Science.gov

Sample records for adult bald eagles

  1. DDE poisoning in an adult bald eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcelon, D.K.; Thomas, N.J.

    1997-01-01

    A 12-year-old female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was found in May 1993 on Santa Catalina Island, California (USA), in a debilitated condition, exhibiting ataxia and tremors; it died within hours. On necropsy, the bird was emaciated but had no evidence of disease or physical injury. Chemical analyses were negative for organophosphorus pesticides and lead poisoning. High concentrations of DDE (wet weight basis) were found in the brain (212 ppm), liver (838 ppm), and serum (53 ppm). Mobilization of DDE, from depleted fat deposits, probably resulted in the lethal concentration in the eagle's brain.

  2. High rates of nonbreeding adult bald eagles in southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.J.; Hodges, J.I. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Present knowledge of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) demography is derived primarily from populations in environments that have been drastically altered by man. Most reproductive studies were done in the 1960's and 1970's when chemical toxins were inhibiting bald eagle productivity. Earlier, the removal of old-growth forests and decimation of anadromous fish runs by Euro-Americans may have greatly reduced bald eagle abundance from presettlement levels. Historical trends in this species are of interest because fundamental differences may exist between populations in pristine and man-altered environments. One difference may be breeding rate. Surpluses of nonbreeding adult bald eagles during the nesting season are rarely mentioned in the literature. Most surveys of reproductive success focus exclusively on eagles at nest sites, which assumes nearly all adults attempt to breed each year. The authors report that a majority of adults in the relatively pristine habitats of southeastern Alaska do not breed annually. This finding is important because if surpluses of non-breeding adults are a natural feature of the population, then hypotheses on density dependent population regulation and the evolution of delayed maturation are suggested. If, on the other hand, the abundance of nonbreeders is an artifact of recent environmental perturbations, serious population declines may occur in southeastern Alaska.

  3. Migration of Florida sub-adult Bald Eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mojica, E.K.; Meyers, J.M.; Millsap, B.A.; Haley, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    We used satellite telemetry locations accurate within 1 km to identify migration routes and stopover sites of 54 migratory sub-adult Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) hatched in Florida from 1997 to 2001. We measured number of days traveled during migration, path of migration, stopover time and locations, and distance traveled to and from winter and summer areas for each eagle (1?5 years old). Eagles used both Coastal Plain (n = 24) and Appalachian Mountain (n = 26) routes on their first migration north. Mountain migrants traveled farther (X = 2,112 km; 95% CI: 1,815-2,410) than coastal migrants (X = 1,397 km; 95% CI: 1,087?1,706). Eagles changed between migration routes less often on northbound and southbound movements as they matured (X2 = 13.22, df = 2, P < 0.001). One-year-old eagles changed routes between yearly spring and fall migrations 57% of the time, 2-year-olds 30%, and 3-5-year-olds changed only 17% of the time. About half (n = 25, 46%) used stopovers during migration and stayed 6-31 days (X = 14.8 days; 95% CI: 12.8-16.8). We recommend that migratory stopover site locations be added to GIS data bases for improving conservation of Bald Eagles in the eastern United States.

  4. Bald eagle and osprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Anthony, R.G.; Pendleton, Beth Giron

    1989-01-01

    Bald eagles nested in all nine western states during recent years (about 19% of known U.S. population in 1982). The known numbers of nesting pairs in the west increased substantially in the last 10 years and totaled 584 in 1986. Much of the increase was due to more intensive survey efforts, but most biologists cite examples of new palrs establishing nesting territories. In contrast, productivity was relatively stable at 0.9 young produced per occupied territory with small annual fluctuations, a level slightly below the requirement for delisting (1.0 young per occupied territory) by the Pacific States Bald Eagle Recovery Plan. About 4,500 to 6,000 (minimum estimate) bald eagles winter throughout the western United States, which is about 50% of the surveyed population in the contiguous 48 states. Osprey range expansion and population increases have been documented in the West since 1981, when the population was estimated at 1,472 palrs (i.e., about 18% of the U.S. population). Monitoring efforts in the 1980s were not as intensive for ospreys as for bald eagles, but productivity was usually at the upper end of 0.95 to 13 young per occupied territory (a rate generally believed adequate for population stability). Although bald eagle and osprey nesting populations and productivity show cause for optimism, organochlorine contaminants remain a problem in a few individual birds and in some localized areas (e.g., lower Columbia River). DDE residues high enough to reduce productivity have been documented in eggs of both species during the 1980s. In addition, the bald eagle, which also forages on sick or dead prey, has been exposed to lead shot and the organophosphorus insecticide famphur. These contaminants have killed numbers of them in the West in recent years. Nesting ospreys appear more tolerant than nesting bald eagles of man and his disturbance; thus, more restrictions are required at bald eagle nest sites. Furthermore, bald eagles winter within the United States and

  5. Migration, home range, and important use areas of Florida sub-adult bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mojica, E.K.

    2006-01-01

    Long distance movements of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have prevented a thorough documentation of their migration when monitored with traditional methods of banding and radio telemetry. I used satellite telemetry to determine diurnal and nocturnal important use areas (IUAs), migration routes, stopover sites, and home ranges of 69 migratory and non-migratory Florida sub-adult Bald Eagles. I located 151 daytime IUAs in 20 states and provinces, and 50 nocturnal roosts in 8 states and provinces. There was no difference in coarse home range size of migratory eagles between sexes in winter or summer (2-way ANOVA sex x season). Coarse home ranges were larger in winter ( x = 25,218 km2, 95% CI: 13,015 ? 37,421) than summer ( x = 6,166 km2, 95% CI: 2,696 ? 9,637; F1,64 = 4.03, P = 0.01). Eagles made equal use of Coastal Plain (n = 24) and Appalachian Mountain (n = 26) migratory routes during the first migration north. I recommend conserving nocturnal roosts and undeveloped shoreline forest within IUAs for sustained recruitment of Florida Bald Eagles.

  6. Provisioning rates and time budgets of adult and nestling Bald Eagles at Inland Wisconsin nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, Warnke D.; Andersen, D.E.; Dykstra, C.R.; Meyer, M.W.; Karasov, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    We used a remote video recording system and direct observation to quantify provisioning rate and adult and nestling behavior at Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests in north-central Wisconsin in 1992 (N = 5) and 1993 (N = 8). Eagles nesting in this region have a high reproductive rate (??? 1.3 young/occupied territory), and the number of occupied territories has expanded nearly three-fold since 1980. The season-long provisioning rate averaged 5.2 prey deliveries/nest/d and 3.0 prey deliveries/nestling/d, and did not vary by year or with nestling number or age. Fish (Osteichthyes) made up 97% of identified prey deliveries followed by reptiles (Reptilia) (1.5%), birds (Aves) (1.2%), and mammals (Mammalia) (0.6%). Nearly 85% of prey items were >15 cm and 90% of the day and was negatively correlated with nestling age. Time adults spent feeding nestlings was negatively correlated with nestling age. Nestlings stood or sat in the nest >30% of the day, began to feed themselves, and exhibited increased mobility in the nest at 6-8 wk. We identified three stages of the nestling period and several benchmarks that may be useful when scheduling data collection for comparison of Bald Eagle nesting behavior. Our results support the hypothesis that food was not limiting this breeding population of Bald Eagles. ?? 2002 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  7. Southern Bald Eagles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This is one in a series of remarkable photos documenting the daily lives of two of KSC's most famous residents: The Southern Bald Eagles which inhabit an enormous nest on the Kennedy Parkway North. Each fall, the eagles take up winter residence in the nest to breed and raise a new generation. Thanks to a remote-controlled Nikon camera installed yearly in the same pine tree as the nest, the activities of these magnificent birds are recorded on film. This year, a rare and unique event was captured by the camera when a second clutch of eggs was laid, even though a healthy eaglet was born a month earlier. Although it is impossible to determine if it is the same eagles returning each year, the continued tolerance shown by this pair to the human presence seems to indicate that they are the same couple. According to wildlife experts, eight to nine pairs of bald eagles inhabit nests at KSC. The nest on Kennedy Parkway North is particularly well-known because of its huge size and close proximity to a busy road.

