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Sample records for adult autoimmune enteropathy

  1. Seronegative Adult Autoimmune Enteropathy in a Male Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Alli-Akintade, Latifat; Stondell, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune enteropathy (AIE) is rare but damaging. The lack of consistent objective findings makes diagnosis a challenge. A 45-year-old male developed noninfectious diarrhea with significant weight loss and electrolyte abnormalities. Computed tomography delineated enteritis. Colonoscopy and esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed villous atrophy, chronic inflammation, and ulceration of the terminal ileum and cecum. Pathology showed cryptitis with apoptosis and abscesses throughout the small and large bowel and absent goblet cells. Steroids rapidly improved symptoms. Anti-enterocyte antibody serologies were negative. Management can be challenging, and, in this case, the patient initially improved with budesonide and infliximab but required alternative anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy after relapsing. This is an unusual presentation of seronegative AIE, which should be considered in cases of persistent severe diarrhea. PMID:28184376

  2. Autoimmune enteropathy with a CD8+ CD7- T-cell small bowel intraepithelial lymphocytosis: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adult onset autoimmune enteropathy (AIE) is a rare condition characterized by diarrhea refractory to dietary therapy diagnosed in patients with evidence of autoimmune conditions. Auto-antibodies to gut epithelial cells and other tissues are commonly demonstrated. Despite increasing awareness, the pathogenesis, histologic, immunologic and clinical features of AIE remain uncertain. There remains controversy regarding the diagnostic criteria, the frequency and types of auto-antibodies and associated autoimmune conditions, and the extent and types of histologic and immunologic abnormalities. CD4+ T-cells are thought to at least responsible for this condition; whether other cell types, including B- and other T-cell subsets are involved, are uncertain. We present a unique case of AIE associated with a CD8+CD7- lymphocytosis and review the literature to characterize the histologic and immunologic abnormalities, and the autoantibodies and autoimmune conditions associated with AIE. Case Presentation We present a case of immune mediated enteropathy distinguished by the CD8+CD7- intra-epithelial and lamina propria lymphocytosis. Twenty-nine cases of AIE have been reported. The majority of patients had auto-antibodies (typically anti-enterocyte), preferential small bowel involvement, and predominately CD3+ CD4+ infiltrates. Common therapies included steroids or immuno-suppressive agents and clinical response with associated with histologic improvement. Conclusions AIE is most often characterized (1) IgG subclass anti-epithelial cell antibodies, (2) preferential small bowel involvement, and (3) CD3+ alphabeta TCR+ infiltrates; there is insufficient evidence to conclude CD4+ T-cells are solely responsible in all cases of AIE. PMID:22126605

  3. Immune Dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-Linked Syndrome: A Paradigm of Immunodeficiency with Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Barzaghi, Federica; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare monogenic primary immunodeficiency (PID) due to mutations of FOXP3, a key transcription factor for naturally occurring (n) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells is the main pathogenic event leading to the multi-organ autoimmunity that characterizes IPEX syndrome, a paradigm of genetically determined PID with autoimmunity. IPEX has a severe early onset and can become rapidly fatal within the first year of life regardless of the type and site of the mutation. The initial presenting symptoms are severe enteritis and/or type-1 diabetes mellitus, alone or in combination with eczema and elevated serum IgE. Other autoimmune symptoms, such as hypothyroidism, cytopenia, hepatitis, nephropathy, arthritis, and alopecia can develop in patients who survive the initial acute phase. The current therapeutic options for IPEX patients are limited. Supportive and replacement therapies combined with pharmacological immunosuppression are required to control symptoms at onset. However, these procedures can allow only a reduction of the clinical manifestations without a permanent control of the disease. The only known effective cure for IPEX syndrome is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it is always limited by the availability of a suitable donor and the lack of specific guidelines for bone marrow transplant in the context of this disease. This review aims to summarize the clinical histories and genomic mutations of the IPEX patients described in the literature to date. We will focus on the clinical and immunological features that allow differential diagnosis of IPEX syndrome and distinguish it from other PID with autoimmunity. The efficacy of the current therapies will be reviewed, and possible innovative approaches, based on the latest highlights of the pathogenesis to treat this severe primary autoimmune disease of childhood, will be discussed. PMID:23060872

  4. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma type II complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kato, Aiko; Takiuchi, Yoko; Aoki, Kazunari; Ono, Yuichiro; Arima, Hiroshi; Nagano, Seiji; Tabata, Sumie; Yanagita, Soshi; Matsushita, Akiko; Maruoka, Hayato; Wada, Masaya; Imai, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    A 74-year-old man was admitted to hospital because of persistent fever, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. CT scanning showed extensive wall thickening of the colon. He was transferred to our hospital because he further developed ascites and paraaortic lymph node swelling. On presentation, he was extremely emaciated with superficial lymph node swelling, ascitic signs, and leg edema. Histological image of a biopsied mesenteric lymph node demonstrated diffuse infiltration of large abnormal T cells. Surface antigen analysis of abnormal cells in the ascites revealed positivity for CD3, CD8, CD56, and weak positivity for CD103. Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed monoclonal rearrangement of the T cell receptor (TCR) gene. The subtype of TCR was αβ. A diagnosis of enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL) type II was made. The lymphoma involved the bone marrow. The patient also had severe hemolytic anemia with a positive Coomb's test result. An additional diagnosis for autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was made, which was resistant to methylprednisolone therapy. We first treated him with only vincristine in addition to the steroid to avoid acute tumor lysis syndrome ; however, he died of septic shock that occurred soon after vincristine administration. To the best of our knowledge, this may be the first reported case of EATL complicated by AIHA.

  5. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype–phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  6. Atypical Manifestation of LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency Syndrome as an Autoimmune Endocrine Disorder without Enteropathy and Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Ruemmele, Frank; Charbit-Henrion, Fabienne; Lévy, Eva; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Bader, Peter; Paetow, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation. The third child of consanguineous Egyptian parents (Patient 1) presented at 6 months of age with intractable enteropathy and failure to thrive. Later on, he developed symptoms of adrenal insufficiency, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and infectious complications due to immunosuppressive treatment. The severe enteropathy was non-responsive to the standard treatment and led to death at the age of 22 years. His younger sister (Patient 2) presented at the age of 12 to the endocrinology department with decompensated hypothyroidism, perioral vitiligo, delayed pubertal development, and growth failure without enteropathy and immunodeficiency. Using whole exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous frameshift mutation (c.6862delT, p.Y2288MfsX29) in the LRBA gene in both siblings. To our knowledge, our patient (Patient 2) is the first case of LRBA deficiency described with predominant endocrine phenotype without immunodeficiency and enteropathy. LRBA deficiency should be considered as underlying disease in pediatric patients presenting with autoimmune endocrine symptoms. The same genetic mutation can manifest with a broad phenotypic spectrum without genotype-phenotype correlation. The awareness for disease symptoms among non-immunologists might be a key to early diagnosis. Further functional studies in LRBA deficiency are

  7. [Gluten enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Macić-Dzanković, A; Sudí, J

    1997-01-01

    In this case report has been shown 32-old women patient. She was received on Department of Internal medicine of State Hospital "Sarajevo" because of prostration, weight loss (more than 20 kg) and frequently, abundant diarrheas. Clinical treatment, including biopsy of small intestine, referred on gluten-enteropathy. In war-stricken Sarajevo, when major part of food were bread, macaroni and pies, obviously there was perception of sensibility on gluten in this women who hadn't got any similar problem for her life. After adequate diet without gluten, on the control examination two month later, we can hardly recognize our patient. She can get more than 20 kg, without mental depression and would be married soon.

  8. Protein-losing enteropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  9. Enteropathy of coeliac disease in adults: increased number of enterochromaffin cells the duodenal mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Sjölund, K; Alumets, J; Berg, N O; Håkanson, R; Sundler, F

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-nine adult patients with coeliac disease and 39 patients with a normal duodenal morphology were studied with respect to the 5-ht containing enterochromaffin cells. Their number in duodenal biopsies was assessed by fluorescence histochemistry and they were examined by immunohistochemistry for peptides known or believed to occur in enterochromaffin cells. Antisera used were raised against substance P, motilin, and leu-enkephalin. In addition, the concentration of 5-HT was determined chemically. In adult coeliac disease there was a significant increase in the number of duodenal enterochromaffin cells compared with the control group. The concentration of 5-HT in the duodenal mucosa was also greatly increased. Substance P was found in a minority population of enterochromaffin cells. These cells were very few and did not increase in number in coeliac disease. Motilin cells were distinct from enterochromaffin cells. No enkephalin immunoreactive cells were found in the biopsies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7056495

  10. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Adike, Abimbola; Corral, Juan; Rybnicek, David; Sussman, Daniel; Shah, Samir; Quigley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Olmesartan-induced enteropathy mimics celiac disease clinically and pathologically. As in celiac disease, the pathologic findings are villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. Clinical presentation of olmesartan-induced enteropathy includes diarrhea, weight loss, and nausea. In contrast to celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase is not elevated and there is no response to a gluten-free diet. Including this entity in the differential diagnosis of sprue-like enteropathy is critical for its early diagnosis since replacing olmesartan with an alternative antihypertensive drug can simplify the diagnostic workup and provide both clinical and histologic improvement. PMID:28289500

  11. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3+CD4−CD8− T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient. PMID:27979843

  12. Unexplained lymphadenopathies: autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Leal-Seabra, Fatima; Costa, Gonçalo Sarmento; Coelho, Henrique Pereira; Oliveira, Agripino

    2016-12-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterised by massive enlargement of the lymphoid organs, autoimmune cytopenias and a predisposition to develop lymphoid malignancies. The basic defect is a disturbance of the lymphocyte apoptosis, and a high number of circulating TCRab CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T-cells (double-negative T cells (DNT cells)). We describe a case of a 41-year-old man with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, multiple lymphadenopathy, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Peripheral blood immunophenotyping revealed elevation of the characteristic DNT cells in 8% and high levels of interleukin 10. Histopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed lymphadenitis with paracortical hyperplasia. It was assumed as a probable diagnosis of ALPS, and the procedure was to medicate the patient with steroids. As a result, a significant clinical improvement was achieved, and he has been in remission for 2 years. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported in a Portuguese adult patient.

  13. Refractory Adult Primary Autoimmune Neutropenia that Responded to Alemtuzumab.

    PubMed

    Neerukonda, Anu R; Lan, Fengshuo; Gabig, Theodore; Saraya, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary autoimmune neutropenia (P-AIN) is an extremely rare disease. The most effective treatment for primary P-AIN is a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; however, no curative treatment has been reported. We herein report a case of an adult P-AIN patient with a relatively mild medical history (irrespective of the severe neutropenia) who showed a sustained hematological response over seventeen months after the initiation of treatment with subcutaneous Alemtuzumab.

  14. An exotic cause of exudative enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tsourdi, Elena; Heidrich, Felix M.; Winzer, Maria; Röllig, Christoph; Kirsch, Christian; Meinel, Jörn; Baretton, Gustavo B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 50 Final Diagnosis: Exudative enteropathy Symptoms: Abdominal pain • diarrhea • fever • hyponatremia • lymphadenopathy • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Protein-losing enteropathy is a rare cause of hypoproteinemia. Erosive and non-erosive gastrointestinal diseases as well as vascular disorders that result in increased central venous pressure or mesenteric lymphatic obstruction may result in protein loss via the gastrointestinal tract. Case Report: We present the case of a 50-year-old man with protein-losing enteropathy, who had profuse diarrhea, abdominal pain, lymphadenopathy, fever, and a weight loss of 10 kg in the preceding 2 months. Extensive work-up revealed infection with Giardia lamblia. We review clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory findings, and imaging studies, and discuss potential pitfalls in establishing the diagnosis. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this represents one of the few published cases of intestinal giardiasis as a cause of protein-losing enteropathy in an immunocompetent adult. The diagnosis of lambliasis should be based on a combination of stool cultures and serum serology, and in cases of high clinical suspicion, an endoscopy and biopsy of the upper GI tract is recommended. PMID:24883172

  15. Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

    2014-09-07

    The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy.

  16. Efficacy and safety of splenectomy in adult autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Valentina; Rosamilio, Rosa; Ferrara, Idalucia; Seneca, Elisa; Serio, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare hematologic disease, primarily affecting adults or children with immunodeficiency disease. First-line therapy consists of long course of steroids administration, with an early complete response rate (CRr) of 75-80%, but up to 20-30% of patients requires a second-line therapy. Rituximab is the first choice in refractory old AIHA patients, because of its safety and efficacy (early CRr at 80-90% and at 68% at 2-3 years). For this reason, splenectomy is even less chosen as second-line therapy in elderly, even though laparoscopic technique decreased complication and mortality rates. However, splenectomy can be still considered a good therapeutic option with a CRr of 81% at 35.6 months in patients older than 60 year-old, when rituximab administration cannot be performed. PMID:28352823

  17. [Protein-losing enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    2017-01-01

    Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a rare complication of intestinal diseases. Its main manifestation is hypoproteinemic edema. The diagnosis of PLE is based on the verification of protein loss into the intestinal lumen, by determining fecal α1-antitrypsin concentration and clearance. The localization of the affected colonic segment is clarified using radiologic and endoscopic techniques. The mainstay of treatment for PLE is a fat-free diet enriched with medium-chain triglycerides. Surgical resection of the affected segment of the colon may be the treatment of choice for severe hypoproteinemia resistant to drug therapy.

  18. Coeliac disease in endocrine diseases of autoimmune origin.

    PubMed

    Miśkiewicz, Piotr; Kępczyńska-Nyk, Anna; Bednarczuk, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Coeliac disease (CD, sometimes called gluten-sensitive enteropathy or nontropical sprue) is an inflammatory disorder of the small intestine of autoimmune origin. It occurs in genetically predisposed people and is induced by a gluten protein, which is a component of wheat. The prevalence of histologically confirmed CD is estimated in screening studies of adults in the United States and Europe to be between 0.2% and 1.0%. The results of previous studies have indicated that the prevalence of CD is increased in patients with other autoimmune disorders such as: autoimmune thyroid diseases, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and Addison's disease. A coincidence of the above diseases constitutes autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS). The high prevalence of CD in APS is probably due to the common genetic predisposition to the coexistent autoimmune diseases. The majority of adult patients have the atypical or silent type of the disease. This is the main reason why CD so often goes undiagnosed or the diagnosis is delayed. CD, if undiagnosed and untreated, is associated with many medical disorders including haematological (anaemia), metabolical (osteopenia/osteoporosis), obstetric-gynaecological (infertility, spontaneous abortions, late puberty, early menopause), neurological (migraine, ataxia, epilepsy) as well as with an increased risk of malignancy, especially: enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, small intestine adenocarcinoma, and oesophageal and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Early introduction of a gluten-free diet and lifelong adherence to this treatment decreases the risk of these complications.

  19. Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Valmore; Aparicio, Daniel; Colmenares, Carlos; Peñaranda, Lianny; Luti, Yettana; Gotera, Daniela; Rojas, Joselyn; Cabrera, Mayela; Reyna, Nadia; Velasco, Manuel; Israili, Zafar H

    2010-01-01

    Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA) is an autoimmune endocrine disorder in which despite the presence of antipancreatic islets antibodies in the moment of diagnostics, the progression to beta-cell secretory insufficiency is slow. It is often confused with others types of diabetes and therefore the management is frequently inadequate. We report a clinical case of a 23-year-old man with diagnosis of type 2 diabetes since 6 months ago, poorly controlled with a sulfonylurea, who initially presented 2 months ago from polyuria, polydipsia, and asthenia and 6 kg weight loss. History of past illness was negative, however, his mother relates exclusive breastfeeding during the first 15 days of life and later (until the 6 months) he was fed with infant formula (S-26). Family history revealed a first-degree relative (father) with diabetes mellitus secondary to steroid administration due to diagnosis of bone marrow hypoplasia. Also presents second-degree family history (uncle and grandfather) of type 2 diabetes mellitus. There were no pathologic findings at the physical examination. Anthropometry and laboratory tests were as follows: body mass index (BMI) = 19.66 kg/m, basal and postprandial glycemia = 108, and 276 mg/dL respectively, glycated haemoglobin = 8.9%, basal and postprandial C-peptide (2 hours) = 1.9, and 3.2 ng/mL, homeostasis model assessment of beta cell function: 87.5%, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance: 1.6. LADA presumptive diagnosis was confirmed with presence of autoantibodies anti-tyrosin-phosphatase and GAD65. At the time of diagnosis, individuals with LADA present an onset age <50, BMI <25 kg/m2, low magnitude postprandial and basal hyperglycemia, normal or close to normal C-peptide values, and thus not occur with acute hyperglycemic crises. Insulin therapy preserves pancreatic b-cell function, at the point that eventually prescribed insulin doses need to be reduced.

  20. Celiac Disease and Dermatologic Manifestations: Many Skin Clue to Unfold Gluten-Sensitive Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Caproni, Marzia; Bonciolini, Veronica; D'Errico, Antonietta; Antiga, Emiliano; Fabbri, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of intestinal diseases are increasingly reported both in the adult and in the children, and this association cannot longer be considered a simple random. Besides the well-known association between celiac disease (CD) and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), considered as the cutaneous manifestation of gluten-dependent enteropathy, is more frequently reported also the association with other mucocutaneous diseases. Among these there are both autoimmune, allergic, and inflammatory diseases, but also a more heterogeneous group called miscellaneous. The knowledge about pathogenic, epidemiological, clinical, and diagnostic aspects of CD is increasing in recent years as well as those about DH, but some aspects still remain to be defined, in particular the possible pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the association between both CD and DH and CD and other immunological skin diseases. The aim of this paper is to describe the skin diseases frequently associated with CD, distinguishing them from those which have a relationship probably just coincidental. PMID:22693492

  1. How I treat autoimmune hemolytic anemias in adults.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Klaus; Jäger, Ulrich

    2010-09-16

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a heterogeneous disease with respect to the type of the antibody involved and the absence or presence of an underlying condition. Treatment decisions should be based on careful diagnostic evaluation. Primary warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to steroids, but most patients remain steroid-dependent, and many require second-line treatment. Currently, splenectomy can be regarded as the most effective and best-evaluated second-line therapy, but there are still only limited data on long-term efficacy and adverse effects. The monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab is another second-line therapy with documented short-term efficacy, but there is limited information on long-term efficacy and side effects. The efficacy of immunosuppressants is poorly evaluated. Primary cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemias respond well to rituximab but are resistant to steroids and splenectomy. The most common causes of secondary autoimmune hemolytic anemias are malignancies, immune diseases, or drugs. They may be treated in a way similar to primary autoimmune hemolytic anemias, by immunosuppressants or by treatment of the underlying disease.

  2. [Zinc and chronic enteropathies].

    PubMed

    Giorgi, P L; Catassi, C; Guerrieri, A

    1984-01-01

    In recent years the nutritional importance of zinc has been well established; its deficiency and its symptoms have also been recognized in humans. Furthermore, Acrodermatitis Enteropathica has been isolated, a rare but severe disease, of which skin lesions, chronic diarrhoea and recurring infections are the main symptoms. The disease is related to the malfunctioning of intestinal absorption of zinc and can be treated by administering pharmacological doses of zinc orally. Good dietary sources of zinc are meat, fish and, to a less extent, human milk. The amount of zinc absorbed in the small intestine is influenced by other nutrients: some compounds inhibit this process (dietary fiber, phytate) while others (picolinic acid, citric acid), referred to as Zn-binding ligands (ZnBL) facilitate it. Citric acid is thought to be the ligand which accounts for the high level of bioavailability of zinc in human milk. zinc absorption occurs throughout the small intestine, not only in the prossimal tract (duodenum and jejunum) but also in the distal tract (ileum). Diarrhoea is one of the clinical manifestations of zinc deficiency, thus many illnesses distinguished by chronic diarrhoea entail a bad absorption of zinc. In fact, in some cases of chronic enteropathies in infants, like coeliac disease and seldom cystic fibrosis, a deficiency of zinc has been isolated. Some of the symptoms of Crohn's disease, like retarded growth and hypogonadism, have been related to hypozinchemia which is present in this illness. Finally, it is possible that some of the dietary treatments frequently used for persistent post-enteritis diarrhoea (i.e. cow's milk exclusion, abuse and misuse of dietary fiber like carrot and carub powder, use of soy formula) can constitute a scarce supply of zinc and therefore could promote the persistency of diarrhoea itself.

  3. Risk of venous thromboembolism among hospitalizations of adults with selected autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Hussain R; Hooper, W Craig; Beckman, Michele G; Zhang, Qing C; Tsai, James; Ortel, Thomas L

    2014-10-01

    Previous research has suggested autoimmune diseases are risk factors for developing venous thromboembolism (VTE). We assessed whether having diagnoses of selected autoimmune diseases associated with antiphospholipid antibodies--autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)--were associated with having a VTE diagnosis among US adult hospitalizations. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. VTE and autoimmune diseases were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification coded diagnoses information. The percentages of hospitalizations with a VTE diagnosis among all non-maternal adult hospitalizations without any of the four autoimmune diseases of interest and among those with AIHA, ITP, RA, and SLE diagnoses were 2.28, 4.46, 3.35, 2.65 and 2.77%, respectively. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) for having a diagnosis of VTE among non-maternal adult hospitalizations with diagnoses of AIHA, ITP, RA, and SLE were 1.25 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.49], 1.20 (95% CI 1.07-1.34), 1.17 (95% CI 1.13-1.21), and 1.23 (95% CI 1.15-1.32), respectively, when compared to those without the corresponding conditions. The adjusted OR for a diagnosis of VTE associated with a diagnosis of any of the four autoimmune diseases was 1.20 (95% CI 1.16-1.24). The presence of a diagnosis of AIHA, ITP, RA, and SLE was associated with an increased likelihood of having a VTE diagnosis among the group of all non-maternal adult hospitalizations.

  4. Autoimmune diabetes not requiring insulin at diagnosis (latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult): definition, characterization, and potential prevention.

    PubMed

    Pozzilli, P; Di Mario, U

    2001-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune-mediated destruction of islet insulin-secreting beta-cells. This chronic destructive process is associated with both cellular and humoral immune changes in the peripheral blood that can be detected months or even years before the onset of clinical diabetes. Throughout this prediabetic period, metabolic changes, including altered glucose tolerance and reduced insulin secretion, deteriorate at variable rates and eventually result in clinical diabetes. A fraction of individuals with humoral immunological changes have clinical diabetes that initially is not insulin-requiring. The onset of diabetes in these patients is usually in adult life, and because their diabetes is at least initially not insulin-requiring, they appear clinically to be affected by type 2 diabetes. Such patients probably have the same disease process as patients with type 1 diabetes in that they have similar HLA genetic susceptibility as well as autoantibodies to islet antigens, low insulin secretion, and a higher rate of progression to insulin dependency. These patients are defined as being affected by an autoimmune type of diabetes not requiring insulin at diagnosis, which is also named latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA). Special attention should be paid to diagnose such patients because therapy may influence the speed of progression toward insulin dependency, and in this respect, efforts should be made to protect residual C-peptide secretion. LADA can serve as a model for designing new strategies for prevention of type 1 diabetes but also as a target group for prevention in its own right.

  5. Autoimmune post–herpes simplex encephalitis of adults and teenagers

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Moris, Germán; Cantarín-Extremera, Verónica; Conde, Carlos Enrique; Rostasy, Kevin; Erro, Maria Elena; Portilla-Cuenca, Juan Carlos; Turón-Viñas, Eulàlia; Málaga, Ignacio; Muñoz-Cabello, Beatriz; Torres-Torres, Carmen; Llufriu, Sara; González-Gutiérrez-Solana, Luis; González, Guillermo; Casado-Naranjo, Ignacio; Rosenfeld, Myrna; Graus, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report 14 patients with immune-mediated relapsing symptoms post–herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and to compare the clinical and immunologic features of the teenage and adult group with those of young children. Methods: Prospective observational study of patients diagnosed between June 2013 and February 2015. Immunologic techniques have been reported previously. Results: Among the teenage and adult group (8 patients, median age 40 years, range 13–69; 5 male), 3 had an acute symptom presentation suggesting a viral relapse, and 5 a presentation contiguous with HSE suggesting a recrudescence of previous deficits. Seven patients developed severe psychiatric/behavioral symptoms disrupting all social interactions, and one refractory status epilepticus. Blepharospasm occurred in one patient. Five patients had CSF antibodies against NMDA receptor (NMDAR) and 3 against unknown neuronal cell surface proteins. In 5/6 patients, the brain MRI showed new areas of contrast enhancement that decreased after immunotherapy and clinical improvement. Immunotherapy was useful in 7/7 patients, sometimes with impressive recoveries, returning to their baseline HSE residual deficits. Compared with the 6 younger children (median age 13 months, range 6–20, all with NMDAR antibodies), the teenagers and adults were less likely to develop choreoathetosis (0/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and decreased level of consciousness (2/8 vs 6/6, p < 0.01) and had longer delays in diagnosis and treatment (interval relapse/antibody testing 85 days, range 17–296, vs 4 days, range 0–33, p = 0.037). Conclusion: In teenagers and adults, the immune-mediated relapsing syndrome post-HSE is different from that known in young children as choreoathetosis post-HSE and is underrecognized. Prompt diagnosis is important because immunotherapy can be highly effective. PMID:26491084

  6. Prevalence of coeliac disease among adult patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Farahid, O H; Khawaja, N; Shennak, M M; Batieha, A; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2014-02-11

    The prevalence of coeliac disease among patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism has not been studied before in Jordan and other Arab countries. A cross-sectional record-based review was made of all adult autoimmune hypothyroidism patients who attended a referral centre in Jordan, during an 8-month period. Coeliac disease in these patients was diagnosed by the attending physician based on positive serological tests for anti-endomysial antibodies IgA and IgG followed by duodenal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Of 914 patients recruited, 117 (12.8%) were seropositive for coeliac disease. Of 87 seropositive patients who underwent duodenal biopsy, 39 had positive histological findings of coeliac disease (44.8%). Extrapolating from these findings the overall rate of coeliac disease among autoimmune hypothyroidism patients was estimated to be 5.7%. In multivariate logistic regression coeliac disease was significantly associated with older age (> 40 years), presence of other autoimmune diseases, vitamin B12 deficiency and anaemia.

  7. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults: definition, prevalence, beta-cell function, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Stenström, Gunnar; Gottsäter, Anders; Bakhtadze, Ekaterine; Berger, Bo; Sundkvist, Göran

    2005-12-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a disorder in which, despite the presence of islet antibodies at diagnosis of diabetes, the progression of autoimmune beta-cell failure is slow. LADA patients are therefore not insulin requiring, at least during the first 6 months after diagnosis of diabetes. Among patients with phenotypic type 2 diabetes, LADA occurs in 10% of individuals older than 35 years and in 25% below that age. Prospective studies of beta-cell function show that LADA patients with multiple islet antibodies develop beta-cell failure within 5 years, whereas those with only GAD antibodies (GADAs) or only islet cell antibodies (ICAs) mostly develop beta-cell failure after 5 years. Even though it may take up to 12 years until beta-cell failure occurs in some patients, impairments in the beta-cell response to intravenous glucose and glucagon can be detected at diagnosis of diabetes. Consequently, LADA is not a latent disease; therefore, autoimmune diabetes in adults with slowly progressive beta-cell failure might be a more adequate concept. In agreement with proved impaired beta-cell function at diagnosis of diabetes, insulin is the treatment of choice.

  8. Changing aspects of radiation enteropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenstern, L.; Hart, M.; Lugo, D.; Friedman, N.B.

    1985-11-01

    Fifty-two patients with radiation enteropathy secondary to radiation for abdominal or pelvic malignant neoplasms are described. This series (1977 to 1984) is compared with a series of 50 patients from the same institution over an earlier period (1961 to 1977). Intestinal obstruction was the principal complication in both series; 96% of the patients underwent either intestinal resection or anastomotic bypass of the affected segment. Changes that have occurred since the last report are as follows: changes in source of radiation energy (linear accelerator); less evidence of mucosal damage; increased serosal reaction (''serosal peel''); and increased use of elemental diets, parenteral nutrition, and long intestinal tubes in surgical management. Since postoperative radiation injury occurs most frequently in the pelvis, new developments for the exclusion of small bowel from the pelvis during radiation are reviewed. Changes in fractionation of radiation dosage should also be considered in patients with enteric symptoms during radiation therapy.

  9. Intraepithelial lymphocytes, scores, mimickers and challenges in diagnosing gluten-sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease)

    PubMed Central

    Sergi, Consolato; Shen, Fan; Bouma, Gerd

    2017-01-01

    The upper digestive tract is routinely scoped for several causes of malabsorption, and the number of duodenal biopsy specimens has increased notably in the last 10 years. Gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE) is an autoimmune disease, which shows an increasing prevalence worldwide and requires a joint clinico-pathological approach. The classical histopathology of GSE with partial or total villous blunting is well recognized, but the classification of GSE is not straightforward. Moreover, several mimickers of GSE with intraepithelial lymphocytosis have been identified in the last 20 years, with drug interactions and medical comorbidities adding to the conundrum. In this review, we report on the normal duodenal mucosa, the clinical presentation and laboratory diagnosis of GSE, the duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytes and immunophenotype of GSE-associated lymphocytes, the GSE mimickers, the differences “across oceans” among guidelines in diagnosing GSE, and the use of a synoptic report for reporting duodenal biopsies in both children and adults in the 21st century. PMID:28216964

  10. [Autoimmune hepatitis/primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome in adults: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Santos, Oscar Mauricio; Muñoz Ortiz, Edison; Pérez, Camilo; Restrepo, Juan Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Overlap syndromes are cases of liver diseases that share clinical, serological, histological and radiological criteria of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). No definitions have been fully established and therefore there is no solid evidence on the diagnosis and treatment. This article presents the cases of three adult patients with overlapping features of AIH and PSC. Orthotopic liver transplantation was considered the best therapeutic alternative due to advanced disease progression in one patient, while medical treatment was provided in the remaining two patients.

  11. Gestational Hypothyroidism Increases the Severity of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Albornoz, Eduardo A.; Carreño, Leandro J.; Cortes, Claudia M.; Gonzalez, Pablo A.; Cisternas, Pablo A.; Cautivo, Kelly M.; Catalán, Tamara P.; Opazo, M. Cecilia; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Berman, Joan W.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Maternal thyroid hormones play a fundamental role in appropriate fetal development during gestation. Offspring that have been gestated under maternal hypothyroidism suffer cognitive impairment. Thyroid hormone deficiency during gestation can significantly impact the central nervous system by altering the migration, differentiation, and function of neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. Given that gestational hypothyroidism alters the immune cell ratio in offspring, it is possible that this condition could result in higher sensitivity for the development of autoimmune diseases. Methods: Adult mice gestated under hypothyroidism were induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Twenty-one days after EAE induction, the disease score, myelin content, immune cell infiltration, and oligodendrocyte death were evaluated. Results: We observed that mice gestated under hypothyroidism showed higher EAE scores after disease induction during adulthood compared to mice gestated in euthyroidism. In addition, spinal cord sections of mice gestated under hypothyroidism that suffered EAE in adulthood showed higher demyelination, CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration, and increased oligodendrocyte death. Conclusions: These results show for the first time that a deficiency in maternal thyroid hormones during gestation can influence the outcome of a central nervous system inflammatory disease, such as EAE, in their offspring. These data strongly support evaluating thyroid hormones in pregnant women and treating hypothyroidism during pregnancy to prevent increased susceptibility to inflammatory diseases in the central nervous system of offspring. PMID:23777566

  12. Implanting Glass Spinal Cord Windows in Adult Mice with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Fenrich, Keith K.; Weber, Pascal; Rougon, Genevieve; Debarbieux, Franck

    2013-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in adult rodents is the standard experimental model for studying autonomic demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here we present a low-cost and reproducible glass window implantation protocol that is suitable for intravital microscopy and studying the dynamics of spinal cord cytoarchitecture with subcellular resolution in live adult mice with EAE. Briefly, we surgically expose the vertebrae T12-L2 and construct a chamber around the exposed vertebrae using a combination of cyanoacrylate and dental cement. A laminectomy is performed from T13 to L1, and a thin layer of transparent silicone elastomer is applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed spinal cord. A modified glass cover slip is implanted over the exposed spinal cord taking care that the glass does not directly contact the spinal cord. To reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells between the window and spinal cord, anti-inflammatory treatment is administered every 2 days (as recommended by ethics committee) for the first 10 days after implantation. EAE is induced only 2-3 weeks after the cessation of anti-inflammatory treatment. Using this approach we successfully induced EAE in 87% of animals with implanted windows and, using Thy1-CFP-23 mice (blue axons in dorsal spinal cord), quantified axonal loss throughout EAE progression. Taken together, this protocol may be useful for studying the recruitment of various cell populations as well as their interaction dynamics, with subcellular resolution and for extended periods of time. This intravital imaging modality represents a valuable tool for developing therapeutic strategies to treat autoimmune demyelinating diseases such as EAE. PMID:24378439

  13. Implanting glass spinal cord windows in adult mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fenrich, Keith K; Weber, Pascal; Rougon, Genevieve; Debarbieux, Franck

    2013-12-21

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in adult rodents is the standard experimental model for studying autonomic demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Here we present a low-cost and reproducible glass window implantation protocol that is suitable for intravital microscopy and studying the dynamics of spinal cord cytoarchitecture with subcellular resolution in live adult mice with EAE. Briefly, we surgically expose the vertebrae T12-L2 and construct a chamber around the exposed vertebrae using a combination of cyanoacrylate and dental cement. A laminectomy is performed from T13 to L1, and a thin layer of transparent silicone elastomer is applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed spinal cord. A modified glass cover slip is implanted over the exposed spinal cord taking care that the glass does not directly contact the spinal cord. To reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells between the window and spinal cord, anti-inflammatory treatment is administered every 2 days (as recommended by ethics committee) for the first 10 days after implantation. EAE is induced only 2-3 weeks after the cessation of anti-inflammatory treatment. Using this approach we successfully induced EAE in 87% of animals with implanted windows and, using Thy1-CFP-23 mice (blue axons in dorsal spinal cord), quantified axonal loss throughout EAE progression. Taken together, this protocol may be useful for studying the recruitment of various cell populations as well as their interaction dynamics, with subcellular resolution and for extended periods of time. This intravital imaging modality represents a valuable tool for developing therapeutic strategies to treat autoimmune demyelinating diseases such as EAE.

  14. Involvement of heat shock proteins in gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sziksz, Erna; Pap, Domonkos; Veres, Gábor; Fekete, Andrea; Tulassay, Tivadar; Vannay, Ádám

    2014-06-07

    Gluten-sensitive enteropathy, also known as coeliac disease (CD), is an autoimmune disorder occurring in genetically susceptible individuals that damages the small intestine and interferes with the absorption of other nutrients. As it is triggered by dietary gluten and related prolamins present in wheat, rye and barley, the accepted treatment for CD is a strict gluten-free diet. However, a complete exclusion of gluten-containing cereals from the diet is often difficult, and new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. A class of proteins that have already emerged as drug targets for other autoimmune diseases are the heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are highly conserved stress-induced chaperones that protect cells against harmful extracellular factors. HSPs are expressed in several tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, and their levels are significantly increased under stress circumstances. HSPs exert immunomodulatory effects, and also play a crucial role in the maintenance of epithelial cell structure and function, as they are responsible for adequate protein folding, influence the degradation of proteins and cell repair processes after damage, and modulate cell signalling, cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present review discusses the involvement of HSPs in the pathophysiology of CD. Furthermore, HSPs may represent a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of CD due to the cytoprotective, immunomodulatory, and anti-apoptotic effects in the intestinal mucosal barrier.

  15. Effects of autoimmune NGF deprivation in the adult rabbit and offspring.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E M; Gorin, P D; Osborne, P A; Rydel, R E; Pearson, J

    1982-05-20

    An experimental autoimmune approach to the production of nerve growth factor deprivation, which we have previously described in the rat and guinea pig, has been applied to the rabbit. This species was chosen for study because of several potential advantages. The rabbit produces large litters and has a relatively short gestation period. More importantly, rabbits generate high titers of antibody against mouse NGF and large amounts of maternal antibody are passively transferred to the developing rabbit fetus compared to most other species, particularly the rat. The sympathetic nervous system of adult rabbit immunized against mouse NGF underwent degeneration with up to an 85% decrease in neuronal numbers in the superior cervical ganglion after 10 months of immunization, thus providing further evidence that NGF is required for the survival of mature sympathetic neurons. Despite the fact that newborn rabbits born to anti-NGF producing mothers had much higher titers of anti-NGF than did rats, the effects on the developing sympathetic and sensory nervous systems were not found to be any greater than in rats. Reductions in norepinephrine levels in the heart and spleen of adult rabbits born to anti-NGF producing mothers were greater than in small intestine. Prenatal exposure to maternal anti-NGF caused reductions (up to 70%) in the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. Substance-P immunoreactivity was reduced in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord of rabbit exposed to maternal anti-NGF. These changes, however, were not greater than seen in the rat. We conclude that although the rabbits offers some advantage in the study of the effects of NGF deprivation in the adult animal, it appears less well suited than the rat or guinea pig to the study of the effects of NGF deprivation on development.

  16. Sprue-like enteropathy due to olmesartan.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Muñoz, Cándido; López-Vivancos, Josefa; Huaman, Walter; García-Cors, Montserrat

    2015-10-01

    A case of spue-like enteropathy due to olmesartan is reported to draw attention to this disease, given the high frequency of use of this drug and the difficulty of diagnosis if the entity if it is not known. In his journal one case was published as Clinical Note in 2014 and we wish to emphasize the importance of knowledge about this relatively new entity.

  17. Environmental Enteropathy: Critical implications of a poorly understood condition

    PubMed Central

    Korpe, Poonum S.; Petri, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental enteropathy (also called tropical enteropathy) is a subclinical condition caused by constant fecal-oral contamination and resulting in blunting of intestinal villi and intestinal inflammation. Although these histological changes were discovered decades ago, the clinical impact of environmental enteropathy is just starting to be recognized. The failure of nutritional interventions and oral vaccines in the developing world may be attributed to environmental enteropathy, as the intestinal absorptive and immunologic functions are significantly deranged. Here we review the existing literature and examine potential mechanisms of pathogenesis for this poorly understood condition. PMID:22633998

  18. The role of rituximab in adults with warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dierickx, Daan; Kentos, Alain; Delannoy, André

    2015-05-21

    Warm antibody hemolytic anemia is the most common form of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. When therapy is needed, corticosteroids remain the cornerstone of initial treatment but are able to cure only a minority of patients (<20%). Splenectomy is usually proposed when a second-line therapy is needed. This classical approach is now challenged by the use of rituximab both as second-line and as first-line therapy. Second-line treatment with rituximab leads to response rates similar to splenectomy (∼70%), but rituximab-induced responses seem less sustained. However, additional courses of rituximab are most often followed by responses, at the price of reasonable toxicity. In some major European centers, rituximab is now the preferred second-line therapy of warm antibody hemolytic anemia in adults, although no prospective study convincingly supports this attitude. A recent randomized study strongly suggests that in first-line treatment, rituximab combined with steroids is superior to monotherapy with steroids. If this finding is confirmed, rituximab will emerge as a major component of the management of warm antibody hemolytic anemia not only after relapse but as soon as treatment is needed.

  19. Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zettl, Andreas; deLeeuw, Ron; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Mueller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad

    2007-05-01

    Session 7 of the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop was devoted to case presentations and discussion of enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and other T-cell lymphomas involving the gastrointestinal tract. ETL is a rare type of T-cell lymphoma, often associated with a history of celiac disease, that usually arises in the jejunum but can involve other gastrointestinal tract sites (eg, stomach and colon). As the cases submitted illustrate, there are 2 histologic groups of ETL that correlate with clinical and immunophenotypic features. Pleomorphic-anaplastic ETL is usually associated with a history of celiac disease and histologic evidence of enteropathy and is most often CD56-. Monomorphic ETL often occurs without a history of celiac disease, has variable histologic evidence of enteropathy, and is usually CD56+. Comparative genomic hybridization has shown recurrent chromosomal gains and losses that are characteristic of ETL and uncommon in other T-cell lymphomas, providing useful ancillary data for the diagnosis of ETL.

  20. Clinical spectrum associated with MOG autoimmunity in adults: significance of sharing rodent MOG epitopes.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Maria; Armangue, Thaís; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Arrambide, Georgina; Sola-Valls, Nuria; Sabater, Lidia; Téllez, Nieves; Midaglia, Luciana; Ariño, Helena; Peschl, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Blanco, Yolanda; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc; Saiz, Albert

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to report the clinical spectrum associated with antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in adult patients, and to assess whether phenotypic variants are dependent on recognition of rodent MOG epitopes. We retrospectively analyzed the features, course and outcome of 56 patients whose samples were investigated by brain tissue immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays using human and rodent MOG. The median age at symptom onset was 37 years (range 18-70); 35 patients (63 %) were female. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 4-554), only 14 patients (25 %) developed a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), 27 patients (47 %) retained the initial diagnosis of isolated optic neuritis, 7 (12 %) of longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis, and 2 (4 %) of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis; 6 patients (11 %) developed atypical demyelinating syndromes (4 had relapsing episodes of short myelitis lesions which in one occurred with optic neuritis; 1 had relapsing brainstem symptoms, and 1 relapsing demyelinating encephalomyelitis). The course was frequently associated with relapses (71 %) and good outcome. Twenty-seven patients (49 %) had antibodies that recognized rodent MOG epitopes, and 9 of them (16 %) showed a myelin staining pattern in rodent tissue. Only the myelin staining pattern was linked to NMOSD (p = 0.005). In conclusion, MOG autoimmunity in adult patients associates with a clinical spectrum wider than the one expected for patients with suspected NMOSD and overall good outcome. Antibodies to rodent MOG epitopes do not associate with any phenotypic variant.

  1. Prevalence of food-responsive enteropathy among dogs with chronic enteropathy in Japan

    PubMed Central

    KAWANO, Koji; SHIMAKURA, Hidekatsu; NAGATA, Noriyuki; MASASHI, Yuki; SUTO, Akemi; SUTO, Yukinori; UTO, Shohei; UENO, Hiromichi; HASEGAWA, Takehiro; USHIGUSA, Takahiro; NAGAI, Takashi; ARAWATARI, Yasunori; MIYAJI, Kazuki; OHMORI, Keitaro; MIZUNO, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    There have been limited reports on the prevalence of adverse food reactions among dogs suffering from chronic enteropathy (CE) in Japan. We examined the prevalence and histological features of food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) in a total of 32 dogs with history of CE. Fourteen of 18 cases (56.2%) diagnosed as FRE had lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis or eosinophilic enteritis by histopathological examination. Characteristic histopathological changes indicating FRE were not identified in 18 cases, though 4 cases did not show any abnormalities. Results collected from this study provided important information that can help to change the way dogs with CE are treated in the future. PMID:27150023

  2. Diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency in adults.

    PubMed

    Lambotte, Olivier; Neven, Bénédicte; Galicier, Lionel; Magerus-Chatinet, Aude; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Hermine, Olivier; Meyts, Isabelle; Picard, Capucine; Godeau, Bertrand; Fischer, Alain; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    A diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency during adulthood is unusual. We analyzed 17 cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome caused by FAS deficiency diagnosed during adulthood in French reference centers for hereditary immunodeficiencies and for immune cytopenias. Twelve of the 17 patients had developed their first symptoms during childhood. The diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome had been delayed for a variety of reasons, including unusual clinical manifestations, late referral to a reference center, and the occurrence of somatic FAS mutations. The 5 other patients presented their first symptoms after the age of 16 years. In these patients, three germline heterozygous FAS mutations were predicted to be associated with haploinsufficiency and a somatic event on the second FAS allele was observed in 2 cases. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome may well be diagnosed in adulthood. The occurrence of additional genetic events may account for the delayed disease onset.

  3. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholangitis Wilson Disease Liver Disease A-Z Autoimmune Hepatitis What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ... bacteria, viruses, toxins, and medications. What causes autoimmune hepatitis? A combination of autoimmunity, environmental triggers, and a ...

  4. Altered natural killer (NK) cell frequency and phenotype in latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) prior to insulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Akesson, C; Uvebrant, K; Oderup, C; Lynch, K; Harris, R A; Lernmark, A; Agardh, C-D; Cilio, C M

    2010-07-01

    Approximately 10% of the patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have detectable serum levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 autoantibodies (GADA). These patients usually progress to insulin dependency within a few years, and are classified as being latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). A decrease in the frequency of peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells has been reported recently in recent-onset T1D and in high-risk individuals prior to the clinical onset. As NK cells in LADA patients have been investigated scarcely, the aim of this study was to use multicolour flow cytometry to define possible deficiencies or abnormalities in the frequency or activation state of NK cells in LADA patients prior to insulin dependency. All patients were GADA-positive and metabolically compensated, but none were insulin-dependent at the time blood samples were taken. LADA patients exhibited a significant decrease in NK cell frequency in peripheral blood compared to healthy individuals (P=0.0018), as reported previously for recent-onset T1D patients. Interestingly, NKG2D expression was increased significantly (P<0.0001), whereas killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)3DL1 expression was decreased (P<0.0001) within the NK cell population. These observations highlight a defect in both frequency and activation status of NK cells in LADA patients and suggest that this immunological alteration may contribute to the development of autoimmune diabetes by affecting peripheral tolerance. Indeed, recent evidence has demonstrated a regulatory function for NK cells in autoimmunity. Moreover, the decrease in NK cell number concords with observations obtained in recent-onset T1D, implying that similar immunological dysfunctions may contribute to the progression of both LADA and T1D.

  5. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options.

  6. Environmental and NSAID-enteropathy: dysbiosis as a common factor.

    PubMed

    Syer, Stephanie D; Wallace, John L

    2014-03-01

    At first sight, environmental enteropathy and NSAID enteropathy may appear to have little in common. One occurs almost exclusively in poor countries and the other primarily in rich countries. One is the consequence of unhygienic living conditions, while the other is a consequence of use of a drug for relief of pain and inflammation. However, there may be a common pathogenic link between these two conditions, namely a significant alteration in the microbiome (dysbiosis), and this raises the possibility of common approaches to treatment. Correction of the dysbiosis that is central to the intestinal tissue injury and dysfunction observed in environmental and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced enteropathies is a logical approach to bringing about restoration of intestinal function. For both conditions, removal of the trigger for dysbiosis is the simplest approach, but is not always feasible. Correcting the underlying dysbiosis through the use of probiotics or prebiotics may be a viable option.

  7. Severe apoptotic enteropathy caused by methotrexate treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Toquet, Ségolène; Nguyen, Yohan; Sabbagh, Adel; Djerada, Zoubir; Boulagnon, Camille; Bani-Sadr, Firouzé

    2016-03-01

    The folic acid antagonist methotrexate is a cornerstone treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Its use is limited chiefly by gastrointestinal toxicity, which is among the main reasons for methotrexate discontinuation. Here, we report the case of a 40-year-old man on chronic methotrexate therapy in whom life-threatening apoptotic enteropathy with watery diarrhea and hypovolemic shock developed after he was switched from the oral to the intramuscular route, with no change in dosage. Colonic biopsies suggested drug-induced colitis, showing a nonspecific, mildly inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes and plasma cells, dilated damaged crypts, and a marked increase in basal crypt apoptosis (>20 apoptotic bodies/100 crypts). Clinicians should be aware that methotrexate can cause life-threatening apoptotic enteropathy. Increased basal crypt apoptosis in colonic biopsies with more than 5 apoptotic bodies/100 crypts should routinely suggest drug-induced enteropathy.

  8. Endomicroscopic and Transcriptomic Analysis of Impaired Barrier Function and Malabsorption in Environmental Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Besa, Ellen; Zyambo, Kanekwa; Louis-Auguste, John; Lees, James; Banda, Themba; Soko, Rose; Banda, Rosemary; Amadi, Beatrice; Watson, Alastair

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Environmental enteropathy (EE) is associated with growth failure, micronutrient malabsorption and impaired responses to oral vaccines. We set out to define cellular mechanisms of impaired barrier function in EE and explore protective mechanisms. Methods We studied 49 adults with environmental enteropathy in Lusaka, Zambia using confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE); histology, immunohistochemistry and mRNA sequencing of small intestinal biopsies; and correlated these with plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a zinc uptake test. Results CLE images (median 134 for each study) showed virtually ubiquitous small intestinal damage. Epithelial defects, imaged by histology and claudin 4 immunostaining, were predominantly seen at the tips of villi and corresponded with leakage imaged in vivo by CLE. In multivariate analysis, circulating log-transformed LPS was correlated with cell shedding events (β = 0.83; P = 0.035) and with serum glucagon-like peptide-2 (β = -0.13; P = 0.007). Zinc uptake from a test dose of 25mg was attenuated in 30/47 (64%) individuals and in multivariate analysis was reduced by HIV, but positively correlated with GLP-2 (β = 2.72; P = 0.03). There was a U-shaped relationship between circulating LPS and villus surface area. Transcriptomic analysis identified 23 differentially expressed genes in severe enteropathy, including protective peptides and proteins. Conclusions Confocal endomicroscopy, claudin 4 immunostaining and histology identify epithelial defects which are probably sites of bacterial translocation, in the presence of which increased epithelial surface area increases the burden of translocation. GLP 2 and other protective peptides may play an important role in mucosal protection in EE. PMID:27050312

  9. Olmesartan-induced Enteropathy Manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Takanori; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Shingo; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Hideki; Ikegami, Akiko; Hirota, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Cases of sprue-like enteropathy associated with olmesartan have sporadically been encountered since it was first reported in 2012, and their most characteristic manifestation is severe diarrhea. We herein report the first case of sprue-like enteropathy manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome due to vitamin B1 malabsorption with only minimally increased bowel movements. When patients are receiving olmesartan and they complain of nonspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, it is important to consider changing the drugs before any serious malabsorption syndrome develops. PMID:27980272

  10. Olmesartan-induced Enteropathy Manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Takanori; Ikusaka, Masatomi; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Noda, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Shingo; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Hideki; Ikegami, Akiko; Hirota, Yusuke

    Cases of sprue-like enteropathy associated with olmesartan have sporadically been encountered since it was first reported in 2012, and their most characteristic manifestation is severe diarrhea. We herein report the first case of sprue-like enteropathy manifesting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome due to vitamin B1 malabsorption with only minimally increased bowel movements. When patients are receiving olmesartan and they complain of nonspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, it is important to consider changing the drugs before any serious malabsorption syndrome develops.

  11. Relationship between autoantibodies combination, metabolic syndrome components and diabetic complications in autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    PubMed

    Blaslov, Kristina; Bulum, Tomislav; Knežević-Ćuća, Jadranka; Duvnjak, Lea

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to establish the possible association between double or triple antibody positivity and latent autoimmune diabetes (LADA) phenotype in the context of metabolic syndrome (MS) prevalence and its individual components. This cross-sectional study population comprised 69 islet cell antibody-positive patients coming for their comprehensive annual review. They were divided into three groups according to antibody positivity. Twenty-five (36.2 %) were male, mean age of 51 years with disease duration of 8 years. Twenty-eight (40.58 %) were positive only for GAD Abs, 26 (37.68 %) were positive for ICA and GAD Abs and 15 (21.74 %) were positive for GAD, ICA, and IA2 Abs. The lowest value of waist circumference, MS, and artherial hypertension prevalence was found in the group positive for all three antibodies. In the multinomial multivariate logistic regression model, MS was negatively associated with triple Abs positivity compared to single Ab positivity and double Abs positivity. Our results highlight the importance of inverse association between simultaneous Abs positivity for ICA, GAD, and IA2 with the MS and its components present in LADA patients. This inverse relationship might implicate that LADA patients are phenotypically closer to T1DM. The contribution of IA2 Ab positivity merits is to be considered in the determination of LADA phenotypes, while its diagnostic value needs to be clarified in future follow-up studies.

  12. Gene/cell therapy approaches for Immune Dysregulation Polyendocrinopathy Enteropathy X-linked syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Laura; Santoni de Sio, Francesca R; Porteus, Matthew H; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Immune dysregulation, Polyendocrinopathy, Enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome is a rare autoimmune disease due to mutations in the gene encoding for Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), a transcription factor fundamental for the function of thymus-derived (t) regulatory T (Treg) cells. The dysfunction of Treg cells results in the development of devastating autoimmune manifestations affecting multiple organs, eventually leading to premature death in infants, if not promptly treated by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Novel gene therapy strategies can be developed for IPEX syndrome as more definitive cure than allogeneic HSCT. Here we describe the therapeutic approaches, alternative to HSCT, currently under development. We described that effector T cells can be converted in regulatory T cells by LV-mediated FOXP3-gene transfer in differentiated T lymphocytes. Despite FOXP3 mutations mainly affect a highly specific T cell subset, manipulation of stem cells could be required for long-term remission of the disease. Therefore, we believe that a more comprehensive strategy should aim at correcting FOXP3-mutated stem cells. Potentials and hurdles of both strategies will be highlighted here.

  13. Increasing Incidence of Enteropathy-associated T Cell Lymphoma in the United States (1973-2008)

    PubMed Central

    Sharaiha, Reem Z.; Lebwohl, Ben; Reimers, Laura; Bhagat, Govind; Green, Peter H.; Neugut, Alfred I.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare lymphoma subtype that is strongly associated with celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disease triggered by the ingestion of gluten. Since CD rates are increasing in the U.S., we sought to determine whether the incidence rates of EATL are increasing as well. Method We identified primary, pathologically confirmed lymphoma cases from the SEER database registries from 1973 to 2008. To ensure capture of all cases of EATL, we included the following lymphoma subtypes, limited to the small bowel: non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NOS) T-cell, Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (NOS), and enteropathy type T-cell lymphoma, and calculated their age and sex-adjusted incidence rates over time. Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves. Results We identified 161 small bowel lymphomas diagnosed between 1973 and 2008. The overall age and sex-adjusted annual incidence for all bowel lymphomas was 0.016 per 100,000, which increased over the study period from 0.006 to 0.024 per 100,000. These tumors were most common in males (age-adjusted incidence rate= 0.021 per 100,000) with the highest incidence rate in Hispanics (age-adjusted incidence rate =0.033 per 100,000). The median overall survival was 7 months. There was no difference in survival by race/ethnicity (p=0.09), or gender (P= 0.06). Conclusion Our results indicate a significant increase in the incidence of EATL in the U.S., which could reflect the increasing seroprevalence of CD and better recognition of rare types of T-cell lymphomas. The incidence may continue to rise given the large ratio of undiagnosed-to-diagnosed individuals with CD in the U.S. PMID:22169928

  14. Overlap of genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    PubMed

    Basile, Kevin J; Guy, Vanessa C; Schwartz, Stanley; Grant, Struan F A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the notion that there is a degree of commonality to the biological etiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), the lack of overlap in the genetic factors underpinning each of them suggests very distinct mechanisms. A disorder considered to be at the "intersection" of these two diseases is "latent autoimmune diabetes in adults" (LADA). Interestingly, genetic signals from both T1D and T2D are also seen in LADA, including the key HLA and transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) loci, but the magnitudes of these effects are more complex than just pointing to LADA as being a simple admixture of T1D and T2D. We review the current status of the understanding of the genetics of LADA and place it in the context of what is known about the genetics of its better-studied "cousins," T1D and T2D, especially with respect to the myriad of discoveries made over the last decade through genome-wide association studies.

  15. Clofazimine Enteropathy: A Rare and Underrecognized Complication of Mycobacterial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Szeto, Winnie; Garcia-Buitrago, Monica T.; Abbo, Lilian; Rosenblatt, Joseph D.; Moshiree, Baharak; Morris, Michele I.

    2016-01-01

    Clofazimine-induced crystal-storing histiocytosis is a rare complication of treatment previously reported in dermatology literature as a complication of leprosy therapy. We report a case of disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus requiring treatment with high-dose oral clofazimine resulting in enteropathy in a patient who presented with abdominal pain, malnutrition, and melena. PMID:27800519

  16. [Tufting enteropathy: a case report, histopathological methodology, and differential diagnoses].

    PubMed

    Bosaleh, Andrea; Contreras, Monica; García de Dávila, María Teresa

    2015-03-01

    Tufting enteropathy (TE), previously known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia, is a rare congenital enteropathy characterized by refractory diarrhea in the neonatal period. It presents clinical and histological heterogeneity and may be associated with birth defects and punctuate keratitis. The causative gene(s) have not yet been identfied making prenatal diagnosis unavailable. Although there are milder phenotypes most require parenteral nutrition for prolonged periods with the risk of complications. TE becomes an indication for intestinal transplantation. We report the case of a 4-month-old male, born full term with a normal weight. The parents consulted because of severe malnutrition and chronic watery diarrhea. Duodenal and rectal biopsy was negative. Because of poor tolerance gastroclysis was changed to parenteral nutrition. The infant had several catheter-related infections and died at 13 months from catheter-associated complications. Histopathological autopsy was performed. The material was fixed in paraffin and studied with routine techniques. PAS and immunohistochemistry for CD10 were performed. We observed villous atrophy with intestinal epithelial dysplasia and disorganization on the surface of epithelial cells resembling tufts in jejunal and ileal tissue. The objective of this study was to present a rare case of neonatal enteropathy, especially TE, describe the methodology used to study the biopsy, and discuss the differential diagnoses. TE is a rare neonatal enteropathy that is difficult to diagnose and manage. Children in whom TE is suspected should be referred to specialized pediatric centers, with the option of intestinal transplantation.

  17. Reduced Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methylation Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults via Regulation of SUV39H2 and KDM4C

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xi-yu

    2017-01-01

    Aims. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is an autoimmune disease of which the mechanism is not clear. Emerging evidence suggests that histone methylation contributes to autoimmunity. Methods. Blood CD4+ T lymphocytes from 26 LADA patients and 26 healthy controls were isolated to detect histone H3 lysine 4 and H3 lysine 9 methylation status. Results. Reduced global H3 lysine 9 methylation was observed in LADA patients' CD4+ T lymphocytes, compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05). H3 lysine 4 methylation was not statistically different. The reduced H3 lysine 9 methylation was associated with GADA titer but not correlated with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). When the LADA patient group was divided into those with complication and those without, relatively reduced global H3 lysine 9 methylation was observed in LADA patients with complication (P < 0.05). The expression of histone methyltransferase SUV39H2 for H3 lysine 9 methylation was downregulated in LADA patients, and the expression of histone demethylase KDM4C which made H3 lysine 9 demethylation was upregulated. Conclusion. The reduction of histone H3 lysine 9 methylation which may due to the downregulation of methyltransferase SUV39H2 and the upregulation of demethylase KDM4C was found in CD4+ T lymphocytes of LADA patients.

  18. When uncommon and common coalesce: adult onset Still's disease associated with breast augmentation as part of autoimmune syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA).

    PubMed

    Dagan, A; Kogan, M; Shoenfeld, Y; Segal, G

    2016-06-01

    Adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is an uncommon, multisystemic, auto-inflammatory disorder, while breast augmentation is a very common cosmetic procedure. We describe a case in which these two coalesce, AOSD, manifested with pleuritis and pericarditis, developed after breast mammoplasty. The pathogenetic, missing link, behind the development of AOSD following mammoplasty, is thought to be the autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). We reviewed other cases of AOSD associated with breast mammoplasty published to date and the literature regarding AOSD and ASIA syndrome. The review is followed by a short debate of whether silicone implants should be explanted in similar, future cases.

