl/fl6fl/flGdf5Cre articular chondrocytes remain undifferentiated, as shown by continued Gdf5 expression and pancartilaginous gene downregulation. Along with Prg4 downregulation, these defects likely account for joint tissue overgrowth and incomplete cavitation in adult mice. Together, these data suggest that synovial joint morphogenesis relies on essential roles for Sox5/6 in promoting both growth plate and articular chondrocyte differentiation. PMID:20206616

  13. Sodium nitroprusside induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by a slowly progressing degradation of the matrix and destruction of articular cartilage. Apoptosis of chondrocyte is accounted for the mechanism of OA. Nitric oxide (NO), as a stimulus, has been shown to induce chondrocyte apoptosis by activating the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), increasing the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), inhibiting the proteoglycan synthesis and type II collagen expression. In this study, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was administered to be the NO donor to explore the mechanism of NO-induced apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes obtained from six weeks old New Zealand rabbits. CCK-8 assay revealed the inhibitory effect of SNP on cell viability. We used flow cytometry (FCM) to assess the form of cell death by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining, and evaluate the change of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). We found that the SNP induced chondrocyte apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner and an observable reduction of ΔΨm. In conclusion, our findings indicate that SNP induces apoptosis of rabbit chondrocytes via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  14. Induced superficial chondrocyte death reduces catabolic cartilage damage in murine posttraumatic osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minjie; Mani, Sriniwasan B; He, Yao; Hall, Amber M; Xu, Lin; Li, Yefu; Zurakowski, David; Jay, Gregory D; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-08-01

    Joints that have degenerated as a result of aging or injury contain dead chondrocytes and damaged cartilage. Some studies have suggested that chondrocyte death precedes cartilage damage, but how the loss of chondrocytes affects cartilage integrity is not clear. In this study, we examined whether chondrocyte death undermines cartilage integrity in aging and injury using a rapid 3D confocal cartilage imaging technique coupled with standard histology. We induced autonomous expression of diphtheria toxin to kill articular surface chondrocytes in mice and determined that chondrocyte death did not lead to cartilage damage. Moreover, cartilage damage after surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus of the knee was increased in mice with intact chondrocytes compared with animals whose chondrocytes had been killed, suggesting that chondrocyte death does not drive cartilage damage in response to injury. These data imply that chondrocyte catabolism, not death, contributes to articular cartilage damage following injury. Therefore, therapies targeted at reducing the catabolic phenotype may protect against degenerative joint disease. PMID:27427985

  15. Human developmental chondrogenesis as a basis for engineering chondrocytes from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling; Bluguermann, Carolina; Kyupelyan, Levon; Latour, Brooke; Gonzalez, Stephanie; Shah, Saumya; Galic, Zoran; Ge, Sundi; Zhu, Yuhua; Petrigliano, Frank A; Nsair, Ali; Miriuka, Santiago G; Li, Xinmin; Lyons, Karen M; Crooks, Gay M; McAllister, David R; Van Handel, Ben; Adams, John S; Evseenko, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Joint injury and osteoarthritis affect millions of people worldwide, but attempts to generate articular cartilage using adult stem/progenitor cells have been unsuccessful. We hypothesized that recapitulation of the human developmental chondrogenic program using pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) may represent a superior approach for cartilage restoration. Using laser-capture microdissection followed by microarray analysis, we first defined a surface phenotype (CD166(low/neg)CD146(low/neg)CD73(+)CD44(low)BMPR1B(+)) distinguishing the earliest cartilage committed cells (prechondrocytes) at 5-6 weeks of development. Functional studies confirmed these cells are chondrocyte progenitors. From 12 weeks, only the superficial layers of articular cartilage were enriched in cells with this progenitor phenotype. Isolation of cells with a similar immunophenotype from differentiating human PSCs revealed a population of CD166(low/neg)BMPR1B(+) putative cartilage-committed progenitors. Taken as a whole, these data define a developmental approach for the generation of highly purified functional human chondrocytes from PSCs that could enable substantial progress in cartilage tissue engineering.

  16. Collar-type osteophyte of the femur in young adults: is it a harbinger of intra-articular osteoid osteoma?

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Bozkurt, Yalcin

    2013-09-01

    Variable clinical and radiological findings for intra-articular osteoid osteoma (OO) of the hip joint make its diagnosis difficult. Because radiographs commonly do not identify the nidus, MR imaging becomes the second line of study. However, because the appearance varies, findings on MR images can be confusing. We found "collar type osteophyte" of the femur i.e. an osteophyte rim around the femoral neck, to be a conspicuous finding of intra-articular OO. Here, this feature will be emphasized and intra-articular OOs will be discussed, with a review of the literature.

  17. Ultrasound Backscattering Is Anisotropic in Bovine Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Tiitu, Virpi; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-07-01

    Collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes can contribute to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage. However, anisotropy of ultrasound scattering in cartilage is not fully characterized. We investigate this using a clinical intravascular ultrasound device with ultrasound frequencies of 9 and 40 MHz. Osteochondral samples were obtained from intact bovine patellas, and cartilage was imaged in two perpendicular directions: through articular and lateral surfaces. At both frequencies, ultrasound backscattering was higher (p < 0.05) when measured through the lateral surface of cartilage. In addition, the composition and structure of articular cartilage were investigated with multiple reference methods involving light microscopy, digital densitometry, polarized light microscopy and Fourier infrared imaging. Reference methods indicated that acoustic anisotropy of ultrasound scattering arises mainly from non-uniform distribution of chondrocytes and anisotropic orientation of collagen fibers. To conclude, ultrasound backscattering in articular cartilage was found to be anisotropic and dependent on the frequency in use. PMID:25933711

  18. Ultrasound Backscattering Is Anisotropic in Bovine Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Tiitu, Virpi; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2015-07-01

    Collagen, proteoglycans and chondrocytes can contribute to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage. However, anisotropy of ultrasound scattering in cartilage is not fully characterized. We investigate this using a clinical intravascular ultrasound device with ultrasound frequencies of 9 and 40 MHz. Osteochondral samples were obtained from intact bovine patellas, and cartilage was imaged in two perpendicular directions: through articular and lateral surfaces. At both frequencies, ultrasound backscattering was higher (p < 0.05) when measured through the lateral surface of cartilage. In addition, the composition and structure of articular cartilage were investigated with multiple reference methods involving light microscopy, digital densitometry, polarized light microscopy and Fourier infrared imaging. Reference methods indicated that acoustic anisotropy of ultrasound scattering arises mainly from non-uniform distribution of chondrocytes and anisotropic orientation of collagen fibers. To conclude, ultrasound backscattering in articular cartilage was found to be anisotropic and dependent on the frequency in use.

  19. [Structure of the articular cartilage in the middle aged].

    PubMed

    Kop'eva, T N; Mul'diiarov, P Ia; Bel'skaia, O B; Pastel', V B

    1983-10-01

    In persons 17-83 years of age having no articular disorders 39 samples of the patellar articular cartilage, the articulated surface and the femoral head have been studied histochemically, histometrically and electron microscopically. Age involution of the articular cartilage is revealed after 40 years of age as a progressive decrease in chondrocytes density in the superficial and (to a less degree) in the intermediate zones. This is accompanied with a decreasing number of 3- and 4-cellular lacunae and with an increasing number of unicellular and hollow lacunae. In some chondrocytes certain distrophic and necrotic changes are revealed. In the articular matrix the zone with the minimal content of glycosaminoglycans becomes thicker and keratansulfate content in the territorial matrix of the cartilage deep zone grows large.

  20. Oxygen tension affects lubricin expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Okuno, Hiroshi; Itoi, Eiji

    2014-10-01

    We assessed the effects of oxygen tension on lubricin expression in bovine chondrocytes and cartilage explants and a role for hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α in regulating lubricin expression was investigated using a murine chondroprogenitor cell line, ATDC5, and bovine chondrocytes isolated from superficial and middle/deep zones of femoral cartilage. ATDC5 cells and bovine chondrocytes were cultured in micromass under different oxygen tensions (21%, 5%, and 1%). ATDC5 cells and middle/deep zone chondrocytes that initially had low lubricin expression levels were also cultured with or without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was used to determine lubricin and chondrogenic marker gene mRNA levels and immunohistochemistry was used to assess lubricin protein expression. Explant cartilage plugs cultured under different oxygen tensions were also subjected to immunohistological analysis for lubricin. HIF-1α gene silencing was achieved by electroporatic transfer into ATDC5 cells. A low oxygen tension reduced lubricin gene expression levels in bovine superficial chondrocytes, TGF-β1-treated middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and TGF-β1-treated ATDC5 cells. Lubricin expression in explant cartilage was also suppressed under hypoxia. HIF-1α gene silencing in ATDC5 cells attenuated the lubricin expression response to the oxygen tension. These results corroborate with previous studies that the oxygen tension regulates lubricin gene expression and suggest that HIF-1α plays an important role in this regulation. The normal distribution of lubricin in articular cartilage may be due to the hypoxic oxygen environment of cartilage as it is an avascular tissue. An oxygen tension gradient may be a key factor for engineering cartilage tissue with a layered morphology.

  1. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Synovial Joint and Articular Cartilage Formation

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Maurizio; Koyama, Eiki; Shibukawa, Yoshihiro; Wu, Changshan; Tamamura, Yoshihiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Iwamoto, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Synovial joints and articular cartilage play crucial roles in skeletal function, but relatively little is actually known about their embryonic development. Here we first focused on the interzone, a thin mesenchymal cell layer forming at future joint sites that is widely thought to be critical for joint and articular cartilage development. To determine interzone cell origin and fate, we microinjected the vital fluorescent dye DiI at several peri-joint sites in chick limbs and monitored behavior and fate of labeled cells over time. Peri-joint mesenchymal cells located immediately adjacent to incipient joints migrated, became part of the interzone, and were eventually found in epiphyseal articular layer and joint capsule. Interzone cells isolated and reared in vitro expressed typical phenotypic markers, including GDF-5, Wnt-14 and CD-44, and differentiated into chondrocytes over time. To determine the molecular mechanisms of articular chondrocyte formation, we carried out additional studies on the ets transcription factor family member ERG and its alternatively-spliced variant C-1-1 that we previously found to be expressed in developing avian articular chondrocytes. We cloned the human counterpart of avian C-1-1 (ERGp55Δ81) and conditionally expressed it in transgenic mice under cartilage-specific Col2 gene promoter-enhancer control. The entire transgenic mouse limb chondrocyte population exhibited an immature articular-like phenotype and a virtual lack of growth plate formation and chondrocyte maturation compared to wild type littermate. Together, our studies reveal that peri-joint mesenchymal cells take part in interzone and articular layer formation, interzone cells can differentiate into chondrocytes, and acquisition of a permanent articular chondrocyte phenotype is aided and perhaps dictated by ets transcription factor ERG. PMID:16831907

  2. Articular Cartilage Changes in Maturing Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Luria, Ayala; Chu, Constance R.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage has a unique functional architecture capable of providing a lifetime of pain-free joint motion. This tissue, however, undergoes substantial age-related physiologic, mechanical, biochemical, and functional changes that reduce its ability to overcome the effects of mechanical stress and injury. Many factors affect joint function in the maturing athlete—from chondrocyte survival and metabolism to structural composition and genetic/epigenetic factors governing cartilage and synovium. An evaluation of age-related changes for joint homeostasis and risk for osteoarthritis is important to the development of new strategies to rejuvenate aging joints. Objective: This review summarizes the current literature on the biochemical, cellular, and physiologic changes occurring in aging articular cartilage. Data Sources: PubMed (1969-2013) and published books in sports health, cartilage biology, and aging. Study Selection: Keywords included aging, athlete, articular cartilage, epigenetics, and functional performance with age. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: To be included, research questions addressed the effect of age-related changes on performance, articular cartilage biology, molecular mechanism, and morphology. Results: The mature athlete faces challenges in maintaining cartilage health and joint function due to age-related changes to articular cartilage biology, morphology, and physiology. These changes include chondrocyte loss and a decline in metabolic response, alterations to matrix and synovial tissue composition, and dysregulation of reparative responses. Conclusion: Although physical decline has been regarded as a normal part of aging, many individuals maintain overall fitness and enjoy targeted improvement to their athletic capacity throughout life. Healthy articular cartilage and joints are needed to maintain athletic performance and general activities. Genetic and potentially reversible

  3. Aging-related differences in chondrocyte viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Steklov, Nikolai; Srivastava, Ajay; Sung, K L P; Chen, Peter C; Lotz, Martin K; D'Lima, Darryl D

    2009-06-01

    The biomechanical properties of articular cartilage change profoundly with aging. These changes have been linked with increased potential for cartilage degeneration and osteoarthritis. However, less is known about the change in biomechanical properties of chondrocytes with increasing age. Cell stiffness can affect mechanotransduction pathways and may alter cell function. We measured aging-related changes in the biomechanical properties of chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were isolated from knee articular cartilage within 48 hours after death or from osteochondral specimens obtained from knee arthroplasty. Cells were divided into two age groups: between 18 and 35 years (18 - 35); and greater than 55 years (55+) of age. The 55+ group was further subdivided based on visual grade of osteoarthritis: normal (N) or osteoarthritic (OA). The viscoelastic properties of the cell were measured using the previously described micropipette cell aspiration technique. The equilibrium modulus, instantaneous modulus, and apparent viscosity were significantly higher in the 55+ year age group than in the 18 - 35 age group. On the other hand, no differences were found in the equilibrium modulus, instantaneous modulus, or apparent viscosity between the N and OA groups. The increase in cell stiffness can be attributed to altered mechanical properties of the cell membrane, the cytoplasm, or the cytoskeleton. Increased stiffness has been reported in osteoarthritic chondrocytes, which in turn has been attributed to the actin cytoskeleton. A similar mechanism may be responsible for our finding of increased stiffness in aging chondrocytes. With advancing age, changes in the biomechanical properties of the cell could alter molecular and biochemical responses.

  4. Joint aging and chondrocyte cell death

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Shawn P; D’Lima, Darryl D

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage extracellular matrix and cell function change with age and are considered to be the most important factors in the development and progression of osteoarthritis. The multifaceted nature of joint disease indicates that the contribution of cell death can be an important factor at early and late stages of osteoarthritis. Therefore, the pharmacologic inhibition of cell death is likely to be clinically valuable at any stage of the disease. In this article, we will discuss the close association between diverse changes in cartilage aging, how altered conditions influence chondrocyte death, and the implications of preventing cell loss to retard osteoarthritis progression and preserve tissue homeostasis. PMID:20671988

  5. Exercise increases osteophyte formation and diminishes fibrillation following chemically induced articular cartilage injury.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J M; Brandt, K D

    1984-01-01

    The present study shows that a treadmill exercise regimen imposed on guinea-pigs whose articular cartilage has been damaged by intra-articular injection of IA reduces chondrocyte depletion, results in an increase in pericellular Safranin-O staining around surviving chondrocytes, and prevents fibrillation of the articular surface. The data suggest that exercise protected, or facilitated recovery of, chondrocytes subjected to chemical injury, and that the surviving cells then synthesised a matrix which was sufficiently normal to withstand impulsive joint loading. On the other hand, the exercise regimen accelerated osteophyte formation, and led to formation of osteophytes in sites at which they did not develop in animals which received intra-articular IA but which were not exercised. Images Fig. 1 (cont.) Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6526713

  6. Editorial Commentary: Focal Cartilage Defects in Young Patients Indicate Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation Sooner Rather Than Later.

    PubMed

    Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2016-09-01

    Articular cartilage lesions, whether acute or chronic, are among the most common and difficult-to-treat conditions of the knee in the adolescent and athletic population. The results from a study in this issue as well as some in the previous literature suggest that autologous chondrocyte implantation yields long-term improvement in function and symptoms and may be a viable treatment for young to adult athletes or patients with high physical demands and a long active lifespan. No intervention in the young symptomatic patient will yield inferior results because it appears that no treatment over time has deleterious effects. Treatment in young athletes should include (1) early stabilization of ligament injuries, (2) resurfacing chondral defects, (3) correction of malalignment, (4) restoration of meniscal integrity, and (5) utilization of a chondroprotective strategy with orthobiological interventions. PMID:27594334

  7. Pterosin B prevents chondrocyte hypertrophy and osteoarthritis in mice by inhibiting Sik3

    PubMed Central

    Yahara, Yasuhito; Takemori, Hiroshi; Okada, Minoru; Kosai, Azuma; Yamashita, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Fujita, Kaori; Itoh, Yumi; Nakamura, Masahiro; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Fukui, Naoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common debilitating joint disorder. Risk factors for osteoarthritis include age, which is associated with thinning of articular cartilage. Here we generate chondrocyte-specific salt-inducible kinase 3 (Sik3) conditional knockout mice that are resistant to osteoarthritis with thickened articular cartilage owing to a larger chondrocyte population. We also identify an edible Pteridium aquilinum compound, pterosin B, as a Sik3 pathway inhibitor. We show that either Sik3 deletion or intraarticular injection of mice with pterosin B inhibits chondrocyte hypertrophy and protects cartilage from osteoarthritis. Collectively, our results suggest Sik3 regulates the homeostasis of articular cartilage and is a target for the treatment of osteoarthritis, with pterosin B as a candidate therapeutic. PMID:27009967

  8. The properties of bioengineered chondrocyte sheets for cartilage regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mitani, Genya; Sato, Masato; Lee, Jeong IK; Kaneshiro, Nagatoshi; Ishihara, Miya; Ota, Naoshi; Kokubo, Mami; Sakai, Hideaki; Kikuchi, Tetsutaro; Mochida, Joji

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the clinical results of autologous chondrocyte implantation for articular cartilage defects have recently improved as a result of advanced techniques based on tissue engineering procedures, problems with cell handling and scaffold imperfections remain to be solved. A new cell-sheet technique has been developed, and is potentially able to overcome these obstacles. Chondrocyte sheets applicable to cartilage regeneration can be prepared with this cell-sheet technique using temperature-responsive culture dishes. However, for clinical application, it is necessary to evaluate the characteristics of the cells in these sheets and to identify their similarities to naive cartilage. Results The expression of SOX 9, collagen type 2, 27, integrin α10, and fibronectin genes in triple-layered chondrocyte sheets was significantly increased in comparison to those in conventional monolayer culture and in a single chondrocyte sheet, implying a nature similar to ordinary cartilage. In addition, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that collagen type II, fibronectin, and integrin α10 were present in the triple-layered chondrocyte sheets. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that these chondrocyte sheets with a consistent cartilaginous phenotype and adhesive properties may lead to a new strategy for cartilage regeneration. PMID:19267909

  9. Regulation of α5 and αV Integrin Expression by GDF-5 and BMP-7 in Chondrocyte Differentiation and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Garciadiego-Cázares, David; Aguirre-Sánchez, Hilda I.; Abarca-Buis, René F.; Kouri, Juan B.; Velasquillo, Cristina; Ibarra, Clemente

    2015-01-01

    The Integrin β1 family is the major receptors of the Extracellular matrix (ECM), and the synthesis and degradation balance of ECM is seriously disrupted during Osteoarthritis (OA). In this scenario, integrins modify their pattern expression and regulate chondrocyte differen-tiation in the articular cartilage. Members of the Transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-β) Su-perfamily, such as Growth differentiation factor 5 (Gdf-5) and Bone morphogenetic protein 7 (Bmp-7), play a key role in joint formation and could regulate the integrin expression during chondrocyte differentiation and osteoarthritis progression in an experimental OA rat model. Decrease of α5 integrin expression in articular cartilage was related with chondrocyte dedif-ferentiation during OA progression, while increase of α1, α2, and α3 integrin expression was related with fibrous areas in articular cartilage during OA. Hypertrophic chondrocytes expressedαV integrin and was increased in the articular cartilage of rats with OA. Integrin expression during chondrocyte differentiation was also analyzed in a micromass culture system of mouse embryo mesenchymal cells, micromass cultures was treated with Gdf-5 or Bmp-7 for 4 and 6 days, respectively. Gdf-5 induced the expression of theα5 sub-unit, while Bmp-7 induced the expression of the αV sub-unit. This suggests a switch in signaling for prehypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation towards hypertrophy, where Gdf-5 could maintain the articular chondrocyte phenotype and Bmp-7 would induce hypertrophy. Decrease of Ihh expression during late stages of OA in rat model suggest that the ossification in OA rat knees and endochondral ossification could be activated by Bmp-7 and αV integrin in absence of Ihh. Thus, chondrocyte phenotype in articular cartilage is similar to prehypetrophic chondrocyte in growth plate, and is preserved due to the presence of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), Gdf-5 and α5 integrin to maintain articular cartilage and prevent hy

  10. Cell manipulation in autologous chondrocyte implantation: from research to cleanroom.

    PubMed

    Roseti, Livia; Serra, Marta; Tigani, Domenico; Brognara, Irene; Lopriore, Annamaria; Bassi, Alessandra; Fornasari, Pier Maria

    2008-04-01

    In the field of orthopaedics, autologous chondrocyte implantation is a technique currently used for the regeneration of damaged articular cartilage. There is evidence of the neo-formation of tissue displaying characteristics similar to hyaline cartilage. In vitro chondrocyte manipulation is a crucial phase of this therapeutic treatment consisting of different steps: cell isolation from a cartilage biopsy, expansion in monolayer culture and growth onto a three-dimensional biomaterial to implant in the damaged area. To minimise the risk of in vitro cell contamination, the manipulation must be performed in a controlled environment such as a cleanroom. Moreover, the choice of reagents and raw material suitable for clinical use in humans and the translation of research protocols into standardised production processes are important. In this study we describe the preliminary results obtained by the development of chondrocyte manipulation protocols (isolation and monolayer expansion) in cleanrooms for the application of autologous implantation.

  11. Runx1 Activities in Superficial Zone Chondrocytes, Osteoarthritic Chondrocyte Clones and Response to Mechanical Loading

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Kimberly T.; Walcott, Marie E.; Gaur, Tripti; O’Connell, Shannon L.; Basil, Kirti; Tadiri, Christina P.; Mason-Savas, April; Silva, Jason A.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S; Ayers, David C.; Lian, Jane B.; Fanning, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Runx1, the hematopoietic lineage determining transcription factor, is present in perichondrium and chondrocytes. Here we addressed Runx1 functions, by examining expression in cartilage during mouse and human osteoarthritis (OA) progression and in response to mechanical loading. Methods Spared and diseased compartments in knees of OA patients and in mice with surgical destabilization of the medial meniscus were examined for changes in expression of Runx1 mRNA (Q-PCR) and protein (immunoblot, immunohistochemistry). Runx1 levels were quantified in response to static mechanical compression of bovine articular cartilage. Runx1 function was assessed by cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA) and cell type phenotypic markers. Results Runx1 is enriched in superficial zone (SZ) chondrocytes of normal bovine, mouse, and human tissues. Increasing loading conditions in bovine cartilage revealed a positive correlation with a significant elevation of Runx1. Runx1 becomes highly expressed at the periphery of mouse OA lesions and in human OA chondrocyte ‘clones’ where Runx1 co-localizes with Vcam1, the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) marker and lubricin (Prg4), a cartilage chondroprotective protein. These OA induced cells represent a proliferative cell population, Runx1 depletion in MPCs decreases cell growth, supporting Runx1 contribution to cell expansion. Conclusion The highest Runx1 levels in SZC of normal cartilage suggest a function that supports the unique phenotype of articular chondrocytes, reflected by upregulation under conditions of compression. We propose Runx1 co-expression with Vcam1 and lubricin in murine cell clusters and human ‘clones’ of OA cartilage, participate in a cooperative mechanism for a compensatory anabolic function. PMID:25078095

  12. Linking cell shape, elasticity and fate: in vitro re-differentiation of chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Chim, Yahua; Yin, Huabing

    2014-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has become a promising method for repairing large articular defects. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during cell expansion remains a major limitation for ACT procedures. In this study, we explore the potential of confining cell shape for re-differentiation of dedifferentiated bovine chondrocytes. A novel culture system, combining 2D micropatterning with 3D matrix formation, was developed to control and maintain individual chondrocyte's shape. Both collagen II synthesis and the mechanical properties of cells were monitored during re-differentiation. We show that a spherical morphology without cell spreading plays a limited role in induction of re-differentiation. Instead, isolated, dedifferentiated chondrocytes partially regain chondrogenic properties if they have an appropriate cell shape and limited spreading.

  13. MicroRNA-33 suppresses CCL2 expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meng; Xie, Qingyun; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Yue; Guo, Dongyang; Wang, Ying; Mo, Liweng; Wang, Shuai

    2016-06-01

    CCL2-mediated macrophage infiltration in articular tissues plays a pivotal role in the development of the osteoarthritis (OA). miRNAs regulate the onset and progression of diseases via controlling the expression of a series of genes. How the CCL2 gene was regulated by miRNAs was still not fully elucidated. In the present study, we demonstrated that the binding sites of miR-33 in the 3'UTR of CCL2 gene were conserved in human, mouse and rat species. By performing gain- or loss-of-function studies, we verified that miR-33 suppressed CCL2 expression in the mRNA and protein levels. We also found that miR-33 suppressed the CCL2 levels in the supernatant of cultured primary mouse chondrocytes. With reporter gene assay, we demonstrated that miR-33 targeted at AAUGCA in the 3'UTR of CCL2 gene. In transwell migration assays, we demonstrated that the conditional medium (CM) from miR-33 deficient chondrocytes potentiated the monocyte chemotaxis in a CCL2 dependent manner. Finally, we demonstrated that the level of miR-33 was decreased, whereas the CCL2 level was increased in the articular cartilage from the OA patients compared with the control group. In summary, we identified miR-33 as a novel suppressor of CCL2 in chondrocytes. The miR-33/CCL2 axis in chondrocytes regulates monocyte chemotaxis, providing a potential mechanism of macrophage infiltration in OA.

  14. Autoradiographic evidence of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin binding sites in the articular cartilage of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Castano, M.T.; Freire-Garabal, M.; Giraldez, M.; Nunez, M.J.; Belmonte, A.; Couceiro, J.; Jorge, J. )

    1991-01-01

    After {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin was intravenously injected to rats, an autoradiographic study of distal femur articular cartilage was performed. Results show a specific binding of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin to chondrocytes, suggesting the possible existence of an opiate modulation of articular cartilage.

  15. Comparison of three types of chondrocytes in collagen scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Spector, Myron

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the chondrogenesis in type I and II collagen scaffolds seeded with chondrocytes from three types of cartilage, after four weeks of culture: auricular (AU), articular (AR) and meniscal (ME). Related aims were to investigate the expression of a contractile muscle actin isoform, alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA), in the cells in the scaffold and to determine the presence of a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, in the constructs. Adult goat AU, AR and ME chondrocytes were seeded into two types of collagen scaffolds: type II collagen and type I/III collagen. After four weeks of culture, the constructs were prepared for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of the distribution of glycosaminoglycan (GAG), types I and II collagen, elastin, SM and lubricin. AU constructs contained substantially more tissue than the AR and ME samples. The AU constructs exhibited neocartilage, but no elastin. There were no notable differences between the type I and II collagen scaffolds. Novel findings were the expression of SMA by the AU cells in the scaffolds and the presence of lubricin in the AR and AU constructs. AU cells have the capability to produce cartilage in collagen scaffolds under conditions in which there is little histogenesis by AR and ME cells.

  16. A possible barrier function of the articular surface.

    PubMed

    Takada, N; Wada, I; Sugimura, I; Sakuma, E; Maruyama, H; Matsui, N

    1999-12-01

    Since MacConaill first reported the existence of a thin additional layer of the articular cartilage and named it the lamina splendens, there have been various opinions as to the role of this layer in the lubrication of the articular surface. We studied the superficial portion of the articular cartilage in the 20 day-old and 30 day-old rats using light and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we studied the articular cartilage of the rat whose "cover layer" had been removed mechanically. Also, intraarticular latex beads injection, intraarticular dye injection using lithium carmine and supravital staining experiments were performed. On day 20, dye injected intraarticularly was clearly observed by light microscopy in chondrocytes situated in the deeper layers. The dye injected in the 30 day-old rats, however, was not seen in the chondrocytes but was found only in the superficial layer. Dye was found in the chondrocytes when supravital staining was performed in the articular cartilage of 30 day-old rats after mechanical removal of the cover layer. By transmission electron microscopy, a superficial layer consisted of fine filamentous structures was observed on the articular surface of the 30 day-old rats. The cover layer was destroyed by intraarticular injected latex beads in 30 day-old rats. These findings strongly support the idea that the cover layer acts as a barrier against substances which invade from the surface of the articular cartilage. The development period of the cover layer coincides with the initiation of weight bearing, and joint cartilage debris and pressure changes might further promote maturation. PMID:10659579

  17. Cryopreservation Effect on Proliferative and Chondrogenic Potential of Human Chondrocytes Isolated from Superficial and Deep Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Muiños-López, Emma; Rendal-Vázquez, Mª Esther; Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the proliferative and chondrogenic potential of fresh and frozen chondrocytes isolated from superficial and deep articular cartilage biopsies. Materials and Methodology: The study included 12 samples of fresh and frozen healthy human knee articular cartilage. Cell proliferation was tested at 3, 6 and 9 days. Studies of mRNA quantification, protein expression and immunofluorescence for proliferation and chondrogenic markers were performed. Results: Stimulation of fresh and frozen chondrocytes from both superficial and deep cartilage with fetal bovine serum produced an increase in the proliferative capacity compared to the non-stimulated control group. In the stimulated fresh cells group, the proliferative capacity of cells from the deep biopsy was greater than that from cells from the superficial biopsy (0.046 vs 0.028, respectively, p<0.05). There was also a significant difference between the proliferative capacity of superficial zone fresh (0.028) and frozen (0.051) chondrocytes (p<0.05). CCND1 mRNA and protein expression levels, and immunopositivity for Ki67 revealed a higher proliferative capacity for fresh articular chondrocytes from deep cartilage. Regarding the chondrogenic potential, stimulated fresh cells showed higher SOX9 and Col II expression in chondrocytes from deep than from superficial zone (p<0.05, T student test). Conclusions: The highest rate of cell proliferation and chondrogenic potential of fresh chondrocytes was found in cells obtained from deep cartilage biopsies, whereas there were no statistically significant differences in proliferative and chondrogenic capacity between biopsy origins with frozen chondrocytes. These results indicate that both origin and cryopreservation affect the proliferative and chondrogenic potential of chondrocytes. PMID:22523526

  18. Computational aspects in mechanical modeling of the articular cartilage tissue.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Hadi; Mequanint, Kibret; Herzog, Walter

    2013-04-01

    This review focuses on the modeling of articular cartilage (at the tissue level), chondrocyte mechanobiology (at the cell level) and a combination of both in a multiscale computation scheme. The primary objective is to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of conventional models implemented to study the mechanics of the articular cartilage tissue and chondrocytes. From monophasic material models as the simplest form to more complicated multiscale theories, these approaches have been frequently used to model articular cartilage and have contributed significantly to modeling joint mechanics, addressing and resolving numerous issues regarding cartilage mechanics and function. It should be noted that attentiveness is important when using different modeling approaches, as the choice of the model limits the applications available. In this review, we discuss the conventional models applicable to some of the mechanical aspects of articular cartilage such as lubrication, swelling pressure and chondrocyte mechanics and address some of the issues associated with the current modeling approaches. We then suggest future pathways for a more realistic modeling strategy as applied for the simulation of the mechanics of the cartilage tissue using multiscale and parallelized finite element method.

  19. Bovine Lactoferricin-induced Anti-inflammation Is, in Part, via Up-regulation of Interleukin-11 by Secondary Activation of STAT3 in Human Articular Cartilage*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dongyao; Kc, Ranjan; Chen, Di; Xiao, Guozhi; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB), a multifunctional peptide, was recently demonstrated to be anti-catabolic and anti-inflammatory in human articular cartilage. LfcinB blocks IL-1-mediated proteoglycan depletion, matrix-degrading enzyme expression, and pro-inflammatory mediator induction. LfcinB selectively activates ERK1/2, p38 (but not JNK), and Akt signaling. However, the relationship between these pathways and LfcinB target genes has never been explored. In this study, we uncovered the remarkable ability of LfcinB in the induction of an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-11. LfcinB binds to cell surface heparan sulfate to initiate ERK1/2 signaling and activate AP-1 complexes composed of c-Fos and JunD, which transactivate the IL-11 gene. The induced IL-11 functions as an anti-inflammatory and chondroprotective cytokine in articular chondrocytes. Our data show that IL-11 directly attenuates IL-1-mediated catabolic and inflammatory processes ex vivo and in vitro. Moreover, IL-11 activates STAT3 signaling pathway to critically up-regulate TIMP-1 expression, as a consecutive secondary cellular response after IL-11 induction by LfcinB-ERK-AP-1 axis in human adult articular chondrocytes. The pathological relevance of IL-11 signaling to osteoarthritis is evidenced by significant down-regulation of its cognate receptor expression in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Together, our results suggest a two-step mechanism, whereby LfcinB induces TIMP-1 through an IL-11-dependent pathway involving transcription factor AP-1 and STAT3. PMID:24036113

  20. ECM stiffness primes the TGFβ pathway to promote chondrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jessica L.; Cooke, Margaret E.; Alliston, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Cells encounter physical cues such as extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness in a microenvironment replete with biochemical cues. However, the mechanisms by which cells integrate physical and biochemical cues to guide cellular decision making are not well defined. Here we investigate mechanisms by which chondrocytes generate an integrated response to ECM stiffness and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), a potent agonist of chondrocyte differentiation. Primary murine chondrocytes and ATDC5 cells grown on 0.5-MPa substrates deposit more proteoglycan and express more Sox9, Col2α1, and aggrecan mRNA relative to cells exposed to substrates of any other stiffness. The chondroinductive effect of this discrete stiffness, which falls within the range reported for articular cartilage, requires the stiffness-sensitive induction of TGFβ1. Smad3 phosphorylation, nuclear localization, and transcriptional activity are specifically increased in cells grown on 0.5-MPa substrates. ECM stiffness also primes cells for a synergistic response, such that the combination of ECM stiffness and exogenous TGFβ induces chondrocyte gene expression more robustly than either cue alone through a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase–dependent mechanism. In this way, the ECM stiffness primes the TGFβ pathway to efficiently promote chondrocyte differentiation. This work reveals novel mechanisms by which cells integrate physical and biochemical cues to exert a coordinated response to their unique cellular microenvironment. PMID:22833566

  1. Protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase contribute to the chondroprotective effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Zeng, Guoqing; Liu, Zejun; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Xu; Zhao, Honghai; Zheng, Xinpeng; Song, Gang; Kang, Jian; Xia, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies on the multifaceted roles of morroniside, the main active constituent of iridoid glycoside from Corni Fructus, the effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the influence of morroniside on cultured human OA chondrocytes and a rat experimental model of OA. The results showed that morroniside enhanced the cell viability and the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression (PCNA), type II collagen and aggrecan in human OA chondrocytes, indicating that morroniside promoted chondrocyte survival and matrix synthesis. Furthermore, different doses of morroniside activated protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in human OA chondrocytes, and in turn, triggered AKT/S6 and ERK/P70S6K/S6 pathway, respectively. The PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 or the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the effect of morroniside on human OA chondrocytes, indicating that the activation of AKT and ERK contributed to the regulation of morroniside in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, the intra-articular injection of morroniside elevated the level of proteoglycans in cartilage matrix and the thickness of articular cartilage in a rat experimental model of OA, with the increase of AKT and ERK activation. As a consequence, morroniside has chondroprotective effect on OA chondrocytes, and may have the therapeutic potential for OA treatment. PMID:25754021

  2. The Interplay between Chondrocyte Redifferentiation Pellet Size and Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Babur, Betul Kul; Ghanavi, Parisa; Levett, Peter; Lott, William B.; Klein, Travis; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Crawford, Ross; Doran, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Chondrocytes dedifferentiate during ex vivo expansion on 2-dimensional surfaces. Aggregation of the expanded cells into 3-dimensional pellets, in the presence of induction factors, facilitates their redifferentiation and restoration of the chondrogenic phenotype. Typically 1×105–5×105 chondrocytes are aggregated, resulting in “macro” pellets having diameters ranging from 1–2 mm. These macropellets are commonly used to study redifferentiation, and recently macropellets of autologous chondrocytes have been implanted directly into articular cartilage defects to facilitate their repair. However, diffusion of metabolites over the 1–2 mm pellet length-scales is inefficient, resulting in radial tissue heterogeneity. Herein we demonstrate that the aggregation of 2×105 human chondrocytes into micropellets of 166 cells each, rather than into larger single macropellets, enhances chondrogenic redifferentiation. In this study, we describe the development of a cost effective fabrication strategy to manufacture a microwell surface for the large-scale production of micropellets. The thousands of micropellets were manufactured using the microwell platform, which is an array of 360×360 µm microwells cast into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), that has been surface modified with an electrostatic multilayer of hyaluronic acid and chitosan to enhance micropellet formation. Such surface modification was essential to prevent chondrocyte spreading on the PDMS. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production and collagen II gene expression in chondrocyte micropellets increased significantly relative to macropellet controls, and redifferentiation was enhanced in both macro and micropellets with the provision of a hypoxic atmosphere (2% O2). Once micropellet formation had been optimized, we demonstrated that micropellets could be assembled into larger cartilage tissues. Our results indicate that micropellet amalgamation efficiency is inversely related to the time cultured as discreet

  3. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Merry Zc; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan Hl

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  4. Treatment of osteoarthritis using a helper-dependent adenoviral vector retargeted to chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Merry ZC; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Cela, Racel; Clarke, Chris; Lundgren-Akerlund, Evy; Barry, Michael A; Lee, Brendan HL

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, subchondral bone remodeling, and secondary inflammation. It is among the top three causes of chronic disability, and currently there are no treatment options to prevent disease progression. The localized nature of OA makes it an ideal candidate for gene and cell therapy. However, gene and cell therapy of OA is impeded by inefficient gene transduction of chondrocytes. In this study, we developed a broadly applicable system that retargets cell surface receptors by conjugating antibodies to the capsid of helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDVs). Specifically, we applied this system to retarget chondrocytes by conjugating an HDV to an α-10 integrin monoclonal antibody (a10mab). We show that a10mab-conjugated HDV (a10mabHDV)-infected chondrocytes efficiently in vitro and in vivo while detargeting other cell types. The therapeutic index of an intra-articular injection of 10mabHDV-expressing proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) into a murine model of post-traumatic OA was 10-fold higher than with standard HDV. Moreover, we show that PRG4 overexpression from articular, superficial zone chondrocytes is effective for chondroprotection in postinjury OA and that α-10 integrin is an effective protein for chondrocyte targeting. PMID:27626040

  5. Palmitate has proapoptotic and proinflammatory effects on articular cartilage and synergizes with interleukin-1

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Rogers, Nicole H; Smith, Roy G; Lotz, Martin K

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) that is associated with a state of low-grade inflammation, and increased circulating adipokines and free fatty acids (FFA). The aim of this study was to analyze effects of saturated (palmitate) and monounsaturated (oleate) free fatty acids (FFA) on articular chondrocytes and cartilage. Methods Human articular chondrocytes and fibroblast-like synoviocytes obtained from young healthy donors, and OA chondrocytes from patients undergoing total knee replacement were treated with palmitate or oleate alone or with interleukin 1-β (IL-1β). Cell viability, caspase activation, and gene expression of proinflammatory factors, extracellular matrix proteins, and extracellular proteases were studied. In addition, chondrocyte viability, interleukin-6 (IL-6) production and matrix damage were assessed in bovine and human articular cartilage explants cultured with FFA with or without IL-1β. Results Palmitate, but not oleate, induced caspase activation and cell death in IL-1β-stimulated normal chondrocytes, and upregulated il6 and cox2 expression in chondrocytes and fibroblast-like synoviocytes through toll-like receptor-4 signaling. In cartilage explants, palmitate induced chondrocyte death, IL-6 release and extracellular matrix degradation. Palmitate synergized with IL-1β in stimulating proapoptotic and proinflammatory cellular responses. Pharmacological inhibition of caspases or TLR-4 signaling reduced palmitate and IL-1β-induced cartilage damage. Conclusions Palmitate acts as a pro-inflammatory and catabolic factor that, in synergy with IL-1β, induces chondrocyte apoptosis and articular cartilage breakdown. Collectively, our data suggest that elevated levels of saturated FFA often found in obesity may contribute to OA pathogenesis. PMID:24591481

  6. Self-patterning of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes cocultured on hyaluronan-grafted chitosan surface.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2016-03-01

    The articular cartilage, once injured, has a limited capacity for intrinsic repair. Preparation of functionally biocartilage substitutes in vitro for cartilage repair is an attractive concept with the recent advances in tissue engineering. In this study, adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADAS) and chondrocytes (Ch) were cocultured in different population ratios on the surface of hyaluronan-grafted chitosan (CS-HA) membranes. The two types of cells could self-assemble into cospheroids with different morphologies. In particular, when ADAS and Ch were cocultured at an initial ratio of 7:3 on CS-HA surface, the expression of chondrogenic markers was upregulated, leading to preferred chondrogenesis of the cospheroids. Therefore, using the ADAS/Ch 7:3 cospheroids derived on CS-HA surface instead of using only a single type of cells may be favorable for future therapeutic applications. PMID:26916660

  7. Adipose mesenchymal stem cells protect chondrocytes from degeneration associated with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Maumus, Marie; Manferdini, Cristina; Toupet, Karine; Peyrafitte, Julie-Anne; Ferreira, Rosanna; Facchini, Andrea; Gabusi, Elena; Bourin, Philippe; Jorgensen, Christian; Lisignoli, Gina; Noël, Danièle

    2013-09-01

    Our work aimed at evaluating the role of adipose stem cells (ASC) on chondrocytes from osteoarthritic (OA) patients and identifying the mediators involved. We used primary chondrocytes, ASCs from different sources and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from OA donors. ASCs or MSCs were co-cultured with chondrocytes in a minimal medium and using cell culture inserts. Under these conditions, ASCs did not affect the proliferation of chondrocytes but significantly decreased camptothecin-induced apoptosis. Both MSCs and ASCs from different sources allowed chondrocytes in the cocultures maintaining a stable expression of markers specific for a mature phenotype, while expression of hypertrophic and fibrotic markers was decreased. A number of factors known to regulate the chondrocyte phenotype (IL-1β, IL-1RA, TNF-α) and matrix remodeling (TIMP-1 and -2, MMP-1 and -9, TSP-1) were not affected. However, a significant decrease of TGF-β1 secretion by chondrocytes and induction of HGF secretion by ASCs was observed. Addition of a neutralizing anti-HGF antibody reversed the anti-fibrotic effect of ASCs whereas hypertrophic markers were not modulated. In summary, ASCs are an interesting source of stem cells for efficiently reducing hypertrophy and dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, at least partly via the secretion of HGF. This supports the interest of using these cells in therapies for osteo-articular diseases.