  8. Bald eagle predation on common loon egg

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeStefano, Stephen; McCarthy, Kyle P.; Laskowski, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The Common Loon (Gavia immer) must defend against many potential egg predators during incubation, including corvids, Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus), raccoons (Procyon lotor), striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), fisher (Martes pennanti), and mink (Neovison vison) (McIntyre 1988, Evers 2004, McCann et al. 2005). Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have been documented as predators of both adult Common Loons and their chicks (Vliestra and Paruk 1997, Paruk et al. 1999, Erlandson et al. 2007, Piper et al. 2008). In Wisconsin, where nesting Bald Eagles are abundant (>1200 nesting pairs, >1 young/pair/year), field biologists observed four instances of eagle predation of eggs in loon nests during the period 2002–2004 (M. Meyer pers. comm.). In addition, four cases of eagle predation of incubating adult loons were inferred from evidence found at the loon nest (dozens of plucked adult loon feathers, no carcass remains) and/or loon leg, neck, and skull bones beneath two active eagle nests, including leg bones containing the bands of the nearby (<25 m) incubating adult loon. However, although loon egg predation has been associated with Bald Eagles, predation events have yet to be described in peer-reviewed literature. Here we describe a photographic observation of predation on a Common Loon egg by an immature Bald Eagle as captured by a nest surveillance video camera on Lake Umbagog, a large lake (32 km2) at Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge (UNWR) in Maine.

  9. Flash electroretinography in the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Sonia E; Hendrix, Diane V H; Sims, Michael H; Ward, Daniel A; Jones, Michael P; Baine, Katherine H

    2014-09-01

    Photopic and scotopic flash electroretinograms (fERGs) were done on 12 adult captive anesthetized bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) following a complete ophthalmic exam. The b-wave amplitude in the bald eagle exceeds that seen in other species when using a similar protocol. This data may be used clinically as a reference for bald eagles undergoing fERG evaluation for retinal disease or as a preoperative screening tool before phacoemulsification.

  10. Bald and Golden Eagles of the SRP. (Annual report, 1986)

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J.J.; Hoppe, R.T.; Kennamer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Both Bald and Golden Eagles have a prior history of occurrence on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Sightings of Bald Eagles have been uncommon but persistent, while Golden Eagle sightings have been rare. A one-year survey was conducted to assess the use of the SRP by these two species. Thirty-six Bald Eagles were seen during the study period. No Golden Eagles were observed. Over 90% of the Bald Eagle sightings were on Par Pond; three out of four of these birds were adults. Thirteen percent of the sightings were of paired birds, and the remainder were of solitary individuals. Bald Eagles were observed during every month of the survey. The majority were seen between November and May. Sightings were evenly divided between morning and afternoon hours. Two marked Bald Eagles were observed. Since the conclusion of this study, twenty-two Bald Eagles have been reported. Six were new locality records for the SRP. Four of these sightings were on L-Lake. Bald Eagle use of the SRP is higher than was previously thought; Golden Eagle use remains rare.

  11. Famphur toxicosis in a bald eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Kolbe, E.J.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    On 24 November 1983, an adult female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus L.) was found unable to fly near Lewes, Del-aware. She was kept overnight by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service personnel at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge and transported to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, the following afternoon.

  12. Bald Eagles at Bay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laycock, George

    1974-01-01

    Describes the process of transplanting eggs from one nest to another in an attempt to aid in the strengthening of the eagle population. Discusses pressures exerted on eagles by hunting, trapping and pesticides. (SLH)

  13. Breeding bald eagles in captivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maestrelli, J.R.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1975-01-01

    A 7-year-old female Bald Eagle from Alabama was paired with a 4-year-old Alaskan male in a large flight pen during December 1969. Both birds were free of physical defects when originally placed in the pen but the female was blind in one eye prior to the 1973 breeding season.....Nesting first occurred during 1971 when at least two eggs were laid; all but one, which showed no sign of embryonic development after being incubated for 56 days, were broken by the adult birds. Two of three eggs laid in 1972 hatched. Both young died a few days after hatching following a period of inclement weather. Three eggs were laid and hatched during 1973. Antagonism between the nestlings was observed soon after hatching and may have been responsible for the unobserved death of one nestling, two days after the third young hatched. The two remaining young were raised by the adult birds and eventually left the nest 85 days after the first egg hatched. Incubation periods for the 1972-73 clutches averaged 35 days. No renesting attempts were made by the eagles during the 3.year period.

  14. A bald eagle at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    High in a pine tree on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, a bald eagle perches on a branch. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  15. A bald eagle at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A bald eagle joins two vultures at the site of an undetermined carcass on the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  16. A bald eagle at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, a bald eagle takes wing away from two vultures at the site of an undetermined carcass. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  17. Agonistic asymmetries and the foraging ecology of Bald Eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Richard L.; Skagen, Susan Knight

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the effects of both asymmetries and differing food levels on contest outcomes of wintering Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) feeding on chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) carcasses. Large eagles, regardless of age, were more successful in pirating than smaller eagles. Small pirating eagles were usually unsuccessful unless they were adults attempting to supplant other small eagles. Feeding eagles were more successful in defeating pirating eagles according to (1) whether their heads were up to prior to a pirating attempt, (2) how long their heads had been up, and (3) whether they displayed. During periods of food scarcity pirating eagles were less successful, a fact attributed in a proximate sense to the increase incidence of retaliation by feeding birds. When food was scarce and eagles had a choice between scavenging the pirating, they chose to scavenge more often. Body size appears to be an important factor in determining social dominance and influencing differences in foraging modes of wintering Bald Eagles.

  18. The Northern Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus alascanus).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    facilitate enlightened management of this eagle. 3 _!tz ’.~ ~ - [ GERAL BIOLOGY Description. As is the case of most birds of prey, the female northern bald...adult birds of the same sex. Yet the average weight of juveniles was less than adults, indi- cating the greater dimensions of juveniles are attributable...male was still living in 1967 at the age of 34 years (Han- cock, 1973). While birds of prey may live to considerable age in captivity, they seldom

  19. Sarcocystis-associated meningoencephalitis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is rare in raptors. An adult female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) with progressive neurological signs was euthanized after several months of treatment. The predominant histological lesion was lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis involving the ...

  20. Kleptoparasitism by bald eagles wintering in south-central Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorde, D.G.; Lingle, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Kleptoparasitism on other raptors was one means by which Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) secured food along the North Platte and Platte rivers during the winters of 1978-1980. Species kelptoparasitized were Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis), Red-tailed Hawk (B. jamaicensis), Rough-legged Hawk (B. lagopus), Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), and Bald Eagle. Stealing of prey occurred more often during the severe winter of 1978-1979 when ice cover restricted eagles from feeding on fish than during the milder winter of 1979-1980. Kleptoparasitism occurred principally in agricultural habitats where large numbers of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) were foraging. Subadults watched adults steal food and participated in food-stealing with adults, which indicated interspecific kleptoparasitism may be a learned behavior. We suggest factors that may favor interspecific kleptoparasitism as a foraging strategy of Bald Eagles in obtaining waterfowl during severe winters.

  1. Mercury concentrations in tissues of Florida bald eagles

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, P.B.; Wood, J.M.; White, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    We collected 48 blood and 61 feather samples from nestling bald eagles at 42 nests and adult feather samples from 20 nests in north and central Florida during 1991-93. We obtained 32 liver, 10 feather, and 5 blood samples from 33 eagle carcasses recovered in Florida during 1987-93. For nestlings, mercury concentrations in blood (GM = 0.16 ppm wet wt) and feather (GM = 3.23 ppm) samples were correlated (r = 0.69, P = 0.0001). Although nestlings had lower mercury concentrations in feathers than did adults (GM = 6.03 ppm), the feather mercury levels in nestlings and adults from the same nest were correlated (r = 0.63, P < 0.02). Mercury concentrations in blood of captive adult eagles (GM = 0.23 ppm) was similar to Florida nestlings but some Florida nestlings had blood mercury concentrations up to 0.61 ppm, more than twice as high as captive adults. Feather mercury concentrations in both nestlings and adults exceeded those in captive eagles, but concentrations in all tissues were similar to, or lower than, those in bald eagles from other wild populations. Although mercury concentrations in Florida eagles are below those that cause mortality, they are in the range of concentrations that can cause behavioral changes or reduce reproduction. We recommend periodic monitoring of mercury in Florida bald eagles for early detection of mercury increases before negative effects on reproduction occur. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Double-survey estimates of bald eagle populations in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, R.G.; Garrett, M.G.; Isaacs, F.B.

    1999-01-01

    The literature on abundance of birds of prey is almost devoid of population estimates with statistical rigor. Therefore, we surveyed bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) populations on the Crooked and lower Columbia rivers of Oregon and used the double-survey method to estimate populations and sighting probabilities for different survey methods (aerial, boat, vehicle) and bald eagle ages (adults vs. subadults). Sighting probabilities were consistently 20%. The results revealed variable and negative bias (percent relative bias = -9 to -70%) of direct counts and emphasized the importance of estimating populations where some measure of precision and ability to conduct inference tests are available. We recommend use of the double-survey method to estimate abundance of bald eagle populations and other raptors in open habitats.

  3. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection in a captive bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Galbreath, Elizabeth J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Abell, John M.