  19. Six-year follow-up of pancreatic β cell function in adults with latent autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Huang, Gan; Ouyang, Ling-Li; Li, Xia; Yan, Xiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of the progression of islet β cell function in Chinese latent autoimmune diabetes in adult (LADA) patients with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) positivity, and to explore the prognostic factors for β cell function. METHODS: Forty-five LADA patients with GAD-Ab positivity screened from phenotypic type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients and 45 T2DM patients without GAD-Ab matched as controls were followed-up every 6 mo. Sixteen patients in LADA1 and T2DM1 groups respectively have been followed-up for 6 years, while 29 patients in LADA2 and T2DM2 groups respectively for only 1.5 years. GAD-Ab was determined by radioligand assay, and C-peptides (CP) by radioimmune assay. RESULTS: The percentage of patients whose fasting CP (FCP) decreased more than 50% compared with the baseline reached to 25.0% at 1.5th year in LADA1 group, and FCP level decreased (395.8±71.5 vs 572.8±72.3 pmol/L, P<0.05) at 2.5th year and continuously went down to the end of follow-up. No significant changes of the above parameters were found in T2DM1 group. The average decreased percentages of FCP per year in LADA and T2DM patients were 15.8% (4.0-91.0%) and 5.2% (-3.5 to 35.5%, P = 0.000) respectively. The index of GAD-Ab was negatively correlated with the FCP in LADA patients (rs = -0.483, P = 0.000). The decreased percentage of FCP per year in LADA patients were correlated with GAD-Ab index, body mass index (BMI) and age at onset (rs = 0.408, -0.301 and -0.523 respectively, P<0.05). Moreover, GAD-Ab was the only risk factor for predicting β cell failure in LADA patients (B = 1.455, EXP (B) = 4.283, P = 0.023). CONCLUSION: The decreasing rate of islet β cell function in LADA, being highly heterogeneous, is three times that of T2DM patients. The titer of GAD-Ab is an important predictor for the progression of islet β cell function, and age at onset and BMI could also act as the predictors. PMID:15902725

  20. Immunological changes following protein losing enteropathy after surgery total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) by cytomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, József; Lenz, Dominik; Mittag, Anja; Sauer, Ursula; Wild, Lena; Hess, John; Schranz, Dietmar; Hambsch, Jörg; Schneider, Peter; Tárnok, Attila

    2008-02-01

    Complex immunophenotyping single-cell analysis are essential for systems biology and cytomics. The application of cytomics in immunology and cardiac research and diagnostics is very broad, ranging from the better understanding of the cardiovascular cell biology to the identification of heart function and immune consequences after surgery. TCPC or Fontan-type circulation is an accepted palliative surgery for patients with a functionally univentricular heart. Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), the enteric loss of proteins, is a potential late complication after TCPC surgery. PLE etiology is poorly understood, but immunological factors seem to play a role. This study was aimed to gain insight into immune phenotype alterations following post-TCPC PLE. Patients were studied during routine follow-up up to 5yrs after surgery, blood samples of TCPC patients without (n=21, age 6.8+/-2.6 years at surgery; mean+/-SD) and with manifest PLE (n=12, age 12.8+/- 4.5 years at sampling) and age matched healthy children (control, n=22, age 8.6+/-2.5 years) were collected. Routine laboratory, immune phenotype and serological parameters were determined. Following PLE the immune phenotype dramatically changed with signs of acute inflammation (increased neutrophil and monocyte count, CRP, IL-8). In contrast, lymphocyte count (NK-cells, αβTCR +CD4 +, αβTCR +CD8 + cells) decreased (p<0.001). The residual T-cells had elevated CD25 and CD69 expression. In PLE-patients unique cell populations with CD3 +αβ/γδTCR - and αβTCR +CD4 -8 - phenotype were present in increased frequencies. Our studies show dramatically altered leukocyte phenotype after PLE in TCPC patients. These alterations resemble to changes in autoimmune diseases. We conclude that autoimmune processes may play a role in etiology and pathophysiology of PLE.

  1. Effect of Lactobacillus GG on intestinal integrity in Malawian children at risk of tropical enteropathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical enteropathy is an asymptomatic villous atrophy of the small bowel that is prevalent in the developing world and is associated with altered intestinal function and integrity. The histology of tropical enteropathy resembles that seen in small-bowel bacterial overgrowth. This study tested the...

  2. Distinct clinical and laboratory characteristics of latent autoimmune diabetes in adults in relation to type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Pipi, Elena; Marketou, Marietta; Tsirogianni, Alexandra

    2014-08-15

    Ever since its first appearance among the multiple forms of diabetes, latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA), has been the focus of endless discussions concerning mainly its existence as a special type of diabetes. In this mini-review, through browsing important peer-reviewed publications, (original articles and reviews), we will attempt to refresh our knowledge regarding LADA hoping to enhance our understanding of this controversial diabetes entity. A unique combination of immunological, clinical and metabolic characteristics has been identified in this group of patients, namely persistent islet cell antibodies, high frequency of thyroid and gastric autoimmunity, DR3 and DR4 human leukocyte antigen haplotypes, progressive loss of beta cells, adult disease onset, normal weight, defective glycaemic control, and without tendency to ketoacidosis. Although anthropomorphic measurements are useful as a first line screening, the detection of C-peptide levels and the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibodies is undoubtedly the sine qua non condition for a confirmatory LADA diagnosis. In point of fact, GAD autoantibodies are far from being solely a biomarker and the specific role of these autoantibodies in disease pathogenesis is still to be thoroughly studied. Nevertheless, the lack of diagnostic criteria and guidelines still puzzle the physicians, who struggle between early diagnosis and correct timing for insulin treatment.

  3. [Autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis].

    PubMed

    Dienes, H P

    2005-01-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases encompass autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) as lesions of the biliary tract. The term autoimmune cholangitis has not been generally accepted, so it remains an entitiy waiting for precise definition. AIH is a chronic progressive necroinflammatory liver disease mostly occuring in female individuals and leading to ultimate autodestruction of the liver if not treated. Histopathology of the liver reflects the gerneral understanding of the underlying immune especially self reactive CD4 + T-helper cells mediated mechanisms in destruction of liver cells displaying a typical but by no means pathognomonic histopathological pattern. Since there are no specific and generally valid tests the diagnosis should be confirmed by a scoring system including histopathology. Variants of autoimmune hepatitis cover seronegative cases, acute onset autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune hepatitis with centrilobular necrosis. Differential diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis includes drug induced chronic hepatitis that may mimick autoimmune hepatitis by clinical course and serology. Histopathology may give helpful hints for the correct diagnosis. Autoimmune lesions of the biliary tract are PBC in the first line. The target antigen of the autoimmune response has been identified, natural history of the diseases is well known and histopathology is pathognomonic in about a third of the cases. In clinical practice liver biopsy is taken to exclude other etiologies when AMA is present in the serum, staging the disease at first diagnosis and to establish diagnosis in cases of AMA negativity. The autoimmune nature of PSC has been discussed in the literature ever since the first description and the answer in not settled yet. Histopathology is relevant for the diagnosis in excluding other etiologies and confirming the diagnosis of small duct PSC. The term autoimmune cholangitis has been used to designate AMA-negative PBC

  4. Chronic enteropathy and feeding in children: an update.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Silvia; Hauser, Bruno; Devreker, Thierry; Arrigo, Serena; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2008-01-01

    Enteropathy defines abnormalities of the small intestinal mucosa of various etiologies in which nutrition has a causal or a therapeutic role. Breast milk is the gold-standard feeding during infancy for optimal nutrition in health and the majority of diseases. Therapeutic formulae have decreased the need for enteral or parenteral support. Gastrointestinal infections are worldwide the most frequent cause of enteropathy by increasing mucosal permeability, local expression of costimulatory molecules allowing antigen penetration in the mucosa, and T-cell activation leading sometimes to disruption of oral tolerance. Concomitant malnutrition impairs not only the immunologic response but also the recovery of damaged mucosa with secondary intestinal and pancreatic enzymatic reductions. Optimal nutritional rehabilitation is the cornerstone of the management of persisting diarrhea. Celiac disease and cow's milk protein allergy are examples of chronic enteropathy. Multiple food allergies, even during breast-feeding, are increasingly reported due to an impaired development of oral tolerance. The dietary approach to allergic disease is currently evolving from passive allergen avoidance to active modulation of the immune system to (re)establish tolerance. The gastrointestinal flora provides maturational signals for the lymphoid tissue, improves balance of inflammatory cytokines, reduces bacterial invasiveness and dietary antigen load, and normalizes gut permeability. The clinical effects of nucleotides and zinc merit further clinical evaluation. Major attention has recently focused on the immune effects of dietary lipids in terms of possible prevention of allergic sensitization by downregulating inflammatory response and protecting the epithelial barrier and host-microbe interactions modifying the adherence of microbes to the mucosa.

  5. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if ...

  6. [Protein-losing enteropathy with systemic lupus erythematosus effectively treated with octreotide and medium chain triglyceride diet: A case report].

    PubMed

    Kubo, Makoto; Uchida, Kousuke; Nakashima, Tadaaki; Oda, Seiko; Nakamura, Tomomi; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Watada, Toshiko; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Araki, Jun; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Yano, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    In January 2009, a 62-year-old man presented with diarrhea, leg edema, and thrombopenia and was admitted to our hospital. The past medical history revealed Sjögren's syndrome and autoimmune hepatitis for which he had been administered prednisolone. On admission, a laboratory examination revealed massive hypoalbuminemia and high levels of C-reactive protein and platelet-associated IgG. Anti-double stranded DNA and anti-Sm antibodies were negative. Analysis of the bone marrow aspirate and Tc-99m albumin scintigraphy findings suggested autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) and protein-losing enteropathy (PLE), respectively. We diagnosed him as SLE, because past immunoserological testing had showed positivity for anti-double stranded DNA antibody and LE cells. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy were ineffective. Rituximab was ineffective against PLE but was effective against AITP. Cyclosporine and Cyclophosphamide were ineffective against PLE. Subcutaneous injection of 200-μg octreotide daily and a medium chain triglyceride (MCT) diet was effective against PLE, and the patient's condition dramatically improved. The effectiveness of octreotide treatment and an MCT diet in the treatment of PLE with SLE is discussed.

  7. Gut Microbiota Mediates Protection Against Enteropathy Induced by Indomethacin

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xue; Nakatsu, Geicho; Jin, Ye; Wong, Sunny; Yu, Jun; Lau, James Y. W.

    2017-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause significant small bowel injuries. The role of gut microbiota in this NSAID-induced enteropathy is poorly understood. We studied the dynamic changes in gut microbiota following indomethacin administration in mice, and investigated the effects of these adaptive changes on subsequent NSAID-induced enteropathy. The changes in gut microbiota were studied using 16S rRNA sequencing, and the effects of such changes were investigated using antibiotics and a faecal transplantation model. After indomethacin treatment, significant adaptive changes in gut microbiota were observed, including increased abundance of Firmicutes and decreased abundance in that of Bacteroidetes. Depletion of gut microbiota with antibiotics led to a higher mortality (P = 0.0021) in mice compared to controls. Mice pre-transplanted with adaptively changed microbiota showed less small bowel injury and lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines when exposed to indomethacin. In summary, this study identifies adaptive changes in the gut microbiota upon indomethacin administration, which can in turn ameliorate further NSAID-induced injury. The heightened mortality with antibiotic depletion of the adaptively changed microbiota suggests its important role in protecting against such injury. This study provides insight for future efforts to target the microbiota as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:28067296

  8. Characteristics and outcome of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia in adults: New insights based on a single-center experience with 60 patients.

    PubMed

    Roumier, Mathilde; Loustau, Valentine; Guillaud, Constance; Languille, Laetitia; Mahevas, Matthieu; Khellaf, Mehdi; Limal, Nicolas; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Godeau, Bertrand; Michel, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is a rare autoimmune disease with poorly known natural history and management remaining mainly empirical. To better describe the characteristics and outcome of wAIHA in adults, we performed a single-center cohort study of patients diagnosed with wAIIHA from 2001 to 2012 in our center. Sixty patients (50% women) were included, the mean age at the time of wAIHA onset was 54 ± 23 years. wAIHA was considered "primary" for 21 patients (35%) and was associated with an underlying disorder in 39 (65%), including mainly lymphoproliferative disorders and systemic lupus. All patients but two needed treatment and received corticosteroids, with an overall initial response rate of 87%. However, 63% of the patients were corticosteroid-dependent and 56% required at least one second-line treatment including mainly rituximab (n = 19). At the time of analysis, after a mean follow-up of 46 months, 28 patients (47%) were in remission and off treatment and 5 (8%) had died. The presence of an underlying lymphoproliferative disorder was associated with reduced response to corticosteroids and increased need for second-line therapy. In conclusion, in the last decade and compared to a previous series from our center, the rate of secondary wAIHA has increased and the use of rituximab has emerged as the preferred second-line treatment and corticosteroid-sparing strategy; the overall mortality has significantly decreased (8 vs. 18%).

  9. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment.

  10. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... that may be done to diagnose an autoimmune disorder include: Antinuclear antibody tests Autoantibody tests CBC Comprehensive metabolic panel C-reactive protein (CRP) Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) Urinalysis

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  12. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  13. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, you might ... help you to feel your best. Meditation, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery, are simple relaxation techniques that ...

  14. Low-dose rituximab in adult patients with idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia: clinical efficacy and biologic studies.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma; Zaja, Francesco; Zaninoni, Anna; Imperiali, Francesca Guia; Battista, Marta Lisa; Di Bona, Eros; Fattizzo, Bruno; Consonni, Dario; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Fanin, Renato; Zanella, Alberto

    2012-04-19

    This prospective study investigated the efficacy, safety, and response duration of low-dose rituximab (100 mg fixed dose for 4 weekly infusions) together with a short course of steroids as first- or second-line therapy in 23 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). The overall response was 82.6% at month +2, and subsequently stabilized to ∼ 90% at months +6 and +12; the response was better in warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA; overall response, 100% at all time points) than in cold hemagglutinin disease (CHD; average, 60%); the relapse-free survival was 100% for WAIHA at +6 and +12 months versus 89% and 59% in CHD, respectively, and the estimated relapse-free survival at 2 years was 81% and 40% for the warm and cold forms, respectively. The risk of relapse was higher in CHD and in patients with a longer interval between diagnosis and enrollment. Steroid administration was reduced both as cumulative dose (∼ 50%) and duration compared with the patient's past history. Treatment was well tolerated and no adverse events or infections were recorded; retreatment was also effective. The clinical response was correlated with amelioration biologic markers such as cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-12, TNF-α, and IL-17), suggesting that low-dose rituximab exerts an immunomodulating activity. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01345708.

  15. How I treat enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Biagi, Federico; Gobbi, Paolo G; Corazza, Gino R

    2012-03-15

    Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a complication of celiac disease (CD). This tumor derives from the neoplastic transformation of aberrant intraepithelial T lymphocytes emerging in celiac patients unresponsive to a gluten-free diet. Poor adherence to a gluten-free diet, HLA-DQ2 homozygosity, and late diagnosis of CD are recognized as risk factors for malignant evolution of CD. Recurrence of diarrhea, unexplained weight loss, abdominal pain, fever, and night sweating should alert physicians to this complication. The suspicion of EATL should lead to an extensive diagnostic workup in which magnetic resonance enteroclysis, positron emission tomography scan, and histologic identification of lesions represent the best options. Treatment includes high-dose chemotherapy preceded by surgical resection and followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, although biologic therapies seem to be promising. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet remains the only way to prevent EATL.

  16. [Enteropathy type T-cell lymphomas: pathology and pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Zettl, A; Rüdiger, T; Müller-Hermelink, H K

    2007-02-01

    Enteropathy type T-cell lymphomas (ETL) are the most frequent T-cell lymphomas arising in the gastrointestinal tract. Commonly, the neoplasm is clinically associated with symptoms of malabsorption, and it frequently manifests as a spontaneous bowel perforation. Among ETL, two types can be distinguished by morphology, immunophenotype and, possibly, by pathogenesis. A total of 80% of ETL are characterized by a close association with celiac disease, pleomorphic cytomorphology and the rare expression of CD8 and CD56. In contrast, 20% of ETL show a monomorphic small to medium size cytomorphology and frequent expression of CD8 and CD56, an association with celiac disease is rare in the latter cases. Genetically, ETL is characterized by frequent and recurrent chromosomal gains of 9q33-q34.

  17. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  18. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  19. Dietary requirement for serum-derived bovine immunoglobulins in the clinical management of patients with enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Petschow, Bryon W; Burnett, Bruce P; Shaw, Audrey L; Weaver, Eric M; Klein, Gerald L

    2015-01-01

    A variety of human disease conditions are associated with chronic intestinal disorders or enteropathies that are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Such disruptions in the homeostasis of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can lead to symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function, and malabsorption of nutrients. While significant advances have been made in understanding the factors that influence the complex and fragile balance between the gut microbiota, intestinal epithelial cell integrity, and the underlying immune system, effective therapies for restoring intestinal balance during enteropathy are still not available. Numerous studies have demonstrated the ability of oral immunoglobulins to improve weight gain, support gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animals. More recently, studies in humans provide evidence that serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate is safe and improves nutritional status and GI symptoms in patients with enteropathy associated with irritable bowel syndrome or infection with the human immunodeficiency virus. This review summarizes studies showing the impact of enteropathy on nutritional status and how specially formulated bovine immunoglobulins may help restore intestinal homeostasis and nutritional status in patients with specific enteropathies. Such protein preparations may provide distinct nutritional support required for the dietary management of patients who, because of therapeutic or chronic medical needs, have limited or impaired capacity to digest, absorb, or metabolize ordinary foodstuffs or certain nutrients, or other special medically determined nutrient requirements that cannot be satisfied by changes to the normal diet alone.

  20. The potential of mesenchymal stem cells in the management of radiation enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, P-Y; Qu, Y-Q; Wang, J; Dong, L-H

    2015-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is effective in managing abdominal and pelvic malignant tumors, radiation enteropathy is still unavoidable. This disease severely affects the quality of life of cancer patients due to some refractory lesions, such as intestinal ischemia, mucositis, ulcer, necrosis or even perforation. Current drugs or prevailing therapies are committed to alleviating the symptoms induced by above lesions. But the efficacies achieved by these interventions are still not satisfactory, because the milieus for tissue regeneration are not distinctly improved. In recent years, regenerative therapy for radiation enteropathy by using mesenchymal stem cells is of public interests. Relevant results of preclinical and clinical studies suggest that this regenerative therapy will become an attractive tool in managing radiation enteropathy, because mesenchymal stem cells exhibit their pro-regenerative potentials for healing the injuries in both epithelium and endothelium, minimizing inflammation and protecting irradiated intestine against fibrogenesis through activating intrinsic repair actions. In spite of these encouraging results, whether mesenchymal stem cells promote tumor growth is still an issue of debate. On this basis, we will discuss the advances in anticancer therapy by using mesenchymal stem cells in this review after analyzing the pathogenesis of radiation enteropathy, introducing the advances in managing radiation enteropathy using regenerative therapy and exploring the putative actions by which mesenchymal stem cells repair intestinal injuries. At last, insights gained from the potential risks of mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy for radiation enteropathy patients may provide clinicians with an improved awareness in carrying out their studies. PMID:26247725

  1. Comparison of human adult stem cells from adipose tissue and bone marrow in the treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While administration of ex vivo culture-expanded stem cells has been used to study immunosuppressive mechanisms in multiple models of autoimmune diseases, less is known about the uncultured, nonexpanded stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-based therapy. The SVF is composed of a heterogeneous population of cells and has been used clinically to treat acute and chronic diseases, alleviating symptoms in a range of tissues and organs. Methods In this study, the ability of human SVF cells was compared with culture-expanded adipose stem cells (ASCs) and bone-derived marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as a treatment of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (35–55)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalitis in C57Bl/6J mice, a well-studied multiple sclerosis model (MS). A total of 1 × 106 BMSCs, ASCs, or SVF cells were administered intraperitoneally concomitantly with the induction of disease. Mice were monitored daily for clinical signs of disease by three independent, blinded investigators and rated on a scale of 0 to 5. Spinal cords were obtained after euthanasia at day 30 and processed for histological staining using luxol fast blue, toluidine blue, and hematoxylin and eosin to measure myelin and infiltrating immune cells. Blood was collected from mice at day 30 and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. Results The data indicate that intraperitoneal administration of all cell types significantly ameliorates the severity of disease. Furthermore, the data also demonstrate, for the first time, that the SVF was as effective as the more commonly cultured BMSCs and ASCs in an MS model. All cell therapies also demonstrated a similar reduction in tissue damage, inflammatory infiltrates, and sera levels of IFNγ and IL-12. While IFNγ levels were reduced to comparable levels between treatment groups, levels of IL-12 were significantly lower in SVF-treated than BMSC-treated or ASC-treated mice. Conclusions Based

  2. Update on autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Teufel, Andreas; Galle, Peter R; Kanzler, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a necroinflammatory liver disease of unknown etiology that occurs in children and adults of all ages. Characteristics are its autoimmune features, hyperglobulinemia (IgG), and the presence of circulating autoantibodies, as well as a response to immunosuppressant drugs. Current treatment consists of prednisone and azathioprine and in most patients this disease has become very treatable. Over the past 2 years, a couple of new insights into the genetic aspects, clinical course and treatment of AIH have been reported, which will be the focus of this review. In particular, we concentrate on genome-wide microsatellite analysis, a novel mouse model of AIH, the evaluation of a large AIH cohort for overlap syndromes, suggested novel criteria for the diagnosis of AIH, and the latest studies on treatment of AIH with budenoside and mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:19266594

  3. Marginal Zone Lymphoma Complicated by Protein Losing Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stanek, Nadine; Bauerfeind, Peter; Herzog, Guido; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Lenggenhager, Daniela; Reiner, Cäcilia; Manz, Markus G.; Goede, Jeroen S.

    2016-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) refers to excessive intestinal protein loss, resulting in hypoalbuminemia. Underlying pathologies include conditions leading to either reduced intestinal barrier or lymphatic congestion. We describe the case of a patient with long-lasting diffuse abdominal problems and PLE. Repetitive endoscopies were normal with only minimal lymphangiectasia in biopsies. Further evaluations revealed an indolent marginal zone lymphoma with minor bone marrow infiltration. Monotherapy with rituximab decreased bone marrow infiltration of the lymphoma but did not relieve PLE. Additional treatments with steroids, octreotide, a diet devoid of long-chain fatty-acids, and parenteral nutrition did not prevent further clinical deterioration with marked weight loss (23 kg), further reduction in albumin concentrations (nadir 8 g/L), and a pronounced drop in performance status. Finally, immunochemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustine resulted in hematological remission and remarkable clinical improvement. 18 months after therapy the patient remains free of gastrointestinal complaints and has regained his body weight with normal albumin levels. We demonstrate a case of PLE secondary to indolent marginal zone lymphoma. No intestinal pathologies were detected, contrasting a severe and almost lethal clinical course. Immunochemotherapy relieved lymphoma and PLE, suggesting that a high suspicion of lymphoma is warranted in otherwise unexplained cases of PLE. PMID:27891267

  4. Marginal Zone Lymphoma Complicated by Protein Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Nadine; Bauerfeind, Peter; Herzog, Guido; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Lenggenhager, Daniela; Reiner, Cäcilia; Manz, Markus G; Goede, Jeroen S; Misselwitz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) refers to excessive intestinal protein loss, resulting in hypoalbuminemia. Underlying pathologies include conditions leading to either reduced intestinal barrier or lymphatic congestion. We describe the case of a patient with long-lasting diffuse abdominal problems and PLE. Repetitive endoscopies were normal with only minimal lymphangiectasia in biopsies. Further evaluations revealed an indolent marginal zone lymphoma with minor bone marrow infiltration. Monotherapy with rituximab decreased bone marrow infiltration of the lymphoma but did not relieve PLE. Additional treatments with steroids, octreotide, a diet devoid of long-chain fatty-acids, and parenteral nutrition did not prevent further clinical deterioration with marked weight loss (23 kg), further reduction in albumin concentrations (nadir 8 g/L), and a pronounced drop in performance status. Finally, immunochemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustine resulted in hematological remission and remarkable clinical improvement. 18 months after therapy the patient remains free of gastrointestinal complaints and has regained his body weight with normal albumin levels. We demonstrate a case of PLE secondary to indolent marginal zone lymphoma. No intestinal pathologies were detected, contrasting a severe and almost lethal clinical course. Immunochemotherapy relieved lymphoma and PLE, suggesting that a high suspicion of lymphoma is warranted in otherwise unexplained cases of PLE.

  5. Epizootic rabbit enteropathy inoculum (TEC4): antibiograms and antibiotic fractionation.

    PubMed

    Huybens, Nathalie; Houeix, Julien; Licois, Dominique; Mainil, Jacques; Marlier, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Epizootic rabbit enteropathy (ERE) emerged and spread in Europe within the last 13 years causing major economical loss. The aims of the study was to evaluate antibiograms of TEC4, an inoculum composed of an extract of intestinal content of affected rabbits, and to test the potential of different antibiotic-based TEC4 fractions to reproduce the disease. Twenty nine different antibiotic discs were incubated for determining bacteria resistance. In a complementary study, nine tubes of liquid medium were inoculated with TEC4, incubated and added individually with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, bacitracin, ceftiofur, doxycycline, novobiocin, streptomycyin, tylosin, vancomycin and 0.9% saline solution as control. The content of each tube was washed by centrifugation and suspended in saline. The three most effective antibiotics are florfenicol, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid and tylosin. A high concentration of Clostridium sordelli and Bacillus firmus were isolated in all fractions. Species never cultured from TEC4 were identified as Fusobacterium necrogenes (in vancomycin fraction), Cellulomonas sp (in novobiocin fraction) and Bacteroides distasonis (in doxycycline fraction). The ERE was reproduced when bacitracin, doxycycline and 0.9% fractions were inoculated. Rabbits showed ERE clinical signs with the specific drop in daily weight gain.

  6. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable antibiotic, in the treatment of tropical enteropathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical enteropathy is characterized by an increased urinary lactulose-to-mannitol (L:M) ratio on a site-specific sugar absorption test and is associated with increased intestinal permeability and decreased nutrient absorptive capacity. The etiology of tropical enteropathy is postulated to be intes...

  7. Disseminated Cytomegalovirus Infection and Protein Losing Enteropathy as Presenting Feature of Pediatric Patient with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ersoz, Safak; Akbulut, Ulas Emre

    2015-01-01

    We report a pediatric patient admitted with abdominal pain, diffuse lower extremity edema and watery diarrhea for two months. Laboratory findings including complete blood count, serum albumin, lipid and immunoglobulin levels were compatible with protein losing enteropathy. Colonoscopic examination revealed diffuse ulcers with smooth raised edge (like "punched out holes") in the colon and terminal ileum. Histopathological examination showed active colitis, ulcerations and inclusion bodies. Immunostaining for cytomegalovirus was positive. Despite supportive management, antiviral therapy, the clinical condition of the patient worsened and developed disseminated cytomegalovirus infection and the patient died. Protein losing enteropathy and disseminated cytomegalovirus infection a presenting of feature in steroid-naive patient with inflammatory bowel disease is very rare. Hypogammaglobulinemia associated with protein losing enteropathy in Crohn's disease may predispose the cytomegalovirus infection in previously healthy children. PMID:25866735

  8. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  9. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth and Environmental Enteropathy in Bangladeshi Children

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rashidul; Kirkpatrick, Beth D.; Alam, Masud; Lu, Miao; Kabir, Mamun; Kakon, Shahria Hafiz; Islam, Bushra Zarin; Afreen, Sajia; Musa, Abu; Khan, Shaila Sharmeen; Colgate, E. Ross; Carmolli, Marya P.; Ma, Jennie Z.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies suggest small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is common among developing world children. SIBO’s pathogenesis and effect in the developing world are unclear. Our objective was to determine the prevalence of SIBO in Bangladeshi children and its association with malnutrition. Secondary objectives included determination of SIBO’s association with sanitation, diarrheal disease, and environmental enteropathy. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 90 Bangladeshi 2-year-olds monitored since birth from an impoverished neighborhood. SIBO was diagnosed via glucose hydrogen breath testing, with a cutoff of a 12-ppm increase over baseline used for SIBO positivity. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to investigate SIBO predictors. Differences in concomitant inflammation and permeability between SIBO-positive and -negative children were compared with multiple comparison adjustment. A total of 16.7% (15/90) of the children had SIBO. The strongest predictors of SIBO were decreased length-for-age Z score since birth (odds ratio [OR], 0.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.60) and an open sewer outside the home (OR, 4.78; 95% CI, 1.06 to 21.62). Recent or frequent diarrheal disease did not predict SIBO. The markers of intestinal inflammation fecal Reg 1β (116.8 versus 65.6 µg/ml; P = 0.02) and fecal calprotectin (1,834.6 versus 766.7 µg/g; P = 0.004) were elevated in SIBO-positive children. Measures of intestinal permeability and systemic inflammation did not differ between the groups. These findings suggest linear growth faltering and poor sanitation are associated with SIBO independently of recent or frequent diarrheal disease. SIBO is associated with intestinal inflammation but not increased permeability or systemic inflammation. PMID:26758185

  10. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L.; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A.; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J.; Ball, Katherine R.; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M.; Hamilton, Don L.; Gebhart, Connie J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present. PMID:24082402

  11. The rabbit as an infection model for equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Francesca; Allen, Andrew L; Pusterla, Nicola; Vannucci, Fabio A; Antonopoulos, Aphroditi J; Ball, Katherine R; Thompson, Julie; Dowling, Patricia M; Hamilton, Don L; Gebhart, Connie J

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the susceptibility of rabbits to Lawsonia intracellularis obtained from a case of clinical equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). This is a preliminary step toward developing a rabbit infection model for studying pathogenesis and therapy of EPE in horses. Nine does were equally assigned to 3 groups. Animals in 2 groups (Group 1 and Group 2) were orally inoculated with different doses of cell-cultured L. intracellularis. Controls (Group 3) were sham-inoculated. Feces and blood were collected before the rabbits were infected and at 7, 14, and 21 days post-infection (DPI). Serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers were measured using an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) and fecal samples were analyzed with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). A doe from each group was euthanized at 7, 14, and 21 DPI for collection and evaluation of intestinal samples. Tissues were stained by routine hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with L. intracellularis-specific mouse monoclonal antibody. At 14 DPI, serologic responses were detected in both infected groups, which maintained high titers through to 21 DPI. Lawsonia intracellularis DNA was detected in the feces of Group 2 on 7 DPI and in both infected groups on 14 DPI. Gross lesions were apparent in Group 1 and Group 2 on 14 DPI. Immunohistochemistry confirmed L. intracellularis antigen within cells of rabbits in Group 1 and Group 2 on 7, 14, and 21 DPI. No lesions, serologic response, shedding, or IHC labeling were found in Group 3 rabbits. This study describes an EPE rabbit model that simulates natural infection, as typical lesions, immune response, and fecal shedding were present.

  12. Late-onset of immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, x-linked syndrome (IPEX) with intractable diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Zama, Daniele; Cocchi, Ilaria; Masetti, Riccardo; Specchia, Fernando; Alvisi, Patrizia; Gambineri, Eleonora; Lima, Mario; Pession, Andrea

    2014-10-18

    The syndrome of immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X linked (IPEX) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene. Diarrhea, diabetes and dermatitis are the hallmark of the disease, with a typical onset within the first months of life. We describe the case of a twelve-year old male affected by a very late-onset IPEX with intractable enteropathy, which markedly improved after starting Sirolimus as second-line treatment. This case suggests that IPEX should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of watery intractable diarrhea, despite its unusual onset.

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  14. Immunological studies in cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, M; Iyngkaran, N

    1981-01-01

    reliable measure of the local immune response. Levels of complement and immunoglobulin in serum or duodenal juice fail to provide help in the diagnosis of cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy. PMID:7193434

  15. Diagnostic and epidemiological features of Lawsonia intracellularis enteropathy in 2 foals

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillier, Julie; Picandet, Valérie; Harel, Josée; Gottschalk, Marcelo; Desrosiers, Robert; Jean, Daniel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Two clinical cases of equine proliferative enteropathy are described. Both foals had a positive fecal polymerase chain reaction, but shedding of the bacterium stopped < 4 days after therapy was initiated. One foal was serologically positive 3 days after onset of clinical signs and remained positive for more than 6 months. PMID:16898113

  16. Expression Pattern of Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Celiac Disease Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Bottasso Arias, Natalia M.; García, Marina; Bondar, Constanza; Guzman, Luciana; Redondo, Agustina; Chopita, Nestor; Córsico, Betina; Chirdo, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy that develops in genetically susceptible individuals following exposure to dietary gluten. Severe changes at the intestinal mucosa observed in untreated CD patients are linked to changes in the level and in the pattern of expression of different genes. Fully differentiated epithelial cells express two isoforms of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs): intestinal and liver, IFABP and LFABP, respectively. These proteins bind and transport long chain fatty acids and also have other important biological roles in signaling pathways, particularly those related to PPARγ and inflammatory processes. Herein, we analyze the serum levels of IFABP and characterize the expression of both FABPs at protein and mRNA level in small intestinal mucosa in severe enteropathy and normal tissue. As a result, we observed higher levels of circulating IFABP in untreated CD patients compared with controls and patients on gluten-free diet. In duodenal mucosa a differential FABPs expression pattern was observed with a reduction in mRNA levels compared to controls explained by the epithelium loss in severe enteropathy. In conclusion, we report changes in FABPs' expression pattern in severe enteropathy. Consequently, there might be alterations in lipid metabolism and the inflammatory process in the small intestinal mucosa. PMID:26346822

  17. Zinc or albendazole attenuates the progression of environmental enteropathy a randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical condition among children in the developing world, characterized by T-cell infiltration of the small-bowel mucosa and diffuse villous atrophy. EE leads to macronutrient and micronutrient malabsorption and stunting, with a resultant increased risk for in...

  18. Identification of new cases of severe enteropathy has recently increased the spectrum of intestinal non-celiac villous atrophy.

    PubMed

    Malamut, Georgia; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Cellier, Christophe

    2015-06-01

    From olmesartan-induced enteropathy to small CD4(+) T-cell intestinal lymphoproliferation, the spectrum of non-celiac villous atrophy has recently been largely extended. Precise characterization of the different types of non-celiac enteropathy with villous atrophy is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis, to identify a causal mechanism and propound appropriate therapeutic strategies. This paper discusses how to use the different diagnostic tools to address diagnostic criteria, citing the examples of recent new cases of non-celiac enteropathy with intestinal villous atrophy.

  19. The sera from adult patients with suggestive signs of autoimmune diseases present antinuclear autoantibodies that cross-react with Leishmania infantum conserved proteins: crude Leishmania histone and Soluble Leishmania antigens [corrected].

    PubMed

    Lakhal, Sami; Benabid, Meriem; Sghaier, Ines Ben; Bettaieb, Jihen; Bouratbine, Aïda; Galai, Yousr

    2015-02-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis has been associated with hyper-gammaglobulinemia and antinuclear antibodies and may simulate systemic lupus erythematosus. Sera from patients with visceral leishmaniasis have been shown to strongly react against conserved proteins from the parasite, such as ribosomal and histones. Some of these proteins have also been described as immunogenic in several auto-immune syndromes, and the detection of antibodies against them is considered to be indicative of disorder in the immune system. This study aimed to assess by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, test routinely employed in visceral leishmaniasis diagnosis, the recognition of Crude Leishmania histone and Soluble Leishmania antigens proteins from Leishmania infantum by adult patients with suggestive signs of autoimmune diseases. Our results show that the humoral response generated during autoimmune diseases cross-reacts with the parasitic Crude Leishmania histone and Soluble Leishmania antigens. In these cases, higher precautions must be taken to confirm the presence of visceral leishmaniasis in front of positive serology in antinuclear antibodies positive sera, in order to avoid wrong diagnosis.

  20. Toxicology of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, Per; Kono, Dwight H.

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to most autoimmune diseases is dependent on polygenic inheritance, environmental factors, and poorly defined stochastic events. One of the significant challenges facing autoimmune disease research is in identifying the specific events that trigger loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Although many intrinsic factors, including age, sex, and genetics, contribute to autoimmunity, extrinsic factors such as drugs, chemicals, microbes, or other environmental factors can also act as important initiators. This review explores how certain extrinsic factors, namely drugs and chemicals, can promote the development of autoimmunity, focusing on a few better characterized agents that, in most instances, have been shown to produce autoimmune manifestations in human populations. Mechanisms of autoimmune disease induction are discussed in terms of research obtained using specific animal models. Although a number of different pathways have been delineated for drug/chemical-induced autoimmunity some similarities do exist and a working model is proposed. PMID:20078109

  1. [Coexistence of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with diabetes insipidus].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are conditions characterized by the combination of two or more organ-specific disorders. The underestimation oftheir real frequency probable results from physicians' inadequate knowledge of these clinical entities and sometimes their atypical clinical presentation. Because they comprise a wide spectrum of autoimmune disorders, autoimmune polyglandular syndromes are divided into four types, among which type-3 is the most common one. In this article, we report the case of a young female, initially diagnosed with diabetes mellitus who several years later developed full-blown autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 consisting of autoimmune thyroid disorder and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.The discussed case suggests that in selected patients diabetes insipidus may coexist with autoimmune endocrinopathies and nonendocrine autoimmunopathies, as well as that in some patients idiopathic diabetes insipidus may be secondary to lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and/or the supraoptic-hypophyseal tract

  2. Emphysema: an autoimmune vascular disease?

    PubMed

    Voelkel, Norbert; Taraseviciene-Stewart, Laima

    2005-01-01

    We propose that an endogenous maintenance program controls lung cell turnover, apoptosis, and tissue repair, and that emphysema is a manifestation of the breakdown of the lung structure maintenance program. Emphysema can be induced experimentally in rats by three methods: blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors using SU5416, a small molecule-tyrosine kinase inhibitor; methylprednisolone, which activates matrix metalloproteinase-9 and decreases Akt phosphorylation; and antibodies directed against endothelial cells (autoimmune emphysema). SU5416-induced emphysema is associated with lung induction of cytochrome P450 and oxidant stress, and a superoxide dismutase mimetic or N-acetylcysteine prevents this form of emphysema. A broad-spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitor prevents methylprednisolone-induced emphysema and, finally, autoimmune emphysema is associated with increased lung tissue metalloproteinase-9 expression and alveolar septal cell apoptosis. Athymic rats, which lack CD4+ T cells, are protected against autoimmune emphysema, whereas adoptive transfer of CD4+ T cells causes autoimmune emphysema in naive adult rats. It appears that vascular endothelial growth factor and signaling via its receptors plays a central role in the lung structural maintenance program, and oxidative stress, proteolysis, and apoptosis may coincide in the moment of lung cell destruction. Interestingly, the methylprednisolone model illustrates that inflammation is not necessary for the development of emphysema.

  3. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  4. Evaluation of intestinal biopsies for pediatric enteropathy: a proposed immunohistochemical panel approach.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brock A; Kerner, John A; Hazard, Florette K; Longacre, Teri A

    2014-10-01

    Congenital enteropathies are rare disorders with significant clinical consequences; however, definitive diagnosis based on morphologic assessment of duodenal biopsies with routine stains alone is often impossible. To determine the role of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the evaluation for microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy (intestinal epithelial dysplasia), and enteroendocrine cell dysgenesis, a series of duodenal biopsies from 26 pediatric patients with chronic/intractable diarrhea was retrospectively reviewed. IHC stains for CD10, EpCAM, chromogranin, and villin were performed on all biopsies, and the results were correlated with hematoxylin and eosin and ultrastructural findings using electron microscopy, when available. Biopsies from 2 patients diagnosed with microvillous inclusion disease at the time of original biopsy demonstrated diffuse CD10-positive cytoplasmic inclusions within enterocytes and normal expression of EpCAM and chromogranin. Biopsies from 3 patients, including 2 siblings with confirmed EPCAM mutations, demonstrated complete loss of EpCAM expression and normal expression of CD10 and chromogranin; electron microscopic evaluation revealed characteristic ultrastructural findings of tufting enteropathy. Biopsies from 1 patient with a confirmed NEUROG3 mutation demonstrated an absence of intestinal enteroendocrine cells by chromogranin staining, consistent with enteroendocrine cell dysgenesis. Four patients' biopsies displayed nonspecific staining patterns for CD10 and/or EpCAM with normal expression of chromogranin, and 16 patients' biopsies exhibited normal expression for all 3 markers. Villin stains demonstrated heterogenous brush border labeling with nonspecific cytoplasmic reactivity, a pattern variably present throughout the biopsy series. In conclusion, the routine use of an IHC panel of CD10, EpCAM, and chromogranin is warranted in patients meeting specific age and/or clinical criteria, as the morphologic findings

  5. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents.

  6. Lack of association of CCR2-64I and CCR5-Delta 32 with type 1 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults.

    PubMed

    Gambelunghe, Giovanni; Ghaderi, Mehran; Brozzetti, Annalisa; Del Sindaco, Paola; Gharizadeh, Babeck; Nyren, Paul; Hjelmström, Peter; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Sanjeevi, Carani B; Falorni, Alberto

    2003-06-01

    It is well known that type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a complex genetic disease resulting from the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Several genes have been associated with susceptibility and/or protection for T1DM, but the disease risk is mostly influenced by genes located in the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex. The attraction of leukocytes to tissues is essential for inflammation and the beginning of autoimmune reaction. The process is controlled by chemokines, which are chemotactic cytolines. Some studies have shown that CCR2-64I and CCR5-Delta 32 might be important for protection of susceptibility to some immunologically-mediated disorders. In the present study, we demonstrate the lack of association between CCR2-64I and CCR5-Delta 32 gene polymorphism and TIDM and we describe a new method for a simple and more precise genotyping of the CCR2 gene.

  7. Seizures Associated With Hypocalcemia in a Yorkshire Terrier With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Jim; Quimby, Jessica; Bayliss, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    A 7 yr old, male, castrated, Yorkshire terrier was presented on emergency for an acute onset of seizure activity. The owner also reported that the dog had previously exhibited other symptoms, including intermittent vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia for several yr. The initial workup revealed a marked decrease in ionized calcium and total protein. Further diagnostics revealed decreases in magnesium, 25 hydroxyvitamin D, albumin, and globulins, and an increased parathyroid hormone level. Intestinal biopsies revealed inflammatory bowel disease and lymphangiectasia. The dog received intravenous calcium gluconate for treatment of hypocalcemia followed by oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Seizure activity ceased once calcium levels approached the normal range. Medical and dietary therapy for lymphangiectasia and inflammatory bowel disease consisted of prednisone, rutin, and a low-fat diet. Decreased serum total ionized calcium levels have been reported previously in dogs with protein-losing enteropathies. Typically, the hypocalcemia is not associated with clinical signs. Severe clinical signs of hypocalcemia are rarely reported in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy, but seizures, facial twitching, and tremors can occur. When presented with a dog with a history of seizure activity, panhypoproteinemia, and hypocalcemia, protein-losing enteropathy should be included on the list of differential diagnoses.

  8. Coniferyl Aldehyde Attenuates Radiation Enteropathy by Inhibiting Cell Death and Promoting Endothelial Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function. PMID:26029925

  9. Coniferyl aldehyde attenuates radiation enteropathy by inhibiting cell death and promoting endothelial cell function.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ye-Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Son, Yeonghoon; Jang, Jun-Ho; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Young-Gyo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Hae-June

    2015-01-01

    Radiation enteropathy is a common complication in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate whether radiation-induced intestinal injury could be alleviated by coniferyl aldehyde (CA), an HSF1-inducing agent that increases cellular HSP70 expression. We systemically administered CA to mice with radiation enteropathy following abdominal irradiation (IR) to demonstrate the protective effects of CA against radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury. CA clearly alleviated acute radiation-induced intestinal damage, as reflected by the histopathological data and it also attenuated sub-acute enteritis. CA prevented intestinal crypt cell death and protected the microvasculature in the lamina propria during the acute and sub-acute phases of damage. CA induced HSF1 and HSP70 expression in both intestinal epithelial cells and endothelial cells in vitro. Additionally, CA protected against not only the apoptotic cell death of both endothelial and epithelial cells but also the loss of endothelial cell function following IR, indicating that CA has beneficial effects on the intestine. Our results provide novel insight into the effects of CA and suggest its role as a therapeutic candidate for radiation-induced enteropathy due to its ability to promote rapid re-proliferation of the intestinal epithelium by the synergic effects of the inhibition of cell death and the promotion of endothelial cell function.

  10. Comparisons of CVID and IgGSD: referring physicians, autoimmune conditions, pneumovax reactivity, immunoglobulin levels, blood lymphocyte subsets, and HLA-A and -B typing in 432 adult index patients.

    PubMed

    Barton, James C; Bertoli, Luigi F; Barton, J Clayborn

    2014-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G subclass deficiency (IgGSD) are heterogeneous disorders characterized by respiratory tract infections, selective Ig isotype deficiencies, and impaired antibody responses to polysaccharide antigens. Using univariable analyses, we compared observations in 34 CVID and 398 IgGSD adult index patients (81.9% women) referred to a hematology/oncology practice. Similarities included specialties of referring physicians, mean ages, proportions of women, reactivity to Pneumovax, median serum IgG3 and IgG4 levels, median blood CD56+/CD16+ lymphocyte levels, positivity for HLA-A and -B types, and frequencies of selected HLA-A, -B haplotypes. Dissimilarities included greater prevalence of autoimmune conditions, lower median IgG, IgA, and IgM, and lower median CD19+, CD3+/CD4+, and CD3+/CD8+ blood lymphocytes in CVID patients. Prevalence of Sjögren's syndrome and hypothyroidism was significantly greater in CVID patients. Combined subnormal IgG1/IgG3 occurred in 59% and 29% of CVID and IgGSD patients, respectively. Isolated subnormal IgG3 occurred in 121 IgGSD patients (88% women). Logistic regression on CVID (versus IgGSD) revealed a significant positive association with autoimmune conditions and significant negative associations with IgG1, IgG3, and IgA and CD56+/CD16+ lymphocyte levels, but the odds ratio was increased for autoimmune conditions alone (6.9 (95% CI 1.3, 35.5)).

  11. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome-like disease in patients with LRBA mutation.

    PubMed

    Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Fischer, Ute; Keller, Bärbel; Nabhani, Schafiq; Gámez-Díaz, Laura; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Gombert, Michael; Hönscheid, Andrea; Saleh, Hani; Shaag, Avraham; Borkhardt, Arndt; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Elpeleg, Orly; Stepensky, Polina

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in LPS-responsive and beige-like anchor (LRBA) gene were recently described in patients with combined immunodeficiency, enteropathy and autoimmune cytopenia. Here, we extend the clinical and immunological phenotypic spectrum of LRBA associated disorders by reporting on three patients from two unrelated families who presented with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, cytopenia, elevated double negative T cells and raised serum Fas ligand levels resembling autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) and one asymptomatic patient. Homozygous loss of function mutations in LRBA were identified by whole exome analysis. Similar to ALPS patients, Fas mediated apoptosis was impaired in LRBA deficient patients, while apoptosis in response to stimuli of the intrinsic mitochondria mediated apoptotic pathway was even enhanced. This manuscript illustrates the phenotypic overlap of other primary immunodeficiencies with ALPS-like disorders and strongly underlines the necessity of genetic diagnosis in order to provide early correct diagnosis and subsequent care.

  12. Sexual dimorphism in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rubtsova, Kira; Marrack, Philippa; Rubtsov, Anatoly V.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system attacks and destroys the organs and tissues of its own host. Autoimmunity is the third most common type of disease in the United States. Because there is no cure for autoimmunity, it is extremely important to study the mechanisms that trigger these diseases. Most autoimmune diseases predominantly affect females, indicating a strong sex bias. Various factors, including sex hormones, the presence or absence of a second X chromosome, and sex-specific gut microbiota can influence gene expression in a sex-specific way. These changes in gene expression may, in turn, lead to susceptibility or protection from autoimmunity, creating a sex bias for autoimmune diseases. In this Review we discuss recent findings in the field of sex-dependent regulation of gene expression and autoimmunity. PMID:25915581

  13. [Autoantibodies, tolerance and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Oppezzo, Pablo; Dighiero, Guillaume

    2003-07-01

    In 1900, the group from Metchnikoff suggested the concept of autoimmunization by demonstrating the presence of autoantibodies in normal conditions; which was opposed to the concept of horror autotoxicus raised by Ehrlich. Landsteiner's description of the transfusion compatibility rules and 50 year-later work from Burnett's and Medawar's groups lead to the clonal deletion theory as a general explanation of tolerance and autoimmunity. However, more recent work succeeded demonstrating that autoreactive B cells constitute a substantial part of the B-cell repertoire and that this autoreactive repertoire secretes the so-called natural autoantibodies (NAA) characterized by their broad reactivity mainly directed against very well conserved public epitopes. They fulfill the definition of an autoantibody since they are self-reactive, but they are not self-specific. As yet, NAA directed against determinants of polymorphism have not been reported. The presence of this repertoire in normal conditions challenges the clonal deletion theory as a unique explanation for self-tolerance. However, if we take into account that this autoreactive B-cell repertoire is not self-specific, this contradiction may not be a real one opposition. Indeed, the Lansteiner's rule that a subject belonging to group A will never produce anti-A antibodies and will always produce natural antibodies against the B-cell group, could never be challenged. Clonal deletion is probably accounting for this phenomenum. However, the serum of healthy adult individuals frequently exhibits low titers of anti-I antibodies, which is a precursor molecule of AB0 antigen system. The mechanism accounting for deletion of B cells directed against critical determinants like antigens A and B in the red blood cell system and allowing the production of autoantibodies against I remain elusive.

  14. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  15. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell–cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte–macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26142116

  16. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a β-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  17. Environmental Basis of Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Floreani, Annarosa; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-06-01

    The three common themes that underlie the induction and perpetuation of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and immune regulation. Environmental factors have gained much attention for their role in triggering autoimmunity, with increasing evidence of their influence as demonstrated by epidemiological studies, laboratory research, and animal studies. Environmental factors known to trigger and perpetuate autoimmunity include infections, gut microbiota, as well as physical and environmental agents. To address these issues, we will review major potential mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading, bystander activation, polyclonal activation of B and T cells, infections, and autoinflammatory activation of innate immunity. The association of the gut microbiota on autoimmunity will be particularly highlighted by their interaction with pharmaceutical agents that may lead to organ-specific autoimmunity. Nonetheless, and we will emphasize this point, the precise mechanism of environmental influence on disease pathogenesis remains elusive.

  18. The plethora, clinical manifestations and treatment options of autoimmunity in patients with primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Barış, Hatice Ezgi; Kıykım, Ayça; Nain, Ercan; Özen, Ahmet Oğuzhan; Karakoç-Aydıner, Elif; Barış, Safa

    2016-01-01

    Aim Although the association between primary immunodeficiency and autoimmunity is already well-known, it has once again become a topic of debate with the discovery of newly-defined immunodeficiencies. Thus, investigation of the mechanisms of development of autoimmunity in primary immunodefficiency and new target-specific therapeutic options has come to the fore. In this study, we aimed to examine the clinical findings of autoimmunity, autoimmunity varieties, and treatment responses in patients who were genetically diagnosed as having primary immunodeficiency. Material and Methods The files of patients with primary immunodeficiency who had clinical findings of autoimmunity, who were diagnosed genetically, and followed up in our clinic were investigated. The demographic and clinical features of the patients and their medical treatments were evaluated. Results Findings of autoimmunity were found in 30 patients whose genetic mutations were identified. The mean age at the time of the first symptoms was 8.96±14.64 months, and the mean age of receiving a genetic diagnosis was 82.55±84.71 months. The most common diseases showing findings of autoimmunity included immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy X-linked syndrome (16.7%); autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (10%); lipopolysaccharide-responsive beige-like anchor protein deficiency (10%); and DiGeorge syndrome (10%). Twelve (40%) patients showed findings of autoimmunity at the time of first presentation. The most common findings of autoimmunity included inflammatory bowel disease, inflammatory bowel disease-like findings (n=14, 46.7%), immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n=11, 36.7%), and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (n=9, 30.0%). A response to immunosupressive agents was observed in 15 (50%) patients. Ten patients underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Six patients were lost to follow-up due to a variety of complications. Conclusion Autoimmunity is frequently observed in patients with

  19. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2017-03-29

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection.

  20. FOXP3(+) Treg Cells and Gender Bias in Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jia; Li, Yang Yang; Zheng, Song Guo; Tsun, Andy; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, where the X-linked master transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) determines Treg cell development and function. Genetic deficiency of foxp3 induces dysfunction of Treg cells and immuno-dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome in humans. Functionally deficient Treg cells or the development of exTreg cells positively correlate with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In general, females are more susceptible to SLE and MS but less susceptible to AS, where the expression of FOXP3 and its protein complex are perturbed by multiple factors, including hormonal fluctuations, inflammatory cytokines, and danger signals. Therefore, it is critical to explore the potential molecular mechanisms involved and these differences linked to gender. Here, we review recent findings on the regulation of FOXP3 activity in Treg cells and also discuss gender difference in the determination of Treg cell function in autoimmune diseases.

  1. Autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Part 1: Clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Kneisel, Andrea; Hertl, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune bullous skin diseases are characterized by autoantibodies against adhesion molecules of the skin. Pemphigus is a disorder with an intraepidermal loss of adhesion and is characterized by fragile blisters and erosions. Pemphigus vulgaris often shows extensive lesions of the oral mucosa, while pemphigus foliaceus is commonly restricted to cutaneous involvement with puff pastry-like scale formation. Paraneoplastic pemphigus is obligatorily associated with malignancies and often presents as hemorrhagic stomatitis with multiforme-like exanthems. IgA pemphigus typically presents with pustules and annular plaques but not with mucosal involvement. The clinical spectrum of the pemphigoids includes tense blisters, urticarial plaques, and prurigo- like eczematous lesions. Pemphigoid gestationis mostly occurs during the last trimester of pregnancy and mucous membrane pemphigoid primarily involves the oral mucosa and conjunctivae and leads to scarring. Linear IgA bullous dermatosis manifests with tense blisters in a "cluster of jewels"-like pattern in childhood and is more heterogeneous in adulthood. Classical epidermolysis bullosa acquisita shows extensive skin fragility. Dermatitis herpetiformis is associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy and manifests clinically with severe itching and papulovesicles on the extensor surfaces of the extremities and the lumbosacral area. The intention of the review is to demonstrate the heterogeneous clinical spectrum of autoimmune bullous disorders.

  2. Diagnostic value of the skin lesions in immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martín-Santiago, Ana; Hervás, Juan A; Hervás, Daniel; Rosell, Antonio; Caimari, María; de Carlos, Juan C; Matamoros, Nuria

    2013-01-01

    We report a child with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome due to a de novo c.1190G>A (p.R397Q) mutation in exon 11 of the forkhead domain of the FOXP3 gene. He had chronic dermatitis with an eczematous and ichthyosiform appearance and had an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. IPEX syndrome is a rare, often fatal recessive disease caused by mutations in the FOXP3 gene on the X chromosome (Xp11.23-q13.3).

  3. Protein-losing enteropathy associated with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus with a good response to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Sansinanea, Pierina; Carrica, Sebastián Augusto; Marcos, Josefina; García, Mercedes Argentina

    2016-01-01

    A case is presented of a protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) as the initial manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a 17 year-old female patient, who presented with ascites, edema and hypoalbuminemia. The diagnosis of SLE was based on the presence of: malar rash, oral ulcers, thrombocytopenia, antinuclear antibodies, IgM anticardiolipin antibody, and lupus anticoagulant. Renal and liver diseases were ruled out. The PLE diagnosis was confirmed with fecal alpha 1-antitrypsin clearance. The PLE was refractory to different lines of immunosuppressive agents like glucocorticoids, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, and cyclosporine, showing a satisfactory and sustained response with rituximab, allowing steroid sparing and long term remission.

  4. Strongyloidiasis: an unusual cause of septic shock with pneumonia and enteropathy in western countries

    PubMed Central

    Montini, Florent; Grenouillet, Frederic; Capellier, Gilles; Piton, Gaël

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of invasive strongyloidiasis in a patient from the French Antilles who had been living in France for many years, with no history of immunosuppression, and who was hospitalised in the intensive care unit for septic shock with multimicrobial hypoxaemia pneumonia and exudative enteropathy. Initiation of systemic corticosteroid therapy for septic shock seems to have precipitated onset of the parasitic infection, with recurrence of hypoxaemic pneumonia complicated by hypoxic cardiac arrest. The diagnosis was confirmed after roundworm larvae were found on bronchoalveolar lavage. Treatment with ivermectin was initiated, but the patient died in a context of postanoxic encephalopathy. PMID:25819827

  5. Protein Loosing Enteropathy Secondary to Strongyloidiasis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    El Hajj, Weam; Nakad, Gilbert; Abou Rached, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a helminthic disease which affects millions around the world resulting in a significant burden in certain high risk groups. It is rarely reported in the Lebanese population probably due to the low index of suspicion in common practice. We are reporting a case of strongyloidiasis that was found in an elderly patient presenting initially with dyspnea followed by skin rash, protein loosing enteropathy, diarrhea, and abdominal pain while on corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was suspected based on clinical presentation in addition to peripheral eosinophilia. We will also describe the upper and lower endoscopic aspects of the disease, as well as histologic findings on duodenal and colonic biopsies. PMID:26881152

  6. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and autoimmune thrombocytopenia at diagnosis and during follow-up of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dimou, Maria; Angelopoulou, Maria K; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Georgiou, Georgios; Kalpadakis, Christina; Pappi, Vassiliki; Tsopra, Olga; Koutsoukos, Konstantinos; Zografos, Eleftherios; Boutsikas, George; Moschogianni, Maria; Vardounioti, Ioanna; Petevi, Kyriaki; Karali, Vassiliki; Kanellopoulos, Alexandros; Ntalageorgos, Themis; Yiakoumis, Xanthis; Bartzis, Vasiliki; Bitsani, Aikaterini; Pessach, Elias; Efthimiou, Anna; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Rassidakis, George; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Patsouris, Efstratios; Meletis, John; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P

    2012-08-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia (AIHA/AITP) frequently complicate the course of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, especially low-grade, but they are very rarely observed in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Consequently the frequency and the profile of patients with HL-associated AIHA/AITP have not been well defined. Among 1029 patients with HL diagnosed between 1990 and 2010, two cases of AIHA (0.19%) and three of AITP (0.29%) were identified at the presentation of disease. These patients were significantly older, and more frequently had features of advanced disease and non-nodular sclerosing histology, compared to the majority of patients, who did not have autoimmune cytopenias at diagnosis. ABVD combination chemotherapy (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) provided effective control of HL and the autoimmune condition as well. During approximately 6600 person-years of follow-up for the remaining 1024 patients, seven (0.7%) patients developed autoimmune cytopenias (three AITP, three AIHA, one autoimmune pancytopenia) for a 10- and 15-year actuarial incidence of 0.95% and 1.40%, respectively. Their features did not differ compared to the general population of adult HL. In this large series of consecutive, unselected patients, those who presented with autoimmune cytopenias had a particular demographic and disease-related profile. In contrast, patients developing autoimmune cytopenias during follow-up did not appear to differ significantly from those who did not.

  7. Metals and kidney autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P E

    1999-01-01

    The causes of autoimmune responses leading to human kidney pathology remain unknown. However, environmental agents such as microorganisms and/or xenobiotics are good candidates for that role. Metals, either present in the environment or administered for therapeutic reasons, are prototypical xenobiotics that cause decreases or enhancements of immune responses. In particular, exposure to gold and mercury may result in autoimmune responses to various self-antigens as well as autoimmune disease of the kidney and other tissues. Gold compounds, currently used in the treatment of patients with progressive polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis, can cause a nephrotic syndrome. Similarly, an immune-mediated membranous nephropathy frequently occurred when drugs containing mercury were commonly used. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that occupational exposure to mercury does not usually result in autoimmunity. However, mercury induces antinuclear antibodies, sclerodermalike disease, lichen planus, or membranous nephropathy in some individuals. Laboratory investigations have confirmed that the administration of gold or mercury to experimental animals leads to autoimmune disease quite similar to that observed in human subjects exposed to these metals. In addition, studies of inbred mice and rats have revealed that a few strains are susceptible to the autoimmune effects of gold and mercury, whereas the majority of inbred strains are resistant. These findings have emphasized the importance of genetic (immunogenetic and pharmacogenetic) factors in the induction of metal-associated autoimmunity. (italic)In vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) research of autoimmune disease caused by mercury and gold has already yielded valuable information and answered a number of important questions. At the same time it has raised new issues about possible immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive mechanisms of xenobiotic activity. Thus it is evident that investigations of metal

  8. [Syndrome overlap: autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis].