  8. Cathepsin B expression and down-regulation by gene silencing and antisense DNA in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zwicky, Roman; Müntener, Kathrin; Goldring, Mary B; Baici, Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Cathepsin B, a marker of the dedifferentiated chondrocyte phenotype, contributes to cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis and pathological proteolysis in rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. In search of possible means for neutralizing the action of this enzyme, we compared its expression, biosynthesis and distribution in articular chondrocytes and two lines of immortalized human chondrocytes. Native articular chondrocytes in primary culture and the polyclonal T/C-28a2 chondrocyte cell line were similar with respect to the number of endosomes and lysosomes, the distribution of three alternatively spliced cathepsin B mRNA forms, and the cathepsin B activity. In contrast, the clonal C-28/I2 cell line contained four times higher levels of intracellular cathepsin B activity, slightly higher numbers of endosomes and lysosomes, and uniform distribution of all three cathepsin B transcripts and thus resembled subcultured chondrocytes at an early stage of dedifferentiation. Transfection of T/C-28a2 chondrocytes with double-stranded cathepsin B mRNA resulted in inhibition of cathepsin B biosynthesis by up to 70% due to RNA interference, and single-stranded antisense DNAs of various sizes decreased cathepsin B biosynthesis by up to 78%. An antisense oligonucleotide designed to hybridize to the end of cathepsin B's exons 1 and the beginning of exon 3 was successful in specifically inhibiting the mRNA splice variant lacking exon 2. These results indicate that cathepsin B expression and activity may be targeted for gene silencing by RNA interference and antisense DNA in chondrocytes. Furthermore, the differential expression and distribution of cathepsin B and presence of the necessary molecular apparatus for gene silencing in the immortalized human chondrocyte cell lines indicate that they may serve as a useful model for studying the function of relevant enzymes in cartilage pathologies. PMID:12086583

  9. Chondrocytes Transdifferentiate into Osteoblasts in Endochondral Bone during Development, Postnatal Growth and Fracture Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo

  10. Chondrocytes transdifferentiate into osteoblasts in endochondral bone during development, postnatal growth and fracture healing in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo

  11. Chondrocyte channel transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Rebecca; May, Hannah; Mobasheri, Ali; Barrett-Jolley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    To date, a range of ion channels have been identified in chondrocytes using a number of different techniques, predominantly electrophysiological and/or biomolecular; each of these has its advantages and disadvantages. Here we aim to compare and contrast the data available from biophysical and microarray experiments. This letter analyses recent transcriptomics datasets from chondrocytes, accessible from the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI). We discuss whether such bioinformatic analysis of microarray datasets can potentially accelerate identification and discovery of ion channels in chondrocytes. The ion channels which appear most frequently across these microarray datasets are discussed, along with their possible functions. We discuss whether functional or protein data exist which support the microarray data. A microarray experiment comparing gene expression in osteoarthritis and healthy cartilage is also discussed and we verify the differential expression of 2 of these genes, namely the genes encoding large calcium-activated potassium (BK) and aquaporin channels. PMID:23995703

  12. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    LIN, PINGDONG; WENG, XIAPING; LIU, FAYUAN; MA, YUHUAN; CHEN, HOUHUANG; SHAO, XIANG; ZHENG, WENWEI; LIU, XIANXIANG; YE, HONGZHI; LI, XIHAI

    2015-01-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model of OA. Chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of the knee joints of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were detected by immunohistochemical staining for type II collagen. The ER stress-mediated apoptosis of tunicamycin (TM)-stimulated chondrocytes was detected using 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA). We found that 4-PBA inhibited TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which confirmed the successful induction of chondrocyte apoptosis. BZD enhanced the viability of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by MTT assay. The apoptotic rate and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD was markedly decreased compared with those of chondrocytes not treated with BZD, as shown by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-FITC binding assay and JC-1 assay. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by ER stress, the mRNA and protein expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP-homologous protein (Chop), caspase-9, caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. In the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bip, Atf4, Chop, caspase-9, caspase-3

  13. Bushen Zhuangjin decoction inhibits TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pingdong; Weng, Xiaping; Liu, Fayuan; Ma, Yuhuan; Chen, Houhuang; Shao, Xiang; Zheng, Wenwei; Liu, Xianxiang; Ye, Hongzhi; Li, Xihai

    2015-12-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis triggered by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Bushen Zhuangjin decoction (BZD) has been widely used in the treatment of OA. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on chondrocyte apoptosis remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of BZD on ER stress-induced chondrocyte apoptosis using a chondrocyte in vitro model of OA. Chondrocytes obtained from the articular cartilage of the knee joints of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were detected by immunohistochemical staining for type Ⅱ collagen. The ER stress-mediated apoptosis of tunicamycin (TM)‑stimulated chondrocytes was detected using 4-phenylbutyric acid (4‑PBA). We found that 4‑PBA inhibited TM-induced chondrocyte apoptosis, which confirmed the successful induction of chondrocyte apoptosis. BZD enhanced the viability of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by MTT assay. The apoptotic rate and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) of the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD was markedly decreased compared with those of chondrocytes not treated with BZD, as shown by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, Annexin V-FITC binding assay and JC-1 assay. To further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the inhibitory effects of BZD on TM‑induced chondrocyte apoptosis mediated by ER stress, the mRNA and protein expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (Bip), X‑box binding protein 1 (Xbp1), activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4), C/EBP‑homologous protein (Chop), caspase‑9, caspase-3, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. In the TM-stimulated chondrocytes treated with BZD, the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bip, Atf4, Chop, caspase

  14. Pannocytes: distinctive cells found in rheumatoid arthritis articular cartilage erosions.

    PubMed Central

    Zvaifler, N. J.; Tsai, V.; Alsalameh, S.; von Kempis, J.; Firestein, G. S.; Lotz, M.

    1997-01-01

    A distinctive cell was identified from sites of rheumatoid arthritis cartilage injury. Similar cells are not found in lesions of osteoarthritis cartilage. We have designated them as pannocytes (PCs). Their rhomboid morphology differs from the bipolar shape of fibroblast-like synoviocytes or the spherical configuration of primary human articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes are short-lived, whereas the original PC line grew for 25 passages before becoming senescent. Features in common with cultured primary chondrocytes include maximal proliferation in response to transforming growth factor-beta a catabolic response to interleukin-1 beta, collagenase production, and mRNA for the induced lymphocyte antigen and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Despite the presence of the inducible nitric oxide synthase message, PCs do not produce NO either constitutively or when cytokine stimulated. Each of the mesenchymal cells, fibroblast-like synoviocytes, primary chondrocytes, and PCs have the gene for type I collagen, but the type II collagen gene is detected only in primary chondrocytes. PCs can be distinguished from fibroblast-like synoviocytes and primary chondrocytes by their morphology, bright VCAM-1 staining, and growth response to cytokines and growth factors. Their prolonged life span in vitro suggests that PCs might represent an earlier stage of mesenchymal cell differentiation, and they could have a heretofore unrecognized role in rheumatoid arthritis joint destruction. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 PMID:9060847

  15. Cartilage Abnormalities Associated with Defects of Chondrocytic Primary Cilia in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Anjan P.; Martin, James A.; Zhang, Qihong; Sheffield, Val C.; Morcuende, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary cilia are found on nearly every mammalian cell, including osteocytes, fibroblasts, and chondrocytes. However, the functions of primary cilia have not been extensively studied in these cells, particularly chondrocytes. Interestingly, defects in the primary cilium result in skeletal defects such as polydactyly in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS), a ciliary disorder that also results in obesity, retinopathy, and cognitive impairments (1–4). Wild-type mice and mutant mice of the ciliary proteins Bbs1, Bbs2, and Bbs6 were evaluated with respect to histological and biochemical differences in chondrocytes from articular cartilage and xiphoid processes. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, chondrocytic cilia were visualized from the load-bearing joints and non-load-bearing xiphoid processes. Significant differences in ciliary morphology were not identified between mutant and wild-type mice. However, after expanding chondrocytes in cell culture and implanting them in solid agarose matrix, it was seen that the fraction of ciliated cells in cultures from mutant mice was significantly lower than in the wild-type cultures (p<.05). In addition, in Safranin-O-stained whole joint sections, Bbs mutant mice had significantly lower articular joint thickness (p<.05) and lower proteoglycan content saturation (p<.05) than wild-type mice. Moreover, there were statistically significant differences of cell distribution between Bbs mutant and wild-type mice (p<.05), indicating that mutant articular cartilage had changes consistent with early signs of osteoarthritis. These data indicate that Bbs genes and their functions in the chondrocytic primary cilium are important for normal articular cartilage maintenance. PMID:19195025

  16. Mechanical loading of in situ chondrocytes in lapine retropatellar cartilage after anterior cruciate ligament transection.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Kuy; Seerattan, Ruth; Herzog, Walter

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to quantify chondrocyte mechanics in fully intact articular cartilage attached to its native bone and (ii) to compare the chondrocyte mechanics for cells in healthy and early osteoarthritis (OA) tissue. We hypothesized that cells in the healthy tissue would deform less for given articular surface pressures than cells in the early OA tissue because of a loss of matrix integrity in early OA and the associated loss of structural integrity that is thought to protect chondrocytes. Chondrocyte dynamics were quantified by measuring the deformation response of the cells to controlled loading of fully intact cartilage using a custom-designed confocal indentation system. Early OA was achieved nine weeks following transection of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in rabbit knees. Experiments were performed on the retropatellar cartilage of early OA rabbit knees (four joints and 48 cells), the corresponding intact contralateral control knees (four joints and 48 cells) and knees from normal control rabbits (four joints and 48 cells). Nine weeks following ACL transection, articular cartilage of the experimental joints showed substantial increases in thickness, and progression towards OA as assessed using histological grading. Local matrix strains in the superficial zone were greater for the experimental (38 +/- 4%) compared with the contralateral (27 +/- 5%) and normal (28 +/- 4%) joints (p = 0.04). Chondrocyte deformations in the axial and depth directions were similar during indentation loading for all experimental groups. However, cell width increased more for the experimental cartilage chondrocytes (12 +/- 1%) than the contralateral (6 +/- 1%) and normal control chondrocytes (6 +/- 1%; p < 0.001). On average, chondrocyte volume increased with indentation loading in the early OA cartilage (8 +/- 3%, p = 0.001), while it decreased for the two control groups (-8 +/- 2%, p = 0.002 for contralateral and -8 +/- 1%, p = 0.004 for normal controls

  17. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a rabbit osteoarthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, N-T.; Cui, Y-P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent studies have shown that systemic injection of rapamycin can prevent the development of osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in human chondrocytes and reduce the severity of experimental OA. However, the systemic injection of rapamycin leads to many side effects. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of intra-articular injection of Torin 1, which as a specific inhibitor of mTOR which can cause induction of autophagy, is similar to rapamycin, on articular cartilage degeneration in a rabbit osteoarthritis model and to investigate the mechanism of Torin 1’s effects on experimental OA. Methods Collagenase (type II) was injected twice into both knees of three-month-old rabbits to induce OA, combined with two intra–articular injections of Torin 1 (400 nM). Degeneration of articular cartilage was evaluated by histology using the Mankin scoring system at eight weeks after injection. Chondrocyte degeneration and autophagosomes were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Matrix metallopeptidase-13 (MMP-13) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR).Beclin-1 and light chain 3 (LC3) expression were examined by Western blotting. Results Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 significantly reduced degeneration of the articular cartilage after induction of OA. Autophagosomes andBeclin-1 and LC3 expression were increased in the chondrocytes from Torin 1-treated rabbits. Torin 1 treatment also reduced MMP-13 and VEGF expression at eight weeks after collagenase injection. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in collagenase-induced OA, at least partially by autophagy activation, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach for preventing cartilage degeneration and treating OA. Cite this article: N-T. Cheng, A. Guo, Y-P. Cui. Intra-articular injection of Torin 1 reduces degeneration of articular cartilage in a

  18. 3D braid scaffolds for regeneration of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyunchul; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Park, Sook Young; Huh, Jeong Eun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2014-06-01

    Regenerating articular cartilage in vivo from cultured chondrocytes requires that the cells be cultured and implanted within a biocompatible, biodegradable scaffold. Such scaffolds must be mechanically stable; otherwise chondrocytes would not be supported and patients would experience severe pain. Here we report a new 3D braid scaffold that matches the anisotropic (gradient) mechanical properties of natural articular cartilage and is permissive to cell cultivation. To design an optimal structure, the scaffold unit cell was mathematically modeled and imported into finite element analysis. Based on this analysis, a 3D braid structure with gradient axial yarn distribution was designed and manufactured using a custom-built braiding machine. The mechanical properties of the 3D braid scaffold were evaluated and compared with simulated results, demonstrating that a multi-scale approach consisting of unit cell modeling and continuum analysis facilitates design of scaffolds that meet the requirements for mechanical compatibility with tissues. PMID:24556323

  19. Long-term storage and preservation of tissue engineered articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nover, Adam B; Stefani, Robert M; Lee, Stephanie L; Ateshian, Gerard A; Stoker, Aaron M; Cook, James L; Hung, Clark T

    2016-01-01

    With limited availability of osteochondral allografts, tissue engineered cartilage grafts may provide an alternative treatment for large cartilage defects. An effective storage protocol will be critical for translating this technology to clinical use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the Missouri Osteochondral Allograft Preservation System (MOPS) for room temperature storage of mature tissue engineered grafts, focusing on tissue property maintenance during the current allograft storage window (28 days). Additional research compares MOPS to continued culture, investigates temperature influence, and examines longer-term storage. Articular cartilage constructs were cultured to maturity using adult canine chondrocytes, then preserved with MOPS at room temperature, in refrigeration, or kept in culture for an additional 56 days. MOPS storage maintained desired chondrocyte viability for 28 days of room temperature storage, retaining 75% of the maturity point Young's modulus without significant decline in biochemical content. Properties dropped past this time point. Refrigeration maintained properties similar to room temperature at 28 days, but proved better at 56 days. For engineered grafts, MOPS maintained the majority of tissue properties for the 28-day window without clearly extending that period as it had for native grafts. These results are the first evaluating engineered cartilage storage.

  20. Mechanical overloading causes mitochondrial superoxide and SOD2 imbalance in chondrocytes resulting in cartilage degeneration.

    PubMed

    Koike, Masato; Nojiri, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Muramatsu, Yuta; Kaneko, Haruka; Morikawa, Daichi; Kobayashi, Keiji; Saita, Yoshitomo; Sasho, Takahisa; Shirasawa, Takuji; Yokote, Koutaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress and aging are major risk factors of cartilage degeneration. Human studies have previously reported that oxidative damage increased, while SOD2 protein was reciprocally downregulated in osteoarthritic degenerated cartilage. However, it remains unclear whether mitochondrial superoxide imbalance in chondrocytes causes cartilage degeneration. We herein demonstrate that mechanical loading promoted mitochondrial superoxide generation and selective Sod2 downregulation in chondrocytes in vivo and that mitochondrial superoxide inducer also downregulated Sod2 expression in chondrocytes in vitro. A genetically manipulated model revealed that Sod2 deficiency in chondrocytes also resulted in mitochondrial superoxide overproduction and dysfunction, thus leading to cartilage degeneration. Intra-articular injection of a permeable antioxidant effectively suppressed the mechanical loading-induced mitochondrial superoxide generation and cartilage degeneration in mice. Our findings demonstrate that mitochondrial superoxide plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of osteoarthritis, and the mitochondrial superoxide balance may therefore be a promising target for the treatment of cartilage degeneration. PMID:26108578

  1. Determination of the Poisson's ratio of the cell: recovery properties of chondrocytes after release from complete micropipette aspiration.

    PubMed

    Trickey, Wendy R; Baaijens, Frank P T; Laursen, Tod A; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Guilak, Farshid

    2006-01-01

    Chondrocytes in articular cartilage are regularly subjected to compression and recovery due to dynamic loading of the joint. Previous studies have investigated the elastic and viscoelastic properties of chondrocytes using micropipette aspiration techniques, but in order to calculate cell properties, these studies have generally assumed that cells are incompressible with a Poisson's ratio of 0.5. The goal of this study was to measure the Poisson's ratio and recovery properties of the chondrocyte by combining theoretical modeling with experimental measures of complete cellular aspiration and release from a micropipette. Chondrocytes isolated from non-osteoarthritic and osteoarthritic cartilage were fully aspirated into a micropipette and allowed to reach mechanical equilibrium. Cells were then extruded from the micropipette and cell volume and morphology were measured throughout the experiment. This experimental procedure was simulated with finite element analysis, modeling the chondrocyte as either a compressible two-mode viscoelastic solid, or as a biphasic viscoelastic material. By fitting the experimental data to the theoretically predicted cell response, the Poisson's ratio and the viscoelastic recovery properties of the cell were determined. The Poisson's ratio of chondrocytes was found to be 0.38 for non-osteoarthritic cartilage and 0.36 for osteoarthritic chondrocytes (no significant difference). Osteoarthritic chondrocytes showed an increased recovery time following full aspiration. In contrast to previous assumptions, these findings suggest that chondrocytes are compressible, consistent with previous studies showing cell volume changes with compression of the extracellular matrix.

  2. FOXO transcription factors support oxidative stress resistance in human chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Akasaki, Yukio; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Saito, Masahiko; Caramés, Beatriz; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Lotz, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A major signaling pathway that regulates cellular aging is the Insulin/IGF-1/Pl3k/Akt/forkhead-box class O (FOXO) transcription factor axis. Previously, we observed that FOXO factors are dysregulated in aged and OA cartilage. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of downregulated FOXOs on chondrocytes. Methods Small interference RNAs (siRNAs) for FOXO1 and FOXO3 were transfected into human articular chondrocytes. Cell viability following treatment with the oxidant tert-Butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) was measured by MTT assay. Caspase-3/7 activation and apoptotic cell were examined. Gene and protein expression of antioxidant proteins and autophagy related proteins and changes in inflammatory mediators following treatment with IL-1β were analyzed. Cells transfected with FOXO plasmids were also analyzed. Results Cell viability was significantly reduced by siFOXO under treatment with t-BHP. Apoptosis accompanied by caspase activation was significantly induced in FOXO-siRNA transfected chondrocytes. Knock-down of FOXO1 and FOXO1+3 resulted in significant reductions of GPX-1, catalase, LC3, Beclin1, and SIRT1 proteins following treatment with t-BHP. In contrast, constitutive active form of FOXO 3 increased cell viability while inducing GPX1, Beclin1, and LC3 in response to t-BHP. Expression and production of ADAMTS-4 and Chemerin were significantly increased in FOXO-siRNA transfected chondrocytes. Conclusions Reduced expression of FOXO transcription factors in chondrocytes increased susceptibility to cell death induced by oxidative stress. This was associated with reduced antioxidant proteins and autophagy related proteins. Our data provide evidence for a key role of FOXO transcription factors as regulators of chondrocyte oxidative stress resistance and tissue homeostasis. PMID:25186470

  3. Dynamic Compression of Chondrocyte-Agarose Constructs Reveals New Candidate Mechanosensitive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bougault, Carole; Aubert-Foucher, Elisabeth; Paumier, Anne; Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Huot, Ludovic; Hot, David; Duterque-Coquillaud, Martine; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage is physiologically exposed to repeated loads. The mechanical properties of cartilage are due to its extracellular matrix, and homeostasis is maintained by the sole cell type found in cartilage, the chondrocyte. Although mechanical forces clearly control the functions of articular chondrocytes, the biochemical pathways that mediate cellular responses to mechanical stress have not been fully characterised. The aim of our study was to examine early molecular events triggered by dynamic compression in chondrocytes. We used an experimental system consisting of primary mouse chondrocytes embedded within an agarose hydrogel; embedded cells were pre-cultured for one week and subjected to short-term compression experiments. Using Western blots, we demonstrated that chondrocytes maintain a differentiated phenotype in this model system and reproduce typical chondrocyte-cartilage matrix interactions. We investigated the impact of dynamic compression on the phosphorylation state of signalling molecules and genome-wide gene expression. After 15 min of dynamic compression, we observed transient activation of ERK1/2 and p38 (members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways) and Smad2/3 (members of the canonical transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathways). A microarray analysis performed on chondrocytes compressed for 30 min revealed that only 20 transcripts were modulated more than 2-fold. A less conservative list of 325 modulated genes included genes related to the MAPK and TGF-β pathways and/or known to be mechanosensitive in other biological contexts. Of these candidate mechanosensitive genes, 85% were down-regulated. Down-regulation may therefore represent a general control mechanism for a rapid response to dynamic compression. Furthermore, modulation of transcripts corresponding to different aspects of cellular physiology was observed, such as non-coding RNAs or primary cilium. This study provides new insight into how chondrocytes respond

  4. REST corepressor (CoREST) repression induces phenotypic gene regulation in advanced osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Tao; Wu, Zhihong; Shi, Zhanjun; Chen, Jianting; Lam, Stephen K L; Zhao, Zandong; Yang, Lanbo; Qiu, Guixing

    2010-12-01

    Alternations in cartilage chondrocyte phenotype characteristic by the decreased type II collagen and aggrecan together with increased type X collagen synthesis serve as a beacon for osteoarthritis progression. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. The current study seeks to discover molecules that involved in osteoarthritic chondrocytes phenotype regulation. Differential proteomics was generated with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis between normal articular cartilage (NAC) and advanced osteoarthritic cartilage (AOC). Those differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. The down-regulation of a neuronal silencer, the REST corepressor (CoREST) in AOC, was verified by Western blot. CoREST silencing was performed in primarily cultured NAC chondrocytes with specific siRNA to reveal the possible involvement of CoREST repression in chondrocyte phenotypic genes modulation. Ninteen differentially expressed proteins were screened and identified. Among these proteins, CoREST, HHL, and zinc finger protein 155 were estimated to be possible gene modulators. CoREST protein level was verified to be down-regulated by 69.5% (p < 0.001) in AOC. In response to CoREST knock-down by 64.8% (p < 0.001) in NAC chondrocytes, the gene expression level of the chondrocyte terminal differentiation marker gene, collagen X was found to be up-regulated by 40.0% (p = 0.017), whereas the chondrocyte differentiation phenotypic genes, collagen II and aggrecan were down-regulated by 71.4% (p < 0.001) and 57.6% (p < 0.001), respectively. The results indicate that the silencing of CoREST by siRNA transfection in NAC may reflect CoREST repression in AOC, which results in phenotypic genes modulation and suggests a homeostatic role of this transcription factor in articular chondrocyte.

  5. The potential of pulsed low intensity ultrasound to stimulate chondrocytes matrix synthesis in agarose and monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Natalie M; Grainger, James; Bader, Dan L; Knight, Martin M

    2010-12-01

    Pulsed low intensity ultrasound (PLIUS) has been used successfully for bone fracture repair and has therefore been suggested for cartilage regeneration. However, previous in vitro studies with chondrocytes show conflicting results as to the effect of PLIUS on the elaboration of extracellular matrix. This study tests the hypothesis that PLIUS, applied for 20 min/day, stimulates the synthesis of sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) by adult bovine articular chondrocytes cultured in either monolayer or agarose constructs. For both culture models, PLIUS at either 30 or 100 mW/cm(2) intensity had no net effect on the total sGAG content. Although PLIUS at 100 mW/cm(2) did induce a 20% increase in sGAG content at day 2 of culture in agarose, this response was lost by day 5. Intensities of 200 and 300 mW/cm(2) resulted in cell death probably due to heating from the ultrasound transducers. The lack of a sustained up-regulation of sGAG synthesis may reflect the suggestion that PLIUS only induces a stimulatory effect in the presence of a tissue injury response. These results suggest that PLIUS has a limited potential to provide an effective method of stimulating matrix production as part of a tissue engineering strategy for cartilage repair. PMID:20938751

  6. Softening Substrates Promote Chondrocytes Phenotype via RhoA/ROCK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Lin, Shiyu; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Tengfei; Lin, Yunfeng

    2016-09-01

    Due to its evascular, aneural, and alymphatic conditions, articular cartilage shows extremely poor regenerative ability. Thus, directing chondrocyte toward a desired location and function by utilizing the mechanical cues of biomaterials is a promising approach for effective tissue regeneration. However, chondrocytes cultured on Petri dish will lose their typical phenotype which may lead to compromised results. Therefore, we fabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials with various stiffness as culture substrates. Cell morphology and focal adhesion of chondrocytes displayed significant changes. The cytoskeletal tension of the adherent cells observed by average myosin IIA fluorescent intensity increased as stiffness of the underlying substrates decreased, consistent with the alteration of chondrocyte phenotype in our study. Immunofluorescent images and q-PCR results revealed that chondrocyte cultured on soft substrates showed better chondrocyte functionalization by more type II collagen and aggrecan expression, related to the lowest mRNA level of Rac-1, RhoA, ROCK-1, and ROCK-2. Taken together, this work not only points out that matrix elasticity can regulate chondrocyte functionalization via RhoA/ROCK pathway, but also provides new prospect for biomechanical control of cell behavior in cell-based cartilage regeneration.

  7. IL-36α: a novel cytokine involved in the catabolic and inflammatory response in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Javier; Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; Lois, Ana; López, Verónica; García-Caballero, Tomás; Pino, Jesús; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús; Gómez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies confer to IL-36α pro-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about the expression and function of IL-36α in cartilage. This study sought to analyze the expression of IL-36α in healthy and OA cartilage. Next, we determined the effects of recombinant IL-36α on catabolism and inflammation in chondrocytes. For completeness, part of the signaling pathway elicited by IL-36α was also explored. IL-36α expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2 was also determined in OA articular chondrocytes treated with recombinant IL-36α. IκB-α and P-p38 was explored by western blot. We observed a low constitutive expression of IL-36α in healthy human chondrocytes. However, OA chondrocytes likely expressed more IL-36α than healthy chondrocytes. In addition, immune cells infiltrated into the joint and PBMCs express higher levels of IL-36α in comparison to chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, treated with IL-36α, showed significant increase in the expression of MMP-13, NOS2 and COX-2. Finally, IL-36α stimulated cells showed NFκB and p38 MAPK activated pathways. IL-36α acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine at cartilage level, by increasing the expression of markers of inflammation and cartilage catabolism. Like other members of IL-1 family, IL-36α acts through the activation of NFκB and p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:26560022

  8. Softening Substrates Promote Chondrocytes Phenotype via RhoA/ROCK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Gong, Tao; Xie, Jing; Lin, Shiyu; Liu, Yao; Zhou, Tengfei; Lin, Yunfeng

    2016-09-01

    Due to its evascular, aneural, and alymphatic conditions, articular cartilage shows extremely poor regenerative ability. Thus, directing chondrocyte toward a desired location and function by utilizing the mechanical cues of biomaterials is a promising approach for effective tissue regeneration. However, chondrocytes cultured on Petri dish will lose their typical phenotype which may lead to compromised results. Therefore, we fabricated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials with various stiffness as culture substrates. Cell morphology and focal adhesion of chondrocytes displayed significant changes. The cytoskeletal tension of the adherent cells observed by average myosin IIA fluorescent intensity increased as stiffness of the underlying substrates decreased, consistent with the alteration of chondrocyte phenotype in our study. Immunofluorescent images and q-PCR results revealed that chondrocyte cultured on soft substrates showed better chondrocyte functionalization by more type II collagen and aggrecan expression, related to the lowest mRNA level of Rac-1, RhoA, ROCK-1, and ROCK-2. Taken together, this work not only points out that matrix elasticity can regulate chondrocyte functionalization via RhoA/ROCK pathway, but also provides new prospect for biomechanical control of cell behavior in cell-based cartilage regeneration. PMID:27534990

  9. Lithium chloride modulates chondrocyte primary cilia and inhibits Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Clare L; Wiles, Anna; Poole, C Anthony; Knight, Martin M

    2016-02-01

    Lithium chloride (LiCl) exhibits significant therapeutic potential as a treatment for osteoarthritis. Hedgehog signaling is activated in osteoarthritis, where it promotes chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage matrix catabolism. Hedgehog signaling requires the primary cilium such that maintenance of this compartment is essential for pathway activity. Here we report that LiCl (50 mM) inhibits Hedgehog signaling in bovine articular chondrocytes such that the induction of GLI1 and PTCH1 expression is reduced ​ by 71 and 55%, respectively. Pathway inhibition is associated with a 97% increase in primary cilia length from 2.09 ± 0.7 μm in untreated cells to 4.06 ± 0.9 μm in LiCl-treated cells. We show that cilia elongation disrupts trafficking within the axoneme with a 38% reduction in Arl13b ciliary localization at the distal region of the cilium, consistent with the role of Arl13b in modulating Hedgehog signaling. In addition, we demonstrate similar increases in cilia length in human chondrocytes in vitro and after administration of dietary lithium to Wistar rats in vivo. Our data provide new insights into the effects of LiCl on chondrocyte primary cilia and Hedgehog signaling and shows for the first time that pharmaceutical targeting of the primary cilium may have therapeutic benefits in the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:26499268

  10. Collagen and chondrocyte concentrations control ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, S; Liukkonen, J; Ylärinne, J H; Puhakka, P H; Lammi, M J; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound imaging has been proposed for diagnostics of osteoarthritis and cartilage injuries in vivo. However, the specific contribution of chondrocytes and collagen to ultrasound scattering in articular cartilage has not been systematically studied. We investigated the role of these tissue structures by measuring ultrasound scattering in agarose scaffolds with varying collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Ultrasound catheters with center frequencies of 9 MHz (7.1-11.0 MHz, -6 dB) and 40 MHz (30.1-45.3 MHz, -6 dB) were applied using an intravascular ultrasound device. Ultrasound backscattering quantified in a region of interest starting right below sample surface differed significantly (p < 0.05) with the concentrations of collagen and chondrocytes. An ultrasound frequency of 40 MHz, as compared with 9 MHz, was more sensitive to variations in collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. The present findings may improve diagnostic interpretation of arthroscopic ultrasound imaging and provide information necessary for development of models describing ultrasound propagation within cartilage. PMID:24972499

  11. Effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangzhi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Chaoyong; Sun, Yu; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Yuebei; Bao, Rongni; Zhao, Ningjian

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are suffering from osteoarthritis every year, and the directed intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells has provided a promising treatment strategy for osteoarthritis. Although a number of studies have demonstrated that intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells produced desirable results, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. In the current study, the effect of bone marrow stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis was observed in a co-culture system. Human chondrocytes were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent surgical procedures and bone marrow stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspirates, and then the chondrocytes were then cultured alone or cocultured with bone marrow stem cells in 0.4-µm Transwell inserts. The differentiation and biological activity of chondrocytes in the culture system were measured, and the inflammatory factors and OA-associated markers were also measured. The results indicated that coculture with human bone marrow stem cells increases cell proliferation of chondrocytes and inhibits inflammatory activity in osteoarthritis.

  12. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhakka, P. H.; Ylärinne, J. H.; Lammi, M. J.; Saarakkala, S.; Tiitu, V.; Kröger, H.; Virén, T.; Jurvelin, J. S.; Töyräs, J.

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT.

  13. Dependence of light attenuation and backscattering on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density in agarose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, P H; Ylärinne, J H; Lammi, M J; Saarakkala, S; Tiitu, V; Kröger, H; Virén, T; Jurvelin, J S; Töyräs, J

    2014-11-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been applied for high resolution imaging of articular cartilage. However, the contribution of individual structural elements of cartilage on OCT signal has not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesize that both collagen and chondrocytes, essential structural components of cartilage, act as important light scatterers and that variation in their concentrations can be detected by OCT through changes in backscattering and attenuation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we established a controlled model system using agarose scaffolds embedded with variable collagen concentrations and chondrocyte densities. Using OCT, we measured the backscattering coefficient (µb) and total attenuation coefficient (µt) in these scaffolds. Along our hypothesis, light backscattering and attenuation in agarose were dependent on collagen concentration and chondrocyte density. Significant correlations were found between µt and chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001) and between µt and collagen concentration (ρ = 0.694, p < 0.001). µb correlated significantly with chondrocyte density (ρ = 0.504, p < 0.001) but not with collagen concentration (ρ = 0.103, p = 0.422) of the scaffold. Thus, quantitation of light backscattering and, especially, attenuation could be valuable when evaluating the integrity of soft tissues, such as articular cartilage with OCT. PMID:25310088

  14. Aging and Osteoarthritis: The Role of Chondrocyte Senescence and Aging Changes in the Cartilage Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Loeser, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objective Age-related changes in multiple components of the musculoskeletal system may contribute to the well established link between aging and osteoarthritis (OA). This review focused on potential mechanisms by which age-related changes in the articular cartilage could contribute to the development of OA. Methods The peer-reviewed literature published prior to February 2009 in the PubMed database was searched using pre-defined search criteria. Articles, selected for their relevance to aging and articular chondrocytes or cartilage, were summarized. Results Articular chondrocytes exhibit an age-related decline in proliferative and synthetic capacity while maintaining the ability to produce pro-inflammatory mediators and matrix degrading enzymes. These findings are characteristic of the senescent secretory phenotype and are most likely a consequence of extrinsic stress-induced senescence driven by oxidative stress rather than intrinsic replicative senescence. Extracellular matrix changes with aging also contribute to the propensity to develop OA and include the accumulation of proteins modified by non-enzymatic glycation. Conclusion The effects of aging on chondrocytes and their matrix result in a tissue that is less able to maintain homeostasis when stressed, resulting in breakdown and loss of the articular cartilage, a hallmark of osteoarthritis. A better understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying senescence and how the process may be modified could provide novel ways to slow the development of osteoarthritis. PMID:19303469

  15. CCN1 Regulates Chondrocyte Maturation and Cartilage Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongchun; Sheu, Tzong-jen; Hoak, Donna; Shen, Jie; Hilton, Matthew J; Zuscik, Michael J; Jonason, Jennifer H; O’Keefe, Regis J

    2016-01-01

    WNT/β-CATENIN signaling is involved in multiple aspects of skeletal development, including chondrocyte differentiation and maturation. Although the functions of β-CATENIN in chondrocytes have been extensively investigated through gain-of-function and loss-of-function mouse models, the precise downstream effectors through which β-CATENIN regulates these processes are not well defined. Here, we report that the matricellular protein, CCN1, is induced by WNT/β-CATENIN signaling in chondrocytes. Specifically, we found that β-CATENIN signaling promotes CCN1 expression in isolated primary sternal chondrocytes and both embryonic and postnatal cartilage. Additionally, we show that, in vitro, CCN1 overexpression promotes chondrocyte maturation, whereas inhibition of endogenous CCN1 function inhibits maturation. To explore the role of CCN1 on cartilage development and homeostasis in vivo, we generated a novel transgenic mouse model for conditional Ccn1 overexpression and show that cartilage-specific CCN1 overexpression leads to chondrodysplasia during development and cartilage degeneration in adult mice. Finally, we demonstrate that CCN1 expression increases in mouse knee joint tissues after meniscal/ligamentous injury (MLI) and in human cartilage after meniscal tear. Collectively, our data suggest that CCN1 is an important regulator of chondrocyte maturation during cartilage development and homeostasis. PMID:26363286

  16. The surface of articular cartilage contains a progenitor cell population.

    PubMed

    Dowthwaite, Gary P; Bishop, Joanna C; Redman, Samantha N; Khan, Ilyas M; Rooney, Paul; Evans, Darrell J R; Haughton, Laura; Bayram, Zubeyde; Boyer, Sam; Thomson, Brian; Wolfe, Michael S; Archer, Charles W

    2004-02-29

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that articular cartilage growth is achieved by apposition from the articular surface. For such a mechanism to occur, a population of stem/progenitor cells must reside within the articular cartilage to provide transit amplifying progeny for growth. Here, we report on the isolation of an articular cartilage progenitor cell from the surface zone of articular cartilage using differential adhesion to fibronectin. This population of cells exhibits high affinity for fibronectin, possesses a high colony-forming efficiency and expresses the cell fate selector gene Notch 1. Inhibition of Notch signalling abolishes colony forming ability whilst activated Notch rescues this inhibition. The progenitor population also exhibits phenotypic plasticity in its differentiation pathway in an embryonic chick tracking system, such that chondroprogenitors can engraft into a variety of connective tissue types including bone, tendon and perimysium. The identification of a chondrocyte subpopulation with progenitor-like characteristics will allow for advances in our understanding of both cartilage growth and maintenance as well as provide novel solutions to articular cartilage repair. PMID:14762107

  17. Prolonged Application of High Fluid Shear to Chondrocytes Recapitulates Gene Expression Profiles Associated with Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Wang, Pu; Lee, Norman H.; Goldring, Mary B.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    Background Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA) disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm2) for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS) induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. Conclusions/Significance Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis/progression of OA

  18. Directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrogenic lineages for articular cartilage treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lach, Michał; Richter, Magdalena; Pawlicz, Jarosław; Suchorska, Wiktoria M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increases in the number of articular cartilage injuries caused by environmental factors or pathological conditions have led to a notable rise in the incidence of premature osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis, considered a disease of civilization, is the leading cause of disability. At present, standard methods for treating damaged articular cartilage, including autologous chondrocyte implantation or microfracture, are short-term solutions with important side effects. Emerging treatments include the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, a technique that could provide a new tool for treatment of joint damage. However, research in this area is still early, and no optimal protocol for transforming induced pluripotent stem cells into chondrocytes has yet been established. Developments in our understanding of cartilage developmental biology, together with the use of modern technologies in the field of tissue engineering, provide an opportunity to create a complete functional model of articular cartilage. PMID:25383175

  19. Transient anabolic effects accompany epidermal growth factor receptor signal activation in articular cartilage in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Signals from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have typically been considered to provide catabolic activities in articular cartilage, and accordingly have been suggested to have a causal role in osteoarthritis progression. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo roles for endogenous EGFR signal activation in articular cartilage. Methods Transgenic mice with conditional, limb-targeted deletion of the endogenous intracellular EGFR inhibitor Mig-6 were generated using CreLoxP (Mig-6-flox; Prx1Cre) recombination. Histology, histochemical staining and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm activation of EGFR signaling in the articular cartilage and joints, and to analyze phenotypic consequences of Mig-6 loss on articular cartilage morphology, proliferation, expression of progenitor cell markers, presence of chondrocyte hypertrophy and degradation of articular cartilage matrix. Results The articular cartilage of Mig-6-conditional knockout (Mig-6-cko) mice was dramatically and significantly thicker than normal articular cartilage at 6 and 12 weeks of age. Mig-6-cko articular cartilage contained a population of chondrocytes in which EGFR signaling was activated, and which were three to four times more proliferative than normal Mig-6-flox articular chondrocytes. These cells expressed high levels of the master chondrogenic regulatory factor Sox9, as well as high levels of putative progenitor cell markers including superficial zone protein (SZP), growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF-5) and Notch1. Expression levels were also high for activated β-catenin and the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) mediators phospho-Smad2/3 (pSmad2/3). Anabolic effects of EGFR activation in articular cartilage were followed by catabolic events, including matrix degradation, as determined by accumulation of aggrecan cleavage fragments, and onset of hypertrophy as determined by type × collagen expression. By 16 weeks of age, the articular cartilage of

  20. Calcium signaling in response to fluid flow by chondrocytes in 3D alginate culture.

    PubMed

    Degala, Satish; Williams, Rebecca; Zipfel, Warren; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2012-05-01

    Quantifying the effects of mechanical loading on the metabolic response of chondrocytes is difficult due to complicated structure of cartilage ECM and the coupled nature of the mechanical stimuli presented to the cells. In this study we describe the effects of fluid flow, particularly hydrostatic pressure and wall shear stress, on the Ca(2+) signaling response of bovine articular chondrocytes in 3D culture. Using well-established alginate hydrogel system to maintain spherical chondrocyte morphology, we altered solid volume fraction to change scaffold mechanics. Fluid velocities in the bulk of the scaffolds were directly measured via an optical technique and scaffold permeability and aggregate modulus was characterized to quantify the mechanical stimuli presented to cells. Ca(2+) signaling response to direct perfusion of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds increased monotonically with flow rate and was found more directly dependent on fluid velocity rather than shear stress or hydrostatic pressure. Chondrocytes in alginate scaffolds responded to fluid flow at velocities and shear stresses 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than seen in previous monolayer studies. Our data suggest that flow-induced Ca(2+) signaling response of chondrocytes in alginate culture may be due to mechanical signaling pathways, which is influenced by the 3D nature of cell shape.