    1994-01-01

    An adult bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) kept in captivity for nearly 7 yr at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, Maryland, died suddenly with gross and microscopic lesions characteristic of septicemia. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae was isolated from the liver. Fish comprised part of the bird's diet and may have been the source of the organism.

  4. Experimental lead poisoning in bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, H.; Wiemeyer, S.; Hoffman, P.; Carpenter, J.; Sileo, L.

    1979-01-01

    Captive, crippled bald eagles unsuitable for release were fed lead shot to determine diagnostic criteria for lead poisoning. The eagles were fluoroscoped and bled periodically to determine shot retention and blood delta--aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity. Microscopic examination revealed renal tubular degeneration, arterial fibrinoid necrosis and myocardial necrosis. Acid-fast intra-nuclear inclusion bodies were not found in proximal convoluted tubule cells. Analyses of blood and toxicological data are not yet complete.

  5. Environmental contaminants in blood of western bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Frenzel, R.W.; Anthony, R.G.; McClelland, B.R.; Knight, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Blood samples collected in 1979-81 from wintering Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in Oregon and northern California, residents in Oregon, migrants in Montana and residents in Washington were analyzed for lead (Pb), mercury (Hg) and organochlorines. Lead was detected infrequently (5%) and at low concentrations (0.40 ppm) in wintering Bald Eagles in Oregon and north California and migrants in Montana, and most frequently (56%) in nestlings from Washington but at low concentrations (<0.40 ppm). Mercury concentrations were low (<0.70 ppm) in samples from Washington nestlings and higher in samples from Oregon and northern California birds and in Montana migrants. Adults tended to have higher concentrations of Hg than hatch year birds or nestlings. Two Bald Eagles from Montana had clearly elevated Hg concentrations (7.0 and 9.5 ppm). DDE and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were generally low (most means <0.20 ppm) with adults having higher concentrations than subadults or nestlings. A few resident adult Bald Eagles from Oregon had elevated concentrations of DDE.

  6. Environmental contaminants in bald eagles in the Columbia River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, R.G.; Garrett, M.G. ); Schuler, C.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Eggs, blood, and carcasses of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and fish were collected and breeding success of eagles was monitored in the Columbia River estuary, 1980-87, to determine if contaminants were having an effect on productivity. High levels of dichloro diphenyl dichloroethylene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were found in eggs, blood from adults, and 2 eagle carcasses. Detectable levels of DDE and PCB's were found in blood of nestlings indicating they were exposed to these contaminants early in life. Increasing concentrations of DDE and PCB's with age also indicated accumulation of these contaminants. Adult eagles also had higher levels of mercury (Hg) in blood than subadults or young indicating accumulation with age. The high levels of DDE and PCB's were associated with eggshell thinning ([bar x] = 10%) and with productivity ([bar x] = 0.56 young/occupied site) that was lower than that of healthy populations (i.e., [ge]1.00 young/occupied site). DDE and PCB's had a deleterious effect on reproduction of bald eagles in the estuary. The role dioxins play in eagle reproduction remains unclear, but concentrations in eagle eggs were similar to those in laboratory studies on other species where dioxins adversely affected hatchability of eggs. Probable source of these contaminants include dredged river sediments and hydroelectric dams, and the proper management of each may reduce the amount of contaminants released into the Columbia River estuary. 46 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  7. Salt River Project's Participation in Arizona's Bald Eagle Conservation Efforts

    PubMed

    NOBEL

    1996-11-01

    / Bald eagle ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus) conservation in Arizona, USA, is a prime example of a successful, cooperative environmental management effort. The Salt River Project (SRP) is an active participant in the statewide bald eagle management activities. This paper summarizes the major components of the statewide program and highlights SRP's participation in these efforts. The Southwestern Bald Eagle Management Committee (SWBEMC) was formed as a means of coordinating interagency projects. Chaired by the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), the SWBEMC is comprised of 15 state, federal, tribal, and private agencies. Together, these agencies sponsor the Nest Watch Program, a unique and effective program dedicated to the study, conservation, and recovery of bald eagles in the southwest. Other significant components of the bald eagle management program include nest monitoring, nest search activities, winter counts, and demography studies.KEY WORDS: Bald eagle conservation; Participatory; Cooperative effort; SRP

  8. Suspected lead toxicosis in a bald eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, E.; Carpenter, J.W.; Novilla, M.

    1977-01-01

    An immature bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was submitted to the University of Maryland, College Park, for clinical examination. The bird was thin, had green watery feces, and was unable to maintain itself in upright posture. Following radiography, the bird went into respiratory distress and died. Numerous lead shot were recovered from the gizzard, and chemical analysis of liver and kidney tissue revealed 22.9 and 11.3 ppm lead, respectively. The clinical signs, necropsy findings, and chemical analysis of the eagle were compatible with lead toxicosis.

  9. Bald eagle survival and population dynamics in Alaska after the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, T.D.; Bernatowicz, J.A.; Schempf, P.F.

    1995-04-01

    We investigated age-specific annual survival rates for 159 bald eagles (Haliaeetus Leucocephalus) radiotagged from 1989 to 1992 in Prince William Sound (PWS), Alaska. We monitored radio-tagged eagles for {le}3 years beginning 4 months after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. There was no difference (P > 0.10) in survival rates between eagles radiotagged in oiled areas and eagles radiotagged in unoiled areas of PWS. Pooled annual survival rates were 71% for first-year eagles, 95% for subadults, and 88% for adult bald eagles. Most deaths occurred from March to May. We found no indication that survival of bald eagles radiotagged >4 months after the oil spill in PWS was directly influenced by the spill and concluded that any effect of the spill on survival occurred before eagles were radiotagged. A deterministic life table model suggests that the PWS bald eagle population has an annual finite growth rate of 2%. Given the cumulative effects of direct mortality and reduced productivity caused by the oil spill, we predicted that the bald eagle population would return to its pre-spill size by 1992. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Modeling climate change impacts on overwintering bald eagles

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Chris J; Moriarty, Pamela E; Salathé Jr, Eric P

    2012-01-01

    Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) are recovering from severe population declines, and are exerting pressure on food resources in some areas. Thousands of bald eagles overwinter near Puget Sound, primarily to feed on chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) carcasses. We used modeling techniques to examine how anticipated climate changes will affect energetic demands of overwintering bald eagles. We applied a regional downscaling method to two global climate change models to obtain hourly temperature, precipitation, wind, and longwave radiation estimates at the mouths of three Puget Sound tributaries (the Skagit, Hamma Hamma, and Nisqually rivers) in two decades, the 1970s and the 2050s. Climate data were used to drive bald eagle bioenergetics models from December to February for each river, year, and decade. Bald eagle bioenergetics were insensitive to climate change: despite warmer winters in the 2050s, particularly near the Nisqually River, bald eagle food requirements declined only slightly (<1%). However, the warming climate caused salmon carcasses to decompose more rapidly, resulting in 11% to 14% less annual carcass biomass available to eagles in the 2050s. That estimate is likely conservative, as it does not account for decreased availability of carcasses due to anticipated increases in winter stream flow. Future climate-driven declines in winter food availability, coupled with a growing bald eagle population, may force eagles to seek alternate prey in the Puget Sound area or in more remote ecosystems. PMID:22822430

  11. Modeling climate change impacts on overwintering bald eagles.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Chris J; Moriarty, Pamela E; Salathé, Eric P

    2012-03-01

    Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) are recovering from severe population declines, and are exerting pressure on food resources in some areas. Thousands of bald eagles overwinter near Puget Sound, primarily to feed on chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) carcasses. We used modeling techniques to examine how anticipated climate changes will affect energetic demands of overwintering bald eagles. We applied a regional downscaling method to two global climate change models to obtain hourly temperature, precipitation, wind, and longwave radiation estimates at the mouths of three Puget Sound tributaries (the Skagit, Hamma Hamma, and Nisqually rivers) in two decades, the 1970s and the 2050s. Climate data were used to drive bald eagle bioenergetics models from December to February for each river, year, and decade. Bald eagle bioenergetics were insensitive to climate change: despite warmer winters in the 2050s, particularly near the Nisqually River, bald eagle food requirements declined only slightly (<1%). However, the warming climate caused salmon carcasses to decompose more rapidly, resulting in 11% to 14% less annual carcass biomass available to eagles in the 2050s. That estimate is likely conservative, as it does not account for decreased availability of carcasses due to anticipated increases in winter stream flow. Future climate-driven declines in winter food availability, coupled with a growing bald eagle population, may force eagles to seek alternate prey in the Puget Sound area or in more remote ecosystems.

  12. Salt river project's participation in Arizona's bald eagle conservation efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobel, Teah A.