    PubMed

    Guerra Montero, Luis; Ortega Alvarez, Félix; Marquez Teves, Maguin; Asato Higa, Carmen; Sumire Umeres, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and autoimmune cholangitis are chronic autoimmune liver disease, usually present separate, the cases where characteristics of two of the above is observed liver disease is commonly referred to as Overlap Syndromes (OS). Although there is no consensus on specific criteria for the diagnosis of OS identification of this association is important for initiating appropriate treatment and prevent its progression to cirrhosis or at least the complications of cirrhosis and death. We report the case of awoman aged 22 cirrhotic which debuted are edematous ascites, severe asthenia and jaundice compliant diagnostics SS criteria and initially present any response to treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid and oral corticosteroids, but ultimately finished performing a transplant orthotopic liver.

  9. The Autoimmune Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A.; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures – internal and external – across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied. PMID:27199979

  10. Infection and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The development of some autoimmune diseases is increasing in the developed world faster than can be accounted for by genetic change. The development of these autoimmune diseases, such as Type 1 diabetes, is known to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Environmental factors which have been considered to play a role include infectious agents such as viruses or bacteria. The search for a common initiating infection in the aetiology of Type 1 diabetes as proved thus far inconclusive. An alternative way of considering a role for infection is that infection may have historically prevented the development of autoimmune disease. In the developing world changes have occurred such that many chronic infections have been eliminated and this may have led to the emergence of autoimmune pathology. Evidence in support of this hypothesis is considered here and factors governing the development of autoimmunity compared with those which might have influenced the development of childhood leukaemia.

  11. Autoimmune hypophysitis: new developments.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hypophysitis, often referred to as lymphocytic hypophysitis, is defined as an inflammatory condition of the pituitary gland of autoimmune etiology that leads to pituitary dysfunction. However, the pathogenesis of autoimmune hypophysitis is still incompletely defined. Although pathogenic autoantibodies in autoimmune hypophysitis have not yet been reported, it has been suggested that several antibodies may be closely related to pathogenesis. Novel clinical entities that are associated with hypophysitis, such as IgG4-related hypophysitis and anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome, have recently been reported. The findings demonstrate the heterogeneity of the disease and provide important clues for understanding the pathogenesis and definition of hypophysitis, as well as the significance of antipituitary antibodies. This review focuses on new developments in autoimmune hypophysitis.

  12. Similarity of HLA-DQ profiles in adult-onset type 1 insulin-dependent diabetic patients with and without extra-pancreatic auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Gu, X F; Larger, E; Clauser, E; Assan, R

    1992-01-01

    Some insulin-dependent diabetic patients present with auto-immune diseases involving extra pancreatic tissues (type 1b diabetes mellitus). The genetic specificity of this syndrome, as opposed to insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) free of such associations (Type 1a IDDM) is not clearly established. We have analyzed the HLA-DQB1 and DQA1, loci, after PCR amplification of genomic DNA, in 44 Type 1b IDDM patients, 78 Type 1a IDDM patients and 105 control subjects. No essential difference in HLA-DQ profiles appeared between Type 1b and Type 1a IDDM patients. Both diabetic groups displayed a significant enrichment in DQB1 alleles negative for aspartate at position 57 (Type 1b: 83%; Type 1a: 89%; controls 48%; p < 0.001 vs both patient groups) and in DQB1 Asp 57 negative homozygosity: 71% of Type 1b; 80% of Type 1a; 25% of controls (p < 0.01). This enrichment in DQB1 Asp 57 negative alleles was accounted for by DQB1* 0201 in the Type 1b group, and by DQB1 % 0201 and 0302 in the Type 1a patients. Conversely, alleles DQB1* 0602 and 0301 (DQB1 Asp 57 positive) were protective. Both diabetic groups also displayed a significant enrichment in DQA1 alleles positives for arginine at position 52 (65% of Type 1b; 76% of Type 1a; 50% of control subjects; p < 0.01 and 0.001, respectively, vs controls), and in DQA1 Arg 52 positive homozygotes (48% of Type 1b, 58% of Type 1a, 22% of control subjects; p < 0.01). All differences between diabetic groups and the control group were more pronounced in the case of Type 1a than of Type 1b patients. The HLA-DQ genes shared by Type 1a and Type 1b patients must therefore be closely associated with islet autoimmunity. Genetic differences between Type 1a and Type 1b syndromes, if any, must be investigated in other MHC and non-MHC regions of the genome.

  13. Extended major histocompatibility complex haplotypes in patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Alper, C A; Fleischnick, E; Awdeh, Z; Katz, A J; Yunis, E J

    1987-01-01

    We have studied major histocompatibility complex markers in randomly ascertained Caucasian patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy and their families. The frequencies of extended haplotypes, defined as haplotypes of specific HLA-B, DR, BF, C2, C4A, and C4B allelic combinations, occurring more frequently than expected, were compared on patient chromosomes, on normal chromosomes from the study families, and on chromosomes from normal families. Over half of patient chromosomes consisted almost entirely of two extended haplotypes [HLA-B8, DR3, SC01] and [HLA-B44, DR7, FC31] which, with nonextended HLA-DR7, accounted for the previously observed HLA markers of this disease: HLA-B8, DR3, and DR7. There was no increase in HLA-DR3 on nonextended haplotypes or in other extended haplotypes with HLA-DR3 or DR7. The distribution of homozygotes and heterozygotes for HLA-DR3 and DR7 was consistent with recessive inheritance of the major histocompatibility complex-linked susceptibility gene for gluten-sensitive enteropathy. On the other hand, by odds ratio analysis and from the sum of DR3 and DR7 homozygotes compared with DR3/DR7 heterozygotes, there was an increase in heterozygotes and a decrease in homozygotes suggesting the presence of modifying phenomena. PMID:3793924

  14. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: analysis of 533 adult patients who underwent transplantation at King's College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wang, Wenjia; Abeywardane, Ayesha; Adikarama, Malinthi; McLornan, Donal; Raj, Kavita; de Lavallade, Hugues; Devereux, Stephen; Mufti, Ghulam J; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Victoria T; Mijovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); it is often refractory to treatment and carries a high mortality. To improve understanding of the incidence, risk factors, and clinical outcome of post-transplantation AIHA, we analyzed 533 patients who received allogeneic HSCT, and we identified 19 cases of AIHA after HSCT (overall incidence, 3.6%). The median time to onset, from HSCT to AIHA, was 202 days. AIHA was associated with HSCT from unrelated donors (hazard ratio [HR], 5.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22 to 22.9; P = .026). In the majority (14 of 19; 74%) of AIHA patients, multiple agents for treatment were required, with only 9 of 19 (47%) patients achieving complete resolution of AIHA. Patients with post-transplantation AIHA had a higher overall mortality (HR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.33 to 4.63; P = .004), with 36% (4 of 11 cases) of deaths attributable to AIHA.

  15. Commensal microbiota influence systemic autoimmune responses

    PubMed Central

    Van Praet, Jens T; Donovan, Erin; Vanassche, Inge; Drennan, Michael B; Windels, Fien; Dendooven, Amélie; Allais, Liesbeth; Cuvelier, Claude A; van de Loo, Fons; Norris, Paula S; Kruglov, Andrey A; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Rabot, Sylvie; Tito, Raul; Raes, Jeroen; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valerie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eberl, Gérard; Ware, Carl F; Elewaut, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies are a hallmark feature of generalized autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. However, the processes underlying the loss of tolerance against nuclear self-constituents remain largely unresolved. Using mice deficient in lymphotoxin and Hox11, we report that approximately 25% of mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs spontaneously develop specific antinuclear antibodies. Interestingly, we find this phenotype is not caused by a defect in central tolerance. Rather, cell-specific deletion and in vivo lymphotoxin blockade link these systemic autoimmune responses to the formation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the neonatal period of life. We further demonstrate antinuclear antibody production is influenced by the presence of commensal gut flora, in particular increased colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria, and IL-17 receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that neonatal colonization of gut microbiota influences generalized autoimmunity in adult life. PMID:25599993

  16. Commensal microbiota influence systemic autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Van Praet, Jens T; Donovan, Erin; Vanassche, Inge; Drennan, Michael B; Windels, Fien; Dendooven, Amélie; Allais, Liesbeth; Cuvelier, Claude A; van de Loo, Fons; Norris, Paula S; Kruglov, Andrey A; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Rabot, Sylvie; Tito, Raul; Raes, Jeroen; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valerie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Van de Wiele, Tom; Eberl, Gérard; Ware, Carl F; Elewaut, Dirk

    2015-02-12

    Antinuclear antibodies are a hallmark feature of generalized autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. However, the processes underlying the loss of tolerance against nuclear self-constituents remain largely unresolved. Using mice deficient in lymphotoxin and Hox11, we report that approximately 25% of mice lacking secondary lymphoid organs spontaneously develop specific antinuclear antibodies. Interestingly, we find this phenotype is not caused by a defect in central tolerance. Rather, cell-specific deletion and in vivo lymphotoxin blockade link these systemic autoimmune responses to the formation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue in the neonatal period of life. We further demonstrate antinuclear antibody production is influenced by the presence of commensal gut flora, in particular increased colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria, and IL-17 receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that neonatal colonization of gut microbiota influences generalized autoimmunity in adult life.

  17. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-12-24

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4⁺ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4⁺ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity.

  18. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity. PMID:26712781

  19. Drugs in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, D B; Bicker, U

    1990-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases arise when autoimmunity or the loss of self tolerance results in tissue damages. Many mechanisms have been proposed for the origin of autoimmunity, including immunologic, viral, hormonal and genetic factors. All known parts of the immunological network are involved in causing immunopathologic symptoms. Therefore, more or less specific immunosuppressants are widely used in the treatment of autoimmune disorders which range from organ-specific, i.e. Hashimoto's thyroiditis, to non-organ-specific or systemic diseases, i.e. systemic lupus erythematosus. Unspecifically acting cytostatics do not only suppress autoimmune reactions but also create severe side-effects due to the impairment of immune responses against foreign antigens, leading, for example, to an increased risk of infections. Moreover, the genotoxic activity of cytostatics might induce malignancies. Corticosteroids are clinically well known and very active agents for the management of acute symptoms but different side-effects limit their use in the treatment of chronic diseases. Cyclosporin A has been an important step forward to a more specific prevention of organ transplant rejections and to the therapy of some autoimmune disorders. Modern approaches to immunosuppression include monoclonal antibodies directed against a variety of different determinants on immunocompetent cells. Ciamexone and Leflunomide which are in early clinical and preclinical development, respectively, might be interesting new drugs. Future immunopharmacologic drug research and development should lead to more specific, low molecular weight, orally active and chemically defined immunosuppressive compounds with good tolerability under long-term treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  20. Psoriasis and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Sticherling, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic inflammatory human skin diseases. Though clinically well characterized, the exact etiological and pathogenic mechanisms are still not known in detail. Current knowledge indicates distinct overlap to other inflammatory as well as autoimmune disorders. However, the one or more relevant autoantigens could not be characterized so-far. On the other side, several autoimmune diseases were shown to be associated with psoriasis. In addition, serological autoimmune phenomena, namely diverse circulating specific autoantibodies could be demonstrated in the past. A matter of current debate is if psoriasis is a primary autoimmune disease or secondarily evolving into autoimmunity as seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases. Related to this aspect is the concept of autoinflammation versus autoimmunity where psoriasis shares mechanisms of both entities. Though T-cells remain among the most important cellular players in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and current therapeutic strategies successfully target these cells or their products irrespective of these concepts, autoimmunity if relevant will add to the treatment armamentarium by using protective and prophylactic antigen-specific modalities.

  1. Pain in autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Mifflin, Katherine A; Kerr, Bradley J

    2016-07-22

    Most autoimmune diseases are associated with pathological pain development. Autoimmune diseases with pathological pain include complex regional pain syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and Guillian-Barré syndrome to name a few. The present Review explores research linking the immune system to the development of pathological pain in autoimmune diseases. Pathological pain has been linked to T-cell activation and the release of cytokines from activated microglia in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. New research on the role of autoantibodies in autoimmunity has generated insights into potential mechanisms of pain associated with autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies may act through various mechanisms in autoimmune disorders. These include the alteration of neuronal excitability via specific antigens such as the voltage-gated potassium channel complexes or by mediating bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Although more research must be done to understand better the role of autoantibodies in autoimmune disease related pain, this may be a promising area of research for new analgesic therapeutic targets. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Immunometabolism and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Jenny; Berod, Luciana; Kamradt, Thomas; Sparwasser, Tim

    2016-11-01

    A continuous increase in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases is to be expected in the aging societies worldwide. Autoimmune disorders not only cause severe disability and chronic pain, but also lead to considerable socio-economic costs. Given that the current treatment options are not curative, have substantial side effects and a high percentage of non-responders, innovative options to the existing therapeutic armament against autoimmune diseases are urgently required. Accumulating evidence suggests that changes in the metabolism of immune cells are associated with, and contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. Additionally, some autoimmune diseases share alterations in metabolic pathways, key metabolites or metabolic byproducts such as reactive oxygen species. Other examples for metabolic changes in autoimmune settings include modifications in amino acid and cholesterol levels or glucose catabolism. Thus, the emerging field of immunometabolism may hold the potential to discover new therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss recent findings describing metabolic changes in autoimmune arthritis, multiple sclerosis as well as type 1 diabetes, focusing on pathophysiological aspects.

  3. Autoimmunity in Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Todoric, Krista; Koontz, Jessica B.; Mattox, Daniel; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) comprise a diverse group of clinical disorders with varied genetic defects. Paradoxically, a substantial proportion of PID patients develop autoimmune phenomena in addition to having increased susceptibility to infections from their impaired immunity. Although much of our understanding comes from data gathered through experimental models, there are several well-characterized PID that have improved our knowledge of the pathways that drive autoimmunity. The goals of this review will be to discuss these immunodeficiencies and to review the literature with respect to the proposed mechanisms for autoimmunity within each put forth to date. PMID:23591608

  4. Autoimmunity in picornavirus infections

    PubMed Central

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Koenig, Andreas; Reddy, Jay; Huber, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Enteroviruses are small, non-enveloped, positive-sense single-strand RNA viruses, and are ubiquitously found throughout the world. These viruses usually cause asymptomatic or mild febrile illnesses, but have a propensity to induce severe diseases including type 1 diabetes and pancreatitis, paralysis and neuroinflammatory disease, myocarditis, or hepatitis. This pathogenicity may result from induction of autoimmunity to organ-specific antigens. While enterovirus-triggered autoimmunity can arise from multiple mechanisms including antigenic mimicry and release of sequestered antigens, the recent demonstration of T cells expressing dual T cell receptors arising as a natural consequence of Theiler's virus infection is the first demonstration of this autoimmune mechanism. PMID:26554915

  5. [Non-autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Leonardo F L; Mana, Daniela L; Bruno, Oscar D

    2014-01-01

    The term thyroiditis comprises a group of thyroid diseases characterized by the presence of inflammation, including autoimmune and non-autoimmune entities. It may manifest as an acute illness with severe thyroid pain (subacute thyroiditis and infectious thyroiditis), and conditions in which the inflammation is not clinically evident evolving without pain and presenting primarily thyroid dysfunction and/or goiter (drug-induced thyroiditis and Riedel thyroiditis). The aim of this review is to provide an updated approach on non-autoimmune thyroiditis and its clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects.

  6. Treatment of Infantile Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Autoimmunity by Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in LPS-Responsive Beige-Like Anchor Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Gámez-Díaz, Laura; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Grimbacher, Bodo; Belohradsky, Bernd; Keller, Klaus-Michael; Rietschel, Christoph; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koletzko, Sibylle; Albert, Michael H.; Bader, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in young children can be a clinical manifestation of various primary immunodeficiency syndromes. Poor clinical outcome is associated with poor quality of life and high morbidity from the complications of prolonged immunosuppressive treatment and malabsorption. In 2012, mutations in the lipopolysaccharide-responsive beige-like anchor (LRBA) gene were identified as the cause of an autoimmunity and immunodeficiency syndrome. Since then, several LRBA-deficient patients have been reported with a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations without reliable predictive prognostic markers. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) has been performed in a few severely affected patients with complete or partial response. Herein, we present a detailed course of the disease and the transplantation procedure used in a LRBA-deficient patient suffering primarily from infantile IBD with immune enteropathy since the age of 6 weeks, and progressive autoimmunity with major complications following long-term immunosuppressive treatment. At 12 years of age, alloHSCT using bone marrow of a fully matched sibling donor—a healthy heterozygous LRBA mutant carrier—was performed after conditioning with a reduced-intensity regimen. During the 6-year follow-up, we observed a complete remission of enteropathy, autoimmunity, and skin vitiligo, with complete donor chimerism. The genetic diagnosis of LRBA deficiency was made post-alloHSCT by detection of two compound heterozygous mutations, using targeted sequencing of DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood before the transplantation. PMID:28197149

  7. Protective Autoimmunity in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. It is accompanied by an autoimmune response against ApoB100, the core protein of LDL, which manifests as CD4 T cell and antibody responses. Approach and Results To assess the role of the autoimmune response in atherosclerosis, the nature of the CD4 T cell response against ApoB100 was studied with and without vaccination with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides. The immunological basis of autoimmunity in atherosclerosis is discussed in the framework of theories of adaptive immunity. Older vaccination approaches are also discussed. Vaccinating Apoe−/− mice with MHC-II restricted ApoB100 peptides reduces atheroma burden in the aorta by ~40%. The protective mechanism likely includes secretion of IL-10. Conclusion Protective autoimmunity limits atherosclerosis in mice and suggests potential for developing preventative and therapeutic vaccines for humans. PMID:26821946

  8. Autoimmunity against laminins.

    PubMed

    Florea, Florina; Koch, Manuel; Hashimoto, Takashi; Sitaru, Cassian

    2016-09-01

    Laminins are ubiquitous constituents of the basement membranes with major architectural and functional role as supported by the fact that absence or mutations of laminins lead to either lethal or severely impairing phenotypes. Besides genetic defects, laminins are involved in a wide range of human diseases including cancer, infections, and inflammatory diseases, as well as autoimmune disorders. A growing body of evidence implicates several laminin chains as autoantigens in blistering skin diseases, collagenoses, vasculitis, or post-infectious autoimmunity. The current paper reviews the existing knowledge on autoimmunity against laminins referring to both experimental and clinical data, and on therapeutic implications of anti-laminin antibodies. Further investigation of relevant laminin epitopes in pathogenic autoimmunity would facilitate the development of appropriate diagnostic tools for thorough characterization of patients' antibody specificities and should decisively contribute to designing more specific therapeutic interventions.

  9. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autoimmune Diseases Progress and Promise Key Words The Immune System Your immune system is the network of cells and tissues throughout ... having two parts: the acquired and the innate immune systems. The acquired (or adaptive) immune system develops as ...

  10. Autoimmunity and Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Amrita

    2015-11-01

    The references provided include data from evidence A and B studies based on the relevant populations. Because many primary immunodeficiencies associated with autoimmune diseases are rare, illustrative cases (evidence D) also are referenced. On the basis of level A evidence, immunoglobulin A deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency and is associated with defective mucosal immunity and autoimmune disease. On the basis of strong evidence (level A), Wiskott Aldrich syndrome presents early in life and is associated with autoimmune arthritis and anemia. On the basis of strong evidence in the literature, a number of primary immunodeficiencies are associated with defects in T regulatory cell number and development, cytokine aberrancies, and, as a consequence, production of autoantibodies. On the basis of strong evidence (level A) and case reports (level D), complement deficiency can be associated with autoimmune disease, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus.

  11. Control of proliferative enteropathy in growing/fattening pigs using growth promoters.

    PubMed

    Tsinas, A C; Kyriakis, S C; Lekkas, S; Sarris, K; Bourtzi-Hatzopoulou, E; Saoulidis, K

    1998-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different antibiotics used as growth promoters on the control of porcine intestinal adenomatosis when administered in weaning, growing and fattening pig diets, according to Annex I of the European Union directive (70/524/EEC and its subsequent amendments to date) for the use of feed additives. On a farm with a previous history of proliferative enteropathy outbreaks, 648 weaned piglets (23 days old) were divided into nine experimental groups according to bodyweight and sex ratio, each group comprising four pens with 18 pigs in each pen. One group served the trial as a negative (unmedicated) control: another (the positive control) received monensin via feed at 100 p.p.m. up to the end of the growing phase (107 days old) and 50 p.p.m. up to slaughter age (156 days old). The remaining seven groups were offered feed with the addition of the following antibiotics: virginia-mycin (50-20 p.p.m.), avilamycin (40-20 p.p.m.), spiramycin (50-20 p.p.m.), zinc bacitracin (50-10 p.p.m.), avoparcin (40-20 p.p.m.), tylosin (40-20 p.p.m.) and salinomycin (60-30 p.p.m.), respectively. The performance of the pigs in the positive control group was very satisfying and among the highest in the trial, verifying earlier field studies. As a general conclusion it seems that all tested growth promoters had a beneficial effect compared with the untreated control, indicated by the decrease of mortality rate, the elimination of diarrhoeal incidence and the enhancement of growth performance, although the proliferative enteropathy control achieved by each substance was not always satisfactory. More specifically, the antibiotic growth promoters tested can be scaled according to their total efficacy as follows: 1. Salinomycin, tylosin, spiramycin; 2. Virginiamycin, zinc bacitracin, avilamycin; and 3. Avoparcin. Finally, it is considered that part of the growth promotion efficacy of the tested substances is due to their potential capacity to control

  12. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy, Inflammation, Stunting, and Impaired Growth in Children in Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Guerrant, Richard L.; Leite, Alvaro M.; Pinkerton, Relana; Medeiros, Pedro H. Q. S.; Cavalcante, Paloma A.; DeBoer, Mark; Kosek, Margaret; Duggan, Christopher; Gewirtz, Andrew; Kagan, Jonathan C.; Gauthier, Anna E.; Swann, Jonathan; Mayneris-Perxachs, Jordi; Bolick, David T.; Maier, Elizabeth A.; Guedes, Marjorie M.; Moore, Sean R.; Petri, William A.; Havt, Alexandre; Lima, Ila F.; Prata, Mara de Moura Gondim; Michaleckyj, Josyf C.; Scharf, Rebecca J.; Sturgeon, Craig; Fasano, Alessio; Lima, Aldo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Critical to the design and assessment of interventions for enteropathy and its developmental consequences in children living in impoverished conditions are non-invasive biomarkers that can detect intestinal damage and predict its effects on growth and development. We therefore assessed fecal, urinary and systemic biomarkers of enteropathy and growth predictors in 375 6–26 month-old children with varying degrees of malnutrition (stunting or wasting) in Northeast Brazil. 301 of these children returned for followup anthropometry after 2-6m. Biomarkers that correlated with stunting included plasma IgA anti-LPS and anti-FliC, zonulin (if >12m old), and intestinal FABP (I-FABP, suggesting prior barrier disruption); and with citrulline, tryptophan and with lower serum amyloid A (SAA) (suggesting impaired defenses). In contrast, subsequent growth was predicted in those with higher fecal MPO or A1AT and also by higher L/M, plasma LPS, I-FABP and SAA (showing intestinal barrier disruption and inflammation). Better growth was predicted in girls with higher plasma citrulline and in boys with higher plasma tryptophan. Interactions were also seen with fecal MPO and neopterin in predicting subsequent growth impairment. Biomarkers clustered into markers of 1) functional intestinal barrier disruption and translocation, 2) structural intestinal barrier disruption and inflammation and 3) systemic inflammation. Principle components pathway analyses also showed that L/M with %L, I-FABP and MPO associate with impaired growth, while also (like MPO) associating with a systemic inflammation cluster of kynurenine, LBP, sCD14, SAA and K/T. Systemic evidence of LPS translocation associated with stunting, while markers of barrier disruption or repair (A1AT and Reg1 with low zonulin) associated with fecal MPO and neopterin. We conclude that key noninvasive biomarkers of intestinal barrier disruption, LPS translocation and of intestinal and systemic inflammation can help elucidate how we

  13. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future.

  14. Auto-immune disease.

    PubMed

    Panayi, G S

    1976-02-01

    Auto-immune disease may result from the interaction of the genetic load of the individual, modification of self-tissue antigens by environmental agents such as virus or drugs and abnormalities of the immunological system itself such as the loss of controlling or suppressor T cells with age. In the majority of people the outcome is tolerance, maintenance of normal tissue architecture and function. In the unfortunate few the outcome is auto-immune disease, that is, failure to recognize "self".

  15. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  16. A monocentric retrospective study comparing pulse cyclophosphamide therapy versus low dose rituximab in the treatment of refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia in adults.

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong; Yan, Siyang; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Guojin; Qu, Wen; Wang, Huaquan; Wu, Yuhong; Liu, Hong; Song, Jia; Guan, Jin; Xing, Limin; Ruan, Erbao; Li, Lijuan; Liu, Hui; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-10-01

    This retrospective study aims at confirming the efficacy and safety of low dose rituximab and pulse cyclophosphamide in the treatment of refractory AIHA in adults and making comparison of the two. Forty-nine adult patients with refractory AIHA have been enrolled. Results showed low dose rituximab combined with steroid therapy (group B) got more CR (78.9 %, 15/19) compared to that in intermittent intravenous cyclophosphamide combined with steroid therapy (group A) (42.1 %, 8/19) (P = 0.04) at 6 months after treatment. The hemoglobin level in group B was higher than group A at the time point of 1 month (P = 0.02) after treatments. The RFS in group A was 87.9 % at 6 months and 82.7 % at 12 months, which were no significant difference with group B (91.1 % at 6 months and 86.0 % at 12 months) (P = 0.81). Both the two therapies were well tolerated with pulmonary infections as the most common side effects. In conclusion, low dose rituximab combined with steroid therapy presents to be a better choice in the treatment of refractory AIHA in adults comparing with pulse cyclophosphamide therapy.

  17. Autoimmunity in 2013.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The peer-reviewed publications in the field of autoimmunity published in 2013 represented a significant proportion of immunology articles and grew since the previous year to indicate that more immune-mediated phenomena may recognize an autoimmune mechanism and illustrated by osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis. As a result, our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity is becoming the paradigm for translational research in which the progress in disease pathogenesis for both tolerance breakdown and inflammation perpetuation is rapidly followed by new treatment approaches and clinical management changes. The similarities across the autoimmune disease spectrum outnumber differences, particularly when treatments are compared. Indeed, the therapeutics of autoimmune diseases are based on a growing armamentarium that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small molecules which act by targeting molecular markers or intracellular mediators with high specificity. Among the over 100 conditions considered as autoimmune, the common grounds are well illustrated by the data reported for systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis or by the plethora of studies on Th17 cells and biomarkers, particularly serum autoantibodies. Further, we are particularly intrigued by studies on the genomics, epigenetics, and microRNA at different stages of disease development or on the safe and effective use of abatacept acting on the costimulation of T and B cells in rheumatoid arthritis. We are convinced that the data published in 2013 represent a promising background for future developments that will exponentially impact the work of laboratory and clinical scientists over the next years.

  18. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  19. Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma – A Case Report of An Uncommon Extranodal T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    V, Geetha; Kudva, Ranjini

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma is a rare primary intestinal lymphoma. It is often, but not always associated with celiac disease. Intraepithelial T cells are postulated as the cell of origin. It is a rare disease accounting for fewer than 5% of all gastrointestinal tract lymphomas. Recent studies indicate that EATL consists of two diseases that are morphologically and genetically distinct and differ with respect to their frequency of association with celiac disease. Current WHO classification recognises two subtypes of EATL – type 1 (classic) and type 2, based on morphology and immunophenotype. EATL type 1 is a large cell lymphoma which is more common and is more commonly associated with celiac disease compared to type 2. Most common site of involvement is the small intestine. We report a case of EATL type 1, in a 62-year-old female patient who presented with features of intestinal obstruction. However, she did not have spruce like featutes. PMID:25478355

  20. Serologic follow-up of a repopulated swine herd after an outbreak of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Roberto M C; Gebhart, Connie J; Armbruster, Greg A; Roggow, Brian D

    2002-10-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an obligate intracellular organism that causes porcine proliferative enteropathy, a widespread infectious disease. Very little is known about the immune response and the epidemiologic features of the disease in the field. The aims of this study were to evaluate the duration and titers of antibody specific for L. intracellularis in gilts after an outbreak of proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy (PHE), to evaluate maternal antibodies in piglets, and to evaluate seroconversion and fecal shedding in growing-finishing pigs. Thirty-six gilts in a herd that had recently experienced an outbreak of PHE, including 13 that had recovered, were bled 3 wk after the beginning of the outbreak and then every 3 wk until they became seronegative in 2 consecutive tests. Fourteen piglets from 5 gilts seropositive at farrowing and 5 piglets from 2 sows that remained seronegative were bled once or twice at the farrowing house and then every 3 wk until they reached market age. Fecal samples from these pigs were tested by polymerase chain reaction at 7 wk of age and then on the days of blood collection. After the PHE outbreak, the gilts had high serum antibody levels; the levels decreased over time, but antibody was still detectable for up to 3 mo in some animals. Four piglets from sows that were seropositive at farrowing had detectable passive antibodies up to 5 wk of age. Some nursery pigs started shedding L. intracellularis around 7 wk of age; peak shedding was observed between 13 and 16 wk. Antibody was not detected until 16 wk of age and was more often detected between 19 and 22 wk.

  1. [Hodgkin disease and autoimmunity in children: 11 case reports].

    PubMed

    Jarrassé, C; Pagnier, A; Edan, C; Landman-Parker, J; Mazingue, F; Mansuy, L; Bertrand, Y; Paillard, C; Pellier, I; Margueritte, G; Plantaz, D

    2011-04-01

    The association of lymphoma and autoimmune manifestations has been predominantly studied in adults affected by non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Few publications exist in the literature concerning Hodgkin lymphoma, particularly in children and adolescents. The objectives of this study were to define the characteristics of the link between Hodgkin disease and autoimmunity in childhood. The present 25-year retrospective study was conducted in all centers affiliated with the French Society of Paediatric Oncology (SFCE). Eleven children with Hodgkin disease presented manifestations of disimmunity preceding or following their diagnosis. Four patients had thrombocytopenic purpura, the remaining 7 each had a different autoimmune pathology: lupus syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome with transient ischemic attack, Evans syndrome, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, autoimmune thyroiditis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Lymphoma relapse occurred in 3 patients. Two children died, death being directly attributed to the autoimmune disease in 1 case. Our data suggest that development of autoimmunity is related to significant morbidity. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms include lymphocyte proliferation secondary to chronic inflammation, cell-mediated immune deficiency in Hodgkin disease, molecular mimetics, and antineoplastic phenomena are discussed. A study with a larger patient population is needed to identify the group of children at high risk of autoimmunity for whom additional investigations and modified therapy may be indicated.

  2. Progress in autoimmune epileptic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, S.; Vincent, A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Autoimmune epileptic encephalopathy is a potentially treatable neurological syndrome characterized by the coexistence of a neuronal antibody in the CSF and serum. Patients present with combinations of seizures, neuropsychiatric features, movement disorder and cognitive decline, but some patients have isolated seizures either at first presentation or during their illness. This review summarises our current understanding of the roles of specific neuronal antibodies in epilepsy-related syndromes and aims to aid the clinician in diagnosis and treatment. Recent findings Antigen discovery methods in three neuroimmunology centres independently identified antibodies to different subunits of the GABAA receptor; high levels of these antibodies were found mainly in patients with severe refractory seizures. These and other antibodies were also found in a proportion (<10%) of children and adults with epilepsy. A clinical study comparing immunotherapy in patients with autoantibodies or without an identified target antigen found neuroinflammatory features were predictive of a therapeutic response. New in-vitro and in-vivo studies, and spontaneous animal models, have confirmed the pathogenicity and epileptogenicity of neuronal antibodies and their relevance to other mammals. Summary Neuronal antibodies are an important cause of autoimmune epileptic encephalopathy, early recognition is important as there may be an underlying tumour, and early treatment is associated with a better outcome. In the absence of an antibody, the clinician should adopt a pragmatic approach and consider a trial of immunotherapy when other causes have been excluded. PMID:26886357

  3. Pregnancy with autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Braga, António Costa; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Braga, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to review our experience with gestations in autoimmune hepatitis patients. Background: There are only limited data describing pregnancy in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Patients and methods: Retrospective analysis of pregnancies with autoimmune hepatitis followed in Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Portugal in the last ten years. Results: We reported nine pregnancies in seven patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Two patients had documented liver cirrhosis prior to the pregnancy. In this study, 66.7% of patients were treated with azathioprine and 88.9% with prednisolone. Clinical improvements were observed in 11.1% of pregnancies and 22.2% exacerbations were diagnosed. There were six live births and two preterm deliveries (preterm delivery rate of 33%). We also report three first trimester miscarriages (early gestation miscarriage rate of 33%). There were no neonatal or maternal deaths. Conclusion: The favorable obstetric outcome is a realistic expectation in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Tight monitoring and control of asymptomatic and unpredictable exacerbations, which are unrelated to the severity of the underlying disease, are essential to the prognosis of the current pregnancy. PMID:27458515

  4. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling.

  5. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Jean C.; Serve, Kinta M.; Noonan, Curtis W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease. PMID:24876951

  6. Curcumin and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Bright, John J

    2007-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from microbial infection; nevertheless, a breakdown in the immune system often results in infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, thyroiditis, uveitis, systemic lupus erythromatosis, and myasthenia gravis are organ-specific autoimmune diseases that afflict more than 5% of the population worldwide. Although the etiology is not known and a cure is still wanting, the use of herbal and dietary supplements is on the rise in patients with autoimmune diseases, mainly because they are effective, inexpensive, and relatively safe. Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used for pain and wound-healing. Recent studies have shown that curcumin ameliorates multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease in human or animal models. Curcumin inhibits these autoimmune diseases by regulating inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and associated JAK-STAT, AP-1, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in immune cells. Although the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals are traditionally achieved through dietary consumption at low levels for long periods of time, the use of purified active compounds such as curcumin at higher doses for therapeutic purposes needs extreme caution. A precise understanding of effective dose, safe regiment, and mechanism of action is required for the use of curcumin in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases.

  7. A minimum number of autoimmune T cells to induce autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Bosch, Angela J T; Bolinger, Beatrice; Keck, Simone; Stepanek, Ondrej; Ozga, Aleksandra J; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Stein, Jens V; Palmer, Ed

    2017-03-12

    While autoimmune T cells are present in most individuals, only a minority of the population suffers from an autoimmune disease. To better appreciate the limits of T cell tolerance, we carried out experiments to determine how many autoimmune T cells are required to initiate an experimental autoimmune disease. Variable numbers of autoimmune OT-I T cells were transferred into RIP-OVA mice, which were injected with antigen-loaded DCs in a single footpad; this restricted T cell priming to a few OT-I T cells that are present in the draining popliteal lymph node. Using selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) we counted the number of OT-I T cells present in the popliteal lymph node at the time of priming. Analysis of our data suggests that a single autoimmune T cell cannot induce an experimental autoimmune disease, but a "quorum" of 2-5 autoimmune T cells clearly has this capacity.

  8. Coeliac disease: a unique model for investigating broken tolerance in autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Melinda Y; Tye-Din, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease, a prevalent immune-mediated enteropathy driven by dietary gluten, provides an exceptional human model to dissect the genetic, environmental and immunologic factors operating in autoimmunity. Despite the causative antigen being an exogenous food protein, coeliac disease has many features in common with autoimmune disease including a strong HLA class II association and the presence of pathogenic CD4+ T cells and autoantibodies. CD8+ intraepithelial lymphocytes specifically target and destroy intestinal epithelium in response to stress signals and not a specific antigen. A unique feature of coeliac disease is the ability to remove gluten to induce disease remission and reintroduce it to trigger a memory response. This provides an unparalleled opportunity to study disease-relevant CD4+ T cells that have been expanded in vivo. As a result, the causative peptides have been characterised at a level unprecedented for any autoimmune disease. Despite the complexity of the gluten proteome, resistance to gastrointestinal proteolysis and susceptibility to post-translational modification by transglutaminase help shape a restricted repertoire of immunogenic gluten peptides that have high affinity for disease-associated HLA. The critical steps in coeliac disease pathogenesis have been broadly elucidated and provide the basis for experimental therapies in pre-clinical or clinical development. However, little is known about how and why tolerance to gluten sometimes breaks or fails to develop. Understanding the interactions between genes, the environment, gluten immunity and the microbiome may provide novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of disease. PMID:27990287

  9. Autoimmune encephalitis update

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Josep; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-associated immune-mediated disorders of the central nervous system are a heterogeneous group. These disorders include the classic paraneoplastic neurologic disorders and the more recently described autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to neuronal cell-surface or synaptic receptors that occur with and without a cancer association. Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized as the cause of a variety of neuropsychiatric syndromes that can be severe and prolonged. In contrast to the classic paraneoplastic disorders that are poorly responsive to tumor treatment and immunotherapy, autoimmune encephalitis often responds to these treatments, and patients can have full or marked recoveries. As early treatment speeds recovery, reduces disability, and decreases relapses that can occur in about 20% of cases, it is important that the immune pathogenesis of these disorders is recognized. PMID:24637228

  10. Headache in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    John, Seby; Hajj-Ali, Rula A

    2014-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous inflammatory disorders characterized by systemic or localized inflammation, leading to ischemia and tissue destruction. These include disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus and related diseases, systemic vasculitides, and central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis (primary or secondary). Headache is a very common manifestation of CNS involvement of these diseases. Although headache characteristics can be unspecific and often non-diagnostic, it is important to recognize because headache can be the first manifestation of CNS involvement. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary not only to treat the headache, but also to help prevent serious neurological sequelae that frequently accompany autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss headache associated with autoimmune diseases along with important mimics.

  11. Epigenomics of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bhawna; Hawkins, R David

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune diseases are complex disorders of largely unknown etiology. Genetic studies have identified a limited number of causal genes from a marginal number of individuals, and demonstrated a high degree of discordance in monozygotic twins. Studies have begun to reveal epigenetic contributions to these diseases, primarily through the study of DNA methylation, but chromatin and non-coding RNA changes are also emerging. Moving forward an integrative analysis of genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic data, with the latter two coming from specific cell types, will provide an understanding that has been missed from genetics alone. We provide an overview of the current state of the field and vision for deriving the epigenomics of autoimmunity.

  12. The microbiota-derived metabolite indole decreases mucosal inflammation and injury in a murine model of NSAID enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield-Cargile, Canaan M.; Cohen, Noah D.; Chapkin, Robert S.; Weeks, Brad R.; Davidson, Laurie A.; Goldsby, Jennifer S.; Hunt, Carrie L.; Steinmeyer, Shelby H.; Menon, Rani; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Jayaraman, Arul; Alaniz, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are one of the most frequently used classes of medications in the world. Unfortunately, NSAIDs induce an enteropathy associated with high morbidity and mortality. Although the pathophysiology of this condition involves the interaction of the gut epithelium, microbiota, and NSAIDs, the precise mechanisms by which microbiota influence NSAID enteropathy are unclear. One possible mechanism is that the microbiota may attenuate the severity of disease by specific metabolite-mediated regulation of host inflammation and injury. The microbiota-derived tryptophan-metabolite indole is abundant in the healthy mammalian gut and positively influences intestinal health. We thus examined the effects of indole administration on NSAID enteropathy. Mice (n = 5 per group) were treated once daily for 7 days with an NSAID (indomethacin; 5 mg/kg), indole (20 mg/kg), indomethacin plus indole, or vehicle only (control). Outcomes compared among groups included: microscopic pathology; fecal calprotectin concentration; proportion of neutrophils in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes; fecal microbiota composition and diversity; small intestinal mucosal transcriptome; and, fecal tryptophan metabolites. Co-administration of indole with indomethacin: significantly reduced mucosal pathology scores, fecal calprotectin concentrations, and neutrophilic infiltration of the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes induced by indomethacin; modulated NSAID-induced perturbation of the microbiota, fecal metabolites, and inferred metagenome; and, abrogated a pro-inflammatory gene expression profile in the small intestinal mucosa induced by indomethacin. The microbiota-derived metabolite indole attenuated multiple deleterious effects of NSAID enteropathy, including modulating inflammation mediated by innate immune responses and altering indomethacin-induced shift of the microbiota. PMID:27007819

  13. Expression of epithelial cell-derived cytokine genes in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with chronic enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    OSADA, Hironari; OGAWA, Misato; HASEGAWA, Ayana; NAGAI, Makoto; SHIRAI, Junsuke; SASAKI, Kazuaki; SHIMODA, Minoru; ITOH, Hiroshi; KONDO, Hirotaka; OHMORI, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear whether epithelial cell-derived cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), contribute to development of canine chronic enteropathy (CE), which includes antibiotic-responsive enteropathy (ARE), food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, we examined mRNA expression of il-25, il-33 and tslp in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with ARE, FRE and IBD. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of il-33 was significantly lower in the duodenum in dogs with FRE than in healthy dogs. The results suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines may not be an inducer of Th2-type immunity in the gut of dogs with CE, and decreased expression of IL-33 may be involved in induction of FRE. Further studies are required to clarify roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines, especially IL-33, in the pathogenesis of canine CE. PMID:28049868

  14. Expression of epithelial cell-derived cytokine genes in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with chronic enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hironari; Ogawa, Misato; Hasegawa, Ayana; Nagai, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kondo, Hirotaka; Ohmori, Keitaro

    2017-02-28

    It remains unclear whether epithelial cell-derived cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), contribute to development of canine chronic enteropathy (CE), which includes antibiotic-responsive enteropathy (ARE), food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, we examined mRNA expression of il-25, il-33 and tslp in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with ARE, FRE and IBD. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of il-33 was significantly lower in the duodenum in dogs with FRE than in healthy dogs. The results suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines may not be an inducer of Th2-type immunity in the gut of dogs with CE, and decreased expression of IL-33 may be involved in induction of FRE. Further studies are required to clarify roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines, especially IL-33, in the pathogenesis of canine CE.

  15. A case of autoimmune urticaria accompanying autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III associated with Hashimoto's disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Kasznicki, Jacek; Drzewoski, Józef

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type III (APS III) associated with Hashimoto's disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, vitiligo and autoimmune urticaria. This rare genetic disorder occurs with unknown frequency in the Polish population. It is characterised by endocrine tissue destruction resulting in the malfunction of multiple organs.Several cases of APS III associated with organ-specific autoimmune diseases such as coeliac disease, hypogonadism and myasthenia gravis, as well as organ-nonspecific or systemic autoimmune diseases such as sarcoidosis, Sjögren syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis have been described. To the best of our knowledge, we here describe the first case of APS III associated with autoimmune thyroiditis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, vitiligo and autoimmune urticaria in an adult patient.

  16. Ciprofloxacin blocked enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated NSAID-induced enteropathy in rats partly by inhibiting intestinal β-glucuronidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ze-yu; Sun, Bin-bin; Shu, Nan; Xie, Qiu-shi; Tang, Xian-ge; Ling, Zhao-li; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Kai-jing; Xu, Ping; Zhang, Mian; Li, Ying; Chen, Yang; Liu, Li; Xia, Lun-zhu; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Diclofenac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which may cause serious intestinal adverse reactions (enteropathy). In this study we investigated whether co-administration of ciprofloxacin affected the pharmacokinetics of diclofenac and diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats. Methods: The pharmacokinetics of diclofenac was assessed in rats after receiving diclofenac (10 mg/kg, ig, or 5 mg/kg, iv), with or without ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg, ig) co-administered. After receiving 6 oral doses or 15 intravenous doses of diclofenac, the rats were sacrificed, and small intestine was removed to examine diclofenac-induced enteropathy. β-Glucuronidase activity in intestinal content, bovine liver and E coli was evaluated. Results: Following oral or intravenous administration, the pharmacokinetic profile of diclofenac displayed typical enterohepatic circulation, and co-administration of ciprofloxacin abolished the enterohepatic circulation, resulted in significant reduction in the plasma content of diclofenac. In control rats, β-glucuronidase activity in small intestinal content was region-dependent: proximal intestineenteropathy was developed with severe enteropathy occurred in distal small intestine. Co-administration of ciprofloxacin significantly alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy. Conclusion: Co-administration of ciprofloxacin attenuated enterohepatic circulation of diclofenac and alleviated diclofenac-induced enteropathy in rats, partly via

  17. [THE ENVIRONMENT AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES].

    PubMed

    Watad, Abdulla; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-05-01

    The immune system carefully distinguishes between self and non-self-components. Therefore, any small deviation of this balanced function may result in an autoimmune activity and harm against self-antigens (autoantigens). The link between autoimmune diseases and various heredity and environmental factors has been discussed in numerous studies. The infectious factor is still considered to be the most important environmental factor leading to the development of autoimmune disease. Recent studies associated new environmental factors to autoimmunity, such as excessive salt consumption. In this paper, we summarize the relationship between environmental factors and autoimmune diseases covering innovations in this field.

  18. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Rust, Christian; Beuers, Ulrich

    2008-06-07

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes, although there has been no standardised definition. Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC. The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form, affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC. Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported. The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children, adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC. Interestingly, transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients, especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome. Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment. Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric, since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders. Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes. In end-stage disease, liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  19. Prenatal immunotoxicant exposure and postnatal autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, S D

    1999-01-01

    Reports in humans and rodents indicate that immune development may be altered following perinatal exposure to immunotoxic compounds, including chemotherapeutics, corticosteroids, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. Effects from such exposure may be more dramatic or persistent than following exposure during adult life. For example, prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlordane or to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[(italic)a(/italic)]pyrene produces what appears to be lifelong immunosuppression in mice. Whether prenatal immunotoxicant exposure may predispose the organism to postnatal autoimmune disease remains largely unknown. In this regard, the therapeutic immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) crosses the placenta poorly. However, lethally irradiated rodents exposed to CsA postsyngeneic bone marrow transplant (i.e., during re-establishment of the immune system) develop T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, suggesting this drug may produce a fundamental disruption in development of self-tolerance by T cells. The environmental contaminant 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxin (TCDD) crosses the placenta and produces fetal thymic effects (italic)in vivo(/italic) similar to effects of CsA in fetal thymic organ culture, including inhibited thymocyte maturation and reduced expression of thymic major histocompatability complex class II molecules. These observations led to the suggestion that gestational exposure to TCDD may interfere with normal development of self-tolerance. Possibly supporting this hypothesis, when mice predisposed to development of autoimmune disease were treated with TCDD during gestation, postnatal autoimmunity was exacerbated. Similar results have been reported for mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol during development. These reports suggest that prenatal exposure to certain immunotoxicants may play a role in postnatal expression of autoimmunity. PMID:10502532

  20. Clinical significance of autoantibodies in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2013-10-01

    The accurate diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) rely upon the detection of characteristic autoantibodies. Positivity for anti-nuclear (ANA) and/or anti-smooth muscle (SMA) autoantibodies defines AIH type 1 (AIH-1), whereas anti-liver kidney microsomal type 1 (anti-LKM1) and/or anti-liver cytosol type 1 (anti-LC1) define AIH type 2 (AIH-2). ANA and SMA, and less commonly anti-LKM1, have also been detected in de-novo autoimmune hepatitis developing after liver transplantation, a condition that may affect patients transplanted for non-autoimmune liver disease. The diagnostic autoantibodies associated with AIH-1 are also detected in the paediatric AIH/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome, referred to as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis (ASC). ASC, like adult primary sclerosing cholangitis, is often associated with atypical perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (p-ANCA), although p-ANCA are also detected in other autoimmune liver diseases. These associations highlight the necessity for simple and prompt diagnostic autoantibody testing, and the requirement for the accurate interpretation of the results of the tests in the clinical context. Fine-mapping of antigenic autoantibody targets has facilitated the development of rapid molecular assays that have the potential to revolutionise the field if properly standardised and when used in combination with classical immunofluorescence. Despite their diagnostic significance, the pathogenic role of the various autoantibodies and the mechanisms by which they can potentially inflict damage onto the liver cell remain a topic for further research.

  1. Profound Reversible Hypogammaglobulinemia Caused by Celiac Disease in the Absence of Protein Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Ameratunga, Rohan; Barker, Russell William; Steele, Richard Henderson; Deo, Maneka; Woon, See-Tarn; Yeong, Mee Ling; Koopmans, Wikke

    2015-08-01

    When patients with hypogammaglobulinemia are encountered, a vigorous search should be undertaken for secondary treatable causes. Here we describe the first case of a patient with severe asymptomatic hypogammaglobulinemia where the underlying cause was undiagnosed celiac disease. A strict gluten free diet resulted in resolution of her mild long-standing abdominal symptoms and correction of her hypogammaglobulinemia. There was corresponding improvement in her duodenal histology and normalisation of her celiac serology. Protein losing enteropathy was unlikely to have been the mechanism of her profound hypogammaglobulinemia, as her albumin was within the normal range and she had a normal fecal alpha 1 antitrypsin level. Application of the Ameratunga et al. (2013) diagnostic criteria was helpful in confirming this patient did not have Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorder (CVID). Celiac disease must now be considered in the differential diagnosis of severe hypogammaglobulinemia. There should be a low threshold for undertaking celiac serology in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia, even if they have minimal symptoms attributable to gut disease.

  2. Chromosomal gains at 9q characterize enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zettl, Andreas; Ott, German; Makulik, Angela; Katzenberger, Tiemo; Starostik, Petr; Eichler, Thorsten; Puppe, Bernhard; Bentz, Martin; Müller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Chott, Andreas

    2002-11-01

    Genetic alterations in enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) are unknown so far. In this series, 38 cases of ETL were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). CGH revealed chromosomal imbalances in 87% of cases analyzed, with recurrent gains of genetic material involving chromosomes 9q (in 58% of cases), 7q (24%), 5q (18%), and 1q (16%). Recurrent losses of genetic material occurred on chromosomes 8p and 13q (24% each), and 9p (18%). In this first systematic genetic study on ETL, chromosomal gains on 9q (minimal overlapping region 9q33-q34) were found to be highly characteristic of ETL. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis on four cases of ETL, using a probe for 9q34, indicated frequent and multiple gains of chromosomal material at 9q34 (up to nine signals per case). Among 16 patients with ETL who survived initial disease presentation, patients with more than three chromosomal gains or losses (n = 11) followed a worse clinical course than those with three or less imbalances (n = 5). The observation of similar genetic alterations in ETL and in primary gastric (n = 4) and colonic (n = 1) T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, is suggestive of a genetic relationship of gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas at either localization.

  3. Assessment of Environmental Enteropathy in the MAL-ED Cohort Study: Theoretical and Analytic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L.; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J.; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A.; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C.; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world. PMID:25305293

  4. Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH), environmental enteropathy, nutrition, and early child development: making the links.

    PubMed

    Ngure, Francis M; Reid, Brianna M; Humphrey, Jean H; Mbuya, Mduduzi N; Pelto, Gretel; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    There is scarce research and programmatic evidence on the effect of poor water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions of the physical environment on early child cognitive, sensorimotor, and socioemotional development. Furthermore, many common WASH interventions are not specifically designed to protect babies in the first 3 years of life, when gut health and linear growth are established. We review evidence linking WASH, anemia, and child growth, and highlight pathways through which WASH may affect early child development, primarily through inflammation, stunting, and anemia. Environmental enteropathy, a prevalent subclinical condition of the gut, may be a key mediating pathway linking poor hygiene to developmental deficits. Current early child development research and programs lack evidence-based interventions to provide a clean play and infant feeding environment in addition to established priorities of nutrition, stimulation, and child protection. Solutions to this problem will require appropriate behavior change and technologies that are adapted to the social and physical context and conducive to infant play and socialization. We propose the concept of baby WASH as an additional component of early childhood development programs.

  5. Changes in cecal microbiota and mucosal gene expression revealed new aspects of epizootic rabbit enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Bäuerl, Christine; Collado, M Carmen; Zúñiga, Manuel; Blas, Enrique; Pérez Martínez, Gaspar

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy (ERE) is a severe disease of unknown aetiology that mainly affects post-weaning animals. Its incidence can be prevented by antibiotic treatment suggesting that bacterial elements are crucial for the development of the disease. Microbial dynamics and host responses during the disease were studied. Cecal microbiota was characterized in three rabbit groups (ERE-affected, healthy and healthy pretreated with antibiotics), followed by transcriptional analysis of cytokines and mucins in the cecal mucosa and vermix by q-rtPCR. In healthy animals, cecal microbiota with or without antibiotic pretreatment was very similar and dominated by Alistipes and Ruminococcus. Proportions of both genera decreased in ERE rabbits whereas Bacteroides, Akkermansia and Rikenella increased, as well as Clostridium, γ-Proteobacteria and other opportunistic and pathogenic species. The ERE group displayed remarkable dysbiosis and reduced taxonomic diversity. Transcription rate of mucins and inflammatory cytokines was very high in ERE rabbits, except IL-2, and its analysis revealed the existence of two clearly different gene expression patterns corresponding to Inflammatory and (mucin) Secretory Profiles. Furthermore, these profiles were associated to different bacterial species, suggesting that they may correspond to different stages of the disease. Other data obtained in this work reinforced the notion that ERE morbidity and mortality is possibly caused by an overgrowth of different pathogens in the gut of animals whose immune defence mechanisms seem not to be adequately responding.

  6. Changes in Cecal Microbiota and Mucosal Gene Expression Revealed New Aspects of Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, Manuel; Blas, Enrique; Pérez Martínez, Gaspar

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic Rabbit Enteropathy (ERE) is a severe disease of unknown aetiology that mainly affects post-weaning animals. Its incidence can be prevented by antibiotic treatment suggesting that bacterial elements are crucial for the development of the disease. Microbial dynamics and host responses during the disease were studied. Cecal microbiota was characterized in three rabbit groups (ERE-affected, healthy and healthy pretreated with antibiotics), followed by transcriptional analysis of cytokines and mucins in the cecal mucosa and vermix by q-rtPCR. In healthy animals, cecal microbiota with or without antibiotic pretreatment was very similar and dominated by Alistipes and Ruminococcus. Proportions of both genera decreased in ERE rabbits whereas Bacteroides, Akkermansia and Rikenella increased, as well as Clostridium, γ-Proteobacteria and other opportunistic and pathogenic species. The ERE group displayed remarkable dysbiosis and reduced taxonomic diversity. Transcription rate of mucins and inflammatory cytokines was very high in ERE rabbits, except IL-2, and its analysis revealed the existence of two clearly different gene expression patterns corresponding to Inflammatory and (mucin) Secretory Profiles. Furthermore, these profiles were associated to different bacterial species, suggesting that they may correspond to different stages of the disease. Other data obtained in this work reinforced the notion that ERE morbidity and mortality is possibly caused by an overgrowth of different pathogens in the gut of animals whose immune defence mechanisms seem not to be adequately responding. PMID:25147938

  7. Assessment of environmental enteropathy in the MAL-ED cohort study: theoretical and analytic framework.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Margaret; Guerrant, Richard L; Kang, Gagandeep; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gratz, Jean; Gottlieb, Michael; Lang, Dennis; Lee, Gwenyth; Haque, Rashidul; Mason, Carl J; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Lima, Aldo; Petri, William A; Houpt, Eric; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Seidman, Jessica C; Mduma, Estomih; Samie, Amidou; Babji, Sudhir

    2014-11-01

    Individuals in the developing world live in conditions of intense exposure to enteric pathogens due to suboptimal water and sanitation. These environmental conditions lead to alterations in intestinal structure, function, and local and systemic immune activation that are collectively referred to as environmental enteropathy (EE). This condition, although poorly defined, is likely to be exacerbated by undernutrition as well as being responsible for permanent growth deficits acquired in early childhood, vaccine failure, and loss of human potential. This article addresses the underlying theoretical and analytical frameworks informing the methodology proposed by the Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study to define and quantify the burden of disease caused by EE within a multisite cohort. Additionally, we will discuss efforts to improve, standardize, and harmonize laboratory practices within the MAL-ED Network. These efforts will address current limitations in the understanding of EE and its burden on children in the developing world.

  8. Environmental enteropathy is associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Lee, G O; Olortegui, M Paredes; Salas, M Siguas; Yori, P Peñataro; Trigoso, D Rengifo; Kosek, P; Mispireta, M L; Oberhelman, R; Caulfield, L E; Kosek, M N

    2017-03-07

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a syndrome of altered small intestine structure and function hypothesized to be common among individuals lacking access to improved water and sanitation. There are plausible biological mechanisms, both inflammatory and non-inflammatory, by which EE may alter the cardiometabolic profile. Here, we test the hypothesis that EE is associated with the cardiometabolic profile among young children living in an environment of intense enteropathogen exposure. In total, 156 children participating in the Peruvian cohort of a multicenter study on childhood infectious diseases, growth and development were contacted at 3-5 years of age. The urinary lactulose:mannitol ratio, and plasma antibody to endotoxin core were determined in order to assess intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation. Blood pressure, anthropometry, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and cholesterol and apolipoprotein profiles were also assessed. Extant cohort data were also used to relate biomarkers of EE during the first 18 months of life to early child cardiometabolic profile. Lower intestinal surface area, as assessed by percent mannitol excretion, was associated with lower apolipoprotein-AI and lower high-density lipoprotein concentrations. Lower intestinal surface area was also associated with greater blood pressure. Inflammation at 7 months of age was associated with higher blood pressure in later childhood. This study supports the potential for a relationship between EE and the cardiometabolic profile.

  9. Cross Lineage Rearrangement in Feline Enteropathy-Associated T-cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Andrews, C; Operacz, M; Maes, R; Kiupel, M

    2016-05-01

    Feline enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) type II is characterized by infiltration of the small intestinal mucosa with small T-cells with variable epitheliotropism and is often difficult to differentiate from inflammation. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to assess antigen receptor rearrangements (PARR) amplifies the T- (T-cell receptor gamma, TCRG) or B-cell (immunoglobulin heavy chain, IGH) antigen receptor genes and is used to differentiate EATL from inflammation. However, PARR does not determine lymphocyte phenotype, and clonal rearrangement of either or both the TCRG or IGH genes may be detected in neoplastic T-cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of cross lineage rearrangement in feline EATL type II. Using a diagnostic algorithm combining histology, immunohistochemistry, and PARR testing, 8 of 92 cases diagnosed as EATL type II at Michigan State University between January 2013 and June 2014 showed cross lineage rearrangement (8.7%). PARR for the IGH gene facilitates the diagnosis of cases histologically highly suggestive of EATL type II in which polyclonal rearrangement of the TCRG gene is detected.