  1. Finite difference time domain model of ultrasound propagation in agarose scaffold containing collagen or chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inkinen, Satu I; Liukkonen, Jukka; Malo, Markus K H; Virén, Tuomas; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of ultrasound backscattering is a promising diagnostic technique for arthroscopic evaluation of articular cartilage. However, contribution of collagen and chondrocytes on ultrasound backscattering and speed of sound in cartilage is not fully understood and is experimentally difficult to study. Agarose hydrogels have been used in tissue engineering applications of cartilage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to simulate the propagation of high frequency ultrasound (40 MHz) in agarose scaffolds with varying concentrations of chondrocytes (1 to 32 × 10(6) cells/ml) and collagen (1.56-200 mg/ml) using transversely isotropic two-dimensional finite difference time domain method (FDTD). Backscatter and speed of sound were evaluated from the simulated pulse-echo and through transmission measurements, respectively. Ultrasound backscatter increased with increasing collagen and chondrocyte concentrations. Furthermore, speed of sound increased with increasing collagen concentration. However, this was not observed with increasing chondrocyte concentrations. The present study suggests that the FDTD method may have some applicability in simulations of ultrasound scattering and propagation in constructs containing collagen and chondrocytes. Findings of this study indicate the significant role of collagen and chondrocytes as ultrasound scatterers and can aid in development of modeling approaches for understanding how cartilage architecture affects to the propagation of high frequency ultrasound. PMID:27475127

  2. Induction of nerve growth factor expression and release by mechanical and inflammatory stimuli in chondrocytes: possible involvement in osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nerve growth factor (NGF) level is increased in osteoarthritis (OA) joints and is involved in pain associated with OA. Stimuli responsible for NGF stimulation in chondrocytes are unknown. We investigated whether mechanical stress and proinflammatory cytokines may influence NGF synthesis by chondrocytes. Methods Primary cultures of human OA chondrocytes, newborn mouse articular chondrocytes or cartilage explants were stimulated by increasing amounts of IL-1β, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) or by cyclic mechanical compression (0.5 Hz, 1 MPa). Before stimulation, chondrocytes were pretreated with indomethacin, Apo866, a specific inhibitor of NAMPT enzymatic activity, or transfected by siRNA targeting visfatin/NAMPT. mRNA NGF levels were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and NGF released into media was determined by ELISA. Results Unstimulated human and mouse articular chondrocytes expressed low levels of NGF (19.2 ± 8.7 pg/mL, 13.5 ± 1.0 pg/mL and 4.4 ± 0.8 pg/mL/mg tissue for human and mouse articular chondrocytes and costal explants, respectively). Mechanical stress induced NGF release in conditioned media. When stimulated by IL-1β or visfatin/NAMPT, a proinflammatory adipokine produced by chondocytes in response to IL-1β, a dose-dependent increase in NGF mRNA expression and NGF release in both human and mouse chondrocyte conditioned media was observed. Visfatin/NAMPT is also an intracellular enzyme acting as the rate-limiting enzyme of the generation of NAD. The expression of NGF induced by visfatin/NAMPT was inhibited by Apo866, whereas IL-1β-mediated NGF expression was not modified by siRNA targeting visfatin/NAMPT. Interestingly, PGE2, which is produced by chondrocytes in response to IL-1β and visfatin/NAMPT, did not stimulate NGF production. Consistently, indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, did not counteract IL-1β-induced NGF production. Conclusions These

  3. TRPV4-mediated mechanotransduction regulates the metabolic response of chondrocytes to dynamic loading

    PubMed Central

    O’Conor, Christopher J.; Leddy, Holly A.; Benefield, Halei C.; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of joints plays a critical role in maintaining the health and function of articular cartilage. The mechanism(s) of chondrocyte mechanotransduction are not fully understood, but could provide important insights into new physical or pharmacologic therapies for joint diseases. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), a Ca2+-permeable osmomechano-TRP channel, is highly expressed in articular chondrocytes, and loss of TRPV4 function is associated with joint arthropathy and osteoarthritis. The goal of this study was to examine the hypothesis that TRPV4 transduces dynamic compressive loading in articular chondrocytes. We first confirmed the presence of physically induced, TRPV4-dependent intracellular Ca2+ signaling in agarose-embedded chondrocytes, and then used this model system to study the role of TRPV4 in regulating the response of chondrocytes to dynamic compression. Inhibition of TRPV4 during dynamic loading prevented acute, mechanically mediated regulation of proanabolic and anticatabolic genes, and furthermore, blocked the loading-induced enhancement of matrix accumulation and mechanical properties. Furthermore, chemical activation of TRPV4 by the agonist GSK1016790A in the absence of mechanical loading similarly enhanced anabolic and suppressed catabolic gene expression, and potently increased matrix biosynthesis and construct mechanical properties. These findings support the hypothesis that TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ signaling plays a central role in the transduction of mechanical signals to support cartilage extracellular matrix maintenance and joint health. Moreover, these insights raise the possibility of therapeutically targeting TRPV4-mediated mechanotransduction for the treatment of diseases such as osteoarthritis, as well as to enhance matrix formation and functional properties of tissue-engineered cartilage as an alternative to bioreactor-based mechanical stimulation. PMID:24474754

  4. Arthroscopic Autologous Chondrocyte Transplantation for Osteochondritis Dissecans of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Patzer, Thilo; Krauspe, Ruediger; Hufeland, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans of the humeral capitellum is characterized by separation of a circumscript area of the articular surface and the subchondral bone in juvenile patients. In advanced lesions, arthroscopic fragment refixation or fragment removal with microfracturing or drilling can be successful. The purpose of this technical note is to describe an all-arthroscopic surgical technique for 3-dimensional purely autologous chondrocyte transplantation for osteochondral lesions of the humeral capitellum. PMID:27656389

  5. Tensorial electrokinetics in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Reynaud, Boris; Quinn, Thomas M

    2006-09-15

    Electrokinetic phenomena contribute to biomechanical functions of articular cartilage and underlie promising methods for early detection of osteoarthritic lesions. Although some transport properties, such as hydraulic permeability, are known to become anisotropic with compression, the direction-dependence of cartilage electrokinetic properties remains unknown. Electroosmosis experiments were therefore performed on adult bovine articular cartilage samples, whereby fluid flows were driven by electric currents in directions parallel and perpendicular to the articular surface of statically compressed explants. Magnitudes of electrokinetic coefficients decreased slightly with compression (from approximately -7.5 microL/As in the range of 0-20% compression to -6.0 microL/As in the 35-50% range) consistent with predictions of microstructure-based models of cartilage material properties. However, no significant dependence on direction of the electrokinetic coupling coefficient was detected, even for conditions where the hydraulic permeability tensor is known to be anisotropic. This contrast may also be interpreted using microstructure-based models, and provides insights into structure-function relationships in cartilage extracellular matrix and physical mediators of cell responses to tissue compression. Findings support the use of relatively simple isotropic modeling approaches for electrokinetic phenomena in cartilage and related materials, and indicate that measurement of electrokinetic properties may provide particularly robust means for clinical evaluation of cartilage matrix integrity.

  6. Hydrostatic pressure influences HIF-2 alpha expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  7. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; Zhang, Qing-Song; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Reiser, Brendan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Braun, Stephen E.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX) in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype. PMID:24758934

  8. Hydrostatic Pressure Influences HIF-2 Alpha Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Terauchi, Ryu; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Tsuchida, Shinji; Matsuki, Tomohiro; Ueshima, Keiichirou; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is considered to play a major role in the progression of osteoarthritis. Recently, it was reported that pressure amplitude influences HIF-2α expression in murine endothelial cells. We examined whether hydrostatic pressure is involved in expression of HIF-2α in articular chondrocytes. Chondrocytes were cultured and stimulated by inflammation or hydrostatic pressure of 0, 5, 10, or 50 MPa. After stimulation, heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HIF-2α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression were evaluated. The levels of all gene expression were increased by inflammatory stress. When chondrocytes were exposed to a hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa, HIF-2α, MMP-13, and MMP-3 gene expression increased significantly although those of HSP70 and NF-κB were not significantly different from the control group. In contrast, HIF-2α gene expression did not increase under a hydrostatic pressure of 50 MPa although HSP70 and NF-κB expression increased significantly compared to control. We considered that hydrostatic pressure of 5 MPa could regulate HIF-2α independent of NF-κB, because the level of HIF-2α gene expression increased significantly without upregulation of NF-κB expression at 5 MPa. Hydrostatic pressure may influence cartilage degeneration, inducing MMP-13 and MMP-3 expression through HIF-2α. PMID:25569085

  9. Stimulation by concanavalin A of cartilage-matrix proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.Q.; Nakashima, K.; Iwamoto, M.; Kato, Y. )

    1990-06-15

    The effect of concanavalin A on proteoglycan synthesis by rabbit costal and articular chondrocytes was examined. Chondrocytes were seeded at low density and grown to confluency in medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, and then the serum concentration was reduced to 0.3%. At the low serum concentration, chondrocytes adopted a fibroblastic morphology. Addition of concanavalin A to the culture medium induced a morphologic alteration of the fibroblastic cells to spherical chondrocytes and increased by 3- to 4-fold incorporation of (35S)sulfate and (3H)glucosamine into large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that was characteristically found in cartilage. The stimulation of incorporation of labeled precursors reflected real increases in proteoglycan synthesis, as chemical analyses showed a 4-fold increase in the accumulation of macromolecules containing hexuronic acid in concanavalin A-maintained cultures. Furthermore, the effect of concanavalin A on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans was greater than that of various growth factors or hormones. However, concanavalin A had smaller effects on (35S)sulfate incorporation into small proteoglycans and (3H)glucosamine incorporation into hyaluronic acid and chondroitinase AC-resistant glycosaminoglycans. Since other lectins tested, such as wheat germ agglutinin, lentil lectin, and phytohemagglutinin, had little effect on (35S)sulfate incorporation into proteoglycans, the concanavalin A action on chondrocytes seems specific. Although concanavalin A decreased (3H)thymidine incorporation in chondrocytes, the stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis could be observed in chondrocytes exposed to the inhibitor of DNA synthesis, cytosine arabinoside. These results indicate that concanavalin A is a potent modulator of proteoglycan synthesis by chondrocytes.

  10. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize and lyse chondrocytes under inflammatory, but not non-inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Cohen, E Suzanne; Bodmer, Helen C

    2003-05-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I allele HLA-B27 is strongly associated with seronegative spondyloarthropathies including ankylosing spondylitis and reactive arthritis. Although of unknown aetiology, one hypothesis suggests that a cytotoxic T cell (CTL) response against a self-antigen at sites of inflammation, such as entheses or joints may be involved. The chondrocyte is one of the major specialized cell types found both in articular cartilage and cartilaginous entheses and therefore is a possible source of such an antigen. CTL recognition of these cells is a potential mechanism for inflammation and cartilage damage, both through direct lysis of chondrocytes and the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). We test the feasibility of this hypothesis by examining the ability of chondrocytes to present antigen to CTL in vitro. Chondrocytes isolated from the ribcages of mice did not constitutively express detectable levels of MHC class I by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. In addition, they were resistant to lysis by alloreactive and influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP)-specific CTL. However, treatment of chondrocytes with IFN-gamma up-regulated MHC class I expression and rendered the cells susceptible to lysis by CTL. Similarly, IFN-gamma-treated chondrocytes infected with influenza A virus were recognized by NP-specific CTL, though with variable efficiency. Thus, we suggest that under certain circumstances CTL-mediated lysis of chondrocytes is potentially a potent mechanism for cartilage damage in vivo, but that low levels of MHC class I on healthy chondrocytes protects from immune recognition in health. PMID:12709012

  11. The spatial organisation of joint surface chondrocytes: review of its potential roles in tissue functioning, disease and early, preclinical diagnosis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Aicher, Wilhelm K; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2014-04-01

    Chondrocytes display within the articular cartilage depth-dependent variations of their many properties that are comparable to the depth-dependent changes of the properties of the surrounding extracellular matrix. However, not much is known about the spatial organisation of the chondrocytes throughout the tissue. Recent studies revealed that human chondrocytes display distinct spatial patterns of organisation within the articular surface, and each joint surface is dominated in a typical way by one of four basic spatial patterns. The resulting complex spatial organisations correlate with the specific diarthrodial joint type, suggesting an association of the chondrocyte organisation within the joint surface with the occurring biomechanical forces. In response to focal osteoarthritis (OA), the superficial chondrocytes experience a destruction of their spatial organisation within the OA lesion, but they also undergo a defined remodelling process distant from the OA lesion in the remaining, intact cartilage surface. One of the biological insights that can be derived from this spatial remodelling process is that the chondrocytes are able to respond in a generalised and coordinated fashion to distant focal OA. The spatial characteristics of this process are tremendously different from the cellular aggregations typical for OA lesions, suggesting differences in the underlying mechanisms. Here we summarise the available information on the spatial organisation of chondrocytes and its potential roles in cartilage functioning. The spatial organisation could be used to diagnose early OA onset before manifest OA results in tissue destruction and clinical symptoms. With further development, this concept may become clinically suitable for the diagnosis of preclinical OA.

  12. A vision on the future of articular cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Cucchiarini, M; Madry, H; Guilak, F; Saris, D B; Stoddart, M J; Koon Wong, M; Roughley, P

    2014-05-06

    An AO Foundation (Davos, Switzerland) sponsored workshop "Cell Therapy in Cartilage Repair" from the Symposium "Where Science meets Clinics" (September 5-7, 2013, Davos) gathered leaders from medicine, science, industry, and regulatory organisations to debate the vision of cell therapy in articular cartilage repair and the measures that could be taken to narrow the gap between vision and current practice. Cell-based therapy is already in clinical use to enhance the repair of cartilage lesions, with procedures such as microfracture and articular chondrocyte implantation. However, even though long term follow up is good from a clinical perspective and some of the most rigorous randomised controlled trials in the regenerative medicine/orthopaedics field show beneficial effect, none of these options have proved successful in restoring the original articular cartilage structure and functionality in patients so far. With the remarkable recent advances in experimental research in cell biology (new sources for chondrocytes, stem cells), molecular biology (growth factors, genes), biomaterials, biomechanics, and translational science, a combined effort between scientists and clinicians with broad expertise may allow development of an improved cell therapy for cartilage repair. This position paper describes the current state of the art in the field to help define a procedure adapted to the clinical situation for upcoming translation in the patient.

  13. Role of lubricin and boundary lubrication in the prevention of chondrocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Waller, Kimberly A; Zhang, Ling X; Elsaid, Khaled A; Fleming, Braden C; Warman, Matthew L; Jay, Gregory D

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is a complex disease involving the mechanical breakdown of articular cartilage in the presence of altered joint mechanics and chondrocyte death, but the connection between these factors is not well established. Lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein encoded by the PRG4 gene, provides boundary lubrication in articular joints. Joint friction is elevated and accompanied by accelerated cartilage damage in humans and mice that have genetic deficiency of lubricin. Here, we investigated the relationship between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte death using ex vivo and in vitro measurements of friction and apoptosis. We observed increases in whole-joint friction and cellular apoptosis in lubricin knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. When we used an in vitro bovine explant cartilage-on-cartilage bearing system, we observed a direct correlation between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte apoptosis in the superficial layers of cartilage. In the bovine explant system, the addition of lubricin as a test lubricant significantly lowered the static coefficient of friction and number of apoptotic chondrocytes. These results demonstrate a direct connection between lubricin, boundary lubrication, and cell survival and suggest that supplementation of synovial fluid with lubricin may be an effective treatment to prevent cartilage deterioration in patients with genetic or acquired deficiency of lubricin.

  14. Role of lubricin and boundary lubrication in the prevention of chondrocyte apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Kimberly A.; Zhang, Ling X.; Elsaid, Khaled A.; Fleming, Braden C.; Warman, Matthew L.; Jay, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a complex disease involving the mechanical breakdown of articular cartilage in the presence of altered joint mechanics and chondrocyte death, but the connection between these factors is not well established. Lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein encoded by the PRG4 gene, provides boundary lubrication in articular joints. Joint friction is elevated and accompanied by accelerated cartilage damage in humans and mice that have genetic deficiency of lubricin. Here, we investigated the relationship between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte death using ex vivo and in vitro measurements of friction and apoptosis. We observed increases in whole-joint friction and cellular apoptosis in lubricin knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. When we used an in vitro bovine explant cartilage-on-cartilage bearing system, we observed a direct correlation between coefficient of friction and chondrocyte apoptosis in the superficial layers of cartilage. In the bovine explant system, the addition of lubricin as a test lubricant significantly lowered the static coefficient of friction and number of apoptotic chondrocytes. These results demonstrate a direct connection between lubricin, boundary lubrication, and cell survival and suggest that supplementation of synovial fluid with lubricin may be an effective treatment to prevent cartilage deterioration in patients with genetic or acquired deficiency of lubricin. PMID:23530215

  15. In vitro studies on clonal growth of chondrocytes in thanatophoric dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, R.E.; Bartmann, P.; Terinde, R.

    1996-05-17

    Thanatophoric dysplasia (TD) is characterized by a disorganized growth plate with markedly reduced proliferative and hypertrophic cartilage zones. Therefore, we studied in vitro the proliferation rates of articular chondrocytes from five TD patients and age-matched controls in response to bFGF, IGF-I, IGF-II, and TGF-{beta}1. In human fetal controls bFGF was the most potent growth factor. Clonal growth of articular chondrocytes in response to bFGF was reduced in two of five TD patients and slightly below the range of controls in a third case. Stimulation of chondrocyte proliferation by IGF I and II was reduced in the patient whose response to bFGF was most markedly impaired. The effect of TGF-{beta}1 ranged from normal to slightly elevated values in TD fetuses. These results indicate heterogeneity of the underlying defects in TD. Low proliferative responses of chondrocytes to bFGF and IGF-I/II are likely to play a key role in the pathogenesis of some cases. In two of five patients studied, the mechanisms of bFGF and IGF-signal transduction are candidates for the primary molecular defect. 22 refs., 6 tabs.

  16. Demonstration of fibronectin in human articular cartilage by an indirect immunoperoxidase technique.

    PubMed

    Clemmensen, I; Hølund, B; Johansen, N; Andersen, R B

    1982-01-01

    Fresh frozen tissue sections of human articular cartilage was treated without and with human testicular hyaluronidase (2 x 10(6) units/l) for 60 min at 37 degrees C and stained by the indirect immunoperoxidase technique with rabbit antihuman fibronectin. The rabbit antihuman fibronectin was purified by affinity chromatography on human fibronectin-Sepharose. Fibronectin was only found on the acellular surface of the articular cartilage in tissue sections not treated with hyaluronidase. In this surface layer, probably identical to "lamina splendens", the arrangement of fibronectin was as a membrane. No collagen was seen in this area by van Gieson staining. No staining for fibronectin was found in the cartilage matrix or in the chondrocytes. Treatment of the cartilage tissue with hyaluronidase resulted in visualization of high amount of fibronectin in the cartilage matrix, with the highest intensity around the chondrocytes. The staining of the acellular surface layer of the articular cartilage was identical with the results obtained without hyaluronidase treatment. These results indicate that articular cartilage is rich in fibronectin probably in complex with hyaluronic acid, and that the chondrocytes produce fibronectin in situ. It also demonstrates the steric hindrance of hyaluronic acid aggregates in diffusion of the antibody and the value of hyaluronidase treatment of tissue before demonstration of fibronectin. PMID:6757202

  17. Hydrogen peroxide induces apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Cai-ping; Liang, Qian; Wang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Tong-sheng

    2012-03-01

    The degenerative joint disease such as osteoarthritis (OA) is closely associated with the death of chondrocytes in apoptosis fashion. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), higher expression following acute damage in OA patients, has been shown to be up-regulated during apoptosis in a bulk of experimental models. This study was aimed to explore the mechanism of H2O2-induced rabbit chondrocytes apoptosis. Articular cartilage was biopsied from the joints of 6 weeks old New Zealand rabbits. Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) assay was used to assess the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on cell viability. H2O2 treatment induced a remarkable reduction of cell viability. We used flow cytometry to assess the form of cell death with Annexin-V/PI double staining, and found that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in a dose-and time-dependent manner. Exposure of chondrocytes to 1.5 mM of H2O2 for 2 h induced a burst apoptosis that can be alleviated by N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) pretreatment, an anti-oxidant amino-acid derivative. Loss of mitochondria membrane potential (▵Ψm) was evaluated using confocal microscopy imaging and flow cytometry (FCM). H2O2 treatment induced a marked reduction of ▵Ψm, and the abrupt disappearance of ▵Ψm occurred within 5 minutes. These results indicate that H2O2 induces a rapid apoptosis via a mitochondrial pathway in rabbit chondrocytes.

  18. Can microcarrier-expanded chondrocytes synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro?

    PubMed

    Surrao, Denver C; Khan, Aasma A; McGregor, Aaron J; Amsden, Brian G; Waldman, Stephen D

    2011-08-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach for articular cartilage repair; however, it is challenging to produce adequate amounts of tissue in vitro from the limited number of cells that can be extracted from an individual. Relatively few cell expansion methods exist without the problems of de-differentiation and/or loss of potency. Recently, however, several studies have noted the benefits of three-dimensional (3D) over monolayer expansion, but the ability of 3D expanded chondrocytes to synthesize cartilaginous tissue constructs has not been demonstrated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare the properties of engineered cartilage constructs from expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarriers) to those developed from primary chondrocytes. Isolated bovine chondrocytes were grown for 3 weeks in either monolayer (T-Flasks) or 3D microcarrier (Cytodex 3) expansion culture. Expanded and isolated primary cells were then seeded in high density culture on Millicell™ filters for 4 weeks to evaluate the ability to synthesize cartilaginous tissue. While microcarrier expansion was twice as effective as monolayer expansion (microcarrier: 110-fold increase, monolayer: 52-fold increase), the expanded cells (monolayer and 3D microcarrier) were not effectively able to synthesize cartilaginous tissue in vitro. Tissues developed from primary cells were substantially thicker and accumulated significantly more extracellular matrix (proteoglycan content: 156%-292% increase; collagen content: 70%-191% increase). These results were attributed to phenotypic changes experienced during the expansion phase. Monolayer expanded chondrocytes lost their native morphology within 1 week, whereas microcarrier-expanded cells were spreading by 3 weeks of expansion. While the use of 3D microcarriers can lead to large cellular yields, preservation of chondrogenic phenotype during expansion is required in order to synthesize cartilaginous tissue. PMID:21449621

  19. [Chondrocalcinosis. Clinical impact of intra-articular calcium phosphate crystals].

    PubMed

    Fuerst, M

    2014-06-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals are known to cause acute attacks of pseudogout in joints but crystal deposition has also been reported to be associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Aside from CPPD crystals, basic calcium phosphates (BCPs), consisting of carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA), tricalcium phosphate and octacalcium phosphate, have been found in synovial fluid, synovium and cartilage of patients with OA. Although CPPD crystals have been found to be associated with OA and are an important factor in joint disease, this has also recently been associated with a genetic defect. However, according to the most recent findings, the association of BCP crystals, such as apatite with OA is much stronger, as their presence significantly correlates with the severity of cartilage degeneration. Identification of BCP crystals in OA joints remains problematic due to a lack of simple and reliable methods of detection. The clinical and pathological relevance of cartilage mineralization in patients with OA is not completely understood. It is well established that mineralization of articular cartilage is often found close to hypertrophic chondrocytes. A significant correlation between the expression of type X collagen, a marker for chondrocyte hypertrophy and cartilage mineralization was observed. In the process of endochondral ossification, the link between hypertrophy and matrix mineralization is particularly well described. Hypertrophic chondrocytes in OA cartilage and at the growth line share certain features, not only hypertrophy but also a capability to mineralize the matrix. Recent data indicate that chondrocyte hypertrophy is a key factor in articular cartilage mineralization strongly linked to OA and does not characterize a specific subset of OA patients, which has important consequences for therapeutic strategies for OA. PMID:24924727

  20. Importance of reference gene selection for articular cartilage mechanobiology studies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabah, A.; Stadnik, P.; Gilbert, S.J.; Duance, V.C.; Blain, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective Identification of genes differentially expressed in mechano-biological pathways in articular cartilage provides insight into the molecular mechanisms behind initiation and/or progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is commonly used to measure gene expression, and is reliant on the use of reference genes for normalisation. Appropriate validation of reference gene stability is imperative for accurate data analysis and interpretation. This study determined in vitro reference gene stability in articular cartilage explants and primary chondrocytes subjected to different compressive loads and tensile strain, respectively. Design The expression of eight commonly used reference genes (18s, ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, PPIA, RPL4, SDHA and YWHAZ) was determined by qPCR and data compared using four software packages (comparative delta-Ct method, geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper). Calculation of geometric means of the ranked weightings was carried out using RefFinder. Results Appropriate reference gene(s) for normalisation of mechanically-regulated transcript levels in articular cartilage tissue or isolated chondrocytes were dependent on experimental set-up. SDHA, YWHAZ and RPL4 were the most stable genes whilst glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and to a lesser extent Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), showed variable expression in response to load, demonstrating their unsuitability in such in vitro studies. The effect of using unstable reference genes to normalise the expression of aggrecan (ACAN) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) resulted in inaccurate quantification of these mechano-sensitive genes and erroneous interpretation/conclusions. Conclusion This study demonstrates that commonly used ‘reference genes’ may be unsuitable for in vitro cartilage chondrocyte mechanobiology studies, reinforcing the principle that careful validation of reference genes is essential prior to each experiment to

  1. Matrix molecule influence on chondrocyte phenotype and proteoglycan 4 expression by alginate-embedded zonal chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Coates, Emily E; Riggin, Corinne N; Fisher, John P

    2012-12-01

    Articular cartilage resists load and provides frictionless movement at joint surfaces. The tissue is organized into the superficial, middle, deep, and calcified zones throughout its depth, each which serve distinct functions. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), found in the superficial zone, is a critical component of the joint's lubricating mechanisms. Maintenance of both the chondrocyte and zonal chondrocyte phenotype remain challenges for in vitro culture and tissue engineering. Here we investigate the expression of PRG4 mRNA and protein by primary bovine superficial zone chondrocytes, middle/deep zone chondrocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in alginate hydrogels with hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) additives. Chondrogenic phenotype and differentiation markers are evaluated by mRNA expression, histochemical, and immunohistochemical staining. Results show middle/deep cells express no measurable PRG4 mRNA by day 7. In contrast, superficial zone cells express elevated PRG4 mRNA throughout culture time. This expression can be significantly enhanced up to 15-fold by addition of both HA and CS to scaffolds. Conversely, PRG4 mRNA expression is downregulated (up to 5-fold) by CS and HA in differentiating MSCs, possibly due to build up of entrapped protein. HA and CS demonstrate favorable effects on chondrogenesis by upregulating transcription factor Sox9 mRNA (up to 4.6-fold) and downregulating type I collagen mRNA (up to 18-fold). Results highlight the important relationship between matrix components and expression of critical lubricating proteins in an engineered cartilage scaffold. PMID:22674584

  2. Articular cartilage biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuettner, K.E.; Schleyerbach, R.; Hascall, V.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains six parts, each consisting of several papers. The part titles are: Cartilage Matrix Components; Biosynthesis and Characterization of Cartilage--Specific Matrix Components and Events; Cartilage Metabolism; In Vitro Studies of Articular Cartilage Metabolism; Normal and Pathologic Metabolism of Cartilage; and Destruction of the Articular Cartilage in Rheumatoid Diseases. Some of the paper topics are: magnetic resonance imaging; joint destruction; age-related changes; proteoglycan structure; and biosynthesis of cartilage proteoglycan.

  3. Effect of transforming growth factor-β3 on mono and multilayer chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sefat, Farshid; Youseffi, Mansour; Khaghani, Seyed Ali; Soon, Chin Fhung; Javid, Farideh

    2016-07-01

    Articular cartilage is an avascular and flexible connective tissue found in joints. It produces a cushioning effect at the joints and provides low friction to protect the ends of the bones from wear and tear/damage. It has poor repair capacity and any injury can result pain and loss of mobility. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), a cytokine superfamily, regulates cell function, including differentiation and proliferation. Although the function of the TGF-βs in various cell types has been investigated, their function in cartilage repair is as yet not fully understood. The effect of TGF-β3 in biological regulation of primary chondrocyte was investigated in this work. TGF-β3 provided fibroblastic morphology to chondrocytes and therefore overall reduction in cell proliferation was observed. The length of the cells supplemented with TGF-β3 were larger than the cells without TGF-β3 treatment. This was caused by the fibroblast like cells (dedifferentiated chondrocytes) which occupied larger areas compared to cells without TGF-β3 addition. The healing process of the model wound closure assay of chondrocyte multilayer was slowed down by TGF-β3, and this cytokine negatively affected the strength of chondrocyte adhesion to the cell culture surface. PMID:27108397

  4. Biological Effects of the Herbal Plant-Derived Phytoestrogen Bavachin in Primary Rat Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyeong-Je; Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok; Kim, Do Kyung; Sohn, Hong-Moon; You, Jae-Won; Oh, Ji-Su; Seo, Yo-Seob; Yu, Sang-Joun; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the anabolic and anticatabolic functions of bavachin in primary rat chondrocytes. With bavachin treatment, chondrocytes survived for 21 d without cell proliferation, and the proteoglycan content and extracellular matrix increased. Short-term monolayer culture of chondrocytes showed that gene induction of both aggrecan and collagen type II, major extracellular matrix components, was significantly upregulated by bavachin. The expression and activities of cartilage-degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs were inhibited significantly by bavachin, while tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease were significantly upregulated. Bavachin inhibits the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a representative catabolic factor, and downregulated the expression of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase-2, and prostaglandin E2 in a dose-dependent manner in chondrocytes. Our results suggest that the bavachin has anabolic and potent anticatabolic biological effects on chondrocytes, which may have considerable promise in treating articular cartilage degeneration in the future. PMID:26235583

  5. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, G.; Loreto, C.; Carnazza, M.L.; Coppolino, F.; Cardile, V.; Leonardi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease. PMID:22073377

  6. Lubricin is expressed in chondrocytes derived from osteoarthritic cartilage encapsulated in poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, G; Loreto, C; Carnazza, M L; Coppolino, F; Cardile, V; Leonardi, R

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degenerative changes within joints that involved quantitative and/or qualitative alterations of cartilage and synovial fluid lubricin, a mucinous glycoprotein secreted by synovial fibroblasts and chondrocytes. Modern therapeutic methods, including tissue-engineering techniques, have been used to treat mechanical damage of the articular cartilage but to date there is no specific and effective treatment. This study aimed at investigating lubricin immunohistochemical expression in cartilage explant from normal and OA patients and in cartilage constructions formed by Poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) based hydrogels (PEG-DA) encapsulated OA chondrocytes. The expression levels of lubricin were studied by immunohistochemistry: i) in tissue explanted from OA and normal human cartilage; ii) in chondrocytes encapsulated in hydrogel PEGDA from OA and normal human cartilage. Moreover, immunocytochemical and western blot analysis were performed in monolayer cells from OA and normal cartilage. The results showed an increased expression of lubricin in explanted tissue and in monolayer cells from normal cartilage, and a decreased expression of lubricin in OA cartilage. The chondrocytes from OA cartilage after 5 weeks of culture in hydrogels (PEGDA) showed an increased expression of lubricin compared with the control cartilage. The present study demonstrated that OA chondrocytes encapsulated in PEGDA, grown in the scaffold and were able to restore lubricin biosynthesis. Thus our results suggest the possibility of applying autologous cell transplantation in conjunction with scaffold materials for repairing cartilage lesions in patients with OA to reduce at least the progression of the disease.

  7. Del1 Knockout Mice Developed More Severe Osteoarthritis Associated with Increased Susceptibility of Chondrocytes to Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Tran, Misha C.; Bhatia, Namrata J.; Hsing, Alexander W.; Chen, Carol; LaRussa, Marie F.; Fattakhov, Ernst; Rashidi, Vania; Jang, Kyu Yun; Choo, Kevin J.; Nie, Xingju; Mathy, Jonathan A.; Longaker, Michael T.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.; Helms, Jill A.; Yang, George P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We identified significant expression of the matricellular protein, DEL1, in hypertrophic and mature cartilage during development. We hypothesized that this tissue-specific expression indicated a biological role for DEL1 in cartilage biology. Methods Del1 KO and WT mice had cartilage thickness evaluated by histomorphometry. Additional mice underwent medial meniscectomy to induce osteoarthritis, and were assayed at 1 week for apoptosis by TUNEL staining and at 8 weeks for histology and OA scoring. In vitro proliferation and apoptosis assays were performed on primary chondrocytes. Results Deletion of the Del1 gene led to decreased amounts of cartilage in the ears and knee joints in mice with otherwise normal skeletal morphology. Destabilization of the knee led to more severe OA compared to controls. In vitro, DEL1 blocked apoptosis in chondrocytes. Conclusion Osteoarthritis is among the most prevalent diseases worldwide and increasing in incidence as our population ages. Initiation begins with an injury resulting in the release of inflammatory mediators. Excessive production of inflammatory mediators results in apoptosis of chondrocytes. Because of the limited ability of chondrocytes to regenerate, articular cartilage deteriorates leading to the clinical symptoms including severe pain and decreased mobility. No treatments effectively block the progression of OA. We propose that direct modulation of chondrocyte apoptosis is a key variable in the etiology of OA, and therapies aimed at preventing this important step represent a new class of regenerative medicine targets. PMID:27505251

  8. Comparing effects of perfusion and hydrostatic pressure on gene profiles of human chondrocyte.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ge; Mayer-Wagner, Susanne; Schröder, Christian; Woiczinski, Matthias; Blum, Helmut; Lavagi, Ilaria; Krebs, Stefan; Redeker, Julia I; Hölzer, Andreas; Jansson, Volkmar; Betz, Oliver; Müller, Peter E

    2015-09-20

    Hydrostatic pressure and perfusion have been shown to regulate the chondrogenic potential of articular chondrocytes. In order to compare the effects of hydrostatic pressure plus perfusion (HPP) and perfusion (P) we investigated the complete gene expression profiles of human chondrocytes under HPP and P. A simplified bioreactor was constructed to apply loading (0.1 MPa for 2 h) and perfusion (2 ml) through the same piping by pressurizing the medium directly. High-density monolayer cultures of human chondrocytes were exposed to HPP or P for 4 days. Controls (C) were maintained in static cultures. Gene expression was evaluated by sequencing (RNAseq) and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Both treatments changed gene expression levels of human chondrocytes significantly. Specifically, HPP and P increased COL2A1 expression and decreased COL1A1 and MMP-13 expression. Despite of these similarities, RNAseq revealed a list of cartilage genes including ACAN, ITGA10 and TNC, which were differentially expressed by HPP and P. Of these candidates, adhesion related molecules were found to be upregulated in HPP. Both HPP and P treatment had beneficial effects on chondrocyte differentiation and decreased catabolic enzyme expression. The study provides new insight into how hydrostatic pressure and perfusion enhance cartilage differentiation and inhibit catabolic effects.

  9. Structural and metabolic changes in articular cartilage induced by iodoacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, J.; Hoedt-Schmidt, S.; Kalbhen, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The chemically induced injury to articular cartilage, caused by two successive intra-articular injections of sodium iodoacetate, has been used in studies on the effects of anti-inflammatory and of potentially chondroprotective agents. It has been assumed that the injurious effects are caused by inhibition of the glycolytic pathway. In the present study this inhibition has been shown to be greater than expected from in vitro studies, and to influence equally other oxidative pathways. However, the response is clearly not a simple one in that some of the surface chondrocytes, and synovial lining cells in close proximity to the cartilage, show virtually no inhibition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:1390193

  10. Transamidation by Transglutaminase 2 Transforms S100A11 Calgranulin into a Procatabolic Cytokine for Chondrocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Cecil, Denise L.; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2008-01-01

    In osteoarthritis (OA), low-grade joint inflammation promotes altered chondrocyte differentiation and cartilage catabolism. S100/calgranulins share conserved calcium-binding EF-hand domains, associate noncovalently as homodimers and heterodimers, and are secreted and bind receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Chondrocyte RAGE expression and S100A11 release are stimulated by IL-1β in vitro and increase in OA cartilage in situ. Exogenous S100A11 stimulates chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Moreover, S100A11 is covalently cross-linked by transamidation catalyzed by transglutaminase 2 (TG2), itself an inflammation-regulated and redox stress-inducible mediator of chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. In this study, we researched mouse femoral head articular cartilage explants and knee chondrocytes, and a soluble recombinant double point mutant (K3R/Q102N) of S100A11 TG2 transamidation substrate sites. Both TG2 and RAGE knockout cartilage explants retained IL-1β responsiveness. The K3R/Q102N mutant of S100A11 retained the capacity to bind to RAGE and chondrocytes but lost the capacity to signal via the p38 MAPK pathway or induce chondrocyte hypertrophy and glycosaminoglycans release. S100A11 failed to induce hypertrophy, glycosaminoglycan release, and appearance of the aggrecanase neoepitope NITEGE in both RAGE and TG2 knockout cartilages. We conclude that transamidation by TG2 transforms S100A11 into a covalently bonded homodimer that acquires the capacity to signal through the p38 MAPK pathway, accelerate chondrocyte hypertrophy and matrix catabolism, and thereby couple inflammation with chondrocyte activation to potentially promote OA progression. PMID:18523305

  11. Expression of novel extracellular sulfatases Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 in normal and osteoarthritic articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Shuhei; Taniguchi, Noboru; Grogan, Shawn P; D'Lima, Darryl; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Lotz, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Changes in sulfation of cartilage glycosaminoglycans as mediated by sulfatases can regulate growth factor signaling. The aim of this study was to analyze expression patterns of recently identified extracellular sulfatases Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 in articular cartilage and chondrocytes. Methods Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 expressions in human articular cartilage from normal donors and patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and in normal and aged mouse joints were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Results In normal articular cartilage, Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 mRNAs and proteins were expressed predominantly in the superficial zone. OA cartilage showed significantly higher Sulf-1 and Sulf-2 mRNA expression as compared with normal human articular cartilage. Sulf protein expression in OA cartilage was prominent in the cell clusters. Western blotting revealed a profound increase in Sulf protein levels in human OA cartilage. In normal mouse joints, Sulf expression was similar to human cartilage, and with increasing age, there was a marked upregulation of Sulf. Conclusion The results show low levels of Sulf expression, restricted to the superficial zone in normal articular cartilage. Sulf mRNA and protein levels are increased in aging and OA cartilage. This increased Sulf expression may change the sulfation patterns of heparan sulfate proteoglycans and growth factor activities and thus contribute to abnormal chondrocyte activation and cartilage degradation in OA. PMID:18507859

  12. Time-dependent processes in stem cell-based tissue engineering of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gadjanski, Ivana; Spiller, Kara; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC), situated in diarthrodial joints at the end of the long bones, is composed of a single cell type (chondrocytes) embedded in dense extracellular matrix comprised of collagens and proteoglycans. AC is avascular and alymphatic and is not innervated. At first glance, such a seemingly simple tissue appears to be an easy target for the rapidly developing field of tissue engineering. However, cartilage engineering has proven to be very challenging. We focus on time-dependent processes associated with the development of native cartilage starting from stem cells, and the modalities for utilizing these processes for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. PMID:22016073

  13. Current Concepts of Articular Cartilage Restoration Techniques in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Stuart, Michael J.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage injuries are common in patients presenting to surgeons with primary complaints of knee pain or mechanical symptoms. Treatment options include comprehensive nonoperative management, palliative surgery, joint preservation operations, and arthroplasty. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search on articular cartilage restoration techniques of the knee was conducted to identify outcome studies published from 1993 to 2013. Special emphasis was given to Level 1 and 2 published studies. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Current surgical options with documented outcomes in treating chondral injuries in the knee include the following: microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allograft transplant, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Generally, results are favorable regarding patient satisfaction and return to sport when proper treatment algorithms and surgical techniques are followed, with 52% to 96% of patients demonstrating good to excellent clinical outcomes and 66% to 91% returning to sport at preinjury levels. Conclusion: Clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes may be improved in the majority of patients with articular cartilage restoration surgery; however, some patients may not fully return to their preinjury activity levels postoperatively. In active and athletic patient populations, biological techniques that restore the articular surface may be options that provide symptom relief and return patients to their prior levels of function. PMID:24790697

  14. Evidence for a negative Pasteur effect in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Lee, R B; Urban, J P

    1997-01-01

    Uptake of external glucose and production of lactate were measured in freshly-excised bovine articular cartilage under O2 concentrations ranging from 21% (air) to zero (N2-bubbled). Anoxia (O2 concentration < 1% in the gas phase) severely inhibited both glucose uptake and lactate production. The decrease in lactate formation correlated closely with the decrease in glucose uptake, in a mole ratio of 2:1. This reduction in the rate of glycolysis in anoxic conditions is seen as evidence of a negative Pasteur effect in bovine articular cartilage. Anoxia also suppressed glycolysis in articular cartilage from horse, pig and sheep. Inhibitors acting on the glycolytic pathway (2-deoxy-D-glucose, iodoacetamide or fluoride) strongly decreased aerobic lactate production and ATP concentration, consistent with the belief that articular cartilage obtains its principal supply of ATP from substrate-level phosphorylation in glycolysis. Azide or cyanide lowered the ATP concentration in aerobic cartilage to approximately the same extent as did anoxia but, because glycolysis (lactate production) was also inhibited by these treatments, the importance of any mitochondrial ATP production could not be assessed. A negative Pasteur effect would make chondrocytes particularly liable to suffer a shortage of energy under anoxic conditions. Incorporation of [35S]sulphate into proteoglycan was severely curtailed by treatments, such as anoxia, which decreased the intracellular concentration of ATP.

  15. Interleukin 1 beta suppresses transforming growth factor-induced inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) production and expression of the PPi-generating enzyme PC-1 in human chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lotz, M; Rosen, F; McCabe, G; Quach, J; Blanco, F; Dudler, J; Solan, J; Goding, J; Seegmiller, J E; Terkeltaub, R

    1995-01-01

    Articular cartilage chondrocytes have the unique ability to elaborate large amounts of extracellular pyrophosphate (PPi), and transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) appears singular among cartilage regulatory factors in stimulating PPi production. TGF beta caused a time and dose-dependent increase in intracellular and extracellular PPi in human articular chondrocyte cultures. TGF beta and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) antagonistically regulate certain chondrocyte functions. IL-1 beta profoundly inhibited basal and TGF beta-induced PPi elaboration. To address mechanisms involved with the regulation of PPi synthesis by IL-1 beta and TGF beta, we analyzed the activity of the PPi-generating enzyme NTP pyrophosphohydrolase (NTPPPH) and the PPi-hydrolyzing enzyme alkaline phosphatase. Human chondrocyte NTPPPH activity was largely attributable to plasma cell membrane glycoprotein 1, PC-1. Furthermore, TGF beta induced comparable increases in the activity of extracellular PPi, intracellular PPi, and cellular NTPPPH and in the levels of PC-1 protein and mRNA in chondrocytes as well as a decrease in alkaline phosphatase. All of these TGF beta-induced responses were completely blocked by IL-1 beta. Thus, IL-1 beta may be an important regulator of mineralization in chondrocytes by inhibiting TGF beta-induced PPi production and PC-1 expression. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7479785

  16. Physiological levels of hydrocortisone maintain an optimal chondrocyte extracellular matrix metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Elewaut, D; Hoffman, I; Veys, E; Verbruggen, G

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of physiological doses of hydrocortisone on synthesis and turnover of cell associated matrix (CAM) by human chondrocytes obtained from normal articular cartilage. Methods: Human articular cartilage cells were obtained from visually intact cartilage of the femoral condyles of five donors and maintained in culture for one week to reach equilibrium in accumulated CAM compounds. 0, 0.05, 0.20, and 1.0 µg/ml hydrocortisone was added to the nutrient media during the entire culture period. Cells were liberated and levels of CAM aggrecan, type II collagen, and fibronectin, of intracellular IGF-1, IL1α and ß, and of their respective plasma membrane bound receptors IGFR1, IL1RI, and the decoy receptor IL1RII, were assayed by flow cytometry. Results: In comparison with controls, hydrocortisone treated chondrocytes, at all concentrations, expressed significantly higher plasma membrane bound IGFR1. Intracellular IGF-1 levels remained unchanged. Together with these changes, reflecting an increased ability to synthesise extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecules, hydrocortisone treated cells expressed significantly higher amounts of the plasma membrane bound decoy IL1RII. Concurrently, intracellular IL1α and ß levels and membrane bound IL1RI were down regulated. Levels of CAM aggrecan, type II collagen, and fibronectin were significantly up regulated in the chondrocytes treated with hydrocortisone. Conclusion: 0.05 µg/ml hydrocortisone treated chondrocytes had decreased catabolic signalling pathways and showed an enhanced ability to synthesise ECM macromolecules. Because IL1 activity was decreased and the expression of IL1RII decoy receptor enhanced, more of the ECM macromolecules produced remained accumulated in the CAM of the chondrocytes. The effects were obtained at doses comparable with physiological plasma levels of hydrocortisone in humans. PMID:14672893

  17. State of the art and future perspectives of articular cartilage regeneration: a focus on adipose-derived stem cells and platelet-derived products.