    1996-11-01

    Bald eagle ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus) conservation in Arizona, USA, is a prime example of a successful, cooperative environmental management effort. The Salt River Project (SRP) is an active participant in the statewide bald eagle management activities. This paper summarizes the major components of the statewide program and highlights SRP's participation in these efforts. The Southwestern Bald Eagle Management Committee (SWBEMC) was formed as a means of coordinating interagency projects. Chaired by the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), the SWBEMC is comprised of 15 state, federal, tribal, and private agencies. Together, these agencies sponsor the Nest Watch Program, a unique and effective program dedicated to the study, conservation, and recovery of bald eagles in the southwest. Other significant components of the bald eagle management program include nest monitoring, nest search activities, winter counts, and demography studies.

  13. Are Bald Eagles important predators of Emperor Geese?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gill, Robert E.; Kincheloe, Karen L.

    1993-01-01

    Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and geese often occur together, especially at sites used by geese for migrational staging and wintering. Although numerous studies have been directed at these taxa, there are only anecdotal accounts (Parris et al. 1980, Bennett and Klaas 1986, Bartley 1988) of Bald Eagles killing healthy geese at any time of the year (but see Raveling and Zezulak 1991). Most species of geese may be too large, as suggested by Shetrod et al. (1976) and Palmer (1988), or they may not regularly allow eagles an advantageous attack position (J.M. Gerrard in litt.).Here we report observations of attacks on Emperor Geese (Chen canagica) by Bald Eagles on the Alaska Peninsula in autumn. We discuss these and other observations of eagle-goose interactions vis-a-vis the role of Bald Eagles as predators of Emperor Geese.

  14. Mercury contamination in Idaho bald eagles, Haliaeetus leucocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bechard, Marc J; Perkins, Dusty N; Kaltenecker, Gregory S; Alsup, Steve

    2009-11-01

    Because mercury contamination is potentially threatening to bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) populations, we collected molted feathers at nests to determine the level of contamination in bald eagles in the state of Idaho, USA. Eagle feathers contained measurable amounts of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), selenium (Se), lead (Pb), as well as mercury (Hg). Cadmium, Cr, Se, and Pb levels averaged 0.17, 4.68, 2.02, and 1.29 mg/kg dry weight, respectively, and were at or below concentrations indicated as causing reproductive failure in bald eagles. Mercury contamination was found to be the highest averaging 18.74 mg/kg dry weight. Although a concentration of only 7.5 mg/kg dry weight Hg in bird feathers can cause reduced productivity and even sterility, all of the eagles we sampled bred successfully and the population of bald eagles continues to grow annually throughout the state.

  15. Thyroid adenocarcinoma in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leukocephalus).

    PubMed

    Bates, G; Tucker, R L; Ford, S; Mattix, M E

    1999-09-01

    Thyroid adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in an adult bald eagle (Haliaeetus leukocephalus) with clinical signs of weakness manifested by inability to fly. Physical examination at the time of admission revealed dried blood in the pharynx and glottis and the presence of pharyngeal trichomonads. Radiographs revealed a large soft tissue mass in the area of the left coracoid and clavicular bones. One month following successful treatment for trichomoniasis, the bird suffered an acute episode of tracheal hemorrhage and died. Necropsy revealed a large mass within the interclavicular air sac. The histologic features were consistent with thyroid adenocarcinoma. This is the first report of thyroid neoplasia in a member of the order Falconiformes.

  16. Mycobacteriosis in an American bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Hoenerhoff, Mark; Kiupel, Matti; Sikarskie, James; Bolin, Carole; Simmons, Heather; Fitzgerald, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Avian mycobacteriosis is an important disease in companion, captive, exotic, and wild birds worldwide. Mycobacterium avium is the most widely distributed and pathogenic organism causing tuberculous lesions in birds. Multiple factors including age, stress, immune status, and preexisting disease determine the pathogenicity of M. avium, and the disease can manifest itself in a variety of forms. Mycobacteriosis can cause severe losses in zoo aviaries, including the loss of rare and endangered bird species. We report a case of systemic avian mycobacteriosis in an adult, free-living male American bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) that presented to the Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health in November 2003.

  17. Effects of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill on bald eagles. Bird study number 4. Exxon Valdez Oil Spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, T.D.; Schempf, P.F.; Bernatowicz, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    We estimated that about 8000 bald eagles (Halieetus leucocephalus) inhabited the area affected by the spill at the time of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. We conducted a 3-year study to determine effects of the spill on the bald eagle population and reproduction and survival of adults and fledglings. The greatest injuries to bald eagles occurred in 1989 and were manifested by direct mortality of bald eagles throughout the spill area and significantly reduced reproduction in PWS. We could not discern negative effects on the population or reproduction of eagles after 1989.

  18. Spermatogenesis in bald eagles experimentally fed a diet containing DDT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Chura, N.J.; Stewart, P.A.

    1966-01-01

    When Bald Eagles were fed DDT in the diet at the level of 10 ppm (dry weight basis) for periods of 60 and 120 days, there was no interference with spermatogenic activity. Degenerative testicular changes were produced only by levels of DDT that produced abnormal neurological signs and usually resulted in death. Histological examination of these testes indicates that Bald Eagles have a seasonal testicular cycle similar to that reported for many other birds of the Northern Hemisphere.

  19. Acanthocephala of the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in North America.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D J; Cole, R A

    1997-06-01

    Examination of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) collected from several locations in North America contributed new information concerning the acanthocephalan fauna of this host. Representatives of Arythmorhynchus brevis, representing a new host record, were collected from eagles in Florida, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin. Plagiorhynchus sp. was collected from an eagle in Florida. Corynosoma strumosum was collected from an eagle in Alaska. Andracantha phalacrocoracis, representing a new host record, was collected from an eagle in Alaska. Southwellina hispida, representing a new host record, was collected from eagles in Maine and Virginia. The occurrence of gravid or mature females of A. brevis, Plagiorhynchus sp., and S. hispida suggests that the bald eagle may serve as a competent definitive host for these species.

  20. Acanthocephala of the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, D.J.; Cole, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Examination of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) collected from several locations in North America contributed new information concerning the acanthocephalan fauna of this host. Representatives of Arythmorhynchus brevis, representing a new host record, were collected from eagles in Florida, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin. Plagiorhynchus sp. was collected from an eagle in Florida. Corynosoma strumosum was collected from an eagle in Alaska. Andracantha phalacrocoracis, representing a new host record, was collected from an eagle in Alaska. Southwellina hispida, representing a new host record, was collected from eagles in Maine and Virginia. The occurrence of gravid or mature females of A. brevis, Plagiorhynchus sp., and S. hispida suggests that the bald eagle may serve as a competent definitive host for these species.

  1. Pleistocene to historic shifts in bald eagle diets on the Channel Islands, California.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Seth D; Collins, Paul W; Rick, Torben C; Guthrie, Daniel A; Erlandson, Jon M; Fogel, Marilyn L

    2010-05-18

    Studies of current interactions among species, their prey, and environmental factors are essential for mitigating immediate threats to population viability, but the true range of behavioral and ecological flexibility can be determined only through research on deeper timescales. Ecological data spanning centuries to millennia provide important contextual information for long-term management strategies, especially for species that now are living in relict populations. Here we use a variety of methods to reconstruct bald eagle diets and local abundance of their potential prey on the Channel Islands from the late Pleistocene to the time when the last breeding pairs disappeared from the islands in the mid-20th century. Faunal and isotopic analysis of bald eagles shows that seabirds were important prey for immature/adult eagles for millennia before the eagles' local extirpation. In historic times (A.D. 1850-1950), however, isotopic and faunal data show that breeding bald eagles provisioned their chicks with introduced ungulates (e.g., sheep), which were locally present in high densities. Today, bald eagles are the focus of an extensive conservation program designed to restore a stable breeding population to the Channel Islands, but native and nonnative prey sources that were important for bald eagles in the past are either diminished (e.g., seabirds) or have been eradicated (e.g., introduced ungulates). In the absence of sufficient resources, a growing bald eagle population on the Channel Islands could expand its prey base to include carrion from local pinniped colonies, exert predation pressure on a recovering seabird population, and possibly prey on endangered island foxes.

  2. Pleistocene to historic shifts in bald eagle diets on the Channel Islands, California

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Seth D.; Collins, Paul W.; Rick, Torben C.; Guthrie, Daniel A.; Erlandson, Jon M.; Fogel, Marilyn L.