  10. Geophagy is associated with environmental enteropathy and stunting in children in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    George, Christine Marie; Oldja, Lauren; Biswas, Shwapon; Perin, Jamie; Lee, Gwenyth O; Kosek, Margaret; Sack, R Bradley; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Haque, Rashidul; Parvin, Tahmina; Azmi, Ishrat J; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Talukder, Kaisar A; Mohammad, Shahnaij; Faruque, Abu G

    2015-06-01

    There is a growing body of literature indicating an association between stunting and environmental enteropathy (EE), a disorder thought to be caused by repeated exposures to enteric pathogens. To investigate the relationship between exposure to enteric pathogens through geophagy, consumption of soil, EE, and stunting, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 216 children under 5 years of age in rural Bangladesh. Geophagy was assessed at baseline using 5 hour structured observation and caregiver reports. Stool was analyzed for fecal markers of intestinal inflammation: alpha-1-antitrypsin, myeloperoxidase, neopterin (all three combined to form an EE disease activity score), and calprotectin. Eighteen percent of children had observed geophagy events by structured observation and 28% had caregiver reported events in the past week. Nearly all households had Escherichia coli (97%) in soil, and 14% had diarrheagenic E. coli. Children with caregiver-reported geophagy had significantly higher EE scores (0.72 point difference, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.01, 1.42) and calprotectin concentrations (237.38 μg/g, 95% CI: 12.77, 462.00). Furthermore, at the 9-month follow-up the odds of being stunted (height-for-age z-score < -2) was double for children with caregiver-reported geophagy (odds ratio [OR]: 2.27, 95% CI: 1.14, 4.51). These findings suggest that geophagy in young children may be an important unrecognized risk factor for EE and stunting.

  11. Autoimmune Neuromuscular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kraker, Jessica; Živković, Saša A

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune neuromuscular disorders affecting peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction or muscle have a wide clinical spectrum with diverse pathogenetic mechanisms. Peripheral nervous system may be targeted in the context of complex immune reactions involving different cytokines, antigen-presenting cells, B cells and different types of T cells. Various immunomodulating and cytotoxic treatments block proliferation or activation of immune cells by different mechanisms attempting to control the response of the immune system and limit target organ injury. Most treatment protocols for autoimmune neuromuscular disorders are based on the use of corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis, with cytotoxic agents mostly used as steroid-sparing medications. More recently, development of specific monoclonal antibodies targeting individual cell types allowed a different approach targeting specific immune pathways, but these new treatments are also associated with various adverse effects and their long-term efficacy is still unknown. PMID:22379454

  12. Complement in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Pandiarajan; Rawat, Amit; Sharma, Madhubala; Singh, Surjit

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is an ancient and evolutionary conserved element of the innate immune mechanism. It comprises of more than 20 serum proteins most of which are synthesized in the liver. These proteins are synthesized as inactive precursor proteins which are activated by appropriate stimuli. The activated forms of these proteins act as proteases and cleave other components successively in amplification pathways leading to exponential generation of final effectors. Three major pathways of complement pathways have been described, namely the classical, alternative and lectin pathways which are activated by different stimuli. However, all the 3 pathways converge on Complement C3. Cleavage of C3 and C5 successively leads to the production of the membrane attack complex which is final common effector. Excessive and uncontrolled activation of the complement has been implicated in the host of autoimmune diseases. But the complement has also been bemusedly described as the proverbial "double edged sword". On one hand, complement is the final effector of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases and on the other, deficiencies of some components of the complement can result in autoimmune diseases. Currently available tools such as enzyme based immunoassays for functional assessment of complement pathways, flow cytometry, next generation sequencing and proteomics-based approaches provide an exciting opportunity to study this ancient yet mysterious element of innate immunity.

  13. Cytokines and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, M G; Pozzilli, P; Thorpe, R

    1994-01-01

    Although the immunopathology of most autoimmune diseases has been well defined, the mechanisms responsible for the breakdown of self-tolerance and which lead to the development of systemic and organ-specific autoaggression are still unclear. Evidence has accumulated which supports a role for a disregulated production of cytokines by leucocytes and possibly other cells in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of cytokine effects in the regulation of the immune response, it is difficult to determine whether abnormalities in the patterns of cytokine production are primary or secondary to the pathological process. Confusion is also caused by the fact that the biological activities of cytokines are multiple and often overlapping, and consequently it is difficult to focus on a unique effect of any one cytokine. Characterization of the potential and actual involvement of cytokines is important not only for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmune conditions, but particularly because of the implications for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of the diseases. PMID:8149655

  14. Paediatric Autoimmune Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    In paediatrics, there are 2 liver disorders in which liver damage most likely stems from an autoimmune attack: 'classical' autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and the AIH/sclerosing cholangitis overlap syndrome (also known as autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, ASC). The presentation of childhood autoimmune liver disease (AILD) is non-specific and can mimic most other liver disorders. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to prevent rapid deterioration and promote remission and long-term survival. Difficult-to-treat or non-responsive patients should be treated with mycophenolate mofetil; if this fails then calcineurin inhibitors can be tried. Persistent failure to respond or lack of adherence to treatment result in end-stage liver disease. These patients, and those with fulminant liver failure at diagnosis, will require liver transplantation. ASC responds to the same immunosuppressive treatment used for AIH when treatment is initiated early. Abnormal liver function tests often resolve within a few months of treatment, although medium- to long-term prognosis is worse than that of AIH because bile duct disease continues to progress despite treatment in approximately 50% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid is usually added to conventional treatment regimen in ASC, but whether this actually helps arrest the progression of bile duct disease remains to be established. The pathogenesis of paediatric-onset AILD is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4pos T-cells. While Th1 effector cells are associated with hepatocyte damage in both AIH and ASC, Th17 immune responses predominate in the latter where they correlate with biochemical indices of cholestasis, indicating that IL-17 is involved in the

  15. Imaging of autoimmune biliary disease.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Melinda J; Kim, So Yeon; Jhaveri, Kartik S; Behr, Spencer C; Seo, Nieun; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune biliary diseases are poorly understood but important to recognize. Initially, autoimmune biliary diseases are asymptomatic but may lead to progressive cholestasis with associated ductopenia, portal hypertension, cirrhosis, and eventually liver failure. The three main forms of autoimmune biliary disease are primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and IgG4-associated cholangitis. Although some overlap may occur between the three main autoimmune diseases of the bile ducts, each disease typically affects a distinct demographic group and requires a disease-specific diagnostic workup. For all the autoimmune biliary diseases, imaging provides a means to monitor disease progression, assess for complications, and screen for the development of hepatobiliary malignancies that are known to affect patients with these diseases. Imaging is also useful to suggest or corroborate the diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis and IgG4-associated cholangitis. We review the current literature and emphasize radiological findings and considerations for these autoimmune diseases of the bile ducts.

  16. Fecal Markers of Environmental Enteropathy and Subsequent Growth in Bangladeshi Children.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Michael B; Richardson, Barbra A; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Mahfuz, Mustafa; Haque, Rashidul; John-Stewart, Grace C; Denno, Donna M; Petri, William A; Kosek, Margaret; Walson, Judd L

    2016-09-07

    Environmental enteropathy (EE), a subclinical intestinal disorder characterized by mucosal inflammation, reduced barrier integrity, and malabsorption, appears to be associated with increased risk of stunting in children in low- and middle-income countries. Fecal biomarkers indicative of EE (neopterin [NEO], myeloperoxidase [MPO], and alpha-1-antitrypsin [AAT]) have been negatively associated with 6-month linear growth. Associations between fecal markers (NEO, MPO, and AAT) and short-term linear growth were examined in a birth cohort of 246 children in Bangladesh. Marker concentrations were categorized in stool samples based on their distribution (< first quartile, interquartile range, > third quartile), and a 10-point composite EE score was calculated. Piecewise linear mixed-effects models were used to examine the association between markers measured quarterly (in months 3-21, 3-9, and 12-21) and 3-month change in length-for-age z-score (ΔLAZ). Children with high MPO levels at quarterly time points lost significantly more LAZ per 3-month period during the second year of life than those with low MPO (ΔLAZ = -0.100; 95% confidence interval = -0.167 to -0.032). AAT and NEO were not associated with growth; however, composite EE score was negatively associated with subsequent 3-month growth. In this cohort of children from an urban setting in Bangladesh, elevated MPO levels, but not NEO or AAT levels, were associated with decreases in short-term linear growth during the second year of life, supporting previous data suggesting the relevance of MPO as a marker of EE.

  17. Alterations of the Ileal and Colonic Mucosal Microbiota in Canine Chronic Enteropathies

    PubMed Central

    Cassmann, Eric; White, Robin; Atherly, Todd; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Khoda, Samir; Mosher, Curtis; Ackermann, Mark; Jergens, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background The intestinal microbiota is increasingly linked to the pathogenesis of chronic enteropathies (CE) in dogs. While imbalances in duodenal and fecal microbial communities have been associated with mucosal inflammation, relatively little is known about alterations in mucosal bacteria seen with CE involving the ileum and colon. Aim To investigate the composition and spatial organization of mucosal microbiota in dogs with CE and controls. Methods Tissue sections from endoscopic biopsies of the ileum and colon from 19 dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 6 dogs with granulomatous colitis (GC), 12 dogs with intestinal neoplasia, and 15 controls were studied by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on a quantifiable basis. Results The ileal and colonic mucosa of healthy dogs and dogs with CE is predominantly colonized by bacteria localized to free and adherent mucus compartments. CE dogs harbored more (P < 0.05) mucosal bacteria belonging to the Clostridium-coccoides/Eubacterium rectale group, Bacteroides, Enterobacteriaceae, and Escherichia coli versus controls. Within the CE group, IBD dogs had increased (P < 0.05) Enterobacteriaceae and E. coli bacteria attached onto surface epithelia or invading within the intestinal mucosa. Bacterial invasion with E. coli was observed in the ileal and colonic mucosa of dogs with GC (P < 0.05). Dogs with intestinal neoplasia had increased (P < 0.05) adherent (total bacteria, Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli) and invasive (Enterobacteriaceae, E. coli, and Bacteroides) bacteria in biopsy specimens. Increased numbers of total bacteria adherent to the colonic mucosa were associated with clinical disease severity in IBD dogs (P < 0.05). Conclusion Pathogenic events in canine CE are associated with different populations of the ileal and colonic mucosal microbiota. PMID:26840462

  18. Tufting enteropathy revisited: the utility of MOC31 (EpCAM) immunohistochemistry in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Schmitt, Lori A; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2014-02-01

    Tufting enteropathy (TE) is an uncommon disease causing intractable diarrheas starting in early childhood and resulting in failure to thrive, dependence on total parenteral nutrition, and eventually requiring transplantation for treatment. The diagnosis has been based on histology showing the presence of epithelial "tufts" in the small bowel and colonic mucosa and variable villus alterations with mild to no inflammatory changes and preserved brush border. The gene for TE has been identified to be the EpCAM gene on chromosome 2p21. With Institutional Review Board approval, all cases of intractable diarrhea in children in whom TE was suspected or diagnosed were retrieved from the pathology files (17 patients). Other cases of infantile, neonatal, and childhood diarrhea were also retrieved to serve as controls for the staining studies (total 37 patients). EpCAM/MOC31 antibody staining was performed on all cases. The study cohort comprised 17 patients (13 boys, 4 girls) with a diagnosis of TE ranging in age at diagnosis from 3 months to 9 years, all presenting with protracted diarrhea and/or failure to thrive, usually since birth. Staining with MOC31 was carried out in all but 2 patients (both consults) and was completely negative in the epithelium irrespective of the site of biopsy or resection. In contrast, MOC31 was positive in all other cases tested, giving a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for loss of staining. MOC31 is a diagnostic stain for TE and should be included in the panel in any case of prolonged diarrhea in children to exclude this possibility.

  19. A case of enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma diagnosed by small bowel enteroscopy: a perspective on imaging-enhanced endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jun Yong; Ko, Bong Min; Min, Seul Ki; Lee, Jong Chan; Lee, Gun Wha; Yoon, La Young; Hong, Su Jin; Lee, Moon Sung; Kim, Hee Kyung

    2012-10-01

    Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) or enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is a very rare malignant intestinal tumor. ETL is usually diagnosed by surgery. Endoscopic findings of ETL are not well known, and there are few reports of findings from endoscopy that has been performed only using white light. Additionally, there are no definite treatment guidelines for ETL. Therefore, we report a case of ETL diagnosed by enteroscopy with imaging-enhanced endoscopy and also review recently developed treatment options.

  20. Neuropathology of autoimmune encephalitides.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Jan; Bien, Christian G

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a large number of antibody-associated or antibody-defined encephalitides have been discovered. These conditions are often referred to as autoimmune encephalitides. The clinical features include prominent epileptic seizures, cognitive and psychiatric disturbance. These encephalitides can be divided in those with antibodies against intracellular antigens and those with antibodies against surface antigens. The discovery of new antibodies against targets on the surface of neurons is especially interesting since patients with such antibodies can be successfully treated immunologically. This chapter focuses on the pathology and the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in these encephalitides and discusses some of the questions that are raised in this exciting new field. It is important to realise, however, that because of the use of antibodies to diagnose the patients, and their improvement with treatment, there are relatively few biopsy or postmortem reports, limiting the neuropathological data and conclusions that can be drawn. For this reason we especially focus on the most frequent autoimmune encephalitides, those with antibodies to the NMDA receptor and with antibodies to the known protein components of the VGKC complex. Analysis of these encephalitides show completely different pathogenic mechanisms. In VGKC complex encephalitis, antibodies seem to bind to their target and activate complement, leading to destruction and loss of neurons. On the other hand, in NMDAR encephalitis, complement activation and neuronal degeneration seems to be largely absent. Instead, binding of antibodies leads to a decrease of NMDA receptors resulting in a hypofunction. This hypofunction offers an explanation for some of the clinical features such as psychosis and episodic memory impairment, but not for the frequent seizures. Thus, additional analysis of the few human brain specimens present and the use of specific animal models are needed to further understand the effects

  1. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology.

  2. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation.

  3. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  4. Autoimmunity: alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Hordinsky, Maria; Ericson, Marna

    2004-01-01

    Strong direct and indirect evidence supports an autoimmune etiology for alopecia areata. T lymphocytes that have been shown to be oligoclonal and autoreactive are predominantly present in the peribulbar inflammatory infiltrate. Alopecia areata frequently occurs in association with other autoimmune diseases, such as thyroiditis and vitiligo, and autoantibodies to follicular components have been detected. Finally, the use of immune modulating drugs, including corticosteroids and contact sensitizers such as dyphencyprone, can be beneficial in the management of this disease. Recent studies have demonstrated that alopecia areata scalp skin grafted onto nude mice with severe combined immunodeficiency grow hair and that infiltrating lymphocytes in the graft are lost. It is now also possible to induce alopecia areata in human scalp explants on these mice by injecting T lymphocytes with scalp homogenate. Neuropeptides produced by cutaneous nerves are known to modify immune reactivity and, in all likelihood, affect the alopecia areata process. Future studies may show that modulation of neuropeptide expression is associated with hair regrowth. Likewise, testing the efficacy of the newly developed immunomodulatory agents in patients with alopecia areata may lead to the introduction of novel therapies for this immune-mediated disease of the hair follicle.

  5. [Hydroxychloroquine for autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Danza, Álvaro; Graña, Diego; Goñi, Mabel; Vargas, Andrea; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo

    2016-02-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is by far the most frequently used antimalarial for the management of Systemic Autoimmune Diseases. It has immunomodulatory, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic and antithrombotic properties and it diminishes the risk of malignancies. The most important mechanisms to explain the immunomodulatory actions are its ability to reduce inflammatory pathways and Toll-like receptors activation. The safety profile is favorable. In spite of its low frequency, retinal toxicity is potentially severe. In systemic lupus erythematous HCQ therapy reduces activity, the accrual of organ damage, risk of infections and thrombosis and improves the cardiometabolic profile. It contributes to induce lupus nephritis remission, spares steroid use and increases survival rates. In rheumatoid arthritis, it improves cardiometabolic risk and has a favorable effect in joint inflammation. In Sjögren's syndrome, an increased lacrimal quality as well as an improvement in objective and subjective inflammatory markers has been demonstrated with HCQ. In Antiphospholipid Syndrome, HCQ is effective in primary and secondary thrombosis prevention. The effectiveness of the drug in other systemic autoimmune diseases is less established. HCQ therapy may improve dermatological manifestations in Dermatomyositis and may have a positive effects in the treatment of Sarcoidosis and Still disease.

  6. [Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome].

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Vera; Conde, Marta; Figueiredo, António; Vasconcelos, Júlia; Dias, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is an impairment of lymphocyte apoptosis expressed by generalized non-malignant lymphoproliferation, lymphadenopathy and/or splenomegaly. This article describes a seven and 14 year old males. The first one was admitted at 3 years of age with fever, bicytopenia and generalized lymphadenopathy. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed reactive follicular hyperplasia and marked paracortical expansion. He was readmitted three years later presenting herpes zoster and similar clinical features. High levels of IL-10 and increasing tendency of Fas-L in plasma and serum. The second child was admitted at 13 years of age presenting thigh and gluteus cellulitis, anemia and neutropenia. T lymphocytes aß+CD4-CD8- 3,1%. Hystopathological analysis of lymph nodes showed marked paracortical hyperplasia. Both children are treated with mycophenolate mofetil with good response. ALPS is an underestimated entity that must be considered in non malign lymphoproliferation, autoimmunity and expansion of an unusual population of a/ßCD3+CD4-CD8-(double-negative T cells>1%).

  7. [Autoimmune bullous skin disorders].

    PubMed

    Hertl, Michael; Niedermeier, Andrea; Borradori, Luca

    2010-09-01

    Autoimmune bullous skin disorders are rare, potentially fatal disorders of skin and mucous membranes which are associated with IgG or IgA autoantibodies against distinct adhesion molecules of the epidermis and dermal epidermal basement membrane zone, respectively. These autoantibodies lead to a loss of skin adhesion which shows up clinically as the formation of blisters or erosions. In pemphigus, loss of adhesion occurs within the epidermis while in the pemphigoids, linear IgA dermatosis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita and dermatitis herpetiformis, loss of adhesion takes place within or underneath the basement membrane zone. The autoantigens of these disorders are largely identified and characterized. Making the diagnosis of autoimmune bullous skin diseases is based on histology and direct immunofluorescence of perilesional skin and the serological detection of autoantibodides by indirect immunofluorescence and recombinant autoantigens. Therapeutically, systemic treatment with glucocorticoids is combined with immunosuppressive adjuvants which allow for the fast reduction of systemic steroids. A prospective trial in pemphigus showed that adjuvant treatment with azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil and cyclophosphamide, respectively, led to a significant reduction of the cummulative dose of systemic steroids until complete clinical remission was achieved. In bullous pemphigoid, topical treatment with clobetasol led to complete clinical remissions without major side effects seen when glucocorticoids were applied systemically. Therapeutic depletion of B cells by rituximab as a second line therapy has significantly improved the overall prognosis of pemphigus. Comparable controlled therapeutic trials have not yet been performed in dermatitis herpetiformis and epidermolysis bullosa acquisita.

  8. Prolactin and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Vera-Lastra, Olga; Jara, Luis J; Espinoza, Luis R

    2002-12-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a versatile hormone that is produced by the anterior pituitary gland and various extrapituitary sites including immune cells. Furthermore, PRL has widespread influences on proliferation and differentiation of a variety of cells in the immune system and is, in effect, a cytokine. PRL-receptors (PRL-R) are distributed throughout the immune system and are included as members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. PRL-R signal transduction is mediated by a complex array of signaling molecules of which JAK2, Stat1 and Stat5 pathway have been well studied. In PRL-stimulated T cells, the transcription factor gene, interferon regulatory factor-1 provides a mechanism whereby PRL can regulate the immune response. The human PRL gene is situated on the short arm of chromosome 6 close to the major histocompatibility complex. Polymorphisms of the human PRL gene have implications for production of lymphocyte PRL in SLE. Mild and moderate hyperprolactinemia (HPRL) has been demonstrated in 20-30% of SLE patients and is associated with active disease. HPRL may have a role in lupus nephritis and central nervous system involvement of SLE patients. HPRL stimulated the production of autoantibodies. These evidences support the important role of PRL in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases, mainly SLE.

  9. Electrosmog and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Trevor G; Heil, Trudy J Rumann

    2016-07-13

    Studies in mice have shown that environmental electromagnetic waves tend to suppress the murine immune system with a potency similar to NSAIDs, yet the nature of any Electrosmog effects upon humans remains controversial. Previously, we reported how the human Vitamin-D receptor (VDR) and its ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D (1,25-D), are associated with many chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. We have shown how olmesartan, a drug marketed for mild hypertension, acts as a high-affinity partial agonist for the VDR, and that it seems to reverse disease activity resulting from VDR dysfunction. We here report that structural instability of the activated VDR becomes apparent when observing hydrogen bond behavior with molecular dynamics, revealing that the VDR pathway exhibits a susceptibility to Electrosmog. Further, we note that characteristic modes of instability lie in the microwave frequency range, which is currently populated by cellphone and WiFi communication signals, and that the susceptibility is ligand dependent. A case series of 64 patient-reported outcomes subsequent to use of a silver-threaded cap designed to protect the brain and brain stem from microwave Electrosmog resulted in 90 % reporting "definite" or "strong" changes in their disease symptoms. This is much higher than the 3-5 % rate reported for electromagnetic hypersensitivity in a healthy population and suggests that effective control of environmental Electrosmog immunomodulation may soon become necessary for successful therapy of autoimmune disease.

  10. Cannabidiol Limits T Cell–Mediated Chronic Autoimmune Myocarditis: Implications to Autoimmune Disorders and Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Shin; Erdelyi, Katalin; Matyas, Csaba; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Varga, Zoltan V; Liaudet, Lucas; Hask’, György; ’iháková, Daniela; Mechoulam, Raphael; Pacher, Pal

    2016-01-01

    Myocarditis is a major cause of heart failure and sudden cardiac death in young adults and adolescents. Many cases of myocarditis are associated with autoimmune processes in which cardiac myosin is a major autoantigen. Conventional immunosuppressive therapies often provide unsatisfactory results and are associated with adverse toxicities during the treatment of autoimmune myocarditis. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychoactive constituent of marijuana that exerts antiinflammatory effects independent of classical cannabinoid receptors. Recently, 80 clinical trials have investigated the effects of CBD in various diseases from inflammatory bowel disease to graft versus host disease. CBD-based formulations are used for the management of multiple sclerosis in numerous countries, and CBD also received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of refractory childhood epilepsy and glioblastoma multiforme. Herein, using a well-established mouse model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) induced by immunization with cardiac myosin emmulsified in adjuvant resulting in T cell–mediated inflammation, cardiomyocyte cell death, fibrosis and myocardial dysfunction, we studied the potential beneficial effects of CBD. EAM was characterized by marked myocardial T-cell infiltration, profound inflammatory response and fibrosis (measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, histology and immunohistochemistry analyses) accompanied by marked attenuation of both systolic and diastolic cardiac functions measured with a pressure-volume conductance catheter technique. Chronic treatment with CBD largely attenuated the CD3+ and CD4+ T cell–mediated inflammatory response and injury, myocardial fibrosis and cardiac dysfunction in mice. In conclusion, CBD may represent a promising novel treatment for managing autoimmune myocarditis and possibly other autoimmune disorders and organ transplantation. PMID:26772776

  11. Spontaneous germinal centers and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Domeier, Phillip P; Schell, Stephanie L; Rahman, Ziaur S M

    2017-02-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are dynamic microenvironments that form in the secondary lymphoid organs and generate somatically mutated high-affinity antibodies necessary to establish an effective humoral immune response. Tight regulation of GC responses is critical for maintaining self-tolerance. GCs can arise in the absence of purposeful immunization or overt infection (called spontaneous GCs, Spt-GCs). In autoimmune-prone mice and patients with autoimmune disease, aberrant regulation of Spt-GCs is thought to promote the development of somatically mutated pathogenic autoantibodies and the subsequent development of autoimmunity. The mechanisms that control the formation of Spt-GCs and promote systemic autoimmune diseases remain an open question and the focus of ongoing studies. Here, we discuss the most current studies on the role of Spt-GCs in autoimmunity.

  12. Gene Therapy for Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shang-An; Wang, Jinjun; Tao, Mi-Hua; Leung, Patrick S C

    2015-10-01

    Advances in understanding the immunological and molecular basis of autoimmune diseases have made gene therapy a promising approach to treat the affected patients. Gene therapy for autoimmune diseases aims to regulate the levels of proinflammatory cytokines or molecules and the infiltration of lymphocytes to the effected sites through successful delivery and expression of therapeutic genes in appropriate cells. The ultimate goal of gene therapy is to restore and maintain the immune tolerance to the relevant autoantigens and improve clinical outcomes for patients. Here, we summarize the recent progress in identifying genes responsible for autoimmune diseases and present examples where gene therapy has been applied as treatments or prevention in autoimmune diseases both in animal models and the clinical trials. Discussion on the advantages and pitfalls of gene therapy strategies employed is provided. The intent of this review is to inspire further studies toward the development of new strategies for successful treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Mucormycosis in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Royer, Mathieu; Puéchal, Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Mucormycosis is an emerging infection in systemic autoimmune diseases. All published cases of systemic autoimmune diseases complicated by mucormycosis were reviewed. The clinical features, diagnostic procedures and the main principles of treatment were analyzed. Twenty-four cases of mucormycosis have been reported in systemic auto-immune diseases, of which 83% in systemic lupus erythematosus, all occurring during immunosuppressants. In most cases, the infection was disseminated or rhinocerebral and it had mimicked a flare of the underlying connective tissue disease. A fatal outcome was reported in 58.3% of these patients. In conclusion, mucormycosis often mimics a flare of the underlying systemic disease and is associated with a high mortality rate. Systemic lupus erythematosus is by far the most common associated systemic autoimmune disease. A high degree of awareness is warranted to rapidly rule out infection, of which mucormycosis, in immunocompromised patients with systemic autoimmune disease before a disease flare is conclusively diagnosed.

  14. Autoimmunity in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shradha; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common clinically significant primary immune defect. Although the hallmark of CVID is hypogammaglobulinemia, the intrinsic dysregulation of the immune system leads to defective T-cell activation and proliferation, as well as dendritic cell and cytokine defects. Although 70% to 80% of patients have had recurrent sinopulmonary infections, auto-immunity and inflammatory complications are also common. The most common autoimmune conditions are immune thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic anemia, but other autoimmune complications arise, including rheumatoid arthritis, pernicious anemia, primary biliary cirrhosis, thyroiditis, sicca syndrome, systemic lupus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Treatment of autoimmunity includes high-dose immunoglobulins, corticosteroids, selected immunosuppressants, and other immune modulators. This review focuses on autoimmune conditions associated with CVID, potential mechanisms of immune dysregulation, and therapeutic strategies. PMID:19671377

  15. Evaluation of lincomycin in drinking water for treatment of induced porcine proliferative enteropathy using a Swine challenge model.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Winkelman, Nathan L; Moreira, Frederico P; Elfring, Gregory D

    2004-01-01

    A single-location, challenge-model study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of lincomycin against porcine proliferative enteropathy when administered through the drinking water at 125 and 250 mg/gallon. The primary variables of interest were pig removal rate, diarrhea scores, demeanor scores, and abdominal appearance scores. Ancillary performance variables examined included average daily feed intake, average daily gain, and feed per gain. After a 3-day acclimation period, pigs were challenged on 2 consecutive days with a mucosal homogenate containing a total dose of 1.4 x 10(9) cells of Lawsonia intracellularis. Five days later, when porcine proliferative enteropathy was well established, drinking water medicated with 125 mg (L125) or 250 mg (L250) lincomycin/gallon was provided to two groups of pigs for 10 days. Pigs were observed for 13 days following the treatment period. A third group of pigs served as controls and received unmedicated drinking water throughout the study. The L250 group experienced a significantly lower (P < .05) pig removal rate than the control group over the 23-day observation period. Additionally, for every primary variable, the L250 group experienced a significantly decreased (P < .01) number of abnormal days compared with the control group. The L125 group showed a significant reduction (P < .05) in abnormal demeanor and abnormal abdominal appearance scores compared with controls.

  16. Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma expressing NK-cell intraepithelial lymphocyte (NK-IEL) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Naoko; Asaoka, Daisuke; Mori, Kiyoshi L; Sohda, Naomi; Miura, Ichiro; Miwa, Hiroto; Sato, Nobuhiro; Oshimi, Kazuo

    2004-07-01

    Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) is an intraepithelial T-lymphocyte (T-IEL) tumor. The tumor cells are usually CD3+, CD4-, CD8+, and contain cytotoxic granule associated proteins. We report on a CD3-negative CD56-positive enteropathy-associated lymphoma (ETL). This is the first case report of CD3-negative, CD56-positive, CD94-negative, and CD161-positive ETL. ETL cells originate from intraepithelial T-lymphocytes of the intestine. CD3-negative intraepithelial lymphocytes are known as natural killer (NK)-IELs. The phenotype of NK-IELs is also CD3-negative, CD56-positive, CD94-negative, and CD161-positive, while most normal NK cells express CD56 and CD94. CD3-negative lymphoma cells in this report also expressed CD56 and CD161, but not CD94. Because Southern blotting analysis showed a rearrangement of T-cell receptor (TCR) Cbeta in this case, the tumor is classified as an ETL. Based on the findings, NK-IELs may originate from T-cells, not NK-cells.

  17. Functional characterization of IgA-targeted bacterial taxa from malnourished Malawian children that produce diet-dependent enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kau, Andrew L.; Planer, Joseph D.; Liu, Jie; Rao, Sindhuja; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Trehan, Indi; Manary, Mark J.; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Ashorn, Per; Dewey, Kathryn G.; Houpt, Eric R.; Hsieh, Chyi-Song; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2015-01-01

    To gain insights into the interrelationships among childhood undernutrition, the gut microbiota, and gut mucosal immune/barrier function, we purified bacterial strains targeted by IgA from the fecal microbiota of two cohorts of Malawian infants and children. IgA responses to several bacterial taxa, including Enterobacteriaceae, correlated with anthropometric measurements of nutritional status in longitudinal studies. The relationship between IgA responses and growth was further explained by enteropathogen burden. Gnotobiotic mouse recipients of an IgA+-bacterial consortium purified from the gut microbiota of undernourished children exhibited a diet-dependent enteropathy characterized by rapid disruption of the small intestinal and colonic epithelial barrier, weight loss and sepsis that could be prevented by administering two IgA-targeted bacterial species from a healthy microbiota. Dissection of a culture collection of 11 IgA-targeted strains from an undernourished donor, sufficient to transmit these phenotypes, disclosed that Enterobacteriaceae interacted with other consortium members to produce enteropathy. These findings indicate that bacterial targets of IgA responses have etiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications for childhood undernutrition. PMID:25717097

  18. Functional characterization of IgA-targeted bacterial taxa from undernourished Malawian children that produce diet-dependent enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Kau, Andrew L; Planer, Joseph D; Liu, Jie; Rao, Sindhuja; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Trehan, Indi; Manary, Mark J; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Maleta, Kenneth M; Ashorn, Per; Dewey, Kathryn G; Houpt, Eric R; Hsieh, Chyi-Song; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2015-02-25

    To gain insights into the interrelationships among childhood undernutrition, the gut microbiota, and gut mucosal immune/barrier function, we purified bacterial strains targeted by immunoglobulin A (IgA) from the fecal microbiota of two cohorts of Malawian infants and children. IgA responses to several bacterial taxa, including Enterobacteriaceae, correlated with anthropometric measurements of nutritional status in longitudinal studies. The relationship between IgA responses and growth was further explained by enteropathogen burden. Gnotobiotic mouse recipients of an IgA(+) bacterial consortium purified from the gut microbiota of undernourished children exhibited a diet-dependent enteropathy characterized by rapid disruption of the small intestinal and colonic epithelial barrier, weight loss, and sepsis that could be prevented by administering two IgA-targeted bacterial species from a healthy microbiota. Dissection of a culture collection of 11 IgA-targeted strains from an undernourished donor, sufficient to transmit these phenotypes, disclosed that Enterobacteriaceae interacted with other consortium members to produce enteropathy. These findings indicate that bacterial targets of IgA responses have etiologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic implications for childhood undernutrition.

  19. NSAID enteropathy: appearance at CT and MR enterography in the age of multi-modality imaging and treatment.

    PubMed

    Frye, Judson M; Hansel, Stephanie L; Dolan, Steven G; Fidler, Jeff L; Song, Louis M Wong Kee; Barlow, John M; Smyrk, Tom C; Flicek, Kristina T; Hara, Amy K; Bruining, David H; Fletcher, Joel G

    2015-06-01

    CT and MR enterography and capsule endoscopy are increasingly used as routine diagnostic tests for patients with potential small bowel disorders and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used drugs that disrupt prostaglandin synthesis and result in a variety of localized complications within the small bowel ranging from ulcer formation to characteristic circumferential strictures, or diaphragms. NSAID enteropathy encompasses this spectrum of acute and chronic inflammatory sequelae, and is associated with typical findings at capsule endoscopy and surgery. Herein we review the typical clinical presentation of NSAID enteropathy, in addition to its endoscopic appearances, focusing on imaging findings at cross-sectional enterography. Multiple, short-segment strictures are the hallmarks of imaging diagnosis. Strictures may have minimal hyperenhancement or wall thickening, but these findings are typically symmetric and circumferential with respect to the bowel lumen. Multifocal Crohn's strictures, and occasionally radiation-induced strictures or adhesions, will mimic NSAID diaphragms. Multi-phase or multi-sequence imaging at CT and MR enterography increase diagnostic confidence in stricture presence. Strategies for subsequent workup and therapy after enterography are also discussed. Given the frequent use of NSAIDs and typical appearance of these strictures, knowledge of characteristic imaging findings can be particularly useful when evaluating patients with anemia and recurrent small bowel obstruction.

  20. Genomic and immunohistochemical profiles of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Sakura; Kikuti, Yara Y; Carreras, Joaquim; Kojima, Minoru; Ando, Kiyoshi; Takasaki, Hirotaka; Sakai, Rika; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Bea, Silvia; Campo, Elias; Nakamura, Naoya

    2015-10-01

    Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare primary T-cell lymphoma of the digestive tract. EATL is classified as either Type I, which is frequently associated with and thought to arise from celiac disease and is primarily observed in Northern Europe, and Type II, which occurs de novo and is distributed all over the world with predominance in Asia. The pathogenesis of EATL in Asia is unknown. We aimed to clarify the histological and genomic profiles of EATL in Japan in a homogeneous series of 20 cases. The cases were characterized by immunohistochemistry, high-resolution oligonucleotide microarray, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) at five different loci: 1q21.3 (CKS1B), 6q16.3 (HACE1), 7p22.3 (MAFK), 9q33.3 (PPP6C), and 9q34.3 (ASS1, CARD9) using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. The histological appearance of EATL ranged from medium- to large-sized cells in 13 cases (65%), small- to medium-sized cells in five cases (25%), and medium-sized in two cases (10%). The immunophenotype was CD2(+) (60%), CD3ɛ(+) (100%), CD4(+) (10%), CD7(+) (95%), CD8(+) (80%), CD56(+) (85%), TIA-1(+) (100%), Granzyme B(+) (25%), T-cell receptor (TCR)β(+) (10%), TCRγ(+) (35%), TCRγδ(+) (50%), and double negative for TCR (six cases, 30%). All cases were EBER(-). The genomic profile showed recurrent copy number gains of 1q32.3, 4p15.1, 5q34, 7q34, 8p11.23, 9q22.31, 9q33.2, 9q34.13, and 12p13.31, and losses of 7p14.1. FISH showed 15 patients (75%) with a gain of 9q34.3 with good correlation with array comparative genomic hybridization. EATL in Japan is characterized by non-monomorphic cells with a cytotoxic CD8(+) CD56(+) phenotype similar to EATL Type II. The genomic profile is comparable to EATL of Western countries, with more similarity to Type I (gain of 1q and 5q) rather than Type II (gain of 8q24, including MYC). The 9q34.3 gain was the most frequent change confirmed by FISH irrespective of the cell origin of αβ-T-cells and γδ-T-cells.

  1. Environmental Enteropathy, Oral Vaccine Failure and Growth Faltering in Infants in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Caitlin; Lu, Miao; Haque, Rashidul; Mondal, Dinesh; Buonomo, Erica; Nayak, Uma; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Kirkpatrick, Beth; Colgate, Ross; Carmolli, Marya; Dickson, Dorothy; van der Klis, Fiona; Weldon, William; Steven Oberste, M.; Ma, Jennie Z.; Petri, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a subclinical enteric condition found in low-income countries that is characterized by intestinal inflammation, reduced intestinal absorption, and gut barrier dysfunction. We aimed to assess if EE impairs the success of oral polio and rotavirus vaccines in infants in Bangladesh. Methods We conducted a prospective observational study of 700 infants from an urban slum of Dhaka, Bangladesh from May 2011 to November 2014. Infants were enrolled in the first week of life and followed to age one year through biweekly home visits with EPI vaccines administered and growth monitored. EE was operationally defied as enteric inflammation measured by any one of the fecal biomarkers reg1B, alpha-1-antitrypsin, MPO, calprotectin, or neopterin. Oral polio vaccine success was evaluated by immunogenicity, and rotavirus vaccine response was evaluated by immunogenicity and protection from disease. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01375647. Findings EE was present in greater than 80% of infants by 12 weeks of age. Oral poliovirus and rotavirus vaccines failed in 20.2% and 68.5% of the infants respectively, and 28.6% were malnourished (HAZ < − 2) at one year of age. In contrast, 0%, 9.0%, 7.9% and 3.8% of infants lacked protective levels of antibody from tetanus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, diphtheria and measles vaccines respectively. EE was negatively associated with oral polio and rotavirus response but not parenteral vaccine immunogenicity. Biomarkers of systemic inflammation and measures of maternal health were additionally predictive of both oral vaccine failure and malnutrition. The selected biomarkers from multivariable analysis accounted for 46.3% variation in delta HAZ. 24% of Rotarix® IgA positive individuals can be attributed to the selected biomarkers. Interpretation EE as well as systemic inflammation and poor maternal health were associated with oral but not parenteral vaccine

  2. Impact of mass screening for gluten-sensitive enteropathy in working population

    PubMed Central

    Mariné, Meritxell; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Alsina, Montserrat; Farré, Carme; Cortijo, Montserrat; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Salas, Antonio; Tomàs, Margarita; Abugattas, Elias; Loras, Carme; Ordás, Ingrid; Viver, Josep M; Esteve, Maria

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess: (1) frequency and clinical relevance of gluten sensitive enteropathy (GSE) detected by serology in a mass screening program; (2) sensitivity of antitransglutaminase (tTGA) and antiendomysium antibodies (EmA); and (3) adherence to gluten-free diet (GFD) and follow-up. METHODS: One thousand, eight hundred and sixty-eight subjects recruited from an occupational health department underwent analysis for tTGA and EmA and, if positive, duodenal biopsy, DQ2/DQ8 genotyping, clinical feature recording, blood tests, and densitometry were performed. Since > 98% of individuals had tTGA < 2 U/mL, this value was established as the cut-off limit of normality and was considered positive when confirmed twice in the same sample. Adherence to a GFD and follow up were registered. RESULTS: Twenty-six (1.39%) subjects had positive tTGA and/or EmA, and 21 underwent biopsy: six Marsh III (one IIIa, four IIIb, one IIIc), nine Marsh I and six Marsh 0 (frequency of GSE 1:125). The sensitivity of EmA for GSE was 46.6% (11.1% for Marsh I, 100% for Marsh III), while for tTGA, it was 93.3% (88.8% for Marsh I, 100% for Marsh III). All 15 patients with abnormal histology had clinical features related to GSE. Marsh I and III subjects had more abdominal pain than Marsh 0 (P = 0.029), and a similar trend was observed for distension and diarrhea. No differences in the percentage of osteopenia were found between Marsh I and III (P = 0.608). Adherence to follow-up was 69.2%. Of 15 GSE patients, 66.7% followed a GFD with 80% responding to it. CONCLUSION: GSE in the general population is frequent and clinically relevant, irrespective of histological severity. tTGA is the marker of choice. Mass screening programs are useful in identifying patients who can benefit from GFD and follow-up. PMID:19294762

  3. Perturbed zinc homeostasis in rural 3-5-y-old Malawian children is associated with abnormalities in intestinal permeability attributed to tropical enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Manary, Micah J; Abrams, Steven A; Griffin, Ian J; Quimper, Megan M; Shulman, Robert J; Hamzo, Maria G; Chen, Zhensheng; Maleta, Kenneth; Manary, Mark J

    2010-06-01

    Tropical enteropathy and zinc deficiency are major public health problems worldwide. Tropical enteropathy is characterized by reduced mannitol absorption with normal or increased lactulose absorption when a dual sugar absorption test is administered, the results of which are reported as the lactulose:mannitol ratio (L:M). Zinc homeostasis is quantified with a dual stable isotope test. This study tested the hypothesis that endogenous fecal zinc (EFZ) was correlated with the L:M. A dual sugar absorption test and dual stable isotope test were performed on 25 asymptomatic Malawian children aged 3-5 y at risk for tropical enteropathy and zinc deficiency. EFZ and net zinc retention were estimated and correlated with the L:M. Twenty-two children (88%) had an abnormal L:M (L:M>0.10), and the L:M was 0.24+/-0.10 (mean+/-SD). EFZ was 1.68+/-1.06 mg/d, a quantity greater than is seen in healthy populations from the developed world. EFZ was positively correlated with the L:M (r=0.62, p<0.001). Net zinc retention (0.67+/-1.6 mg/d) was negatively correlated with the L:M (r=-0.47, p=0.02). This suggests that perturbed zinc homeostasis is associated with subclinical enteropathy in these children.

  4. Multiple micronutrient supplementation transiently ameliorates environmental enteropathy in Malawian children aged 12-35 months in a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is subclinical, diffuse villous atrophy characterized by T cell infiltration of the small intestinal mucosa associated with nutrient malabsorption and stunting. EE is assessed by the lactulose:mannitol (L:M) test, whereby nonmetabolized sugars are ingested and quantifi...

  5. Psychoneuroimmunology - psyche and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2012-01-01

    Psychoneuroimmunology is a relatively young field of research that investigates interactions between central nervous and immune system. The brain modulates the immune system by the endocrine and autonomic nervous system. Vice versa, the immune system modulates brain activity including sleep and body temperature. Based on a close functional and anatomical link, the immune and nervous systems act in a highly reciprocal manner. From fever to stress, the influence of one system on the other has evolved in an intricate manner to help sense danger and to mount an appropriate adaptive response. Over recent decades, reasonable evidence has emerged that these brain-to-immune interactions are highly modulated by psychological factors which influence immunity and autoimmune disease. For several diseases, the relevance of psychoneuroimmunological findings has already been demonstrated.

  6. Autoimmune premature ovarian failure

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF), also termed as primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), is a highly heterogenous condition affecting 0.5-3.0% of women in childbearing age. These young women comprise quite a formidable group with unique physical and psychological needs that require special attention. Premature ovarian senescence (POS) in all of its forms evolves insidiously as a basically asymptomatic process, leading to complete loss of ovarian function, and POI/POF diagnoses are currently made at relatively late stages. Well-known and well-documented risk factors exist, and the presence or suspicion of autoimmune disorder should be regarded as an important one. Premature ovarian failure is to some degree predictable in its occurrence and should be considered while encountering young women with loss of menstrual regularity, especially when there is a concomitant dysfunction in the immune system. PMID:28250725

  7. Autoimmune Encephalitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The causes of encephalitis are numerous, and extensive investigations for infectious agents and other etiologies are often negative. The discovery that many of these encephalitis are immune mediated has changed the approach to the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. Moreover, the broad spectrum of symptoms including, psychosis, catatonia, alterations of behavior and memory, seizures, abnormal movements, and autonomic dysregulation usually requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This review focuses in several forms of encephalitis that occur in children, and for which an autoimmune etiology has been demonstrated (eg, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis) or is strongly suspected (eg, Rasmussen encephalitis, limbic encephalitis, opsoclonus-myoclonus). The authors also review several disorders that may be immune mediated, such as the rapid onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) syndrome and some encephalopathies with fever and status epilepticus. Recognition of novel immune-mediated encephalitis is important because some of these disorders are highly responsive to immunotherapy. PMID:22935553

  8. Questions and Answers on Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

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  9. Rheumatic symptoms in autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) is generally regarded as a classic example of single organ autoimmunity with a high association with endocrine thyroid disorders. However, it is closely associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatologic syndromes and has long been known to have several rheumatic manifestations particularly in association with hypothyroidism. More recently, it has also been implicated in rheumatologic syndromes in the absence of hypothyroidism or subclinical hypothyroidism. There is also an emerging body of evidence that ATD is highly linked to chronic generalized pain syndromes including fibromyalgia. This review examines the rheumatic symptoms of ATD described in the current literature and discusses the clinical relevance of ATD in general rheumatology.

  10. Expression of serotonin, chromogranin-A, serotonin receptor-2B, tryptophan hydroxylase-1, and serotonin reuptake transporter in the intestine of dogs with chronic enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Candice; Ruaux, Craig; Stang, Bernadette V; Valentine, Beth A

    2016-05-01

    Serotonin regulates many intestinal motor and sensory functions. Altered serotonergic metabolism has been described in human gastrointestinal diseases. The objective of our study was to compare expression of several components of the serotonergic system [serotonin (5-HT), serotonin reuptake transporter protein (SERT), tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH-1), 5-HT receptor2B (5-HT2B)] and the enterochromaffin cell marker chromogranin-A (CgA) in the intestinal mucosa between dogs with chronic enteropathy and healthy controls. Serotonin and CgA expression were determined by immunohistochemistry using banked and prospectively obtained, paraffin-embedded canine gastrointestinal biopsies (n = 11), and compared to a control group of canine small intestinal sections (n = 10). Expression of SERT, TPH-1, and 5-HT2B were determined via real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR using prospectively collected endoscopic duodenal biopsies (n = 10) and compared to an additional control group of control duodenal biopsies (n = 8, control group 2) showing no evidence of intestinal inflammation. Dogs with chronic enteropathies showed strong staining for both 5-HT and CgA. Mean positive cells per high power field (HPF) were significantly increased for both compounds in dogs with chronic enteropathies (p < 0.001 for 5-HT; p < 0.05 for CgA). The number of 5-HT-positive and CgA-positive cells/HPF showed significant correlation in the entire group of dogs, including both diseased and healthy individuals (Pearson r(2) = 0.2433, p = 0.016). No significant differences were observed for SERT, TPH-1, or 5-HT2B expression; however, dogs with chronic enteropathy showed greater variability in expression of TPH-1 and 5-HT2B We conclude that components of the neuroendocrine system show altered expression in the intestinal mucosa of dogs with chronic enteropathy. These changes may contribute to nociception and clinical signs in these patients.

  11. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases.

  12. [Molecular diagnosis of autoimmune dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, K; Hertl, M; Sitaru, C

    2016-01-01

    Bullous autoimmune diseases are organ-specific disorders characterized by an autoantibody-mediated blistering of skin and mucous membranes. The detection of tissue-bound and serum autoantibodies is prerequisite for the diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases. The individual entities of this group may be difficult to differentiate on clinical grounds alone. An accurate diagnosis is however important for prognosis and therapy. A preliminary diagnostic step includes direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, which provide information about the binding pattern and isotype of autoantibodies and allow the diagnosis of the autoimmune blistering disease. Subsequent characterization of the molecular specificity of autoantibodies is necessary for the exact classification of autoimmune bullous dermatoses. The quantitative measurement of autoantibodies against structural proteins of the skin may be often used to assess disease severity at follow-up.

  13. SIALIC ACIDS AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vinay S.; Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    summary An important underlying mechanism that contributes to autoimmunity is the loss of inhibitory signaling in the immune system. Sialic acid-recognizing Ig superfamily lectins or Siglecs are a family of cell surface proteins largely expressed in hematopoietic cells. The majority of Siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in immune cells that bind to sialic acid containing ligands and recruit SH2-domain containing tyrosine phosphatases to their cytoplasmic tails. They deliver inhibitory signals that can contribute to the constraining of immune cells and thus protect the host from autoimmunity. The inhibitory functions of CD22/Siglec-2 and Siglec-G and their contributions to tolerance and autoimmunity, primarily in the B lymphocyte context, are considered in some detail in this review. The relevance to autoimmunity and unregulated inflammation of modified sialic acids, enzymes that modify sialic acid, and other sialic acid binding proteins are also reviewed. PMID:26683151

  14. [Sexuality and auto-immunity].

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georges; Vlatkovic, Dejan

    2010-03-24

    The idea that it might be a link between auto-immune affections and sexual disturbances could appear a vain purpose at a first glance. Nevertheless, as we start from a new point of view, it is understandable that we focus on a possible common tendency to develop self-aggression and self-destruction. Similarities which could play a role in the development of an auto-immune disease and of a sexual dixturbance as well.

  15. Xenobiotic Exposure and Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Although genetics contributes to the development of autoimmune diseases, it is clear that “environmental” factors are also required. These factors are thought to encompass exposure to certain drugs and environmental pollutants. This paper examines the mechanisms that normally maintain immune unresponsiveness in the liver and discusses how exposure to certain xenobiotics such as trichloroethylene may disrupt those mechanisms and promote autoimmune hepatitis. PMID:21253536

  16. Forced-exercise attenuates experimental autoimmune neuritis.

    PubMed

    Calik, Michael W; Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Stubbs, Evan B

    2012-07-01

    Physical inactivity in combination with a sedentary lifestyle is strongly associated with an increased risk of development of inflammatory-mediated diseases, including autoimmune disorders. Recent studies suggest that anti-inflammatory effects of physical exercise may be of therapeutic value in some affected individuals. In this study, we determined the effects of forced-exercise (treadmill running) on the development and progression of experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN), an established animal model of Guillain-Barré syndrome. Adult male Lewis rats were subjected to sedentary (control) or forced-exercise (1.2 km per day, 5 days a week) for three weeks prior to induction of EAN. P2 (53-78)-immunized sedentary control rats developed a monophasic course of EAN beginning on post-injection day 12.33 ± 0.59 (n = 18) and reaching peak severity on day 15.83 ± 0.35 (n = 18). At near peak of disease, ankle- and sciatic notch-evoked compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitudes in sedentary control rats were reduced (~50%) while motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) was slowed (~30%) compared with pre-induction evoked responses. In marked contrast, rats undergoing forced-exercise exhibited a significantly less severe clinical course of EAN beginning on post-injection day 12.63 ± 0.53 (n = 16) and reaching peaking severity on day 14.69 ± 0.73 (n = 16). At near peak of disease, ankle- and sciatic-notch-evoked CMAP amplitudes in forced-exercised rats were preserved while EAN-associated slowing of MNCV was modestly attenuated by exercise. Three weeks of forced-exercise reduced by 46% total plasma corticosterone content while elevating the levels of corticosteroid binding globulin. We conclude from this study that forced-exercise administered prior to and during development of EAN affords a novel measure of protection against autoimmune-associated deficits in peripheral nerve evoked responses independent of steroid-induced immune suppression.

  17. Further investigation of exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild and feral animals captured on horse properties with equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Gebhart, Connie

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis in wild birds, mice, rabbits, raccoons, coyotes and squirrels, and feral cats and pigs on 10 farms with confirmed equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Serum samples from all resident foals (417 samples) as well as fecal (461) and serum (106) samples from wild and feral animals were collected for serological and molecular detection of L. intracellularis following the diagnosis of EPE in index cases. A total of three cats from two farms, three mice from two farms and eight cottontail rabbits from one farm had evidence of prior exposure to L. intracellularis. These animals may be an indicator of environmental exposure or may be actively involved in the transmission of L. intracellularis to foals by acting as a potential reservoir/amplifier host.

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Two Lawsonia intracellularis Isolates Associated with Proliferative Hemorrhagic Enteropathy and Porcine Intestinal Adenomatosis in South Korea▿

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jung-Yong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Aeran; Lee, Ji Youn; Hwang, Jeong-Min; Kang, Bo-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, In-Soo; Lee, Joong-Bok

    2011-01-01

    This study represents the first published data on antimicrobial susceptibility of Asian isolates of Lawsonia intracellularis. We assessed MICs of 16 antimicrobials for two isolates of L. intracellularis recovered from diseased pigs in South Korea, one from a finisher pig with acute proliferative hemorrhagic enteropathy in 2002 and the other from a grower pig with porcine intestinal adenomatosis in 2010. Tylosin and tilmicosin were found to be the most active against L. intracellularis both intracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 0.125 μg/ml, respectively) and extracellularly (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 μg/ml and 1 μg/ml, respectively). PMID:21690283

  19. Treatment of Children with Protein – Losing Enteropathy After Fontan and Other Complex Congenital Heart Disease Procedures in Condition with Limited Human and Technical Resources

    PubMed Central

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Vuqiterna, Armend; Maloku, Arlinda

    2014-01-01

    Background Protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) is a disorder characterized by abnormal and often profound enteric protein loss. It’s relatively uncommon complication of Fontan and other complex congenital heart disease (CCHD) procedures. Because of the complexity and rarity of this disease process, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of protein-losing enteropathy remain poorly understood, and attempts at treatment seldom yield long-term success. Aim of presentation is to describe single centre experience in diagnosis, evaluation, management and treatment of children with protein-losing enteropathy after Fontan and other CCHD procedures in the current era and in centre with limited human and technical resources, follows with a comprehensive review of protein-losing enteropathy publications, and concludes with suggestions for prevention and treatment. Material and methodology Retrospectively we analyzed patients with CCHD and protein-losing enteropathy in our institution, starting from January 2000 to December 2012. The including criteria were age between two and 17 years, to have a complex congenital heart disease and available complete documentation of cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Results Of all patients we evaluated 18 cases with protein-losing enteropathy, aged 6 to 19 years (mean 14±9); there were three children who had undergone screening procedure for D-transposition, one Tetralogy of Fallot, and remaining 14 patients had undergone Fontan procedures; (anatomic diagnosis are: six with tricuspid atresia, seven with d-transposition, double outlet right ventricle and pulmonary atresia and two with hypoplastic left heart syndrome). The diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy was made at median age of 5.6 years, ranging from 13 months to 15 years. Diagnosis was made using alpha 1-antitrypsin as a gold marker in stool. By physical examination in 14 patients edema was found, in three ascites, and six patients had pleural effusion. Laboratory findings

  20. Autoimmune NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Tebo, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a treatable autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with prominent neurologic and psychiatric features at disease onset. The disease is associated with the production of autoantibodies to NMDAR, a protein involved in memory function and synaptic plasticity. Affected patients develop a multistage progressive illness with symptoms ranging from memory deficits, seizures and psychosis, to potentially lethal catatonia, and autonomic and breathing instability. The outcome can be much improved with accurate diagnosis and early treatment using adequate immunosuppressive therapy. However, since the neurological and psychiatric symptoms as well as the clinical examination results can be non-specific, the disease is probably under-recognized. Reliable and accurate clinical testing for the identification of NMDAR autoantibodies is crucial for diagnosis, timely treatment selection, and monitoring. Recently, a cell-based indirect immunofluorescent antibody test for the detection of IgG antibodies to NMDAR has become available for diagnostic use. This review highlights the progress and challenges of laboratory testing in the evaluation and management anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and perspectives for the future.

  1. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-28

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP).

  2. Anti-CD4 treatment inhibits autoimmunity in scurfy mice through the attenuation of co-stimulatory signals.

    PubMed

    Mayer, C T; Tian, L; Hesse, C; Kühl, A A; Swallow, M; Kruse, F; Thiele, M; Gershwin, M E; Liston, A; Sparwasser, T

    2014-05-01

    A major concept in autoimmunity is that disruption of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) predisposes to breach of tolerance. This is exemplified by the Foxp3-linked disorder termed IPEX (immunodysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) which affects newborn children. There has been considerable clinical interest in the role of non-depleting anti-CD4 antibodies as a means of upregulating the function of Foxp3(+) Tregs in order to control detrimental inflammatory responses such as transplant rejection. However, according to the paradigm of a Treg-dependent mechanism of action, the effectiveness of anti-CD4 antibodies as a therapy for human autoimmune diseases is unclear considering that Treg function might be intrinsically impaired. Specifically, anti-CD4 therapy is expected to fail in patients suffering from the IPEX syndrome due to the lack of functional Foxp3(+) Tregs. Taking advantage of natural Foxp3 mutant scurfy (sf) mice closely resembling the IPEX syndrome, and genetically engineered mice depleted of Foxp3(+) Tregs, we report here that anti-CD4 treatment induces tolerance independent of Foxp3(+) Tregs. This so far undefined mechanism is dependent on the recessive non-infectious tolerization of autoreactive T cells. Treg-independent tolerance alone is powerful enough to suppress both the onset and severity of autoimmunity and reduces clinically relevant autoantibody levels and liver fibrosis. Mechanistically, tolerance induction requires the concomitant activation of autoreactive T cells and is associated with the down-regulation of the co-stimulatory TNF-receptor superfamily members OX40 and CD30 sustaining CD4(+) T cell survival. In the light of ongoing clinical trials, our results highlight an unexpected potency of anti-CD4 antibodies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Particularly, CD4 blockade might represent a novel therapeutic option for the human IPEX syndrome.

  3. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants and Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Watad, Abdulla; David, Paula; Brown, Stav; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    The autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA), presented by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin in 2011, is an entity that incorporates diverse autoimmune conditions induced by the exposure to various adjuvants. Adjuvants are agents that entail the capability to induce immune reactions. Adjuvants are found in many vaccines and used mainly to increase the response to vaccination in the general population. Silicone has also been reported to be able to induce diverse immune reactions. Clinical cases and series of heterogeneous autoimmune conditions including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and rheumatoid arthritis have been reported to be induced by several adjuvants. However, only a small number of cases of autoimmune thyroid disorder have been included under the umbrella of ASIA syndrome. Indeed, clinical cases of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and/or subacute thyroiditis were observed after the exposure to vaccines as well as silicone implantation. In our review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge on ASIA syndrome presented as endocrinopathies, focusing on autoimmune thyroid disorders associated with the various adjuvants. PMID:28167927

  4. Occupational exposures and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Glinda S; Miller, Frederick W; Germolec, Dori R

    2002-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are pathologic conditions defined by abnormal autoimmune responses and characterized by immune system reactivity in the form of autoantibodies and T cell responses to self-structures. Here we review the limited but growing epidemiologic and experimental literature pertaining to the association between autoimmune diseases and occupational exposure to silica, solvents, pesticides, and ultraviolet radiation. The strongest associations (i.e., relative risks of 3.0 and higher) have been documented in investigations of silica dust and rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, scleroderma and glomerulonephritis. Weaker associations are seen, however, for solvent exposures (in scleroderma, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, and multiple sclerosis) and for farming or pesticide exposures (in rheumatoid arthritis). Experimental studies suggest two different effects of these exposures: an enhanced proinflammatory (TH1) response (e.g., TNF-alpha and IL-1 cytokine production with T cell activation), and increased apoptosis of lymphocytes leading to exposure to or modification of endogenous proteins and subsequent autoantibody formation. The former is a general mechanism that may be relevant across a spectrum of autoimmune diseases, whereas the latter may be a mechanism more specific to particular diseases (e.g., ultraviolet radiation, Ro autoantibodies, and lupus). Occupational exposures are important risk factors for some autoimmune diseases, but improved exposure assessment methods and better coordination between experimental/animal models and epidemiologic studies are needed to define these risks more precisely.

  5. Updated Understanding of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Huang, Ping; Yang, Ye; Hao, Mu; Peng, Hongwei; Li, Fei

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), a disorder characterized by immune dysregulation due to disrupted lymphocyte homeostasis, is mainly resulted from the mutations in FAS-mediated apoptotic pathway. In addition, other mutations of the genes such as Fas-ligand (FASLG), Caspase 10 (CASP10) and Caspase 8 (CASP8), NRAS and KRAS have also been observed in a small number of patients with ALPS or ALPS-related disorders. However, approximately 20-30% of patients with ALPS have unidentified defect. Its clinical manifestations observed in multiple family members include unexplained lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias such as thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and anemia due to excessive production of antibodies by lymphocytes, elevated number of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. As a very rare disease, ALPS was first characterized in the early 1990s. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have been reported till now; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years. ALPS has historically considered as a primary immune defect presenting in early childhood, however, recent studies have shown that it may be more common than previous thought because adult onset presentation is increasingly becoming recognized and more adult ALPS patients are diagnosed. The new genetic and biological insights have improved the understanding of ALPS and a number of targeted therapeutic strategies such as mycophenolate mofetil, sirolimus, and pentostatin have been successfully applied in ALPS patients with promising treatment efficacy. This article comprehensively reviews the clinical and laboratory manifestations, new research advances in the molecular pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatments of this disorder.