    PubMed

    Hildner, F; Albrecht, C; Gabriel, C; Redl, H; van Griensven, M

    2011-04-01

    Trauma, malposition and age-related degeneration of articular cartilage often result in severe lesions that do not heal spontaneously. Many efforts over the last centuries have been undertaken to support cartilage healing, with approaches ranging from symptomatic treatment to structural cartilage regeneration. Microfracture and matrix-associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) can be regarded as one of the most effective techniques available today to treat traumatic cartilage defects. Research is focused on the development of new biomaterials, which are intended to provide optimized physical and biochemical conditions for cell proliferation and cartilage synthesis. New attempts have also been undertaken to replace chondrocytes with cells that are more easily available and cause less donor site morbidity, e.g. adipose derived stem cells (ASC). The number of in vitro studies on adult stem cells has rapidly increased during the last decade, indicating that many variables have yet to be optimized to direct stem cells towards the desired lineage. The present review gives an overview of the difficulties of cartilage repair and current cartilage repair techniques. Moreover, it reviews new fields of cartilage tissue engineering, including stem cells, co-cultures and platelet-rich plasma (PRP).

  18. In Vivo Toxicity of Local Anesthetics and Corticosteroids on Chondrocyte and Synoviocyte Viability and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    James, Christopher; Stoker, Aaron M.; Cook, Cristi R.; Khazai, Ravand S.; Flood, David L.; Cook, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Intra-articular injection of local anesthetic and/or corticosteroid is an adjunct treatment for arthritic and inflammatory orthopedic conditions. Despite potential benefits, there is growing concern that these medications may cause significant morbidity, including potential toxicity to intra-articular chondrocytes and synoviocytes. Design: Twenty dogs underwent intra-articular injection of the shoulder joint using ultrasound guidance, with the following injectates (n = 5 each): negative control (saline), methylprednisolone/1.0% lidocaine, triamcinolone/1.0% lidocaine, and triamcinolone/0.0625% bupivacaine. The dogs were euthanized 24 hours postinjection for reasons unrelated to this study. Synovium/cartilage explants were harvested under sterile conditions and assessed immediately or cultured for 7 days. Synoviocyte and chondrocyte viability was determined on day 1 and day 7 using Calcien AM and Sytox Blue live/dead fluorescent stains, and cell metabolism determined on day 2 using the alamar blue additive test. Results were compared statistically. Results: On day 1 synovium exposed to 1%L/M demonstrated a significant decrease in cell metabolism (P = 0.0107) and subjective synoviocyte viability scores (P = 0.013) compared with the negative control. Cartilage exposed to 1%L/M demonstrated decreased chondrocyte viability and cell metabolism versus all other groups, although not significantly. After 7 days of culture, cartilage viable cell density in the 1%L/M group was significantly (P ≤ 0.001) lower than the negative control. Subjective synoviocyte viability scores was significantly lower in the 1%L/M (P = 0.013), 1%L/T (P ≤ 0.001), and 0.0625%B/T groups (P = 0.006) compared with the negative control. Conclusions: This study suggests potential negative effects of combination local anesthetic/corticosteroid on intra-articular cell viability and cell metabolism. Further study is needed before determining definitive clinical recommendations. PMID:26069713

  19. Activin A/BMP2 chimera AB235 drives efficient redifferentiation of long term cultured autologous chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, G.; López-Ruiz, E.; Kwiatkowski, W.; Montañez, E.; Arrebola, F.; Carrillo, E.; Gray, P. C.; Belmonte, J. C. Izpisua; Choe, S.; Perán, M.; Marchal, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) depends on the quality and quantity of implanted cells and is hindered by the fact that chondrocytes cultured for long periods of time undergo dedifferentiation. Here we have developed a reproducible and efficient chondrogenic protocol to redifferentiate chondrocytes isolated from osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We used morphological, histological and immunological analysis together with a RT-PCR detection of collagen I and collagen II gene expression to show that chondrocytes isolated from articular cartilage biopsies of patients and subjected to long-term culture undergo dedifferentiation and that these cells can be redifferentiated following treatment with the chimeric Activin A/BMP2 ligand AB235. Examination of AB235-treated cell pellets in both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed that redifferentiated chondrocytes synthesized a cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily consisting of vertically-orientated collagen fibres and cartilage-specific proteoglycans. AB235-treated cell pellets also integrated into the surrounding subcutaneous tissue following transplantation in mice as demonstrated by their dramatic increase in size while non-treated control pellets disintegrated upon transplantation. Thus, our findings describe an effective protocol for the promotion of redifferentiation of autologous chondrocytes obtained from OA patients and the formation of a cartilage-like ECM that can integrate into the surrounding tissue in vivo. PMID:26563344

  20. The Effect of Chondroitin Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid on Chondrocytes Cultured within a Fibrin-Alginate Hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Little, Christopher J; Kulyk, William M; Chen, Xiongbiao

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a painful degenerative joint disease that could be better managed if tissue engineers can develop methods to create long-term engineered articular cartilage tissue substitutes. Many of the tissue engineered cartilage constructs currently available lack the chemical stimuli and cell-friendly environment that promote the matrix accumulation and cell proliferation needed for use in joint cartilage repair. The goal of this research was to test the efficacy of using a fibrin-alginate hydrogel containing hyaluronic acid (HA) and/or chondroitin sulphate (CS) supplements for chondrocyte culture. Neonatal porcine chondrocytes cultured in fibrin-alginate hydrogels retained their phenotype better than chondrocytes cultured in monolayer, as evidenced by analysis of their relative expression of type II versus type I collagen mRNA transcripts. HA or CS supplementation of the hydrogels increased matrix glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production during the first week of culture. However, the effects of these supplements on matrix accumulation were not additive and were no longer observed after two weeks of culture. Supplementation of the hydrogels with CS or a combination of both CS and HA increased the chondrocyte cell population after two weeks of culture. Statistical analysis indicated that the HA and CS treatment effects on chondrocyte numbers may be additive. This research suggests that supplementation with CS and/or HA has positive effects on cartilage matrix production and chondrocyte proliferation in three-dimensional (3D) fibrin-alginate hydrogels. PMID:25238548

  1. Induction and prevention of chondrocyte hypertrophy in culture

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Primary chondrocytes from whole chick embryo sterna can be maintained in suspension culture stabilized with agarose for extended periods of time. In the absence of FBS, the cells remain viable only when seeded at high densities. They do not proliferate at a high rate but they deposit extracellular matrix with fibrils resembling those of authentic embryonic cartilage in their appearance and collagen composition. The cells exhibit many morphological and biochemical characteristics of resting chondrocytes and they do not produce collagen X, a marker for hypertrophic cartilage undergoing endochondral ossification. At low density, cells survive in culture without FBS when the media are conditioned by chondrocytes grown at high density. Thus, resting cartilage cells in agarose cultures can produce factors required for their own viability. Addition of FBS to the culture media leads to profound changes in the phenotype of chondrocytes seeded at low density. Cells form colonies at a high rate and assume properties of hypertrophic cells, including the synthesis of collagen X. They extensively deposit extracellular matrix resembling more closely that of adult rather than embryonic cartilage. PMID:2808534

  2. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A; McNulty, Amy L; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B

    2014-11-25

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca(2+) signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca(2+) transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains.

  3. Synergy between Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels confers high-strain mechanosensitivity to articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Whasil; Leddy, Holly A.; Chen, Yong; Lee, Suk Hee; Zelenski, Nicole A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Wu, Jason; Beicker, Kellie N.; Coles, Jeffrey; Zauscher, Stefan; Grandl, Jörg; Sachs, Frederick; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2014-01-01

    Diarthrodial joints are essential for load bearing and locomotion. Physiologically, articular cartilage sustains millions of cycles of mechanical loading. Chondrocytes, the cells in cartilage, regulate their metabolic activities in response to mechanical loading. Pathological mechanical stress can lead to maladaptive cellular responses and subsequent cartilage degeneration. We sought to deconstruct chondrocyte mechanotransduction by identifying mechanosensitive ion channels functioning at injurious levels of strain. We detected robust expression of the recently identified mechanosensitive channels, PIEZO1 and PIEZO2. Combined directed expression of Piezo1 and -2 sustained potentiated mechanically induced Ca2+ signals and electrical currents compared with single-Piezo expression. In primary articular chondrocytes, mechanically evoked Ca2+ transients produced by atomic force microscopy were inhibited by GsMTx4, a PIEZO-blocking peptide, and by Piezo1- or Piezo2-specific siRNA. We complemented the cellular approach with an explant-cartilage injury model. GsMTx4 reduced chondrocyte death after mechanical injury, suggesting a possible therapy for reducing cartilage injury and posttraumatic osteoarthritis by attenuating Piezo-mediated cartilage mechanotransduction of injurious strains. PMID:25385580

  4. Effect of low-level helium-neon laser therapy on histological and ultrastructural features of immobilized rabbit articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Enayatallah; Gholami, Narges; Bayat, Aghdas

    2007-05-25

    The present study investigates whether low-level helium-neon laser therapy can increase histological parameters of immobilized articular cartilage in rabbits or not. Twenty five rabbits were divided into three groups: the experiment group, which received low-level helium-neon laser therapy with 13J/cm(2) three times a week after immobilization of their right knees; the control group which did not receive laser therapy after immobilization of their knees; and the normal group which received neither immobilization nor laser therapy. Histological and electron microscopic examinations were performed at 4 and 7 weeks after immobilization. Depth of the chondrocyte filopodia in four-week immobilized experiment group, and depth of articular cartilage in seven-week immobilized experiment group were significantly higher than those of relevant control groups (exact Fisher test, p=0.001; student's t-test, p=0.031, respectively). The surfaces of articular cartilages of the experiment group were relatively smooth, while those of the control group were unsmooth. It is therefore concluded that low-level helium-neon laser therapy had significantly increased the depth of the chondrocyte filopodia in four-week immobilized femoral articular cartilage and the depth of articular cartilage in seven-week immobilized knee in comparison with control immobilized articular cartilage.

  5. Effect of levofloxacin on glycosaminoglycan and DNA synthesis of cultured rabbit chondrocytes at concentrations inducing cartilage lesions in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, M; Takada, S; Ogawara, S; Takayama, S

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the toxic effect of levofloxacin (LVFX), a quinolone antibacterial agent, on cartilage by examining aspects of its in vivo toxicokinetics and effect on the function of cultured chondrocytes of the femoral articular cartilage from juvenile New Zealand White rabbits. Repeated administration of LVFX (100 mg/kg) orally for 7 days induced focal necrosis and superficial erosion in the articular cartilage of the femoral condyle, but 30 mg/kg did not. Concentrations of LVFX in the cartilage were highest at the first sampling point (30 min) after a single administration, being 4.93 and 12.2 micrograms/g in the 30- and 100-mg/kg groups, respectively. The arthropathic concentration of LVFX in the cartilage was then shown to be 12.2 micrograms/g or more. For an in vitro study, chondrocytes were separated from the articular cartilage of the rabbit femoral condyle and cultured for 7 days until confluence. 35SO4 uptake by cultured chondrocyte sheets was most susceptible to LVFX, decreasing at drug concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml or more in 24- and 48-h cultures but not in a 72-h culture. Furthermore, 3H-thymidine uptake was decreased at concentrations of 10 micrograms/ml or more in a 48-h culture but not in 24- and 72-h cultures. Rhodamine 123 accumulation was susceptible to inhibition in cultured chondrocytes at an LVFX concentration of 10 micrograms/ml or more. These results suggest that LVFX inhibits glycosaminoglycan synthesis initially and DNA synthesis and mitochondrial function secondarily at actual arthropathic concentrations in cultured rabbit chondrocytes but that these changes are reversible and not enough to kill the cells. PMID:8540702

  6. Cloning, characterization, and expression of a cDNA encoding an inducible nitric oxide synthase from the human chondrocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, I G; Palmer, R M; Hickery, M S; Bayliss, M T; Chubb, A P; Hall, V S; Moss, D W; Moncada, S

    1993-01-01

    Incubation of human articular chondrocytes with interleukin 1 beta results in the time-dependent expression of nitric oxide (NO) synthase. We report here the isolation of a cDNA clone which encodes a protein of 1153 amino acids with a molecular mass of 131,213 Da and a calculated isoelectric point of 7.9. CHO cells transfected with a plasmid harboring this cDNA clone expressed NO synthase activity that was inhibited by some L-arginine analogues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the human chondrocyte inducible NO synthase shows 51% identity and 68% similarity with the endothelial NO synthase and 54% identity and 70% similarity with the neuronal NO synthase. The similarity (88%) between the human chondrocyte NO synthase cDNA sequence and that reported for the murine macrophage suggests that the inducible class of enzyme is conserved between different cell types and across species. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7504305

  7. MR imaging of osteochondral grafts and autologous chondrocyte implantation

    PubMed Central

    Millington, S. A.; Szomolanyi, P.; Marlovits, S.

    2006-01-01

    Surgical articular cartilage repair therapies for cartilage defects such as osteochondral autograft transfer, autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) or matrix associated autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT) are becoming more common. MRI has become the method of choice for non-invasive follow-up of patients after cartilage repair surgery. It should be performed with cartilage sensitive sequences, including fat-suppressed proton density-weighted T2 fast spin-echo (PD/T2-FSE) and three-dimensional gradient-echo (3D GRE) sequences, which provide good signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios. A thorough magnetic resonance (MR)-based assessment of cartilage repair tissue includes evaluations of defect filling, the surface and structure of repair tissue, the signal intensity of repair tissue and the subchondral bone status. Furthermore, in osteochondral autografts surface congruity, osseous incorporation and the donor site should be assessed. High spatial resolution is mandatory and can be achieved either by using a surface coil with a 1.5-T scanner or with a knee coil at 3 T; it is particularly important for assessing graft morphology and integration. Moreover, MR imaging facilitates assessment of complications including periosteal hypertrophy, delamination, adhesions, surface incongruence and reactive changes such as effusions and synovitis. Ongoing developments include isotropic 3D sequences, for improved morphological analysis, and in vivo biochemical imaging such as dGEMRIC, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging, which make functional analysis of cartilage possible. PMID:16802126

  8. IFT88 influences chondrocyte actin organization and biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Wann, A.K.T.; Thompson, C.L.; Hassen, A.; Wang, W.; Knight, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objectives Primary cilia are microtubule based organelles which control a variety of signalling pathways important in cartilage development, health and disease. This study examines the role of the intraflagellar transport (IFT) protein, IFT88, in regulating fundamental actin organisation and mechanics in articular chondrocytes. Methods The study used an established chondrocyte cell line with and without hypomorphic mutation of IFT88 (IFT88orpk). Confocal microscopy was used to quantify F-actin and myosin IIB organisation. Viscoelastic cell and actin cortex mechanics were determined using micropipette aspiration with actin dynamics visualised in live cells transfected with LifeACT-GFP. Results IFT88orpk cells exhibited a significant increase in acto-myosin stress fibre organisation relative to wild-type (WT) cells in monolayer and an altered response to cytochalasin D. Rounded IFT88orpk cells cultured in suspension exhibited reduced cortical actin expression with reduced cellular equilibrium modulus. Micropipette aspiration resulted in reduced membrane bleb formation in IFT88orpk cells. Following membrane blebbing, IFT88orpk cells exhibited slower reformation of the actin cortex. IFT88orpk cells showed increased actin deformability and reduced cortical tension confirming that IFT regulates actin cortex mechanics. The reduced cortical tension is also consistent with the reduced bleb formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the ciliary protein IFT88 regulates fundamental actin organisation and the stiffness of the actin cortex leading to alterations in cell deformation, mechanical properties and blebbing in an IFT88 chondrocyte cell line. This adds to the growing understanding of the role of primary cilia and IFT in regulating cartilage biology. PMID:26493329

  9. Looping Mediated Interaction between the Promoter and 3′ UTR Regulates Type II Collagen Expression in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jash, Arijita; Yun, Kangsun; Sahoo, Anupama; So, Jae-Seon; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2012-01-01

    Type II collagen is the major component of articular cartilage and is mainly synthesized by chondrocytes. Repeated sub-culturing of primary chondrocytes leads to reduction of type II collagen gene (Col2a1) expression, which mimics the process of chondrocyte dedifferentiation. Although the functional importance of Col2a1 expression has been extensively investigated, mechanism of transcriptional regulation during chondrocyte dedifferentiation is still unclear. In this study, we have investigated the crosstalk between cis-acting DNA element and transcription factor on Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the potential regulatory regions in the Col2a1 genomic locus. Among them, promoter and 3′ untranslated region (UTR) showed highly accessible chromatin architecture with enriched recruitment of active chromatin markers in primary chondrocytes. 3′ UTR has a potent enhancer function which recruits Lef1 (Lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1) transcription factor, leading to juxtaposition of the 3′ UTR with the promoter through gene looping resulting in up-regulation of Col2a1 gene transcription. Knock-down of endogenous Lef1 level significantly reduced the gene looping and subsequently down-regulated Col2a1 expression. However, these regulatory loci become inaccessible due to condensed chromatin architecture as chondrocytes dedifferentiate which was accompanied by a reduction of gene looping and down-regulation of Col2a1 expression. Our results indicate that Lef1 mediated looping between promoter and 3′ UTR under the permissive chromatin architecture upregulates Col2a1 expression in primary chondrocytes. PMID:22815835

  10. [Intra-articular injections].

    PubMed

    Chapelle, Ch

    2015-09-01

    It is not unusual for a specialist or general practitioner to be presented with a pathology which necessitates the use of an intra-articular injection of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid or a local anaesthetic. It would seem to be interesting to update and to precise the techniques and methods of intraarticular injections which have appeared in recent international publications, when we know that 30 % of the injections given into the knee and so called "dry" are incorrect and, therefore, inefficient. The indication of an articular injection depends, firstly, on the diagnosis which should be done with great care; after which should be an objective analysis complete with secondary effects linked to both the injection and the product used. The conditions of asepsis, the choice of needles and quantities of the injection and even the ways of the injections should be reviewed in detail. The last studies clearly question the secondary effects of the cartilage degradations of the cortisone given as an intra-articular injection and shows its efficiency on the pain and inflammatory phenomonen in osteoarthritis. Studies on hyaluronic acid are often contradictory going from a modest result to an important pain relief but it is necessary to be aware that the objective criteria are difficult to interpret. The use of local anaesthetics in intra-articular is limited by the few indications in view of the major risk of aggravating the pre-existing lesions by the disappearing signs of pain.

  11. Evaluation of thermoreversible polymers containing fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF-9) for chondrocyte culture

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Angela; Ha, Jinny; Polotsky, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.; Gutowska, Anna; Hungerford, Davis S.; Frondoza, Carmelita G.

    2004-05-01

    We have evaluated a biomaterial to serve as a scaffold for the propagation and amplification of chondrocytes that promotes the original cellular phenotype of these cells. The goal of the present study was to investigate the use of thermally reversible polymer gels poly(NiPAAm-co-AAc), as a biocompatible supporting scaffold for the propagation of chondrocytic cells. The polymer gels at temperatures above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST) while liquefying at temperatures below its LCST of 34.5 C. Hence, the polymer, in its gelled form, has the ability to hold cells in situ, forming a matrix similar to the natural cellular environment or the extracellular matrix that comprises cartilage. We tested the hypothesis that the polymer gel promotes cell viability and function. Human osteoblast-like cells, nasal chondrocytes, and articular chondrocytes (1x105/150 ?l) were re-suspended in enriched DMEM media and were plated onto control (without gel) and gel containing 24-well plates. The plates were re-incubated at 37 C, 5% CO2 for the time-point of interest. Additional media was added to the plates and exchanged as needed. Following cell culture, cells were retrieved, enumerated, and cell viability was determined. Other aliquots of the cells were stained for morphological analysis while expression of chondrocyte markers including collagen type II and aggrecan were determined using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). The polymer gel was not cytotoxic as the cell number retrieved from three-dimensional culture gel was found to be one to two times higher than that retrieved from monolayer culture. Chondrocytes propagated in the thermo-reversible polymers expressed enhanced or maintained expression of collagen type II and aggrecan. Collagen type I expression was decreased or unaltered. The N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid copolymer gel has potential use as a cell culture substrate and as a cell delivery vehicle.

  12. Initiation of Chondrocyte Self-Assembly Requires an Intact Cytoskeletal Network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer K; Hu, Jerry C Y; Yamada, Soichiro; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembly and self-organization have recently emerged as robust scaffold-free tissue engineering methodologies that can be used to generate various tissues, including cartilage, vessel, and liver. Self-assembly, in particular, is a scaffold-free platform for tissue engineering that does not require the input of exogenous energy to the system. Although self-assembly can generate functional tissues, most notably neocartilage, the mechanisms of self-assembly remain unclear. To study the self-assembling process, we used articular chondrocytes as a model to identify parameters that can affect this process. Specifically, the roles of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules, surface-bound collagen, and the actin cytoskeletal network were investigated. Using time-lapse imaging, we analyzed the early stages of chondrocyte self-assembly. Within hours, chondrocytes rapidly coalesced into cell clusters before compacting to form tight cellular structures. Chondrocyte self-assembly was found to depend primarily on integrin function and secondarily on cadherin function. In addition, actin or myosin II inhibitors prevented chondrocyte self-assembly, suggesting that cell adhesion alone is not sufficient, but rather the active contractile actin cytoskeleton is essential for proper chondrocyte self-assembly and the formation of neocartilage. Better understanding of the self-assembly mechanisms allows for the rational modulation of this process toward generating neocartilages with improved properties. These findings are germane to understanding self-assembly, an emerging platform for tissue engineering of a plethora of tissues, especially as these neotissues are poised for translation.

  13. Mechanotransduction in primary human osteoarthritic chondrocytes is mediated by metabolism of energy, lipids, and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zignego, Donald L; Hilmer, Jonathan K; June, Ronald K

    2015-12-16

    Chondrocytes are the sole cell type found in articular cartilage and are repeatedly subjected to mechanical loading in vivo. We hypothesized that physiological dynamic compression results in changes in energy metabolism to produce proteins for maintenance of the pericellular and extracellular matrices. The objective of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding for the short term (<30min) chondrocyte response to sub-injurious, physiological compression by analyzing metabolomic profiles for human chondrocytes harvested from femoral heads of osteoarthritic donors. Cell-seeded agarose constructs were randomly assigned to experimental groups, and dynamic compression was applied for 0, 15, or 30min. Following dynamic compression, metabolites were extracted and detected by HPLC-MS. Untargeted analyzes examined changes in global metabolomics profiles and targeted analysis examined the expression of specific metabolites related to central energy metabolism. We identified hundreds of metabolites that were regulated by applied compression, and we report the detection of 16 molecules not found in existing metabolite databases. We observed patient-specific mechanotransduction with aging dependence. Targeted studies found a transient increase in the ratio of NADP+ to NADPH and an initial decrease in the ratio of GDP to GTP, suggesting a flux of energy into the TCA cycle. By characterizing metabolomics profiles of primary chondrocytes in response to applied dynamic compression, this study provides insight into how OA chondrocytes respond to mechanical load. These results are consistent with increases in glycolytic energy utilization by mechanically induced signaling, and add substantial new data to a complex picture of how chondrocytes transduce mechanical loads.

  14. Dose-injury relationships for cryoprotective agent injury to human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, M D; Almansoori, K A; Laouar, L; Prasad, V; McGann, L E; Elliott, J A W; Jomha, N M

    2014-02-01

    Vitrification of articular cartilage (AC) could enhance tissue availability but requires high concentrations of cyroprotective agents (CPAs). This study investigated relative injuries caused by commonly used CPAs. We hypothesized that the in situ chondrocyte dose-injury relationships of five commonly used CPAs are nonlinear and that relative injuries could be determined by comparing cell death after exposure at increasing concentrations. Human AC samples were used from four patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty surgery. Seventy μm slices were exposed in a stepwise protocol to increasing concentrations of 5 CPAs (max = 8 M); dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO), glycerol (Gly), propylene glycol (PG), ethylene glycol (EG), and formamide (FM). Chondrocyte viability was determined by membrane integrity stains. Statistical analysis included t-tests and nonlinear least squares estimation methods. The dose-injury to chondrocytes relationships for all CPAs were found to be nonlinear (sigmoidal best fit). For the particular loading protocol in this study, the data identified the following CPA concentrations at which chondrocyte recoveries statistically deviated significantly from the control recovery; 1 M for Gly, 4 M for FM and PG, 6 M for Me(2)SO, and 7 M for EG. Comparison of individual means demonstrated that Gly exposure resulted in the lowest recovery, followed by PG, and then Me(2)SO, FM and EG in no specific order. The information from this study provides an order of damage to human chondrocytes in situ of commonly used CPAs for vitrification of AC and identifies threshold CPA concentrations for a stepwise loading protocol at which chondrocyte recovery is significantly decreased. In general, Gly and PG were the most damaging while DMSO and EG were among the least damaging. PMID:24269869

  15. Dual effects of 17ß-oestradiol on interleukin 1ß-induced proteoglycan degradation in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Richette, P; Dumontier, M; Francois, M; Tsagris, L; Korwin-Zmijowska, C; Rannou, F; Corvol, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether 17ß-oestradiol (E2) modulates interleukin (IL) 1ß-induced proteoglycan degradation in chondrocytes, and to analyse the part played by metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process. Methods: Primary cultured rabbit articular chondrocytes were prepared and treated with 10 ng/ml IL1ß combined or not with 0.1–10 nM E2. Neosynthesised proteoglycans (PGs) were evaluated after incorporation of [35SO4]sulphate and further analysed after chromatography on a Sepharose 2B column. Chondrocyte mRNA levels of aggrecan, MMP-1, -3, -13, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) were studied by northern blot. MMP-1 activity was measured by zymography. MMP-1 gene transcription was studied by transient transfection of chondrocytes with an MMP-1-luciferase construct. Results: E2 modulated the IL1ß-induced total sulphated PGs in rabbit articular chondrocytes, which decreased as the E2 concentration was increased. At a low concentration (0.1 nmol/l) E2 counteracts the IL1ß-induced decrease in sulphated PG, while at high concentration (10 nmol/l) E2 enhances the IL1ß effects. A biphasic E2 effect was also observed on IL1ß-induced disaggregation of PG, 53–58 kDa gelatinolytic activity, and MMP-1, -3, and -13 mRNA levels. In contrast, E2 did not modify the level of aggrecan mRNA and had no effect on TIMP-1 mRNA expression. Finally, simultaneous addition of IL1ß and E2 (0.1–10 nmol/l) did not modify IL1ß-induced MMP-1-luciferase activity, suggesting that E2 effects probably occur at the post-transcriptional level of MMP gene expression. Conclusion: Oestrogen concentration may have an inverse effect on IL1ß stimulated proteoglycan degradation and MMP production by chondrocytes. PMID:14722210

  16. Role of Chondrocytes in Cartilage Formation, Progression of Osteoarthritis and Cartilage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akkiraju, Hemanth; Nohe, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) covers the diarthrodial joints and is responsible for the mechanical distribution of loads across the joints. The majority of its structure and function is controlled by chondrocytes that regulate Extracellular Matrix (ECM) turnover and maintain tissue homeostasis. Imbalance in their function leads to degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis (OA). OA is characterized by cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation and stiffening of joints. Cartilage degeneration is a consequence of chondrocyte hypertrophy along with the expression of proteolytic enzymes. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs (ADAMTS) are an example of these enzymes that degrade the ECM. Signaling cascades involved in limb patterning and cartilage repair play a role in OA progression. However, the regulation of these remains to be elucidated. Further the role of stem cells and mature chondrocytes in OA progression is unclear. The progress in cell based therapies that utilize Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) infusion for cartilage repair may lead to new therapeutics in the long term. However, many questions are unanswered such as the efficacy of MSCs usage in therapy. This review focuses on the role of chondrocytes in cartilage formation and the progression of OA. Moreover, it summarizes possible alternative therapeutic approaches using MSC infusion for cartilage restoration. PMID:27347486

  17. Impact of Storage Solution Formulation during Refrigerated Storage upon Chondrocyte Viability and Cartilage Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J.; Brockbank, Kelvin G.M.; Rahn, Eliza; Halwani, Dina O.; Chen, Zhen; Yao, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Various preservation solutions have been evaluated for longer hypothermic cartilage storage for tissue transplantation, however, the results are mixed. This research was to determine whether phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or organ preservation solutions would preserve both the extracellular matrix and chondrocytes of articular cartilage better than culture medium during refrigerated storage in the time frame that cartilage is stored for clinical use. Porcine cartilage plugs were stored, without the underlying bone, in culture medium with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS), PBS, Belzer's and Unisol solutions for 1 month at 4°C. Metabolic activity was tested using a resazurin reduction method and matrix permeability was evaluated by measuring electrical conductivity. Storage in culture medium with 10% FBS was shown to provide good cartilage metabolic function for 7 days decreasing to about 36% after 1 month of storage. There was no significant difference between samples stored in culture medium with and without FBS after 1 month of storage (p=0.5005). Refrigerated storage of cartilage in PBS and two solutions (Belzer's and Unisol) designed for optimal refrigerated tissue and organ storage results in loss of chondrocyte function and retention of matrix permeability. In contrast the opposite, significantly better retention of chondrocyte function and loss of matrix permeability was observed in culture medium. Future research is focused on combining retention of chondrocyte function and matrix permeability by storage solution formulation. PMID:25171188

  18. Evolution of Autologous Chondrocyte Repair and Comparison to Other Cartilage Repair Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Ashvin K.; Gibson, Matthew A.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.; Trice, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects have been addressed using microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, or osteochondral grafting, but these strategies do not generate tissue that adequately recapitulates native cartilage. During the past 25 years, promising new strategies using assorted scaffolds and cell sources to induce chondrocyte expansion have emerged. We reviewed the evolution of autologous chondrocyte implantation and compared it to other cartilage repair techniques. Methods. We searched PubMed from 1949 to 2014 for the keywords “autologous chondrocyte implantation” (ACI) and “cartilage repair” in clinical trials, meta-analyses, and review articles. We analyzed these articles, their bibliographies, our experience, and cartilage regeneration textbooks. Results. Microfracture, abrasion chondroplasty, osteochondral grafting, ACI, and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis are distinguishable by cell source (including chondrocytes and stem cells) and associated scaffolds (natural or synthetic, hydrogels or membranes). ACI seems to be as good as, if not better than, microfracture for repairing large chondral defects in a young patient's knee as evaluated by multiple clinical indices and the quality of regenerated tissue. Conclusion. Although there is not enough evidence to determine the best repair technique, ACI is the most established cell-based treatment for full-thickness chondral defects in young patients. PMID:25210707

  19. The collagen fibril organization in human articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Minns, R J; Steven, F S

    1977-01-01

    In this scanning electron microscopic study blocks of collagen fibrils were prepared from human articular cartilage, using two techinques which selectively removed either the proteoglycans alone, or both the proteoglycans and the collagen fibrils, of the non-calcified cartilage layer. Amino acid analysis of the fibrils confirmed the purity of the collagen after proteoglycan extraction. The cartilage was scanned in four different ways: (1) normal to the articular surface, (2) in superficial sections, (3) on surfaces of blocks which had been broken in planes parallel to artificial splits make by the insertion of a pin, and (4) on fracture surfaces which traversed the calcified cartilage and the subchondral bone. Five features of the organization of the collagen fibrils were specially noted: (1) Individual fibrils within the trabeculae joined to form small fibre bundles which became grouped into larger bundles at the calcified/uncalcified interface. (2) Fibrils in the deep and middle zones which, exhibiting the characteristic surface periodicity of collagen, were generally oriented towars the articular surface in large bundles approximately 55 micronm across. (3) In the superficial zone, fibrils ran parallel to the surface. (4) The surface fibrils had random orientation, even at the bases of empty lacunae vacated by chondrocytes during specimen preparation. (5) The collagen fibrils of the lacunar walls appeared to be thinner and more closely packed than thos between the lacunae. The fine collagen fibrils associated with the lacunar walls were frequently observed to pass through a large lacunar space, resulting in the formation of two or more compartments, each of which was presumably filled with a chondrocyte in the living cartilage. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 PMID:870478

  20. Unique glycosignature for intervertebral disc and articular cartilage cells and tissues in immaturity and maturity

    PubMed Central

    Collin, E. C.; Kilcoyne, M.; White, S. J.; Grad, S.; Alini, M.; Joshi, L.; Pandit, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, on/off markers for intervertebral disc (IVD) and articular cartilage (AC) cells (chondrocytes) and distinct glycoprofiles of cell and tissue-types were identified from immaturity to maturity. Three and eleven month-old ovine IVD and AC tissues were histochemically profiled with a panel of lectins and antibodies. Relationships between tissue and cell types were analysed by hierarchical clustering. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) composition of annulus fibrosus (AF), nucleus pulposus (NP) and AC tissues was determined by HPLC analysis. Clear on/off cell type markers were identified, which enabled the discrimination of chondrocytes, AF and NP cells. AF and NP cells were distinguishable using MAA, SNA-I, SBA and WFA lectins, which bound to both NP cells and chondrocytes but not AF cells. Chondrocytes were distinguished from NP and AF cells with a specific binding of LTA and PNA lectins to chondrocytes. Each tissue showed a unique CS composition with a distinct switch in sulfation pattern in AF and NP tissues upon disc maturity while cartilage maintained the same sulfation pattern over time. In conclusion, distinct glycoprofiles for cell and tissue-types across age groups were identified in addition to altered CS composition and sulfation patterns for tissue types upon maturity. PMID:26965377

  1. Chondrocyte Generation of Cartilage-Like Tissue Following Photoencapsulation in Methacrylated Polysaccharide Solution Blends.

    PubMed

    Hayami, James W S; Waldman, Stephen D; Amsden, Brian G

    2016-07-01

    Chondrocyte-seeded, photo-cross-linked hydrogels prepared from solutions containing 50% mass fractions of methacrylated glycol chitosan or methacrylated hyaluronic acid (MHA) with methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (MCS) are cultured in vitro under static conditions over 35 d to assess their suitability for load-bearing soft tissue repair. The photo-cross-linked hydrogels have initial equilibrium moduli between 100 and 300 kPa, but only the MHAMCS hydrogels retain an approximately constant modulus (264 ± 5 kPa) throughout the culture period. Visually, the seeded chondrocytes in the MHAMCS hydrogels are well distributed with an apparent constant viability in culture. Multicellular aggregates are surrounded by cartilaginous matrix, which contain aggrecan and collagen II. Thus, co-cross-linked MCS and MHA hydrogels may be suited for use in an articular cartilage or nucleus pulposus repair applications. PMID:27061241

  2. Construction of a chondrocyte cell sheet using temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Viravaidya-Pasuwat, Kwanchanok; Wong-in, Sopita; Sakulaue, Phongphot; Siriwatwechakul, Wanwipa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a novel temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-acrylamide was used to prepare a chondrocyte cell sheet. Chondrocytes were isolated from human articular cartilage and plated on the copolymer film grafted tissue culture plates. The cell attachment on the copolymer film was shown to be similar to that of the ungrafted surface. To harvest a cell sheet, the incubation temperature was reduced to 10°C for 30 minutes to allow the polymer chain to fully extend, changing the copolymer's phase from hydrophobicity to hydrophilicity. Additional incubation at 20°C for 60 minutes was necessary to activate the cellular metabolism required for cytoskeletal organization and cell detachment. A complete cell sheet recovery was achieved when a PVDF membrane was used as a cell sheet carrier. Unfortunately, the shrinkage of the cell sheet was observed. Nonetheless, the harvested cell sheet was shown to be viable and healthy. PMID:24111348

  3. Irrigating solutions used in arthroscopy and their effect on articular cartilage. An in vivo study

    SciTech Connect

    Arciero, R.A.; Little, J.S.; Liebenberg, S.P.; Parr, T.J.

    1986-11-01

    The effect of arthroscopic irrigating solutions on articular cartilage was determined by the use of an animal model. Rabbit knee joints were irrigated continuously for two hours with either normal saline, Ringer's lactate, or sterile water. Subsequently, the rate of incorporation of /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ by articular cartilage was used to measure the effect of the irrigants on chondrocyte metabolism. In addition, the irrigated groups were compared to an unirrigated control group. There was no significant difference in /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ incorporation between the groups. This suggested that none of the irrigating solutions used in this study adversely affected articular cartilage function. On the basis of these findings, it appears that normal saline, Ringer's lactate, and sterile water can be safely used as irrigating solutions during most arthroscopic procedures.

  4. Elastin fibers display a versatile microfibril network in articular cartilage depending on the mechanical microenvironments.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Wu, Jian Ping; Chen, Hong Hui; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Xu, Jiake

    2013-09-01

    Elastin fibers are major extracellular matrix macromolecules that are critical in maintaining the elasticity and resilience of tissues such as blood vessels, lungs and skins. However, the role of elastin in articular cartilage is poorly defined. The present study investigated the organization of elastin fiber in articular cartilage, its relationship to collagen fibers and the architecture of elastin fibers from different mechanical environments by using a kangaroo model. Five morphologies of elastin fibers were identified: Straight fiber, straight fiber with branches, branching fibers directly associated with chondrocyte, wave fiber and fine elastin. The architecture of the elastin network varied significantly with cartilage depth. In the most superficial layer of tibial plateau articular cartilage, dense elastin fibers formed a distinctive cobweb-like meshwork which was parallel to the cartilage surface. In the superficial zone, elastin fibers were well organized in a preferred orientation which was parallel to collagen fibers. In the deep zone, no detectable elastin fiber was found. Moreover, differences in the organization of elastin fibers were also observed between articular cartilage from the tibial plateau, femoral condyle, and distal humerus. This study unravels the detailed microarchitecture of elastin fibers which display a well-organized three-dimensional versatile network in articular cartilage. Our findings imply that elastin fibers may play a crucial role in maintaining the integrity, elasticity, and the mechanical properties of articular cartilage, and that the local mechanical environment affects the architectural development of elastin fibers. PMID:23649803

  5. Identification of a Prg4-positive articular cartilage progenitor cell population

    PubMed Central

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Zhang, Minjie; Ionescu, Andreia; Ayturk, Ugur M.; Ono, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Akio; Kronenberg, Henry; Warman, Matthew L.; Lassar, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We generated knock-in mice that express a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase from the Prg4 locus (Prg4GFPCreERt2), and used these animals to fate-map the progeny of Prg4-positive articular cartilage cells at various ages. Methods We crossed Prg4GFPCreERt2 mice to Rosa26floxlacZ or Rosa26mTmG reporter strains, administered tamoxifen to the double heterozygous offspring at different ages, and assayed Cre-mediated recombination by histochemistry and/or fluorescence microscopy. Results In 1-month-old mice, the expression of the Prg4GFPCreERt2 allele mirrors expression of endogenous Prg4 and, when tamoxifen is given for 10 days, causes Cre-mediated recombination in ~70% of the superficial-most chondrocytes. Prg4GFPCreERt2 expressing cells are mostly confined to the top three cell layers of the articular cartilage in 1-month-old mice, but descendants of these cells are located in deeper regions of the articular cartilage in aged mice. At embryonic day 17.5, Prg4GFPCreERt2 expressing cells are largely restricted to the superficial-most cell layer of the forming joint, yet at approximately 1 year, progeny of these cells span the depth of the articular cartilage. Conclusions Our results indicate that Prg4-expressing cells located at the joint surface in the embryo serve as a progenitor population for all deeper layers of the mature articular cartilage. Also, our data reveal that Prg4GFPCreERt2 is expressed by superficial chondrocytes in young mice, but expands into deeper regions of the articular cartilage as the animals age. The Prg4GFPCreERt2 allele should be a useful tool for inducing efficient Cre-mediated recombination of floxed alleles at sites of Prg4 expression. PMID:25603997

  6. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. The changes in periarticular bone tend to occur very early in the development of OA. Although chondrocytes also have the capacity to modulate their functional state in response to loading, the capacity of these cells to repair and modify their surrounding extracellular matrix is relatively limited in comparison to the adjacent subchondral bone. This differential adaptive capacity likely underlies the more rapid appearance of detectable skeletal changes in OA in comparison to the articular cartilage. The OA changes in periarticular bone include increases in subchondral cortical bone thickness, gradual decreases in subchondral trabeular bone mass, formation of marginal joint osteophytes, development of bone cysts and advancement of the zone of calcified cartilage between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The expansion of the zone of calcified cartilage contributes to overall thinning of the articular cartilage. The mechanisms involved in this process include the release of soluble mediators from chondrocytes in the deep zones of the articular cartilage and/or the influences of microcracks that have initiated focal remodeling in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in an attempt to repair the microdamage. There is the need for further studies to define the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the interaction between subchondral bone and articular cartilage and for applying this information to the development of therapeutic interventions to improve the

  7. Heterogeneous nanomechanical properties of superficial and zonal regions of articular cartilage of the rabbit proximal radius condyle by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tomkoria, Sara; Patel, Rupal V; Mao, Jeremy J

    2004-12-01

    Articular chondrocytes have been thought to reside in a homogenous matrix. The physical characteristics of the intercellular matrix of articular cartilage are not well characterized, especially at a nanoscopic scale. The present work tested the hypothesis that the nanomechanical properties of the intercellular matrices of articular cartilage in both the articulating surface and various cellular zones are non-homogeneous. Nanoindentation by atomic force microscopy was applied to the geometric center of the medial, lateral and groove regions of the superficial zone of the rabbit proximal radius cartilage, and then the intercellular matrices of chondrocytes from the superficial to calcifying zones in 40 microm increments. The elastic modulus of the articular surface of the medial condyle (1.46+/-0.11 MPa) was significantly higher than the lateral condyle (1.18+/-0.10 MPa), and the groove (0.96+/-0.07 MPa). There is a significant gradient increase in Young's moduli from the superficial zone (0.52+/-0.05 MPa) to calcifying zone (1.69+/-0.12 MPa). Thus, the nanomechanical properties of the intercellular matrices of the articulating surface are region-specific and likely related to articular function. Heterogeneous biophysical properties of intercellular matrices along the depth from the superficial to calcifying zones suggest that chondrocytes likely reside in a heterogeneous matrix.

  8. [Present status and perspective of articular cartilage regeneration].

    PubMed

    Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2007-05-01

    Because the capacity of articular cartilage for repair is limited, defects are a major clinical problem, and there is at present no satisfactory clinical technique to regenerate cartilage defects. Current clinical practice involves the bone stimulation technique, which breaks subchondral bone to facilitate cartilage repair from bone marrow derived cells and cytokines. This consists of multiple perforations, abrasions, and micro-fractures. However, with this procedure, cartilage defects are repaired with fibrocartilage, which is known to be biochemically and biomechanically different from normal hyaline cartilage and degeneration occurs in the reparative tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for repair of human articular cartilage was reported in 1994, and approved by the USA Food and Drug Association in 1997. This procedure has been performed for more than 20000 people all over the world, but its effectiveness is still controversial. Mosaic plasty was explored in the 1990s. Using this procedure, we can repair defects with hyaline cartilage, but the donor site morbidity is unsolved. To explore a new method for cartilage repair, we transplanted autologous culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal cells into articular cartilage defects. Clinical symptoms were improred but the repair cartilage was not hyaline cartilage. Further improvement is required. Many investigations have been made in the search for better means of repair, including gene transduction and the addition of growth factors during cell culture. In addition to bone marrow mesenchymal cells, synovial cells, adipocytes, muscle cells, etc. have been evaluated.