    2010-01-01

    Studies of current interactions among species, their prey, and environmental factors are essential for mitigating immediate threats to population viability, but the true range of behavioral and ecological flexibility can be determined only through research on deeper timescales. Ecological data spanning centuries to millennia provide important contextual information for long-term management strategies, especially for species that now are living in relict populations. Here we use a variety of methods to reconstruct bald eagle diets and local abundance of their potential prey on the Channel Islands from the late Pleistocene to the time when the last breeding pairs disappeared from the islands in the mid-20th century. Faunal and isotopic analysis of bald eagles shows that seabirds were important prey for immature/adult eagles for millennia before the eagles’ local extirpation. In historic times (A.D. 1850–1950), however, isotopic and faunal data show that breeding bald eagles provisioned their chicks with introduced ungulates (e.g., sheep), which were locally present in high densities. Today, bald eagles are the focus of an extensive conservation program designed to restore a stable breeding population to the Channel Islands, but native and nonnative prey sources that were important for bald eagles in the past are either diminished (e.g., seabirds) or have been eradicated (e.g., introduced ungulates). In the absence of sufficient resources, a growing bald eagle population on the Channel Islands could expand its prey base to include carrion from local pinniped colonies, exert predation pressure on a recovering seabird population, and possibly prey on endangered island foxes. PMID:20439737

  3. Helminth parasites of the bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus, in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinsella, J.M.; Foster, Garry W.; Cole, Rebecca A.; Forrester, Donald J.

    1998-01-01

    Twenty species of helminths (9 trematodes, 9 nematodes, and 2 acanthocephalans), including 9 new host records, were collected from 40 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from Florida. Intensities of infection were low and no lesions were attributed to the parasites. No species were considered specialists in bald eagles; 5 species were considered raptor generalists and the remainder, generalists in other orders of fish-eating birds. An undescribed species of Hamatospiculum was found in 3 birds. Most of the common helminths were acquired from eating fish intermediate hosts.

  4. Leucocytozoonosis in nestling bald eagles in Michigan and Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Stuht, J N; Bowerman, W W; Best, D A

    1999-07-01

    Thirteen of 21 nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) examined for blood parasites in Michigan and Minnesota (USA) during June and July 1997 had patent infections of Leucocytozoon toddi. No other parasites were seen. The degree of parasitemia was light and varied from 1 to 2 on the Ashford Scale. Several of the infected nestlings appeared to have elevated levels of heterophils in their peripheral circulating blood. One of the infected nestlings also showed signs of severe anemia. We believe this is the first report of L. toddi in the bald eagle.

  5. A Southern Bald Eagle perches on a pole at KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A Southern Bald Eagle perches on top of a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. About a dozen bald eagles live in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nest in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  6. A Southern Bald Eagle perches on a pole at KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A Southern Bald Eagle perched on top of a utility pole searches the area. About a dozen bald eagles live in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nest in Florida. Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  7. Experimental lead-shot poisoning in bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pattee, O.H.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Mulhern, B.M.; Sileo, L.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Captive, crippled bald eagles unsuitable for release were fed lead shot to determine diagnostic criteria for lead poisoning. The eagles were fluoroscoped and bled periodically to determine shot retention and blood delta--aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity. Microscopic examination revealed renal tubular degeneration, arterial fibrinoid necrosis and myocardial necrosis. Acid-fast intra-nuclear inclusion bodies were not found in proximal convoluted tubule cells. Analyses of blood and toxicological data are not yet complete.

  8. Bald eagles of the Hanford National Environmental Research Park

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Watson, D.G.; Rickard, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    Since 1961, near-yearly aerial surveys of bald eagles along the Hanford reach of the Columbia River have been conducted. Prey resources available to the eagles have also been monitored and we have thus been able to examine predator-prey relationships in a statistical fashion. We report on a unique set of data which provides insight into one of the factors (prey availability) controlling bald eagle wintering populations. The winter distribution of the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) has been reported to closely follow the availability of prey (Servheen 1975, Southern 1963, Shea 1973, Spencer 1976). Fitzner and Hanson (1979) compared twelve years of eagle winter survey data on the Hanford DOE Site with waterfowl numbers and salmon redd densities over the same period and provided some statistical evidence that eagle wintering numbers varied somewhat dependently with changing salmon redd numbers but not with changing waterfowl numbers. This report re-examines Fitzner and Hanson's (1979) twelve year data set and supplies two additional years of data for the Hanford DOE Site in order to gain additional insight into predator-prey interactions.

  9. Fatal toxoplasmosis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Szabo, K A; Mense, M G; Lipscomb, T P; Felix, K J; Dubey, J P

    2004-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites were identified in the myocardium of a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) that died of necrotizing myocarditis. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining with T. gondii-specific polyclonal antibodies. This is a new host record for T. gondii.

  10. Why Did the Bald Eagle Almost Become Extinct?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Sarah J.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2012-01-01

    The activity described in this article poses a question, provides evidence needed to answer the question, and uses a cooperative learning structure within which students analyze the evidence and create their own questions. Students see how a single cause can interact with two natural systems--the water cycle and the bald eagle food chain--to…

  11. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in bald (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden (Aquila chrysaetos) eagles from Washington and Idaho, USA.

    PubMed

    Spears, Brian Lee; Isanhart, John

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the exposure and accumulation of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the 2 species of eagles inhabiting North America. The authors analyzed the livers of 33 bald eagles and 7 golden eagles collected throughout Washington and Idaho, USA, for 51 PBDE congeners. Total PBDEs ranged from 2.4 ng/g to 9920 ng/g wet weight. Bald eagles and eagles associated with large urban areas had the highest PBDE concentrations; golden eagles and eagles from more sparsely populated areas had the lowest concentrations. Congener patterns in the present study (brominated diphenyl ether [BDE]-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-153, and BDE-154 dominating concentrations) were similar to those reported for other bird species, especially raptors. However, the authors also found elevated contributions of BDE-209 in golden eagles and BDE-77 in both species. Patterns in bald eagle samples reflected those in fillets of fish collected from the same general locations throughout Washington, suggesting local exposure to runoff-based contamination, whereas patterns in golden eagle samples suggest a difference in food chain uptake facilitated by atmospheric transport and deposition of BDE-209 and its degradation products into the terrestrial system. Data from the present study represent some of the first reported on burdens of PBDEs in juvenile and adult eagles from North America. The high PBDE liver concentrations associated with large metropolitan areas and accumulation of deca-BDE congeners are a cause for concern.

  12. Bald eagles view their territory from high tower at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A pair of Florida bald eagles take advantage of a tower to rest and view the landscape near the intersection of the NASA Causeway and Kennedy Parkway North at Kennedy Space Center. This pair of eagles nests near Kennedy Parkway and is seen frequently by KSC commuters and visitors. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most southern Florida eagles nesting at KSC arrive during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. . Kennedy Space Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  13. Associations between regional differences in polychlorinated biphenyls and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene in blood of nestling bald eagles and reproductive productivity.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, William W; Best, David A; Giesy, Ohn P; Shieldcastle, Mark C; Meyer, Michael W; Postupalsky, Sergej; Sikarskie, James G

    2003-02-01

    The relationship between regional reproduction rates of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and concentrations of p.p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in blood plasma from nestling bald eagles was assessed. Blood was analyzed from 309 nestlings from 10 subpopulations of eagles across the Great Lakes region. Geometric mean concentrations of p,p'-DDE and total PCBs were inversely correlated to the productivity and success rates of nesting bald eagles within nine subpopulations. Nestlings eight weeks of age and older had significantly greater geometric mean concentrations of total PCBs and p,p'-DDE than nestlings less than eight weeks of age. The ability to use measurements of p,p'-DDE and total PCBs in nestling blood to determine the potential impact of these contaminants on adult nesting on a regional scale was demonstrated.

  14. Captive and field-tested radio attachments for bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buehler, D.A.; Fraser, J.D.; Fuller, M.R.; McAllister, L.S.; Seegar, J.K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of two radio transmitter attachment techniques on captive and one attachment technique on wild Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were studied. A Y-attachment method with a 160-g dummy transmitter was less apt to cause tissue damage on captive birds than an X-attachment method, and loosely fit transmitters caused less damage than tightly fit transmitters Annual survival of wild birds fitted with 65-g transmitters via an X attachment was estimated at 90-95%. As a result of high survival, only five wild birds marked as nestlings were recovered.Two of these birds had superficial pressure sores from tight-fitting harnesses It is recommended that a 1.3-cm space be left between the transmitter and the bird's b ack when radio-tagging post-fiedging Bald Eagles. Additional space, perhaps up to 2.5 cm, is required for nestlings to allow for added growth and development.

  15. Bald Eagle response to boating activity in northcentral Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, P.B.

    1999-01-01

    I examined the effects of weekend and weekday boating activity on Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) use of three lakes in northcentral Florida during 1988-89. On Lake Lochloosa, which had the highest number of boats of the three lakes, boating activity significantly reduced the numbers of all age classes of eagles using the lake (P < 0.025). Increased boating activity on Lake Wauberg was not related to use by eagles (P = 0.06) likely because boating activity was concentrated during midday while eagles typically foraged early and late in the day. On Newnan's Lake, the number of eagles observed also was not different between weekends and weekdays (P = 0.20). Weekend boating activity did not relate to perch use, habitat use, interactions or age distribution indicating no alteration of eagle behavior patterns. Flush distance did not vary between weekends and weekdays (P = 0.96), but did vary by month (P = 0.0001), with a greater flush distance during months with highest boating activity. Minimal flush distances (x?? = 53m) and lack of measurable effects on behavior suggested that eagles in my study area were tolerant of boat disturbance.