  6. Cryptogenia multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis: an entity on its own as a cause of abdominal pain, iron deficiency anemia and protein-losing enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Guisado Vasco, P; Fraile Rodríguez, G

    2014-01-01

    We studied a patient with edema secondary to protein losing enteropathy, and recurrent bouts of bloating and abdominal pain secondary to intestinal subocclusion episodes. After the clinical study, the patient was diagnosed of cryptogenic multifocal ulcerous stenosing enteritis (CMUSE), that is a rare disease, probably caused by mutations in the gene PLA2G4A, and characterized by multiple short stenosis of the small bowel with superficial ulcers, which do not exceed the submucosa layer. Inflammatory bowel disease (Chron's disease), intestinal tuberculosis and intestinal ulcers secondary to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the main differential diagnosis. To sum up, physicians should included CMUSE in the differential diagnosis of recurrent abdominal pain, iron deficiency anaemia, occult intestinal bleeding, edema and protein losing enteropathy.

  7. Free radical theory of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Subburaj

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite great advances in clinical oncology, the molecular mechanisms underlying the failure of chemotherapeutic intervention in treating lymphoproliferative and related disorders are not well understood. Hypothesis A hypothetical scheme to explain the damage induced by chemotherapy and associated chronic oxidative stress is proposed on the basis of published literature, experimental data and anecdotal observations. Brief accounts of multidrug resistance, lymphoid malignancy, the cellular and molecular basis of autoimmunity and chronic oxidative stress are assembled to form a basis for the hypothesis and to indicate the likelihood that it is valid in vivo. Conclusion The argument set forward in this article suggests a possible mechanism for the development of autoimmunity. According to this view, the various sorts of damage induced by chemotherapy have a role in the pattern of drug resistance, which is associated with the initiation of autoimmunity. PMID:16759382

  8. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Harpreet, Singh; Deepak, Jain; Kiran, B

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients.

  9. Unbalanced Immune System: Immunodeficiencies and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Giardino, Giuliana; Gallo, Vera; Prencipe, Rosaria; Gaudino, Giovanni; Romano, Roberta; De Cataldis, Marco; Lorello, Paola; Palamaro, Loredana; Di Giacomo, Chiara; Capalbo, Donatella; Cirillo, Emilia; D’Assante, Roberta; Pignata, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Increased risk of developing autoimmune manifestations has been identified in different primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). In such conditions, autoimmunity and immune deficiency represent intertwined phenomena that reflect inadequate immune function. Autoimmunity in PIDs may be caused by different mechanisms, including defects of tolerance to self-antigens and persistent stimulation as a result of the inability to eradicate antigens. This general immune dysregulation leads to compensatory and exaggerated chronic inflammatory responses that lead to tissue damage and autoimmunity. Each PID may be characterized by distinct, peculiar autoimmune manifestations. Moreover, different pathogenetic mechanisms may underlie autoimmunity in PID. In this review, the main autoimmune manifestations observed in different PID, including humoral immunodeficiencies, combined immunodeficiencies, and syndromes with immunodeficiencies, are summarized. When possible, the pathogenetic mechanism underlying autoimmunity in a specific PID has been explained. PMID:27766253

  10. Multiple autoimmune syndrome with celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Harpreet, Singh; Kiran, B.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) is a condition characterised by three or more autoimmune disorders in a same individual. Familial, immunologic and infectious factors are implicated in the development of MAS. Here we report a case of a 32-year-old woman with co-existence of four auto-immune diseases, namely autoimmune hypothyroidism, Sjögren’s syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and celiac disease which leads to the final diagnosis of multiple autoimmune syndrome type 3 with celiac disease. Patients with single autoimmune disorder are at 25% risk of developing other autoimmune disorders. The present case emphasises to clinicians that there is a need for continued surveillance for the development of new autoimmune disease in predisposed patients. PMID:28115785

  11. The genetics and epigenetics of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hewagama, Anura; Richardson, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Self tolerance loss is fundamental to autoimmunity. While understanding of immune regulation is expanding rapidly, the mechanisms causing loss of tolerance in most autoimmune diseases remain elusive. Autoimmunity is believed to develop when genetically predisposed individuals encounter environmental agents that trigger the disease. Recent advances in the genetic and environmental contributions to autoimmunity suggest that interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic changes caused by environmental agents may be responsible for inducing autoimmune disease. Genetic loci predisposing to autoimmunity are being identified through multi-center consortiums, and the number of validated genes is growing rapidly. Recent reports also indicate that the environment can contribute to autoimmunity by modifying gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. This article will review current understanding of the genetics and epigenetics of lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, using systemic lupus erythematosus as the primary example. Other autoimmune diseases may have a similar foundation. PMID:19349147

  12. The genetics and epigenetics of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Hewagama, Anura; Richardson, Bruce

    2009-08-01

    Self tolerance loss is fundamental to autoimmunity. While understanding of immune regulation is expanding rapidly, the mechanisms causing loss of tolerance in most autoimmune diseases remain elusive. Autoimmunity is believed to develop when genetically predisposed individuals encounter environmental agents that trigger the disease. Recent advances in the genetic and environmental contributions to autoimmunity suggest that interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic changes caused by environmental agents may be responsible for inducing autoimmune disease. Genetic loci predisposing to autoimmunity are being identified through multi-center consortiums, and the number of validated genes is growing rapidly. Recent reports also indicate that the environment can contribute to autoimmunity by modifying gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. This article will review current understanding of the genetics and epigenetics of lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, using systemic lupus erythematosus as the primary example. Other autoimmune diseases may have a similar foundation.

  13. Experimental studies of immunologically mediated enteropathy. Development of cell mediated immunity and intestinal pathology during a graft-versus-host reaction in irradiated mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mowat, A M; Felstein, M V; Borland, A; Parrott, D M

    1988-01-01

    The intestinal component of a graft-versus-host reaction (GvHR) provides a useful experimental model to elucidate the pathogenesis of clinical enteropathies which cause villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia and which are associated with a local immune response. One to three days after induction of GvHR in heavily irradiated (CBAxBALB/c)F1 mice, a proliferative form of enteropathy developed. Compared with controls, these mice had increased counts of jejunal intraepithelial lymphocytes and had a four-fold increase in crypt cell production rate as well as an increase in crypt length. These changes were accompanied by a marked enhancement of splenic natural killer cell activity. After day three, the crypt cell production rate fell to zero and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) which could lyse targets of host origin appeared. In parallel, mice with GvHR developed significant villus shortening and their clinical condition deteriorated. Further experiments showed that increased counts of intraepithelial lymphocytes, villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia also occurred in grafts of fetal CBA intestine implanted under the kidney capsule of (CBAxBALB/c)F1 mice with GvHR. As these grafts are syngeneic to the injected CBA spleen cells, they should not be attacked by anti-host cytotoxic T lymphocytes. We suggest that the proliferative and destructive components of enteropathy in GvHR are caused by lymphokines released by an anti-host delayed type hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:3294125

  14. The clinical phenotypes of autoimmune hepatitis: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qixia; Yang, Fan; Miao, Qi; Krawitt, Edward L; Gershwin, M Eric; Ma, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) fulfills the generally accepted contemporary criteria of an autoimmune liver disease: the presence of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells, a female gender bias, association with other autoimmune diseases, response to immunosuppressive therapy and strong associations with the major histocompatibility complex HLA loci. It occurs worldwide in both children and adults and is marked by both etiopathogenic and clinical heterogeneity, differing from the other putative autoimmune liver diseases, primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), albeit occasionally presenting with overlapping features of PBC or PSC. Although diagnostic criteria have been established and validated, there are still major issues to be clarified due to its variability, such as autoantibody-negative AIH, drug-induced AIH, AIH sharing features with PBC or PSC, and post-transplant de novo AIH. In view of the diverse presentations and courses, including classical chronic onset, acute and acute severe onset, cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis, individualized management of patients is indicated. Each patient should receive a personalized analysis of the benefits and side effect risks of drugs. Herein we describe a comprehensive review of the clinical phenotypes of AIH underscoring its clinical heterogeneity.

  15. [Biermer's disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Biermer's disease is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis of the fundus predominantly responsible for a malabsorption of vitamin B12. Despite its association with several autoimmune disorders, few observations have reported an association with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We report a case of Biermer's disease associated with AIHA in a patient of 66 years old.

  16. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Islam, Shahidul; Nishat, Naoshin S.; Hossain, Motaher; Rafique, Tanzeem Ahmed; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Zhang, Yue; Saha, Amit; Harris, Jason B.; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Ryan, Edward T.; Leung, Daniel T.; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV). We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3–14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT), and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), and soluble CD14 (sCD14). We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional) status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03) and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02); plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07); plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01) and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01); stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory) T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02), and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02). In summary, in a cohort of children 3–14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV. PMID:27824883

  17. Biomarkers of Environmental Enteropathy are Positively Associated with Immune Responses to an Oral Cholera Vaccine in Bangladeshi Children.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Muhammad Ikhtear; Islam, Shahidul; Nishat, Naoshin S; Hossain, Motaher; Rafique, Tanzeem Ahmed; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Zhang, Yue; Saha, Amit; Harris, Jason B; Calderwood, Stephen B; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Ryan, Edward T; Leung, Daniel T; Qadri, Firdausi

    2016-11-01

    Environmental enteropathy (EE) is a poorly understood condition that refers to chronic alterations in intestinal permeability, absorption, and inflammation, which mainly affects young children in resource-limited settings. Recently, EE has been linked to suboptimal oral vaccine responses in children, although immunological mechanisms are poorly defined. The objective of this study was to determine host factors associated with immune responses to an oral cholera vaccine (OCV). We measured antibody and memory T cell immune responses to cholera antigens, micronutrient markers in blood, and EE markers in blood and stool from 40 Bangladeshi children aged 3-14 years who received two doses of OCV given 14 days apart. EE markers included stool myeloperoxidase (MPO) and alpha anti-trypsin (AAT), and plasma endotoxin core antibody (EndoCab), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (i-FABP), and soluble CD14 (sCD14). We used multiple linear regression analysis with LASSO regularization to identify host factors, including EE markers, micronutrient (nutritional) status, age, and HAZ score, predictive for each response of interest. We found stool MPO to be positively associated with IgG antibody responses to the B subunit of cholera toxin (P = 0.03) and IgA responses to LPS (P = 0.02); plasma sCD14 to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.07); plasma i-FABP to be positively associated with LPS IgG responses (P = 0.01) and with memory T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.01); stool AAT to be negatively associated with IL-10 (regulatory) T cell responses specific to cholera toxin (P = 0.02), and plasma EndoCab to be negatively associated with cholera toxin-specific memory T cell responses (P = 0.02). In summary, in a cohort of children 3-14 years old, we demonstrated that the majority of biomarkers of environmental enteropathy were positively associated with immune responses after vaccination with an OCV.

  18. Cell therapy for autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dazzi, Francesco; van Laar, Jacob M; Cope, Andrew; Tyndall, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Cell therapy, pioneered for the treatment of malignancies in the form of bone marrow transplantation, has subsequently been tested and successfully employed in autoimmune diseases. Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become a curative option for conditions with very poor prognosis such as severe forms of scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and lupus, in which targeted therapies have little or no effect. The refinement of the conditioning regimens has virtually eliminated transplant-related mortality, thus making HSCT a relatively safe choice. Although HSCT remains a nonspecific approach, the knowledge gained in this field has led to the identification of new avenues. In fact, it has become evident that the therapeutic efficacy of HSCT cannot merely be the consequence of a high-dose immuno-suppression, but rather the result of a resetting of the abnormal immune regulation underlying autoimmune conditions. The identification of professional and nonprofessional immunosuppressive cells and their biological properties is generating a huge interest for their clinical exploitation. Regulatory T cells, found abnormal in several autoimmune diseases, have been proposed as central to achieve long-term remissions. Mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow origin have more recently been shown not only to be able to differentiate into multiple tissues, but also to exert a potent antiproliferative effect that results in the inhibition of immune responses and prolonged survival of haemopoietic stem cells. All of these potential resources clearly need to be investigated at the preclinical level but support a great deal of enthusiasm for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:17367542

  19. Leaky gut and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alessio

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by tissue damage and loss of function due to an immune response that is directed against specific organs. This review is focused on the role of impaired intestinal barrier function on autoimmune pathogenesis. Together with the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the neuroendocrine network, the intestinal epithelial barrier, with its intercellular tight junctions, controls the equilibrium between tolerance and immunity to non-self antigens. Zonulin is the only physiologic modulator of intercellular tight junctions described so far that is involved in trafficking of macromolecules and, therefore, in tolerance/immune response balance. When the zonulin pathway is deregulated in genetically susceptible individuals, autoimmune disorders can occur. This new paradigm subverts traditional theories underlying the development of these diseases and suggests that these processes can be arrested if the interplay between genes and environmental triggers is prevented by re-establishing the zonulin-dependent intestinal barrier function. Both animal models and recent clinical evidence support this new paradigm and provide the rationale for innovative approaches to prevent and treat autoimmune diseases.

  20. Diet, microbiota and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vieira, S M; Pagovich, O E; Kriegel, M A

    2014-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (the gut microbiota) influence the development of autoimmunity in rodent models. Since humans have co-evolved with commensals for millennia, it is likely that people, who are genetically predisposed to autoimmunity, harbor gut microbial communities that similarly influence the onset and/or severity of disease. Beyond the current efforts to identify such disease-promoting or -preventing commensals ("pathobionts" or "symbionts"), it will be important to determine what factors modulate them. Dietary changes are known to affect both the composition and function of the gut microbial communities, which in turn can alter the innate and adaptive immune system. In this review, we focus on the relationships between diet, microbiota, and autoimmune diseases. We hypothesize that the beneficial and life-prolonging effects of caloric restriction on a variety of autoimmune models including lupus might partly be mediated by its effects on the gut microbiome and associated virome, the collection of all viruses in the gut. We give recent examples of the immunomodulatory potential of select gut commensals and their products or diet-derived metabolites in murine models of arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes. Lastly, we summarize the published phenotypes of germ-free mouse models of lupus and speculate on any role of the diet-sensitive microbiome and virome in systemic lupus and the related antiphospholipid syndrome.

  1. Sex bias in paediatric autoimmune disease - Not just about sex hormones?

    PubMed

    Chiaroni-Clarke, Rachel C; Munro, Jane E; Ellis, Justine A

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases affect up to 10% of the world's population, and approximately 80% of those affected are female. The majority of autoimmune diseases occur more commonly in females, although some are more frequent in males, while others show no bias by sex. The mechanisms leading to sex biased disease prevalence are not well understood. However, for adult-onset autoimmune disease, at least some of the cause is usually ascribed to sex hormones. This is because levels of sex hormones are one of the most obvious physiological differences between adult males and females, and their impact on immune system function is well recognised. While for paediatric-onset autoimmune diseases a sex bias is not as common, there are several such diseases for which one sex predominates. For example, the oligoarticular subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in approximately three times more girls than boys, with a peak age of onset well before the onset of puberty, and at a time when levels of androgen and oestrogen are low and not strikingly different between the sexes. Here, we review potential explanations for autoimmune disease sex bias with a particular focus on paediatric autoimmune disease, and biological mechanisms outside of sex hormone differences.

  2. Autoimmune hepatitis-primary biliary cirrhosis concurrent with biliary stricture after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yong-Zhen; Sun, Xiao-Ye; Liu, Yi-He; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-02-21

    Although the development of de novo autoimmune liver disease after liver transplantation (LT) has been described in both children and adults, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH)-primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) overlap syndrome has rarely been seen in liver transplant recipients. Here, we report a 50-year-old man who underwent LT for decompensated liver disease secondary to alcoholic steatohepatitis. His liver function tests became markedly abnormal 8 years after LT. Standard autoimmune serological tests were positive for anti-nuclear and anti-mitochondrial antibodies, and a marked biochemical response was observed to a regimen consisting of prednisone and ursodeoxycholic acid added to maintain immunosuppressant tacrolimus. Liver biopsy showed moderate bile duct lesions and periportal lymphocytes infiltrating along with light fibrosis, which confirmed the diagnosis of AIH-PBC overlap syndrome. We believe that this may be a case of post-LT de novo AIH-PBC overlap syndrome; a novel type of autoimmune overlap syndrome.

  3. The incidence and prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Donald S A; Cooper, David S

    2012-10-01

    The thyroid gland is the most common organ affected by autoimmune disease. Other autoimmune diseases, most notably type 1 diabetes mellitus, are increasing in incidence. It is unknown whether autoimmune thyroid diseases are following the same pattern. This review summarizes studies of autoimmune thyroid disease incidence and prevalence since 1950, not only for these measures of occurrences, but also for commenting on identified risk factors for thyroid autoimmunity. We find that incidence of autoimmune thyroid disease is currently higher than in historic series although the studies are so variable in design, patient population, disease definition, and laboratory methods that it is impossible to tell whether this difference is real. Further research is required to assess the possibility of changing disease patterns of autoimmune thyroid disease as opposed to simple changes in diagnostic thresholds.

  4. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma without a prior diagnosis of coeliac disease: diagnostic dilemmas and management options.

    PubMed

    Hönemann, Dirk; Prince, H Miles; Hicks, Rodney J; Seymour, John F

    2005-02-01

    Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) ultimately develops in 7-10% of patients with long-standing coeliac disease. In patients without a prior diagnosis of coeliac disease this is a very rare disorder, and the diagnosis in such cases is often difficult and delayed due to the non-specific nature of the symptoms and a very low index of clinical suspicion. Standard anti-lymphoma therapies have minimal utility in patients with EATL, and their prognosis is poor. An added difficulty is the high risk of intestinal perforation especially with the commencement of treatment due to the multifocal nature of bowel disease and poor underlying nutrition and tissue integrity. To illustrate these problems and provide an example of how these issues may be addressed, we report the case of a patient with EATL who was completely asymptomatic from unsuspected underlying coeliac disease and presented initially with back pain followed by bowel obstruction. He was treated with gut rest with total parenteral nutrition before commencing an intensive chemotherapy regimen [hyper-CVAD (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone)] and is currently well in ongoing complete remission 34 months later.

  5. Recovery of graft steatosis and protein-losing enteropathy after biliary diversion in a PFIC 1 liver transplanted child.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Emanuele; Stephenne, Xavier; Smets, Françoise; Fusaro, Fabio; de Magnée, Catherine; Reding, Raymond; Sokal, Etienne M

    2012-08-01

    PFIC 1 is a genetic disorder characterized by hepatic and gastrointestinal disease, often requiring LT during childhood. Extrahepatic symptoms, such as diarrhea and malabsorption, do not improve or may be aggravated after LT, as graft steatosis or steatohepatitis as consequences of the interaction between transplanted liver and native bowel. We describe a patient with PFIC 1 who presented with cholestasis in infancy, who developed intractable pruritus and liver fibrosis. The child underwent living donor LT at 3.6 yr of age, and he early developed severe refractory diarrhea, secondary malabsorption with protein-losing enteropathy, and an early fatty liver disease trough graft steatohepatitis. As the response to cholestyramine was unsatisfactory, we decided to perform an EBD by using the jejunal loop used for the cholangiojejunostomy. Diarrhea resolved rapidly after surgery. He remained well after six months following biliary diversion, with normal stool output and no protein loss. We documented a dramatic improvement of graft steatosis at histology as well as normalization of liver function test. EBD can be considered a valuable treatment option to avoid organ disfunction and loss in PFIC 1 transplanted patients who develop graft steatohepatitis.

  6. A Novel SMAD4 Mutation Causing Severe Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Protein Losing Enteropathy, Immunodeficiency, and Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Joel; Sahin, Christofer; Pestoff, Rebecka; Ignatova, Simone; Forsberg, Pia; Edsjö, Anders; Ekstedt, Mattias; Stenmark Askmalm, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by juvenile polyps of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a new pathogenic mutation of the SMAD4 gene and illustrate the need for a multidisciplinary health care approach to facilitate the correct diagnosis. The patient, a 47-year-old Caucasian woman, was diagnosed with anaemia at the age of 12. During the following 30 years, she developed numerous gastrointestinal polyps. The patient underwent several operations, and suffered chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and multiple infections. Screening of the SMAD4 gene revealed a novel, disease-causing mutation. In 2012, the patient suffered hypoalbuminemia and a large polyp in the small bowel was found. Gamma globulin was given but the patient responded with fever and influenza-like symptoms and refused more treatment. The patient underwent surgery in 2014 and made an uneventful recovery. At follow-up two months later albumin was 38 g/L and IgG was 6.9 g/L. Accurate diagnosis is essential for medical care. For patients with complex symptomatology, often with rare diseases, this is best provided by multidisciplinary teams including representatives from clinical genetics. Patients with a SMAD4 mutation should be followed up both for JPS and haemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia and may develop protein loosing enteropathy and immunodeficiency. PMID:25705527

  7. Type II enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma features a unique genomic profile with highly recurrent SETD2 alterations

    PubMed Central

    Roberti, Annalisa; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Bisig, Bettina; Vallois, David; Boéchat, Cloé; Lanitis, Evripidis; Bouchindhomme, Brigitte; Parrens, Marie- Cécile; Bossard, Céline; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Gaulard, Philippe; de Leval, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL), a rare and aggressive intestinal malignancy of intraepithelial T lymphocytes, comprises two disease variants (EATL-I and EATL-II) differing in clinical characteristics and pathological features. Here we report findings derived from whole-exome sequencing of 15 EATL-II tumour-normal tissue pairs. The tumour suppressor gene SETD2 encoding a non-redundant H3K36-specific trimethyltransferase is altered in 14/15 cases (93%), mainly by loss-of-function mutations and/or loss of the corresponding locus (3p21.31). These alterations consistently correlate with defective H3K36 trimethylation. The JAK/STAT pathway comprises recurrent STAT5B (60%), JAK3 (46%) and SH2B3 (20%) mutations, including a STAT5B V712E activating variant. In addition, frequent mutations in TP53, BRAF and KRAS are observed. Conversely, in EATL-I, no SETD2, STAT5B or JAK3 mutations are found, and H3K36 trimethylation is preserved. This study describes SETD2 inactivation as EATL-II molecular hallmark, supports EATL-I and -II being two distinct entities, and defines potential new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27600764

  8. P-glycoprotein expression in lamina propria lymphocytes of duodenal biopsy samples in dogs with chronic idiopathic enteropathies.

    PubMed

    Allenspach, K; Bergman, P J; Sauter, S; Gröne, A; Doherr, M G; Gaschen, F

    2006-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (p-gp) is a transmembrane protein functioning as a drug-efflux pump in the intestinal epithelium. Human patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who fail to respond to treatment with steroids express high levels of p-gp in lamina propria lymphocytes. The purpose of this study was to investigate p-gp expression in duodenal biopsy samples of dogs with chronic enteropathies and to evaluate the expression of p-gp after treatment with a known inducer of p-gp (prednisolone). Duodenal biopsy samples from 48 dogs were evaluated immunohistochemically with the mouse monoclonal antibody C219 for expression of p-gp in lamina propria lymphocytes. Biopsy samples were available from 15 dogs after treatment with prednisolone and 16 dogs after dietary therapy alone ("elimination diet"). Treatment with prednisolone resulted in an increase in p-gp expression (P=0.005). In contrast, dietary treatment alone produced no significant change in p-gp expression (P=0.59). A low p-gp score before initiation of steroid treatment was significantly associated with a positive response to treatment (P=0.01). These results indicate that lamina propria lymphocyte expression of p-gp is upregulated after prednisolone treatment in dogs with IBD, and that mucosal expression of p-gp may be of value in predicting the response to therapy.

  9. Rheumatic manifestations of autoimmune thyroid disease: the other autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E; Zezon, Anna; Khattri, Saakshi

    2012-06-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is an inflammatory thyroiditis that in some cases is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid gland, also referred to as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis or Hashimoto thyroiditis. Hashimoto thyroiditis is one of the commonest causes of hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism has been associated with osteoarthritis (OA) and inflammatory forms of arthritis and with several well defined connective tissue diseases, which in turn can cause arthritis. The presence of arthritis in patients with AITD with normal thyroid function is now being increasingly recognized. There is also considerable evidence to suggest that AITD is highly associated with fibromyalgia syndrome. We review the current literature on the rheumatologic manifestations of AITD and describe the features in its presentation that set it apart from other forms of autoimmune arthritis.

  10. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome: an update and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shaili; Wu, Eveline; Rao, V Koneti; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by immune dysregulation due to a defect in lymphocyte apoptosis. The clinical manifestations may be noted in multiple family members and include lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, increased risk of lymphoma, and autoimmune disease, which typically involves hematopoietic cell lines manifesting as multilineage cytopenias. Since the disease was first characterized in the early 1990s, there have been many advances in the diagnosis and management of this syndrome. The inherited genetic defect of many ALPS patients has involved (FAS) pathway signaling proteins, but there remain those patients who carry undefined genetic defects. Despite ALPS having historically been considered a primary immune defect presenting in early childhood, adult onset presentation is increasingly becoming recognized and more so in genetically undefined patients and those with somatic FAS mutations. Thus, future research may identify novel pathways and/or regulatory proteins important in lymphocyte activation and apoptosis.

  11. sirt1-null mice develop an autoimmune-like condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, Jedon; Boily, Gino; Bazinet, Stephanie; Saliba, Sarah; He Xiaohong; Jardine, Karen; Kennedy, Christopher; Staines, William; Rousseaux, Colin; Mueller, Rudi; McBurney, Michael W.

    2008-10-01

    The sirt1 gene encodes a protein deacetylase with a broad spectrum of reported substrates. Mice carrying null alleles for sirt1 are viable on outbred genetic backgrounds so we have examined them in detail to identify the biological processes that are dependent on SIRT1. Sera from adult sirt1-null mice contain antibodies that react with nuclear antigens and immune complexes become deposited in the livers and kidneys of these animals. Some of the sirt1-null animals develop a disease resembling diabetes insipidus when they approach 2 years of age although the relationship to the autoimmunity remains unclear. We interpret these observations as consistent with a role for SIRT1 in sustaining normal immune function and in this way delaying the onset of autoimmune disease.

  12. Definition of human autoimmunity--autoantibodies versus autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Lleo, Ana; Invernizzi, Pietro; Gao, Bin; Podda, Mauro; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-03-01

    The critical function of the immune system is to discriminate self from non-self. Tolerance against self-antigens is a highly regulated process and, in order to maintain it, the immune system must be able to distinguish self-reactive lymphocytes as they develop. The presence of autoantibodies is the consequence of breakdown of tolerance and, although they are an important serological feature of autoimmune diseases, their presence is not exclusive of these conditions. Antibodies against self-antigens are also found in cancer, during massive tissue damage and even in healthy subjects. Natural autoantibodies provide immediate protection against infection and also prevent inflammation by facilitating the clearance of oxidized lipids, oxidized proteins, and apoptotic cells; their role in development of autoimmunity is still unclear. Detection of serum autoantibodies in clinical practice has become more available to clinicians worldwide while providing a powerful diagnostic tool. This review discusses the clinical significance of autoantibodies, their pathogenic mechanisms in autoimmune diseases and, finally, illustrates the technology available for appropriate autoantibody detection.

  13. Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suma; Li, Yuebing

    2015-04-15

    Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is a recently characterized entity belonging to the spectrum of statin myotoxicity. It is a more severe form, and is usually associated with significant proximal muscle weakness, strikingly elevated creatine kinase levels and persistent symptoms despite statin discontinuation. The characteristic pathological finding is a marked muscle fiber necrosis with minimal or no inflammation on muscle biopsy. SINAM is an autoimmune disorder associated with an antibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and the antibody titer is a useful marker for assessing treatment response. However, anti-HMGCR positive myopathies are also caused by unknown etiologies other than statin exposure, especially in the younger population. SINAM should be promptly recognized as immunosuppressive therapy can improve its clinical outcome significantly. Further research is needed to elucidate its pathogenesis and provide evidence based guidelines for management.

  14. Animal Models of Autoimmune Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Soliven, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system (PNS) comprises the cranial nerves, the spinal nerves with their roots and rami, dorsal root ganglia neurons, the peripheral nerves, and peripheral components of the autonomic nervous system. Cell-mediated or antibody-mediated immune attack on the PNS results in distinct clinical syndromes, which are classified based on the tempo of illness, PNS component(s) involved, and the culprit antigen(s) identified. Insights into the pathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathy have been provided by ex vivo immunologic studies, biopsy materials, electrophysiologic studies, and experimental models. This review article summarizes earlier seminal observations and highlights the recent progress in our understanding of immunopathogenesis of autoimmune neuropathies based on data from animal models. PMID:24615441

  15. Autoantibody testing for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Self, Sally E

    2010-09-01

    The proper use and interpretation of serologic testing for diagnosing autoimmune diseases presents a challenge to clinicians for several reasons. Most laboratory tests for autoimmune disease are significantly less than 100% sensitive or specific. In addition, different techniques for the same antibody test may give different results, such as indirect immunofluorescence and multiplex bead assay for antinuclear antibody. Autoantibody testing should only be performed in the context of the clinical workup of patients who have a reasonable likelihood of having the disease for which the testing is relevant. Otherwise, the predictive value of a positive test is too low. Particularly with antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody testing, clinicians must know the methodology through which the tests are being performed, and should develop a relationship with the laboratory pathologist so that inconsistent or surprising results can be investigated.

  16. Vitamin D in autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    Smyk, Daniel S; Orfanidou, Timoklia; Invernizzi, Pietro; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Lenzi, Marco

    2013-11-01

    The development of autoimmune disease is based on the interaction of genetic susceptibility and environmental causes. Environmental factors include infectious and non-infectious agents, with some of these factors being implicated in several autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D is now believed to play a role in the development (or prevention) of several autoimmune diseases, based on its immunomodulatory properties. As well, the increasing incidence of autoimmune disease as one moves away from the equator, may be due to the lack of sunlight, which is crucial for the maintenance of normal vitamin D levels. A deficiency in vitamin D levels or vitamin D receptors is commonly indicated in autoimmune diseases, with multiple sclerosis (MS) being one of the best-studied and well-known examples. However, the role of vitamin D in other autoimmune diseases is not well defined, including autoimmune liver diseases such as primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and primary sclerosing cholangitis. This review will examine the role of vitamin D as an immunomodulator, followed by a comparison of vitamin D in MS versus autoimmune liver disease. From this comparison, it will become clear that vitamin D likely plays a role in the development of autoimmune liver disease, but this area requires further investigation.

  17. [Autoimmune hepatitis induced by isotretionine].

    PubMed

    Guzman Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos Lopez, Roxana; Ciliotta Chehade, Alessandra; Scavino, Yolanda; Morales, Alejandro; Tagle, Martín

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a teenage patient with the diagnosis of drug induced autoimmune hepatitis. The patient is a 16 years old female, with the past medical history of Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism controlled with levothyroxine, who started treatment with Isotretionin (®Accutane) 20 mg q/12 hours for a total of 3 months for the treatment of severe acne. The physical examination was within normal limits and the results of the laboratory exams are: Baseline values of ALT 28 U/L, AST 28 U/L. Three months later: AST 756 U/L, ALT 1199U/L, alkaline phosphatase 114 U/L, with normal bilirrubin levels throughout the process. The serology studies were negative for all viral hepatitis; ANA titers were positive (1/160) and igG levels were also elevated. A liver biopsy was performed, and was compatible with the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis. Corticosteroid therapy was started with Prednisone 40 mg per day one week after stopping the treatment with isotretionin, observing an improvement in the laboratory values. We describe this case and review the world literature since there are no reported cases of Isotretinoin-induced autoimmune hepatitis.

  18. Autoimmune diseases and HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emilie; Duclos, Antoine; Adelaide, Leopold; Miailhes, Patrick; Hot, Arnaud; Ferry, Tristan; Seve, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To describe the clinical manifestations, treatments, prognosis, and prevalence of autoimmune diseases (ADs) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. All HIV-infected patients managed in the Infectious Diseases Department of the Lyon University Hospitals, France, between January 2003 and December 2013 and presenting an AD were retrospectively included. Thirty-six ADs were found among 5186 HIV-infected patients which represents a prevalence of 0.69% including immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 15), inflammatory myositis (IM) (n = 4), sarcoidosis (n = 4), Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) (n = 4), myasthenia gravis (n = 2), Graves’ disease (n = 2), and 1 case of each following conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune hepatitis, Hashimoto thyroiditis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. One patient presented 2 ADs. Thirty patients were known to be HIV-infected when they developed an AD. The AD preceded HIV infection in 2 patients. GBS and HIV infection were diagnosed simultaneously in 3 cases. At AD diagnosis, CD4 T lymphocytes count were higher than 350/mm3 in 63% of patients, between 200 and 350/mm3 in 19% and less than 200/mm3 in 19%. Twenty patients benefited from immunosuppressant treatments, with a good tolerance. ADs during HIV infection are uncommon in this large French cohort. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura, sarcoidosis, IM, and GBS appear to be more frequent than in the general population. Immunosuppressant treatments seem to be effective and well tolerated. PMID:28121924

  19. The Autoimmune Model of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D. D.; Knight, J. G.; Ebringer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is of mysterious causation. It is not infectious, not congenital, but shows familial aggregation, the Mendelian genetics indicating involvement of multiple codominant genes with incomplete penetrance. This is the pattern for autoimmune diseases, such as Graves' disease of the thyroid, where forbidden clones of B lymphocytes develop, and cause thyrotoxicosis by secreting autoantibodies that react with the thyroid gland's receptor for thyroid-stimulating hormone from the pituitary gland. In 1982, Knight postulated that autoantibodies affecting the function of neurons in the limbic region of the brain are a possible cause of schizophrenia. Today, this is even more probable, with genes predisposing to schizophrenia having being found to be immune response genes, one in the MHC and two for antibody light chain V genes. Immune response genes govern the immune repertoire, dictating the genetic risk of autoimmune diseases. The simplest test for an autoimmune basis of schizophrenia would be trial of immunosuppression with prednisone in acute cases. The urgent research need is to find the microbial trigger, as done by Ebringer for rheumatoid arthritis and for ankylosing spondylitis. This could lead to prophylaxis of schizophrenia by vaccination against the triggering microbe. PMID:23738211

  20. Autoimmune aspects of type 2 diabetes mellitus - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Itariu, Bianca K; Stulnig, Thomas M

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity is a well-known pathogenic component in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The assumption that the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) also encompasses autoimmune aspects is recognized increasingly, based on the presence of circulating autoantibodies against β cells, self-reactive T cells, but also on the glucose-lowering efficacy of some immunomodulatory therapies in T2DM. The identification of these autoantibodies in elderly patients with slowly progressive manifestation of diabetes led to the introduction of a distinct clinical entity termed latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult (LADA), which combines features of both T1DM and T2DM. The autoantibody cluster differs in patients with LADA from patients with T1DM, but their presence indicates steady progression towards β-cell death and subsequent need for initiation of insulin treatment in a shorter period of time compared to autoantibody-negative T2DM patients. Autoimmune aspects in T2DM are not solely restricted to autoantibodies and thus LADA. They include the self-reactive T cells or defects in regulatory T cells (Tregs), which have been detected in autoantibody-negative T2DM patients as well. One contributor to the autoimmune activation in T2DM seems to be the chronic inflammatory state, characteristic of this disease. Upon inflammation-induced tissue destruction, cryptic 'self' antigens can trigger an autoimmune response, which in turn accelerates β-cell death. Both innate and adaptive immune system components, specifically macrophages and self-reactive T cells, contribute to an increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines involved in inflammatory and autoimmune processes. However, the extent to which inflammation overlaps with autoimmunity is not known. Our review focuses on autoimmune involvement in T2DM, with an emphasis on LADA and the humoral immune response, on the involvement of chronic inflammation in autoimmunity, and specifically the role of B and T cells as links between inflammatory and

  1. Sex-based differences in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ortona, Elena; Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Veroni, Caterina; Aloisi, Francesca; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by an exaggerated immune response leading to damage and dysfunction of specific or multiple organs and tissues. Most autoimmune diseases are more prevalent in women than in men. Symptom severity, disease course, response to therapy and overall survival may also differ between males and females with autoimmune diseases. Sex hormones have a crucial role in this sex bias, with estrogens being potent stimulators of autoimmunity and androgens playing a protective role. Accumulating evidence indicates that genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors may also contribute to sex-related differences in risk and clinical course of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms for sex specific differences in autoimmunity with a special focus on three paradigmatic diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis.

  2. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a flavor of autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Perros, Frédéric; Humbert, Marc; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    It is admitted that autoimmunity results from a combination of risks such as genetic background, environmental triggers, and stochastic events. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) shares with the so-called prototypic autoimmune diseases, genetic risk factors, female predominance and sex hormone influence, association with other chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, defects in regulatory T cells function, and presence of autoantibodies. Case reports have been published indicating the beneficial effect of some immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies in PAH, supporting the potential role of immune mechanisms in the pathophysiology of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on autoimmune mechanisms operating in PAH, especially mounting a local autoimmune response inside the pulmonary tissue, namely pulmonary lymphoid neogenesis. A better understanding of the role of autoimmunity in pulmonary vascular remodelling may help develop targeted immunomodulatory strategies in PAH.

  3. Role of leptin in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Siloşi, Isabela; Rogoz, Suzana

    2013-03-01

    Leptin represents a link between metabolism, nutritional status, and immune responses. Leptin is important for optimal functioning of the immune system. Leptin is a cytokine-like hormone with proinflammatory properties linked to autoimmune diseases. Moreover, there has been increasing evidence that leptin is involved in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. Leptin has been shown to enhance immune reactions in autoimmune diseases that are commonly associated with inflammatory responses. Both high and low levels of leptin might contribute to autoimmune diseases. Leptin has been explored as a potential target for therapeutic development in treating autoimmune diseases. In this review, we review here the most recent advances on the role of leptin in autoimmunity and in immune-rheumatological diseases.

  4. Autoimmune diseases associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Arti

    2008-01-01

    Associations of autoimmune diseases with neurofibromatosis type 1 have been rarely described. In the present report, we describe two patients of neurofibromatosis type 1 having an association with vitiligo in one, and alopecia areata and autoimmune thyroiditis in another. The associations of neurofibromatosis type 1 with vitiligo, alopecia areata, and autoimmune thyroiditis have not been reported earlier. Whether these associations reflect a causal relationship with neurofibromatosis type 1 or are coincidental needs to be settled.

  5. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  6. Low Vitamin D Status Is Associated with Systemic and Gastrointestinal Inflammation in Dogs with a Chronic Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Titmarsh, Helen F.; Gow, Adam G.; Kilpatrick, Scott; Cartwright, Jennifer A.; Milne, Elspeth M.; Philbey, Adrian W.; Berry, Jacqueline; Handel, Ian; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D deficiency, as assessed by serum concentrations of 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), has been linked to the development of over-zealous and inappropriate inflammation in humans. However, the relationship between vitamin D status and inflammation in dogs is ill-defined. Chronic enteropathies (CE) are frequently diagnosed in client owned dogs, have a wide range of serum 25(OH)D concentrations, and represent a spontaneous model in which to probe the relationship between vitamin D and inflammation. The hypothesis of this study was that vitamin D status would be negatively associated with systemic and gastrointestinal inflammation in dogs with a CE. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D concentrations and markers of systemic and gastrointestinal inflammation in a cohort of dogs with CE. Methods and Materials Serum 25(OH)D concentrations, together with neutrophil, monocyte, eosinophil and lymphocyte counts, duodenal histopathology scores, serum IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TNFα concentrations and were measured in 39 dogs with histologically confirmed CE. A linear regression model examined the relationship between serum 25(OH)D status and measures of inflammation. Results Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were negatively associated with neutrophil and monocyte counts, duodenal histopathology scores and serum IL-2 and IL-8 concentrations. Dogs with low serum 25(OH)D concentrations typically had an inflammatory signature characterised by high monocyte and neutrophil numbers together with low lymphocyte numbers. There is a need to establish whether low vitamin D status is a cause or consequence of inflammation. PMID:26333093

  7. Humoral Immunodeficiency with Hypotonia, Feeding Difficulties, Enteropathy, and Mild Eczema Caused by a Classical FOXP3 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Tuijnenburg, Paul; Cuadrado, Eloy; Bosch, Annet M; Kindermann, Angelika; Jansen, Machiel H; Alders, Marielle; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2017-01-01

    We describe here the case of a boy who presented with pulmonary infections, feeding difficulties due to velopharyngeal insufficiency and gastroesophageal reflux, myopathy, and hypotonia soon after birth. Later, he was also found to have an elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) E and mild eczema and was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. Further immunological screening at the age of 7 years showed low B and NK cell numbers but normal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and notably, normal numbers of CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells. Serum IgG, IgA, and IgM were low to normal, but he had a deficient response to a pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and thus a humoral immunodeficiency. To our surprise, whole exome sequencing revealed a mutation in forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3), encoding an essential transcription factor for the development and function of Treg cells. This classical mutation is associated with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. Further in vitro studies indeed showed defective function of Treg cells despite normal FOXP3 protein expression and nuclear localization. The boy underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 11 years of age and despite the temporary development of diabetes while on prednisone is now doing much better, IgE levels have declined, and his fatigue has improved. This case illustrates that a classical pathogenic mutation in FOXP3 can lead to a clinical phenotype where the diagnosis of IPEX syndrome was never considered because of the lack of diabetes and the presence of only mild eczema, in addition to the normal Treg cell numbers and FOXP3 expression.

  8. Humoral Immunodeficiency with Hypotonia, Feeding Difficulties, Enteropathy, and Mild Eczema Caused by a Classical FOXP3 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tuijnenburg, Paul; Cuadrado, Eloy; Bosch, Annet M.; Kindermann, Angelika; Jansen, Machiel H.; Alders, Marielle; van Leeuwen, Ester M. M.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2017-01-01

    We describe here the case of a boy who presented with pulmonary infections, feeding difficulties due to velopharyngeal insufficiency and gastroesophageal reflux, myopathy, and hypotonia soon after birth. Later, he was also found to have an elevated immunoglobulin (Ig) E and mild eczema and was diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease. Further immunological screening at the age of 7 years showed low B and NK cell numbers but normal CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and notably, normal numbers of CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells. Serum IgG, IgA, and IgM were low to normal, but he had a deficient response to a pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and thus a humoral immunodeficiency. To our surprise, whole exome sequencing revealed a mutation in forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3), encoding an essential transcription factor for the development and function of Treg cells. This classical mutation is associated with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. Further in vitro studies indeed showed defective function of Treg cells despite normal FOXP3 protein expression and nuclear localization. The boy underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at 11 years of age and despite the temporary development of diabetes while on prednisone is now doing much better, IgE levels have declined, and his fatigue has improved. This case illustrates that a classical pathogenic mutation in FOXP3 can lead to a clinical phenotype where the diagnosis of IPEX syndrome was never considered because of the lack of diabetes and the presence of only mild eczema, in addition to the normal Treg cell numbers and FOXP3 expression. PMID:28289675

  9. mTrop1/Epcam Knockout Mice Develop Congenital Tufting Enteropathy through Dysregulation of Intestinal E-cadherin/β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Emanuela; Lattanzio, Rossano; La Sorda, Rossana; Dini, Francesca; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Piantelli, Mauro; Alberti, Saverio

    2012-01-01

    Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is a life-threatening hereditary disease that is characterized by enteric mucosa tufting degeneration and early onset, severe diarrhea. Loss-of-function mutations of the human EPCAM gene (TROP1, TACSTD1) have been indicated as the cause of CTE. However, loss of mTrop1/Epcam in mice appeared to lead to death in utero, due to placental malformation. This and indications of residual Trop-1/EpCAM expression in cases of CTE cast doubt on the role of mTrop1/Epcam in this disease. The aim of this study was to determine the role of TROP1/EPCAM in CTE and to generate an animal model of this disease for molecular investigation and therapy development. Using a rigorous gene-trapping approach, we obtained mTrop1/Epcam -null (knockout) mice. These were born alive, but failed to thrive, and died soon after birth because of hemorrhagic diarrhea. The intestine from the mTrop1/Epcam knockout mice showed intestinal tufts, villous atrophy and colon crypt hyperplasia, as in human CTE. No structural defects were detected in other organs. These results are consistent with TROP1/EPCAM loss being the cause of CTE, thus providing a viable animal model for this disease, and a benchmark for its pathogenetic course. In the affected enteric mucosa, E-cadherin and β-catenin were shown to be dysregulated, leading to disorganized transition from crypts to villi, with progressive loss of membrane localization and increasing intracellular accumulation, thus unraveling an essential role for Trop-1/EpCAM in the maintenance of intestinal architecture and functionality. Supporting information is available for this article. PMID:23209569

  10. mTrop1/Epcam knockout mice develop congenital tufting enteropathy through dysregulation of intestinal E-cadherin/β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Emanuela; Lattanzio, Rossano; La Sorda, Rossana; Dini, Francesca; Tiboni, Gian Mario; Piantelli, Mauro; Alberti, Saverio

    2012-01-01

    Congenital tufting enteropathy (CTE) is a life-threatening hereditary disease that is characterized by enteric mucosa tufting degeneration and early onset, severe diarrhea. Loss-of-function mutations of the human EPCAM gene (TROP1, TACSTD1) have been indicated as the cause of CTE. However, loss of mTrop1/Epcam in mice appeared to lead to death in utero, due to placental malformation. This and indications of residual Trop-1/EpCAM expression in cases of CTE cast doubt on the role of mTrop1/Epcam in this disease. The aim of this study was to determine the role of TROP1/EPCAM in CTE and to generate an animal model of this disease for molecular investigation and therapy development. Using a rigorous gene-trapping approach, we obtained mTrop1/Epcam -null (knockout) mice. These were born alive, but failed to thrive, and died soon after birth because of hemorrhagic diarrhea. The intestine from the mTrop1/Epcam knockout mice showed intestinal tufts, villous atrophy and colon crypt hyperplasia, as in human CTE. No structural defects were detected in other organs. These results are consistent with TROP1/EPCAM loss being the cause of CTE, thus providing a viable animal model for this disease, and a benchmark for its pathogenetic course. In the affected enteric mucosa, E-cadherin and β-catenin were shown to be dysregulated, leading to disorganized transition from crypts to villi, with progressive loss of membrane localization and increasing intracellular accumulation, thus unraveling an essential role for Trop-1/EpCAM in the maintenance of intestinal architecture and functionality.Supporting information is available for this article.

  11. Genome-wide Association Study of Dermatomyositis Reveals Genetic Overlap with other Autoimmune Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E. R.; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Lamb, Janine A.; Chen, Wei; Amos, Christopher I.; Gregersen, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify new genetic associations with juvenile and adult dermatomyositis (DM). Methods We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of adult and juvenile DM patients of European ancestry (n = 1178) and controls (n = 4724). To assess genetic overlap with other autoimmune disorders, we examined whether 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus, and previously associated with autoimmune diseases, predispose to DM. Results Compared to controls, patients with DM had a strong signal in the MHC region consisting of GWAS-level significance (P < 5x10−8) at 80 genotyped SNPs. An analysis of 141 non-MHC SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases showed that three SNPs linked with three genes were associated with DM, with a false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05. These genes were phospholipase C like 1 (PLCL1, rs6738825, FDR=0.00089), B lymphoid tyrosine kinase (BLK, rs2736340, FDR=0.00031), and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 21 (CCL21, rs951005, FDR=0.0076). None of these genes was previously reported to be associated with DM. Conclusion Our findings confirm the MHC as the major genetic region associated with DM and indicate that DM shares non-MHC genetic features with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting the presence of additional novel risk loci. This first identification of autoimmune disease genetic predispositions shared with DM may lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:23983088

  12. Autoimmune myocarditis: a clinical entity.

    PubMed Central

    Dragatakis, L. N.; Klassen, J.; Hüttner, I.; Fraser, D. G.; Poirier, N. L.; Klassen, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    In a case of myocarditis electron microscopic and immunoflourescent studies of a transmural myocardial biopsy specimen indicated an autoimmune process. Extensive inflammatory cell infiltration, immunoglobulin and complement deposition along the sarcolemma and in the interstitium, and capillary endothelial injury were found. After a short course of immunosuppressive therapy the inflammatory process was replaced by collagenous scarring and lymphocytic depletion; the blood vessels were then normal. Earlier therapy in such cases may be lifesaving. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:427670

  13. [Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Vaarala, Outi; Julkunen, Ilkka; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder of central origin. Hypocretin deficiency is the essential feature of type 1 narcolepsy. The biological background of type 2 narcolepsy (without cataplexy) is less clear. Infections or other external factors are thought to function as triggers of narcolepsy. After the H1N1 vaccination campaign, the incidence of narcolepsy increased clearly in countries where a vaccine boosted with the AS03 adjuvant was used. According to the current view, the increase of narcolepsy in connection with the pandemic vaccine especially in children and adolescents was associated with the virus component of the vaccine, but the adjuvant may also have boosted the development of autoimmune response.

  14. Autoimmune Inflammatory Myopathy in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Seema; Suri, Vanita; Bagga, Rashmi; Thami, Meenakshi R.; Sharma, Aman; Bambery, Pardeep

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis, Wegner's granulomatosis, and polyarteritis nodosa are rarely seen in pregnancy, unlike systemic lupus erythematosus, whose association with pregnancy is well studied. Dermatomyositis is a protean disease that affects women in reproductive age. There are only a few case reports documenting the outcome of pregnancy in patients with dermatomyositis/polymyositis. The disease is usually considered to have an adverse effect on pregnancy. Fetal prognosis is guided by the severity of maternal disease and is usually good when the disease remains inactive during pregnancy. PMID:18324327

  15. Autoimmune Cytopenias In Common Variable Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Podjasek, Jenna C.; Abraham, Roshini S.

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a humoral immunodeficiency whose primary diagnostic features include hypogammaglobulinemia involving two or more immunoglobulin isotypes and impaired functional antibody responses in the majority of patients. While increased susceptibility to respiratory and other infections is a common thread that binds a large cross-section of CVID patients, the presence of autoimmune complications in this immunologically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is recognized in up to two-thirds of patients. Among the autoimmune manifestations reported in CVID (20–50%; Chapel et al., 2008; Cunningham-Rundles, 2008), autoimmune cytopenias are by far the most common occurring variably in 4–20% (Michel et al., 2004; Chapel et al., 2008) of these patients who have some form of autoimmunity. Association of autoimmune cytopenias with granulomatous disease and splenomegaly has been reported. The spectrum of autoimmune cytopenias includes thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia. While it may seem paradoxical “prima facie” that autoimmunity is present in patients with primary immune deficiencies, in reality, it could be considered two sides of the same coin, each reflecting a different but inter-connected facet of immune dysregulation. The expansion of CD21 low B cells in CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune features has also been previously reported. It has been demonstrated that this unique subset of B cells is enriched for autoreactive germline antibodies. Further, a correlation has been observed between various B cell subsets, such as class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, and autoimmunity in CVID. This review attempts to explore the most recent concepts and highlights, along with treatment of autoimmune hematological manifestations of CVID. PMID:22837758

  16. GAD65 autoimmunity-clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Uibo, Raivo; Lernmark, Ake

    2008-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children and particularly in teenagers and adults is strongly associated with autoreactivity to the Mr 65,000 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65). Autoantibodies to GAD65 are common at the time of clinical diagnosis and may be present for years prior to the onset of hyperglycemia. GAD65 autoantibodies predict conversion to insulin dependence when present in patients classified with type 2 diabetes nowadays more often referred to as patients with latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA) or type 1,5 diabetes. Analyses of T cells with HLA DRB1 0401-tetramers with GAD65-specific peptides as well as of anti-idiotypic GAD65 autoantibodies suggest that GAD65 autoreactivity is common. The immunological balance is disturbed and the appearance of GAD65 autoantibodies represents markers of autoreactive loss of pancreatic beta cells. Extensive experimental animal research, in particular of the Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse, showed that GAD65 therapies reduce insulitis and prevent spontaneous diabetes. Recombinant human GAD65 produced by current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) and formulated with alum was found to be safe in Phase I and II placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized clinical trials. The approach to modulate GAD65 autoreactivity with subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) showed promise as alum-formulated GAD65 induced a dose-dependent reduction in the disappearance rate of endogenous residual C-peptide production. Additional controlled clinical trials are needed to uncover the mechanisms by which subcutaneous injections of recombinant human GAD65 may alter GAD65 autoreactivity.

  17. LADA type diabetes, celiac diasease, cerebellar ataxia and stiff person syndrome. A rare association of autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Erdei, Katalin; Kaszás, Nóra; Folyovich, András; Szücs, Anna; Barcs, Gábor; Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Skaliczkis, József; Vadasdi, Károly; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-05-30

    Celiac disease--in its typical form--is a chronic immune-mediated enteropathy with typical clinical symptoms that develops against gliadin content of cereal grains, and is often associated with other autoimmune diseases. In cases of atypical manifestation classic symptoms may be absent or mild, and extra-intestinal symptoms or associated syndromes dominate clinical picture. The authors present a longitudinal follow-up of such a case. A 63-years old woman was diagnosed with epilepsy at the age of 19, and with progressive limb ataxia at the age of 36, which was initially thought to be caused by cerebellar atrophy, later probably by stiff person syndrome. At the age 59, her diabetes mellitus manifested with type 2 diabetic phenotype, but based on GAD positivity later was reclassified as type 1 diabetes. Only the last check-up discovered the celiac disease, retrospectively explaining the entire disease course and neurological symptoms. By presenting this case, the authors would like to draw attention to the fact that one should think of the possibility of celiac disease when cerebellar ataxia, progressive neurological symptoms and diabetes are present at the same time. An early diagnosis may help to delay the progression of disease and help better treatment.

  18. [Autoimmune myopathy associated with statin use].

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, Unn; Mygland, Åse

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that statins can have a toxic effect on musculature, but less widely known that they can also trigger progressive autoimmune myopathy. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy is characterised by proximal muscle weakness, antibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) in serum, and necrosis without lymphocytic infiltration on muscle biopsy.

  19. Kaleidoscope of autoimmune diseases in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Roszkiewicz, Justyna; Smolewska, Elzbieta

    2016-11-01

    Within the last 30 years, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has changed its status from inevitably fatal to chronic disorder with limited impact on life span. However, this breakthrough was mainly the effect of introduction of the aggressive antiviral treatment, which has led to the clinically significant increase in CD4+ cell count, resulting in fewer cases of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and improved management of opportunistic infections occurring in the course of the disease. The occurrence of a particular autoimmune disease depends on degree of immunosuppression of the HIV-positive patient. In 2002, four stages of autoimmunity were proposed in patients infected by HIV, based on the absolute CD4+ cell count, feature of AIDS as well as on the presence of autoimmune diseases. Spectrum of autoimmune diseases associated with HIV infection seems to be unexpectedly wide, involving several organs, such as lungs (sarcoidosis), thyroid gland (Graves' disease), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), connective tissue (systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, polyarteritis nodosa and other types of vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome) or hematopoietic system (autoimmune cytopenias). This paper contains the state of art on possible coincidences between HIV infection and a differential types of autoimmune diseases, including the potential mechanisms of this phenomenon. As the clinical manifestations of autoimmunization often mimic those inscribed in the course of HIV infection, health care providers should be aware of this rare but potentially deadly association and actively seek for its symptoms in their patients.

  20. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yoshiyuki; Tomer, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine) is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4) and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg). Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. PMID:15712599

  1. Advances in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndromes.

    PubMed

    Madkaikar, Manisha; Mhatre, Snehal; Gupta, Maya; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2011-07-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of lymphocyte homeostasis. It is characterized by non-malignant lymphoproliferation autoimmunity mostly directed toward blood cells and increased risk of lymphoma. Majority of patients with ALPS harbor heterozygous germline mutations in the gene for the TNF receptor-family member Fas (CD 95, Apo-1) which are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Somatic Fas mutations are the second most common genetic etiology of ALPS. Additionally mutations in the genes encoding Fas-ligand (FASLG), caspase 10 (CASP10) and caspase 8 (CASP8), NRAS and KRAS have been identified in a small number of patients with ALPS and related disorders. Approximately one-third of patients with ALPS have yet unidentified defect. ALPS was initially thought to be a very rare disease, but recent studies have shown that it may be more common than previously thought. Testing for ALPS should therefore be considered in patients with unexplained lymphadenopathy, cytopenias, and hepatosplenomegaly. There have been significant advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ALPS in last few years which has resulted in the development of new diagnostic criteria and a number of targeted therapies. This review describes the clinical and laboratory manifestations found in patients with ALPS, as well as the molecular basis for the disease and new advances in treatment.

  2. Cardiovascular Involvement in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AD) represent a broad spectrum of chronic conditions that may afflict specific target organs or multiple systems with a significant burden on quality of life. These conditions have common mechanisms including genetic and epigenetics factors, gender disparity, environmental triggers, pathophysiological abnormalities, and certain subphenotypes. Atherosclerosis (AT) was once considered to be a degenerative disease that was an inevitable consequence of aging. However, research in the last three decades has shown that AT is not degenerative or inevitable. It is an autoimmune-inflammatory disease associated with infectious and inflammatory factors characterized by lipoprotein metabolism alteration that leads to immune system activation with the consequent proliferation of smooth muscle cells, narrowing arteries, and atheroma formation. Both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms have been proposed to participate in the onset and progression of AT. Several risk factors, known as classic risk factors, have been described. Interestingly, the excessive cardiovascular events observed in patients with ADs are not fully explained by these factors. Several novel risk factors contribute to the development of premature vascular damage. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how traditional and nontraditional risk factors contribute to pathogenesis of CVD in AD. PMID:25177690

  3. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Minalyan, Artem; Benhammou, Jihane N; Artashesyan, Aida; Lewis, Michael S; Pisegna, Joseph R

    2017-01-01

    At present there is no universally accepted classification for gastritis. The first successful classification (The Sydney System) that is still commonly used by medical professionals was first introduced by Misiewicz et al in Sydney in 1990. In fact, it was the first detailed classification after the discovery of Helicobacter pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982. In 1994, the Updated Sydney System was proposed during the International Workshop on the Histopathology of Gastritis followed by the publication in The American Journal of Surgical Pathology by Dixon et al. Using the new classification, distinction between atrophic and nonatrophic gastritis was revised, and the visual scale grading was incorporated. According to the Updated Sydney System Classification, atrophic gastritis is categorized into multifocal (H. pylori, environmental factors, specific diet) and corpus-predominant (autoimmune). Since metaplasia is a key histological characteristic in patients with atrophic gastritis, it has been recommended to use the word “metaplastic” in both variants of atrophic gastritis: autoimmune metaplastic atrophic gastritis (AMAG) and environmental metaplastic atrophic gastritis. Although there are many overlaps in the course of the disease and distinction between those two entities may be challenging, the aim of this review article was to describe the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and treatment in patients with AMAG. However, it is important to mention that H. pylori is the most common etiologic factor for the development of gastritis in the world. PMID:28223833

  4. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases.

  5. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4+ T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects. PMID:28184367

  6. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4(+) T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects.