  9. Management of articular cartilage defects of the knee.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Feeley, Brian T; Williams, Riley J

    2010-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a poor intrinsic capacity for healing. The goal of surgical techniques to repair articular cartilage injuries is to achieve the regeneration of organized hyaline cartilage. Microfracture and other bone marrow stimulation techniques involve penetration of the subchondral plate in order to recruit mesenchymal stem cells into the chondral defect. The formation of a stable clot that fills the lesion is of paramount importance to achieve a successful outcome. Mosaicplasty is a viable option with which to address osteochondral lesions of the knee and offers the advantage of transplanting hyaline cartilage. However, limited graft availability and donor site morbidity are concerns. Transplantation of an osteochondral allograft consisting of intact, viable articular cartilage and its underlying subchondral bone offers the ability to address large osteochondral defects of the knee, including those involving an entire compartment. The primary theoretical advantage of autologous chondrocyte implantation is the development of hyaline-like cartilage rather than fibrocartilage in the defect, which presumably leads to better long-term outcomes and longevity of the healing tissue. Use of synthetic scaffolds is a potentially attractive alternative to traditional cartilage procedures as they are readily available and, unlike allogeneic tissue transplants, are associated with no risk of disease transmission. Their efficacy, however, has not been proven clinically.

  10. Interstitial Perfusion Culture with Specific Soluble Factors Inhibits Type I Collagen Production from Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes in Clinical-Grade Collagen Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Talò, Giuseppe; Lovati, Arianna B.; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Riboldi, Stefania A.; Moretti, Matteo; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor healing ability and cartilage injuries often evolve to osteoarthritis. Cell-based strategies aiming to engineer cartilaginous tissue through the combination of biocompatible scaffolds and articular chondrocytes represent an alternative to standard surgical techniques. In this context, perfusion bioreactors have been introduced to enhance cellular access to oxygen and nutrients, hence overcoming the limitations of static culture and improving matrix deposition. Here, we combined an optimized cocktail of soluble factors, the BIT (BMP-2, Insulin, Thyroxin), and clinical-grade collagen sponges with a bidirectional perfusion bioreactor, namely the oscillating perfusion bioreactor (OPB), to engineer in vitro articular cartilage by human articular chondrocytes (HACs) obtained from osteoarthritic patients. After amplification, HACs were seeded and cultivated in collagen sponges either in static or dynamic conditions. Chondrocyte phenotype and the nature of the matrix synthesized by HACs were assessed using western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Finally, the stability of the cartilaginous tissue produced by HACs was evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our results showed that perfusion improved the distribution and quality of cartilaginous matrix deposited within the sponges, compared to static conditions. Specifically, dynamic culture in the OPB, in combination with the BIT cocktail, resulted in the homogeneous production of extracellular matrix rich in type II collagen. Remarkably, the production of type I collagen, a marker of fibrous tissues, was also inhibited, indicating that the association of the OPB with the BIT cocktail limits fibrocartilage formation, favoring the reconstruction of hyaline cartilage. PMID:27584727

  11. Interstitial Perfusion Culture with Specific Soluble Factors Inhibits Type I Collagen Production from Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes in Clinical-Grade Collagen Sponges.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Nathalie; Lopa, Silvia; Talò, Giuseppe; Lovati, Arianna B; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Riboldi, Stefania A; Moretti, Matteo; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor healing ability and cartilage injuries often evolve to osteoarthritis. Cell-based strategies aiming to engineer cartilaginous tissue through the combination of biocompatible scaffolds and articular chondrocytes represent an alternative to standard surgical techniques. In this context, perfusion bioreactors have been introduced to enhance cellular access to oxygen and nutrients, hence overcoming the limitations of static culture and improving matrix deposition. Here, we combined an optimized cocktail of soluble factors, the BIT (BMP-2, Insulin, Thyroxin), and clinical-grade collagen sponges with a bidirectional perfusion bioreactor, namely the oscillating perfusion bioreactor (OPB), to engineer in vitro articular cartilage by human articular chondrocytes (HACs) obtained from osteoarthritic patients. After amplification, HACs were seeded and cultivated in collagen sponges either in static or dynamic conditions. Chondrocyte phenotype and the nature of the matrix synthesized by HACs were assessed using western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Finally, the stability of the cartilaginous tissue produced by HACs was evaluated in vivo by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. Our results showed that perfusion improved the distribution and quality of cartilaginous matrix deposited within the sponges, compared to static conditions. Specifically, dynamic culture in the OPB, in combination with the BIT cocktail, resulted in the homogeneous production of extracellular matrix rich in type II collagen. Remarkably, the production of type I collagen, a marker of fibrous tissues, was also inhibited, indicating that the association of the OPB with the BIT cocktail limits fibrocartilage formation, favoring the reconstruction of hyaline cartilage. PMID:27584727

  12. Cell-Based Articular Cartilage Repair: The Link between Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Kenneth L.; Wang, Jinxi

    2014-01-01

    Context Clinical efforts to repair damaged articular cartilage (AC) currently face major obstacles due to limited intrinsic repair capacity of the tissue and unsuccessful biological interventions. This highlights a need for better therapeutic strategies. Evidence Acquisition Relevant articles were identified through a search of the PubMed database from January 1956 to August 2014 using the following keywords: articular cartilage repair, stem cell, cartilage tissue-engineering, synovium, and NFAT. Evidence Synthesis In both animals and humans, AC defects that penetrate into the subchondral bone marrow are mainly filled with fibrocartilaginous tissue through the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), followed by degeneration of repaired cartilage and osteoarthritis. Cell therapy and tissue engineering techniques using culture-expanded chondrocytes, bone marrow MSCs, or pluripotent stem cells with chondroinductive growth factors may generate cartilaginous tissue in AC defects but do not form hyaline cartilage-based articular surface because repair cells often lose chondrogenic activity or result in chondrocyte hypertrophy. The new evidence that AC and synovium develop from the same pool of precursors with similar gene profiles and that synovium-derived chondrocytes have stable chondrogenic activity has promoted use of synovium as a new cell source for AC repair. The recent finding that NFAT1 and NFAT2 transcription factors inhibit chondrocyte hypertrophy and maintain metabolic balance in AC is a significant advance in the field of AC repair. Conclusions The use of synovial MSCs and discovery of upstream transcriptional regulators that help maintain the AC phenotype have opened new avenues to improve the outcome of AC regeneration. PMID:25450846

  13. Prone position for minimal invasive or all-arthroscopic autologous chondrocyte implantation at the patella.

    PubMed

    Siebold, Rainer; Sartory, Nico; Yang, Yuping; Feil, Sven; Paessler, Hans H

    2011-12-01

    Full size retropatellar cartilage lesions are troublesome conditions to treat and an autologous chondrocyte implantation with or without matrix or scaffold in supine position is difficult. Usually, it is necessary to perform a large arthrotomy to evert the patella in order to get sufficient access to the retropatellar cartilage defect. The procedure is associated with a significant parapatellar soft tissue trauma to the patient. This technical note introcudes a minimal invasive approach with the patient in prone position using an all-arthroscopic or mini-open technique to treat retropatellar full size articular cartilage lesions of the patella.

  14. Cell death of chondrocytes is a combination between apoptosis and autophagy during the pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis within an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Almonte-Becerril, M; Navarro-Garcia, F; Gonzalez-Robles, A; Vega-Lopez, M A; Lavalle, C; Kouri, J B

    2010-05-01

    The death of chondrocytes and the loss of extracellular matrix are the central features in cartilage degeneration during Osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. The mechanism by which chondrocytes are removed in OA cartilage are still not totally defined, although previous reports support the presence of apoptotic as well as non apoptotic signals. In addition, in 2004 Roach and co-workers suggested the term "Chondroptosis" to design the type of cell death present in articular cartilage, which include the presence of some apoptotic and autophagic processes. To identify the mechanisms, as well as the chronology by which chondrocytes are eliminated during OA pathogenesis, we decided to evaluate apoptosis (by active caspase 3 and TUNEL signal) and autophagy (by LC3II molecule and cytoplasmic vacuolization) using Immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques in an animal OA model. During OA pathogenesis, chondrocytes exhibit modifications in their death process in each zone of the cartilage. At early stages of OA, the death of chondrocytes starts with apoptosis in the superficial and part of the middle zones of the cartilage, probably as a consequence of a constant mechanical damage in the joint. As the degenerative process progresses, high incidence of active caspase 3 as well as LC3II expression are observed in the same cell, which indicate a combination of both death processes. In contrast, in the deep zone, due the abnormal subchondral bone ossification during the OA pathogenesis, apoptosis is the only mechanism observed.

  15. An evaluation of chondrocyte morphology and gene expression on superhydrophilic vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Eliane; Lobo, Anderson O; Ferretti, Mario; Cohen, Moisés; Marciano, Fernanda R; Corat, Evaldo J; Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir J

    2013-03-01

    Cartilage serves as a low-friction and wear-resistant articulating surface in diarthrodial joints and is also important during early stages of bone remodeling. Recently, regenerative cartilage research has focused on combinations of cells paired with scaffolds. Superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are of particular interest in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate cell expansion of human articular chondrocytes on superhydrophilic VACNTs, as well as their morphology and gene expression. VACNT films were produced using a microwave plasma chamber on Ti substrates and submitted to an O2 plasma treatment to make them superhydrophilic. Human chondrocytes were cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs up to five days. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to measure type I and type II Collagen, Sox9, and Aggrecan mRNA expression levels. The morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. SEM images demonstrated that superhydrophilic VACNTs permit cell growth and adhesion of human chondrocytes. The chondrocytes had an elongated morphology with some prolongations. Chondrocytes cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs maintain the level expression of Aggrecan, Sox9, and Collagen II determined by qPCR. This study was the first to indicate that superhydrophilic VACNTs may be used as an efficient scaffold for cartilage or bone repair. PMID:25427468

  16. An evaluation of chondrocyte morphology and gene expression on superhydrophilic vertically-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Eliane; Lobo, Anderson O; Ferretti, Mario; Cohen, Moisés; Marciano, Fernanda R; Corat, Evaldo J; Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir J

    2013-03-01

    Cartilage serves as a low-friction and wear-resistant articulating surface in diarthrodial joints and is also important during early stages of bone remodeling. Recently, regenerative cartilage research has focused on combinations of cells paired with scaffolds. Superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are of particular interest in regenerative medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate cell expansion of human articular chondrocytes on superhydrophilic VACNTs, as well as their morphology and gene expression. VACNT films were produced using a microwave plasma chamber on Ti substrates and submitted to an O2 plasma treatment to make them superhydrophilic. Human chondrocytes were cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs up to five days. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to measure type I and type II Collagen, Sox9, and Aggrecan mRNA expression levels. The morphology was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. SEM images demonstrated that superhydrophilic VACNTs permit cell growth and adhesion of human chondrocytes. The chondrocytes had an elongated morphology with some prolongations. Chondrocytes cultivated on superhydrophilic VACNTs maintain the level expression of Aggrecan, Sox9, and Collagen II determined by qPCR. This study was the first to indicate that superhydrophilic VACNTs may be used as an efficient scaffold for cartilage or bone repair.

  17. Intrauterine low-functional programming of IGF1 by prenatal nicotine exposure mediates the susceptibility to osteoarthritis in female adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Tie, Kai; Zhang, Xianrong; Tan, Yang; Deng, Yu; Li, Jing; Ni, Qubo; Wang, Hui; Chen, Liaobin

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether female adult offspring born with intrauterine growth retardation induced by prenatal nicotine exposure (PNE) are susceptible to osteoarthritis (OA) and to explore the underlying programming mechanisms. Pregnant rats were treated with nicotine or saline at 2.0 mg/kg/d from gestational d 11 to 20. The female adult offspring with or without PNE were forced with a strenuous treadmill running for 6 wk to induce OA. Nicotine's effects on fetal articular chondrocytes were studied by exposing chondrocytes to nicotine for 10 d, and dihydro-β-erythroidine, a selective α4β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) inhibitor, was used to identify the change of nicotine's effect. For adult offspring, increased cartilage destruction and accelerated OA progression were observed in the PNE group with running; the expression of α1 chain of type II collagen (Col2A1), aggrecan, SRY-type high mobility group box 9 (Sox9), and IGF1 signaling molecules in the cartilage of PNE offspring were decreased. For fetuses, elevated serum corticosteroid and nicotine levels and suppressed IGF1 levels were observed; expression of Col2A1, aggrecan, Sox9, and IGF1 were reduced. The result of chondrocytes revealed that nicotine impeded the expression of Col2A1, aggrecan, and IGF1; blocking α4β2-nAChR rescued nicotine's suppression. In conclusion, PNE increases the susceptibility of adult offspring to OA; the potential mechanism involves IGF1 low-functional programming in articular cartilage caused directly by the action of nicotine on α4β2-nAChR.

  18. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Methods Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Conclusions Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death

  19. A multi-scale finite element model for investigation of chondrocyte mechanics in normal and medial meniscectomy human knee joint during walking.

    PubMed

    Tanska, Petri; Mononen, Mika E; Korhonen, Rami K

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical signals experienced by chondrocytes (articular cartilage cells) modulate cell synthesis and cartilage health. Multi-scale modeling can be used to study how forces are transferred from joint surfaces through tissues to chondrocytes. Therefore, estimation of chondrocyte behavior during certain physical activities, such as walking, could provide information about how cells respond to normal and abnormal loading in joints. In this study, a 3D multi-scale model was developed for evaluating chondrocyte and surrounding peri- and extracellular matrix responses during gait loading within healthy and medial meniscectomy knee joints. The knee joint geometry was based on MRI, whereas the input used for gait loading was obtained from the literature. Femoral and tibial cartilages were modeled as fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic materials, whereas menisci were considered as transversely isotropic. Fluid pressures in the chondrocyte and cartilage tissue increased up to 2MPa (an increase of 30%) in the meniscectomy joint compared to the normal, healthy joint. The elevated level of fluid pressure was observed during the entire stance phase of gait. A medial meniscectomy caused substantially larger (up to 60%) changes in maximum principal strains in the chondrocyte compared to those in the peri- or extracellular matrices. Chondrocyte volume or morphology did not change substantially due to a medial meniscectomy. Current findings suggest that during walking chondrocyte deformations are not substantially altered due to a medial meniscectomy, while abnormal joint loading exposes chondrocytes to elevated levels of fluid pressure and maximum principal strains (compared to strains in the peri- or extracellular matrices). These might contribute to cell viability and the onset of osteoarthritis.

  20. The ClC-7 Chloride Channel Is Downregulated by Hypoosmotic Stress in Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Takashi; Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Giles, Wayne R; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    Articular chondrocytes in osteoarthritis (OA) patients are exposed to hypoosmotic stress because the osmolality of this synovial fluid is significantly decreased. Hypoosmotic stress can cause an efflux of Cl(-) and an associated decrease of cell volume. We have previously reported that a Cl(-) conductance contributes to the regulation of resting membrane potential and thus can alter intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human chondrocytes. The molecular identity and pathologic function of these Cl(-) channels, however, remained to be determined. Here, we show that the ClC-7 Cl(-) channel is strongly expressed in a human chondrocyte cell line (OUMS-27) and that it is responsible for Cl(-) currents that are activated by extracellular acidification (pH 5.0). These acid-sensitive currents are inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS; IC50 = 13 μM) and are markedly reduced by small-interfering RNA-induced knockdown of ClC-7. DIDS hyperpolarized these chondrocytes, and this was followed by an increase in [Ca(2+)]i. ClC-7 knockdown caused a similar hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Short-term culture (48 hours) in hypoosmotic medium (270 mOsm) reduced the expression of ClC-7 and decreased the acid-sensitive currents. Interestingly, these hypoosmotic culture conditions, or ClC-7 knockdown, resulted in enhanced cell death. Taken together, our results show that the significant hyperpolarization due to ClC-7 impairment in chondrocytes can significantly increase [Ca(2+)]i and cell death. Thus, downregulation of ClC-7 channels during the hypoosmotic stress that accompanies OA progression is one important concept of the complex etiology of OA. These findings suggest novel targets for therapeutic intervention(s) and drug development for OA.

  1. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling Is Essential for the Autonomous Formation of Cartilage-Like Tissue by Expanded Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tekari, Adel; Luginbuehl, Reto; Hofstetter, Willy; Egli, Rainer J.

    2015-01-01

    Cartilage is a tissue with limited self-healing potential. Hence, cartilage defects require surgical attention to prevent or postpone the development of osteoarthritis. For cell-based cartilage repair strategies, in particular autologous chondrocyte implantation, articular chondrocytes are isolated from cartilage and expanded in vitro to increase the number of cells required for therapy. During expansion, the cells lose the competence to autonomously form a cartilage-like tissue, that is in the absence of exogenously added chondrogenic growth factors, such as TGF-βs. We hypothesized that signaling elicited by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β is essential for the formation of cartilage-like tissue and that alterations within the TGF-β signaling pathway during expansion interfere with this process. Primary bovine articular chondrocytes were harvested and expanded in monolayer culture up to passage six and the formation of cartilage tissue was investigated in high density pellet cultures grown for three weeks. Chondrocytes expanded for up to three passages maintained the potential for autonomous cartilage-like tissue formation. After three passages, however, exogenous TGF-β1 was required to induce the formation of cartilage-like tissue. When TGF-β signaling was blocked by inhibiting the TGF-β receptor 1 kinase, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue was abrogated. At the initiation of pellet culture, chondrocytes from passage three and later showed levels of transcripts coding for TGF-β receptors 1 and 2 and TGF-β2 to be three-, five- and five-fold decreased, respectively, as compared to primary chondrocytes. In conclusion, the autonomous formation of cartilage-like tissue by expanded chondrocytes is dependent on signaling induced by autocrine and/or paracrine TGF-β. We propose that a decrease in the expression of the chondrogenic growth factor TGF-β2 and of the TGF-β receptors in expanded chondrocytes accounts for a decrease in the activity of

  2. A novel synthesized sulfonamido-based gallic acid--LDQN-C: effects on chondrocytes growth and phenotype maintenance.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenhui; Wei, Shixiu; Wu, Huayu; Lin, Xiao; Lin, Cuiwu; Liu, Buming; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jinmin

    2014-12-01

    Chondrocyte based therapy is promising to treat symptomatic chondral and osteochondral lesions. Growth factors to accelerate the proliferation and retain the phenotype of chondrocytes in vitro are imperative. However, the high cost and rapid degradation of growth factors limited their further application. Therefore, it is significant to find substitutes that can preserve chondrocytes phenotype and ensure sufficient cells for cytotherapy. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents or their derivatives that have effect on arthritis may be an alternative. In this study, we synthesized sulfonamido-based gallate - LDQN-C and investigated its effect on rat articular chondrocytes through examination of the cell proliferation, morphology, viability, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) synthesis and cartilage specific gene expression. Results showed that LDQN-C could enhance secretion and synthesis of cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) by up-regulating expression levels of aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9 genes compared to the GA treated group and control group. Expression of collagen type II was effectively up-regulated while collagen I was down-regulated, which demonstrated that the inhibition of chondrocytes dedifferentiation by LDQN-C. Range of 1.36×10(-9)M to 1.36×10(-7)M is recommended dose of LDQN-C, among which the most profound response was observed with 1.36×10(-8)M. GA at concentration of 0.125μg/mL was compared. This study might provide a basis for the development of a novel agent for the treatment of articular cartilage defect.

  3. Chromatin protein HMGB2 regulates articular cartilage surface maintenance via β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Caramés, Beatriz; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Amendt, Brad A.; Komiya, Setsuro; Lotz, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The superficial zone (SZ) of articular cartilage is critical in maintaining tissue function and homeostasis and represents the site of the earliest changes in osteoarthritis. Mechanisms that regulate the unique phenotype of SZ chondrocytes and maintain SZ integrity are unknown. We recently demonstrated that expression of the chromatin protein high mobility group box (HMGB) protein 2 is restricted to the SZ in articular cartilage suggesting a transcriptional regulation involving HMGB2 in SZ. Here, we show that an interaction between HMGB2 and the Wnt/β-catenin pathway regulates the maintenance of the SZ. We found that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is active specifically in the SZ in normal mouse knee joints and colocalizes with HMGB2. Both Wnt signaling and HMGB2 expression decrease with aging in mouse joints. Our molecular studies show that HMGB2 enhances the binding of Lef-1 to its target sequence and potentiates transcriptional activation of the Lef-1-β-catenin complex. The HMG domain within HMGB2 is crucial for interaction with Lef-1, suggesting that both HMGB2 and HMGB1 may be involved in this function. Furthermore, conditional deletion of β-catenin in cultured mouse chondrocytes induced apoptosis. These findings define a pathway where protein interactions of HMGB2 and Lef-1 enhance Wnt signaling and promote SZ chondrocyte survival. Loss of the HMGB2-Wnt signaling interaction is a new mechanism in aging-related cartilage pathology. PMID:19805379

  4. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent. PMID:23122223

  5. Pendulum mass affects the measurement of articular friction coefficient.

    PubMed

    Akelman, Matthew R; Teeple, Erin; Machan, Jason T; Crisco, Joseph J; Jay, Gregory D; Fleming, Braden C

    2013-02-01

    Friction measurements of articular cartilage are important to determine the relative tribologic contributions made by synovial fluid or cartilage, and to assess the efficacy of therapies for preventing the development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. Stanton's equation is the most frequently used formula for estimating the whole joint friction coefficient (μ) of an articular pendulum, and assumes pendulum energy loss through a mass-independent mechanism. This study examines if articular pendulum energy loss is indeed mass independent, and compares Stanton's model to an alternative model, which incorporates viscous damping, for calculating μ. Ten loads (25-100% body weight) were applied in a random order to an articular pendulum using the knees of adult male Hartley guinea pigs (n=4) as the fulcrum. Motion of the decaying pendulum was recorded and μ was estimated using two models: Stanton's equation, and an exponential decay function incorporating a viscous damping coefficient. μ estimates decreased as mass increased for both models. Exponential decay model fit error values were 82% less than the Stanton model. These results indicate that μ decreases with increasing mass, and that an exponential decay model provides a better fit for articular pendulum data at all mass values. In conclusion, inter-study comparisons of articular pendulum μ values should not be made without recognizing the loads used, as μ values are mass dependent.

  6. Dielectric Characterization of Costal Cartilage Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Michael W.; Sabuncu, Ahmet Can; Beskok, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Chondrocytes respond to biomechanical and bioelectrochemical stimuli by secreting appropriate extracellular matrix proteins that enables the tissue to withstand the large forces it experiences. Although biomechanical aspects of cartilage are well described, little is known of the bioelectrochemical responses. The focus of this study is to identify bioelectrical characteristics of human costal cartilage cells using dielectric spectroscopy. Methods Dielectric spectroscopy allows non-invasive probing of biological cells. An in house computer program is developed to extract dielectric properties of human costal cartilage cells from raw cell suspension impedance data measured by a microfluidic device. The dielectric properties of chondrocytes are compared with other cell types in order to comparatively assess the electrical nature of chondrocytes. Results The results suggest that electrical cell membrane characteristics of chondrocyte cells are close to cardiomyoblast cells, cells known to possess an array of active ion channels. The blocking effect of the non-specific ion channel blocker gadolinium is tested on chondrocytes with a significant reduction in both membrane capacitance and conductance. Conclusions We have utilized a microfluidic chamber to mimic biomechanical events through changes in bioelectrochemistry and described the dielectric properties of chondrocytes to be closer to cells derived from electrically excitably tissues General significance and interest The studydescribes dielectric characterization of human costal chondrocyte cells using physical tools, where results and methodology can be used to identify potential anomalies in bioelectrochemical responses that may lead to cartilage disorders. PMID:24016606

  7. The chondrocyte clock gene Bmal1 controls cartilage homeostasis and integrity

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Michal; Gossan, Nicole; Yang, Nan; Im, Hee-Jeong; Ruckshanthi, Jayalath P.D.; Yoshitane, Hikari; Li, Xin; Jin, Ding; Wang, Ping; Boudiffa, Maya; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Fukada, Yoshitaka; Boot-Handford, Ray P.; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent and debilitating joint disease, and there are currently no effective disease-modifying treatments available. Multiple risk factors for OA, such as aging, result in progressive damage and loss of articular cartilage. Autonomous circadian clocks have been identified in mouse cartilage, and environmental disruption of circadian rhythms in mice predisposes animals to OA-like damage. However, the contribution of the cartilage clock mechanisms to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis is still unclear. Here, we have shown that expression of the core clock transcription factor BMAL1 is disrupted in human OA cartilage and in aged mouse cartilage. Furthermore, targeted Bmal1 ablation in mouse chondrocytes abolished their circadian rhythm and caused progressive degeneration of articular cartilage. We determined that BMAL1 directs the circadian expression of many genes implicated in cartilage homeostasis, including those involved in catabolic, anabolic, and apoptotic pathways. Loss of BMAL1 reduced the levels of phosphorylated SMAD2/3 (p-SMAD2/3) and NFATC2 and decreased expression of the major matrix-related genes Sox9, Acan, and Col2a1, but increased p-SMAD1/5 levels. Together, these results define a regulatory mechanism that links chondrocyte BMAL1 to the maintenance and repair of cartilage and suggest that circadian rhythm disruption is a risk factor for joint diseases such as OA. PMID:26657859

  8. [Effects of SL-1010 (sodium hyaluronate with high molecular weight) on experimental osteoarthritis induced by intra-articularly applied papain in guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Kitoh, Y; Katsuramaki, T; Tanaka, M; Kitabayashi, N; Fujimori, S; Umemoto, J; Namba, K

    1992-07-01

    Effects of SL-1010 on the experimental osteoarthritis (OA) produced by intra-articular injection of papain, proteolytic enzyme, in the knee joint of the guinea pigs were histologically and biochemically investigated. In addition, experimental conditions to produce OA in guinea pig knee joint were also examined, since papain-induced OA has been mainly studied in rabbits. Six weeks after intra-articular injection of papain (1%, 0.1 ml), there were inflammatory reactions of the synovial membrane, degenerative changes in chondrocytes and the matrix of the articular cartilage, a decrease in the Safranin-O staining intensity and lowering of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Electronmicroscopic observations revealed that the amorphous layer had disappeared and large bundles of unit collagen fibers and larger collagen fibers had appeared in the cartilage matrix. In the OA model, SL-1010 reduced the inflammatory reactions of the synovial membrane, inhibited development of degenerative changes in chondrocytes and the matrix of the articular cartilage and recovered the Safranin-O staining intensity. The sulfated glycosaminoglycan contents in the cartilage was significantly increased in the SL-1010-treated group, compared with the control group. The electromicroscopically observed charges in the papain-injected knee joint of the control group were rarely detected in the SL-1010-treated group. These results suggest that SL-1010 inhibits degenerative changes in the chondrocytes and the matrix probably by reducing synovial inflammation and protection of the cartilage in the OA model of guinea pigs.

  9. Localization of hyaluronic acid in human articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Asari, A; Miyauchi, S; Kuriyama, S; Machida, A; Kohno, K; Uchiyama, Y

    1994-04-01

    To demonstrate localization of hyaluronic acid (HA) in articular cartilage of the human femur, biotinylated HA-binding region, which specifically binds HA molecules, was applied to the tissue. In sections fixed by 2% paraformaldehyde-2% glutaraldehyde, HA staining was detected in lamina splendens and chondrocytes in the middle zone. By pretreatment with trypsin, intense HA staining appeared in the extracellular matrix of the deep zone and weak staining in the superficial and middle zones. Moreover, pre-treatment with chondroitinase ABC (CHase ABC) intensely enhanced the stainability for HA in the superficial and middle zones and weakly in the deeper zone. Combined pre-treatment of trypsin with CHase ABC abolished intra- and extracellular staining for HA in all zones. By microbiochemical study, the concentrations of HA and dermatan sulfate were high in the middle zone, whereas those of chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were high in the deep zone. These results suggest that HA is abundantly synthesized in and secreted from the chondrocytes, particularly in the middle zone, whereas it is largely masked by proteoglycan constituents in the extracellular matrix. PMID:8126377

  10. Effect of Fiber Diameter on the Spreading, Proliferation and Differentiation of Chondrocytes on Electrospun Chitosan Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Sandra E.; Hasanova, Gulnara I.; Schneider, Min Jeong; Larsen, Gustavo F.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2012-01-01

    Tissue-engineered neocartilage with appropriate biomechanical properties holds promise not only for graft applications but also as a model system for controlled studies of chondrogenesis. Our objective in the present research study is to better understand the impact of fiber diameter on the cellular activity of chondrocytes cultured on nanofibrous matrices. By using the electrospinning process, fibrous scaffolds with fiber diameters ranging from 300 nm to 1 μm were prepared and the physicomechanical properties of the scaffolds were characterized. Bovine articular chondrocytes were then seeded and maintained on the scaffolds for 7 and 14 days in culture. An upregulation in the gene expression of collagen II was noted with decreasing fiber diameters. For cells that were cultured on scaffolds with a mean fiber diameter of 300 nm, a 2-fold higher ratio of collagen II/collagen I was noted when compared to cells cultured on sponge-like scaffolds prepared by freeze drying and lyophilization. Integrin (α5, αv, β1) gene expression was also observed to be influenced by matrix morphology. Our combined results suggest that matrix geometry can regulate and promote the retention of the chondrocyte genotype. PMID:21540560

  11. The Involvement of Mutual Inhibition of ERK and mTOR in PLCγ1-Mediated MMP-13 Expression in Human Osteoarthritis Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zejun; Cai, Heguo; Zheng, Xinpeng; Zhang, Bing; Xia, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The issue of whether ERK activation determines matrix synthesis or degradation in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis currently remains controversial. Our previous study shows that PLCγ1 and mTOR are involved in the matrix metabolism of OA cartilage. Investigating the interplays of PLCγ1, mTOR and ERK in matrix degradation of OA will facilitate future attempts to manipulate ERK in OA prevention and therapy. Here, cultured human normal chondrocytes and OA chondrocytes were treated with different inhibitors or transfected with expression vectors, respectively. The levels of ERK, p-ERK, PLCγ1, p-PLCγ1, mTOR, p-mTOR and MMP-13 were then evaluated by Western blotting analysis. The results manifested that the expression level of ERK in human OA chondrocytes was lower than that in human normal articular chondrocytes, and the up-regulation of ERK could promote matrix synthesis, including the decrease in MMP-13 level and the increase in Aggrecan level in human OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, the PLCγ1/ERK axis and a mutual inhibition of mTOR and ERK were observed in human OA chondrocytes. Interestingly, activated ERK had no inhibitory effect on MMP-13 expression in PLCγ1-transformed OA chondrocytes. Combined with our previous study, the non-effective state of ERK activation by PLCγ1 on MMP-13 may be partly attributed to the inhibition of the PLCγ1/mTOR axis on the PLCγ1/ERK axis. Therefore, the study indicates that the mutual inhibition of ERK and mTOR is involved in PLCγ1-mediated MMP-13 expression in human OA chondrocytes, with important implication for the understanding of OA pathogenesis as well as for its prevention and therapy.

  12. Lysophosphatidic Acid Enhanced the Angiogenic Capability of Human Chondrocytes by Regulating Gi/NF-kB-Dependent Angiogenic Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai-Hua; Hong, Chang-Zern; Chang, Pey-Jium; Hsu, Hung-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been found to mediate myeloid differentiation, stimulate osteogenesis, alter cell proliferation and migration, and inhibit apoptosis in chondrocytes. The effect of LPA on the angiogenic capability of chondrocytes is not clear. This study aimed to investigate its effect on the angiogenic capability of human chondrocytes and the underlying mechanism of these effects. Human chondrocyte cell line, CHON-001, commercialized human chondrocytes (HC) derived from normal human articular cartilage, and human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used as cell models in this study. The angiogenic capability of chondrocytes was determined by capillary tube formation, monolayer permeability, cell migration, and cell proliferation. An angiogenesis protein array kit was used to evaluate the secretion of angiogenic factors in conditioned medium. Angiogenin, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1), interleukin (IL)-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expressions were evaluated by Q-RT-PCR and EIA, respectively. LPA receptor (LPAR) expression was determined by RT-PCR. Signaling pathways were clarified using inhibitors, Western blot analysis, and reporter assays. The LPA treatment promoted the angiogenic capability of CHON-001 cells and HC, resulting in enhanced HUVEC capillary tube formation, monolayer permeability, migration, and cell growth. Angiogenin, IGFBP-1, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP-9, and VEGF mRNA and protein expressions were significantly enhanced in LPA-treated chondrocytes. LPA2, 3, 4 and 6 were expressed in CHON-001 and HC cells. Pretreatment with the Gi/o type G protein inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX), and the NF-kB inhibitor, PDTC, significantly inhibited LPA-induced angiogenin, IGFBP-1, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP-9, and VEGF expressions in chondrocytes. The PTX pretreatment also inhibited LPA-mediated NF-kB activation, suggesting

  13. [The early development of the articular cartilage. IV. The metamorphosing cartilage].

    PubMed

    Knese, K H

    1980-01-01

    The definite articular cartilage originate from 2 anlagen, the primordial tangential layer and the greater part including the joint bone plate from the metamorphosing cartilage. The tangential layer grow by apposition from the perichondrium. Additional the layer becomes also dilatated as a result of the growing volume of the ossification center. In this way the Lamina splendens with residues of cells may be formed. The chondrocytes resemble partly fibroblasts, in older animals possibly even tendocytes. Moreover the cells exhibit a varying different shape. Today it is impossible to interpret the polymorphism of the cells. In the primordial state, the chondrocyts are embedded in a network from thin cartilage fibrils. Later on collagen fibrils from varied thickness (up to 900 A) are formed. The fibrils run only partly parallel to each other, in general they form a network, in which they cross with a low angle. There are great local differences in the fibrillar structure by the same animal. PMID:7461420

  14. TIP39/parathyroid hormone type 2 receptor signaling is a potent inhibitor of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Dibiyendu; Goltzman, David; Jüppner, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) is a member of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) family of peptide hormones that exerts its function by interacting with the PTH type 2 receptor (PTH2R). Presently, no known function has been attributed to this signaling pathway in the developing skeleton. We observed that TIP39 and PTH2R were present in the newborn mouse growth plate, with the receptor localizing in the resting zone whereas ligand expression was restricted exclusively in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. By 8 wk of life, PTH2R, and to a lesser degree TIP39, immunoreactivity was present in articular chondrocytes. We therefore sought to investigate the role of TIP39/PTH2R signaling in chondrocytes by generating stably transfected CFK2 chondrocytic cells overexpressing PTH2R (CFK2R). TIP39 treatment of CFK2R clones in culture inhibited their proliferation by restricting cells at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, coupled with decreased expression and activity of cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk2 and Cdk4, while p21, an inhibitor of Cdks, was upregulated. In addition, TIP39 treatment decreased expression of differentiation markers in these cells associated with marked alterations in extracellular matrix and metalloproteinase expression. Transcription of Sox9, the master regulator of cartilage differentiation, was reduced in TIP39-treated CFK2R clones. Moreover, Sox9 promoter activity, as measured by luciferase reporter assay, was markedly diminished after TIP39 treatment. In summary, our results show that TIP39/PTH2R signaling inhibits proliferation and alters differentiation of chondrocytes by modulating SOX9 expression, thereby substantiating the functional significance of this signaling pathway in chondrocyte biology. PMID:19706789

  15. TIP39/parathyroid hormone type 2 receptor signaling is a potent inhibitor of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Panda, Dibiyendu; Goltzman, David; Jüppner, Harald; Karaplis, Andrew C

    2009-11-01

    Tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39) is a member of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) family of peptide hormones that exerts its function by interacting with the PTH type 2 receptor (PTH2R). Presently, no known function has been attributed to this signaling pathway in the developing skeleton. We observed that TIP39 and PTH2R were present in the newborn mouse growth plate, with the receptor localizing in the resting zone whereas ligand expression was restricted exclusively in prehypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes. By 8 wk of life, PTH2R, and to a lesser degree TIP39, immunoreactivity was present in articular chondrocytes. We therefore sought to investigate the role of TIP39/PTH2R signaling in chondrocytes by generating stably transfected CFK2 chondrocytic cells overexpressing PTH2R (CFK2R). TIP39 treatment of CFK2R clones in culture inhibited their proliferation by restricting cells at the G(0)/G(1) phase of the cell cycle, coupled with decreased expression and activity of cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk2 and Cdk4, while p21, an inhibitor of Cdks, was upregulated. In addition, TIP39 treatment decreased expression of differentiation markers in these cells associated with marked alterations in extracellular matrix and metalloproteinase expression. Transcription of Sox9, the master regulator of cartilage differentiation, was reduced in TIP39-treated CFK2R clones. Moreover, Sox9 promoter activity, as measured by luciferase reporter assay, was markedly diminished after TIP39 treatment. In summary, our results show that TIP39/PTH2R signaling inhibits proliferation and alters differentiation of chondrocytes by modulating SOX9 expression, thereby substantiating the functional significance of this signaling pathway in chondrocyte biology.

  16. Mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue which have been differentiated into chondrocytes in three-dimensional culture express lubricin.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Lo Furno, Debora; Loreto, Carla; Giuffrida, Rosario; Caggia, Silvia; Leonardi, Rosalia; Cardile, Venera

    2011-11-01

    The present study focused on the isolation, cultivation and characterization of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue and on their differentiation into chondrocytes through the NH ChondroDiff medium. The main aim was to investigate some markers of biomechanical quality of cartilage, such as lubricin, and collagen type I and II. Little is known, in fact, about the ability of chondrocytes from human MSCs of adipose tissue to generate lubricin in three-dimensional (3D) culture. Lubricin, a 227.5-kDa mucinous glycoprotein, is known to play an important role in articular joint physiology, and the loss of accumulation of lubricin is thought to play a role in the pathology of osteoarthritis. Adipose tissue is an alternative source for the isolation of multipotent MSCs, which allows them to be obtained by a less invasive method and in larger quantities than from other sources. These cells can be isolated from cosmetic liposuctions in large numbers and easily grown under standard tissue culture conditions. 3D chondrocytes were assessed by histology (hematoxylin and eosin) and histochemistry (Alcian blue and Safranin-O/fast green staining). Collagen type I, II and lubricin expression was determined through immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The results showed that, compared with control cartilage and monolayer chondrocytes showing just collagen type I, chondrocytes from MSCs (CD44-, CD90- and CD105- positive; CD45-, CD14- and CD34-negative) of adipose tissue grown in nodules were able to express lubricin, and collagen type I and II, indicative of hyaline cartilage formation. Based on the function of lubricin in the joint cavity and disease and as a potential therapeutic agent, our results suggest that MSCs from adipose tissue are a promising cell source for tissue engineering of cartilage. Our results suggest that chondrocyte nodules producing lubricin could be a novel biotherapeutic approach for the treatment of cartilage abnormalities.

  17. Cotransfected human chondrocytes: over-expression of IGF-I and SOX9 enhances the synthesis of cartilage matrix components collagen-II and glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Simental-Mendía, M; Lara-Arias, J; Álvarez-Lozano, E; Said-Fernández, S; Soto-Domínguez, A; Padilla-Rivas, G R; Martínez-Rodríguez, H G

    2015-12-01

    Damage to cartilage causes a loss of type II collagen (Col-II) and glycosaminoglycans (GAG). To restore the original cartilage architecture, cell factors that stimulate Col-II and GAG production are needed. Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and transcription factor SOX9are essential for the synthesis of cartilage matrix, chondrocyte proliferation, and phenotype maintenance. We evaluated the combined effect of IGF-I and SOX9 transgene expression on Col-II and GAG production by cultured human articular chondrocytes. Transient transfection and cotransfection were performed using two mammalian expression plasmids (pCMV-SPORT6), one for each transgene. At day 9 post-transfection, the chondrocytes that were over-expressing IGF-I/SOX9 showed 2-fold increased mRNA expression of the Col-II gene, as well as a 57% increase in Col-II protein, whereas type I collagen expression (Col-I) was decreased by 59.3% compared with controls. The production of GAG by these cells increased significantly compared with the controls at day 9 (3.3- vs 1.8-times, an increase of almost 83%). Thus, IGF-I/SOX9 cotransfected chondrocytes may be useful for cell-based articular cartilage therapies.