  16. Golden eagle records from the Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey: information for wind energy management and planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakle, Wade; Haggerty, Patti; Fuller, Mark; Phillips, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this Data Series report is to provide the occasions, locations, and counts when golden eagles were recorded during the annual Midwinter Bald Eagle Surveys. Golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) are protected by Federal statutes including the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA) (16 USC 668-668c) and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) (16 USC 703-12). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) manages golden eagles with the goal of maintaining stable or increasing breeding populations (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2009). Development for the generation of electricity from wind turbines is occurring in much of the range of the golden eagle in the western United States. Development could threaten population stability because golden eagles might be disturbed by construction and operation of facilities and they are vulnerable to mortality from collisions with wind turbines (Smallwood and Thelander, 2008). Therefore, the Service has proposed a process by which wind energy developers can collect information that could lead to Eagle Conservation Plans (ECP), mitigation, and permitting that allow for golden eagle management in areas of wind energy development (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2011). The Service recommends that ECP be developed in stages, and the first stage is to learn if golden eagles occur at the landscape level where potential wind facilities might be located. Information about where eagles occur can be obtained from technical literature, agency files, and other sources of information including on-line biological databases. The broad North American distribution of golden eagles is known, but there is a paucity of readily available information about intermediate geographic scales and site-specific scales, especially during the winter season (Kochert and others, 2002).

  17. Postfledging nest dependence period for bald eagles in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, P.B.; Collopy, M.W.; Sekerak, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the postfledging dependency period in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), a little studied but important period in the life cycle of avian species. Bald eagles in Florida had a postfledging dependency period of 4-11 weeks (15-22 weeks old). The length of the dependency period did not vary by year of study, sex, number of fledgings, timing of fledging, or hatch order (P > 0.05). Mean distance fledglings ranged from the nest increased with age, but they were observed in the nest or nest tree throughout the postfledging dependency period. Distance from the nest did not vary by sex, number of fledglings, or timing of fledging (P > 0.05). Over 80% of the fledgling observations were within 229 m of the nest. The boundary of the primary protection zone specified in the bald eagle habitat management guidelines for the southeastern United States is 229 m. Restrictions on human disturbance around nest sites should remain in place during the postfledging dependency period because of the close association of fledglings with the nest site. Restrictions also should be flexible because of the varying length of the dependency period.

  18. Environmental contaminants in bald eagle eggs from the Aleutian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Robert G; Miles, A Keith; Ricca, Mark A; Estes, James A

    2007-09-01

    We collected 136 fresh and unhatched eggs from bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests and assessed productivity on eight islands in the Aleutian archipelago, 2000 to 2002. Egg contents were analyzed for a broad spectrum of organochlorine (OC) contaminants, mercury (Hg), and stable isotopes of carbon (delta13C) and nitrogen (delta15N). Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (SigmaPCBs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and Hg in bald eagle eggs were elevated throughout the archipelago, but the patterns of distribution differed among the various contaminants. Total PCBs were highest in areas of past military activities on Adak and Amchitka Islands, indicating local point sources of these compounds. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were higher on Amchitka Island, which was subjected to much military activity during World War II and the middle of the 20th century. Concentrations of SigmaPCBs also were elevated on islands with little history of military activity (e.g., Amlia, Tanaga, Buldir), suggesting non-point sources of PCBs in addition to point sources. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were highest in eagle eggs from the most western Aleutian Islands (e.g., Buldir, Kiska) and decreased eastward along the Aleutian chain. This east-to-west increase suggested a Eurasian source of contamination, possibly through global transport and atmospheric distillation and/or from migratory seabirds. Eggshell thickness and productivity of bald eagles were normal and indicative of healthy populations because concentrations of most contaminants were below threshold levels for effects on reproduction. Contrary to our predictions, contaminant concentrations were not correlated with stable isotopes of carbon (delta13C) or nitrogen (delta15N) in eggs. These latter findings indicate that contaminant concentrations were influenced more by point sources and geographic location than trophic status of eagles among the different islands.

  19. Environmental contaminants in bald eagle eggs from the Aleutian archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, R.G.; Miles, A.K.; Ricca, M.A.; Estes, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We collected 136 fresh and unhatched eggs from bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nests and assessed productivity on eight islands in the Aleutian archipelago, 2000 to 2002. Egg contents were analyzed for a broad spectrum of organochlorine (OC) contaminants, mercury (Hg), and stable isotopes of carbon (??13C) and nitrogen (??15N). Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (??PCBs), p,p???- dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and Hg in bald eagle eggs were elevated throughout the archipelago, but the patterns of distribution differed among the various contaminants. Total PCBs were highest in areas of past military activities on Adak and Amchitka Islands, indicating local point sources of these compounds. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were higher on Amchitka Island, which was subjected to much military activity during World War II and the middle of the 20th century. Concentrations of ??PCBs also were elevated on islands with little history of military activity (e.g., Amlia, Tanaga, Buldir), suggesting non-point sources of PCBs in addition to point sources. Concentrations of DDE and Hg were highest in eagle eggs from the most western Aleutian Islands (e.g., Buldir, Kiska) and decreased eastward along the Aleutian chain. This east-to-west increase suggested a Eurasian source of contamination, possibly through global transport and atmospheric distillation and/or from migratory seabirds. Eggshell thickness and productivity of bald eagles were normal and indicative of healthy populations because concentrations of most contaminants were below threshold levels for effects on reproduction. Contrary to our predictions, contaminant concentrations were not correlated with stable isotopes of carbon (??13C) or nitrogen (??15N) in eggs. These latter findings indicate that contaminant concentrations were influenced more by point sources and geographic location than trophic status of eagles among the different islands. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  20. Normal ocular parameters and characterization of ophthalmic lesions in a group of captive bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Sonia E; Jones, Michael P; Hendrix, Diane V H; Ward, Daniel A; Baine, Katherine H

    2013-06-01

    Sixteen adult captive bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) underwent a complete bilateral ocular examination to assess normal ocular parameters and describe ophthalmic lesions. Tear production was measured with the Schirmer tear test 1 and intraocular pressure was measured with applanation tonometry. The menace response was normal bilaterally in 13 of 16 eagles. Two birds had normal menace responses despite having fundic lesions, and 2 birds with an inconsistent or absent menace response did not have appreciable ophthalmic lesions. Mean (SD) tear production was 14 +/- 2 mm/min (range, 8-19 mm/min). Mean intraocular pressure was 21.5 +/- 1.7 mm Hg (range, 15-26 mm Hg). At least 1 ocular lesion was present in 50% of examined eyes. Cataracts, the most common lesion observed, were present in 8 eyes of 5 birds. Three of 4 known geriatric birds were or had been affected with bilateral cataracts. Overall, ocular lesions are common in captive bald eagles, and cataracts appear to be more prevalent in geriatric bald eagles. An obvious positive menace response is present in most visual birds but may be absent in some eagles that are either normal or that do not have appreciable ophthalmic lesions. Applanation tonometry and the Schirmer tear test 1 can be performed easily on adult bald eagles and provide reproducible results.

  1. Final Report Bald and Golden Eagle Territory Surveys for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fratanduono, M. L.

    2014-11-25

    Garcia and Associates (GANDA) was contracted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct surveys for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) at Site 300 and in the surrounding area out to 10-miles. The survey effort was intended to document the boundaries of eagle territories by careful observation of eagle behavior from selected viewing locations throughout the study area.

  2. Sarcocystis sp.-associated meningoencephalitis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Olson, Erik J; Wünschmann, Arno; Dubey, J P

    2007-09-01

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is uncommon in raptors. An adult female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was euthanized after several months of treatment for progressive neurologic signs. The predominant histologic lesion was lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis involving the cerebrum and cerebellum. There was a marked segmental loss of granular cells and Purkinje cells, as well as segmental atrophy of the molecular layer in the cerebellum. Protozoal merozoites and schizonts were observed in the gray matter of the cerebellum. Ultrastructurally, the merozoites were classified as a species of Sarcocystis due to the lack of rhoptries. Immunohistochemistry of the agent revealed a positive reaction for Sarcocystis neurona, while sections were negative for Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Sarcocystis sp. infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis in bald eagles with chronic neurologic disease.

  3. 75 FR 31811 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Post-Delisting Monitoring Plan for Bald Eagle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-04

    ... for Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... that have been recovered and no longer need ESA protection. In 2007, we removed the bald eagle in the... recovery. Over a 20-year period, we will monitor the status of the bald eagle, at 5-year...