  7. Emu Oil Reduces Small Intestinal Inflammation in the Absence of Clinical Improvement in a Rat Model of Indomethacin-Induced Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Abimosleh, Suzanne M.; Tran, Cuong D.; Howarth, Gordon S.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsteroidal-anti-inflammatory-drug (NSAID) enteropathy is characterized by small intestinal damage and ulceration. Emu Oil (EO) has previously been reported to reduce intestinal inflammation. Aim. We investigated EO for its potential to attenuate NSAID-enteropathy in rats. Methods. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n = 10/group) were gavaged with Water, Olive Oil (OO), or EO (0.5 mL; days 0–12) and with 0.5 mL Water or the NSAID, Indomethacin (8 mg/kg; days 5–12) daily. Disease activity index (DAI), 13C-sucrose breath test (SBT), organ weights, intestinal damage severity (IDS), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were assessed. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results. In Indomethacin-treated rats, DAI was elevated (days 10–12) and SBT values (56%) and thymus weight (55%) were decreased, relative to normal controls. Indomethacin increased duodenum (68%), colon (24%), SI (48%), caecum (48%), liver (51%) and spleen (88%) weights, IDS scores, and MPO levels (jejunum: 195%, ileum: 104%) compared to normal controls. Jejunal MPO levels were decreased (64%) by both EO and OO, although only EO decreased ileal MPO (50%), compared to Indomethacin controls. Conclusions. EO reduced acute intestinal inflammation, whereas other parameters of Indomethacin-induced intestinal injury were not affected significantly. Increased EO dose and/or frequency of administration could potentially improve clinical efficacy. PMID:23573127

  8. Autoimmune mechanisms in pernicious anaemia & thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Osborne, David; Sobczyńska-Malefora, Agata

    2015-09-01

    Pernicious anaemia (PA) and some types of thyroid disease result from autoimmune processes. The autoimmune mechanisms in these conditions have not been fully elucidated. This review discusses the autoimmune mechanisms involved in PA and how these affect diagnosis and disease progression. In addition to gastric antibodies, antibodies to the vitamin B12 binding protein transcobalamin which can result in high serum B12 levels are also addressed with regard to how they affect clinical practice. The role of autoimmune susceptibility is investigated by comparing PA to one of its most common comorbidities, autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Thyroid disease (although not exclusively AITD) and B12 deficiency are both also implicated in the pathology of hyperhomocysteinemia, an elevated homocysteine in plasma. Since hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular occlusive disease, this review also addresses how thyroid disease in particular leads to changes in homocysteine levels.

  9. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti; Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-11-24

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented.

  10. Loss of heterozygosity at chromosome 9p21 is a frequent finding in enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Obermann, E C; Diss, T C; Hamoudi, R A; Munson, P; Wilkins, B S; Camozzi, M L P; Isaacson, P G; Du, M Q; Dogan, A

    2004-02-01

    Enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETL) and ulcerative jejunitis (UJ) are rare disorders often occurring in patients with coeliac disease. The genetic events associated with the accumulation of intraepithelial lymphocytes in coeliac disease and tumour development are largely unknown. Deletions at chromosome 9p21, which harbours the tumour suppressor genes p14/ARF, p15/INK4b, and p16/INK4a, and 17p13, where p53 is located, are associated with the development and progression of lymphomas. To examine whether deletions at 9p21 and 17p13 play a role in ETL, 22 cases of ETL and seven cases of UJ were screened for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) by tissue microdissection and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis for microsatellite markers. Furthermore, p53 and p16 protein expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis for detection of mutations in exons 5-8 of the p53 gene was performed in five cases of ETL and three cases of UJ. LOH was found in at least one microsatellite marker at the 9p21 locus in 8 of 22 (36%) ETLs, but not in UJ. Five of nine (56%) tumours composed of large cells showed LOH at 9p21, as opposed to two of eight (25%) tumours with small- or medium-sized cell morphology. The region spanning the p14/p15/p16 gene locus was most frequently affected (five cases); LOH at these markers coincided with loss of p16 protein expression in all of these cases. p53 overexpression was demonstrated in all ETLs examined and in four of seven cases of UJ. However, no alterations of the p53 gene were detected by LOH or PCR-SSCP analysis. The results of this study show that LOH at chromosome 9p21 is frequent in ETL, especially in tumours with large cell morphology; this finding suggests that gene loss at this locus may play a role in the development of ETL.

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dede, Kristóf; Salamon, Ferenc; Taller, András; Teknős, Dániel; Bursics, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease of unknown pathomechanism. It belongs to the IgG4-related disease family and responds well to steroids, although the relapse rate can reach up to 20–30%. Differentiating AIP from the more common pancreatic cancer can be very challenging. About 20% of AIP is diagnosed postoperatively during final histological examination. Each of the investigative tools can add something to the definitive diagnosis; the question remains whether it is possible to prevent an unnecessary resection. Through our case we would like to demonstrate the differential diagnostic opportunities and present the literary background of this issue. In conclusion, we can state that whenever a focal pancreatic lesion is encountered AIP should always be considered. PMID:24968399

  12. Electroencephalography of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W; Sutter, Raoul

    2013-10-01

    There is an increasing recognition of autoimmune limbic encephalopathy with the hope for earlier diagnosis and expedited and improved treatment. Although antibody testing remains the definitive clinical diagnostic feature, the presentation of a rapid dementia, behavioral changes, and seizures leads to investigation using cerebral imaging, electroencephalography, and cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the diagnosis and also to exclude similar disorders. The electroencephalographer may be asked to comment on the types of electroencephalography abnormality and provide input toward the diagnosis of limbic encephalopathy. This article reviews the literature on limbic paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic encephalopathies, providing descriptions and examples of the electroencephalography findings. Typically, there are patterns of slow theta and delta activity and different patterns of temporal and frontal epileptic activity.

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Perez, David; Vaquero, Eva C; Ayuso, Juan R; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined as a particular form of pancreatitis that often manifests as obstructive jaundice associated with a pancreatic mass or an obstructive bile duct lesion, and that has an excellent response to corticosteroid treatment. The prevalence of AIP worldwide is unknown, and it is considered as a rare entity. The clinical and radiological presentation of AIP can mimic bilio-pancreatic cancer, presenting difficulties for diagnosis and obliging the surgeon to balance decision-making between the potential risk presented by the misdiagnosis of a deadly disease against the desire to avoid unnecessary major surgery for a disease that responds effectively to corticosteroid treatment. In this review we detail the current and critical points for the diagnosis, classification and treatment for AIP, with a special emphasis on surgical series and the methods to differentiate between this pathology and bilio-pancreatic cancer.

  14. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Marmosets.

    PubMed

    Jagessar, S Anwar; Dijkman, Karin; Dunham, Jordon; 't Hart, Bert A; Kap, Yolanda S

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset, a small-bodied Neotropical primate, is a well-known and validated animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). This model can be used for exploratory research, i.e., investigating the pathogenic mechanisms involved in MS, and applied research, testing the efficacy of new potential drugs.In this chapter, we will describe a method to induce EAE in the marmoset. In addition, we will explain the most common immunological techniques involved in the marmoset EAE research, namely isolation of mononuclear cells (MNC) from peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue, assaying T cell proliferation by thymidine incorporation, MNC phenotyping by flow cytometry, antibody measurement by ELISA, generation of B cell lines and antigen-specific T cell lines, and assaying cytotoxic T cells.

  15. Rett syndrome: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Leoncini, Silvia; Signorini, Cinzia; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rovero, Paolo; Durand, Thierry; Ciccoli, Lucia; Papini, Anna Maria; Hayek, Joussef

    2016-04-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disease, previously included into the autistic spectrum disorders, affecting almost exclusively females (frequency 1:10,000). RTT leads to intellective deficit, purposeful hands use loss and late major motor impairment besides featuring breathing disorders, epilepsy and increased risk of sudden death. The condition is caused in up to 95% of the cases by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Our group has shown a number of previously unrecognized features, such as systemic redox imbalance, chronic inflammatory status, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease-like lung disease, and erythrocyte morphology changes. While evidence on an intimate involvement of MeCP2 in the immune response is cumulating, we have recently shown a cytokine dysregulation in RTT. Increasing evidence on the relationship between MeCP2 and an immune dysfunction is reported, with, apparently, a link between MECP2 gene polymorphisms and autoimmune diseases, including primary Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic sclerosis. Antineuronal (i.e., brain proteins) antibodies have been shown in RTT. Recently, high levels of anti-N-glucosylation (N-Glc) IgM serum autoantibodies [i.e., anti-CSF114(N-Glc) IgMs] have been detected by our group in a statistically significant number of RTT patients. In the current review, the Authors explore the current evidence, either in favor or against, the presence of an autoimmune component in RTT.

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Vergani, Diego

    2013-03-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune-mediated liver disorder characterised by female preponderance, elevated transaminase and immunoglobulin G levels, seropositivity for autoantibodies and interface hepatitis. Presentation is highly variable, therefore AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any increase in liver enzyme levels. Overlap/variant forms of the disease, presenting with concomitant features of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis are increasingly recognised. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment, which should be instituted promptly to prevent rapid deterioration and promote remission and long-term survival. Difficult-to-treat or non-responsive patients should be treated with mycophenolate mofetil or, failing that, calcineurin inhibitors. Persistent failure to respond or lack of adherence to treatment result in end-stage liver disease. These patients, and those with fulminant liver failure (encephalopathy grade II-IV) at diagnosis, will require liver transplantation. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4(pos) T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. Animal models faithfully representing the human condition are needed to unravel the contribution of innate and adaptive, effector and regulatory immune responses. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigen-specific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim to restore tolerance to liver-derived antigens.

  17. Pemphigus autoimmunity: Hypotheses and realities

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Sergei A

    2011-01-01

    The goal of contemporary research in pemphigus vulgaris and pemphigus foliaceus is to achieve and maintain clinical remission without corticosteroids. Recent advances of knowledge on pemphigus autoimmunity scrutinize old dogmas, resolve controversies, and open novel perspectives for treatment. Elucidation of intimate mechanisms of keratinocyte detachment and death in pemphigus has challenged the monopathogenic explanation of disease immunopathology. Over 50 organ-specific and non-organ-specific antigens can be targeted by pemphigus autoimmunity, including desmosomal cadherins and other adhesion molecules, PERP cholinergic and other cell membrane (CM) receptors, and mitochondrial proteins. The initial insult is sustained by the autoantibodies to the cell membrane receptor antigens triggering the intracellular signaling by Src, epidermal growth factor receptor kinase, protein kinases A and C, phospholipase C, mTOR, p38 MAPK, JNK, other tyrosine kinases, and calmodulin that cause basal cell shrinkage and ripping desmosomes off the CM. Autoantibodies synergize with effectors of apoptotic and oncotic pathways, serine proteases, and inflammatory cytokines to overcome the natural resistance and activate the cell death program in keratinocytes. The process of keratinocyte shrinkage/detachment and death via apoptosis/oncosis has been termed apoptolysis to emphasize that it is triggered by the same signal effectors and mediated by the same cell death enzymes. The natural course of pemphigus has improved due to a substantial progress in developing of the steroid-sparing therapies combining the immunosuppressive and direct anti-acantholytic effects. Further elucidation of the molecular mechanisms mediating immune dysregulation and apoptolysis in pemphigus should improve our understanding of disease pathogenesis and facilitate development of steroid-free treatment of patients. PMID:21939410

  18. Autoimmunity and oxidatively modified autoantigens

    PubMed Central

    Kurien, Biji T.; Scofield, R. Hal

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative damage mediated by reactive oxygen species results in the generation of deleterious by-products. The oxidation process itself and the proteins modified by these molecules are important mediators of cell toxicity and disease pathogenesis. Aldehydic products, mainly the 4-hydroxy-2-alkenals, form adducts with proteins and make them highly immunogenic. Proteins modified in this manner have been shown to induce pathogenic antibodies in a variety of diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), alcoholic liver disease, diabetes mellitus (DM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 8-oxodeoxyguanine (oxidatively modified DNA) and low density lipoproteins (LDL) occur in SLE, a disease in which premature atherosclerosis is a serious problem. In addition, immunization with 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) modified 60 kD Ro autoantigen induces an accelerated epitope spreading in an animal model of SLE. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) pentosidine and AGE modified IgG have been shown to correlate with RA disease activity. Oxidatively modified glutamic acid decarboxylase is important in type 1 DM, while autoantibodies against oxidized LDL are prevalent in Behcet’s disease. The fragmentation of scleroderma specific autoantigens occurs as a result of oxidative modification and is thought to be responsible for the production of autoantibodies through the release of cryptic epitopes. The administration of antioxidants is a viable untried alternative for preventing or ameliorating autoimmune disease, particularly on account of the overwhelming evidence for the involvement of oxidative damage in autoimmunity. However, this should be viewed in the light of disappointing results obtained with the use of antioxidants in cardiovascular disease. PMID:18625446

  19. Immunotherapeutic strategies in autoimmune uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Papotto, Pedro Henrique; Marengo, Eliana Blini; Sardinha, Luiz Roberto; Goldberg, Anna Carla; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune uveitis is an organ-specific disorder characterized by irreversible lesions to the eye that predominantly affect people in their most productive years and is among the leading causes of visual deficit and blindness. Currently available therapies are effective in the treatment of a wide spectrum of uveitis, but are often associated with severe side effects. Here, we review ongoing research with promising immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies, describing their specific features, interactions and the responses triggered by the targeted immune molecules that aim to minimize clinical complications and the likelihood of disease relapse. We first review the main features of the disease, diagnostic tools, and traditional forms of therapy, as well as the animal models predominantly used to understand the pathogenesis and test the novel intervention approaches aiming to control the acute immune and inflammatory responses and to dampen chronic responses. Both exploratory research and clinical trials have targeted either the blockade of effector pathways or of their companion co-stimulatory molecules. Examples of targets are T cell receptors (CD3), their co-stimulatory receptors (CD28, CTLA-4) and corresponding ligands (B7-1 and B7-2, also known as CD80 and CD86), and cytokines like IL-2 and their receptors. Here, we summarize the available evidence on effectiveness of these treatments in human and experimental uveitis and highlight a novel CD28 antagonist monovalent Fab′ antibody, FR104, which has shown preclinical efficacy suppressing effector T cells while enhancing regulatory T cell function and immune tolerance in a humanized graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) mice model and is currently being tested in a mouse autoimmune uveitis model with encouraging results. PMID:24833504

  20. Immunoadsorption therapy in autoimmune encephalitides

    PubMed Central

    Golombeck, Kristin S.; Bien, Corinna; Abu-Tair, Mariam; Brand, Marcus; Bulla-Hellwig, Michael; Lohmann, Hubertus; Münstermann, Dieter; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Thölking, Gerold; Valentin, Rainer; Wiendl, Heinz; Melzer, Nico; Bien, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It was hypothesized that in encephalitides with autoantibodies directed to CNS surface antigens an antibody-removing intervention might speed up recovery. Methods: The outcome of autoimmune encephalitis in 19 patients with antibodies against surface antigens (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 [LGI1], n = 3; contactin-associated protein-2 [CASPR2], n = 4; NMDA receptor [NMDAR], n = 7) and intracellular antigens (glutamic acid decarboxylase [GAD], n = 5) after immunoadsorption in addition to corticosteroid therapy was evaluated retrospectively. Modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores and data on seizures, memory, and antibody titers directly after immunoadsorption (early follow-up) and after a median of 4 months (late follow-up) were compiled. Results: Immediately after immunoadsorption, 9 of 14 patients with antibodies against LGI1, CASPR2, or NMDAR (64%), but none with GAD antibodies, had improved by at least one mRS point. Five of the 7 patients with LGI1 or CASRP2 antibodies had become seizure-free, and 2 patients with NMDAR antibodies had a memory improvement of more than 1 SD of a normal control population. At late follow-up, 12 of 14 patients with surface antibodies had improved (86%), and none of the patients with GAD antibodies. Conclusions: It is suggested that addition of immunoadsorption to immunosuppression therapy in patients with surface antibodies may accelerate recovery. This supports the pathogenic role of surface antibodies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that immunoadsorption combined with immunosuppression therapy is effective in patients with autoimmune encephalitis with surface antibodies. PMID:26977423

  1. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade.

  2. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Silva, C A; Cocuzza, M; Carvalho, J F; Bonfá, E

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune orchitis is characterized by testis inflammation and the presence of specific antisperm antibodies (ASA). It is classified in two categories. Primary autoimmune orchitis is defined by infertility and asymptomatic orchitis associated with ASA (100%) directed to the basement membrane or seminiferous tubules in infertile men, without any systemic disease and usually asymptomatic. Secondary autoimmune orchitis is characterized by symptomatic orchitis and/or testicular vasculiti`s associated with a systemic autoimmune disease, particularly vasculitis. These patients typically demonstrate testicular pain, erythema and/or swelling. ASA in secondary autoimmune orchitis have been reported in up to 50% of patients, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The pathogenesis of primary as well as secondary autoimmune orchitis is still unknown. Although the etiology is likely to be multifactorial, testicular inflammation, infection or trauma may induce T cell response with pro-inflammatory cytokine production with a consequent blood-testis-barrier permeability alteration, ASA production and apoptosis of spermatocytes and spermatids. ASA is known to cause immobilization and/or agglutination of spermatozoa, which may block sperm-egg interaction resulting in infertility. Assisted reproduction has been used as an efficient option in primary cases and immunosuppressive therapy for secondary autoimmune orchitis, although there is no double-blind, randomized trial to confirm the efficacy of any treatment regimens for these conditions.

  3. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis causes subacute deficits of memory and cognition, often followed by suppressed level of consciousness or coma. A careful history and examination may show early clues to particular autoimmune causes, such as neuromyotonia, hyperekplexia, psychosis, dystonia, or the presence of particular tumors. Ancillary testing with MRI and EEG may be helpful for excluding other causes, managing seizures, and, rarely, for identifying characteristic findings. Appropriate autoantibody testing can confirm specific diagnoses, although this is often done in parallel with exclusion of infectious and other causes. Autoimmune encephalitis may be divided into several groups of diseases: those with pathogenic antibodies to cell surface proteins, those with antibodies to intracellular synaptic proteins, T-cell diseases associated with antibodies to intracellular antigens, and those associated with other autoimmune disorders. Many forms of autoimmune encephalitis are paraneoplastic, and each of these conveys a distinct risk profile for various tumors. Tumor screening and, if necessary, treatment is essential to proper management. Most forms of autoimmune encephalitis respond to immune therapies, although powerful immune suppression for weeks or months may be needed in difficult cases. Autoimmune encephalitis may relapse, so follow-up care is important. PMID:26754777

  4. Cutting-edge issues in autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Clovis A; Cocuzza, Marcello; Borba, Eduardo F; Bonfá, Eloísa

    2012-04-01

    Autoimmune orchitis is a relevant cause of decreased fecundity in males, and it is defined as a direct aggression to the testis with the concomitant presence of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA). The presence of these specific antibodies has been observed in approximately 5-12% of infertile male partners. Primary autoimmune orchitis is defined by isolated infertility with ASA but without evidence of a systemic disease. Secondary causes of orchitis and/or testicular vasculitis are uniformly associated with autoimmune diseases, mainly in primary vasculitis such as polyarteritis nodosa, Behçet's disease, and Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The overall frequencies of acute orchitis and ASA in rheumatic diseases are 2-31% and 0-50%, respectively. The pathogenesis of primary/secondary autoimmune orchitis is not completely understood but probably involves the access of immune cells to the testicular microenvironment due to inflammation, infection or trauma, leading to apoptosis of spermatocytes and spermatids. Glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive drugs are indicated in autoimmune orchitis-associated active systemic autoimmune diseases. However, there are no standardized treatment options, and the real significance of ASA in infertile men is still controversial. Assisted reproductive technologies such as intrauterine insemination, in vitro fertilization, and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) are therapeutic options for male infertility associated with these autoantibodies. ICSI is considered to be the best choice for patients with severe sperm autoimmunity, particularly in males with low semen counts or motility.

  5. Autoimmune blistering dermatoses as systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, Snejina; Drenovska, Kossara; Manuelyan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering dermatoses are examples of skin-specific autoimmune disorders that can sometimes represent the cutaneous manifestation of a multiorgan disease due to potential common pathogenic mechanisms. As soon as a distinct autoimmune blistering dermatosis is diagnosed, it is imperative to consider its potential systemic involvement, as well as the autoimmune and inflammatory conditions that are frequently associated with it. In paraneoplastic pemphigus/paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome, the internal organs (particularly the lungs) are affected by the autoimmune injury. Pemphigus erythematosus may manifest with overlapping serologic and immunohistologic features of lupus erythematosus. In patients with bullous pemphigoid, there is a greater prevalence of neurologic disease, possibly caused by cross-reactivity of the autoantibodies with isoforms of bullous pemphigoid antigens expressed in the skin and brain. Anti-laminin 332 pemphigoid shows an increased risk for adenocarcinomas. Patients with anti-p200 pemphigoid often suffer from psoriasis. A rare form of pemphigoid with antibodies against the α5 chain of type IV collagen is characterized by underlying nephropathia. Particularly interesting is the association of linear IgA disease or epidermolysis bullosa acquisita with inflammatory bowel disease. Dermatitis herpetiformis is currently regarded as the skin manifestation of gluten sensitivity. Bullous systemic lupus erythematosus is part of the clinical spectrum of systemic lupus erythematosus, a prototypic autoimmune disease with multisystem involvement.

  6. Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome in pregnancy: case report

    PubMed Central

    Pecorino, Basilio; Teodoro, Maria Cristina; Scollo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome is a multiple endocrine disorders disease determined by autoimmunity; it can be diagnosed if a patient is affected by Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and another autoimmune disease, except Addison Disease, for example Autoimmune Hashimoto Thyroiditis or Celiac Disease. R.D., 34-year-old woman (gravida 2 para 1), was referred to the High Risk Pregnancy Outpatient Clinic at Cannizzaro Hospital in Catania at 8 weeks' gestation. She was affected from type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Disease (Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Autoimmune Hashimoto Thyroiditis and Celiac Disease). Pre-conception glycated hemoglobin and thyrotropin levels were normal. This pregnancy was characterized by glycemic instability and the need to increase the insulin units every month. The patient was hospitalized at 32+6 weeks for monitoring fetus and mother health because of inadequate glycemic control and the high insulin dosage required. She was delivered by caesarean section at 36+6 weeks because of uterine contractions, the previous cesarean section, glycemic instability and the gestational age. She delivered a baby boy, birth-weight 3300 g, Apgar 8-9. She was discharged in the fourth day after delivery with good maternal and child prognosis. Literature data and the experience derived by this case report suggest some recommendations to improve obstetrics and neonatologist outcome in the patients affected from type III Polyglandular Autoimmune Syndrome: pre-conception counseling, thyrotropin assay every 4-6 weeks, gluten-free diet, fasting and post-prandial blood glucose level targets. PMID:27917035

  7. Immune complex-mediated autoimmunity in a patient With Smith-Magenis syndrome (del 17p11.2).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianying; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Vilboux, Thierry; Smith, Ann C M; Peterson, Erik J

    2014-08-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a sporadic congenital disorder involving multiple organ systems caused by chromosome 17p11.2 deletions. Smith-Magenis syndrome features craniofacial and skeletal anomalies, cognitive impairment, and neurobehavioral abnormalities. In addition, some SMS patients may exhibit hypogammaglobulinemia. We report the first case of SMS-associated autoimmunity in a woman who presented with adult onset of multiple autoimmune disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and autoimmune hepatitis. Molecular analysis using single-nucleotide polymorphism array confirmed a de novo 3.8-Mb deletion (breakpoints, chr17: 16,660,721-20,417,975), resulting in haploinsufficiency for TACI (transmembrane activator and CAML interactor). Our data are consistent with potential loss of function for the BAFF (B cell-activating factor) receptor TACI as a contributing factor to human autoimmune phenomena.

  8. Autoimmune Hemolysis: A Journey through Time

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John

    2015-01-01

    Summary The existence of autoimmune diseases in humans has been known for almost 100 years. Currently, autoimmune pathogenesis has been attributed to more than 40 human diseases; yet it is still not clear what immune abnormalities conclusively prove underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. Hence, although much has been learned, research is still needed for complete elucidation of the mechanisms of the immune dysregulation in AIHA. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s) may allow for development of more specific therapies of these not uncommon and often difficult-to-treat disorders. PMID:26696795

  9. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Albarracín, Flavio; López Meiller, María José; Naswetter, Gustavo; Longoni, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells, which are capable of self renewal and reconstitution of all types of blood cells, can be a treatment for numerous potential lethal diseases, including leukemias and lymphomas. It may now be applicable for the treatment of severe autoimmune diseases, such as therapy-resistant multiple sclerosis, lupus and systemic sclerosis. Studies in animal models show that the transfer of hematopoietic stem cells can reverse autoimmunity. The outcome of ongoing clinical trials, as well as of studies in patients and animal models, will help to determine the role that stem-cell transplantation can play in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  10. Autoimmune liver disease: novelties in management.

    PubMed

    Hadzic, Nedim; Hierro, Loreto

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmune liver disease is the second commonest cause of chronic liver disease in teenagers. There are several forms including autoimmune hepatitis, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and various overlap syndromes, classified on the basis of different serum antibody profiles, histological features and appearances on cholangiography. Treatment with immunosupressants is usually effective, but often required medium to long-term, raising concerns about side effects and adherence to therapy. For a minority of children presenting in acute liver failure or with difficult-to-treat disease liver transplantation is a possible option, although risk of recurrence in the grafted liver remains lifelong.

  11. Autoimmune Hemolysis: A Journey through Time.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John

    2015-09-01

    The existence of autoimmune diseases in humans has been known for almost 100 years. Currently, autoimmune pathogenesis has been attributed to more than 40 human diseases; yet it is still not clear what immune abnormalities conclusively prove underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. Hence, although much has been learned, research is still needed for complete elucidation of the mechanisms of the immune dysregulation in AIHA. Better understanding of the underlying mechanism(s) may allow for development of more specific therapies of these not uncommon and often difficult-to-treat disorders.

  12. Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Xiuwen; Li, Dan; Lv, Ling; Li, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Th17 cells are a new subset of CD4(+) T cells involved in the clearance of extracellular pathogens and fungi. Accumulating evidence suggests that Th17 cells and their signature cytokines have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Here, we summarize recent research progress on Th17 function in the development and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We also propose to identify new small molecule compounds to manipulate Th17 function for potential therapeutic application to treat human autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis.

  13. [Autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of psychosis].

    PubMed

    Suokas, Kimmo; Kampman, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies directed to the surface structures of nerve cells may cause autoimmune encephalitis. It may cause limbic encephalitis requiring intensive care, or symptoms are restricted to psychosis. This disease may be impossible to distinguish clinically from a functional psychotic illness. Some of the cases are paraneoplastic, i.e. associated with a diagnosed or latent malignant neoplasia, most commonly ovarian teratoma. The first line treatment for autoimmune encephalitis is an immunomodulatory combination therapy with immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone. We recommend screening of the most common NMDAR and VGKC antibodies related to autoimmune encephalitis from patients having developed a new psychosis.

  14. B Cells with Regulatory Function in Animal Models of Autoimmune and Non-Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei; Wang, Zuomin; Han, Xiaozhe

    2015-03-01

    Although the identification of B cell subsets with negative regulatory functions and the definition of their mechanisms of action are recent events, the important negative regulatory roles of B cells in immune responses are now broadly recognized. There is an emerging appreciation for the pivotal role played by B cells in several areas of human diseases including autoimmune diseases and non-autoimmune diseases such as parasite infections and cancer. The recent research advancement of regulatory B cells in human disease coincides with the vastly accelerated pace of research on the bridging of innate and adaptive immune system. Current study and our continued research may provide better understanding of the mechanisms that promote regulatory B10 cell function to counteract exaggerated immune activation in autoimmune as well as non-autoimmune conditions. This review is focused on the current knowledge of BREG functions studied in animal models of autoimmune and non-autoimmune diseases.

  15. Association of autoimmune diseases with lichen sclerosus in 532 male and female patients.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander; Kryvosheyeva, Yulia; Terras, Sarah; Moritz, Rose; Möllenhoff, Katrin; Altmeyer, Peter; Scola, Nina; Gambichler, Thilo

    2013-03-27

    Lichen sclerosus is a relatively common chronic inflammatory skin disease that predominantly affects the anogenital area. Accumulating evidence indicates that lichen sclerosus in women may be associated with other autoimmune disease, whereas this association seems to lack in male patients. We retrospectively evaluated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases and serological parameters indicative for autoimmunity in male and female patients with lichen sclerosus. Of the 532 patients (396 women, 136 men; 500 adults, 32 children; mean age: 49 years; range 1-89 years; female:male ratio 3:1), 452 (85%) had genital and 80 (15%) had extragenital disease. In women, lichen sclerosus was significantly more often associated with at least one autoimmune disease as compared to men (odds ratio [OR] 4.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-9.6; p<0.0001). Moreover, female patients with lichen sclerosus had sinificantly more often associated autoimmune thyroid diseases (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.8-11.9; p<0.0002), antithyroid-antibodies (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.5; p=0.023), and elevated autoantibodies (OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.9-9.3; p<0.0001) as compared to male patients. This observation is suggestive for a different pathogenetic background in male and female patients.

  16. Celiac Disease and Autoimmune-Associated Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage. PMID:23984314

  17. Celiac disease and autoimmune-associated conditions.

    PubMed

    Lauret, Eugenia; Rodrigo, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is frequently accompanied by a variety of extradigestive manifestations, thus making it a systemic disease rather than a disease limited to the gastrointestinal tract. This is primarily explained by the fact that CD belongs to the group of autoimmune diseases. The only one with a known etiology is related to a permanent intolerance to gluten. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved in the last decades, due to a greater interest in the diagnosis of atypical and asymptomatic patients, which are more frequent in adults. The known presence of several associated diseases provides guidance in the search of oligosymptomatic cases as well as studies performed in relatives of patients with CD. The causes for the onset and manifestation of associated diseases are diverse; some share a similar genetic base, like type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D); others share pathogenic mechanisms, and yet, others are of unknown nature. General practitioners and other specialists must remember that CD may debut with extraintestinal manifestations, and associated illnesses may appear both at the time of diagnosis and throughout the evolution of the disease. The implementation of a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves the overall clinical course and influences the evolution of the associated diseases. In some cases, such as iron deficiency anemia, the GFD contributes to its disappearance. In other disorders, like T1D, this allows a better control of the disease. In several other complications and/or associated diseases, an adequate adherence to a GFD may slow down their evolution, especially if implemented during an early stage.

  18. Shaking Out Clues to Autoimmune Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Autoimmune Diseases Immune Cells References: Nature. 2013 Mar 6. doi: 10.1038/nature11981. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 23467089. Nature. 2013 Mar 6. doi: 10.1038/nature11984. [Epub ahead of ...

  19. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: An autoimmune disease?

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    In this review article, we will briefly describe the main characteristics of autoimmune pancreatitis and then we will concentrate on our aim, namely, evaluating the clinical characteristics of patients having recurrence of pain from the disease. In fact, the open question is to evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune pancreatitis in patients with an undefined etiology of acute pancreatitis and for this reason we carried out a search in the literature in order to explore this issue. In cases of recurrent attacks of pain in patients with “diopathic”pancreatitis, we need to keep in mind the possibility that our patients may have autoimmune pancreatitis. Even though the frequency of this disease seems to be quite low, we believe that in the future, by increasing our knowledge on the subject, we will be able to diagnose an ever-increasing number of patients having acute recurrence of pain from autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:18286678

  20. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  1. Childhood polyarteritis nodosa in autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naumann-Bartsch, Nora; Stachel, Daniel; Morhart, Patrick; Staatz, Gundula; Jüngert, Jörg; Schwarz, Klaus; Holter, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an uncommon disorder of Fas-mediated apoptosis that results in impaired lymphocyte death and, therefore, disturbed immune homeostasis. Besides presentation with lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, patients with ALPS have a high incidence of autoimmune phenomena. To our knowledge, this is the first description of polyarteritis nodosa that includes numerous arterial aneurysms in a child with ALPS. Active vasculitis resolved after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This report of polyarteritis nodosa associated with human ALPS supports previous findings in Fas-deficient mouse models that frequently develop vasculitic manifestations and suggests that apoptotic defects of lymphocytes may play a role in the pathophysiology of systemic vasculitis. Thus, patients with ALPS might be more susceptible to autoimmune vessel inflammation. This case furthermore emphasizes that even rare autoimmune manifestations should be considered and investigated in patients with immunodeficiencies, because that might help in planning treatment strategies for these patients.

  2. Prolactin and autoimmune diseases in humans.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ellie; Molitch, Mark E

    2007-01-01

    Prolactin has been shown to have immunomodulatory as well as lactogenic effects. Generally less well known is that prolactin may also play a role in the activity of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Studies have shown decreasing prolactin production to be beneficial in animal models of autoimmune disease. Thus far, double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies of dopamine agonist treatment in humans with autoimmune disease have been done only in lupus patients, and support the potential efficacy of such agents. Small, open-label trials have also suggested potential benefit in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, Reiter's syndrome, and psoriasis. More studies are required to further delineate the mechanisms by which prolactin affects autoimmune disease activity, to determine in which specific diseases prolactin plays a significant role, and to test the efficacy of prolactin-lowering agents as therapy for such diseases.

  3. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers across autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahearn, Joseph; Shields, Kelly J; Liu, Chau-Ching; Manzi, Susan

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a major cause of premature mortality among those with autoimmune disorders. There is an urgent need to identify those patients with autoimmune disease who are at risk for CVD so as to optimize therapeutic intervention and ultimately prevention. Accurate identification, monitoring and stratification of such patients will depend upon a panel of biomarkers of cardiovascular disease. This review will discuss some of the most recent biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases in autoimmune disease, including lipid oxidation, imaging biomarkers to characterize coronary calcium, plaque, and intima media thickness, biomarkers of inflammation and activated complement, genetic markers, endothelial biomarkers, and antiphospholipid antibodies. Clinical implementation of these biomarkers will not only enhance patient care but also likely accelerate the pharmaceutical pipeline for targeted intervention to reduce or eliminate cardiovascular disease in the setting of autoimmunity.

  4. Progressive systemic sclerosis and autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Sumithran, E.

    1976-01-01

    The development of progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) in a patient with established autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is described. Points favouring an immunological aetiology for PSS are reviewed and discussed. PMID:1264941

  5. Paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome: 20 years after.

    PubMed

    Czernik, Annette; Camilleri, Michael; Pittelkow, Mark R; Grando, Sergei A

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight and clarification in the quandary of classification and delineate clinical and histological features and pathophysiology of paraneoplastic pemphigus. This is a paraneoplastic disease of epithelial autoimmunity and adhesion originally described by Dr. Anhalt in 1990. Paraneoplastic pemphigus represents only one manifestation of the heterogeneous autoimmune syndrome in which patients, in addition to small airways occlusion, may display a spectrum of at least five clinical variants of the mucocutaneous disease [i.e. pemphigus-like, pemphigoid-like, erythema multiforme-like, graft-versus-host disease-like, and lichen planus-like, termed paraneoplastic autoimmune multiorgan syndrome (PAMS)]. There is a need for the expanded, inclusive classification of diverse mucocutaneous and respiratory presentations of PAMS. Multiple specific effectors of humoral and cellular autoimmunity mediating epithelial damage have been identified. An update of advances in clinical and basic research on PAMS and in management and overall prognosis of PAMS is provided.

  6. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  7. Gastrointestinal Manifestations in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    COJOCARU, M.; COJOCARU, Inimioara Mihaela; SILOSI, Isabela; VRABIE, Camelia Doina

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT In an autoimmune disease, the immune system attacks and harms the body's own tissues. The systemic autoimmune diseases include collagen vascular diseases, the systemic vasculitides, Wegener granulomatosis, and Churg-Strauss syndrome. These disorders can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary system and pancreas. They can cause a variety of gastrointestinal manifestations that are influenced by the pathophysiologic characteristics of the underlying disease process. There is a wide variation of gastrointestinal manifestations from these autoimmune disorders including, but not limited to: oral ulcers, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, fecal incontinence, pseudo-obstruction, perforation and gastrointestinal bleeding. Clinical workup should be initiated by the patient's subjective complaints. In this review, we analyze the effects of autoimmune diseases on the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21977190

  8. Insights in the autoimmunity of myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    De Baets, Marc H

    2010-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a prototype anti-receptor autoimmune disease. Antibodies against proteins at the neuromuscular junction cause a defect in the signal transmission from nerve terminal to the damaged postsynaptic membrane. This issue of Autoimmunity reviews the mechanisms that lead to the destruction of the neuromuscular junction and the role of the thymus in myasthenia gravis and its animal models. In addition, this issue explores recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  9. Therapeutic benefits of regulating inflammation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Nikoopour, Enayat; Schwartz, Jordan Ari; Singh, Bhagirath

    2008-09-01

    Autoimmunity results from the dysregulation of the immune system leading to tissue damage. Th1 and Th17 cells are known to be cellular mediators of inflammation in autoimmune diseases. The specific cytokine milieu within the site of inflammation or within secondary lymphatic tissues is important during the priming and effector phases of T cell response. In this review, we will address the nature of the inflammatory response in the context of autoimmune disease, specifically we will discuss the role of dendritic cells following stimulation of their innate pathogen recognition receptors in directing the development of T cell responses. We will focus on how dendritic cell subsets change the balance between major players in autoimmunity, namely Th1, Th17 and regulatory T cells. Th17 cells, once thought to only act as pathogenic effectors through production of IL-17, have been shown to have regulatory properties as well with co-production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by a subset now referred to as regulatory Th17 cells. IL-17 is important in the induction of autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Study of the inflammatory process following encounter with agents that stimulate the innate immune responses such as adjuvants opens a new horizon for the discovery of therapeutic agents including those derived from microorganisms. Microbial products such as adjuvants that function as TLR ligands may stimulate the immune system by interacting with Toll-like receptors (TLR) on antigen-presenting cells. Microbial agents such as Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) or Freund's adjuvant (CFA) that induce a Th17 response are protective in models of autoimmune diseases particularly EAE and type 1 diabetes (T1D). The induction of innate immunity by these microbial products alters the balance in the cytokine microenvironment and may be responsible for modulation of the inflammation and protection from

  10. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome with Red Cell Aplasia.

    PubMed

    Meena, K R; Bisht, Supriya; Tamaria, K C

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of abnormal lymphocyte apoptosis, leading to chronic lymphoproliferation. It presents as lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Pure red cell aplasia is characterized by normochromic normocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from a normal bone marrow. Only few lymphoproliferative disorders have been associated with erythroid aplasia. The authors are reporting a case of ALPS associated with red cell aplasia in a 7-y-old girl.

  11. Intermittent cyclophosphamide treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Brian; Maxwell, Ian; Hryniuk, William

    1974-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide was given intermittently rather than daily to 14 patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. Eight patients responded and six did not. In those who responded the rise in platelet count was rapid, and in all patients the lack of toxicity was striking. Intermittent cyclophosphamide seems effective in some cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenia and is safe, at least in the short term. Controlled trials would be required to prove that intermittent is better than daily administration. PMID:4473260

  12. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  13. Type I enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma in the colon of a 29-year-old patient and a brief literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiu-Cong; Wang, Yong; Wang, Xiu-Feng; Zhang, Fang-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, originating from intraepithelial T-lymphocyte, which is specifically associated with celiac disease. EATL most commonly presents in the sixth and seventh decades of life. We report a unique case of type I EATL in the colon with liver metastasis, which was presented with nonspecific radiological findings and at a very young age (29 years old) compared with previously published data. We suggest that EATL should be regarded as part of differential diagnosis in any patient presenting with abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption because delay in treatment can result in an irreversible clinical outcome. PMID:26955284

  14. Autoimmune channelopathies in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2015-10-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are immune neurological disorders occurring or not in association with a cancer. They are thought to be due to an autoimmune reaction against neuronal antigens ectopically expressed by the underlying tumour or by cross-reaction with an unknown infectious agent. In some instances, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are related to an antibody-induced dysfunction of ion channels, a situation that can be labelled as autoimmune channelopathies. Such functional alterations of ion channels are caused by the specific fixation of an autoantibody upon its target, implying that autoimmune channelopathies are usually highly responsive to immuno-modulatory treatments. Over the recent years, numerous autoantibodies corresponding to various neurological syndromes have been discovered and their mechanisms of action partially deciphered. Autoantibodies in neurological autoimmune channelopathies may target either directly ion channels or proteins associated to ion channels and induce channel dysfunction by various mechanisms generally leading to the reduction of synaptic expression of the considered channel. The discovery of those mechanisms of action has provided insights on the regulation of the synaptic expression of the altered channels as well as the putative roles of some of their functional subdomains. Interestingly, patients' autoantibodies themselves can be used as specific tools in order to study the functions of ion channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  15. [Autoimmune connective tissue diseases and vaccination].

    PubMed

    Więsik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Jahnz-Różyk, Karina

    2015-12-31

    The idea that infectious agents can induce autoimmune diseases in genetically susceptible subjects has been a matter of discussion for years. Moreover, increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and introduction of prophylactic vaccinations from early childhood suggest that these two trends are linked. In the medical literature and even non-professional media, case reports or events temporally related to vaccination are reported. It raises the issue of vaccination safety. In everyday practice medical professionals, physicians, rheumatologists and other specialists will be asked their opinion of vaccination safety. The decision should be made according to evidence-based medicine and the current state of knowledge. The purpose of this paper is to discuss a potential mechanism which links infections, vaccinations and autoimmunity. We present an overview of published case reports, especially of systemic connective tissue diseases temporally related to vaccination and results from case-nested studies. As yet, no conclusive evidence supports a causal relationship between vaccination and autoimmune diseases. It has to be determined whether the performed studies are sufficiently sensitive to detect the link. The debate is ongoing, and new data may be required to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We would like to underscore the need for prophylactic vaccination in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases and to break down the myth that the vaccines are contraindicated in this target group.

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis: what must be said.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Ian R

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) was first studied under its earlier name of "chronic active hepatitis" (CAH) from the 1950s, coincident with a renaissance of interest in autoimmunity. The definition of autoimmune serum reactants in disease, including CAH, gave new insights into chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, and led to refinements of Burnet's clonal selection theory of acquired immunity, 1957-59. Various discoveries including serological reactants in CAH prompted its designation in 1965 as autoimmune hepatitis, and treatment with immunosuppressive drug regimens transformed outcomes and survival. Serological observations further indicated that AIH could exist as either of two types, clinically similar but genetically different: Type 1 aligned more with the non-organ-specific multisystem diseases, and the infrequent Type 2 more with the organ-specific diseases. However, events in either type that could explain the onset of autoimmunity in the normally tolerogenic milieu of the liver have not been discerned. In the genetically predisposed individual, initiation may depend on non-specific death of hepatocytes after which fragments derived from disordered apoptosis acquire the capacity for ongoing auto-immunogenic stimulation. Insufficiency in numbers and function of Treg populations appears important in the promotion of this autoimmune process.

  17. Autoimmune liver disease in Noonan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loddo, Italia; Romano, Claudio; Cutrupi, Maria Concetta; Sciveres, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Salpietro, Annamaria; Ferraù, Valeria; Gallizzi, Romina; Briuglia, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is characterized by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Autoimmune Hepatitis (AIH) is a cryptogenic, chronic and progressive necroinflammatory liver disease. Common features of AIH are hypergammaglobulinemia (IgG), presence of circulating autoantibodies, histological picture of interface hepatitis and response to immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional treatment with Prednisone and Azathioprine is effective in most patients. We describe the case of a 6 years-old girl with Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1. Molecular analysis of PTPN11 gene showed heterozygous mutation c.923A>G (Asn308Ser) in exon 8. Though association between NS and autoimmune disorders is known, this is the second case of association between Noonan Syndrome and Autoimmune Hepatitis type 1 described in literature. In the management of NS, an accurate clinical evaluation would be recommended. When there is a clinical suspicion of autoimmune phenomena, appropriate laboratory tests should be performed with the aim of clarifying whether the immune system is involved in NS. We think that autoimmunity represents a characteristic of NS, even if the etiopathogenesis is still unknown.

  18. Plasma Tryptophan and the Kynurenine–Tryptophan Ratio Are Associated with the Acquisition of Statural Growth Deficits and Oral Vaccine Underperformance in Populations with Environmental Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret N.; Mduma, Estomih; Kosek, Peter S.; Lee, Gwenyth O.; Svensen, Erling; Pan, William K. Y.; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Bream, Jay H.; Patil, Crystal; Asayag, Cesar Ramal; Sanchez, Graciela Meza; Caulfield, Laura E.; Gratz, Jean; Yori, Pablo Peñataro

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood enteric infections have adverse impacts on child growth and can inhibit normal mucosal responses to oral vaccines, two critical components of environmental enteropathy. To evaluate the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity and its relationship with these outcomes, we measured tryptophan and the kynurenine–tryptophan ratio (KTR) in two longitudinal birth cohorts with a high prevalence of stunting. Children in rural Peru and Tanzania (N = 494) contributed 1,251 plasma samples at 3, 7, 15, and 24 months of age and monthly anthropometrics from 0 to 36 months of age. Tryptophan concentrations were directly associated with linear growth from 1 to 8 months after biomarker assessment. A 1-SD increase in tryptophan concentration was associated with a gain in length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) of 0.17 over the next 6 months in Peru (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11–0.23, P < 0.001) and a gain in LAZ of 0.13 Z-scores in Tanzania (95% CI = 0.03–0.22, P = 0.009). Vaccine responsiveness data were available for Peru only. An increase in kynurenine by 1 μM was associated with a 1.63 (95% CI = 1.13–2.34) increase in the odds of failure to poliovirus type 1, but there was no association with tetanus vaccine response. A KTR of 52 was 76% sensitive and 50% specific in predicting failure of response to serotype 1 of the oral polio vaccine. KTR was associated with systemic markers of inflammation, but also interleukin-10, supporting the association between IDO1 activity and immunotolerance. These results strongly suggest that the activity of IDO1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of environmental enteropathy, and demonstrates the utility of tryptophan and kynurenine as biomarkers for this syndrome, particularly in identifying those at risk for hyporesponsivity to oral vaccines. PMID:27503512

  19. Plasma Tryptophan and the Kynurenine-Tryptophan Ratio are Associated with the Acquisition of Statural Growth Deficits and Oral Vaccine Underperformance in Populations with Environmental Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Kosek, Margaret N; Mduma, Estomih; Kosek, Peter S; Lee, Gwenyth O; Svensen, Erling; Pan, William K Y; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Bream, Jay H; Patil, Crystal; Asayag, Cesar Ramal; Sanchez, Graciela Meza; Caulfield, Laura E; Gratz, Jean; Yori, Pablo Peñataro

    2016-10-05

    Early childhood enteric infections have adverse impacts on child growth and can inhibit normal mucosal responses to oral vaccines, two critical components of environmental enteropathy. To evaluate the role of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) activity and its relationship with these outcomes, we measured tryptophan and the kynurenine-tryptophan ratio (KTR) in two longitudinal birth cohorts with a high prevalence of stunting. Children in rural Peru and Tanzania (N = 494) contributed 1,251 plasma samples at 3, 7, 15, and 24 months of age and monthly anthropometrics from 0 to 36 months of age. Tryptophan concentrations were directly associated with linear growth from 1 to 8 months after biomarker assessment. A 1-SD increase in tryptophan concentration was associated with a gain in length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) of 0.17 over the next 6 months in Peru (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11-0.23, P < 0.001) and a gain in LAZ of 0.13 Z-scores in Tanzania (95% CI = 0.03-0.22, P = 0.009). Vaccine responsiveness data were available for Peru only. An increase in kynurenine by 1 μM was associated with a 1.63 (95% CI = 1.13-2.34) increase in the odds of failure to poliovirus type 1, but there was no association with tetanus vaccine response. A KTR of 52 was 76% sensitive and 50% specific in predicting failure of response to serotype 1 of the oral polio vaccine. KTR was associated with systemic markers of inflammation, but also interleukin-10, supporting the association between IDO1 activity and immunotolerance. These results strongly suggest that the activity of IDO1 is implicated in the pathophysiology of environmental enteropathy, and demonstrates the utility of tryptophan and kynurenine as biomarkers for this syndrome, particularly in identifying those at risk for hyporesponsivity to oral vaccines.

  20. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment.

  1. Nutritional profile of adult patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Abenavoli, L; Delibasic, M; Peta, V; Turkulov, V; De Lorenzo, A; Medić-Stojanoska, M

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated gluten dependent enteropathy induced by ingestion of gluten, characterized by intestinal malabsorption and subtotals or total atrophy of intestinal villi. The predominant consequence of CD in untreated patients, is malnutrition as a result of malabsorption. Moreover, several and increasing extra-intestinal clinical manifestations have been described in the CD patients. Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) improves nutritional status, inducing an increase in fat and bone compartments, but does not completely normalize body composition and nutritional deficiencies. An early and accurate evaluation of nutritional status can be of the pivotal step in the clinical management of the adult CD patients. The aim of this review is to present the most important and recent data on nutritional and metabolic features in the CD adult patients, the related implications and the effects of the GFD on these conditions.

  2. Pathogenesis of Chagas' Disease: Parasite Persistence and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Antonio R. L.; Hecht, Mariana M.; Guimaro, Maria C.; Sousa, Alessandro O.; Nitz, Nadjar

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Acute Trypanosoma cruzi infections can be asymptomatic, but chronically infected individuals can die of Chagas' disease. The transfer of the parasite mitochondrial kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) minicircle to the genome of chagasic patients can explain the pathogenesis of the disease; in cases of Chagas' disease with evident cardiomyopathy, the kDNA minicircles integrate mainly into retrotransposons at several chromosomes, but the minicircles are also detected in coding regions of genes that regulate cell growth, differentiation, and immune responses. An accurate evaluation of the role played by the genotype alterations in the autoimmune rejection of self-tissues in Chagas' disease is achieved with the cross-kingdom chicken model system, which is refractory to T. cruzi infections. The inoculation of T. cruzi into embryonated eggs prior to incubation generates parasite-free chicks, which retain the kDNA minicircle sequence mainly in the macrochromosome coding genes. Crossbreeding transfers the kDNA mutations to the chicken progeny. The kDNA-mutated chickens develop severe cardiomyopathy in adult life and die of heart failure. The phenotyping of the lesions revealed that cytotoxic CD45, CD8+ γδ, and CD8α+ T lymphocytes carry out the rejection of the chicken heart. These results suggest that the inflammatory cardiomyopathy of Chagas' disease is a genetically driven autoimmune disease. PMID:21734249

  3. Autoimmune Pancreatitis and IgG4 Related Disease in Three Children

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Sze Yee; Coleman, Lee; MacGregor, Duncan; Hardikar, Winita; Oliver, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    We report 3 children who presented with fever and abdominal pain, deranged liver function tests, and on abdominal ultrasound were found to have an enlarged pancreas, substantial abdominal lymphadenopathy, and extrahepatic biliary duct dilatation. After ruling out malignancy, probable immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4RD) associated with autoimmune pancreatitis was considered. This condition was first described in the adults and often mimics pancreatic cancer. It can involve multiple organs, either synchronously or metachronously, and is rarely reported in children. The disorder mostly responds to corticosteroid therapy and other immune suppression. We highlight the difficulty in diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis/IgG4-related disease in children and illustrate the difference between pediatric and adult presentation. PMID:27622194

  4.  An autoimmune polyglandular syndrome complicated with celiac disease and autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Crimi, Romina; Núñez, Concepción; Estrada, Lourdes; López-Palacios, Natalia

    2016-01-01

     Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is a combination of different autoimmune diseases. The close relationship between immune-mediated disorders makes it mandatory to perform serological screening periodically in order to avoid delayed diagnosis of additional autoimmune diseases. We studied a patient with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who later developed an autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) and was referred to our hospital with a serious condition of his clinical status. The patient was suffering from an advance stage of celiac disease (CD), the delay in its diagnosis and in the establishment of a gluten-free dietled the patient to a severe proteincalorie malnutrition. Later, the patient developed an autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We consider that clinical deterioration in patients with APS should alert physicians about the possible presence of other immune-mediated diseases. Periodic screening for autoantibodies would help to prevent delayed diagnosis and would improve patient's quality of life.

  5. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP.

  6. Parkinson's disease: Autoimmunity and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    De Virgilio, Armando; Greco, Antonio; Fabbrini, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; Gallo, Andrea; Conte, Michela; Rosato, Chiara; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disease that causes the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The resulting dopamine deficiency in the basal ganglia leads to a movement disorder that is characterized by classical parkinsonian motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease is recognized as the most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease. PD ethiopathogenesis remains to be elucidated and has been connected to genetic, environmental and immunologic conditions. The past decade has provided evidence for a significant role of the immune system in PD pathogenesis, either through inflammation or an autoimmune response. Several autoantibodies directed at antigens associated with PD pathogenesis have been identified in PD patients. This immune activation may be the cause of, rather than a response to, the observed neuronal loss. Parkinsonian motor symptoms include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity and resting tremor. The non-motor features include olfactory dysfunction, cognitive impairment, psychiatric symptoms and autonomic dysfunction. Microscopically, the specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and the presence of Lewy bodies, which are brain deposits containing a substantial amount of α-synuclein, have been recognized. The progression of Parkinson's disease is characterized by a worsening of motor features; however, as the disease progresses, there is an emergence of complications related to long-term symptomatic treatment. The available therapies for Parkinson's disease only treat the symptoms of the disease. A major goal of Parkinson's disease research is the development of disease-modifying drugs that slow or stop the neurodegenerative process. Drugs that enhance the intracerebral dopamine concentrations or stimulate dopamine receptors remain the mainstay treatment for motor symptoms. Immunomodulatory therapeutic strategies aiming to attenuate PD neurodegeneration have become an attractive option and

  7. 11C-Methionine PET of Myocardial Inflammation in a Rat Model of Experimental Autoimmune Myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Maya, Yoshifumi; Werner, Rudolf A; Schütz, Claudia; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Samnick, Samuel; Lapa, Constantin; Zechmeister, Christina; Jahns, Roland; Jahns, Valérie; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2016-12-01

    Myocarditis represents a major cause of dilated cardiomyopathy and sudden cardiac death in younger adults. Currently, definitive diagnosis of myocarditis requires endomyocardial biopsy, which is highly invasive and has the drawback of variable sensitivity due to inherent sampling error. Therefore, reliable noninvasive methods to detect and monitor cardiac inflammation are clinically relevant. In this study, we explored the potential of radiolabeled methionine to assess myocardial inflammatory activity in a rat model of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM).

  8. Langerhans Cells Maintain Local Tissue Tolerance in a Model of Systemic Autoimmune Disease1

    PubMed Central

    King, Jennifer K.; Philips, Rachael L.; Eriksson, Anna U.; Kim, Peter J.; Halder, Ramesh C.; Lee, Delphine J.; Singh, Ram Raj

    2015-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases such as lupus affect multiple organs, usually in a diverse fashion where only certain organs are affected in individual patients. It is unclear whether the ‘local’ immune cells play a role in regulating tissue specificity in relation to disease heterogeneity in systemic autoimmune diseases. Here, we used skin as a model to determine the role of tissue-resident dendritic cells in local and systemic involvement within a systemic lupus disease model. Skin-resident dendritic cells, namely Langerhans cells (LC), have been implicated in regulating tolerance or autoimmunity using elegant transgenic models, however, their role in local versus systemic immune regulation is unknown. We demonstrate that while lymphocytes from skin-draining lymph nodes of autoimmune-prone MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr mice react spontaneously to a physiological skin self-Ag desmoglein-3, epicutaneous applications of desmoglein-3 induced tolerance that is dependent on LCs. Inducible ablation of LCs in adult, preclinical MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr and MRL/MpJ-Fas+/+ mice resulted in increased autoantibodies against skin Ags and markedly accelerated lupus dermatitis with increased local macrophage infiltration, but had no effect on systemic autoantibodies such as anti-dsDNA Abs or disease in other organs such as kidneys, lung, and liver. Furthermore, skin-draining lymph nodes of LC-ablated MRL/MpJ-Faslpr/lpr mice had significantly fewer CD4+ T-cells producing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 than LC-intact controls. These results indicate that a skin-resident dendritic cell population regulates local tolerance in systemic lupus and emphasize the importance of the local immune milieu in preventing tissue-specific autoimmunity yet have no effect on systemic autoimmunity. PMID:26071559

  9. Complicating autoimmune diseases in myasthenia gravis: a review.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Aliona; Andersen, Jintana Bunpan; Lisnic, Vitalie; Owe, Jone Furlund; Gilhus, Nils Erik

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a rare autoimmune disease of skeletal muscle endplates. MG subgroup is relevant for comorbidity, but usually not accounted for. MG patients have an increased risk for complicating autoimmune diseases, most commonly autoimmune thyroid disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, we present concomitant autoimmune disorders associated with the different MG subgroups, and show how this influences treatment and prognosis. Concomitant MG should always be considered in patients with an autoimmune disorder and developing new neuromuscular weakness, fatigue or respiratory failure. When a second autoimmune disorder is suspected, MG should be included as a differential diagnosis.

  10. Rare phenotypes in the understanding of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Zeissig, Yvonne; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Blumberg, Richard S; Zeissig, Sebastian

    2016-11-01

    The study of rare phenotypes has a long history in the description of autoimmune disorders. First Mendelian syndromes of idiopathic tissue destruction were defined more than 100 years ago and were later revealed to result from immune-mediated reactivity against self. In the past two decades, continuous advances in sequencing technology and particularly the advent of next-generation sequencing have allowed to define the genetic basis of an ever-growing number of Mendelian forms of autoimmunity. This has provided unique insight into the molecular pathways that govern immunological homeostasis and that are indispensable for the prevention of self-reactive immune-mediated tissue damage and 'horror autotoxicus'. Here we will discuss selected examples of past and recent investigations into rare phenotypes of autoimmunity that have delineated pathways critical for central and peripheral control of the adaptive immune system. We will outline the implications of these findings for rare and common forms of autoimmunity and will discuss the benefits and potential pitfalls of the integration of next-generation sequencing into algorithms for clinical diagnostics. Because of the concise nature of this review, we will focus on syndromes caused by defects in the control of adaptive immunity as innate immune-mediated autoinflammatory disorders have been covered in excellent recent reviews on Mendelian and polygenic forms of autoimmunity.

  11. Molecular mimicry and autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Guarneri, Fabrizio

    2016-06-15

    Hypothesized 40 years ago, molecular mimicry has been thereafter demonstrated as an extremely common mechanism by which microbes elude immune response and modulate biosynthetic/metabolic pathways of the host. In genetically predisposed persons and under particular conditions, molecular mimicry between microbial and human antigens can turn a defensive immune response into autoimmunity. Such triggering role and its pathogenetic importance have been investigated and demonstrated for many autoimmune diseases. However, this is not the case for autoimmune thyroid disease, which appears relatively neglected by this field of research. Here we review the available literature on the possible role of molecular mimicry as a trigger of autoimmune thyroid disease. Additionally, we present the results of in silico search for amino acid sequence homologies between some microbial proteins and thyroid autoantigens, and the potential pathogenetic relevance of such homologies. Relevance stems from the overlap with known autoepitopes and the occurrence of specific HLA-DR binding motifs. Bioinformatics data published by our group support and explain the triggering role of Borrelia, Yersinia, Clostridium botulinum, Rickettsia prowazekii and Helicobacter pylori. Our new data suggest the potential pathogenic importance of Toxoplasma gondii, some Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, Candida albicans, Treponema pallidum and hepatitis C virus in autoimmune thyroid disease, indicating specific molecular targets for future research. Additionally, the consistency between in silico prediction of cross-reactivity and experimental results shows the reliability and usefulness of bioinformatics tools to precisely identify candidate molecules for in vitro and/or in vivo experiments, or at least narrow down their number.