  18. The NAD-Dependent Deacetylase Sirtuin-1 Regulates the Expression of Osteogenic Transcriptional Activator Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (Runx2) and Production of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 in Chondrocytes in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Terauchi, Koh; Kobayashi, Hajime; Yatabe, Kanaka; Yui, Naoko; Fujiya, Hiroto; Niki, Hisateru; Musha, Haruki; Yudoh, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Aging is one of the major pathologic factors associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Recently, numerous reports have demonstrated the impact of sirtuin-1 (Sirt1), which is the NAD-dependent deacetylase, on human aging. It has been demonstrated that Sirt1 induces osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. However, the role of Sirt1 in the OA chondrocytes still remains unknown. We postulated that Sirt1 regulates a hypertrophic chondrocyte lineage and degeneration of articular cartilage through the activation of osteogenic transcriptional activator Runx2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 in OA chondrocytes. To verify whether sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) regulates chondrocyte activity in OA, we studied expressions of Sirt1, Runx2 and production of MMP-13, and their associations in human OA chondrocytes. The expression of Sirt1 was ubiquitously observed in osteoarthritic chondrocytes; in contrast, Runx2 expressed in the osteophyte region in patients with OA and OA model mice. OA relating catabolic factor IL-1βincreased the expression of Runx2 in OA chondrocytes. OA chondrocytes, which were pretreated with Sirt1 inhibitor, inhibited the IL-1β-induced expression of Runx2 compared to the control. Since the Runx2 is a promotor of MMP-13 expression, Sirt1 inactivation may inhibit the Runx2 expression and the resultant down-regulation of MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our findings suggest thatSirt1 may regulate the expression of Runx2, which is the osteogenic transcription factor, and the production of MMP-13 from chondrocytes in OA. Since Sirt1 activity is known to be affected by several stresses, including inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as aging, SIRT may be involved in the development of OA. PMID:27367673

  19. Regeneration of Articular Cartilage Surface: Morphogens, Cells, and Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Ryosuke; Iwakura, Takashi; Reddi, A Hari

    2015-10-01

    The articular cartilage is a well-organized tissue for smooth and friction-free joint movement for locomotion in animals and humans. Adult articular cartilage has a very low self-regeneration capacity due to its avascular nature. The regeneration of articular cartilage surface is critical to prevent the progression to osteoarthritis (OA). Although various joint resurfacing procedures in experimental articular cartilage defects have been developed, no standardized clinical protocol has yet been established. The three critical ingredients for tissue regeneration are morphogens and growth factors, cells, and scaffolds. The concepts based on the regeneration triad have been extensively investigated in animal models. However, these studies in animal models have demonstrated variable results and outcomes. An optimal animal model must precisely mimic and model the sequence of events in articular cartilage regeneration in human. In this article, the progress and remaining challenges in articular cartilage regeneration in animal models are reviewed. The role of individual morphogens and growth factors in cartilage regeneration has been investigated. In normal articular cartilage homeostasis, morphogens and growth factors function sequentially in tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cell-based repair of articular cartilage defects, performed with or without various growth factors and scaffolds, has been widely attempted in animal models. Stem cells, including embryonic and adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, have also been reported as attractive cell sources for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Several studies with regard to scaffolds have been advanced, including recent investigations based on nanomaterials, functional mechanocompatible scaffolds, multilayered scaffolds, and extracellular matrix scaffolds for articular cartilage surface regeneration. Continuous refinement of animal models in chondral and osteochondral defects provide opportunities

  20. Resveratrol Interferes with IL1-β-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Paracrine Interaction between Primary Chondrocytes and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Limagne, Emeric; Lançon, Allan; Delmas, Dominique; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Latruffe, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    State of the art. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic articular disease characterized by cartilage degradation and osteophyte formation. OA physiopathology is multifactorial and involves mechanical and hereditary factors. So far, there is neither preventive medicine to delay cartilage breakdown nor curative treatment. Objectives. To investigate pro-inflammatory paracrine interactions between human primary chondrocytes and macrophages following interleukin-1-β (IL-1β) treatment; to evaluate the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of resveratrol. Results. The activation of NF-κB in chondrocytes by IL-1β induced IL-6 secretion. The latter will then activate STAT3 protein in macrophages. Moreover, STAT3 was able to positively regulate IL-6 secretion, as confirmed by the doubling level of IL-6 in the coculture compared to macrophage monoculture. These experiments confirm the usefulness of the coculture model in the inflammatory arthritis-linked process as a closer biological situation to the synovial joint than separated chondrocytes and macrophages. Il also demonstrated the presence of an inflammatory amplification loop induced by IL-1β. Resveratrol showed a strong inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory marker secretion. The decrease of IL-6 secretion is dependent on the NFκB inhibition in the chondrocytes. Such reduction of the IL-6 level can limit STAT3 activation in the macrophages, leading to the interruption of the inflammatory amplification loop. Conclusion. These results increase our understanding of the anti-inflammatory actions of resveratrol and open new potential approaches to prevent and treat osteoarthritis. PMID:27187448

  1. Resveratrol Interferes with IL1-β-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Paracrine Interaction between Primary Chondrocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Limagne, Emeric; Lançon, Allan; Delmas, Dominique; Cherkaoui-Malki, Mustapha; Latruffe, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    State of the art. Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic articular disease characterized by cartilage degradation and osteophyte formation. OA physiopathology is multifactorial and involves mechanical and hereditary factors. So far, there is neither preventive medicine to delay cartilage breakdown nor curative treatment. Objectives. To investigate pro-inflammatory paracrine interactions between human primary chondrocytes and macrophages following interleukin-1-β (IL-1β) treatment; to evaluate the molecular mechanism responsible for the inhibitory effect of resveratrol. Results. The activation of NF-κB in chondrocytes by IL-1β induced IL-6 secretion. The latter will then activate STAT3 protein in macrophages. Moreover, STAT3 was able to positively regulate IL-6 secretion, as confirmed by the doubling level of IL-6 in the coculture compared to macrophage monoculture. These experiments confirm the usefulness of the coculture model in the inflammatory arthritis-linked process as a closer biological situation to the synovial joint than separated chondrocytes and macrophages. Il also demonstrated the presence of an inflammatory amplification loop induced by IL-1β. Resveratrol showed a strong inhibitory effect on the pro-inflammatory marker secretion. The decrease of IL-6 secretion is dependent on the NFκB inhibition in the chondrocytes. Such reduction of the IL-6 level can limit STAT3 activation in the macrophages, leading to the interruption of the inflammatory amplification loop. Conclusion. These results increase our understanding of the anti-inflammatory actions of resveratrol and open new potential approaches to prevent and treat osteoarthritis. PMID:27187448

  2. Tracheal reconstruction using chondrocytes seeded on a poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-fibrin/hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun Jun; Chang, Jae Won; Park, Ju-Kyeong; Choi, Jae Won; Kim, Yoo Suk; Shin, Yoo Seob; Kim, Chul-Ho; Choi, Eun Chang

    2014-11-01

    Reconstruction of trachea is still a clinical dilemma. Tissue engineering is a recent and promising concept to resolve this problem. This study evaluated the feasibility of allogeneic chondrocytes cultured with fibrin/hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel and degradable porous poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold for partial tracheal reconstruction. Chondrocytes from rabbit articular cartilage were expanded and cultured with fibrin/HA hydrogel and injected into a 5 × 10 mm-sized, curved patch-shape PLGA scaffold. After 4 weeks in vitro culture, the scaffold was implanted on a tracheal defect in eight rabbits. Six and 10 weeks postoperatively, the implanted sites were evaluated by bronchoscope and radiologic and histologic analyses. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of regenerated epithelium was also evaluated. None of the eight rabbits showed any sign of respiratory distress. Bronchoscopic examination did not reveal stenosis of the reconstructed trachea and the defects were completely recovered with respiratory epithelium. Computed tomography scan showed good luminal contour of trachea. Histologic data showed that the implanted chondrocytes successfully formed neocartilage with minimal granulation tissue. CBF of regenerated epithelium was similar to that of normal epithelium. Partial tracheal defect was successfully reconstructed anatomically and functionally using allogeneic chondrocytes cultured with PLGA-fibrin/HA composite scaffold.

  3. Effect of low-power helium-neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Mohammad; Ansari, Anayatallah; Hekmat, Hossien

    2004-09-01

    Influence of low-power (632.8 nm, Helium-Neon, 13 J/cm2, three times a week) laser on 13-week immobilized articular cartilage was examined with rabbits knee model. Number of chondrocytes and depth of articular cartilage of experimental group were significantly higher than those of sham irradiated group. Surface morphology of sham-irradiated group had rough prominences, fibrillation and lacunae but surface morphology of experimental group had more similarities to control group than to sham irradiated group. There were marked differences between ultrastructure features of control group and experimental group in comparison with sham irradiated group. Low-power Helium-Neon laser irradiation on 13-week immobilized knee joints of rabbits neutrilized adverse effects of immobilization on articular cartilage.

  4. Morphological and functional interrelationships of articular cartilage matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C A; Flint, M H; Beaumont, B W

    1984-01-01

    The pericellular, territorial and interterritorial matrices of canine tibial cartilage have been identified ultrastructurally on the basis of their collagen fibre density and organisation, proteoglycan distribution and their structural response to experimentally applied compressive loads. In addition, a discrete pericellular capsule composed of fine, faintly banded fibrils is described which surrounds and encloses the pericellular matrix and chondrocytes of the middle and deep layers but not of the superficial layer. It is suggested that the fine fibrils which comprise this pericellular capsule represent some of the new minor collagen species recently localised in a similar position in hyaline cartilages. The densely compacted cupola which forms the articular pole of the capsule is frequently penetrated by a clearly defined pericellular channel, consistently orientated in the direction of the articular surface. Membrane-bound vesicles are observed in the pericellular matrix, within the lumen of the pericellular channel and accumulated in the territorial matrix immediately beyond the pericellular channel. The constancy of this distribution pattern strongly suggests a flow of material through the pericellular channel from the pericellular matrix to the territorial matrix and beyond, possibly in response to minute pressure gradients generated during compressive deformation of the non-distensible capsule. Furthermore, it is suggested that the random dispersal and subsequent rupture of matrix vesicles may represent a mechanism whereby chondrocytes, with limited mobility, could exercise homeostatic control over the cartilage matrix at some distance from the cell. Chondrocytes in the deeper layers of canine tibial cartilage are each surrounded by three distinct compartments, a pericellular matrix and capsule, a territorial matrix and an interterritorial matrix. The response of each of these concentric compartments to experimental load suggests that they function

  5. Biochemical and Proteomic Characterization of Alkaptonuric Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as “black” AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as “white” AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both “white” and “black” AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in “black” AKU chondrocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 3333–3343, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22213341

  6. Oxidative Stress Promotes Peroxiredoxin Hyperoxidation and Attenuates Pro-survival Signaling in Aging Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Collins, John A; Wood, Scott T; Nelson, Kimberly J; Rowe, Meredith A; Carlson, Cathy S; Chubinskaya, Susan; Poole, Leslie B; Furdui, Cristina M; Loeser, Richard F

    2016-03-25

    Oxidative stress-mediated post-translational modifications of redox-sensitive proteins are postulated as a key mechanism underlying age-related cellular dysfunction and disease progression. Peroxiredoxins (PRX) are critical intracellular antioxidants that also regulate redox signaling events. Age-related osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aging and oxidative stress on chondrocyte intracellular signaling, with a specific focus on oxidation of cytosolic PRX2 and mitochondrial PRX3. Menadione was used as a model to induce cellular oxidative stress. Compared with chondrocytes isolated from young adult humans, chondrocytes from older adults exhibited higher levels of PRX1-3 hyperoxidation basally and under conditions of oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was associated with inhibition of pro-survival Akt signaling and stimulation of pro-death p38 signaling. These changes were prevented in cultured human chondrocytes by adenoviral expression of catalase targeted to the mitochondria (MCAT) and in cartilage explants from MCAT transgenic mice. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was observedin situin human cartilage sections from older adults and in osteoarthritic cartilage. MCAT transgenic mice exhibited less age-related osteoarthritis. These findings demonstrate that age-related oxidative stress can disrupt normal physiological signaling and contribute to osteoarthritis and suggest peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation as a potential mechanism.

  7. Extra-articular Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Context: Snapping hip, or coxa saltans, is a vague term used to describe palpable or auditory snapping with hip movements. As increasing attention is paid to intra-articular hip pathologies such as acetabular labral tears, it is important to be able to identify and understand the extra-articular causes of snapping hip. Evidence Acquisition: The search terms snapping hip and coxa sultans were used in PubMed to locate suitable studies of any publication date (ending date, November 2008). Results: Extra-articular snapping may be caused laterally by the iliotibial band or anteriorly by the iliopsoas tendon. Snapping of the iliopsoas tendon usually requires contraction of the hip flexors and may be difficult to differentiate from intra-articular causes of snapping. Dynamic ultrasound can help detect abrupt tendon translation during movement, noninvasively supporting the diagnosis of extra-articular snapping hip. The majority of cases of snapping hip resolve with conservative treatment, which includes avoidance of aggravating activities, stretching, and anti-inflammatory medication. In recalcitrant cases, surgery to lengthen the iliotibial band or the iliopsoas tendon has produced symptom relief but may result in prolonged weakness. Conclusions: In treating active patients with snapping soft tissues around the hip, clinicians should recognize that the majority of cases resolve without surgical intervention, while being mindful of the potential for concomitant intra-articular and internal snapping hips. PMID:23015936

  8. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress in the chondrocytes of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Cao, Yongping; Yang, Xin; Shan, Pengcheng; Liu, Heng

    2015-10-01

    The main pathogenic events in osteoarthritis (OA) include loss and abnormal remodeling of cartilage extracellular matrix. The present study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on chondrocyte apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Articular cartilage tissues were collected from 18 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty and were analyzed histologically. Subsequently, chondrocyte apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were employed to evaluate gene and protein expression, respectively, of ER stress markers, including glucose‑regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest and DNA‑damage‑inducible gene 153 (GADD153) and caspase‑12 along with type II collagen. Chondrocytes obtained from osteoarthritis patients at different stages were cultured in three conditions including: No treatment (CON group), tunicamycin treatment to induce ER stress (ERS group) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment after 4 h of tunicamycin (TDA group); and cell proliferation, apoptosis, function and ER stress level were assessed. Degradation of cartilage resulted in histological damage with more apoptotic cartilage cells observed. Of note, GRP78, GADD153 and caspase‑12 mRNA and protein expression increased gradually from grade I to III cartilage tissue, while type II collagen expression decreased. Tunicamycin induced ER stress, as shown by a high expression of ER stress markers, reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and decreased synthesis of type II collagen. Notably, tauroursodeoxycholic acid treatment resulted in the improvement of tunicamycin‑induced ER stress. These results indicated that ER stress is highly involved in the tunicamycin‑induced apoptosis in chondrocytes, which can be prevented by tauroursodeoxycholic acid. PMID:26238983

  9. Low dose short duration pulsed electromagnetic field effects on cultured human chondrocytes: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Anbarasan, Selvam; Baraneedharan, Ulaganathan; Paul, Solomon FD; Kaur, Harpreet; Rangaswami, Subramoniam; Bhaskar, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) is used to treat bone and joint disorders for over 30 years. Recent studies demonstrate a significant effect of PEMF on bone and cartilage proliferation, differentiation, synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and production of growth factors. The aim of this study is to assess if PEMF of low frequency, ultralow field strength and short time exposure have beneficial effects on in-vitro cultured human chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Primary human chondrocytes cultures were established using articular cartilage obtained from knee joint during joint replacement surgery. Post characterization, the cells were exposed to PEMF at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 Hz and field intensities ranging from 0.65 to 1.95 μT for 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days to analyze the viability, ECM component synthesis, proliferation and morphology related changes post exposure. Association between exposure doses and cellular effects were analyzed with paired't’ test. Results: In-vitro PEMF exposure of 0.1 Hz frequency, 1.95 μT and duration of 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days produced the most favorable response on chondrocytes viability (P < 0.001), ECM component production (P < 0.001) and multiplication. Exposure of identical chondrocyte cultures to PEMFs of 0.65 μT field intensity at 1 Hz frequency resulted in less significant response. Exposure to 1.3 μT PEMFs at 10 Hz frequency does not show any significant effects in different analytical parameters. Conclusions: Short duration PEMF exposure may represent a new therapy for patients with Osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26955182

  10. Effect of a novel synthesized sulfonamido-based gallate-SZNTC on chondrocytes metabolism in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Li, Mu-Yan; Lin, Xiao; Lin, Cui-Wu; Liu, Bu-Ming; Zheng, Li; Zhao, Jin-Min

    2014-09-25

    The ideal therapeutic agent for treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) should have not only potent anti-inflammatory effect but also favorable biological properties to restore cartilage function. Gallic acid (GA) and its derivatives are anti-inflammatory agents reported to have an effect on OA (Singh et al., 2003) [1]. However, GA has much weaker antioxidant effects and inferior bioactivity compared with its derivatives. We modified GA with the introduction of sulfonamide to synthesize a novel sulfonamido-based gallate named sodium salt of 3,4,5-trihydroxy-N-[4-(thiazol-2-ylsulfamoyl)-phenyl]-benzamide (SZNTC) and analyzed its chondro-protective and pharmacological effects. Comparison of SZNTC with GA and sulfathiazole sodium (ST-Na) was also performed. Results showed that SZNTC could effectively inhibit the Interleukin-1 (IL-1)-mediated induction of metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and MMP-3 and could induce the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), which demonstrated ability to reduce the progression of OA. SZNTC can also exert chondro-protective effects by promoting cell proliferation and maintaining the phenotype of articular chondrocytes, as evidenced by improved cell growth, enhanced synthesis of cartilage specific markers such as aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9. Expression of the collagen I gene was effectively down-regulated, revealing the inhibition of chondrocytes dedifferentiation by SZNTC. Hypertrophy that may lead to chondrocyte ossification was also undetectable in SZNTC groups. The recommended dose of SZNTC ranges from 3.91μg/ml to 15.64μg/ml, among which the most profound response was observed with 7.82μg/ml. In contrast, its source products of GA and ST-Na have a weak effect in the bioactivity of chondrocytes, which indicated the significance of this modification. This study revealed SZNTC as a promising novel agent in the treatment of chondral and osteochondral lesions. PMID:25130855

  11. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins in chondrocyte-derived matrices on chondrocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Hoshiba, Takashi; Lu, Hongxu; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yamada, Tomoe; Chen, Guoping

    2013-01-01

    Loss of cartilaginous phenotype during in vitro expansion culture of chondrocytes is a major barrier to the application of chondrocytes for tissue engineering. In previous study, we showed that dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during the passage culture was delayed by matrices formed by primary chondrocytes (P0-ECM). In this study, we investigated bovine chondrocyte functions when being cultured on isolated extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-coated substrata and P0-ECM. Low chondrocyte attachment was observed on aggrecan-coated substratum and P0-ECM. Cell proliferation on aggrecan- and type II collagen/aggrecan-coated substrata and P0-ECM was lower than that on the other ECM protein (type I collagen and type II collagen)-coated substrata. When chondrocytes were subcultured on aggrecan-coated substratum, decline of cartilaginous gene expression was delayed, which was similar to the cells subcultured on P0-ECM. These results indicate that aggrecan plays an important role in the regulation of chondrocyte functions and P0-ECM may be a good experimental control for investigating the role of each ECM protein in cartilage ECM.

  12. Characterization of a macroporous polyvinyl alcohol scaffold for the repair of focal articular cartilage defects.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kenneth W; Torzilli, Peter A; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-02-01

    Focal cartilage defects reduce the ability of articular cartilage to resist mechanical loading and provide lubrication during joint motion. The limitations in current surgical treatments have motivated the use of biocompatible scaffolds as a future treatment option. Here we describe a second generation macroporous, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffold with independently tunable morphological and mechanical properties. The compressive moduli of the PVA scaffold increased with increasing polymer concentration and applied compressive strain, with values in the range for human articular cartilage (HA  > 1000 kPa, EY  > 500 kPa). Scaffolds also possessed strain-dependent permeability and Poisson's ratio. The interconnected macroporous network was found to facilitate chondrocyte seeding and proliferation through the scaffold over one week in culture. Overall, these promising characteristics demonstrate the potential of this macroporous scaffold for future studies in focal cartilage defect repair.

  13. Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro by inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Soo A; Lee, Sang-Han

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Intra-articular injection of local anesthetics (LAs) is a common procedure for therapeutic purposes. However, LAs have been found toxic to articular cartilage, and hyaluronan may attenuate this toxicity. In this study we investigated whether hyaluronan attenuated lidocaine-induced chondrotoxicity, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and newly isolated murine chondrocytes were incubated in culture medium containing hyaluronan and/or lidocaine for 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated using MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected with DAPI staining, caspase 3/7 activity assay and flow cytometry. Cell cycle distributions, ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined using flow cytometry. The expression of p53 and p53-regulated gene products was measured with Western blotting. Results: Lidocaine (0.005%−0.03%) dose-dependently decreased the viability of SW1353 cells. This local anesthetic (0.015%, 0.025%) induced apoptosis, G2/M phase arrest and loss of ΔΨm, and markedly increased ROS production in SW1353 cells. Hyaluronan (50−800 μg/mL) alone did not affect the cell viability, but co-treatment with hyaluronan (200 μg/mL) significantly attenuated lidocaine-induced apoptosis and other abnormalities in SW1353 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with lidocaine and hyaluronan significantly decreased the levels of p53 and its transcription targets Bax and p21 in SW1353 cells, although treatment with lidocaine alone did not significantly change these proteins. Similar results were obtained in ex vivo cultured murine chondrocytes. Conclusion: Hyaluronan suppresses lidocaine-induced apoptosis of human chondrocytes in vitro through inhibiting the p53-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. PMID:27041463

  14. Positive impact of IGF-1-coupled nanoparticles on the differentiation potential of human chondrocytes cultured on collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Pasold, Juliane; Zander, Kathleen; Heskamp, Benjamin; Grüttner, Cordula; Lüthen, Frank; Tischer, Thomas; Jonitz-Heincke, Anika; Bader, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In the present study, silica nanoparticles (sNP) coupled with insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were loaded on a collagen-based scaffold intended for cartilage repair, and the influence on the viability, proliferation, and differentiation potential of human primary articular chondrocytes was examined. Methods Human chondrocytes were isolated from the hyaline cartilage of patients (n=4, female, mean age: 73±5.1 years) undergoing primary total knee joint replacement. Cells were dedifferentiated and then cultivated on a bioresorbable collagen matrix supplemented with fluorescent sNP coupled with IGF-1 (sNP–IGF-1). After 3, 7, and 14 days of cultivation, cell viability and integrity into the collagen scaffold as well as metabolic cell activity and synthesis rate of matrix proteins (collagen type I and II) were analyzed. Results The number of vital cells increased over 14 days of cultivation, and the cells were able to infiltrate the collagen matrix (up to 120 μm by day 7). Chondrocytes cultured on the collagen scaffold supplemented with sNP–IGF-1 showed an increase in metabolic activity (5.98-fold), and reduced collagen type I (1.58-fold), but significantly increased collagen type II expression levels (1.53-fold; P=0.02) after 7 days of cultivation compared to 3 days. In contrast, chondrocytes grown in a monolayer on plastic supplemented with sNP-IGF-1 had significantly lower metabolic activity (1.32-fold; P=0.007), a consistent amount of collagen type I, and significantly reduced collagen type II protein expression (1.86-fold; P=0.001) after 7 days compared to 3 days. Conclusion Collagen-based scaffolds enriched with growth factors, such as IGF-1 coupled to nanoparticles, represent an improved therapeutic intervention for the targeted and controlled treatment of articular cartilage lesions. PMID:25709437

  15. Effects of regenerative radioelectric asymmetric conveyer treatment on human normal and osteoarthritic chondrocytes exposed to IL-1β. A biochemical and morphological study

    PubMed Central

    Collodel, Giulia; Fioravanti, Antonella; Pascarelli, Nicola Antonio; Lamboglia, Antonello; Fontani, Vania; Maioli, Margherita; Santaniello, Sara; Pigliaru, Gianfranco; Castagna, Alessandro; Moretti, Elena; Iacoponi, Francesca; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Ventura, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage extracellular matrix and is due to functional impairments occurring in chondrocytes. In previous works, we highlighted that Regenerative Tissue Optimization (TO-RGN) treatment with radioelectric asymmetric conveyer (REAC) technology influenced the gene expression profiles controlling stem cell differentiation and the pluripotency of human skin-derived fibroblasts in vitro. Since interleukin-1 beta signaling has been implicated in the induction and progression of this disease (through metalloproteinase-3 synthesis and nitric oxide production), we investigated whether REAC TO-RGN might influence the biochemical and morphological changes induced by interleukin-1 beta in normal and OA chondrocytes. Methods The induction of metalloproteinase-3 and proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated by a solid-phase enzyme-amplified sensitivity immunoassay, and nitric oxide production was evaluated with the Griess method. Ultrastructural features were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Results REAC TO-RGN treatment decreased nitric oxide and metalloproteinase-3 production in normal and OA chondrocytes, while inducing an increase in proteoglycan synthesis. OA chondrocytes were more affected by REAC TO-RGN treatment than were normal chondrocytes. Ultrastructural changes confirmed that REAC TO-RGN may counteract the negative effects of interleukin-1 beta incubation. Conclusion The results of this in vitro study suggest that REAC TO-RGN treatment may represent a new, promising approach for the management of OA. PMID:23682210

  16. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. PMID:25179676

  17. Resident mesenchymal progenitors of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Candela, Maria Elena; Yasuhara, Rika; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-10-01

    Articular cartilage has poor capacity of self-renewal and repair. Insufficient number and activity of resident mesenchymal (connective tissue) progenitors is likely one of the underlying reasons. Chondroprogenitors reside not only in the superficial zone of articular cartilage but also in other zones of articular cartilage and in the neighboring tissues, including perichondrium (groove of Ranvier), synovium and fat pad. These cells may respond to injury and contribute to articular cartilage healing. In addition, marrow stromal cells can migrate through subchondral bone when articular cartilage is damaged. We should develop drugs and methods that correctly stimulate resident progenitors for improvement of repair and inhibition of degenerative changes in articular cartilage. PMID:25179676

  18. Poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel as a biocompatible viscoelastic mimetic for articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Grant, Colin; Twigg, Pete; Egan, Alex; Moody, Alexandra; Smith, Annie; Eagland, Donald; Crowther, Nicholas; Britland, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of suboptimal outcome for surgical interventions in the treatment of full-thickness articular cartilage damage suggests that there is scope for a materials-based strategy to deliver a more durable repair. Given that the superficial layer of articular cartilage creates and sustains the tribological function of synovial joints, it is logical that candidate materials should have surface viscoelastic properties that mimic native articular cartilage. The present paper describes force spectroscopy analysis by nano-indentation to measure the elastic modulus of the surface of a novel poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel with therapeutic potential as a joint implant. More than 1 order of magnitude decrease in the elastic modulus was detected after adsorption of a hyaluronic acid layer onto the hydrogel, bringing it very close to previously reported values for articular cartilage. Covalent derivatization of the hydrogel surface with fibronectin facilitated the adhesion and growth of cultured rat tibial condyle chondrocytes as evidenced morphologically and by the observance of metachromatic staining with toluidine blue dye. The present results indicate that hydrogel materials with potential therapeutic benefit for injured and diseased joints can be engineered with surfaces with biomechanical properties similar to those of native tissue and are accepted as such by their constituent cell type. PMID:17022680

  19. Synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations following single intra-articular injection in normal and osteoarthritic canine stifles.

    PubMed

    Barry, S L; Martinez, S A; Davies, N M; Remsberg, C M; Sayre, C L; Bachelez, A

    2015-02-01

    Intra-articular bupivacaine helps alleviate pain in animals receiving joint surgery, but its use has become controversial as ex vivo studies have illuminated the potential for chondrotoxicity. Such studies typically involve cell cultures incubated in solutions containing high bupivacaine concentrations for long durations. The aim of this study was to measure the actual synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations after intra-articular injection. Eight healthy beagles with normal stifles and 22 large and giant-breed dogs with stifle osteoarthritis (OA) were treated with a single intra-articular injection of bupivacaine (1 mg/kg) into a stifle. Joint fluid samples were taken from the treated stifle immediately after injection and 30 min after injection and analyzed for bupivacaine concentrations. Immediately after injection, the median bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 3.6 and 2.5 mg/mL, respectively. Thirty minutes after injection, bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 0.4 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively. These results provide insight into the pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine after injection into a joint. Given its immediate dilution and rapid drop in synovial fluid concentration, bupivacaine is unlikely to damage chondrocytes when administered as a single intra-articular injection.

  20. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J; Cervantes, Thomas M; Kimura, Anya M; Neville, Craig M; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2016-02-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  1. Articular Cartilage Injury in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    McAdams, Timothy R.; Mithoefer, Kai; Scopp, Jason M.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2010-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the athletic population are observed with increasing frequency and, due to limited intrinsic healing capacity, can lead to progressive pain and functional limitation over time. If left untreated, isolated cartilage lesions can lead to progressive chondropenia or global cartilage loss over time. A chondropenia curve is described to help predict the outcome of cartilage injury based on different lesion and patient characteristics. Nutriceuticals and chondroprotective agents are being investigated as tools to slow the development of chondropenia. Several operative techniques have been described for articular cartilage repair or replacement and, more recently, cartilage regeneration. Rehabilitation guidelines are being developed to meet the needs of these new techniques. Next-generation techniques are currently evaluated to optimize articular cartilage repair biology and to provide a repair cartilage tissue that can withstand the high mechanical loads experienced by the athlete with consistent long-term durability. PMID:26069548

  2. Transport Phenomena in Articular Cartilage Cryopreservation as Predicted by the Modified Triphasic Model and the Effect of Natural Inhomogeneities

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Thompson, Richard B.; Elliott, Janet A.W.; McGann, Locksley E.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of cryoprotective agent (CPA) is necessary for the cryopreservation of articular cartilage. Cartilage dehydration and shrinkage, as well as the change in extracellular osmolality, may have a significant impact on chondrocyte survival during and after CPA loading, freezing, and thawing, and during CPA unloading. In the literature, Fick's law of diffusion is commonly used to predict the spatial distribution and overall concentration of the CPA in the cartilage matrix, and the shrinkage and stress-strain in the cartilage matrix during CPA loading are neglected. In this study, we used a previously described biomechanical model to predict the spatial and temporal distributions of CPA during loading. We measured the intrinsic inhomogeneities in initial water and fixed charge densities in the cartilage using magnetic resonance imaging and introduced them into the model as initial conditions. We then compared the prediction results with the results obtained using uniform initial conditions. The simulation results in this study demonstrate the presence of a significant mechanical strain in the matrix of the cartilage, within all layers, during CPA loading. The osmotic response of the chondrocytes to the cartilage dehydration during CPA loading was also simulated. The results reveal that a transient shrinking occurs to different levels, and the chondrocytes experience a significant decrease in volume, particularly in the middle and deep zones of articular cartilage, during CPA loading. PMID:22455911

  3. The effect of chemically defined medium on spontaneous calcium signaling of in situ chondrocytes during long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yilu; Park, Miri; Cheung, Enoch; Wang, Liyun; Lu, X Lucas

    2015-04-13

    Chemically defined serum-free medium has been shown to better maintain the mechanical integrity of articular cartilage explants than serum-supplemented medium during long-term in vitro culture, but little is known about its effect on cellular mechanisms. We hypothesized that the chemically defined culture medium could regulate the spontaneous calcium signaling of in situ chondrocytes, which may modulate the cellular metabolic activities. Bovine cartilage explants were cultured in chemically defined serum-free or serum-supplemented medium for four weeks. The spontaneous intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) signaling of in situ chondrocytes was longitudinally measured together along with the biomechanical properties of the explants. The spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in chondrocytes were enhanced at the initial exposure of serum-supplemented medium, but were significantly dampened afterwards. In contrast, cartilage explants in chemically defined medium preserved the level of calcium signaling, and showed more responsive cells with higher and more frequent [Ca(2+)]i peaks throughout the four week culture in comparison to those in serum medium. Regardless of the culture medium that the explants were exposed, a positive correlation was detected between the [Ca(2+)]i responsive rate and the stiffness of cartilage (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient=0.762). A stable pattern of [Ca(2+)]i peaks was revealed for each chondrocyte, i.e., the spatiotemporal features of [Ca(2+)]i peaks from a cell were highly consistent during the observation period (15 min). This study showed that the beneficial effect of chemically defined culture of cartilage explants is associated with the spontaneous [Ca(2+)]i signaling of chondrocytes in cartilage.

  4. Niacinamide therapy for osteoarthritis--does it inhibit nitric oxide synthase induction by interleukin 1 in chondrocytes?

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F; Russell, A L

    1999-10-01

    Fifty years ago, Kaufman reported that high-dose niacinamide was beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis. A recent double-blind study confirms the efficacy of niacinamide in OA. It may be feasible to interpret this finding in the context of evidence that synovium-generated interleukin-1 (IL-1), by inducing nitric oxide (NO) synthase and thereby inhibiting chondrocyte synthesis of aggrecan and type II collagen, is crucial to the pathogenesis of OA. Niacinamide and other inhibitors of ADP-ribosylation have been shown to suppress cytokine-mediated induction of NO synthase in a number of types of cells; it is therefore reasonable to speculate that niacinamide will have a comparable effect in IL-1-exposed chondrocytes, blunting the anti-anabolic impact of IL-1. The chondroprotective antibiotic doxycycline may have a similar mechanism of action. Other nutrients reported to be useful in OA may likewise intervene in the activity or synthesis of IL-1. Supplemental glucosamine can be expected to stimulate synovial synthesis of hyaluronic acid; hyaluronic acid suppresses the anti-catabolic effect of IL-1 in chondrocyte cell cultures, and has documented therapeutic efficacy when injected intra-articularly. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), another proven therapy for OA, upregulates the proteoglycan synthesis of chondrocytes, perhaps because it functions physiologically as a signal of sulfur availability. IL-1 is likely to decrease SAM levels in chondrocytes; supplemental SAM may compensate for this deficit. Adequate selenium nutrition may down-regulate cytokine signaling, and ample intakes of fish oil can be expected to decrease synovial IL-1 production; these nutrients should receive further evaluation in OA. These considerations suggest that non-toxic nutritional regimens, by intervening at multiple points in the signal transduction pathways that promote the synthesis and mediate the activity of IL-1, may provide a substantially superior alternative to NSAIDs

  5. The Effect of Chemically Defined Medium on Spontaneous Calcium Signaling of In Situ Chondrocytes during Long-term Culture

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yilu; Park, Miri; Cheung, Enoch; Wang, Liyun; Lu, X. Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Chemically defined serum-free medium has been shown to maintain the mechanical integrity of articular cartilage explants better than serum-supplemented medium during long-term in vitro culture, but little is known about its effect on cellular mechanisms. We hypothesized that the chemically defined culture medium can regulate the spontaneous calcium signaling of in situ chondrocytes, which may modulate the cellular metabolic activities. Bovine cartilage explants were cultured in chemically defined serum-free or serum-supplemented medium for four weeks. The spontaneous intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling of in situ chondrocytes was longitudinally measured together along with the biomechanical properties of the explants. The spontaneous [Ca2+]i oscillations in chondrocytes were enhanced at the initial exposure of serum-supplemented medium, but were significantly dampened afterwards. In contrast, cartilage explants in chemically defined medium preserved the level of calcium signaling, and showed more responsive cells with higher and more frequent [Ca2+]i peaks after one to four week culture in comparison to those in serum medium. Regardless of the culture medium that the explants were exposed, a positive correlation was detected between the [Ca2+]i responsive rate and the stiffness of cartilage (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient = 0.762). A stable pattern of [Ca2+]i peaks was revealed for each chondrocyte, i.e., the spatiotemporal features of [Ca2+]i peaks from a cell were highly consistent during the observation period (15 minutes). This study showed that the beneficial effect of chemically defined culture of cartilage explants is associated with the spontaneous [Ca2+]i signaling of chondrocytes in cartilage. PMID:25700610

  6. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -13 synthesis induced by IL-1beta in chondrocytes from mice lacking microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1.

    PubMed

    Gosset, Marjolaine; Pigenet, Audrey; Salvat, Colette; Berenbaum, Francis; Jacques, Claire

    2010-11-15

    Joint destruction in arthritis is in part due to the induction of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and their inhibitors, especially MMP-13 and -3, which directly degrade the cartilage matrix. Although IL-1β is considered as the main catabolic factor involved in MMP-13 and -3 expression, the role of PGE(2) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to determine the role of PGE(2) on MMP synthesis in articular chondrocytes using mice lacking microsomal PGE synthase-1 (mPGES-1), which catalyses the rate-limiting step of PGE(2) synthesis. MMP-3 and MMP-13 mRNA and protein expressions were assessed by real-time RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and ELISA in primary cultures of articular chondrocytes from mice with genetic deletion of mPGES-1. IL-1β-induced PGE(2) synthesis was dramatically reduced in mPGES-1(-/-) and mPGES-1(+/-) compared with mPGES-1(+/+) chondrocytes. A total of 10 ng/ml IL-1β increased MMP-3 and MMP-13 mRNA, protein expression, and release in mPGES-1(+/+) chondrocytes in a time-dependent manner. IL-1β-induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 mRNA expression, protein expression, and release decreased in mPGES-1(-/-) and mPGES-1(+/-) chondrocytes compared with mPGES-1(+/+) chondrocytes from 8 up to 24 h. Otherwise, MMP inhibition was partially reversed by addition of 10 ng/ml PGE(2) in mPGES-1(-/-) chondrocytes. Finally, in mPGES-1(-/-) chondrocytes treated by forskolin, MMP-3 protein expression was significantly decreased compared with wild-type, suggesting that PGE(2) regulates MMP-3 expression via a signaling pathway dependent on cAMP. These results demonstrate that PGE(2) plays a key role in the induction of MMP-3 and MMP-13 in an inflammatory context. Therefore, mPGES-1 could be considered as a critical target to counteract cartilage degradation in arthritis.

  7. Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine articular and epiphyseal cartilage: light ane electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, R; Christian, R G; Nakano, T; Aherne, F X; Thompson, J R

    1981-04-01

    Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine were studied using light microscopy and electron microscopy in articular cartilage and light microscopy and epiphyseal cartilage of swine from three days to 30 weeks of age. Thickness, cellularity and vascularity of both the epiphyseal and articular cartilage, decreased as the swine aged. Osteochondrotic changes included formation of "plugs" of cartilage indicating localized failure of ossification and separation and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage. Eosinophilic streaks and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage was observed in relation to epiphyseal separation. Electron microscopy showed a continuous fibrillar layer on the surface of the cartilage corresponding to the lamina splendens of light microscopy. This layer increased in the thickness and showed accumulation of amorphous material between the fibrils with aging. In the matrix, the orientation and distribution of the collagen fibers changed with growth and thicker fibers with clear sub banding were more common in older age groups. Also, necrotic cells, glycogen containing bodies and cellular debris were noticed in the matrix of normal cartilage in old animals. Chondrocytes in the younger cartilage showed accumulation of organelles responsible for protein synthesis; while Golgi bodies, vesicles, lysosomes, well developed foot processes and other inclusions were noticed in older cartilage. Cartilage erosions had a clumped and disrupted lamina splendens on the surface and electron lucent patches in the ground substances of the matrix and chondrocyte cytoplasm. PMID:7260732

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells as a potent cell source for articular cartilage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Malakooty Poor, Elham

    2014-07-26

    Since articular cartilage possesses only a weak capacity for repair, its regeneration potential is considered one of the most important challenges for orthopedic surgeons. The treatment options, such as marrow stimulation techniques, fail to induce a repair tissue with the same functional and mechanical properties of native hyaline cartilage. Osteochondral transplantation is considered an effective treatment option but is associated with some disadvantages, including donor-site morbidity, tissue supply limitation, unsuitable mechanical properties and thickness of the obtained tissue. Although autologous chondrocyte implantation results in reasonable repair, it requires a two-step surgical procedure. Moreover, chondrocytes expanded in culture gradually undergo dedifferentiation, so lose morphological features and specialized functions. In the search for alternative cells, scientists have found mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to be an appropriate cellular material for articular cartilage repair. These cells were originally isolated from bone marrow samples and further investigations have revealed the presence of the cells in many other tissues. Furthermore, chondrogenic differentiation is an inherent property of MSCs noticed at the time of the cell discovery. MSCs are known to exhibit homing potential to the damaged site at which they differentiate into the tissue cells or secrete a wide spectrum of bioactive factors with regenerative properties. Moreover, these cells possess a considerable immunomodulatory potential that make them the general donor for therapeutic applications. All of these topics will be discussed in this review.

  9. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Boyan, Barbara D; Hyzy, Sharon L; Pan, Qingfen; Scott, Kayla M; Coutts, Richard D; Healey, Robert; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OH)D3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH)2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH)2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH)2D3 or 1α,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 but not 1α,25(OH)2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days). Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH)2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH)2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:27575371

  10. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, Barbara D.; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Pan, Qingfen; Scott, Kayla M.; Coutts, Richard D.; Healey, Robert; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OH)D3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH)2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH)2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH)2D3 or 1α,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 but not 1α,25(OH)2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days). Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH)2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH)2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:27575371

  11. Effect of passive motion on articular cartilage in rat osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jie; Liang, Jun; Wang, Yubin; Wang, Huifang

    2014-08-01

    fibers when compared with the control group, but not when compared with the three-week experimental group. Therefore, proper passive motion can repair and improve the metabolism of chondrocytes and delay the degenerative progress of articular cartilage in OA caused by knee fracture. However, for middle-stage OA, passive motion exhibits no significant repairing effect on the articular cartilage. This therapy increases the levels of proteoglycans and collagen fibers by reducing their decomposition, thereby improving the strength of the articular ligament and the stability of articulation. PMID:25009586

  12. Aging-related loss of the chromatin protein HMGB2 in articular cartilage is linked to reduced cellularity and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Caramés, Beatriz; Ronfani, Lorenza; Ulmer, Ulrich; Komiya, Setsuro; Bianchi, Marco E.; Lotz, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease and typically begins with an aging-related disruption of the articular cartilage surface. Mechanisms leading to the aging-related cartilage surface degeneration remain to be determined. Here, we demonstrate that nonhistone chromatin protein high-mobility group box (HMGB) protein 2 is uniquely expressed in the superficial zone (SZ) of human articular cartilage. In human and murine cartilage, there is an aging-related loss of HMGB2 expression, ultimately leading to its complete absence. Mice genetically deficient in HMGB2 (Hmgb2−/−) show earlier onset of and more severe OA. This is associated with a profound reduction in cartilage cellularity attributable to increased cell death. These cellular changes precede glycosaminoglycan depletion and progressive cartilage erosions. Chondrocytes from Hmgb2−/− mice are more susceptible to apoptosis induction in vitro. In conclusion, HMGB2 is a transcriptional regulator specifically expressed in the SZ of human articular cartilage and supports chondrocyte survival. Aging is associated with a loss of HMGB2 expression and reduced cellularity, and this contributes to the development of OA. PMID:19139395

  13. Structural Variations in Articular Cartilage Matrix Are Associated with Early-Onset Osteoarthritis in the Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita (Sedc) Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, David W.; Squires, Ryan S.; Avery, Shaela A.; Adams, Jason; Baker, Melissa; Cunningham, Christopher R.; Heimann, Nicholas B.; Kooyman, David L.; Seegmiller, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Heterozgyous spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (sedc/+) mice expressing a missense mutation in col2a1 exhibit a normal skeletal morphology but early-onset osteoarthritis (OA). We have recently examined knee articular cartilage obtained from homozygous (sedc/sedc) mice, which express a Stickler-like phenotype including dwarfism. We examined sedc/sedc mice at various levels to better understand the mechanistic process resulting in OA. Mutant sedc/sedc, and control (+/+) cartilages were compared at two, six and nine months of age. Tissues were fixed, decalcified, processed to paraffin sections, and stained with hematoxylin/eosin and safranin O/fast green. Samples were analyzed under the light microscope and the modified Mankin and OARSI scoring system was used to quantify the OA-like changes. Knees were stained with 1C10 antibody to detect the presence and distribution of type II collagen. Electron microscopy was used to study chondrocyte morphology and collagen fibril diameter. Compared with controls, mutant articular cartilage displayed decreased fibril diameter concomitant with increases in size of the pericellular space, Mankin and OARSI scores, cartilage thickness, chondrocyte clustering, proteoglycan staining and horizontal fissuring. In conclusion, homozygous sedc mice are subject to early-onset knee OA. We conclude that collagen in the mutant’s articular cartilage (both heterozygote and homozygote) fails to provide the normal meshwork required for matrix integrity and overall cartilage stability. PMID:23939426

  14. Tissue Neogenesis and STRO-1 Expression in Immature and Mature Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Shuhei; Grogan, Shawn P.; Miyaki, Shigeru; Kinoshita, Mitsuo; Asahara, Hiroshi; Lotz, Martin K.