  4. 76 FR 13446 - Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA-COG Joint Rail Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company-Operation Exemption-SEDA- COG Joint Rail Authority Nittany Bald and Eagle Railroad Company (N&BE), a Class III carrier, has filed a... the Board in Susquehanna Union R.R.-Control Exemption- N. Shore R.R., Nittany & Bald Eagle...

  5. 76 FR 24084 - Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-Norfolk Southern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company--Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption... rights to Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company (N&BE) over a portion of NSR's line of railroad...

  6. 77 FR 18881 - Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-Norfolk Southern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... Surface Transportation Board Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company--Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption--Norfolk Southern Railway Company Norfolk Southern Railway Company (NSR), pursuant to a written trackage... rights to Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company (N&BE), between Lock Haven, Pa. (milepost BR 194.2)...

  7. 75 FR 34530 - Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-Norfolk Southern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Surface Transportation Board Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company--Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption--Norfolk Southern Railway Company Norfolk Southern Railway Company (NSR), pursuant to a written trackage... rights to Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company (N&BE), between Lock Haven and Driftwood, Pa.,...

  8. Research note: isolation of a herpesvirus from a bald eagle nestling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, D.E.; Romaine, R.I.; Knight, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Cloacal swabs collected from wild bald eagle nestlings (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were tested for viruses. A virus isolated from one of these samples had a lipid coat and contained DNA. Electron microscopy confirmed that it was a herpesvirus. This appears to be the first report of a herpesvirus isolation from a wild bald eagle.

  9. Exposure of migrant bald eagles to lead in prairie Canada.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Wayland, M E; Bortolotti, G R

    2001-01-01

    The prevalence of elevated exposure to lead was assessed in a migrant population of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) at a waterfowl staging area in the southern portion of the Canadian prairies, from September to November, 1992-1995. Of 103 eagles, 8% exhibited blood lead (PbB) concentrations suggestive of elevated exposure to lead (> or = 0.200 microgram ml-1 wet wt.). PbB concentrations in eagles from the study area ranged from < 0.01 to 0.585 microgram ml-1, while those of nestling eagles from a reference site indicated normal or background exposure (< 0.01 microgram ml-1). No differences in the prevalence of elevated exposure were detected among genders or age classes (0.5- and > or = 1.5-year-old birds) (P > 0.05). The prevalence of elevated exposure was significantly greater in November than in October (21.7 vs. 3.8%) (all years: chi 2Y = 5.75, P = 0.017). Eagles with shotshell pellets in the digestive tract did not have accompanying high PbB concentrations. The prevalence of elevated lead exposure in this study was low in comparison to other areas in North America. Potential biases in the trapping technique as they relate to interpreting the results are addressed.

  10. Salt River Project`s participation in Arizona`s bald eagle conservation efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Nobel, T.A.

    1996-11-01

    Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) conservation in Arizona, USA, is a prime example of a successful, cooperative environmental management effort. The Salt River Project (SRP) is an active participant in the statewide bald eagle management activities. This paper summarizes the major components of the statewide program and highlights SRP`s participation in these efforts. The Southwestern Bald Eagle Management Committee (SWBEMC) was formed as a means of coordinating interagency projects. Chaired by the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), the SWBEMC is comprised of 15 state, federal, tribal, and private agencies. Together, these agencies sponsor the Nest Watch Program, a unique and effective program dedicated to the study, conservation, and recovery of bald eagles in the southwest. Other significant components of the bald eagle management program include nest monitoring, nest search activities, winter counts, and demography studies. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Residues of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls and autopsy data for bald eagles, 1973-74

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prouty, R.M.; Reichel, W.L.; Locke, L.N.; Belisle, A.A.; Cromartie, E.; Kaiser, T.E.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Swineford, D.M.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-nine bald eagles found sick or dead in 13 States during 1969 and 1970 were analyzed for pesticide residues. Residues of DDE, dieldrin, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), and mercury were detected in all bald eagle carcasses; DDD residues were detected in 38; DDT, heptachlor epoxide, and dichlorobenzophenone (DCBP) were detected less frequently. Six eagles contained possible lethal levels of dieldrin in the brain, and one contained a lethal concentration of DDE (385 ppm) in the brain together with 235 ppm of PCB's. Autopsy revealed that 18 bald eagles were illegally shot; other causes of death were impact injuries, electrocution, emaciation, and infectious diseases.

  12. Disseminated mycobacteriosis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Heatley, J Jill; Mitchell, Mark M; Roy, Alma; Cho, Doo Youn; Williams, Diana L; Tully, Thomas N

    2007-09-01

    A mature bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was diagnosed with mycobacterial infection after being presented for an inability to fly, emaciation, and a swelling of the left tibiotarsal-tarso metatarsal joint. Results of a complete blood cell count revealed a persistent, marked leukocytosis, with heterophilia, monocytosis, and anemia. Radiographs revealed lysis of the left distal tibiotarsus and soft-tissue swelling around the left tibiotarsal-tarsometatarsal joint, multiple pulmonary opacities, and an enlarged liver. Endoscopic evaluation and biopsy of caseated material within the left caudal coelom revealed acid-fast organisms. The eagle was euthanatized, and results of necropsy and histologic evaluation revealed caseated granulomas of the intestine, lungs, air sacs, and subcutaneous regions of the hock. Results of culture, a polymerase chain reaction testing, and direct deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencing for mycobacterial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid DNA determined this organism most likely to be Mycobacterium avium.

  13. Count trends for migratory Bald Eagles reveal differences between two populations at a spring site along the Lake Ontario shoreline.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kyle R

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucophalus), after DDT and other organochlorine insecticides were banned in the United States, can be regarded as one of the most iconic success stories resulting from the Endangered Species Act. Interest remains high in the recovery and growth of the Bald Eagle population. Common to evaluating growth and recovery rates are counts at nesting sites and analyses of individuals fledged per season. But this is merely one snapshot that ignores survival rates as eagles grow to maturity. By analyzing indices from migration counts, we get a different snapshot better reflecting the survival of young birds. Different populations of Bald Eagles breed at different sites at different times of the year. Typical migration count analyses do not separate the populations. A separation of two distinct populations can be achieved at spring count sites by taking advantage of the tendency for northern summer breeding birds to migrate north in spring earlier than southern winter breeding birds who disperse north later in spring. In this paper I analyze migratory indices at a spring site along Lake Ontario. The analysis shows that eagles considered to be primarily of the northern summer breeding population showed an estimated growth rate of 5.3 ± 0.85% (SE) per year with 49% of eagles tallied in adult plumage, whereas the migrants considered to be primarily of the southern breeding population had an estimated growth rate of 14.0 ± 1.79% with only 22% in adult plumage. Together these results argue that the populations of southern breeding Bald Eagles are growing at a substantially higher rate than northern breeding eagles. These findings suggest that aggregate population indices for a species at migration counting sites can sometimes obscure important differences among separate populations at any given site and that separating counts by time period can be a useful way to check for differences among sub-populations.

  14. Count trends for migratory Bald Eagles reveal differences between two populations at a spring site along the Lake Ontario shoreline

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucophalus), after DDT and other organochlorine insecticides were banned in the United States, can be regarded as one of the most iconic success stories resulting from the Endangered Species Act. Interest remains high in the recovery and growth of the Bald Eagle population. Common to evaluating growth and recovery rates are counts at nesting sites and analyses of individuals fledged per season. But this is merely one snapshot that ignores survival rates as eagles grow to maturity. By analyzing indices from migration counts, we get a different snapshot better reflecting the survival of young birds. Different populations of Bald Eagles breed at different sites at different times of the year. Typical migration count analyses do not separate the populations. A separation of two distinct populations can be achieved at spring count sites by taking advantage of the tendency for northern summer breeding birds to migrate north in spring earlier than southern winter breeding birds who disperse north later in spring. In this paper I analyze migratory indices at a spring site along Lake Ontario. The analysis shows that eagles considered to be primarily of the northern summer breeding population showed an estimated growth rate of 5.3 ± 0.85% (SE) per year with 49% of eagles tallied in adult plumage, whereas the migrants considered to be primarily of the southern breeding population had an estimated growth rate of 14.0 ± 1.79% with only 22% in adult plumage. Together these results argue that the populations of southern breeding Bald Eagles are growing at a substantially higher rate than northern breeding eagles. These findings suggest that aggregate population indices for a species at migration counting sites can sometimes obscure important differences among separate populations at any given site and that separating counts by time period can be a useful way to check for differences among sub-populations. PMID:27231647

  15. Mercury in bald eagle nestlings from South Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Jagoe, Charles H; Bryan, A Lawrence; Brant, Heather A; Murphy, Thomas M; Brisbin, I Lehr

    2002-10-01

    Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) may be at risk from contaminants in their diet and young birds may be particularly sensitive to contaminant exposure. To evaluate potential risks from dietary mercury exposure to eagle nestlings in South Carolina (USA), we surveyed mercury concentrations in 34 nestlings over two breeding seasons (1998 and 1999). Samples were also obtained from several post-fledging eagles in the region. Nestling feather mercury ranged from 0.61-6.67 micrograms Hg/g dry weight, nestling down mercury from 0.50-5.05 micrograms Hg/g dry weight, and nestling blood mercury from 0.02-0.25 microgram Hg/g wet weight. We did not detect significant differences in tissue mercury between nestlings from coastal and inland regions in contrast to some other studies of piscivorous birds. Mercury concentrations were much higher in the post fledging birds we sampled. Our data show that nestling eagles in South Carolina are accumulating mercury, and that concentrations in older birds may exceed regulatory guidelines.