  12. Alternatively activated macrophages in infection and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather, DeLisa; Cihakova, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that play an important role in activation of the immune response and wound healing. Pathogens that require T helper-type 2 (Th2) responses for effective clearance, such as parasitic worms, are strong inducers of alternatively activated or M2 macrophages. However, infections such as bacteria and viruses that require Th1-type responses may induce M2 as a strategy to evade the immune system. M2 are particularly efficient at scavenging self tissues following injury through receptors like the mannose receptor and scavenger receptor-A. Thus, M2 may increase autoimmune disease by presenting self tissue to T cells. M2 may also exacerbate immune complex (IC)-mediated pathology and fibrosis, a hallmark of autoimmune disease in women, due to the release of profibrotic factors such as interleukin (IL)-1β, transforming growth factor-β, fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases. We have found that M2 comprise anywhere from 30% to 70% of the infiltrate during acute viral or experimental autoimmune myocarditis, and shifts in M2 populations correlate with increased IC-deposition, fibrosis and chronic autoimmune pathology. Thus, women may be at an increased risk of M2-mediated autoimmunity due to estrogen’s ability to increase Th2 responses. PMID:19819674

  13. Present and future of the autoimmunity laboratory.

    PubMed

    González-Buitrago, José M; González, Concepción

    2006-03-01

    At present, autoimmunity laboratories are very dynamic owing to the constant and increasing availability of new tests, mainly due to the detection of new autoantibodies. The main characteristic of the autoimmunity laboratory and the one that differentiates it from other laboratories that use immunoassays as basic techniques is that it determines antibodies (autoantibodies) and not antigens. For this reason, immunoassay techniques must employ antigens as reagents. Indirect immunofluorescence has and continues to be a basic technique in autoimmunity studies. However, over the last few years, a significant trend at autoimmunity laboratories has been the gradual replacement of immunofluorescence microscopy by immunoassay. Of the several different forms of immunoassay, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format is the one most used in autoimmunity laboratories. Recombinant DNA technology has allowed the production of large quantities of antigens for autoantibody analysis. Flow cytometry for the analysis of microsphere-based immunoassays allows the simultaneous measurement of several autoantibodies. Likewise, autoantigen microarrays provide a practical means to analyse biological fluids in the search for a high number of autoantibodies. We are now at the beginning of an era of multiplexed analysis, with a high capacity of autoantibody specificities. Future trends in this field include immunoassays with greater analytical sensitivity, simultaneous multiplexed capability, the use of protein microarrays, and the use of other technologies such as microfluidics.

  14. Rare phenotypes in the understanding of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zeissig, Yvonne; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Blumberg, Richard S; Zeissig, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    The study of rare phenotypes has a long history in the description of autoimmune disorders. First Mendelian syndromes of idiopathic tissue destruction were defined more than 100 years ago and were later revealed to result from immune-mediated reactivity against self. In the past two decades, continuous advances in sequencing technology and particularly the advent of next-generation sequencing have allowed to define the genetic basis of an ever-growing number of Mendelian forms of autoimmunity. This has provided unique insight into the molecular pathways that govern immunological homeostasis and that are indispensable for the prevention of self-reactive immune-mediated tissue damage and ‘horror autotoxicus’. Here we will discuss selected examples of past and recent investigations into rare phenotypes of autoimmunity that have delineated pathways critical for central and peripheral control of the adaptive immune system. We will outline the implications of these findings for rare and common forms of autoimmunity and will discuss the benefits and potential pitfalls of the integration of next-generation sequencing into algorithms for clinical diagnostics. Because of the concise nature of this review, we will focus on syndromes caused by defects in the control of adaptive immunity as innate immune-mediated autoinflammatory disorders have been covered in excellent recent reviews on Mendelian and polygenic forms of autoimmunity. PMID:27562064

  15. Antibodies as predictors of complex autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, A

    2008-01-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested environmental factors such as infections and xenobiotics and some dietary proteins and peptides in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Considering the fact that autoantibodies can often be detected prior to the onset of a disease, in this study an enzyme immunoassay was used for measurement of antibodies against different highly purified antigens or synthetic peptides originating not only from human tissue, but also from cross-reactive epitopes of infectious agents, dietary proteins and xenobiotics. The measurement of antibodies against a panel of antigens allows for identification of patterns or antibody signatures, rather than just one or two markers of autoimmunity, thus establishing the premise for increased sensitivity and specificity of prediction, as well as positive predictive values. This panel of different autoantibodies was applied to 420 patients with different autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, thyroiditis, lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, Addison's disease, type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and autoimmunity, which are presented in this article. In all cases, the levels of these antibodies were significantly elevated in patients versus controls. Antibody patterns related to neuroautoimmune disorders, cancer, and patients with somatic hypermutation will be shown in a subsequent article. We believe that this novel 96 antigen-specific autoantibody or predictive antibody screen should be studied for its incorporation into routine medical examinations. Clinicians should be aware that the detection of antibodies should not automatically mean that a patient will definitely become ill, but would rather give a percentage of risk for autoimmune disease over subsequent months or years.

  16. Molecular Diagnosis in Autoimmune Skin Blistering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Otten, J.V.; Hashimoto, T.; Hertl, M.; Payne, A.S.; Sitaru, C.

    2014-01-01

    Blister formation in skin and mucous membranes results from a loss of cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion and is a common outcome of pathological events in a variety of conditions, including autoimmune and genetic diseases, viral and bacterial infections, or injury by physical and chemical factors. Autoantibodies against structural components maintaining cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion induce tissue damage in autoimmune blistering diseases. Detection of these autoantibodies either tissue-bound or circulating in serum is essential to diagnose the autoimmune nature of disease. Various immunofluorescence methods as well as molecular immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting, belong to the modern diagnostic algorithms for these disorders. There is still a considerable need to increase awareness of the rare autoimmune blistering diseases, which often show a severe, chronic-relapsing course, among physicians and the public. This review article describes the immunopathological features of autoimmune bullous diseases and the molecular immunoassays currently available for their diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:24160488

  17. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won Sang

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) includes hyperthyroid Graves disease, hypothyroid autoimmune thyroiditis, and subtle subclinical thyroid dysfunctions. AITD is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental predisposing factors and results in autoimmune deterioration. Data on polymorphisms in the AITD susceptibility genes, related environmental factors, and dysregulation of autoimmune processes have accumulated over time. Over the last decade, there has been progress in the clinical field of AITD with respect to the available diagnostic and therapeutic methods as well as clinical consensus. The updated clinical guidelines allow practitioners to identify the most reasonable and current approaches for proper management. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding the genetic and environmental pathogenic mechanisms underlying AITD and introduce the updated set of clinical guidelines for AITD management. We also discuss other aspects of the disease such as management of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, use of levothyroxine plus levotriiodothyronine in the treatment of autoimmune hypothyroidism, risk assessment of long-standing antithyroid drug therapy in recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism, and future research needs. PMID:27586448

  18. How I treat autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, João Bosco

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) represents a failure of apoptotic mechanisms to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis, permitting accumulation of lymphoid mass and persistence of autoreactive cells that often manifest in childhood with chronic nonmalignant lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and recurring multilineage cytopenias. Cytopenias in these patients can be the result of splenic sequestration as well as autoimmune complications manifesting as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, and autoimmune neutropenia. More than 300 families with hereditary ALPS have now been described; nearly 500 patients from these families have been studied and followed worldwide over the last 20 years by our colleagues and ourselves. Some of these patients with FAS mutations affecting the intracellular portion of the FAS protein also have an increased risk of B-cell lymphoma. The best approaches to diagnosis, follow-up, and management of ALPS, its associated cytopenias, and other complications resulting from infiltrative lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity are presented. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrial.gov as #NCT00001350. PMID:21885601

  19. Comorbidity of chronic spontaneous urticaria and autoimmune thyroid diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kolkhir, Pavel; Metz, Martin; Altrichter, Sabine; Maurer, Marcus

    2017-04-13

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) patients are widely held to often have other autoimmune disorders, including autoimmune thyroid disease. Here, we systematically evaluated the literature on the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in CSU and vice versa. There is a strong link between CSU and elevated levels of IgG anti-thyroid autoantibodies (AAbs), with most of a large number of studies reporting rates of ≥10%. Levels of IgG against thyroid peroxidase (TPO) are more often elevated in CSU than those of other IgG anti-thyroid AAbs (strong evidence). Levels of IgG anti-thyroid AAbs are more often elevated in adult CSU patients than in children (strong evidence). CSU patients exhibit significantly higher levels of IgG anti-thyroid AAbs (strong evidence) and IgE-anti-TPO (weak evidence) than controls. Elevated IgG anti-thyroid AAbs in CSU are linked to the use of glucocorticoids (weak evidence) but not to disease duration or severity/activity, gender, age or ASST response (inconsistent evidence). Thyroid dysfunction rates are increased in CSU patients (strong evidence). Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are more common than hyperthyroidism and Graves' disease (strong evidence). Thyroid dysfunction is more common in adult CSU patients than in children (strong evidence) and in female than male CSU patients (weak evidence). Urticaria including CSU is more prevalent in patients with thyroid autoimmunity than in healthy controls (weak evidence). CSU can improve in response to treatment with levothyroxine or other thyroid drugs (strong evidence). Pathogenic mechanisms in CSU patients with thyroid autoimmunity may include IgE against autoantigens, immune complexes and complement. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in adults.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James; Nimmo, Michael

    2011-02-15

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia in the adult may be characterized as a disorder with dilated intestinal lacteals causing loss of lymph into the lumen of the small intestine and resultant hypoproteinemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, hypoalbuminemia and reduced number of circulating lymphocytes or lymphopenia. Most often, intestinal lymphangiectasia has been recorded in children, often in neonates, usually with other congenital abnormalities but initial definition in adults including the elderly has become increasingly more common. Shared clinical features with the pediatric population such as bilateral lower limb edema, sometimes with lymphedema, pleural effusion and chylous ascites may occur but these reflect the severe end of the clinical spectrum. In some, diarrhea occurs with steatorrhea along with increased fecal loss of protein, reflected in increased fecal alpha-1-antitrypsin levels, while others may present with iron deficiency anemia, sometimes associated with occult small intestinal bleeding. Most lymphangiectasia in adults detected in recent years, however, appears to have few or no clinical features of malabsorption. Diagnosis remains dependent on endoscopic changes confirmed by small bowel biopsy showing histological evidence of intestinal lymphangiectasia. In some, video capsule endoscopy and enteroscopy have revealed more extensive changes along the length of the small intestine. A critical diagnostic element in adults with lymphangiectasia is the exclusion of entities (e.g. malignancies including lymphoma) that might lead to obstruction of the lymphatic system and "secondary" changes in the small bowel biopsy. In addition, occult infectious (e.g. Whipple's disease from Tropheryma whipplei) or inflammatory disorders (e.g. Crohn's disease) may also present with profound changes in intestinal permeability and protein-losing enteropathy that also require exclusion. Conversely, rare B-cell type lymphomas have also been described even decades following initial

  1. Clinical heterogeneity in autoimmune acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Tapia, Norberto C; Martinez-Salgado, Julio; Granados, Julio; Uribe, Misael; Tellez-Avila, Felix I

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To describe the outcome and prognosis in a cohort of patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis without liver transplantation. METHODS: A retrospective trial was conducted in 11 patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis who attended the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubiran. Demographic, biochemical and severity indexes, and treatment and outcome were assessed. RESULTS: Among the 11 patients, with a median age of 31 years, 72% had inflammatory response syndrome, and six patients received corticosteroids. The mortality rate within four weeks was 56%, and the one-year survival was 27%. In the survivors, severity indexes were lower and 83% received corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: We observed a relatively high survival rate in patients with acute liver failure due to autoimmune hepatitis. This survival rate could be influenced by severity of the disease and/or use of corticosteroids. PMID:17465474

  2. Adoptive cell transfer in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2015-06-01

    Adoptive cell transfer is an intervention in which autologous immune cells that have been expanded ex vivo are re-introduced to mitigate a pathological process. Tregs, mesenchymal stromal cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells have been transferred in diverse immune-mediated diseases, and Tregs have been the focus of investigations in autoimmune hepatitis. Transferred Tregs have improved histological findings in animal models of autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis. Key challenges relate to discrepant findings among studies, phenotypic instability of the transferred population, uncertain side effects and possible need for staged therapy involving anti-inflammatory drugs. Future investigations must resolve issues about the purification, durability and safety of these cells and consider alternative populations if necessary.

  3. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Soon-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a group of encephalitis syndromes that cause altered mentality, memory decline, or seizures in association with the presence of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) autoantibodies (auto-Abs). An early diagnosis enables early treatments. The detection of auto-Abs is a confirmatory diagnosis. Tissue-based assay, cell-based immunoassay, and immunoblotting are used to detect various autoantibodies. The CSF test for the presence of antibodies is important because it is more sensitive and reflects disease activity in many autoimmune encephalitis, although antibody tests can be negative even in the presence of autoimmune encephalitis. EEG is often abnormal, but nonspecific. A unilateral or bilateral medial temporal T2 high signal is a common finding in MRI. Fludeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is sometimes useful for diagnosis in patients with normal MRI. PMID:28101474

  4. Nanoparticle-based autoimmune disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Serra, Pau; Santamaria, Pere

    2015-09-01

    The goal of immunotherapy against autoimmunity is to block pathogenic inflammation without impairing immunity against infections and tumours. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a central role in maintaining immune homeostasis, and autoimmune inflammation is frequently associated with decreased numbers and/or function of these T-cells. Therapies harnessing Tregs to treat autoimmune inflammation remain under-developed with caveats ranging from the lack of antigenic and disease specificity to the potential phenotypic and functional instability of in vitro-expanded Treg cells in vivo. Here, we review nanotechnology-based approaches designed to promote immune tolerance through various mechanisms, ranging from systemic or local suppression of antigen-presenting cells and deletion of antigen-specific T-cells, to the systemic expansion of antigen- and disease-specific Treg cells in vivo.

  5. Hot topics in autoimmune diseases: perspectives from the 2013 Asian Congress of Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and possible treatments of autoimmune diseases has significantly increased over the past decade. Nonetheless, numerous major issues remain open and such issues span from epidemiology to clinimetrics and from the role of infectious agents to the search for accurate biomarkers in paradigmatic conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondyloarthropathies. In the case of cardiovascular comorbidities of autoimmune diseases or, more generally, the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, fascinating evidence points to a central role of autoimmunity and metabolic dysfunctions and a possible role of therapies targeting inflammation to ameliorate both conditions. Basic science and translational medicine contribute to identify common mechanisms that underlie different autoimmune diseases, as in the case of tumor necrosis factor alpha, and more recently vitamin D, autoantibodies, T and B regulatory cells, and microRNA. Finally, new therapies are expected to significantly change our approach to autoimmune diseases, as represented by the recent FDA approval of the first oral JAK inhibitor. The present article moves from the major topics that were discussed at the 2013 Asian Congress of Autoimmunity in Hong Kong to illustrate the most recent data from leading journals in autoimmunity and immunology.

  6. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms in autoimmune gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Esposito, Gianluca; Sacchi, Maria Carlotta; Severi, Carola; Annibale, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune gastritis is often suspected for its hematologic findings, and rarely the diagnosis is made for the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Aims of this cross-sectional study were to assess in a large cohort of patients affected by autoimmune gastritis the occurrence and the pattern of gastrointestinal symptoms and to evaluate whether symptomatic patients are characterized by specific clinical features. Gastrointestinal symptoms of 379 consecutive autoimmune gastritis patients were systematically assessed and classified following Rome III Criteria. Association between symptoms and anemia pattern, positivity to gastric autoantibodies, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant autoimmune disease were evaluated. In total, 70.2% of patients were female, median age 55 years (range 17–83). Pernicious anemia (53.6%), iron deficiency anemia (34.8%), gastric autoantibodies (68.8%), and autoimmune disorders (41.7%) were present. However, 56.7% of patients complained of gastrointestinal symptoms, 69.8% of them had exclusively upper symptoms, 15.8% only lower and 14.4% concomitant upper and lower symptoms. Dyspepsia, subtype postprandial distress syndrome was the most represented, being present in 60.2% of symptomatic patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that age <55 years (OR 1.6 [CI:1–2.5]), absence of smoking habit (OR 2.2 [CI:1.2–4]), and absence of anemia (OR 3.1 [CI:1.5–6.4]) were independent factors associated to dyspepsia. Autoimmune gastritis is associated in almost 60% of cases with gastrointestinal symptoms, in particular dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is strictly related to younger age, no smoking, and absence of anemia. PMID:28072728

  7. The overlap syndromes of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2013-02-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis has two major variant phenotypes in which the features of classical disease are co-mingled with those of primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis. These overlap syndromes lack codified diagnostic criteria, established pathogenic mechanisms, and confident management strategies. Their clinical importance relates mainly to the identification of patients who respond poorly to conventional corticosteroid treatment. Scoring systems that lack discriminative power have been used in their definition, and a clinical phenotype based on pre-defined laboratory and histological findings has not been promulgated. The frequency of overlap with primary biliary cirrhosis is 7-13 %, and the frequency of overlap with primary sclerosing cholangitis is 8-17 %. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis and features of cholestatic disease must be distinguished from patients with cholestatic disease and features of autoimmune hepatitis. Variants of the overlap syndromes include patients with small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis, antimitochondrial antibody-negative primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, and immunoglobulin G4-associated disease. Conventional corticosteroid therapy alone or in conjunction with ursodeoxycholic acid (13-15 mg/kg daily) has been variably effective, and cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and budesonide have been beneficial in selected patients. The key cholestatic features that influence the prognosis of autoimmune hepatitis must be defined and incorporated into the definition of the syndrome rather than rely on designations that imply the co-mingling of different diseases with manifestations of variable clinical relevance. The overlap syndromes in autoimmune hepatitis are imprecise, heterogeneous, and unfounded, but they constitute a clinical reality that must be accepted, diagnosed, refined, treated, and studied.

  8. Autoimmune Thyroid Disease and Breast Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Özmen, Tolga; Güllüoğlu, Bahadır Mahmut; Yegen, Cumhur Şevket; Soran, Atilla

    2015-01-01

    Objective The association of breast cancer and thyroid autoimmunity has been suggested by many studies in the literature, but the causality still needed to be proven. With this study we aimed to search the correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and breast cancer prognostic factors. Materials and Methods To this prospective cohort study 200 consecutive breast cancer patients, who were operated in our clinic were included. Patients’ serum thyroid hormone, anti-thyroglobuline (anti-TG) and anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) levels and tumors’ prognostic parameters (tumor size, axillary involvement, histological grade, lymphovascular invasion, receptor status, Ki-67 proliferation index) were collected. The correlation between serum thyroid autoantibody levels and tumor’s prognostic factors were studied. Results The prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity (high levels of serum anti-TPO and/or anti-TG) was 18.5% (n=37). Patients with thyroid autoimmunity had a significant lower rate of axillary involvement and a lower rate of Ki-67 proliferation index (22% vs. 46% [p=0,007] and 12.73% vs. 20.72% [p=0.025], respectively) and were more commonly included to the “low-risk” group (<14%) according to their Ki-67 scores (68% vs. 46%; p=0.015). Other parameters did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion We found a favorable correlation between thyroid autoimmunity and axillary involvement and also Ki-67 proliferation index score, which are two crucial and strongly predictive parameters of breast cancer prognoses. This supports the idea of thyroid autoimmunity being a favorable prognostic parameter. Further studies are necessary to investigate the reasons of protective or predictive effect of high thyroid peroxidase levels in breast cancer patients.

  9. Safety of vaccine adjuvants: focus on autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Gould, Sarah; Tanir, Jennifer Y

    2015-03-24

    Questions have been recently raised regarding the safety of vaccine adjuvants, particularly in relation to autoimmunity or autoimmune disease(s)/disorder(s) (AID). The International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) formed a scientific committee and convened a 2-day workshop, consisting of technical experts from around the world representing academia, government regulatory agencies, and industry, to investigate and openly discuss the issues around adjuvant safety in vaccines. The types of adjuvants considered included oil-in-water emulsions and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. The state of science around the use of animal models and biomarkers for the evaluation and prediction of AID were also discussed. Following extensive literature reviews by the HESI committee, and presentations by experts at the workshop, several key points were identified, including the value of animal models used to study autoimmunity and AID toward studying novel vaccine adjuvants; whether there is scientific evidence indicating an intrinsic risk of autoimmunity and AID with adjuvants, or a higher risk resulting from the mechanism of action; and if there is compelling clinical data linking adjuvants and AID. The tripartite group of experts concluded that there is no compelling evidence supporting the association of vaccine adjuvants with autoimmunity signals. Additionally, it is recommended that future research on the potential effects of vaccine adjuvants on AID should consider carefully the experimental design in animal models particularly if they are to be used in any risk assessment, as an improper design and model could result in misleading information. Finally, studies on the mechanistic aspects and potential biomarkers related to adjuvants and autoimmunity phenomena could be developed.

  10. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity.

  11. Impact of Microbes on Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases arise as a consequence of complex interactions of environmental factors with genetic traits. Although specific allelic variations cluster in predisposed individuals and promote the generation and/or expansion of autoreactive T and B lymphocytes, auto-immunity appears in various disease phenotypes and localizes to diverging tissues. Furthermore, the discovery that allelic variations within genes encoding components of the innate immune system drive self-reactive immune responses as well, led to the distinction of immune responses against host tissues into auto-immune and autoinflammatory diseases. In both categories of disorders, different pathogenic mechanisms and/or subsequent orders of tissue assaults may underlie the target cell specificity of the respective autoimmune attack. Furthermore, the transition from the initial tissue assault to the development of full-blown disease is likely driven by several factors. Thus, the development of specific forms of autoimmunity and autoinflammation reflects a multi-factorial process. The delineation of the specific factors involved in the pathogenic process is hampered by the fact that certain symptoms are assembled under the umbrella of a specific disease, although they might originate from diverging pathogenic pathways. These multi-factorial triggers and pathogenic pathways may also explain the inter-individual divergent courses and outcomes of diseases among humans. Here, we will discuss the impact of different environmental factors in general and microbial pathogens in particular on the regulation/ expression of genes encoded within susceptibility alleles, and its consequences on subsequent autoimmune and/or autoinflammatory tissue damage utilizing primarily the chronic cholestatic liver disease primary biliary cirrhosis as model. PMID:23417246

  12. Total Recovery from Monoclonal Gammopathy and Autoimmune Phenomena After Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Carlos A; Echeverri, Andrés F; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Based on the observation of a patient with a causal relationship between hyperparathyroidism and development of both autoimmune disease and paraproteinemia, we hypothesize a novel cause of autoimmunity triggered in the context of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:22870165

  13. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    PubMed

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve.

  14. Reversal of liver cirrhosis in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anish M; Malhotra, Ashish; Kothari, Shivangi; Baddoura, Walid; Depasquale, Joseph; Spira, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Liver cirrhosis is generally considered irreversible but there are reports in which there is documented reversal of fibrosis/cirrhosis in various clinical conditions like Wilson's disease, hemochromatosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and autoimmune hepatitis. The subgroup of patients with autoimmune hepatitis that will have reversal of cirrhosis is not known. We present two cases with documented liver cirrhosis that had reversal of cirrhosis after treatment with immunosuppressive agents. We postulate that patients presenting with acute hepatitis and no other fibrogenic factors have higher chances of reversal of liver cirrhosis as compared to those presenting as chronic liver injury.

  15. Autoimmune Hepatitis Associated with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Akihiro; Yoshizawa, Kaname; Fujimori, Kazuya; Morita, Susumu; Shigeno, Takashi; Maejima, Toshitaka

    2017-01-01

    Although autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is frequently complicated with chronic thyroiditis or other autoimmune disorders, reports on its association with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are scarce. We herein describe a case of AIH associated with ITP. A 75-year-old Japanese woman was admitted to our hospital due to increased aminotransferase levels and severe thrombocytopenia. Elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) was detected, and tests for platelet-associated IgG and anti-nuclear antibody were positive. Following the diagnosis of AIH-associated ITP, prednisolone treatment of 0.6 mg/kg/day resulted in a decrease in the aminotransferase levels and an increased platelet count. PMID:28090042

  16. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bass, Garrett F; Tuscano, Emily T; Tuscano, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Uncompensated autoantibody-mediated red blood cell (RBC) consumption is the hallmark of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). Classification of AIHA is pathophysiologically based and divides AIHA into warm, mixed or cold-reactive subtypes. This thermal-based classification is based on the optimal autoantibody-RBC reactivity temperatures. AIHA is further subcategorized into idiopathic and secondary with the later being associated with a number of underlying infectious, neoplastic and autoimmune disorders. In most cases AIHA is confirmed by a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). The standard therapeutic approaches to treatment of AIHA include corticosteroids, splenectomy, immunosuppressive agents and monoclonal antibodies.

  17. Pharmacologic Therapies for Rheumatologic and Autoimmune Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bays, Alison M; Gardner, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are commonly prescribed by rheumatologists to reduce disease activity and induce remission in autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. Steroids are sometimes used in combination with DMARD therapy and should be used at the lowest effective dose for the least amount of time. There are many biologic agents available for use for inflammatory arthritis and other autoimmune conditions. Care should be taken when prescribing and managing DMARDS, steroids and biologic agents medications with a careful eye towards screening for infectious disease, vaccination, bone heath and lab monitoring.

  18. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS): a rare cause of immune cytopenia.

    PubMed

    John, M Joseph; Rajasekhar, Reena; Mathews, Vikram

    2008-02-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an inherited disorder manifesting with autoimmune cytopenia, lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. The differential diagnosis includes infections, autoimmune disorders or malignancies. The disease is characterized by accumulation of double negative (CD3+ CD4- CD8-) T cells (DNT) in the peripheral blood. We describe a case and review the literature.

  19. Requirements for innate immune pathways in environmentally induced autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that environmental triggers in combination with genetic and stochastic factors play an important role in spontaneous autoimmune disease. Although the specific environmental agents and how they promote autoimmunity remain largely unknown, in part because of diverse etiologies, environmentally induced autoimmune models can provide insights into potential mechanisms. Studies of idiopathic and environmentally induced systemic autoimmunity show that they are mediated by common adaptive immune response genes. By contrast, although the innate immune system is indispensable for autoimmunity, there are clear differences in the molecular and cellular innate components that mediate specific systemic autoimmune diseases, suggesting distinct autoimmune-promoting pathways. Some of these differences may be related to the bifurcation of toll-like receptor signaling that distinguishes interferon regulatory factor 7-mediated type I interferon production from nuclear factor-κB-driven proinflammatory cytokine expression. Accordingly, idiopathic and pristane-induced systemic autoimmunity require both type I interferon and proinflammatory cytokines whereas the less aggressive mercury-induced autoimmunity, although dependent on nucleic acid-binding toll-like receptors, does not require type I interferon but needs proinflammatory cytokines. Scavenger receptors and the inflammasome may contribute to silica-induced autoimmunity. Greater understanding of the innate mechanisms responsible for idiopathic and environmentally induced autoimmunity should yield new information into the processes that instigate and drive systemic autoimmunity. PMID:23557436

  20. Extrahepatic Autoimmune Diseases in Patients with Autoimmune Liver Diseases: A Phenomenon Neglected by Gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Baoru

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs) often coexist with other extrahepatic autoimmune diseases (EHAIDs). The spectrum of EHAIDs in patients with AILDs is similar, whereas the incidence is different. Notably, autoimmune thyroid disease and Sjogren's syndrome are the most common EHAIDs. Associated extrahepatic diseases may predate the appearance of AILDs or coincide with their onset. More frequently, they may appear during the course and even occur years after the diagnosis of AILDs. Importantly, associated EHAIDs may influence the natural course and prognosis of AILDs. To date, a definite pathophysiological pathway which contributes to the coexistence of AILDs and EHAIDs is still lacking. The current view of autoimmunity clustering involves a common susceptibility genetic background which applies to related pathologies. Herein, we review the current published researches regarding EHAIDs in patients with AILDs, particularly in relation to their clinical impact and pathophysiology. In managing patients with AILDs, gastroenterologists should be aware of the possibly associated EHAIDs to ensure a prompt diagnosis and better outcome. PMID:28191014

  1. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  2. Celiac Disease-Associated Autoimmune Endocrinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2001-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten intake in genetically susceptible individuals. It is characterized by the presence of serum antibodies to endomysium, reticulin, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. The incidence of CD in various autoimmune disorders is increased 10- to 30-fold in comparison to the general population, although in many cases CD is clinically asymptomatic or silent. The identification of such cases with CD is important since it may help in the control of type I diabetes or endocrine functions in general, as well as in the prevention of long-term complications of CD, such as lymphoma. It is believed that CD may predispose an individual to other autoimmune disorders such as type I diabetes, autoimmune thyroid, and other endocrine diseases and that gluten may be a possible trigger. The onset of type I diabetes at an early age in patients with CD, compared to non-CD, and the prevention or delay in onset of diabetes by gluten-free diet in genetically predisposed individuals substantiates this antigen trigger hypothesis. Early identification of CD patients in highly susceptible population may result in the treatment of subclinical CD and improved control of associated disorders. PMID:11427410

  3. Anti-cytokine autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Boggio, Elena; Soluri, Maria F; Comi, Cristoforo; Sblattero, Daniele; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2012-01-01

    An overview of the current literature is showing that autoantibodies (AutoAbs) against cytokines are produced in several pathological conditions, including autoimmune diseases, but can also be detected in healthy individuals. In autoimmune diseases, these AutoAbs may also be prognostic markers, either negative (such as AutoAbs to IL-8 and IL-1α in rheumatoid arthritis) or positive (such as AutoAbs to IL-6 in systemic sclerosis and those to osteopontin in rheumatoid arthritis). They may have neutralizing activity and influence the course of the physiological and pathological immune responses. High levels of AutoAbs against cytokines may even lead to immunodeficiency, such as those to IL-17 in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I or those to IFN-γ in mycobacterial infections. Their role in human therapy may be exploited not only through passive immunization but also through vaccination, which may improve the costs for long lasting treatments of autoimmune diseases. Detection and quantification of these AutoAbs can be profoundly influenced by the technique used and standardization of these methods is needed to increase the value of their analysis. PMID:23885320

  4. Evaluation of autoimmune thyroid disease in melasma.

    PubMed

    Rostami Mogaddam, Majid; Iranparvar Alamdari, Manouchehr; Maleki, Nasrollah; Safavi Ardabili, Nastaran; Abedkouhi, Selma

    2015-06-01

    Melasma is one of the most frequently acquired hyperpigmentation disorders clinically characterized by symmetrical brown patches on sun-exposed areas. To date, few studies have been conducted about the relationship between thyroid autoimmun-ity and melasma. To evaluate the thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity in nonpregnant women with melasma. A total of 70 women with melasma and 70 age-matched healthy women with no history of melasma were enrolled in the study. We studied the thyroid hormone profile in both groups. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software. Patients with melasma had 18.5% frequency of thyroid disorders, and 15.7% had positive anti-TPO, while subjects from the control group had a 4.3% frequency of thyroid abnormalities, and only 5.7% had positive anti-TPO. There was a significantly higher prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in women with melasma compared with control group (P = 0.008). This study suggests that there is a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and melasma. However, to make recommendations on screening for thyroid disease in patients with melasma, future research of good methodological quality is needed.

  5. Autism and Autoimmune Disease: A Family Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Described in a family in which the youngest boy has early infantile autism, Addison's disease, and moniliasis and two older boys have autoimmune disease with hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, moniliasis, and either alopecia totalis or diabetes mellitus, while the oldest boy and parents are symptom free. (KW)

  6. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches.

  7. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Motta, M; Cavazza, A; Migliori, C; Chirico, G

    2003-07-01

    The case is reported of an infant with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia of perinatal onset. Combined treatment with steroids and cyclosporin was necessary to improve haemolysis and reduce the high transfusion requirements. Treatment was discontinued at 13 months of age. The child was healthy at the follow up at 24 and 36 months of age.

  8. Tolerizing DNA vaccines for autoimmune arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Peggy P; Higgins, John P; Kidd, Brian A; Tomooka, Beren; Digennaro, Carla; Lee, Lowen Y; de Vegvar, Henry E Neuman; Steinman, Lawrence; Robinson, William H

    2006-12-01

    Current therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune diseases non-specifically suppress immune function, and there is great need for fundamental approaches such as antigen-specific tolerizing therapy. In this paper we describe development of antigen-specific tolerizing DNA vaccines to treat collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice, and use of protein microarrays to monitor response to therapy and to identify potential additional autoimmune targets for next generation vaccines. We demonstrate that tolerizing DNA vaccines encoding type II collagen (CII) reduced the incidence and severity of CIA. Atorvastatin, a statin drug found to reduce the severity of autoimmunity, potentiated the effect of DNA vaccines encoding CII. Analysis of cytokines produced by collagen-reactive T cells derived from mice receiving tolerizing DNA encoding CII, as compared to control vaccines, revealed reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Arthritis microarray analysis demonstrated reduced spreading of autoantibody responses in mice treated with DNA encoding CII. The development of tolerizing DNA vaccines, and the use of antibody profiling to guide design of and to monitor therapeutic responses to such vaccines, represents a promising approach for the treatment of RA and other autoimmune diseases.

  9. Autoimmunity and pulmonary hypertension: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Nicolls, M R; Taraseviciene-Stewart, L; Rai, P R; Badesch, D B; Voelkel, N F

    2005-12-01

    The association between autoimmunity and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has been appreciated for >40 yrs, but how autoimmune injury might contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease has only been examined in a case-specific manner. It is becoming increasingly clear that a variety of diverse clinical diseases, ranging from viral infections to connective tissue disorders, can culminate in pulmonary vascular pathology that is indistinguishable. Is there a hitherto unappreciated biology that unites these seemingly unrelated conditions? The answer to this question may come from the increasing body of evidence concerned with the central importance of regulatory T-cells in preventing inappropriate B-cell activity. Two striking similarities between conditions associated with severe angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension are a defect in the CD4 T-cell compartment and auto-antibody production. Pathogenic auto-antibodies targeting endothelial cells are capable of inducing vascular endothelial apoptosis and may initiate the development of PAH. The present review will focus on what is known about autoimmune phenomena in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients, in order to better consider whether an early loss of self-tolerance followed by autoimmune injury could influence the early development of severe angioproliferative pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA.

  11. Vaccination with cytokines in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Delavallée, Laure; Assier, Eric; Denys, Anne; Falgarone, Géraldine; Zagury, Jean-François; Muller, Sylvianne; Bessis, Natacha; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Most autoimmune diseases have an unknown etiology, but all involve cytokines cascade in their development. At the present time, several cytokines have been identified as major targets in various autoimmune diseases, involving the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against those cytokines. Even if MAbs are indeed efficient, the passive immunotherapies also present some disadvantages and are expensive. To counter this, several strategies have been developed, including active immunotherapy, based on the vaccination principle. The aim of such a strategy is to induce a B cell response and to obtain autoantibodies able to neutralize the interaction of the self-cytokine with its receptor. To that purpose, cytokines (entire or peptide) are either coupled with a protein-carrier or virus-like particle, or modified with foreign Th cell epitopes. DNA vaccination can also be used with cytokine sequences. This review focuses on the different vaccination strategies with cytokines (including Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)alpha, Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-17) in different autoimmune diseases in preclinical studies; the benefit/risk ratio of such a strategy and the present development of clinical trials in some autoimmune diseases are also discussed.

  12. Postpartum autoimmune thyroid syndrome: a model of aggravation of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Amino, N; Tada, H; Hidaka, Y

    1999-07-01

    Postpartum thyroid dysfunction is rather a common problem during the postpartum period being found in approximately 5% of mothers in the general population. It occurs from subclinical autoimmune thyroiditis that is aggravated after parturition and causes various types of thyroid dysfunction. Immune activity is physiologically suppressed during pregnancy so that the fetus is not rejected, and rebounds above the normal level after parturition. Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis also spontaneously ameliorate during pregnancy, and are often aggravated after parturition. The high-risk mothers for postpartum thyroid dysfunction are well screened by antithyroid microsomal antibody (MCAb) and 60% to 70% of MCAb-positive mothers develop postpartum thyroid dysfunction, which is transient in most cases. New onset of Graves' disease may be screened by thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) and 70% of TSAb-positive mothers develop either transient or persistent postpartum Graves' disease that usually occurs 3 to 6 months postpartum. Immune rebound after parturition may cause not only autoimmune thyroid diseases but other autoimmune diseases, which may be investigated with similar strategies to those in postpartum autoimmune thyroid disease. Thus, we found that postpartum onset of rheumatoid arthritis was found in 0.08% of women in the general population and could be partially predicted by measuring rheumatoid factors in early pregnancy. There are several case reports of other autoimmune diseases that develop after delivery; postpartum renal failure or postdelivery hemolytic-uremic syndrome, postpartum idiopathic polymyositis, postpartum syndrome with antiphospholipid antibodies, postpartum autoimmune myocarditis. Many other possible postpartum autoimmune diseases are still unexplored. Puerperal diseases should be carefully examined in relation to autoimmune abnormalities in the affected organs.

  13. Imaging combined autoimmune and infectious disease microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewart, Tom; Raha, Sandeep; Kus, Dorothy; Tarnopolsky, Mark

    2006-09-01

    Bacterial and viral pathogens are implicated in many severe autoimmune diseases, acting through such mechanisms as molecular mimicry, and superantigen activation of T-cells. For example, Helicobacter pylori, well known cause of stomach ulcers and cancers, is also identified in ischaemic heart disease (mimicry of heat shock protein 65), autoimmune pancreatitis, systemic sclerosis, autoimmune thyroiditis (HLA DRB1*0301 allele susceptibility), and Crohn's disease. Successful antibiotic eradication of H.pylori often accompanies their remission. Yet current diagnostic devices, and test-limiting cost containment, impede recognition of the linkage, delaying both diagnosis and therapeutic intervention until the chronic debilitating stage. We designed a 15 minute low cost 39 antigen microarray assay, combining autoimmune, viral and bacterial antigens1. This enables point-of-care serodiagnosis and cost-effective narrowly targeted concurrent antibiotic and monoclonal anti-T-cell and anti-cytokine immunotherapy. Arrays of 26 pathogen and 13 autoimmune antigens with IgG and IgM dilution series were printed in triplicate on epoxysilane covalent binding slides with Teflon well masks. Sera diluted 1:20 were incubated 10 minutes, washed off, anti-IgG-Cy3 (green) and anti-IgM-Dy647 (red) were incubated for 5 minutes, washed off and the slide was read in an ArrayWoRx(e) scanning CCD imager (Applied Precision, Issaquah, WA). As a preliminary model for the combined infectious disease-autoimmune diagnostic microarray we surveyed 98 unidentified, outdated sera that were discarded after Hepatitis B antibody testing. In these, significant IgG or IgM autoantibody levels were found: dsDNA 5, ssDNA 11, Ro 2, RNP 7, SSB 4, gliadin 2, thyroglobulin 13 cases. Since control sera showed no autoantibodies, the high frequency of anti-DNA and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies found in infected sera lend increased support for linkage of infection to subsequent autoimmune disease. Expansion of the antigen

  14. Interleukin-28A enhances autoimmune disease in a retinal autoimmunity model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiangrong; Zhou, Hongyan; Liu, Xialin; Su, Shao Bo

    2014-12-01

    Interleukin-28A (IL-28A), a member of type III interferons (IFN-λs), promotes antiviral, antitumor and immune responses. However, its ability to regulate autoimmune diseases is poorly understood. In this study, we examined the effect of IL-28A on retinal antigen-induced experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU), a mouse model of human T-cell-mediated autoimmune eye disease. We found that administration of IL-28A enhanced EAU scores and autoimmune response parameters including delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), Ag-specific T cell proliferation and the production of Ag-specific IL-17 and IFN-γ in the priming phase. The effect of IL-28A was abrogated by administration of a neutralizing antibody against IL-28A. Our results suggest that IL-28A is capable of exacerbating a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Thus, targeting IL-28A may provide a new therapeutic approach to T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases such as uveitis.

  15. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zand, Ladan; Fervenza, Fernando C; Nasr, Samih H; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2014-04-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN) has been classified based on its pathogenesis into immune complex-mediated and complement-mediated MPGN. The immune complex-mediated type is secondary to chronic infections, autoimmune diseases or monoclonal gammopathy. There is a paucity of data on MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases. We reviewed the Mayo Clinic database over a 10-year period and identified 12 patients with MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases, after exclusion of systemic lupus erythematosus. The autoimmune diseases included rheumatoid arthritis, primary Sjögren's syndrome, undifferentiated connective tissue disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis and Graves' disease. Nine of the 12 patients were female, and the mean age was 57.9 years. C4 levels were decreased in nine of 12 patients tested. The serum creatinine at time of renal biopsy was 2.2 ± 1.0 mg/dl and the urinary protein was 2,850 ± 3,543 mg/24 h. Three patients required dialysis at the time of renal biopsy. Renal biopsy showed an MPGN in all cases, with features of cryoglobulins in six cases; immunoglobulin (Ig)M was the dominant Ig, and both subendothelial and mesangial electron dense deposits were noted. Median follow-up was 10.9 months. Serum creatinine and proteinuria improved to 1.6 ± 0.8 mg/dl and 428 ± 677 mg/24 h, respectively, except in 3 patients with end-stage renal disease. In summary, this study describes the clinical features, renal biopsy findings, laboratory evaluation, treatment and prognosis of MPGN associated with autoimmune diseases.

  16. Autoimmune hepatitis. Definition--classification--histopathology--immunopathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, K H; Dienes, H P

    1996-09-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a distinct form of acute and chronic inflammatory liver disease in which immune reactions against host antigens are found to be the major pathological mechanism. If left untreated it carries an unfavourable prognosis, and the diagnosis should be made as soon as possible. The diagnostic approach has been greatly facilitated by the establishment of a panel of marker autoantibodies, which do not define distinct therapeutic groups of AIH, but do allow a subgrouping based on differences in patient populations, some clinical features and prognosis. The characterization of organ-specific components of the liver cell surface as targets of cellular and humoral autoimmune reactions give new insights into the pathogenesis of the disease, even though the primary event triggering the disease remains to be defined. The most important disease-promoting factor seems to be a genetically determined background for autoimmunity. Without this different environmental factors, including viruses, toxins, cytokines and drugs, are only able to induce transient autoimmune phenomena and not autoimmune disease. The histopathology of AIH is in keeping with the present pathogenetic concept. Although there is no pathognomonic feature distinguishing this type of hepatitis from virus-induced forms, some distinct morphological lesions are regarded as characteristic. Clinical research on AIH has benefited greatly from observations of experimental AIH in mice. Recognition of the critical role of autoreactive T-lymphocytes in the pathogenesis and the observation of spontaneous recovery from AIH in the animal model associated with antigen-specific and antigen-non-specific T-cell suppression have made basic contributions to our improved understanding of the natural course of AIH in humans.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  18. Infections as risk factor for autoimmune diseases - A nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Philip Rising; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Deleuran, Bent Winding; Benros, Michael Eriksen

    2016-11-01

    Viruses, bacteria and other infectious pathogens are the major postulated environmental triggers of autoimmunity. In the present nation-wide study we describe the association between infections and 29 autoimmune diseases. We used the Danish Civil Registration System to identify 4.5 million persons born between 1945 and 2000. Information on infections and autoimmune diseases was obtained from the Danish Hospital Register. The cohort was followed from 1977 to 2012. Incidence rate ratios for developing an autoimmune disease were estimated using poisson regression. We found an association between hospital admission for an infection and 29 autoimmune diseases. This study shows that infections are risk factors for a broad spectrum of autoimmune diseases in a dose-response and temporal manner, in agreement with the hypothesis that infections are an environmental risk factor contributing to the etiology of autoimmune diseases together with genetic factors.

  19. The role of epigenetic mechanisms and processes in autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Judith M; McCombe, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    The lack of complete concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins suggests that nongenetic factors play a major role in determining disease susceptibility. In this review, we consider how epigenetic mechanisms could affect the immune system and effector mechanisms in autoimmunity and/or the target organ of autoimmunity and thus affect the development of autoimmune diseases. We also consider the types of stimuli that lead to epigenetic modifications and how these relate to the epidemiology of autoimmune diseases and the biological pathways operative in different autoimmune diseases. Increasing our knowledge of these epigenetic mechanisms and processes will increase the prospects for controlling or preventing autoimmune diseases in the future through the use of drugs that target the epigenetic pathways. PMID:23055689

  20. Predicting post-vaccination autoimmunity: who might be at risk?

    PubMed

    Soriano, Alessandra; Nesher, Gideon; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-02-01

    Vaccinations have been used as an essential tool in the fight against infectious diseases, and succeeded in improving public health. However, adverse effects, including autoimmune conditions may occur following vaccinations (autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants--ASIA syndrome). It has been postulated that autoimmunity could be triggered or enhanced by the vaccine immunogen contents, as well as by adjuvants, which are used to increase the immune reaction to the immunogen. Fortunately, vaccination-related ASIA is uncommon. Yet, by defining individuals at risk we may further limit the number of individuals developing post-vaccination ASIA. In this perspective we defined four groups of individuals who might be susceptible to develop vaccination-induced ASIA: patients with prior post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena, patients with a medical history of autoimmunity, patients with a history of allergic reactions, and individuals who are prone to develop autoimmunity (having a family history of autoimmune diseases; asymptomatic carriers of autoantibodies; carrying certain genetic profiles, etc.).

  1. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B

  2. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun Mi; Kim, Tae Yong; Kim, Eui Young; Jang, Eun Kyung; Jeon, Min Ji; Kim, Won Gu; Shong, Young Kee; Kim, Won Bae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims There have been controversial reports linking Helicobacter pylori infection to autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). However, data regarding the relationship are limited for Asian populations, which have an extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. We performed this study to investigate the association between H. pylori infection and AITD in Koreans. Methods This study involved adults aged 30 to 70 years who had visited a health promotion center. A total of 5,502 subjects were analysed. Thyroid status was assessed by free thyroxine, thyroid stimulating hormone, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO-Ab). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to H. pylori were measured as an indication of H. pylori infection. We compared the prevalence of TPO-Ab in subjects with and without H. pylori infection. Results H. pylori IgG antibodies were found in 2,875 subjects (52.3%), and TPO-Ab were found in 430 (7.8%). Individuals positive for H. pylori Ab were older than those negative for H. pylori Ab (p < 0.01). The proportion of females was significantly higher in the TPO-Ab positive group (41.0% vs. 64.2%, p < 0.01). Prevalence of TPO-Ab positivity was higher in subjects with H. pylori infection (8.6% vs. 7.00%, p = 0.03), and this association was significant after adjusting for age, sex, and body mass index (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 1.03; p = 0.04). Conclusions In our study, prevalence of TPO-Ab positivity is more frequent in subjects with H. pylori infection. Our findings suggest H. pylori infection may play a role in the development of autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:28092700

  3. Severe Autoimmune Adverse Events Post Herpes Zoster Vaccine: A Case-Control Study of Adverse Events in a National Database.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi Chun; Yew, Yik Weng

    2015-07-01

    Zoster vaccine is recommended to reduce the incidence of herpes zoster and its complication of postherpetic neuralgia in older adults. However, there have been reports of autoimmune side effects post vaccination. We therefore aim to investigate the possible relationship of severe autoimmune adverse events (arthritis, vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, thrombocytopenia, alopecia, Guillain-Barre syndrome, optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis) post zoster vaccination with a matched case-control study of reported events in the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Our study showed no significantly increased risks of severe autoimmune adverse events, except arthritis and alopecia, after vaccination. Compared to the unexposed, patients with zoster vaccination had 2.2 and 2.7 times the odds of developing arthritis and alopecia, respectively (P<0.001 and P=0.015, respectively). However, almost none of these events was life threatening. Zoster vaccine is, therefore, relatively safe and unlikely to exacerbate or induce autoimmune diseases. Given its benefits and safety but low coverage, dermatologists and primary care physicians should encourage zoster vaccine use in elderly patients, including selected patients with autoimmune diseases.

  4. The early onset of type 1 autoimmune hepatitis has a strong genetic influence: role of HLA and KIR genes.

    PubMed

    Podhorzer, A; Paladino, N; Cuarterolo, M L; Fainboim, H A; Paz, S; Theiler, G; Capucchio, M; López, S I; Machicote, A; Montal, S; Podesta, G; Fainboim, L

    2016-04-01

    We have previously reported a strong association between HLA-DRB1*1301 and type 1 pediatric autoimmune hepatitis (PAH) and between HLA-DR*0405 and adult autoimmune hepatitis (AAH). Because human killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors are known to be associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, we investigated the frequencies of HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 and KIR genes in 144 type 1 PAH and 86 AAH patients, which were compared with 273 healthy controls. We demonstrated in PAH the increased frequency of the functional form of KIR2DS4-Full Length (KIR2DS4-FL), which in combination with HLA-DRB1*1301 revealed a strong synergistic effect (odds ratio=36.5). PAH-KIR2DS4-FL+ subjects have shown an increased frequency of their putative HLA-C*02, 04 and 06 ligands. KIR analysis of PAH also revealed a decreased frequency of KIR2DL2 gene and its ligand. In contrast, AAH cases have shown a weaker increased frequency of KIR2DS4-FL, a lack of synergistic effect with HLA class II antigens and a moderate association with HLA-DRB1*0405. Of note, we demonstrated that liver T cells have a unique pattern of KIR expression. These results show a KIR gene involved in autoimmune hepatitis and suggest a stronger genetic influence for the early onset type I autoimmune hepatitis.

  5. Onset of autoimmune type 1 diabetes during pregnancy: Prevalence and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wucher, Hélène; Lepercq, Jacques; Timsit, José

    2010-08-01

    Although this has been recently challenged, gestational diabetes mellitus (gestational diabetes) is still defined as an "impairment of glucose tolerance with onset or first recognition during pregnancy". According to this definition, all pathophysiological conditions leading to beta cell deficiency may reveal as gestational diabetes, due to the physiological insulin resistance associated with pregnancy. In rare patients, gestational diabetes is associated with the presence of islet autoantibodies and with a high risk of progression to overt type 1 diabetes after delivery. This condition has often been compared to the Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults. The frequency of islet autoantibodies in gestational diabetes has been assessed in many studies, but data about the clinical presentation of this subtype and about its prognosis are few. We review these studies and discuss the links of autoimmune gestational diabetes with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Anti-CD38 autoimmunity in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis or Graves' disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, A; Fallahi, P; Nesti, C; Pupilli, C; Marchetti, P; Takasawa, S; Okamoto, H; Ferrannini, E

    2001-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against human CD38 (an enzyme catalysing the interconversion of NAD+ and cyclic ADP-ribose) have been demonstrated recently in patients with type 2 diabetes. We tested 220 consecutive Caucasian patients with autoimmune chronic thyroiditis, 104 patients with Graves' disease, 220 subjects from the general population (control I) and 78 healthy control subjects not affected by thyroid autoimmune disorders (control II) for the presence of anti-CD38 autoimmunity. Using Western blot analysis and optical densitometry, a specific band corresponding to human recombinant CD38 was identified in the serum of several subjects. By defining anti-CD38 positivity as a standardized optical reading >3 s.d. higher than the mean value of control I, 10·4% of patients with thyroiditis and 7·7% of Graves' patients were anti-CD38 positive (P = 0·0009 versus 1·8% of control I). Similarly, 13·1% of patients with thyroiditis and 10·5% of Graves' patients had a standardized optical reading >3 s.d. higher than the mean value of the subjects not affected by thyroid autoimmune disorders (P = 0·002 versus 1·2% of control II). Anti-CD38 autoimmunity did not differ between euthyroid, hyperthyroid or hypothyroid patients or between patients with or without thyroid hypoechogenicity. Anti-CD38 autoantibodies were associated with higher levels of circulating antithyroid-peroxidase antibodies (P = 0·03) and they were more frequent in Graves' patients with ophthalmopathy (P < 0·05). Anti-CD38 autoantibodies are a new autoimmune marker in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and Graves' disease. The specific role of CD38 and its autoantibodies in the modulation of thyroid cell function or growth remains to be investigated. PMID:11737057

  7. Assessment of Virally Vectored Autoimmunity as a Biocontrol Strategy for Cane Toads

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Anthony J.; Venables, Daryl; Voysey, Rhonda D.; Boyle, Donna G.; Shanmuganathan, Thayalini; Hardy, Christopher M.; Siddon, Nicole A.; Hyatt, Alex D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The cane toad, Bufo (Chaunus) marinus, is one of the most notorious vertebrate pests introduced into Australia over the last 200 years and, so far, efforts to identify a naturally occurring B. marinus-specific pathogen for use as a biological control agent have been unsuccessful. We explored an alternative approach that entailed genetically modifying a pathogen with broad host specificity so that it no longer caused disease, but carried a gene to disrupt the cane toad life cycle in a species specific manner. Methodology/Principal Findings The adult beta globin gene was selected as the model gene for proof of concept of autoimmunity as a biocontrol method for cane toads. A previous report showed injection of bullfrog tadpoles with adult beta globin resulted in an alteration in the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs as well as reduced survival. In B. marinus we established for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin exists. The effect of injecting B. marinus tadpoles with purified recombinant adult globin protein was then assessed using behavioural (swim speed in tadpoles and jump length in metamorphs), developmental (time to metamorphosis, weight and length at various developmental stages, protein profile of adult globin) and genetic (adult globin mRNA levels) measures. However, we were unable to detect any differences between treated and control animals. Further, globin delivery using Bohle iridovirus, an Australian ranavirus isolate belonging to the Iridovirus family, did not reduce the survival of metamorphs or alter the form of beta globin expressed in metamorphs. Conclusions/Significance While we were able to show for the first time that the switch from tadpole to adult globin does occur in B. marinus, we were not able to induce autoimmunity and disrupt metamorphosis. The short development time of B. marinus tadpoles may preclude this approach. PMID:21283623

  8. Ectopic Lymphoid Structures: Powerhouse of Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Corsiero, Elisa; Nerviani, Alessandra; Bombardieri, Michele; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) often develop at sites of inflammation in target tissues of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. ELS are characterized by the formation of organized T/B cells aggregates, which can acquire follicular dendritic cells network supporting an ectopic germinal center response. In this review, we shall summarize the mechanisms that regulate the formation of ELS in tertiary lymphoid organs, with particular emphasis on the role of lymphoid chemokines in both formation and maintenance of ELS, the role of emerging positive and negative regulators of ELS development and function, including T follicular helper cells and IL-27, respectively. Finally, we shall discuss the main functions of ELS in supporting the affinity maturation, clonal selection, and differentiation of autoreactive B cells contributing to the maintenance and perpetuation of humoral autoimmunity. PMID:27799933

  9. Th17 cells in autoimmune demyelinating disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Recently published studies in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) have demonstrated an association between the development of demyelinating plaques and the accumulation of Th17 cells in the central nervous system and periphery. However, a causal relationship has been difficult to establish. In fact, in reports published thus far, interleukin (IL)-17A deficiency or neutralization in vivo attenuates, but does not completely abrogate, EAE. There is growing evidence that clinically similar forms of autoimmune demyelinating disease can be driven by myelin-specific T cells of distinct lineages with different degrees of dependence on IL-17A production to achieve their pathological effects. While such observations cast doubts about the potential therapeutic efficacy of Th17 blocking agents in MS, the collective data suggest that IL-17A expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells could serve as a surrogate biomarker of neuroinflammation and plaque formation and be a useful outcome measure for future clinical trials. PMID:20195867

  10. Regulatory B cells in autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Rui, Ke; Wang, Shengjun; Lu, Liwei

    2013-01-01

    B cells are generally considered to be positive regulators of the immune response because of their capability to produce antibodies, including autoantibodies. The production of antibodies facilitates optimal CD4+ T-cell activation because B cells serve as antigen-presenting cells and exert other modulatory functions in immune responses. However, certain B cells can also negatively regulate the immune response by producing regulatory cytokines and directly interacting with pathogenic T cells via cell-to-cell contact. These types of B cells are defined as regulatory B (Breg) cells. The regulatory function of Breg cells has been demonstrated in mouse models of inflammation, cancer, transplantation, and particularly in autoimmunity. In this review, we focus on the recent advances that lead to the understanding of the development and function of Breg cells and the implications of B cells in human autoimmune diseases. PMID:23292280

  11. Targeting Syk in Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Guo-Min; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases, which associates directly with surface receptors, including B-cell receptor and Fcγ receptor, and is involved in a variety of signal transduction pathways. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus are autoimmune diseases in which autoantibodies, immune complexes, and autoreactive T cells account for the expression of tissue inflammation and damage. Syk inhibitors efficiently suppress RA in patients albeit in the expression of unwanted side effects, including gastrointestinal effects, hypertension, and neutropenia. Syk inhibitors also inhibit clinical manifestations in lupus-prone mice. Here, we review the evidence that supports the use of Syk inhibitors to treat rheumatic and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27014261

  12. Roles of A20 in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Peng, Ling-Long; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Shu; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jia; Song, Bin; Yang, Hai-Bing

    2016-04-01

    A20 (TNFAIP3), known to inhibit NF-κB function by deubiquitinating-specific NF-κB signaling molecules, has been found in many cell types of the immune system. Recent findings suggest that A20 is essential for the development and functional performance of dendritic cell, B cell, T cell and macrophage. A number of studies further demonstrate that these cells are crucial in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel disease, ankylosing arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis. In this article, we focus on the recent advances on the roles of A20 in autoimmune diseases and discuss the therapeutic significance of these new findings.

  13. Pleural involvement in systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Bouros, Demosthenes; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Tzouvelekis, Argyris

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases, a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders including multiorgan involvement, can affect the pleura with various frequencies, either as a single presenting feature or as part of multisystem involvement. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus represent the most common immunological diseases that affect the pleural cavity; however, there is considerable variation regarding the reported prevalence, natural history and prognosis of pleural involvement in both conditions. The definition of pleural disease in the remaining systemic autoimmune disorders is unquestionably imprecise and assumptive, since it is risky to support premises based on single case reports or retrospective data from very small series. In this article, we will review the manifestations of pleural disease caused by rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, Sjogren's syndrome and Wegener's granulomatosis.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Vierling, John M

    2012-02-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic liver disease characterized by elevated aminotransferase levels, autoantibodies, increased γ-globulin or IgG levels and biopsy evidence of interface hepatitis. Recent advances include new practice guidelines that redefine criteria for remission to require complete biochemical and histological normalization on therapy; comparisons between the revised original and simplified diagnostic scoring systems; refined characterization of autoantibodies and their diagnostic performance parameters; proof of the safety and efficacy of combination budesonide and azathioprine therapy for non-cirrhotic patients; scrutiny of overlap syndromes; further analyses of the outcomes of orthotopic liver transplantation and the diagnosis and treatment of recurrent and de novo autoimmune hepatitis after transplantation. Anticipated consequences of the application of the new definition of therapeutic remission include a reduction in the proportion of patients achieving remission with conventional immunosuppression regimens and a corresponding increase in the need for alternative therapies.

  15. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  16. [Cytotoxic T lymphocytes in cancer and autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Prado-García, Heriberto; Avila-Moreno, Federico; López-González, José Sullivan

    2004-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are cells of the immune system that recognize and kill cells that have been infected with intracellular pathogens, allogenic cells or tumor cells. It has been reported that CTLs participate in the pathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases. After stimulation with the antigen, CTLs undergo an activation process highly regulated, which leads to the cell to acquire an effector or memory function. In this review, we indicate the cellular markers associated with the different stages of CTL-differentiation (naive, memory and effector); we indicate the distinct models of CTLs differentiation; also, the mechanisms of CTLs cytotoxicity are mentioned. Furthermore, we describe the participation of CTLs in cancer and autoimmunity; the implications of CTLs in the progression of these diseases are discussed.