    2010-01-01

    This study determined the potential for neo tissue formation and the role of STRO-1+ cells in immature versus mature articular cartilage. Cartilage explants from immature and mature bovine knee joints were cultured for up to 12 weeks and stained with Safranin O, for type II collagen and STRO-1. Bovine chondrocyte pellet cultures and murine knee joints at the age of 2 weeks and 3 months and surgically injured cartilage were analyzed for changes in STRO-1 expression patterns. Results show that immature explants contained more STRO-1+ cells than mature explants. After 8 weeks in culture, immature explants showed STRO-1+ cell proliferation and newly formed tissue, which contained glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen. Mature cartilage explants showed only minimal cell expansion and neo tissue formation. Pellet cultures with chondrocytes from immature cartilage showed increased glycosaminoglycan synthesis and STRO-1+ staining as compared to pellets from mature chondrocytes. The frequency of STRO-1+ cells in murine knee joints significantly declined with joint maturation. Following surgical injury, immature explants had higher potential for tissue repair than mature explants. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the high percentage of STRO-1+ cells in immature cartilage changes with joint maturation. STRO-1+ cells have the potential to form new cartilage spontaneously and after tissue injury. PMID:19603515

  15. Utility of Intra-articular Hip Injections for Femoroacetabular Impingement

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wahab; Khan, Moin; Alradwan, Hussain; Williams, Ryan; Simunovic, Nicole; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition that is becoming increasingly recognized as a common etiology of hip pain in athletes, adolescents, and adults. However, history and clinical examination are often inconclusive in reaching a diagnosis, while imaging often detects asymptomatic abnormalities. Treatment has traditionally been limited to surgery, with the role of conservative management remaining unclear. Purpose: To evaluate the utility of the intra-articular hip injection in the diagnosis and management of FAI. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PubMed databases were screened in duplicate for studies published between January 1946 and January 2014. Search terms included femoroacetabular impingement, hip impingement, and intra-articular injection. Quality assessment using the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) scale was completed for all included studies. Data evaluated included study design, study objectives, number of hips, injected product, duration of pain relief, and outcomes measured. Results: Our search yielded 8 studies involving 281 hips. Studies were categorized into diagnostic (4 studies), therapeutic (3 studies), and prognostic (1 study) applications. Patients with FAI and its degenerative sequelae obtained greater relief from diagnostic intra-articular hip injection than those without (P < .05). The diagnostic intra-articular injection performed under ultrasound guidance was better tolerated than injections performed under fluoroscopic guidance (pain rating, 5.6 vs 3.0; P < .1). Intra-articular injection of hyaluronic acid was the most effective at providing pain relief (in 23 patients), with significant improvements of functional outcome measures (Harris Hip Score, visual analog scale) present at 12 months. Pooled results with corticosteroid injection resulted in improvement in only 15% (9/60) of patients at 6 weeks. A negative response to intra-articular

  16. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-01

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation.

  17. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  18. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  19. Modeling IL-1 induced degradation of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kar, Saptarshi; Smith, David W; Gardiner, Bruce S; Li, Yang; Wang, Yang; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we develop a computational model to simulate the in vitro biochemical degradation of articular cartilage explants sourced from the femoropatellar grooves of bovine calves. Cartilage explants were incubated in culture medium with and without the inflammatory cytokine IL-1α. The spatio-temporal evolution of the cartilage explant's extracellular matrix components is modelled. Key variables in the model include chondrocytes, aggrecan, collagen, aggrecanase, collagenase and IL-1α. The model is first calibrated for aggrecan homeostasis of cartilage in vivo, then for data on (explant) controls, and finally for data on the IL-1α driven proteolysis of aggrecan and collagen over a 4-week period. The model was found to fit the experimental data best when: (i) chondrocytes continue to synthesize aggrecan during the cytokine challenge, (ii) a one to two day delay is introduced between the addition of IL-1α to the culture medium and subsequent aggrecanolysis, (iii) collagen degradation does not commence until the total concentration of aggrecan (i.e. both intact and degraded aggrecan) at any specific location within the explant becomes ≤ 1.5 mg/ml and (iv) degraded aggrecan formed due to the IL-1α induced proteolysis of intact aggrecan protects the collagen network while collagen degrades in a two-step process which, together, significantly modulate the collagen network degradation. Under simulated in vivo conditions, the model predicts increased aggrecan turnover rates in the presence of synovial IL-1α, consistent with experimental observations. Such models may help to infer the course of events in vivo following traumatic joint injury, and may also prove useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficiency of various therapeutic molecules that could be employed to avoid or modify the course of cartilage disease states. PMID:26874194

  20. Thyroid-specific gene expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2011-12-16

    Previously, we demonstrated that Runx2 (Cbfa1/AML3), a chondrocyte-specific transcription factor, is expressed in thyroid glands of mice, where it stimulates expression of the thyroglobulin (Tg) gene. Here, we reverse transcribed thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), Pax-8, Tg, thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS) cDNAs from mouse trachea and bronchus RNA samples, but were unable to recover these cDNAs from mouse liver RNA samples. Tg mRNA levels in trachea and bronchus were about 5.1% and 2.1% of those in thyroid glands. ATDC-5 cells, cultured chondrocytes, expressed about 30-fold more Tg mRNA than undifferentiated cells. Gel shift and Tg gene reporter assay revealed that TTF-1 stimulated Tg gene expression in these cells. These results indicate that chondrocytes turn on some aspects of the thyroid gene expression program and that TTF-1 plays important roles in Tg gene expression in chondrocyte. PMID:21945616

  1. Study of the collagen structure in the superficial zone and physiological state of articular cartilage using a 3D confocal imaging technique

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian P; Kirk, Thomas B; Zheng, Ming H

    2008-01-01

    superficial zone during early physiological alteration of articular cartilage. The fibre confocal imaging technology used in this study has allowed developing confocal arthroscopy for in vivo studying the chondrocytes in different depth of articular cartilage. Therefore, the current study has potential to develop an in vivo 3D histology for diagnosis of early osteoarthritis. PMID:18637164

  2. Modeling the transport of cryoprotective agents in articular cartilage for cryopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torqabeh, Alireza Abazari

    Loading vitrifiable concentrations of cryoprotective agents is an important step for cryopreservation of biological tissues by vitrification for research and transplantation purposes. This may be done by immersing the tissue in a cryoprotective agent (CPA) solution, and increasing the concentration, continuously or in multiple steps, and simultaneously decreasing the temperature to decrease the toxicity effects of the cryoprotective agent on the tissue cellular system. During cryoprotective agent loading, osmotic water movement from the tissue to the surrounding solution, and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix as well as on the cellular system can significantly alter the outcome of the cryopreservation protocol. In this thesis, a biomechanical model for articular cartilage is developed to account for the transport of the cryoprotective agent, the nonideal-nondilute properties of the vitrifiable solutions, the osmotic water movement and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix, and the osmotic volume change of the chondrocytes, during cryoprotective agent loading in the cartilage matrix. Four essential transport parameters needed for the model were specified, the values of which were obtained uniquely by fitting the model to experimental data from porcine articular cartilage. Then, it was shown that using real nonuniform initial distributions of water and fixed charges in cartilage, measured separately in this thesis using MRI, in the model can significantly affect the model predictions. The model predictions for dimethyl sulfoxide diffusion in porcine articular cartilage were verified by comparing to spatially and temporally resolved measurements of dimethyl sulfoxide concentration in porcine articular cartilage using a spectral MRI technique, developed for this purpose and novel to the field of cryobiology. It was demonstrated in this thesis that the developed mathematical model provides a novel tool

  3. Effects of Chondroitinase ABC-Mediated Proteoglycan Digestion on Decellularization and Recellularization of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Catherine A.; Park, Hee Jun; Mazur, Courtney M.; Aaron, Roy K.

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage has a limited capacity to heal itself and thus focal defects often result in the development of osteoarthritis. Current cartilage tissue engineering strategies seek to regenerate injured tissue by creating scaffolds that aim to mimic the unique structure and composition of native articular cartilage. Decellularization is a novel strategy that aims to preserve the bioactive factors and 3D biophysical environment of the native extracellular matrix while removing potentially immunogenic factors. The purpose of this study was to develop a procedure that can enable decellularization and recellularization of intact articular cartilage matrix. Full-thickness porcine articular cartilage plugs were decellularized with a series of freeze-thaw cycles and 0.1% (w/v) sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent cycles. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) was applied before the detergent cycles to digest glycosaminoglycans in order to enhance donor chondrocyte removal and seeded cell migration. Porcine synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded onto the decellularized cartilage scaffolds and cultured for up to 28 days. The optimized decellularization protocol removed 94% of native DNA per sample wet weight, while collagen content and alignment were preserved. Glycosaminoglycan depletion prior to the detergent cycles increased removal of nuclear material. Seeded cells infiltrated up to 100 μm into the cartilage deep zone after 28 days in culture. ChABC treatment enhances decellularization of the relatively dense, impermeable articular cartilage by reducing glycosaminoglycan content. ChABC treatment did not appear to affect cell migration during recellularization under static, in vitro culture, highlighting the need for more dynamic seeding methods. PMID:27391810

  4. Human chondrocyte migration behaviour to guide the development of engineered cartilage

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Grace D.; Tan, Andrea R.; Cui, Victoria; Bulinski, J. Chloe; Cook, James L.; Attur, Mukundan; Abramson, Steven B.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Hung, Clark T.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineering techniques have been successful in developing cartilage-like tissues in vitro using cells from animal sources. The successful translation of these strategies to the clinic will likely require cell expansion to achieve sufficient cell numbers. Using a two-dimensional (2D) cell migration assay to first identify the passage at which chondrocytes exhibited their greatest chondrogenic potential, the objective of this study was to determine a more optimal culture medium for developing three-dimensional (3D) cartilage-like tissues using human cells. We evaluated combinations of commonly used growth factors that have been shown to promote chondrogenic growth and development. Human articular chondrocytes (AC) from osteoarthritic (OA) joints were cultured in 3D environments, either in pellets or encapsulated in agarose. The effect of growth factor supplementation was dependent on the environment, such that matrix deposition differed between the two culture systems. ACs in pellet culture were more responsive to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP2) alone or combinations containing BMP2 (i.e. BMP2 with PDGF or FGF). However, engineered cartilage development within agarose was better for constructs cultured with TGFβ3. These results with agarose and pellet culture studies set the stage for the development of conditions appropriate for culturing 3D functional engineered cartilage for eventual use in human therapies. PMID:25627968

  5. Calcitonin attenuates cartilage degeneration and nociception in an experimental rat model of osteoarthritis: role of TGF-β in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhi-Hong; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Chang, Yi-Chen; Huang, Shi-Ying; Lin, Yen-You; Hsieh, Shih-Peng; Lee, Hsin-Pai; Lin, Sung-Chun; Chen, Wu-Fu; Jean, Yen-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the role of the calcitonin (Miacalcin) in the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) and in nociceptive behavior in an experimental rat model of OA and osteoporosis. OA was induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) of the right knee and by bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) in Wistar rats. Nociceptive behaviors (secondary mechanical allodynia and weight-bearing distribution of the hind paws) were analyzed prior to surgery and every week, beginning at 12 weeks after surgery, up to 20 weeks. At 20 weeks, histopathological studies were performed on the cartilage of the knee joints. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine the effect of calcitonin on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression in articular cartilage chondrocytes. Rats subjected to ACLT + OVX surgery showed obvious OA changes in the joints. Animals subjected to ACLT + OVX and treated with calcitonin showed significantly less cartilage degeneration and improved nociceptive tests compared with animals subjected to ACLT + OVX surgeries alone. Moreover, calcitonin increased TGF-β1 expression in chondrocytes in ACLT + OVX-affected cartilage. Subcutaneous injection of calcitonin (1) attenuated the development of OA, (2) concomitantly reduced nociception, and (3) modulated chondrocyte metabolism, possibly by increasing cellular TGF-β1 expression. PMID:27345362

  6. Genetic engineering strategies to prevent the effects of antibody and complement on xenogeneic chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sommaggio, R; Bello-Gil, D; Pérez-Cruz, M; Brokaw, J L; Máñez, R; Costa, C

    2015-01-01

    Advances in animal transgenesis may allow using xenogeneic chondrocytes in tissue-engineering applications for clinical cartilage repair. Porcine cartilage is rejected by humoral and cellular mechanisms that could be overcome by identifying key molecules triggering rejection and developing effective genetic-engineering strategies. Accordingly, high expression of α1,2-fucosyltransferase (HT) in xenogeneic cartilage protects from galactose α1,3-galactose (Gal)-mediated antibody responses. Now, we studied whether expression of a complement inhibitor provides further protection. First, porcine articular chondrocytes (PAC) were isolated from non-transgenic, single and double transgenic pigs expressing HT and moderate levels of human CD59 (hCD59) and their response to human serum was assessed. High recombinant expression of human complement regulatory molecules hCD59 and hDAF was also attained by retroviral transduction of PAC for further analyses. Complement activation on PAC after exposure to 20 % human serum for 24 hours mainly triggered the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Transgenic expression of HT and hCD59 did not suffice to fully counteract this effect. Nevertheless, the combination of blocking anti-Gal antibodies (or C5a) and high hCD59 levels conferred very high protection. On the contrary, high hDAF expression attained the most dramatic reduction in IL-6/IL-8 secretion by a single strategy, but the additional inhibition of anti-Gal antibodies or C5a did not provide further improvement. Notably, we demonstrate that both hCD59 and hDAF inhibit anaphylatoxin release in this setting. In conclusion, our study identifies genetic-engineering approaches to prevent humoral rejection of xenogeneic chondrocytes for use in cartilage repair.

  7. A hexadecylamide derivative of hyaluronan (HYMOVIS®) has superior beneficial effects on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes and synoviocytes than unmodified hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intra-articular hyaluronan (HA) injection provides symptomatic benefit in the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Previously we found superior beneficial effects in a large animal OA model of a hexadecylamide derivative compared with unmodified HA of the same initial molecular weight. The current study sought to define possible molecular mechanisms whereby this enhanced relief of symptoms was occurring. Methods Chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts were isolated from tissues of patients undergoing arthroplasty for knee OA. Monolayer cultures of cells were treated with 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 1.5 mg/mL of unmodified HA (500–730 kDa) or a hexadecylamide derivative of HA of the same initial molecular weight (HYADD4®-G; HYMOVIS®) simultaneously or 1 hour before incubation with interleukin (IL)-1beta (2 ng/mL). Cultures were terminated 15 or 30 minutes later (chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts, respectively) for quantitation of phosphorylated-(p)-JNK, p-NFkappaB, p-p38, or at 24 hours for quantitation of gene expression (MMP1 &13, ADAMTS4 &5, TIMP1 &3, CD44, COL1A1 &2A1, ACAN, PTGS2, IL6, TNF) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 activity. Results The hexadecylamide derivative of HA had significantly better amelioration of IL-1beta-induced gene expression of key matrix degrading enzymes (MMP1, MMP13, ADAMTS5), and inflammatory mediators (IL6, PTGS2) by human OA chondrocytes and synovial fibroblasts. Pre-incubation of cells with the derivatized HA for 1 hour prior to IL-1beta exposure significantly augmented the inhibition of MMP1, MMP13, ADAMTS4 and IL6 expression by chondrocytes. The reduction in MMP13 mRNA by the amide derivative of HA was mirrored in reduced MMP-13 protein and enzyme activity in IL-1beta-stimulated chondrocytes. This was associated in part with a greater inhibition of phosphorylation of the cell signalling molecules JNK, p38 and NF-kappaB. Conclusions The present studies have demonstrated several potential key mechanisms whereby the

  8. Cell and matrix modulation in prenatal and postnatal equine growth cartilage, zones of Ranvier and articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Maria; Ekman, Stina; Svala, Emilia; Lindahl, Anders; Ley, Cecilia; Skiöldebrand, Eva

    2014-11-01

    Formation of synovial joints includes phenotypic changes of the chondrocytes and the organisation of their extracellular matrix is regulated by different factors and signalling pathways. Increased knowledge of the normal processes involved in joint development may be used to identify similar regulatory mechanisms during pathological conditions in the joint. Samples of the distal radius were collected from prenatal and postnatal equine growth plates, zones of Ranvier and articular cartilage with the aim of identifying Notch signalling components and cells with stem cell-like characteristics and to follow changes in matrix protein localisation during joint development. The localisation of the Notch signalling components Notch1, Delta4, Hes1, Notch dysregulating protein epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), the stem cell-indicating factor Stro-1 and the matrix molecules cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), fibromodulin, matrilin-1 and chondroadherin were studied using immunohistochemistry. Spatial changes in protein localisations during cartilage maturation were observed for Notch signalling components and matrix molecules, with increased pericellular localisation indicating new synthesis and involvement of these proteins in the formation of the joint. However, it was not possible to characterise the phenotype of the chondrocytes based on their surrounding matrix during normal chondrogenesis. The zone of Ranvier was identified in all horses and characterised as an area expressing Stro-1, EGFL7 and chondroadherin with an absence of COMP and Notch signalling. Stro-1 was also present in cells close to the perichondrium, in the articular cartilage and in the fetal resting zone, indicating stem cell-like characteristics of these cells. The presence of stem cells in the articular cartilage will be of importance for the repair of damaged cartilage. Perivascular chondrocytes and hypertrophic cells of the cartilage bone interface displayed positive staining for

  9. Cell and matrix modulation in prenatal and postnatal equine growth cartilage, zones of Ranvier and articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Löfgren, Maria; Ekman, Stina; Svala, Emilia; Lindahl, Anders; Ley, Cecilia; Skiöldebrand, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Formation of synovial joints includes phenotypic changes of the chondrocytes and the organisation of their extracellular matrix is regulated by different factors and signalling pathways. Increased knowledge of the normal processes involved in joint development may be used to identify similar regulatory mechanisms during pathological conditions in the joint. Samples of the distal radius were collected from prenatal and postnatal equine growth plates, zones of Ranvier and articular cartilage with the aim of identifying Notch signalling components and cells with stem cell-like characteristics and to follow changes in matrix protein localisation during joint development. The localisation of the Notch signalling components Notch1, Delta4, Hes1, Notch dysregulating protein epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), the stem cell-indicating factor Stro-1 and the matrix molecules cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), fibromodulin, matrilin-1 and chondroadherin were studied using immunohistochemistry. Spatial changes in protein localisations during cartilage maturation were observed for Notch signalling components and matrix molecules, with increased pericellular localisation indicating new synthesis and involvement of these proteins in the formation of the joint. However, it was not possible to characterise the phenotype of the chondrocytes based on their surrounding matrix during normal chondrogenesis. The zone of Ranvier was identified in all horses and characterised as an area expressing Stro-1, EGFL7 and chondroadherin with an absence of COMP and Notch signalling. Stro-1 was also present in cells close to the perichondrium, in the articular cartilage and in the fetal resting zone, indicating stem cell-like characteristics of these cells. The presence of stem cells in the articular cartilage will be of importance for the repair of damaged cartilage. Perivascular chondrocytes and hypertrophic cells of the cartilage bone interface displayed positive staining for

  10. MicroRNA-34a affects chondrocyte apoptosis and proliferation by targeting the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway during the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    YAN, SHIJU; WANG, MENG; ZHAO, JIAN; ZHANG, HONGTAO; ZHOU, CHENGPEI; JIN, LEI; ZHANG, YINGLONG; QIU, XIUCHUN; MA, BAOAN; FAN, QINGYU

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent degenerative joint disease with multifactorial etiology caused by risk factors such as ageing, obesity and trauma. Previously, it was reported that the inhibition of microRNA-34a (miR-34a) may reduce rat chondrocyte apoptosis induced by IL-1β, whereas the molecular mechanism and the role of miR-34a in human chondrocyte as well as in OA progression remains to be determined. In the current study, using MTT, luciferase reporter assays and western blot analysis we identified that miR-34a was upregulated while silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) was inhibited in chondrocytes from 12 OA patients compared with healthy chondrocytes from 10 trauma amputees. Overexpression of miR-34a promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in human chondrocytes. Transfection with miR-34a mimic inhibited SIRT1 expression, which attenuated the deacetylation of p53, leading to the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2. Furthermore, results from the western blot analysis and luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that SIRT1 was directly regulated by miR-34a in human chondrocytes. A rat model of OA was induced through anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscus resection (ACLT+MMx). The results showed that the intra-articular injection of lentiviral vector encoding anti-miR-34a sequence effectively ameliorated the progression of OA. The results suggest that miR-34a has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of OA through direct regulation of the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway and serves as a potential therapeutic target of OA. PMID:27247228

  11. Static and dynamic compressive strains influence nitric oxide production and chondrocyte bioactivity when encapsulated in PEG hydrogels of different crosslinking densities

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, I; Hauschulz, DS; Mejic, D; Bryant, SJ

    2012-01-01

    Summary Objective Mechanical loading is an important regulator of chondrocytes; however, many of the mechanisms involved in chondrocyte mechanotransduction still remain unclear. Here, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels are proposed as a model system to elucidate chondrocyte response due to cell deformation, which is controlled by gel crosslinking (ρx). Methods Bovine articular chondrocytes (50×106cells/ml) were encapsulated in gels with three ρx’s and subjected to static (15% strain) or dynamic (0.3Hz or 1Hz, 15% amplitude strain) loading for 48 hours. Cell deformation was examined by confocal microscopy. Cell response was assessed by total nitric oxide production (NO), proteoglycan (PG) synthesis (35SO42−-incorporation) and cell proliferation ([3H]-thymidine incorporation) (CP). Oxygen consumption was assessed using an oxygen biosensor. Results An increase in ρx led to lower water contents, higher compressive moduli, and higher cell deformations. Chondrocyte response was dependent on both loading regime and ρx. For example, under a static strain, NO was not affected, while CP and PG synthesis were inhibited in low ρx and stimulated in high ρx. Dynamic loading resulted in either no effect or an inhibitory effect on NO, CP, and PG synthesis. Overall, our results showed correlations between NO and CP and/or PG synthesis under static and dynamic (0.3 Hz) loading. This finding was attributed to the hypoxic environment that resulted from the high cell-seeding density. Conclusion This study demonstrates gel ρx and loading condition influence NO, CP, and PG synthesis. Under a hypoxic environment and certain loading conditions, NO appears to have a positive effect on chondrocyte bioactivity. PMID:18203631

  12. MicroRNA-34a affects chondrocyte apoptosis and proliferation by targeting the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway during the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shiju; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhou, Chengpei; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Yinglong; Qiu, Xiuchun; Ma, Baoan; Fan, Qingyu

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent degenerative joint disease with multifactorial etiology caused by risk factors such as ageing, obesity and trauma. Previously, it was reported that the inhibition of microRNA-34a (miR-34a) may reduce rat chondrocyte apoptosis induced by IL-1β, whereas the molecular mechanism and the role of miR-34a in human chondrocyte as well as in OA progression remains to be determined. In the current study, using MTT, luciferase reporter assays and western blot analysis we identified that miR-34a was upregulated while silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) was inhibited in chondrocytes from 12 OA patients compared with healthy chondrocytes from 10 trauma amputees. Overexpression of miR-34a promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in human chondrocytes. Transfection with miR-34a mimic inhibited SIRT1 expression, which attenuated the deacetylation of p53, leading to the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2. Furthermore, results from the western blot analysis and luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that SIRT1 was directly regulated by miR-34a in human chondrocytes. A rat model of OA was induced through anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscus resection (ACLT+MMx). The results showed that the intra‑articular injection of lentiviral vector encoding anti-miR‑34a sequence effectively ameliorated the progression of OA. The results suggest that miR-34a has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of OA through direct regulation of the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway and serves as a potential therapeutic target of OA. PMID:27247228

  13. MicroRNA-34a affects chondrocyte apoptosis and proliferation by targeting the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway during the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shiju; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhou, Chengpei; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Yinglong; Qiu, Xiuchun; Ma, Baoan; Fan, Qingyu

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent degenerative joint disease with multifactorial etiology caused by risk factors such as ageing, obesity and trauma. Previously, it was reported that the inhibition of microRNA-34a (miR-34a) may reduce rat chondrocyte apoptosis induced by IL-1β, whereas the molecular mechanism and the role of miR-34a in human chondrocyte as well as in OA progression remains to be determined. In the current study, using MTT, luciferase reporter assays and western blot analysis we identified that miR-34a was upregulated while silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) was inhibited in chondrocytes from 12 OA patients compared with healthy chondrocytes from 10 trauma amputees. Overexpression of miR-34a promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in human chondrocytes. Transfection with miR-34a mimic inhibited SIRT1 expression, which attenuated the deacetylation of p53, leading to the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2. Furthermore, results from the western blot analysis and luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that SIRT1 was directly regulated by miR-34a in human chondrocytes. A rat model of OA was induced through anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscus resection (ACLT+MMx). The results showed that the intra‑articular injection of lentiviral vector encoding anti-miR‑34a sequence effectively ameliorated the progression of OA. The results suggest that miR-34a has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of OA through direct regulation of the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway and serves as a potential therapeutic target of OA.

  14. Transthyretin deposition in articular cartilage: a novel mechanism in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Akasaki, Yukio; Reixach, Natàlia; Matsuzaki, Tokio; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Olmer, Merissa; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Buxbaum, Joel N.; Lotz, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Amyloid deposits are prevalent in osteoarthritis (OA)-affected joints. This study defined the dominant precursor and determined if the deposits affect chondrocyte functions. Methods Amyloid deposition in normal and OA human knee cartilage was determined by Congo red staining. Transthyretin (TTR) in cartilage and synovial fluid was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The effects of recombinant amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic TTR variants were tested in human chondrocyte cultures. Results Normal cartilage from young donors did not contain detectable amyloid deposits but 58% (7/12) of aged normal cartilage and 100% (12/12) of OA cartilage samples showed Congo red staining with green birefringence under polarized light. TTR, located predominantly at the cartilage surfaces, was detected in all OA and a majority of aged, but not young normal cartilage. Chondrocytes and synoviocytes did not contain significant amounts of TTR mRNA. Synovial fluid TTR levels were similar in normal and OA knees. In cultured chondrocytes, only an amyloidogenic TTR variant induced cell death, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and extracellular matrix degrading enzymes. The effects of amyloidogenic TTR on gene expression were mediated by in part by Toll-like receptor-4, Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts and p38 MAP kinase. TTR-induced cytotoxicity was inhibited by resveratrol, a plant polyphenol that stabilizes the native tetrameric structure of TTR. Conclusions The findings are the first to suggest that TTR amyloid deposition contributes to cell and extracellular matrix damage in articular cartilage in human OA and that therapies designed to reduce TTR amyloid formation might be useful. PMID:25940564

  15. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 regulates the actin organization of chondrocytes and chondrocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Murata, Koichi; Kitaori, Toshiyuki; Oishi, Shinya; Watanabe, Naoki; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Tanida, Shimei; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Kasahara, Takashi; Shibuya, Hideyuki; Fujii, Nobutaka; Nagasawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Ito, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1/CXCL12/PBSF) plays important roles in the biological and physiological functions of haematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells. This chemokine regulates the formation of multiple organ systems during embryogenesis. However, its roles in skeletal development remain unclear. Here we investigated the roles of SDF-1 in chondrocyte differentiation. We demonstrated that SDF-1 protein was expressed at pre-hypertrophic and hypertrophic chondrocytes in the newly formed endochondral callus of rib fracture as well as in the growth plate of normal mouse tibia by immunohistochemical analysis. Using SDF-1(-/-) mouse embryo, we histologically showed that the total length of the whole humeri of SDF-1(-/-) mice was significantly shorter than that of wild-type mice, which was contributed mainly by shorter hypertrophic and calcified zones in SDF-1(-/-) mice. Actin cytoskeleton of hypertrophic chondrocytes in SDF-1(-/-) mouse humeri showed less F-actin and rounder shape than that of wild-type mice. Primary chondrocytes from SDF-1(-/-) mice showed the enhanced formation of philopodia and loss of F-actin. The administration of SDF-1 to primary chondrocytes of wild-type mice and SDF-1(-/-) mice promoted the formation of actin stress fibers. Organ culture of embryonic metatarsals from SDF-1(-/-) mice showed the growth delay, which was recovered by an exogenous administration of SDF-1. mRNA expression of type X collagen in metatarsals and in primary chondrocytes of SDF-1(-/-) mouse embryo was down-regulated while the administration of SDF-1 to metatarsals recovered. These data suggests that SDF-1 regulates the actin organization and stimulates bone growth by mediating chondrocyte hypertrophy.

  16. Role of uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, P.; OKA, M.; TOGUCHIDA, J.; KOBAYASHI, M.; UCHIDA, E.; NAKAMURA, T.; TANAKA, K.

    2001-01-01

    The uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage, the ‘lamina splendens’ which provides a very low friction lubrication surface in articular joints, was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complementary specimens were also observed under SEM at −10 °C without dehydration or sputter ion coating. Fresh adult pig osteochondral specimens were prepared from the patellas of pig knee joints and digested with the enzymes, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease. Friction coefficients between a pyrex glass plate and the osteochondral specimens digested by enzymes as well as natural (undigested) specimens were measured, using a thrust collar apparatus. Normal saline, hyaluronic acid (HA) and a mixture of albumin, globulin, HA (AGH) were used as lubrication media. The surface irregularities usually observed in SEM studies were not apparent under AFM. The articular cartilage surface was resistant to hyaluronidase and also to chondroitinase ABC, but a fibrous structure was exhibited in alkaline protease enzymes-digested specimens. AFM analysis revealed that the thickness of the uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage was between 800 nm and 2 μm in adult pig articular cartilage. The coefficient of friction (c.f.) was significantly higher in chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease enzymes digested specimens. Generally, in normal saline lubrication medium, c.f. was higher in comparison to HA and AGH lubrication media. The role of the uppermost, superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints is discussed. PMID:11554503

  17. Role of uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Oka, M; Toguchida, J; Kobayashi, M; Uchida, E; Nakamura, T; Tanaka, K

    2001-09-01

    The uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage, the 'lamina splendens' which provides a very low friction lubrication surface in articular joints, was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Complementary specimens were also observed under SEM at -10 degrees C without dehydration or sputter ion coating. Fresh adult pig osteochondral specimens were prepared from the patellas of pig knee joints and digested with the enzymes, hyaluronidase, chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease. Friction coefficients between a pyrex glass plate and the osteochondral specimens digested by enzymes as well as natural (undigested) specimens were measured, using a thrust collar apparatus. Normal saline, hyaluronic acid (HA) and a mixture of albumin, globulin, HA (AGH) were used as lubrication media. The surface irregularities usually observed in SEM studies were not apparent under AFM. The articular cartilage surface was resistant to hyaluronidase and also to chondroitinase ABC, but a fibrous structure was exhibited in alkaline protease enzymes-digested specimens. AFM analysis revealed that the thickness of the uppermost superficial surface layer of articular cartilage was between 800 nm and 2 microm in adult pig articular cartilage. The coefficient of friction (c.f.) was significantly higher in chondroitinase ABC and alkaline protease enzymes digested specimens. Generally, in normal saline lubrication medium, c.f. was higher in comparison to HA and AGH lubrication media. The role of the uppermost, superficial surface layer of articular cartilage in the lubrication mechanism of joints is discussed. PMID:11554503

  18. Thrombin Promotes Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression through the PKCδ/c-Src/EGFR/PI3K/Akt/AP-1 Signaling Pathway in Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun-Yin; Lin, Hsiu-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Shui; Cheng, Shi-Yann; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Thrombin is a key mediator of fibrin deposition, angiogenesis, and proinflammatory processes. Abnormalities in these processes are primary features of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) may contribute to the breakdown of articular cartilage during arthritis. However, the role of thrombin in MMP-13 production in chondrocytes is unknown. In this study, we investigated the intracellular signaling pathways involved in thrombin-induced MMP-13 expression in human chondrocytes. We found that stimulation with thrombin led to increased secretion of MMP-13 in cultured human chondrocytes. Further, this thrombin-induced MMP-13 production was reduced after transfection with siRNAs against protease activated receptors 1 and 3 (PAR1 and PAR3), but not with PAR4 siRNA. Treatment with specific inhibitors for PKCδ, c-Src, EGFR, PI3K, Akt, or AP-1 or with the corresponding siRNAs against these signaling proteins also abolished the thrombin-mediated increase in MMP-13 production in chondrocytes. Our results provide evidence that thrombin acts through the PAR1/PAR3 receptors and activates PKCδ and c-Src, resulting in EGFR transactivation and activation of PI3K, Akt, and finally AP-1 on the MMP-13 promoter, thereby contributing to cartilage destruction during arthritis. PMID:24385683

  19. Cryoscanning electron microscopic study of the surface amorphous layer of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, S; Yonekubo, S; Kurogouchi, Y

    1995-01-01

    In order to elucidate the structure near the articular surface, frozen unfixed hydrated articular cartilage with subchondral bone from the pig knee was examined using a cryoscanning electron microscope (cryo-SEM). This method is considered to reduce the introduction of artefacts due to fixation and drying. An amorphous layer, without a collagen-fibril network or chondrocytes, covered most of the surface of the cartilage. This layer was termed the surface amorphous layer. It showed various appearances, which were classified into 4 groups. The average thickness of the layer did not differ among the 8 anatomical regions from which the specimens were taken. The thickness of the layer was found to correlate with the type of appearance of the layer. The 4 appearances associated with thicknesses in descending order are: 'streaked', 'foliate', 'spotted', and 'vestigial'. The surface layer observed in the cryo-SEM was thicker than that observed by a conventional SEM. This difference may be attributable to dehydration of the specimen used in specimen preparation for the latter technique. The layer was also observed in articular cartilage taken from human and rabbit knees. The layer was found to be unstable and to have very variable features. Its thickness and appearance may be influenced by various factors such as dehydration, fluid absorption or mechanical stress. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:7592006

  20. Control of collagen production in mouse chondrocytes by using a combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and small interfering RNA targeting Col1a1 for hydrogel-based tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte-agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  1. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces the osteoarthritis-like phenotype in female adult offspring rats with a post-weaning high-fat diet and its intrauterine programming mechanisms of cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qubo; Wang, Linlong; Wu, Yunpeng; Shen, Lang; Qin, Jun; Liu, Yansong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-14

    Osteoarthritis (OA) development is associated with hypercholesterolemia in adults. Our previous study demonstrated that offspring with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) due to prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) had a high risk of developing hypercholesterolemia and metabolic syndrome when fed a post-weaning high-fat diet (HFD). In this study, we examined the changes in articular chondrocytes of IUGR offspring induced by PEE and explored its intrauterine programming mechanisms related to cholesterol metabolism. Using the PEE/IUGR model, serum and tibias from female fetuses and adult female offspring fed a post-weaning HFD were collected and examined for cholesterol metabolism and histology. The results showed that PEE adult offspring manifested significant catch-up growth. Their serum total cholesterol (TCH) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol increased and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased; the osteoarthritis-like phenotype and an increased TCH content were observed in articular cartilage; and the expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and cholesterol efflux pathway, including ATP-binding-cassette transporter A1 and liver X receptor, was reduced. The expression of IGF1 and cholesterol efflux pathway was also lower in the PEE fetuses. This study showed PEE could induce an enhanced susceptibility to HFD-induced OA in adult female IUGR offspring. The underlying mechanism related to cholesterol accumulation in cartilage mediated by intrauterine programming.

  2. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces the osteoarthritis-like phenotype in female adult offspring rats with a post-weaning high-fat diet and its intrauterine programming mechanisms of cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qubo; Wang, Linlong; Wu, Yunpeng; Shen, Lang; Qin, Jun; Liu, Yansong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-14

    Osteoarthritis (OA) development is associated with hypercholesterolemia in adults. Our previous study demonstrated that offspring with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) due to prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) had a high risk of developing hypercholesterolemia and metabolic syndrome when fed a post-weaning high-fat diet (HFD). In this study, we examined the changes in articular chondrocytes of IUGR offspring induced by PEE and explored its intrauterine programming mechanisms related to cholesterol metabolism. Using the PEE/IUGR model, serum and tibias from female fetuses and adult female offspring fed a post-weaning HFD were collected and examined for cholesterol metabolism and histology. The results showed that PEE adult offspring manifested significant catch-up growth. Their serum total cholesterol (TCH) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol increased and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased; the osteoarthritis-like phenotype and an increased TCH content were observed in articular cartilage; and the expression of insulin-like growth factor1 (IGF1) and cholesterol efflux pathway, including ATP-binding-cassette transporter A1 and liver X receptor, was reduced. The expression of IGF1 and cholesterol efflux pathway was also lower in the PEE fetuses. This study showed PEE could induce an enhanced susceptibility to HFD-induced OA in adult female IUGR offspring. The underlying mechanism related to cholesterol accumulation in cartilage mediated by intrauterine programming. PMID:26220516

  3. Bovine achondrogenesis: evidence for defective chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Horton, W A; Jayo, M J; Leipold, H W; Machado, M A; Campbell, D; Ahmed, S

    1987-01-01

    A survey study of growth cartilage abnormalities in bovine bone dysplasias revealed that a disorder in Holstein cattle called bulldog calf closely resembles human achondrogenesis Type II. Substantial amounts of Type I collagen and other non Type II collagens were detected in the bulldog cartilage which was comprised primarily of extensive vascular canals and cells having the characteristics of hypertrophic and degenerative chondrocytes normally found in the growth plate. It is proposed that chondrocytes throughout the bulldog growth cartilage prematurely differentiate into hypertrophic cells that degenerate and predispose the cartilage to vascular invasion and the formation of cartilage canals. The presence of these canals probably accounts for most of the observed collagen abnormalities. PMID:3606909

  4. The new collagenase, collagenase-3, is expressed and synthesized by human chondrocytes but not by synoviocytes. A role in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, P; Pelletier, J P; Tardif, G; Cloutier, J M; Martel-Pelletier, J

    1996-01-01

    Recently, a new human collagenase, collagenase-3 has been identified. Since collagen changes are of particular importance in cartilage degeneration, we investigated if collagenase-3 plays a role in osteoarthritis (OA). Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis revealed that in articular tissues collagenase-3 was expressed by the chondrocytes but not by the synoviocytes. Northern blot analysis of the chondrocyte mRNA revealed the presence of two major gene transcripts of 3.0 and 2.5 kb, and a third one of 2.2 kb was occasionally present. Compared to normal, OA showed a significantly higher (3.0 kb, P < or = 0.05; 2.5 kb, P < or = 0.03) level of collagenase-3 mRNA expression. Collagenase-3 had a higher catalytic velocity tate (about fivefold) than collagenase-1 on type II collagen. With the use of two specific antibodies, we showed that human chondrocytes had the ability to produce collagenase-3 as a proenzyme and as a glycosylated doublet. The chondrocyte collagenase-3 protein is produced in a significantly higher (P < or = 0.04) level in OA (approximately 9.5-fold) than in normal. The synthesis and expression of this new collagenase could also be modulated by two proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This study provides novel and interesting data on collagenase-3 expression and synthesis in human cartilage cells and suggest its involvement in human OA cartilage patho-physiology. PMID:8621789

  5. Articular Chondroprogenitor Cells Maintain Chondrogenic Potential but Fail to Form a Functional Matrix When Implanted Into Muscles of SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Bari, Cosimo; Dell’Accio, Francesco; Archer, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Articular cartilage is a complex tissue comprising phenotypically distinct zones. Research has identified the presence of a progenitor cell population in the surface zone of immature articular cartilage. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vivo plasticity of articular cartilage progenitor. Design Chondropogenitor cells were isolated from bovine metacarpalphalangeal joints by differential adhesion to fibronectin. Cells were labeled with PKH26 and injected into the thigh muscle of severe-combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. After 2 weeks, the muscles were dissected and cryosectioned. Sections were stained with safranin O and labeled for sox9 and collagen type II. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was carried out to determine plasticity for a number of tissue-specific markers. Full-depth chondrocytes acted as a control. Results Fluorescent PKH26 labeled cells were detected after 2 weeks in all samples analyzed. A cartilage pellet was present after injection of freshly isolated chondrocytes. After injection with clonal and enriched populations of chondroprogenitors, no distinct pellet was detected, but diffuse cartilage nodules were found with regions of safranin O staining and Sox9. Low levels of collagen type II were also detected. Polymerase chain reaction analysis identified the presence of the endothelial cell marker PECAM-1 in one clonal cell line, demonstrating phenotypic plasticity into the phenotype of the surrounding host tissues. Conclusions The bovine articular cartilage progenitor cells were able to survive in vivo postimplantation, but failed to create a robust cartilage pellet, despite expressing sox9 and type II collagen. This suggests the cells require further signals for chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:26069702

  6. Articular cartilage repair with autologous bone marrow mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okabe, Takahiro; Ikawa, Tesshu; Iida, Takahiro; Yasuda, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Wakitani, Shigeyuki

    2010-11-01

    Articular cartilage defects that do not repair spontaneously induce osteoarthritic changes in joints over a long period of observation. In this study, we examined the usefulness of transplanting culture-expanded bone marrow mesenchymal cells into osteochondral defects of joints with cartilage defects. First, we performed experiments on rabbits and up on obtaining good results proceeded to perform the experiments on humans. Macroscopic and histological repair with this method was good, and good clinical results were obtained although there was no significant difference with the control group. Recent reports have indicated that this procedure is comparable to autologous chondrocyte implantation, and concluded that it was a good procedure because it required one step less than that required by surgery, reduced costs for patients, and minimized donor site morbidity. Although some reports have previously shown that progenitor cells formed a tumor when implanted into immune-deficient mice after long term in vitro culture, the safety of the cell transplantation was confirmed by our clinical experience. Thus, this procedure is useful, effective, and safe, but the repaired tissues were not always hyaline cartilage. To obtain better repair with this procedure, treatment approaches using some growth factors during in vitro culture or gene transfection are being explored.

  7. Donor site morbidity after articular cartilage repair procedures: a review.

    PubMed

    Matricali, Giovanni A; Dereymaeker, Greta Ph E; Luyten, Frank P

    2010-10-01

    In order to perform an Osteochondral Autologous Transplantation (OAT) or an Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation (ACI), the integrity of healthy intact articular cartilage at a second location needs to be violated. This creates the possibility for donor site morbidity. Only recently have any publications addressed this issue. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge on donor site morbidity after an OAT or an ACI. Reports were identified by searching Medline and Pubmed up to March 2010. Donor site morbidity was described mostly considering a clinical outcome, both in a qualitative (parameters in history or physical examination) and/or quantitative way (knee status reported by means of a numerical score). An increasing rate of problems is noted when using quantitative instead of qualitative parameters, and when donor site morbidity is the focus of attention, affecting up to more than half of the patients, in particular for an OAT procedure. The decision to harvest an osteochondral or cartilage biopsy to perform a repair procedure should therefore be taken with caution. This also underscores the need for further research to identify safe donor sites or to develop techniques that eliminate the need for a formal biopsy ccompletely.

  8. The 45 kDa collagen-binding fragment of fibronectin induces matrix metalloproteinase-13 synthesis by chondrocytes and aggrecan degradation by aggrecanases.