  17. Autoimmune Myopathies: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jean-Philippe; Marie, Isabelle; Jouen, Fabienne; Boyer, Olivier; Martinet, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) as a whole represent a major health concern and remain a medical and scientific challenge. Some of them, such as multiple sclerosis or type 1 diabetes, have been actively investigated for many decades. Autoimmune myopathies (AIMs), also referred to as idiopathic inflammatory myopathies or myositis, represent a group of very severe AID for which we have a more limited pathophysiological knowledge. AIM encompass a group of, individually rare but collectively not so uncommon, diseases characterized by symmetrical proximal muscle weakness, increased serum muscle enzymes such as creatine kinase, myopathic changes on electromyography, and several typical histological patterns on muscle biopsy, including the presence of inflammatory cell infiltrates in muscle tissue. Importantly, some AIMs are strongly related to cancer. Here, we review the current knowledge on the most prevalent forms of AIM and, notably, the diagnostic contribution of autoantibodies. PMID:27379096

  18. Association of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mghari, Ghizlane El; Ansari, Nawal El

    2016-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune pancreatitis is a new nosological entity in which a lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine pancreas is involved. The concomitant onset of autoimmune pancreatitis and type 1 diabetes has been recently described suggesting a unique immune disturbance that compromises the pancreatic endocrine and exocrine functions. We report a case of type1 diabetes onset associated with an autoimmune pancreatitis in a young patient who seemed to present a type 2 autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. This rare association offers the opportunity to better understand pancreatic autoimmune disorders in type 1 diabetes. Learning points: The case makes it possible to understand the possibility of a simultaneous disturbance of the endocrine and exocrine function of the same organ by one autoimmune process. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes should make practitioner seek other autoimmune diseases. It is recommended to screen for autoimmune thyroiditis and celiac diseases. We draw attention to consider the autoimmune origin of a pancreatitis associated to type1 diabetes. Autoimmune pancreatitis is a novel rare entity that should be known as it is part of the IgG4-related disease spectrum. PMID:27855231

  19. The epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis.

    PubMed

    Benros, Michael E; Eaton, William W; Mortensen, Preben B

    2014-02-15

    This review summarizes the epidemiologic evidence linking autoimmune diseases and psychosis. The associations between autoimmune diseases and psychosis have been studied for more than a half century, but research has intensified within the last decades, since psychosis has been associated with genetic markers of the immune system and with excess autoreactivity and other immune alterations. A range of psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, have been observed to occur more frequently in some autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Many autoimmune diseases involve multiple organs and general dysfunction of the immune system, which could affect the brain and induce psychiatric symptoms. Most studies have been cross-sectional, observing an increased prevalence of a broad number of autoimmune diseases in people with psychotic disorders. Furthermore, there is some evidence of associations of psychosis with a family history of autoimmune disorders and vice versa. Additionally, several autoimmune diseases, individually and in aggregate, have been identified as raising the risk for psychotic disorders in longitudinal studies. The associations have been suspected to be caused by inflammation or brain-reactive antibodies associated with the autoimmune diseases. However, the associations could also be caused by shared genetic factors or common etiologic components such as infections. Infections can induce the development of autoimmune diseases and autoantibodies, possibly affecting the brain. Autoimmune diseases and brain-reactive antibodies should be considered by clinicians in the treatment of individuals with psychotic symptoms, and even if the association is not causal, treatment would probably still improve quality of life and survival.

  20. Dominant Mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator AIRE Are Associated with Common Organ-Specific Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Bergithe E; Hellesen, Alexander; Erichsen, Martina M; Bratland, Eirik; Vardi, Ayelet; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Kemp, E Helen; Fiskerstrand, Torunn; Viken, Marte K; Weetman, Anthony P; Fleishman, Sarel J; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Sewell, W A C; Sozaeva, Leila S; Zayats, Tetyana; Haugarvoll, Kristoffer; Orlova, Elizaveta M; Haavik, Jan; Johansson, Stefan; Knappskog, Per M; Løvås, Kristian; Wolff, Anette S B; Abramson, Jakub; Husebye, Eystein S

    2015-06-16

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene is crucial for establishing central immunological tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. Mutations in AIRE cause a rare autosomal-recessive disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1), distinguished by multi-organ autoimmunity. We have identified multiple cases and families with mono-allelic mutations in the first plant homeodomain (PHD1) zinc finger of AIRE that followed dominant inheritance, typically characterized by later onset, milder phenotypes, and reduced penetrance compared to classical APS-1. These missense PHD1 mutations suppressed gene expression driven by wild-type AIRE in a dominant-negative manner, unlike CARD or truncated AIRE mutants that lacked such dominant capacity. Exome array analysis revealed that the PHD1 dominant mutants were found with relatively high frequency (>0.0008) in mixed populations. Our results provide insight into the molecular action of AIRE and demonstrate that disease-causing mutations in the AIRE locus are more common than previously appreciated and cause more variable autoimmune phenotypes.

  1. Primary biliary cirrhosis--autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pamfil, Cristina; Candrea, Elisabeta; Berki, Emese; Popov, Horațiu I; Radu, Pompilia I; Rednic, Simona

    2015-03-01

    Autoimmune liver diseases may be associated with extrahepatic autoimmune pathology. We report the case of a 52-year old woman who initially presented to the gastroenterology department for extreme fatigue, pale stools, dark urine and pruritus. Laboratory tests showed significant cholestasis and elevation of aminotransferase levels. Immunological tests revealed positive antinuclear (ANA=1:320) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA=1:40) with negative anti-smooth muscle and liver kidney microsomal type 1 antibodies. The biopsy was compatible with overlap syndrome type 1. The patient was commenced on immunosuppressive therapy according to standard of care (azathioprine 50mg, ursodeoxycholic acid and prednisone 0.5mg/kg), with moderate biochemical improvement. She subsequently developed proximal symmetrical weakness and cutaneous involvement and was diagnosed with biopsy-proven dermatomyositis. The immunosuppressive regimen was intensified to 150 mg azathioprine. At the three-month follow-up, her symptoms subsided and aminotransferases and muscle enzymes normalized. Upon further investigation the patient was diagnosed with autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first case of primary biliary cirrhosis - autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome associated with dermatomyositis, autoimmune thyroiditis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

  2. Black Cohosh Hepatotoxicity with Autoimmune Hepatitis Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Diana L.; Kale, Santosh; Lam-Himlin, Dora M.; Harrison, M. Edwyn

    2017-01-01

    Herbal medicines have been used for the treatment of various ailments since time immemorial. Black cohosh (BC) is well known for the treatment of postmenopausal symptoms, with conflicting evidence supporting its safety and benefits. We present a rare case of BC-induced autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) with hepatotoxicity in a 69-year-old female. To our knowledge, this represents the third case of BC-induced AIH. PMID:28203134

  3. Autoimmune retinopathy: A case report from India

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Sudha K.; Ahmed, Arshee S.

    2017-01-01

    A first case report of autoimmune retinopathy (AIR) from India. A middle-aged female patient presented with subacute loss of vision in both eyes. Clinical examination revealed a near normal fundus in both the eyes. A presumed diagnosis of nonparaneoplastic AIR was made based on clinical features and suggestive investigations. Early detection and management with steroids or immunosuppression may be beneficial to patients with AIR. PMID:28298865

  4. Antibodies to Actin in Autoimmune Neutropenia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    protein as actin. Purified Acanthamoeba actin by anti-neutrophil antibodies in autoimmune neutropenia, comigrated with the protein and was specifically...anti-rabbit IgG were obtained from ICN Immunobiolog- formed using purified Acanthamoeba actin (gift of Dr Blair Bowers. icals, Naperville, IL. Cells...preparations𔃼 1 - was the protein recognized by these anti-neutrophil antibody 6 .2- positive sera, lgG, and F(ab’) 2. Purified Acanthamoeba actin

  5. Statin-associated necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Geórgea Hermogenes; Zanoteli, Edmar; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) is a severe adverse effect of statins. We report a 66-year-old Caucasian female who had progressive proximal muscle weakness after treatment with statins. Results of a muscle biopsy showed necrotizing myopathy with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrate and increased major histocompatibility class I antigen expression in muscle fibers. The clinical and laboratory parameters improved significantly with immunosuppressive treatment. Although it is a rare event, statin-induced NAM should be included as a differential diagnosis of myopathies.

  6. Oral Tolerance: Therapeutic Implications for Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Ana M. C.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2006-01-01

    Oral tolerance is classically defined as the suppression of immune responses to antigens (Ag) that have been administered previously by the oral route. Multiple mechanisms of tolerance are induced by oral Ag. Low doses favor active suppression, whereas higher doses favor clonal anergy/deletion. Oral Ag induces Th2 (IL-4/IL-10) and Th3 (TGF-β) regulatory T cells (Tregs) plus CD4+CD25+ regulatory cells and LAP+T cells. Induction of oral tolerance is enhanced by IL-4, IL-10, anti-IL-12, TGF-β, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), Flt-3 ligand, anti-CD40 ligand and continuous feeding of Ag. In addition to oral tolerance, nasal tolerance has also been shown to be effective in suppressing inflammatory conditions with the advantage of a lower dose requirement. Oral and nasal tolerance suppress several animal models of autoimmune diseases including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), uveitis, thyroiditis, myasthenia, arthritis and diabetes in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse, plus non-autoimmune diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis and stroke. Oral tolerance has been tested in human autoimmune diseases including MS, arthritis, uveitis and diabetes and in allergy, contact sensitivity to DNCB, nickel allergy. Positive results have been observed in phase II trials and new trials for arthritis, MS and diabetes are underway. Mucosal tolerance is an attractive approach for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases because of lack of toxicity, ease of administration over time and Ag-specific mechanism of action. The successful application of oral tolerance for the treatment of human diseases will depend on dose, developing immune markers to assess immunologic effects, route (nasal versus oral), formulation, mucosal adjuvants, combination therapy and early therapy. PMID:17162357

  7. Association between thyroid autoimmunity and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Suk, J H; Lee, J H; Kim, J M

    2012-07-01

    Evidence exists that autoimmune thyroiditis is present in a high percentage of fibromyalgia (FM) and associated with the presence of typical symptoms of FM. However, the role of thyroperoxidase antibody (TPO Ab) in the manifestation of FM is still unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate the prevalence of positive TPO Ab in euthyroid FM patients, and whether TPO Ab positivity is associated with the clinical manifestations in euthyroid FM patients.Thyroid assessment was done by free T4, TSH and TPO Ab. The clinical parameters including Fibromyalgia Impact questionnaire (FIQ), pain visual analogical scale (VAS) and tender point counts were evaluated in euthyroid primary FM patients, not associated with autoimmune rheumatic disease. The immunologic tests including rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody were measured. We compared the prevalence of positive TPO Ab between FM patients, and healthy control. We also compared clinical and laboratory parameter in FM patients according to the presence of TPO Ab.149 patients of FM, 68 healthy controls were recruited. FM patients showed higher prevalence of positive TPO Ab than healthy controls (28 out of 149 patients, 19%; 5 out of 68 healthy controls, 7%; P=0.04). There was no difference of clinical and laboratory parameters in FM patients between 2 groups subdivided by the presence of TPO Ab.In our study, euthyroid FM patients showed significantly higher prevalence of positive TPO Ab, as compared to age and sex matched healthy control. However, TPO Ab positivity was relatively low and not associated with the clinical manifestations in euthyroid FM patients. This finding support thyroid autoimmunity may influence the development of FM, but the evidence which support that FM is related to autoimmune etiology is not clear, and FM severity may not be affected by the presence of thyroid autoantibody.

  8. THE AUTOIMMUNE CONSTELLATION IN LICHEN AMYLOIDOSIS.

    PubMed

    Andrese, Elena; Vâţă, D; Ciobanu, Delia; Stătescu, Laura; Solovăstru, Laura Gheucă

    2015-01-01

    Localized cutaneous amyloidosis is a rare disease among white people, being more common in South-Asia, China and South America. The disease is characterized by deposition of amyloid material in the papillary dermis without visceral involvement. Nevertheless, there is a growing list of immune-mediated disorders that have been linked to cutaneous amyloidosis. We present two cases of concomitant occurrence of lichen amyloidosis and autoimmune thyroiditis/atopic dermatitis in two Caucasian women.

  9. Microbiota and autoimmune disease: the hosted self.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2011-10-20

    The trillions of microbial symbionts normally hosted by mammals have important influences on the development and function of the immune system. We highlight recently discovered cellular and molecular mechanisms by which they impact autoimmune diseases--in particular, gut-distal disorders. Besides provoking a reconsideration of the definition of immunological "self" and "nonself," these new findings evoke exciting possibilities for the discovery of a whole new class of immunomodulatory molecules.

  10. NK cell subsets in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-03-09

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system. They not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells or infected cells, but also play regulatory role through promoting or suppressing functions of other immune cells by secretion of cytokines and chemokines. However, overactivation or dysfunction of NK cells may be associated with pathogenesis of some diseases. NK cells are found to act as a two edged weapon and play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activity in autoimmune diseases. Though the precise mechanisms for the opposite effects of NK cells has not been fully elucidated, the importance of NK cells in autoimmune diseases might be associated with different NK cell subsets, different tissue microenvironment and different stages of corresponding diseases. The local tissue microenvironment, unique cellular interactions and different stages of corresponding diseases shape the properties and function of NK cells. In this review, we focus on recent research on the features and function of different NK cell subsets, particularly tissue-resident NK cells in different tissues, and their potential role in autoimmune diseases.

  11. Autoimmune thyroiditis associated with neuromyelitis optica (NMO).

    PubMed

    Sudulagunta, Sreenivasa Rao; Sodalagunta, Mahesh Babu; Khorram, Hadi; Sepehrar, Mona; Gonivada, Jayadevappa; Noroozpour, Zahra; Prasad, Nagendra

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO or Devic's syndrome) is a rare relapsing demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that mainly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves and shares many clinical and radiological features with multiple sclerosis. The association of NMO with other autoimmune diseases was reported, but very few reports described association with autoimmune thyroid disease. Early differentiation between NMO and multiple sclerosis is very important as the natural course and treatment regimens differ significantly. We report a case of a 50-year-old woman who was admitted initially with vomiting, hiccups and paraesthesias but was not diagnosed with NMO and presented with a severe progression of the disease. The patient was also diagnosed to have autoimmune thyroiditis with lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid which progressed from hyperthyroidism to hypothyroidism. NMO diagnosis was established with seropositivity for NMO-IgG and MRI showing longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments). In spite of treatment, the response was poor due to lack of early diagnosis and aggressive immunosuppressant therapy.

  12. Autoimmune Pathogenesis of Chagas Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Engman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas heart disease is an inflammatory cardiomyopathy that develops in approximately one-third of individuals infected with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the discovery of T. cruzi by Carlos Chagas >100 years ago, much has been learned about Chagas disease pathogenesis; however, the outcome of T. cruzi infection is highly variable and difficult to predict. Many mechanisms have been proposed to promote tissue inflammation, but the determinants and the relative importance of each have yet to be fully elucidated. The notion that some factor other than the parasite significantly contributes to the development of myocarditis was hypothesized by the first physician-scientists who noted the conspicuous absence of parasites in the hearts of those who succumbed to Chagas disease. One of these factors—autoimmunity—has been extensively studied for more than half a century. Although questions regarding the functional role of autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of Chagas disease remain unanswered, the development of autoimmune responses during infection clearly occurs in some individuals, and the implications that this autoimmunity may be pathogenic are significant. In this review, we summarize what is known about the pathogenesis of Chagas heart disease and conclude with a view of the future of Chagas disease diagnosis, pathogenesis, therapy, and prevention, emphasizing recent advances in these areas that aid in the management of Chagas disease. PMID:25857229

  13. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with neonatal onset.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Khamis Butt, Umar Bin; Mannan, Jovaria

    2014-05-01

    We describe 2 cases of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS), which is a rare disorder of auto-immunity, chronic persistent or recurrent lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly and hyper gamma globulinemia (1gG, 1gA). Both cases presented in neonatal period which is a rare age of presentation in this disease. A 20 days old female neonate presented with respiratory symptoms which rapidly progressed needing ventilatory support. There was hepatomegaly and no auscultatory findings in the chest. Serial CBCs (complete blood counts) showed persistent leucocytosis with predominant lymphocytosis. Her chest X-ray showed left sided consolidation which responded poorly to antibiotics. Her prompt clinical response to steroids raised the suspicion of autoimmunity and the diagnosis was established after a negative bone marrow examination for leukemia and a positive result for ALPS on flow cytometry. The second case presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia starting in neonatal period followed by persistent lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and recurrent infections which responded poorly to antibiotics. Diagnosis was delayed due to low index of suspicion, and finally achieved with multiple radiological studies, histopathology and flow cytometry.

  14. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  15. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Philippe, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is diagnosed in the presence of anemia, usually macrocytic and of variable intensity, reticulocytosis, and a positive direct and/or indirect antiglobulin test, after ruling out other types of hemolytic anemia. A positive direct antiglobulin test alone is not sufficient to diagnose AIHA and may be positive in many patients without anemia or negative in some patients with AIHA. AIHA may be classified into two major categories according to the optimal temperature of antibody activity: warm-reacting autoantibodies (usually IgG) optimal around 37 degrees C and cold-reacting autoantibodies, optimal at 4 degrees C (usually IgM). This classification guides the selection of tests and treatment. AIHA is widely reported to be associated with a variety of other diseases, although these associations are often fortuitous. A minimal set of useful investigations is appropriate since AIHA may be secondary to viral infections, lymphoid malignancies, or autoimmune disorders such as lupus. Transfusion should remain rare in AHAI, but close contact with the transfusion service is necessary if it is to succeed. As for many autoimmune and/or systemic diseases, numerous types of treatment have been proposed but have not been validated in controlled multicenter studies. These are necessary to improve the management of these rare disorders.

  16. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  17. Cirrhosis and autoimmune liver disease: Current understanding

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Grant, Charlotte R

    2016-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) constitute the classic autoimmune liver diseases (AILDs). While AIH target the hepatocytes, in PBC and PSC the targets of the autoimmune attack are the biliary epithelial cells. Persistent liver injury, associated with chronic AILD, leads to un-resolving inflammation, cell proliferation and the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins by hepatic stellate cells and portal myofibroblasts. Liver cirrhosis, and the resultant loss of normal liver function, inevitably ensues. Patients with cirrhosis have higher risks or morbidity and mortality, and that in the decompensated phase, complications of portal hypertension and/or liver dysfunction lead to rapid deterioration. Accurate diagnosis and monitoring of cirrhosis is, therefore of upmost importance. Liver biopsy is currently the gold standard technique, but highly promising non-invasive methodology is under development. Liver transplantation (LT) is an effective therapeutic option for the management of end-stage liver disease secondary to AIH, PBC and PSC. LT is indicated for AILD patients who have progressed to end-stage chronic liver disease or developed intractable symptoms or hepatic malignancy; in addition, LT may also be indicated for patients presenting with acute liver disease due to AIH who do not respond to steroids. PMID:27729952

  18. Autoimmune Schizophrenia? Psychiatric Manifestations of Hashimoto's Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Maryam; Adetutu, Ebun; Thakur, Richa; Gottlich, Caleb; DeBacker, Danielle L; Marks, Lianne

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto’s encephalitis (HE), also known as steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), can be a debilitating manifestation of an autoimmune reaction against the thyroid that is often under-diagnosed primarily due to a lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This is a case of a 52-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with HE after presenting with recurrent and severe psychosis in conjunction with paranoia and a thyroidopathy. Her symptoms are chronic, having first been documented as presenting 15 years prior and showing progressive exacerbation in both frequency and severity. The patient’s paranoia often manifested as delusions involving family members or close friends and consequently introduced an opportunity for harm to herself and others. She showed great conviction with self-diagnoses that were proven incorrect, resulting in occasional non-compliance. Between episodes, the patient did not show evidence of symptoms. This patient struggled with several incorrect diagnoses and treatments for several years before the correct diagnosis of HE was made and displayed extreme improvement upon corticosteroid administration. This case illustrates the importance of increasing awareness of HE as well as including HE in a differential diagnosis when any patient presents with psychosis and concurrent thyroidopathy. Hashimoto’s encephalitis follows putative characteristics of autoimmune diseases, exhibiting a higher incidence in women as compared to men, presenting with increased titers of autoantibodies, and showing dramatic amelioration when treated with corticosteroids. PMID:27672526

  19. T cells and autoimmune kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Fueyo, Abel; Bradley, Sean J; Klatzmann, David; Tsokos, George C

    2017-03-13

    Glomerulonephritis is traditionally considered to result from the invasion of the kidney by autoantibodies and immune complexes from the circulation or following their formation in situ, and by cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system. The inflammatory response leads to the proliferation and dysfunction of cells of the glomerulus, and invasion of the interstitial space with immune cells, resulting in tubular cell malfunction and fibrosis. T cells are critical drivers of autoimmunity and related organ damage, by supporting B-cell differentiation and antibody production or by directly promoting inflammation and cytotoxicity against kidney resident cells. T cells might become activated by autoantigens in the periphery and become polarized to secrete inflammatory cytokines before entering the kidney where they have the opportunity to expand owing to the presence of costimulatory molecules and activating cytokines. Alternatively, naive T cells could enter the kidney where they become activated after encountering autoantigen and expand locally. As not all individuals with a peripheral autoimmune response to kidney antigens develop glomerulonephritis, the contribution of local kidney factors expressed or produced by kidney cells is probably of crucial importance. Improved understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of T cells in patients with glomerulonephritis offers unique opportunities for the recognition of treatment targets for autoimmune kidney disease.

  20. Autoimmune epitheliitis: Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skopouli, F N; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1994-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS), an autoimmune exocrinopathy, is a common, chronic disease of females. Clinical studies of kidney involvement in SS patients have shown that the predominant lesion is interstitial nephritis which produces tubular dysfunction. Studies on lung involvement have previously indicated that one fourth of SS patients suffer from subclinical interstitial lung disease. Re-evaluation, however, of the pulmonary disease using functional, radiologic and histopathologic studies showed that the lesion starts peribronchially. Finally, evaluation of liver disease in SS patients revealed that this consists of a pericholangeal round-cell infiltrate resembling the early lesion of primary biliary cirrhosis. These clinical studies suggest that the systemic manifestations of SS are probably due to the attraction of lymphocytes by different epithelial tissues. Studies of the epithelial cells of minor salivary glands from SS patients have shown that these inappropriately and selectively express HLA class II molecules and the proto-oncogene c-myc. Evaluation of cytokines in the minor salivary glands from these patients by in situ hybridization revealed that the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 and IL-6 are also produced by the epithelial cells. Finally, proviral DNA has been shown to be incorporated in the DNA of epithelial cells. On the basis of these clinical and laboratory observations, we would like to suggest that the target tissue involved in the autoimmune histopathologic lesions of SS is the epithelium, and therefore we propose the term "Autoimmune Epitheliitis" instead of "Sjögren's syndrome" for this disease.

  1. Autoimmune encephalitis in psychiatric institutions: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bost, Chloe; Pascual, Olivier; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a rare and newly described group of diseases involving autoantibodies directed against synaptic and neuronal cell surface antigens. It comprises a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Sensitive and specific diagnostic tests such as cell-based assay are primordial for the detection of neuronal cell surface antibodies in patients’ cerebrospinal fluid or serum and determine the treatment and follow-up of the patients. As neurological symptoms are fairly well described in the literature, this review focuses on the nature of psychiatric symptoms occurring at the onset or during the course of the diseases. In order to help the diagnosis, the main neurological symptoms of the most representative synaptic and neuronal cell surface autoantibodies were detailed. Finally, the exploration of these autoantibodies for almost a decade allowed us to present an overview of autoimmune encephalitis incidence in psychiatric disease and the general guidelines for the management of psychiatric manifestations. For the majority of autoimmune encephalitis, the prognosis depends on the rapidity of the detection, identification, and the management of the disease. Because the presence of pronounced psychiatric symptoms drives patients to psychiatric institutions and can hinder the diagnosis, the aim of this work is to provide clues to help earlier detection by physicians and thus provide better medical care to patients. PMID:27822050

  2. Autoimmune Schizophrenia? Psychiatric Manifestations of Hashimoto's Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ali S; Alam, Maryam; Adetutu, Ebun; Thakur, Richa; Gottlich, Caleb; DeBacker, Danielle L; Marks, Lianne

    2016-07-05

    Hashimoto's encephalitis (HE), also known as steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), can be a debilitating manifestation of an autoimmune reaction against the thyroid that is often under-diagnosed primarily due to a lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This is a case of a 52-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with HE after presenting with recurrent and severe psychosis in conjunction with paranoia and a thyroidopathy. Her symptoms are chronic, having first been documented as presenting 15 years prior and showing progressive exacerbation in both frequency and severity. The patient's paranoia often manifested as delusions involving family members or close friends and consequently introduced an opportunity for harm to herself and others. She showed great conviction with self-diagnoses that were proven incorrect, resulting in occasional non-compliance. Between episodes, the patient did not show evidence of symptoms. This patient struggled with several incorrect diagnoses and treatments for several years before the correct diagnosis of HE was made and displayed extreme improvement upon corticosteroid administration. This case illustrates the importance of increasing awareness of HE as well as including HE in a differential diagnosis when any patient presents with psychosis and concurrent thyroidopathy. Hashimoto's encephalitis follows putative characteristics of autoimmune diseases, exhibiting a higher incidence in women as compared to men, presenting with increased titers of autoantibodies, and showing dramatic amelioration when treated with corticosteroids.

  3. Avian models with spontaneous autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Georg; Andersson, Leif; Hala, Karel; Gershwin, M. Eric; Selmi, Carlo F.; Erf, Gisela F.; Lamont, Susan J.; Sgonc, Roswitha

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases in human patients only become clinically manifest when the disease process has developed to a stage where functional compensation by the afflicted organ or system is not possible any more. In order to understand the initial etiologic and pathogenic events that are generally not yet accessible in humans, appropriate animal models are required. In this respect, spontaneously developing models - albeit rare – reflect the situation in humans much more closely than experimentally induced models, including knockout and transgenic mice. The present review describes three spontaneous chicken models for human autoimmune diseases, the Obese strain (OS) with a Hashimoto-like autoimmune thyroiditis, the University of California at Davis lines 200 and 206 (UCD-200 and 206) with a scleroderma-like disease and the amelanotic Smyth line with a vitiligo-like syndrome (SLV). Special emphasis is given to the new opportunities to unravel the genetic basis of these diseases in view of the recently completed sequencing of the chicken genome. PMID:17145302

  4. [Vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Bühler, Silja; Hatz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with autoimmune diseases treated with immunosuppressive drugs is increasing steadily. The variety of immunosuppressive drugs and in particular biological therapies is also rising. The autoimmune disease itself as well as the immunosuppressive therapy increases the risk of infection in this population. Particularly the risk of vaccine-preventable infections is elevated. Thus, preventing infections by the means of vaccination is of utmost importance. The Division of Infectious Diseases of the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, University of Zurich, performed a literature search on the topic of vaccinations in patients with autoimmune diseases upon request by the Swiss Federal Commission for Vaccination Issues. Overall, data are scarce. The following main points were retrieved from the literature: Inactivated vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity may be reduced under immunosuppressive therapy. In addition to the generally recommended basic vaccinations, specific vaccinations, such as influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are indicated in these patient groups. Live vaccines are generally contraindicated under immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, specific exceptions apply. Furthermore, certain time intervals for the administration of live vaccines after pausing or ceasing an immunosuppressive therapy should be respected.

  5. Chromosome 18q deletion syndrome with autoimmune diabetes mellitus: putative genomic loci for autoimmunity and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Hogendorf, Anna; Lipska-Zietkiewicz, Beata S; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Borowiec, Maciej; Koczkowska, Magdalena; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Drozdz, Izabela; Wyka, Krystyna; Limon, Janusz; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2016-03-01

    A girl with 18q deletion syndrome was diagnosed with autoimmune diabetes mellitus and Hashimoto's thyroiditis at the age of 3 yr. In addition, the girl suffered from recurrent infections due to immunoglobulin A and IgG4 deficiency. She was also found to have CD3+CD4+FoxP3+, CD3+CD4+FoxP3+CD25+, and CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127 regulatory T cells deficiency. The exceptional coincidence of the two autoimmune disorders occurring at an early age, and associated with immune deficiency, implies that genes located on deleted 19.4 Mbp region at 18q21.32-q23 (chr18:58,660,699-78,012,870) might play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity leading to β cell destruction and diabetes.

  6. Epigenetic modifications and epigenetic based medication implementations of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Majid; Gharibi, Tohid; Dolati, Sanam; Rostamzadeh, Davood; Aslani, Saeed; Baradaran, Behzad; Younesi, Vahid; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have documented a number of genetic variants to explain mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases. However, the precise etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. Epigenetic mechanisms like alterations in the post-translational modification of histones and DNA methylation may potentially cause a breakdown of immune tolerance and the perpetuation of autoreactive responses. Recently, several studies both in experimental models and clinical settings proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically, data support the impact of epigenetic changes in autoimmune diseases, in some cases based on mechanistical observations. Epigenetic therapy already being employed in hematopoietic malignancies may also be associated with beneficial effects in autoimmune diseases. In this review, we will discuss on what we know and expect about the treatment of autoimmune disease based on epigenetic aberrations.

  7. Clinical implications of shared genetics and pathogenesis in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2013-11-01

    Many endocrine diseases, including type 1 diabetes mellitus, Graves disease, Addison disease and Hashimoto disease, originate as an autoimmune reaction that affects disease-specific target organs. These autoimmune diseases are characterized by the development of specific autoantibodies and by the presence of autoreactive T cells. They are caused by a complex genetic predisposition that is attributable to multiple genetic variants, each with a moderate-to-low effect size. Most of the genetic variants associated with a particular autoimmune endocrine disease are shared between other systemic and organ-specific autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, coeliac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis. Here, we review the shared and specific genetic background of autoimmune diseases, summarize their treatment options and discuss how identifying the genetic and environmental factors that predispose patients to an autoimmune disease can help in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients, as well as the design of new treatments.

  8. The MicroRNA-21 in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaowen; Wan, Xiaochun; Ruan, Qingguo

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is an oncomiR and significantly upregulated in a wide range of cancers. It is strongly involved in apoptosis and oncogenesis, since most of its reported targets are tumor suppressors. Recently, miR-21 was found to be correlated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and may play an essential role in regulating autoimmune responses. In particular, miR-21 promotes Th17 cell differentiation, which mediates the development of multiple autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the current research on the mechanisms that regulate miR-21 expression, the potential of miR-21 as a diagnostic biomarker for autoimmune disease and the mechanisms by which miR-21 promotes the development of autoimmune disease. We also discussed the therapeutic potential of targeting miR-21 in treating patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27271606

  9. Insights into IL-37, the role in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the impaired function and the destruction of tissues that are caused by an immune response in which aberrant antibodies are generated and attack the body's own cells and tissues. Interleukin (IL) -37, a new member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immune responses. Recently, studies have shown that expression of IL-37 was abnormal in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriasis, Graves' disease (GD). In addition, functional analysis indicated that IL-37 is negatively involved in the development and pathogenesis of these autoimmune disorders. The strong association of this cytokine with autoimmune diseases promotes us to systematically review what had been published recently on the crucial nature of IL-37 in relation to autoimmune diseases gaining attention for its regulatory capability in these autoimmune disorders.

  10. Detection of Lawsonia intracellularis by real-time PCR in the feces of free-living animals from equine farms with documented occurrence of equine proliferative enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mapes, Samantha; Rejmanek, Daniel; Gebhart, Connie

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether Lawsonia intracellularis was present in the feces of free-living animals collected on two equine premises with documented occurrence of equine proliferative enteropathy (EPE). Fresh feces from black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus, n=100), striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis, n=22), feral cats (Felis catus, n=14), Brewer's Blackbirds (Euphagus cyanocephalus, n=10), Virginian opossums (Didelphis virginiana, n=9), raccoons (Procyon lotor, n=4), California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi, n=3), and coyotes (Canis latrans, n=2) were collected from August 2006 to January 2007 either from the ground while walking the premises or after trapping the animals using live traps. Nucleic acid purified from feces was directly processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using a real-time PCR assay targeting the aspartate ammonia lyase gene of L. intracellularis. Purified DNA samples were also precipitated, preamplified for L. intracellularis, and analyzed using the same real-time PCR assay, to increase the detection limit to one L. intracellularis organism per extracted sample. Feces from jackrabbits, striped skunks, Virginian opossums, and coyotes tested PCR positive for L. intracellularis, whereas all feces from feral cats, Brewer's Blackbirds, raccoons, and ground squirrels tested PCR negative for L. intracellularis. PCR testing on DNA extracted directly from feces was positive for L. intracellularis in six of 164 fecal samples. When DNA purification from feces was followed by a precipitation and preamplification step, five additional fecal samples tested PCR positive for L. intracellularis (11/164). The largest number of PCR positive L. intracellularis fecal samples was observed in striped skunks, followed by Virginian opossums, jackrabbits, and coyotes. This is the first description of L. intracellularis in these four species. Because the fecal samples were collected at equine farms with confirmed

  11. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64-15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59-27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications.

  12. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  13. [Research advances in drug-induced autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Li, C M; Zhang, J Y; Tang, Y Y; Mao, Y M

    2016-11-20

    Drug induced autoimmune hepatitis (DIAIH) refers to the liver injury mediated by drug-induced autoimmune reaction. Since it has similar clinical features as idiopathic autoimmune hepatitis, it is often difficult to make differential diagnosis in clinical practice. A deep understanding of the development, pathogenesis, related drugs, risk factors, and clinical and histological features of DIAIH helps with the correct diagnosis and treatment of DIAIH.

  14. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M; Petroff, Brian K; Petroff, Margaret G

    2014-01-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in association with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune adrenal disease, and takes a toll on both society and individual health. Studies in mice have revealed at least two mechanisms that protect the ovary from autoimmune attack. These mechanisms include control of autoreactive T cells by thymus-derived regulatory T cells, as well as a role for the autoimmune regulator (AIRE), a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of tissue-restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells during development of T cells. Although the latter mechanism is incompletely defined, it is well established that failure of either results in autoimmune-mediated targeting and depletion of ovarian follicles. In this review, we will address the clinical features and consequences of autoimmune-mediated ovarian infertility in women, as well as the possible mechanisms of disease as revealed by animal models. PMID:25327908

  15. Autoimmune thyroid disease in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Robazzi, Teresa Cristina Martins Vicente; Adan, Luis Fernando Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently described in patients with rheumatologic autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma. Limited data are available regarding the prevalence and clinical characteristics of autoimmune thyroiditis in other rheumatologic disorders, such as rheumatic fever and juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus. The authors review the association of endocrine autoimmune and rheumatic autoimmune diseases, assessing various age groups and clinical conditions. The bibliographic survey was conducted through the search for scientific articles indexed in the general health sciences databases, such as Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Medline/PubMed, and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO). The following descriptors were used: "rheumatic autoimmune diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases"; "thyroid disorders and rheumatic diseases"; "thyroiditis and rheumatic diseases"; "autoimmune diseases and thyroid"; and "pediatric rheumatic diseases and autoimmune thyroid diseases". This study showed that, despite contradictory results in the literature, there is a greater prevalence of the association between autoimmune thyroid diseases and rheumatic diseases, highlighting the possibility of common pathogenic mechanisms among them.

  16. Autoimmune vitiligo in rheumatic disease in the mestizo Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Avalos-Díaz, Esperanza; Pérez-Pérez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Mayra; Pacheco-Tovar, María-Guadalupe; Herrera-Esparza, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    Vitiligo is a chronic disease characterized by the dysfunction or destruction of melanocytes with secondary depigmentation. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of vitiligo associated with autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The clinical records from a 10-year database of patients with rheumatic diseases and associated vitiligo was analysed, with one group of patients having autoimmune rheumatic disease and another non-autoimmune rheumatic disease. Available serum samples were used to assess the anti-melanocyte antibodies. A total of 5,251 individual clinical files were archived in the last 10 years, and these patients underwent multiple rheumatology consultations, with 0.3% of the group presenting with vitiligo. The prevalence of vitiligo in the autoimmune rheumatic disease group was 0.672%, which was mainly associated with lupus and arthritis. However, patients with more than one autoimmune disease had an increased relative risk to develop vitiligo, and anti-melanocyte antibodies were positive in 92% of these patients. By contrast, the prevalence was 0.082% in the group that lacked autoimmune rheumatic disease and had negative autoantibodies. In conclusion, the association between vitiligo and autoimmune rheumatic diseases was relatively low. However, the relative risk increased when there were other autoimmune comorbidities, such as thyroiditis or celiac disease. Therefore, the presence of multiple autoimmune syndromes should be suspected.

  17. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models.

    PubMed

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M; Petroff, Brian K; Petroff, Margaret G

    2014-11-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in association with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune adrenal disease, and takes a toll on both society and individual health. Studies in mice have revealed at least two mechanisms that protect the ovary from autoimmune attack. These mechanisms include control of autoreactive T cells by thymus-derived regulatory T cells, as well as a role for the autoimmune regulator (AIRE), a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of tissue-restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells during development of T cells. Although the latter mechanism is incompletely defined, it is well established that failure of either results in autoimmune-mediated targeting and depletion of ovarian follicles. In this review, we will address the clinical features and consequences of autoimmune-mediated ovarian infertility in women, as well as the possible mechanisms of disease as revealed by animal models.

  18. Autoimmune effector memory T cells: the bad and the good

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Chen, Zhibin

    2014-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of adaptive immunity, a defense mechanism endowed to vertebrates during evolution. However, an autoimmune pathogenic role of memory lymphocytes is also emerging with accumulating evidence, despite reasonable skepticism on their existence in a chronic setting of autoimmune damage. It is conceivable that autoimmune memory would be particularly harmful since memory cells would constantly “remember” and attack the body's healthy tissues. It is even more detrimental given the resistance of memory T cells to immunomodulatory therapies. In this review, we focus on self-antigen-reactive CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, surveying the evidence for the role of the TEM compartment in autoimmune pathogenesis. We will also discuss the role of TEM cells in chronic and acute infectious disease settings and how they compare to their counterparts in autoimmune diseases. With their long-lasting potency, the autoimmune TEM cells could also play a critical role in anti-tumor immunity, which may be largely based on their reactivity to self-antigens. Therefore, although autoimmune TEM cells are “bad” due to their role in relentless perpetration of tissue damage in autoimmune disease settings, they are unlikely a by-product of industrial development along the modern surge of autoimmune disease prevalence. Rather, they may be a product of evolution for their “good” in clearing damaged host cells in chronic infections and malignant cells in cancer settings. PMID:24203440

  19. Primary biliary cholangitis associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Moreno, Emmanuel I; Martinez-Cabriales, Sylvia A; Cruz-Moreno, Miguel A; Borjas-Almaguer, Omar D; Cortez-Hernandez, Carlos A; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco J; Garza, Aldo A; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Jose A; Garcia-Compean, Diego; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Maldonado-Garza, Hector J

    2016-02-01

    There are many autoimmune diseases associated with primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), known as primary biliary cirrhosis; however, the association between PBC and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) has rarely been reported. It is documented that hemolysis is present in over 50% of the patients with chronic liver disease, regardless of the etiologies. Due to the clear and frequent relationship between PBC and many autoimmune diseases, it is reasonable to suppose that wAIHA may be another autoimmune disorder seen in association with PBC. Here we reported a 53-year-old female patient diagnosed with wAIHA associated with PBC.

  20. Fli-1, a Functional Factor Performed in Autoimmune Lupus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease. The friend leukemia insertion site 1 (Fli-1) belongs to the Ets family of transcription factors. Recent findings suggested that expression of Fli-1 was abnormal in SLE patients and lupus mice. In addition, functional analysis indicated that Fli-1 plays a key role in the development of this complex autoimmune disorder. Here, we review the updated evidence indicating the roles of Fli-1 in autoimmune lupus. Hopefully, the information obtained may result in a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the systemic autoimmune disease.

  1. Somatic FAS mutations are common in patients with genetically undefined autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, Kennichi C; Niemela, Julie E; Price, Susan; Davis, Joie; Hornung, Ronald L; Oliveira, João Bosco; Puck, Jennifer M; Jaffe, Elaine S; Pittaluga, Stefania; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Fleisher, Thomas A; Rao, V Koneti

    2010-06-24

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is characterized by childhood onset of lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, autoimmune cytopenias, elevated numbers of double-negative T (DNT) cells, and increased risk of lymphoma. Most cases of ALPS are associated with germline mutations of the FAS gene (type Ia), whereas some cases have been noted to have a somatic mutation of FAS primarily in their DNT cells. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with somatic FAS mutations among a group of our ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and to further characterize them. We found more than one-third (12 of 31) of the patients tested had somatic FAS mutations, primarily involving the intracellular domain of FAS resulting in loss of normal FAS signaling. Similar to ALPS type Ia patients, the somatic ALPS patients had increased DNT cell numbers and elevated levels of serum vitamin B(12), interleukin-10, and sFAS-L. These data support testing for somatic FAS mutations in DNT cells from ALPS patients with no detectable germline mutation and a similar clinical and laboratory phenotype to that of ALPS type Ia. These findings also highlight the potential role for somatic mutations in the pathogenesis of nonmalignant and/or autoimmune hematologic conditions in adults and children.

  2. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) in experimental autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Guazzone, Vanesa A; Rival, Claudia; Denduchis, Berta; Lustig, Livia

    2003-12-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is characterized by an interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrate and a severe lesion of seminiferous tubules with germ cells that undergo apoptosis and sloughing. The mechanism by which immune cells migrate and extravasate in the testicular interstitium is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to detect the variations in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and its receptor in the testis of rats undergoing autoimmune orchitis. EAO was induced in Sprague-Dawley adult rats by active immunization with an emulsion of testicular homogenate and complete Freund adjuvant using Bordetella pertussis as co-adjuvant. Control rats injected with saline and adjuvants and normal untreated rats were also studied. By ELISA we observed a significant increase of MCP-1 in the testicular fluid (TF) and in the conditioned medium obtained from cultures of testicular macrophages of rats with EAO compared with control groups. By immunohistochemistry, an increase in MCP-1 expression was observed in mononuclear, endothelial, Leydig and peritubular cells. MCP-1 immunoreactivity was also detected in Sertoli cell cytoplasm of rats with severe orchitis. A 2-fold increase in the number of mononuclear cells that express CCR2 was also found in rats with orchitis compared with controls. In conclusion, we demonstrated in vivo that MCP-1 is highly expressed in testicular interstitial cells suggesting that this chemokine has an important role in recruiting immune cells to the testis in rats undergoing autoimmune orchitis.

  3. Current multiple sclerosis treatments have improved our understanding of MS autoimmune pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roland; Sospedra, Mireia; Rosito, Maria; Engelhardt, Britta

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in young adults. When MS is not treated, it leads to irreversible and severe disability. The etiology of MS and its pathogenesis are not fully understood. The recent discovery that MS-associated genetic variants code for molecules related to the function of specific immune cell subsets is consistent with the concept of MS as a prototypic, T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease targeting the CNS. While the therapeutic efficacy of the currently available immunomodulatory therapies further strengthen this concept, differences observed in responses to MS treatment as well as additional clinical and imaging observations have also shown that the autoimmune pathogenesis underlying MS is much more complex than previously thought. There is therefore an unmet need for continued detailed phenotypic and functional analysis of disease-relevant adaptive immune cells and tissues directly derived from MS patients to unravel the immune etiology of MS in its entire complexity. In this review, we will discuss the currently available MS treatment options and approved drugs, including how they have contributed to the understanding of the immune pathology of this autoimmune disease.

  4. Viral connection between drug rashes and autoimmune diseases: how autoimmune responses are generated after resolution of drug rashes.

    PubMed

    Aota, Noriko; Shiohara, Tetsuo

    2009-05-01

    Viral infections are most likely triggering factors of autoimmune diseases, although a single vial infection is not sufficient to cause clinically evident autoimmune diseases. Any disease that profoundly alters the immune system may cause perturbed viral infections, thereby rendering otherwise refractory patients susceptible to autoimmune diseases. In this regard, drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), a drug rash characterized by sequential reactivations of herpesviruses and the subsequent development of autoimmune diseases, offers a unique opportunity to investigate the mechanism of how autoimmunity is elicited after viral infections. Indeed, several autoimmune diseases have been reported to occur at intervals of several months to years after clinical resolution of DIHS. Two representative cases who developed autoimmune diseases three to four years after DIHS are shown. Our recent analyses of the kinetics of a developing disease have shown that fully functional FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are expanded at the acute stage thereby allowing viral reactivations but lose their suppressive function coincident with their contraction upon clinical resolution. The functional defect of Treg cells would be responsible for the subsequent development of autoimmune diseases. Patients with DIHS need close monitoring because of possible progression to autoimmune diseases even after the complete resolution.

  5. Familial Aggregation and Segregation Analysis in Families Presenting Autoimmunity, Polyautoimmunity, and Multiple Autoimmune Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castiblanco, John; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Mantilla, Ruben Dario; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Studies documenting increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases (ADs) have shown that these conditions share several immunogenetic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology). This report explored familial aggregation and segregation of AD, polyautoimmunity, and multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) in 210 families. Familial aggregation was examined for first-degree relatives. Segregation analysis was implemented as in S.A.G.E. release 6.3. Data showed differences between late- and early-onset families regarding their age, age of onset, and sex. Familial aggregation of AD in late- and early-onset families was observed. For polyautoimmunity as a trait, only aggregation was observed between sibling pairs in late-onset families. No aggregation was observed for MAS. Segregation analyses for AD suggested major gene(s) with no clear discernible classical known Mendelian transmission in late-onset families, while for polyautoimmunity and MAS no model was implied. Data suggest that polyautoimmunity and MAS are not independent traits and that gender, age, and age of onset are interrelated factors influencing autoimmunity. PMID:26697508

  6. Are individuals with an autoimmune disease at higher risk of a second autoimmune disorder?

    PubMed

    Somers, Emily C; Thomas, Sara L; Smeeth, Liam; Hall, Andrew J

    2009-03-15

    Limited evidence suggests that autoimmune diseases tend to co-occur, although data are needed to determine whether individuals with an existing autoimmune disorder are at increased risk of a second disorder. The authors conducted a series of population-based cohort studies, utilizing the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database, to assess intraindividual risks of coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT), multiple sclerosis (MS), and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) during 1990-1999. Sex-specific age- and calendar-period standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for development of a second autoimmune disease among index populations including 22,888 RA, 26,198 AIT, 4,332 MS, and 6,170 IDDM patients compared with the general population. Among those with IDDM, adjusted AIT rates were higher than expected for both males (SIR = 646.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 466, 873) and females (SIR = 409.6, 95% CI: 343, 485), as were RA rates for females (SIR = 181.6, 95% CI: 136, 238). Coexistence of AIT and RA was also shown for either disease sequence (sex-specific SIRs = 130.4-162.0). However, point estimates suggested an inverse relation between RA and MS, irrespective of diagnostic sequence. This study demonstrates coexistence of RA, AIT, and IDDM at higher than expected rates but reduced comorbidity between RA and MS.

  7. Myasthenia Gravis: paradox versus paradigm in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Berrih-Aknin, Sonia

    2014-08-01

    Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a paradigm of organ-specific autoimmune disease (AID). It is mediated by antibodies that target the neuromuscular junction. The purpose of this review is to place MG in the general context of autoimmunity, to summarize the common mechanisms between MG and other AIDs, and to describe the specific mechanisms of MG. We have chosen the most common organ-specific AIDs to compare with MG: type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), multiple sclerosis (MS), some systemic AIDs (systemic lupus erythematous (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Sjogren's syndrome (SS)), as well as inflammatory diseases of the gut and liver (celiac disease (CeD), Crohn's disease (CD), and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC)). Several features are similar between all AIDs, suggesting that common pathogenic mechanisms lead to their development. In this review, we address the predisposing factors (genetic, epigenetic, hormones, vitamin D, microbiota), the triggering components (infections, drugs) and their interactions with the immune system [1,2]. The dysregulation of the immune system is detailed and includes the role of B cells, Treg cells, Th17 and cytokines. We particularly focused on the role of TNF-α and interferon type I whose role in MG is very analogous to that in several other AIDS. The implication of AIRE, a key factor in central tolerance is also discussed. Finally, if MG is a prototype of AIDS, it has a clear specificity compared to the other AIDS, by the fact that the target organ, the muscle, is not the site of immune infiltration and B cell expansion, but exclusively that of antibody-mediated pathogenic mechanisms. By contrast, the thymus in the early onset subtype frequently undergoes tissue remodeling, resulting in the development of ectopic germinal centers surrounded by high endothelial venules (HEV), as observed in the target organs of many other AIDs.

  8. Autoimmune prostatitis: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Motrich, R D; Maccioni, M; Riera, C M; Rivero, V E

    2007-01-01

    The prostate is one of the main male sex accessory glands and the target of many pathological conditions affecting men of all ages. Pathological conditions of the prostate gland range from infections, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) of a still unknown aetiology to benign hyperplasia and cancer. CP/CPPS is one of the most prevalent diseases in the urologic clinic and affects men younger than 50 years old. A significant advance in the understanding of CP/CPPS was made when an autoimmune response against prostate antigens was revealed in a considerable number of patients. During the last 30 years, extensive work has been done regarding the development and characterization of different rodent models of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP). It has been demonstrated that tolerance to prostate antigens can be disrupted in some strains of rats and mice and cellular and humoral responses to prostate antigens are elicited. A Th1 pattern has been described and the cellular response seems to be the major pathogenic mechanism involved. Immune cells infiltrate the gland and induce prostate lesions. The genetic background and hormonal imbalance are factors that could contribute to the onset of the disease in susceptible young males. Moreover, spontaneous autoimmune prostatitis could also occur with advanced age in susceptible strains. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding rodent models of EAP and the immunological alterations present in CP/CPPS patients. We also discuss the reliability of these experimental approaches as genuine tools for the study of human disease.

  9. Stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gratwohl, A; Passweg, J; Gerber, I; Tyndall, A

    2001-12-01

    Much progress has been made in the field of haemopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) for severe autoimmune disorders. Theoretical considerations, animal data and anecdotal evidence suggested some time ago that intensive immunoablation followed by autologous HSCT could restore normal immune reactivity in patients with severe autoimmune disorders. Based on a concept statement issued in 1995, two European societies, the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) began collecting phase I/II trial data in an international collaborative network. Sufficient information from more than 350 patients allows a preliminary assessment with level three evidence. Autologous HSCTs can induce remissions in all disease categories tested so far. Remissions can be transient or durable. HSCTs are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) is near 10% at 1 year and is associated with the intensity of the conditioning and the stage of the disease at the time of transplant. Marked interdisease differences exist. There are few data available in haematological autoimmune diseases, more in systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Patient selection has been recognized as a crucial element from the phase I-II trials. Patients with advanced disease, severely compromised organ function or irreversible organ damage should not be considered as candidates for HSCT. Prospective randomized studies should now determine the value of HSCT compared to standard therapy. Such trials are ongoing for patients with systemic sclerosis (ASTIS trial--Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation International Scleroderma Trial) or are planned for patients with multiple sclerosis (ASTIMS trial--Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation International Multiple Sclerosis Trial) and rheumatoid arthritis (ASTIRA trial--Autologous Stem

  10. Is Grover's disease an autoimmune dermatosis?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Courtney; Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Marchenko, Steve; Chernyavsky, Alex I; Galitovskiy, Valentin; Gindi, Vivian; Chun, Sookhee; Paslin, David; Grando, Sergei A

    2013-12-01

    Grover's disease (GD) is a transient or persistent, monomorphous, papulovesicular, asymptomatic or pruritic eruption classified as non-familial acantholytic disorder. Contribution of autoimmune mechanisms to GD pathogenesis remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate antibody-mediated autoimmunity in 11 patients with GD, 4 of which were positive for IgA and/or IgG antikeratinocyte antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. We used the most sensitive proteomic technique for an unbiased analysis of IgA- and IgG-autoantibody reactivities. Multiplex analysis of autoantibody responses revealed autoreactivity of all 11 GD patients with cellular proteins involved in the signal transduction events regulating cell development, activation, growth, death, adhesion and motility. Semiquantitative fluorescence analysis of cultured keratinocytes pretreated with sera from each patient demonstrated decreased intensity of staining for desmoglein 1 and/or 3 and PCNA, whereas 4 of 10 GD sera induced BAD expression, indicating that binding of autoantibodies to keratinocytes alters expression/function of their adhesion molecules and activates apoptosis. We also tested the ability of GD sera to induce visible alterations of keratinocyte shape and motility in vitro but found no specific changes. Thus, our results demonstrated that humoral autoimmunity in GD can be mediated by both IgA and IgG autoantibodies. At this point, however, it is impossible to conclude whether these autoantibodies cause or are caused by the disease. Antidesmoglein antibodies may be triggered by exposure to immune system of sequestered antigens due to disintegration of desmosomes during primary acantholysis. Clarifying aetiology of GD will help improve treatment, which currently is symptomatic and of marginal effectiveness.

  11. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rozin, Alexander P.; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CYC), cyclosporine (CyA) 100mg/day, IVIG 125G, ciprofloxacin+IV Iloprost+enoxaparin+aspirin (AAVAA), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HO), maggot debridement and autologous skin transplantation were performed and the LLU healed. Case 2. A 45-year old women with MCTD developed multiple LLU’s with non-specific inflammation by biopsy. MethP, PR, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azathioprine (AZA), CYC, IVIG, AAVAA failed. Treatment for underlying the LLU tibial osteomyelitis and addition of CyA was followed by the LLU healing. Case 3. A 20-year-old man with history of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) developed painful LLU’s due to small vessel vasculitis (biopsy). MethP, PR 1 mg/kg, CYC, CyA 100 mg/d, AAVAA failed. MRSA sepsis and relapse of systemic PAN developed. IV vancomycin, followed by ciprofloxacin, monthly IVIG (150 g/for 5 days) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) were instituted and the LLU’s healed. Conclusions LLU are extremely resistant to therapy. Combined use of multiple medications and services are needed for healing of LLU due to autoimmune diseases. PMID:21169912

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis in Japan: overview and perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimosegawa, Tooru; Kanno, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Since the rediscovery and definition of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) by Yoshida et al. in 1995, the disease has been attracting attention because of its unique clinical features and practical issues. This disease shows very impressive imaging findings, serological changes, and characteristic histopathology. It occurs most commonly in elderly males with painless jaundice or mild abdominal pain; resemblance in imaging findings between AIP and pancreatobiliary cancers poses an important practical issue of differentiation. With increasing recognition of AIP and accumulation of cases, another important feature of this disease has been revealed, i.e., association of extrapancreatic organ involvements. Initially misunderstood because it can be accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, such as Sjögren's syndrome or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), AIP is now known to be associated with unique types of sialadenitis and cholangitis distinct from Sjögren's syndrome or PSC. Now the concept of "IgG4-related sclerosing disease" has become widely accepted and the list of organs involved continues to increase. With worldwide recognition, an emerging issue is the clinical definition of other possible types of autoimmune-related pancreatitis called "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis (IDCP)" and "AIP with granulocyte epithelial lesion (GEL)" and their relation to AIP with lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP). The time has arrived to establish clinical diagnostic criteria of AIP based on international consensus and to discuss regional and racial differences in the clinicopathological features of AIP. Consensus guidelines are also required for the ideal use of steroids in the treatment of AIP to suppress recurrence efficiently with minimal side effects. There are many issues to be settled in AIP; international collaboration of experts in the pancreas field is necessary to clarify the entire picture of this unique and important disease.

  13. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guaraldi, Federica; Grottoli, Silvia; Arvat, Emanuela; Ghigo, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A). The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data. PMID:26239463

  14. Faulty ECM signaling facilitates autoimmune lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Brekken, Rolf A

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the microenvironment of solid tumors is appreciated although not completely understood; however, the contribution of the ECM to the development of hematopoietic tumors has not been investigated in depth. A new study by Sangaletti and colleagues demonstrates that faulty ECM signaling can facilitate malignant lymphoproliferation in mice predisposed to autoimmunity. Similar changes in ECM construction, consistent with a loss of inhibitory ECM signaling, were identified in the transition from reactive lymphoid hyperplasia to malignant chronic lymphocytic leukemia in patients. These results reveal a critical contribution of reduced collagen signaling in lymphoma and highlight the importance of appropriate ECM construction for maintenance of tissue homeostasis.

  15. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia associated with mesenteric teratoma].

    PubMed

    Ntanishyan, K I; Sabirov, K R; Shcherbakova, O V; Vybornykh, D E; Shupletsova, I A; Tsvetaeva, N V

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes a case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in a 27-year-old woman whose examination revealed mesenteric teratoma. AIHA was characterized by a hypertensive crisis and a temporary response to corticosteroid therapy that was complicated by the development of somatogenic psychosis and discontinued. A relapse of hemolysis developed 6 months later. The patient underwent laparoscopic splenectomy and removal of mesenteric root teratoma. Immediately after surgery, a hematological response was obtained as relief of hemolysis and restoration of a normal hemoglobin level. There is a sustained remission of AIHA for the next 16 months.

  16. Autoimmune neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Faber, Ingrid; Nucci, Anamarli; Appenzeller, Simone; França, Marcondes C

    2017-04-01

    Systemic manifestations are frequent in autoimmune rheumatic diseases and include peripheral nervous system damage. Neuron cell body, axons and myelin sheath may all be affected in this context. This involvement results in severe and sometimes disabling symptoms. Sensory, motor and autonomic features may be present in different patterns that emerge as peculiar clinical pictures. Prompt recognition of these neuropathies is pivotal to guide treatment and reduce the risks of long term disability. In this review, we aim to describe the main immune-mediated neuropathies associated to rheumatic diseases: sensory neuronopathies, multiple mononeuropathies and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, with an emphasis on clinical features and therapeutic options.

  17. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  18. Treating prolactinoma can prevent autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Watad, Abdulla; Versini, Mathilde; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Amital, Howard; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-04-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a pleiotropic hormone; in addition to a wide variety of endocrine effects, PRL also exhibits immunostimulating effects. Therefore, there is increasing evidence linking PRL with a large number of systemic and organ specific autoimmune diseases. Herein, we report the case of an adolescent girl diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) occurring in the context of untreated prolactinoma evolving since childhood. This raises the exciting question of the involvement of PRL in the pathogenesis of MS. It is likely that early treatment of hyperprolactinemia in this case would have significantly reduced the risk of developing MS or even prevented its occurrence.

  19. Tolerance and autoimmunity to erythroid differentiation (B-G) major histocompatibility complex alloantigens of the chicken

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hematopoietic chimeras were produced at four different stages of ontogeny between two allogeneic strains of chickens. All chimeras produced by parabiosis at day 12 of embryogenesis and the majority (83%) of the ones produced at day 15 by intravenous injection of allogeneic stem cells remained healthy, chimeric, and specifically tolerant at both the humoral and cell-mediated level throughout a long examination period. Chimeras generated at day 17 of embryogenesis demonstrated specific unresponsiveness at the cell-mediated level but produced specific anti-donor alloantibodies directed against erythrocyte-associated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (B-G) antigens. These chimeras and a minority (17%) of the chimeras generated at day 15 of embryogenesis developed severe antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia after the 5th mo of age and succumbed to massive bursal lymphomas and metastases by the 10th mo of age. The immunological and pathological characteristics of these birds appear to reflect an autoimmune state rather than one of tolerance. Erythroid chimeras generated at day 21 of ontogenic development displayed normal levels of GVH reactivity. These birds were eventually able to eliminate the chimeric state and remained healthy until deliberately killed. These results show that there is a critical period in embryogenesis during which the induction of allogeneic erythrocytic chimerism leads to the development, in adult life, of severe autoimmune anemia, B cell lymphomas, and death. B-G MHC antigens are erythroid differentiation antigens of the chicken. Polymorphic determinants on B-G antigens appear to be important cross-reactive determinants (with environmental bacteria), against which a high background immunity exists. Evidence is presented that the immune response to B-G antigens is responsible for the development of autoimmunity and other pathological events that follow and that tolerance to class I MHC antigens (B-F antigens) shared by lymphocytes

  20. Joint effects between five identified risk variants, allergy, and autoimmune conditions on glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Rajaraman, Preetha; Hartge, Patricia; Yeager, Meredith; Linet, Martha; Butler, Mary Ann; Ruder,