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Heather; Ung, Linh; Fosang, Amanda J

    2002-01-01

    Fragments of fibronectin occur naturally in vivo and are increased in the synovial fluid of arthritis patients. We have studied the 45 kDa fragment (Fn-f 45), representing the N-terminal collagen-binding domain of fibronectin, for its ability to modulate the expression of metalloproteinases by porcine articular chondrocytes in vitro. We report that stimulation of cultured chondrocytes, or cartilage explants, with Fn-f 45 increased the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13; collagenase-3) released into the conditioned medium in a dose-dependent manner. Increased levels of MMP-13 were due to stimulation of MMP-13 synthesis, rather than release of MMP-13 from accumulated matrix stores. Fn-f 45 also stimulated the synthesis of MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) from cultured chondrocytes and cartilage cultures. The Fn-f 45-induced increase in MMP-3 and MMP-13 synthesis occurred via an interleukin 1-independent mechanism, since the receptor antagonist of interleukin-1 was unable to block the increased synthesis. The gelatinases, MMP-2 and MMP-9, were not modulated by Fn-f 45 in these culture systems. Fn-f 45 also stimulated the release of aggrecan from cartilage explants into conditioned medium. Neoepitope antibodies specific for aggrecan fragments generated by MMPs or aggrecanases showed that the Fn-f 45-induced aggrecan loss was mediated by aggrecanases, and not by MMPs. Extracts of cultured cartilage contained elevated levels of the aggrecanase-derived ITEGE(373)-G1 domain, whereas levels of the matrix metalloproteinase-derived DIPEN(341)-G1 domain were unchanged. These studies show that Fn-f 45 can induce a catabolic phenotype in articular chondrocytes by up-regulating the expression of metalloproteinases specific for the degradation of collagen and aggrecan. PMID:11988091

  9. Mechanisms of disruption of the articular cartilage surface in inflammation. Neutrophil elastase increases availability of collagen type II epitopes for binding with antibody on the surface of articular cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Jasin, H E; Taurog, J D

    1991-01-01

    We recently observed that specific antibodies to type II collagen do not bind in appreciable amounts to the intact surface of articular cartilage, whereas antibodies to the minor collagen types V, VI, and IX do. These results suggest that the outermost cartilage surface layer prevented interaction of the antibodies with the major collagen type in articular cartilage. The present studies were designed to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cartilage surface layer in inflammatory arthritis. Articular cartilage obtained from rabbits undergoing acute antigen-induced arthritis of 72 h duration showed a significant increase in binding of anti-type II antibody to cartilage surfaces compared with normal control cartilage (P less than 0.01). Augmentation of anti-type II binding was also observed upon in vitro incubation of bovine articular slices or intact rabbit patellar cartilage for 1 h with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), PMN lysates, or purified human PMN elastase. This increase was not inhibited by sodium azide, nor was it enhanced by incubation of cartilage with the strong oxidant hypochlorous acid. Chondrocyte-mediated matrix proteoglycan degradation in cartilage explants cultured in the presence of cytokines failed to increase antibody binding appreciably. The augmentation in antibody binding seen with PMN lysates was inhibited by the nonspecific serine-esterase inhibitor PMSF, but not by the divalent metal chelator EDTA. The elastase-specific inhibitor AAPVCMK also inhibited most of the PMN-induced increase in antibody binding, whereas the cathepsin G-specific inhibitor GLPCMK was much less effective. Incubation of intact cartilage with purified human PMN elastase indicated that this serine esterase could account for the increase in anti-type II collagen antibody binding to intact cartilage surfaces. These studies suggest that in an inflammatory response, PMN-derived elastase degrades the outer layer of articular

  10. Effects of growth and exercise on composition, structural maturation and appearance of osteoarthritis in articular cartilage of hamsters.

    PubMed

    Julkunen, Petro; Halmesmäki, Esa P; Iivarinen, Jarkko; Rieppo, Lassi; Närhi, Tommi; Marjanen, Juho; Rieppo, Jarno; Arokoski, Jari; Brama, Pieter A; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Helminen, Heikki J

    2010-09-01

    Articular cartilage composition and structure are maintained and remodeled by chondrocytes under the influence of loading. Exercise-induced changes in the composition, structure, mechanical properties and tissue integrity of growing and aging hamster articular cartilage were investigated. Articular cartilage samples (n = 191) were harvested from the proximal tibiae of hamsters aged 1, 3, 6, 12 and 15 months. The hamsters were divided into runners and controls. The runners had free access to a running wheel between 1 and 3 months (runner groups 3-, 12- and 15-month-old hamsters) or 1 and 6 months (runner group 6-month-old hamsters) of age. Control animals were subjected to a sedentary lifestyle. Mechanical indentation tests and depth-wise compositional and structural analyses were performed for the cartilage samples. Furthermore, the integrity of articular cartilage was assessed using histological osteoarthritis grading. Exercise affected the collagen network organization after a 5-month exercise period, especially in the middle and deep zones. However, no effect on the mechanical properties was detected after exercise. Before the age of 12 months, the runners showed less osteoarthritis than the controls, whereas at 15 months of age the situation was reversed. It is concluded that, in hamsters, physical exercise at a young age enhances cartilage maturation and alters the depth-wise cartilage structure and composition. This may be considered beneficial. However, exercise at a young age demonstrated adverse effects on cartilage at a later age with a significant increase in the incidence of osteoarthritis.

  11. Oxidized LDL binding to LOX-1 upregulates VEGF expression in cultured bovine chondrocytes through activation of PPAR-{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kanata, Sohya; Akagi, Masao . E-mail: makagi@med.kindai.ac.jp; Nishimura, Shunji; Hayakawa, Sumio; Yoshida, Kohji; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Munakata, Hiroshi; Hamanishi, Chiaki

    2006-09-29

    It has been reported that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors play an important role in the destruction of articular cartilage in osteoarthritis through increased production of matrix metalloproteinases. We investigated whether the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) binding to lectin-like ox-LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) upregulates VEGF expression in cultured bovine articular chondrocytes (BACs). Ox-LDL markedly increased VEGF mRNA expression and protein release in time- and dose-dependent manners, which was significantly suppressed by anti-LOX-1 antibody pretreatment. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{gamma} was evident in BACs with ox-LDL addition and was attenuated by anti-LOX-1 antibody. The specific PPAR-{gamma} inhibitor GW9662 suppressed ox-LDL-induced VEGF expression. These results suggest that the ox-LDL/LOX-1 system upregulates VEGF expression in articular cartilage, at least in part, through activation of PPAR-{gamma} and supports the hypothesis that ox-LDL is involved in cartilage degradation via LOX-1.

  12. Nanocomposite scaffold for chondrocyte growth and cartilage tissue engineering: effects of carbon nanotube surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Nadeen O; Collette, Nicole M; Thomas, Cynthia B; Genetos, Damian C; Loots, Gabriela G

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the long-term biocompatibility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. We hypothesized that SWNT nanocomposite scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering can provide an improved molecular-sized substrate for stimulation of chondrocyte growth, as well as structural reinforcement of the scaffold's mechanical properties. The effect of SWNT surface functionalization (-COOH or -PEG) on chondrocyte viability and biochemical matrix deposition was examined in two-dimensional cultures, in three-dimensional (3D) pellet cultures, and in a 3D nanocomposite scaffold consisting of hydrogels+SWNTs. Outcome measures included cell viability, histological and SEM evaluation, GAG biochemical content, compressive and tensile biomechanical properties, and gene expression quantification, including extracellular matrix (ECM) markers aggrecan (Agc), collagen-1 (Col1a1), collagen-2 (Col2a1), collagen-10 (Col10a1), surface adhesion proteins fibronectin (Fn), CD44 antigen (CD44), and tumor marker (Tp53). Our findings indicate that chondrocytes tolerate functionalized SWNTs well, with minimal toxicity of cells in 3D culture systems (pellet and nanocomposite constructs). Both SWNT-PEG and SWNT-COOH groups increased the GAG content in nanocomposites relative to control. The compressive biomechanical properties of cell-laden SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were significantly elevated relative to control. Increases in the tensile modulus and ultimate stress were observed, indicative of a tensile reinforcement of the nanocomposite scaffolds. Surface coating of SWNTs with -COOH also resulted in increased Col2a1 and Fn gene expression throughout the culture in nanocomposite constructs, indicative of increased chondrocyte metabolic activity. In contrast, surface coating of SWNTs with a neutral -PEG moiety had no significant effect on Col2a1 or Fn gene expression, suggesting that the charged nature of the -COOH surface

  13. Nanocomposite Scaffold for Chondrocyte Growth and Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Effects of Carbon Nanotube Surface Functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Collette, Nicole M.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Genetos, Damian C.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the long-term biocompatibility of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for tissue engineering of articular cartilage. We hypothesized that SWNT nanocomposite scaffolds in cartilage tissue engineering can provide an improved molecular-sized substrate for stimulation of chondrocyte growth, as well as structural reinforcement of the scaffold's mechanical properties. The effect of SWNT surface functionalization (-COOH or -PEG) on chondrocyte viability and biochemical matrix deposition was examined in two-dimensional cultures, in three-dimensional (3D) pellet cultures, and in a 3D nanocomposite scaffold consisting of hydrogels+SWNTs. Outcome measures included cell viability, histological and SEM evaluation, GAG biochemical content, compressive and tensile biomechanical properties, and gene expression quantification, including extracellular matrix (ECM) markers aggrecan (Agc), collagen-1 (Col1a1), collagen-2 (Col2a1), collagen-10 (Col10a1), surface adhesion proteins fibronectin (Fn), CD44 antigen (CD44), and tumor marker (Tp53). Our findings indicate that chondrocytes tolerate functionalized SWNTs well, with minimal toxicity of cells in 3D culture systems (pellet and nanocomposite constructs). Both SWNT-PEG and SWNT-COOH groups increased the GAG content in nanocomposites relative to control. The compressive biomechanical properties of cell-laden SWNT-COOH nanocomposites were significantly elevated relative to control. Increases in the tensile modulus and ultimate stress were observed, indicative of a tensile reinforcement of the nanocomposite scaffolds. Surface coating of SWNTs with -COOH also resulted in increased Col2a1 and Fn gene expression throughout the culture in nanocomposite constructs, indicative of increased chondrocyte metabolic activity. In contrast, surface coating of SWNTs with a neutral -PEG moiety had no significant effect on Col2a1 or Fn gene expression, suggesting that the charged nature of the -COOH surface

  14. Inhibition of phosphate-induced apoptosis in resting zone chondrocytes by thrombin peptide 508.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ming; Carney, Darrell H; Ryaby, James T; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D

    2009-01-01

    Growth plate chondrocytes are susceptible to apoptosis. Terminally differentiated chondrocytes are deleted via apoptosis, which primes the growth plate to vascular invasion and subsequent bone formation. Whether less differentiated resting zone chondrocytes are subject to the same mechanism that governs the apoptotic pathway of more differentiated growth zone chondrocytes is not known. In our current study, we demonstrated that inorganic phosphate, a key inducer of growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis, also causes apoptosis in resting zone chondrocytes, via a pathway similar to the one in growth zone chondrocytes. Our results demonstrated that the conditions that cause growth plate chondrocyte apoptosis lie in the external environment, instead of the differences in differentiation state.

  15. Protective Effect of Resveratrol against IL-1β-Induced Inflammatory Response on Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes Partly via the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB Signaling Pathway: An “in Vitro Study”

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Gu, Hailun; Liu, Huimin; Jiao, Yongliang; Li, Keyu; Zhao, Yue; An, Li; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenolic compound that prevents inflammation in chondrocytes and animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) via yet to be defined mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the protective effect of resveratrol on IL-1β-induced human articular chondrocytes was associated with the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway by incubating human articular chondrocytes (harvested from osteoarthritis patients) with IL-1β before treatment with resveratrol. Cell viability was evaluated using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and TNFα levels in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA(Enzymelinked immunosorbent assay). The levels of TLR4 and its downstream signaling targets (MyD88 and TRAF6) and IL-1β were assessed by measuring the levels of mRNA and protein expression by real-time RT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, in addition to assessing NF-κB activation. In addition, TLR4 siRNA was used to block TLR4 expression in chondrocytes further demonstrating that resveratrol prevented IL-1β-mediated inflammation by TLR4 inhibition. We found that resveratrol prevented IL-1β-induced reduction in cell viability. Stimulation of chondrocytes with IL-1β caused a significant up-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream targets MyD88 and TRAF6 resulting in NF-κB activation associated with the synthesis of IL-1β and TNFα. These IL-1β-induced inflammatory responses were all effectively reversed by resveratrol. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB in chondrocytes treated with TLR4 siRNA was significantly attenuated, but not abolished, and exposure to resveratrol further reduced NF-κB translocation. These data suggested that resveratrol prevented IL-1β-induced inflammation in human articular chondrocytes at least in part by inhibiting the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway suggesting that resveratrol has the potential to be used as a nutritional supplement to counteract OA symptoms. PMID

  16. Effects of Fiber Orientation on the Frictional Properties and Damage of Regenerative Articular Cartilage Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Mario Alberto; McCullen, Seth D.; Callanan, Anthony; Chung, Sangwon; Cann, Philippa M.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage provides a low-friction, wear-resistant surface for diarthrodial joints. Due to overloading and overuse, articular cartilage is known to undergo significant wear and degeneration potentially resulting in osteoarthritis (OA). Regenerative medicine strategies offer a promising solution for the treatment of articular cartilage defects and potentially localized early OA. Such strategies rely on the development of materials to restore some aspects of cartilage. In this study, microfibrous poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds of varying fiber orientations (random and aligned) were cultured with bovine chondrocytes for 4 weeks in vitro, and the mechanical and frictional properties were evaluated. Mechanical properties were quantified using unconfined compression and tensile testing techniques. Frictional properties were investigated at physiological compressive strains occurring in native articular cartilage. Scaffolds were sheared along the fiber direction, perpendicular to the fiber direction and in random orientation. The evolution of damage as a result of shear was evaluated via white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy. As expected, the fiber orientation strongly affected the tensile properties as well as the compressive modulus of the scaffolds. Fiber orientation did not significantly affect the equilibrium frictional coefficient, but it was, however, a key factor in dictating the evolution of surface damage on the surface. Scaffolds shear tested perpendicular to the fiber orientation displayed the highest surface damage. Our results suggest that the fiber orientation of the scaffold implanted in the joint could strongly affect its resistance to damage due to shear. Scaffold fiber orientation should thus be carefully considered when using microfibrous scaffolds. PMID:23688110

  17. Does Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment repair articular cartilage injury? A rabbit model study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) regiment has been used to treat fractures with non-union and to promote bone union in general. The effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage metabolism has been characterized. Yet, the effect of LIPUS to repair articular cartilage injury remains unclear in vivo. Methods We designed a study to investigate the effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage repairing in a rabbit severe cartilage injury model. Eighteen rabbits were divided into three groups: Sham-operated group, operated group without-LIPUS-treatment, operated group with-LIPUS-treatment (a daily 20-minute treatment for 3 months). Full-thickness cartilage defects were surgically created on the right side distal femoral condyle without intending to penetrate into the subchondral bone, which mimicked severe chondral injury. MR images for experimental joints, morphology grading scale, and histopathological Mankin score were evaluated. Results The preliminary results showed that the operated groups with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment had significantly higher Mankin score and morphological grading scale compared with the sham-operated group. However, there was no significant difference between the with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment groups. Cartilage defects filled with proliferative tissue were observed in the with-LIPUS-treatment group grossly and under MR images, however which presented less up-take under Alcian blue stain. Furthermore, no new deposition of type II collagen or proliferation of chondrocyte was observed over the cartilage defect after LIPUS treatment. Conclusion LIPUS has no significant therapeutic potential in treating severe articular cartilage injury in our animal study. PMID:24507771

  18. The study on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Li, Ang; Sun, Lian-Wen; Yan, Yan; Fan, Fan; Li, De-Yu; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2012-10-01

    The microgravity environment of a long-term space flight may induce acute changes in an astronaut's musculo-skeletal systems. This study explores the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage. Six rats underwent tail suspension for 14 days and six additional rats were kept under normal earth gravity as controls. Swelling strains were measured using high-frequency ultrasound in all cartilage samples subject to osmotic loading. Site-specific swelling strain data were used in a triphasic theoretical model of cartilage swelling to determine the uniaxial modulus of the cartilage solid matrix. No severe surface irregularities were found in the cartilage samples obtained from the control or tail-suspended groups. For the tail-suspended group, the thickness of the cartilage at a specified site, as determined by ultrasound echo, showed a minor decrease. The uniaxial modulus of articular cartilage at the specified site decreased significantly, from (6.31 ± 3.37)MPa to (5.05 ± 2.98)MPa ( p < 0.05). The histology-stained image of a cartilage sample also showed a reduced number of chondrocytes and decreased degree of matrix staining. These results demonstrated that the 14 d simulated microgravity induced significant effects on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage. This study is the first attempt to explore the effects of simulated microgravity on the mechanical characteristics of articular cartilage using an osmotic loading method and a triphasic model. The conclusions may provide reference information for manned space flights and a better understanding of the effects of microgravity on the skeletal system.

  19. Extra and Intra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R K; Banskota, B; Rijal, S; Banskota, A K

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is not so rare intra-articular condition secondary to synovial metaplasia, that affects the knee joint. Extra-articular synovial chondromatosis however is an extremely rare condition that usually involves the synovial sheath or bursa of the foot or hand. We present two cases of synovial chondromatosis, one intra and one extra-articular. The first case was a 25 year old lady who presented with pain, swelling and restricted range of motion of left knee and was found to have an intra-articular synovial chondromatosis which was treated successfully by joint debridement. The second case was that of a 22 year old man who presented with right knee pain and was diagnosed to have an extra-articular synovial chondromatosis of his right medial hamstring tendon sheath, excision of which resulted in complete relief of symptoms. PMID:27549506

  20. Chondrocyte-specific ablation of Osterix leads to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung-Hoon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Crombrugghe, Benoit de; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional ablation of Osterix (Osx) in chondrocytes leads to skeletal defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx has an autonomous function in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. -- Abstract: Osterix (Osx) is an essential transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation during both intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Endochondral ossification, a process in which bone formation initiates from a cartilage intermediate, is crucial for skeletal development and growth. Osx is expressed in differentiating chondrocytes as well as osteoblasts during mouse development, but its role in chondrocytes has not been well studied. Here, the in vivo function of Osx in chondrocytes was examined in a chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout model using Col2a1-Cre. Chondrocyte-specific Osx deficiency resulted in a weak and bent skeleton which was evident in newborn by radiographic analysis and skeletal preparation. To further understand the skeletal deformity of the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout, histological analysis was performed on developing long bones during embryogenesis. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were expanded, the formation of bone trabeculae and marrow cavities was remarkably delayed, and subsequent skeletal growth was reduced. The expression of several chondrocyte differentiation markers was reduced, indicating the impairment of chondrocyte differentiation and endochondral ossification in the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout. Taken together, Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Osx in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification.

  1. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes.

  2. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Phull, Abdul-Rehman; Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha; Kim, Song Ja

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes. PMID:27631002

  3. Applications of Chondrocyte-Based Cartilage Engineering: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Eo, Seong-Hui; Abbas, Qamar; Ahmed, Madiha

    2016-01-01

    Chondrocytes are the exclusive cells residing in cartilage and maintain the functionality of cartilage tissue. Series of biocomponents such as different growth factors, cytokines, and transcriptional factors regulate the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiation to chondrocytes. The number of chondrocytes and dedifferentiation are the key limitations in subsequent clinical application of the chondrocytes. Different culture methods are being developed to overcome such issues. Using tissue engineering and cell based approaches, chondrocytes offer prominent therapeutic option specifically in orthopedics for cartilage repair and to treat ailments such as tracheal defects, facial reconstruction, and urinary incontinence. Matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation/implantation is an improved version of traditional autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) method. An increasing number of studies show the clinical significance of this technique for the chondral lesions treatment. Literature survey was carried out to address clinical and functional findings by using various ACT procedures. The current study was conducted to study the pharmacological significance and biomedical application of chondrocytes. Furthermore, it is inferred from the present study that long term follow-up studies are required to evaluate the potential of these methods and specific positive outcomes. PMID:27631002

  4. Treatment and Prevention of (Early) Osteoarthritis Using Articular Cartilage Repair—Fact or Fiction? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    de Windt, Tommy S.; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Brittberg, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Early osteoarthritis (OA) is increasingly being recognized in patients who wish to remain active while not accepting the limitations of conservative treatment or joint replacement. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the existing evidence for treatment of patients with early OA using articular cartilage repair techniques. A systematic search was performed in EMBASE, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane collaboration. Articles were screened for relevance and appraised for quality. Nine articles of generally low methodological quality (mean Coleman score 58) including a total of 502 patients (mean age range = 36-57 years) could be included. In the reports, both radiological and clinical criteria for early OA were applied. Of all patients included in this review, 75% were treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation. Good short-term clinical outcome up to 9 years was shown. Failure rates varied from 8% to 27.3%. The conversion to total knee arthroplasty rate was 2.5% to 6.5%. Although a (randomized controlled) trial in this patient category with long-term follow-up is needed, the literature suggests autologous chondrocyte implantation could provide good short- to mid-term clinical outcome and delay the need for total knee arthroplasty. The use of standardized criteria for early OA and implementation of (randomized) trials with long-term follow-up may allow for further expansion of the research field in articular cartilage repair to the challenging population with (early) OA. PMID:26069664

  5. Interleukin-1beta induces death in chondrocyte-like ATDC5 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion in a reactive nitrogen and oxygen species-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Rika; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Akaike, Takaaki; Akuta, Teruo; Nakamura, Masanori; Takami, Masamichi; Morimura, Naoko; Yasu, Kayoko; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2005-07-15

    IL-1 (interleukin-1) acts as a key mediator of the degeneration of articular cartilage in RA (rheumatoid arthritis) and OA (osteoarthritis),where chondrocyte death is observed. It is still controversial, however, whether IL-1 induces chondrocyte death. In the present study, the viability of mouse chondrocyte-like ATDC5 cells was reduced by the treatment with IL-1beta for 48 h or longer. IL-1beta augmented the expression of the catalytic gp91 subunit of NADPH oxidase, gp91phox, as well as inducible NO synthase in ATDC5 cells. Generation of nitrated guanosine and tyrosine suggested the formation of reactive nitrogen species including ONOO- (peroxynitrite), a reaction product of NO and O2-, in ATDC5 cells and rat primary chondrocytes treated with IL-1beta. Death of ATDC5 cells after IL-1beta treatment was prevented by an NADPH-oxidase inhibitor, AEBSF[4-(2-aminoethyl)benzene-sulphonyl fluoride], an NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), and a ONOO- scavenger, uric acid. The viability of ATDC5 cells was reduced by the ONOO(-)-generator 3-(4-morpholinyl)sydnonimine hydrochloride, but not by either the NO-donor 1-hydroxy-2-oxo-3-(N-methyl-2-aminopropyl)-3-methyl-1-triazene or S-nitrosoglutathione. Disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP deprivation were observed in IL-1beta-treated ATDC5 cells, both of which were restored by L-NAME, AEBSF or uric acid. On the other hand, no morphological or biochemical signs indicating apoptosis were observed in these cells. These results suggest that the death of chondrocyte-like ATDC5 cells was mediated at least in part by mitochondrial dysfunction and energy depletion through ONOO- formation after IL-1beta treatment. PMID:15784009

  6. SERPINE2 Inhibits IL-1α-Induced MMP-13 Expression in Human Chondrocytes: Involvement of ERK/NF-κB/AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scotece, Morena; Abella, Vanessa; Lois, Ana; Lopez, Veronica; Pino, Jesus; Gomez, Rodolfo; Gomez-Reino, Juan J.; Gualillo, Oreste

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic joint disease, characterized by a progressive loss of articular cartilage. During OA, proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin IL-1, induce the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in chondrocytes, contributing thus to the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Members of Serpine family, including plasminogen activator inhibitors have been reported to participate in ECM regulation. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of serpin peptidase inhibitor clade E member 2 (SERPINE2), under basal conditions and in response to increasing doses of IL-1α, in human cultured chondrocytes. We also examined the effects of SERPINE2 on IL-1α-induced MMP-13 expression. For completeness, the signaling pathway involved in this process was also explored. Methods SERPINE2 mRNA and protein expression were evaluated by RT-qPCR and western blot analysis in human T/C-28a2 cell line and human primary chondrocytes. These cells were treated with human recombinant SERPINE2, alone or in combination with IL-1α. ERK 1/2, NFκB and AP-1 activation were assessed by western blot analysis. Results Human cultured chondrocytes express SERPINE2 in basal condition. This expression increased in response to IL-1α stimulation. In addition, recombinant SERPINE2 induced a clear inhibition of MMP-13 expression in IL-1α-stimulated chondrocytes. This inhibitory effect is likely regulated through a pathway involving ERK 1/2, NF-κB and AP-1. Conclusions Taken together, these data demonstrate that SERPINE2 might prevent cartilage catabolism by inhibiting the expression of MMP-13, one of the most relevant collagenases, involved in cartilage breakdown in OA. PMID:26305372

  7. Control of Collagen Production in Mouse Chondrocytes by Using a Combination of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Small Interfering RNA Targeting Col1a1 for Hydrogel-Based Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte–agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  8. Micromechanical response of articular cartilage to tensile load measured using nonlinear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bell, J S; Christmas, J; Mansfield, J C; Everson, R M; Winlove, C P

    2014-06-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a highly anisotropic biomaterial, and its complex mechanical properties have been a topic of intense investigation for over 60 years. Recent advances in the field of nonlinear optics allow the individual constituents of AC to be imaged in living tissue without the need for exogenous contrast agents. Combining mechanical testing with nonlinear microscopy provides a wealth of information about microscopic responses to load. This work investigates the inhomogeneous distribution of strain in loaded AC by tracking the movement and morphological changes of individual chondrocytes using point pattern matching and Bayesian modeling. This information can be used to inform models of mechanotransduction and pathogenesis, and is readily extendable to various other connective tissues.

  9. Biomarkers of Chondrocyte Apoptosis and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Weinberg, Annelie Martina; Al-Wasiyah, Mohammad K.; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cell death with morphological and molecular features of apoptosis has been detected in osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage, which suggests a key role for chondrocyte death/survival in the pathogenesis of OA. Identification of biomarkers of chondrocyte apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapies that may eliminate the cause or, at least, slow down the degenerative processes in OA. The aim of this review was to explore the molecular markers and signals that induce chondrocyte apoptosis in OA. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar using the keywords chondrocyte death, apoptosis, osteoarthritis, autophagy and biomarker. Several molecules considered to be markers of chondrocyte apoptosis will be discussed in this brief review. Molecular markers and signalling pathways associated with chondroycte apoptosis may turn out to be therapeutic targets in OA and approaches aimed at neutralizing apoptosis-inducing molecules may at least delay the progression of cartilage degeneration in OA. PMID:26334269

  10. Chondrocyte behavior on nanostructured micropillar polypropylene and polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Prittinen, Juha; Jiang, Yu; Ylärinne, Janne H; Pakkanen, Tapani A; Lammi, Mikko J; Qu, Chengjuan

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate whether patterned polypropylene (PP) or polystyrene (PS) could enhance the chondrocytes' extracellular matrix (ECM) production and phenotype maintenance. Bovine primary chondrocytes were cultured on smooth PP and PS, as well as on nanostructured micropillar PP (patterned PP) and PS (patterned PS) for 2 weeks. Subsequently, the samples were collected for fluorescein diacetate-based cell viability tests, for immunocytochemical assays of types I and II collagen, actin and vinculin, for scanning electronic microscopic analysis of cell morphology and distribution, and for gene expression assays of Sox9, aggrecan, procollagen α1(II), procollagen α1(X), and procollagen α2(I) using quantitative RT-PCR assays. After two weeks of culture, the bovine primary chondrocytes had attached on both patterned PP and PS, while practically no adhesion was observed on smooth PP. However, the best adhesion of the cells was on smooth PS. The cells, which attached on patterned PP and PS surfaces synthesized types I and II collagen. The chondrocytes' morphology was extended, and an abundant ECM network formed around the attached chondrocytes on both patterned PP and PS. Upon passaging, no significant differences on the chondrocyte-specific gene expression were observed, although the highest expression level of aggrecan was observed on the patterned PS in passage 1 chondrocytes, and the expression level of procollagen α1(II) appeared to decrease in passaged chondrocytes. However, the expressions of procollagen α2(I) were increased in all passaged cell cultures. In conclusion, the bovine primary chondrocytes could be grown on patterned PS and PP surfaces, and they produced extracellular matrix network around the adhered cells. However, neither the patterned PS nor PP could prevent the dedifferentiation of chondrocytes. PMID:25175232

  11. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine acts as a modulator of chondrocyte hypertrophy and maturation in chick caudal region chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to explore the effect of DNA hypomethylation on chondrocytes phenotype, in particular the effect on chondrocyte hypertrophy, maturation, and apoptosis. Chondrocytes derived from caudal region of day 17 embryonic chick sterna were pretreated with hypomethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine for 48 hours and then maintained in the normal culture medium for up to 14 days. Histological studies showed distinct morphological changes occurred in the pretreated cultures when compared to the control cultures. The pretreated chondrocytes after 7 days in culture became bigger in size and acquired more flattened fibroblastic phenotype as well as a loss of cartilage specific extracellular matrix. Scanning electron microscopy at day 7 showed chondrocytes to have increased in cell volume and at day 14 in culture the extracellular matrix of the pretreated cultures showed regular fibrillar structure heavily embedded with matrix vesicles, which is the characteristic feature of chondrocyte hypertrophy. Transmission electron microscopic studies indicated the terminal fate of the hypertrophic cells in culture. The pretreated chondrocytes grown for 14 days in culture showed two types of cells: dark cells which had condense chromatin in dark patches and dark cytoplasm. The other light chondrocytes appeared to be heavily loaded with endoplasmic reticulum indicative of very active protein and secretory activity; their cytoplasm had large vacuoles and disintegrating cytoplasm. The biosynthetic profile showed that the pretreated cultures were actively synthesizing and secreting type X collagen and alkaline phosphatase as a major biosynthetic product. PMID:27382512

  12. Increased Production of Clusterin in Biopsies of Repair Tissue following Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Malda, Jos; Richardson, James B.; Roberts, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To characterize the immunolocalization of clusterin in the repair cartilage of patients having undergone autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and evaluate correlation to clinical outcome. Design. Full-depth core biopsies of repair tissue were obtained from 38 patients who had undergone ACI at an average of 18 ± 13 months previously (range 8-67 months). The biopsies were snap frozen, cryosectioned, and clusterin production immunolocalized using a specific monoclonal clusterin antibody and compared with normal and osteoarthritic cartilage. Clinical outcome was assessed from patients preoperatively, at the time of biopsy, and annually postoperatively. Results. Intensity of immunostaining for clusterin decreased with age in healthy cartilage tissue. Clusterin was detected to a variable degree in 37 of the 38 ACI cartilage biopsies, in single and clustered chondrocytes, in the pericellular capsule and the cartilage extracellular matrix, as well as the osteocytes and osteoid within the bone. Chondrocytes in hyaline repair tissue were significantly more immunopositive than those in fibrocartilage repair tissue. Clinical outcome improved significantly post-ACI, but did not correlate with the presence of clusterin in the repair tissue. Conclusions. These results demonstrate the presence of clusterin in actively repairing human cartilage and indicate a different distribution of clusterin in this tissue compared to normal cartilage. Variability in clusterin staining in the repair tissue could indicate different states of chondrogenic differentiation. The clinical significance of clusterin within repair tissue is difficult to assess, although the ideal functioning repair tissue morphology should resemble that of healthy adult cartilage. PMID:26069669

  13. Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine articular and epiphyseal cartilage: light ane electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, R; Christian, R G; Nakano, T; Aherne, F X; Thompson, J R

    1981-01-01

    Age related changes and osteochondrosis in swine were studied using light microscopy and electron microscopy in articular cartilage and light microscopy and epiphyseal cartilage of swine from three days to 30 weeks of age. Thickness, cellularity and vascularity of both the epiphyseal and articular cartilage, decreased as the swine aged. Osteochondrotic changes included formation of "plugs" of cartilage indicating localized failure of ossification and separation and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage. Eosinophilic streaks and space formation in epiphyseal cartilage was observed in relation to epiphyseal separation. Electron microscopy showed a continuous fibrillar layer on the surface of the cartilage corresponding to the lamina splendens of light microscopy. This layer increased in the thickness and showed accumulation of amorphous material between the fibrils with aging. In the matrix, the orientation and distribution of the collagen fibers changed with growth and thicker fibers with clear sub banding were more common in older age groups. Also, necrotic cells, glycogen containing bodies and cellular debris were noticed in the matrix of normal cartilage in old animals. Chondrocytes in the younger cartilage showed accumulation of organelles responsible for protein synthesis; while Golgi bodies, vesicles, lysosomes, well developed foot processes and other inclusions were noticed in older cartilage. Cartilage erosions had a clumped and disrupted lamina splendens on the surface and electron lucent patches in the ground substances of the matrix and chondrocyte cytoplasm. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2 and 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10 and 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. PMID:7260732

  14. Early articular cartilage degeneration in a developmental dislocation of the hip model results from activation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yuan, Yi; Yao, Jie; Wang, Peng; Ma, Ruixue

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dislocation or dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common deformities in children. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent long-term complication. The molecular mechanism of early articular cartilage degeneration in DDH is still unclear. It is well known that β-catenin plays a crucial role in articular cartilage degeneration. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between β-catenin and DDH cartilage degeneration. We used a DDH model that was established by modification of swaddling position in newborn Wistar rats. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and untreated control group at the age of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. β-Catenin gene and protein were investigated by quantitative (q)RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, markers of early cartilage degeneration, were assessed by qRT-PCR. Primary chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage of two groups at the age of 8 weeks. Expression of β-catenin, collagen X and MMP-13 was detected. Continued high expression of β-catenin was observed in cartilage from DDH model rats. mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin was significantly increased in primary chondrocytes of the DDH model compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expression was higher in the cartilage and chondrocytes from DDH model rats than the control group. Our findings suggest that early cartilage degeneration in DDH may result from activation of β-catenin signaling. PMID:24817933

  15. Multiscale Mechanics of Articular Cartilage: Potentials and Challenges of Coupling Musculoskeletal, Joint, and Microscale Computational Models

    PubMed Central

    Halloran, J. P.; Sibole, S.; van Donkelaar, C. C.; van Turnhout, M. C.; Oomens, C. W. J.; Weiss, J. A.; Guilak, F.; Erdemir, A.

    2012-01-01

    Articular cartilage experiences significant mechanical loads during daily activities. Healthy cartilage provides the capacity for load bearing and regulates the mechanobiological processes for tissue development, maintenance, and repair. Experimental studies at multiple scales have provided a fundamental understanding of macroscopic mechanical function, evaluation of the micromechanical environment of chondrocytes, and the foundations for mechanobiological response. In addition, computational models of cartilage have offered a concise description of experimental data at many spatial levels under healthy and diseased conditions, and have served to generate hypotheses for the mechanical and biological function. Further, modeling and simulation provides a platform for predictive risk assessment, management of dysfunction, as well as a means to relate multiple spatial scales. Simulation-based investigation of cartilage comes with many challenges including both the computational burden and often insufficient availability of data for model development and validation. This review outlines recent modeling and simulation approaches to understand cartilage function from a mechanical systems perspective, and illustrates pathways to associate mechanics with biological function. Computational representations at single scales are provided from the body down to the microstructure, along with attempts to explore multiscale mechanisms of load sharing that dictate the mechanical environment of the cartilage and chondrocytes. PMID:22648577

  16. Extra-articular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Tanasescu, R

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main characteristic is persistent joint inflammation that results in joint damage and loss of function. Although RA is more common in females, extra-articular manifestations of the disease are more common in males. The extra-articular manifestations of RA can occur at any age after onset. It is characterised by destructive polyarthritis and extra-articular organ involvement, including the skin, eye, heart, lung, renal, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. The frequence of extra-articular manifestations in RA differs from one country to another. Extra-articular organ involvement in RA is more frequently seen in patients with severe, active disease and is associated with increased mortality. Incidence and frequence figures for extra-articular RA vary according to study design. Extra-articular involvement is more likely in those who have RF and/or are HLA-DR4 positive. Occasionally, there are also systemic manifestations such as vasculitis, visceral nodules, Sjögren's syndrome, or pulmonary fibrosis present. Nodules are the most common extra-articular feature, and are present in up to 30%; many of the other classic features occur in 1% or less in normal clinic settings. Sjögren's syndrome, anaemia of chronic disease and pulmonary manifestations are relatively common – in 6-10%, are frequently present in early disease and are all related to worse outcomes measures of rheumatoid disease in particular functional impairment and mortality. The occurrence of these systemic manifestations is a major predictor of mortality in patients with RA. This paper focuses on extra-articular manifestations, defined as diseases and symptoms not directly related to the locomotor system. PMID:21977172

  17. The dependence of autologous chondrocyte transplantation on varying cellular passage, yield and culture duration.

    PubMed

    Salzmann, Gian M; Sauerschnig, Martin; Berninger, Markus T; Kaltenhauser, Theresa; Schönfelder, Martin; Vogt, Stephan; Wexel, Gabriele; Tischer, Thomas; Sudkamp, Norbert; Niemeyer, Philipp; Imhoff, Andreas B; Schöttle, Philip B

    2011-09-01

    Matrix-assisted chondrocyte transplantation (m-ACI) still lacks any standardization in its execution in terms of cell passage (P), cell yield (C) and in vitro membrane-holding time (T). It was the goal of this study to analyze the effect of shifting cell culture parameters (P, C, T) on the in vitro as well as in vivo effort of a regulated animal m-ACI. Autologous rabbit knee articular chondrocytes were seeded within bilayer collagen I/III 3-D matrices in variation of P, C and T. Each time, 2 PCT-identical by 2 PCT-identical cell-matrix-constructs (CMC)/animal were created. Simultaneously 2 (PCT-distinct) were re-implanted (CMC-e) autologous into artificial trochlear pristine chondral defects in vivo to remain for 12 weeks while the remaining 2 were harvested (CMC-i) for immediate in vitro analysis at the time of transplantation of their identical twins. mRNA of both, CMC-e regenerates and CMC-i membranes, was analyzed for Collagen-1,-2,-10, COMP, Aggrecan, Sox9 expression by use of a mixed linear model, multiple regression analysis. Generally, CMC-i values were higher than CMC-e values for differentiation targets; the opposite was true for dedifferentiation targets. Regarding individual gene expression, in vivo regenerate cell-matrix properties were significantly dependent on initial cell-matrix in vitro values as a sign of linearity. The parameter membrane-holding time (T) had strongest effects on the resulting mRNA expression with slightly less impact of the parameter passage (P), whereas cell yield (C) had clearly less effects. Noting differences between in vitro and in vivo data, in general, optimal expression patterns concerning chondrogenic differentiation were achieved by few passages, medium cellular yield, short membrane-holding time. Clinical m-ACI may benefit from optimal orchestration of the cell culture parameters passage, yield and time. PMID:21592563

  18. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides induce in vitro degradation of cartilage matrix through chondrocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Jasin, H E

    1983-12-01

    The present studies demonstrate that bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induce cartilage matrix degradation in live explants in organ culture. Quintuplicate bovine nasal fibrocartilage explants cultured for 8 d with three different purified LPS preparations derived from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa at concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 25.0 micrograms/ml resulted in matrix proteoglycan depletion of 33.3 +/- 5.8 to 92.5 +/- 2.0% (medium control depletion 17.7 +/- 0.7 to 32.4 +/- 1.4%). Matrix degradation depended on the presence of live chondrocytes because frozen-thawed explants incubated with LPS failed to show any proteoglycan release. Moreover, the addition of Polymyxin B (25 micrograms/ml) to live explants incubated with LPS abolished matrix release, whereas Polymyxin B had no effect on the matrix-degrading activity provided by blood mononuclear cell factors. A highly purified Lipid A preparation induced matrix degradation at a concentration of 0.01 micrograms/ml. Cartilage matrix collagen and proteoglycan depletion also occurred with porcine articular cartilage explants (collagen release: 18.3 +/- 3.5%, medium control: 2.1 +/- 0.5%; proteoglycan release: 79.0 +/- 5.9%, medium control: 28.8 +/- 4.8%). Histochemical analysis of the cultured explants confirmed the results described above. Gel chromatography of the proteoglycans released in culture indicated that LPS induced significant degradation of the high molecular weight chondroitin sulfate-containing aggregates. These findings suggest that bacterial products may induce cartilage damage by direct stimulation of chondrocytes. This pathogenic mechanism may play a role in joint damage in septic arthritis and in arthropathies resulting from the presence of bacterial products derived from the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. The intracellular Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid induce stress proteins in mammalian chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T C; Benton, H P

    1994-07-15

    Primary cultures of mammalian articular chondrocytes respond to treatment with the intracellular Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors thapsigargin (TG) and cyclopiazonic acid by specific changes in protein synthesis consistent with a stress response. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of newly synthesized proteins confirmed that the response was consistent with the induction of glucose-regulated proteins. The effects of low-dose TG (10 nM), measured by changes in [35S]methionine labelling of newly synthesized proteins, can first be observed by 10 h and are maximal by 24 h. The pattern of changes induced by TG is shared with cyclopiazonic acid, but effects of both perturbants differ significantly from changes induced by heat shock. Upon removal of TG, normal protein synthesis is restored by 48 h. Immunoblots showed increased concentrations of the stress proteins HSP90, HSP72/73 and HSP60 in chondrocytes treated with TG, but induction of newly synthesized heat-shock proteins by TG was not apparent on [35S]methionine-labelled gels. The alterations in protein synthesis induced by Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors were unaffected by BAPTA-AM loading, which clamped cytosolic Ca2+ at resting levels. We conclude that inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+)-pump activity can elicit a stress response, which has important implications for the interpretation of chronic use of Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors. In particular, the activation of the cellular shock response should be considered in interpreting the regulation of protein synthesis and cell survival by Ca(2+)-pump inhibitors such as TG. PMID:8043004

  20. Regulation of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage by TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta.

    PubMed

    DuRaine, Grayson; Neu, Corey P; Chan, Stephanie M T; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; June, Ronald K; Reddi, A Hari

    2009-02-01

    Articular cartilage functions to provide a low-friction surface for joint movement for many decades of life. Superficial zone protein (SZP) is a glycoprotein secreted by chondrocytes in the superficial layer of articular cartilage that contributes to effective boundary lubrication. In both cell and explant cultures, TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta have been demonstrated to, respectively, upregulate and downregulate SZP protein levels. It was hypothesized that the friction coefficient of articular cartilage could also be modulated by these cytokines through SZP regulation. The friction coefficient between cartilage explants (both untreated and treated with TGF-beta1 or IL-1beta) and a smooth glass surface due to sliding in the boundary lubrication regime was measured with a pin-on-disk tribometer. SZP was quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay and localized by immunohistochemistry. Both TGF-beta1 and IL-1beta treatments resulted in the decrease of the friction coefficient of articular cartilage in a location- and time-dependent manner. Changes in the friction coefficient due to the TGF-beta1 treatment corresponded to increased depth of SZP staining within the superficial zone, while friction coefficient changes due to the IL-1beta treatment were independent of SZP depth of staining. However, the changes induced by the IL-1beta treatment corresponded to changes in surface roughness, determined from the analysis of surface images obtained with an atomic force microscope. Thes