  16. Ban of DDT and subsequent recovery of Reproduction in bald eagles

    SciTech Connect

    Grier, J.W.

    1982-12-17

    Reproduction of bald eagles in northwestern Ontario declined from 1.26 young per breeding area in 1966 to a low of 0.46 in 1974 and then increased to 1.12 in 1981. Residues of DDE in addled eggs showed a significant inverse relation, confirming the effects of this toxicant on bald eagle reproduction at the population level and the effectiveness of the ban on DDT. The recovery from DDE contamination in bald eagles appears to be occurring much more rapidly than predicted.

  17. Relationship of diets and environmental contaminants in wintering bald eagles. [Haliaeetus leucocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Frenzel, R.W.; Anthony, R.G. )

    1989-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between diets and potential hazards in contaminants of wintering bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the Klamath Basin of northern California and southern Oregon. We studied diets by identifying remains of 913 prey items found at perches, examining 341 castings collected from communal night roots, and observing foraging eagles. We determined residues of organochlorine compounds, lead (Pb), and mercury (Hg) in bald eagles and their prey by analyzing eagle blood samples and carcasses and 8 major prey species. Bald eagles fed largely on waterfowl by scavenging cholera-killed ducks and geese and on microtine rodents during mid- to late winter. Residues of organochlorine pesticides and Hg in prey were low, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's) were detected in low concentrations in 9% of prey samples. Means Pb concentrations in prey ranged from 0.15 to 4.79 ppm. Mercury was detected in all eagle blood samples, and Pb was detected in 41% of the bald eagle blood samples. Mean Pb concentration in livers of dead eagles was 2.09 ppm and ranged as high as 27 ppm in an eagle that died of Pb poisoning. Prey of the eagles were relatively free of contaminants with the possible exception of embedded Pb shot in waterfowl, which may present a potential for Pb poisoning of eagles.

  18. Trends in midwinter counts of bald eagles in the contiguous United States, 1986-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steenhof, Karen; Bond, Laura; Bates, Kirk K.; Leppert, Lynda L.

    2002-01-01

    We estimated statewide, regional, and national trends in counts of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) along selected routes in the contiguous United States during midwinter, 1986-2000. Each January, several hundred observers collected data as part of a survey initiated by the National Wildlife Federation in 1979. To analyze these data, we used only those routes surveyed consistently in at least four years and on which at least four eagles were counted in a single year. We included surveys conducted during fog or precipitaion after determining that changes in weather conditions probably did not affect trend estimates. Our final analysis, using a hierarchical mixed model, was based on 101,777 eagle sightings during 5,180 surveys of 563 routes in 42 states. In the model, fixed effects were year, region, and route-length category; the random effect was the route itself. Model-based estimates of Bald Eagle counts throughout the U.S. increased 1.9% yr-1, but trend estimates varied by region. Estimated trends were statistically significant, and positive, in the northeastern U.S. (6.1% yr-1), but were not significant in other regions. The proportion of increasing counts was higher north of 40° N and east of 100° W. Trends in numbers of adults and immatures showed similar geographic patterns, but counts of adults increased at a higher rate. Overall, trends were more similar to those identified by the Christmas Bird Count than the Breeding Bird Survey. In spite of limitations, the survey is a cost-effective way to monitor wintering eagles in the lower 48 states. We discuss estimated trends in the context of increased urbanization, changed weather, and recovery from pesticide pollution.

  19. Absolute polycythemia in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Andreia F; Fenton, Heather; Martinson, Shannon; Desmarchelier, Marion; Ferrell, Shannon T

    2014-12-01

    An approximately 6-mo-old female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was presented for an inability to fly and bilateral drooped wings. Pectoral muscle atrophy with a moderate polycythemia was present. Over the course of 3 wk, there were no improvements in flight capacity, although the bird gained substantial weight. Further investigation revealed a prominent cyanosis that was responsive to oxygen therapy, a chronic respiratory acidosis with hypoxia, a cardiac murmur, and a persistent polycythemia. No obvious antemortem etiology for the clinical findings was discovered on computerized tomography, angiography, or echocardiography. The bird was euthanatized as a result of the poor prognosis. Necropsy and histopathology revealed no significant cardiovascular or pulmonary pathology. No myopathy was evident on electron microscopy of formalin-fixed tissues. Based on these diagnostics, a neuromuscular disorder is suspected as the cause for the blood gas abnormalities, with a resulting polycythemia from the hypoxia.

  20. 2. VIEW SOUTH, LOCK ENTRANCE Bald Eagle CrossCut Canal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, LOCK ENTRANCE - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  1. Nesting habitat and nest site selection by the bald eagle in Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.A.; Andrew, J.M.

    1981-07-01

    Habitat at 70 bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nest sites was quantified and compared with evaluations at 139 random habitat plots located in the Chesapeake Bay region of Maryland. Bald eagles selected vegetationally open habitats near water and away from selected human activities relative to random habitat plots. Successful nest sites were located in denser forest stands farther from water and unoccupied structures than unsuccessful nest sites.

  2. Observations of a live Glaucous-winged Gull chick in an active Bald Eagle nest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, R.G.; Faris, J.T.

    2003-01-01

    We report an apparent nonlethal predation attempt on and subsequent adoption of a Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens) chick by a pair of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the Aleutian Archipelago, Alaska. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a live Glaucous-winged Gull chick in a Bald Eagle nest. We describe our observations of this occurrence and offer explanations on how it may have occurred.

  3. Risk analysis for the resident bald eagles of the lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, D.; Connolly, J.; Berghoffen, A.

    1995-12-31

    The resident bald eagles of the lower Columbia River have lower productivity and higher contaminant levels than other bald eagles of the Pacific Northwest. The primary population stressors are believed to be habitat loss, human disturbance, p,p{prime}DDE, PCBs, dioxins and furans. The primary effect of habitat loss is to reduce the carrying capacity of the region for nesting sites, and the primary effects of human disturbance and contamination by organic compounds are to reduce productivity. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the effects of all of, these potential stressors on the bald eagle population dynamics. A model of the population dynamics was developed. The model structure includes a physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) submodel to estimate the degree of contamination, which is linked via a toxicology submodel to a population dynamics submodel. The PBTK submodel is time-variable, incorporating species-specific bioenergetics, as well as contaminant assimilation and excretion rates for each compound of interest. Calculated body burdens and egg concentrations for each compound account for spatial and temporal variations in feeding habits and prey contaminant levels. The population submodel includes fecundity and survival information, as well as a limit to the number of breeding pairs (carrying capacity) and a population of non-breeding subadults and adults (floaters). Model simulations are performed in a Monte Carlo framework. Results include estimates of the persistence, resistance and resilience of the population: the probability of extinction, the relationship between magnitude of stress and change in population size, and the time course of recovery of a population following a reduction in stress.

  4. Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and metabolites: Relation to circulating thyroid hormone and retinol in nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Cesh, Lillian S; Elliott, Kyle H; Quade, Susan; McKinney, Melissa A; Maisoneuve, France; Garcelon, David K; Sandau, Court D; Letcher, Robert J; Williams, Tony D; Elliott, John E

    2010-06-01

    Polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons are global contaminants that are often considered to be endocrine disruptors and include 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The present study examined these compounds and their hydroxylated metabolites or analogues and relationships with circulating thyroid hormones and retinols in plasma from nestling and adult bald eagles in British Columbia, Canada, and California, USA. We also compared our results with published data. Thyroxine (T4) decreased with summation operatorPCB and CB153 in nestling bald eagles, which was congruent with results from nine of 14 other published avian laboratory and field studies. Free thyroid hormone levels also decreased with CB-153 and hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs). Retinol increased with CB118 and CB180 in nestling eagles, decreased with OH-PCBs in a subset of nestlings, and decreased in 7 of 12 PCB published studies. Thyroxine decreased with p,p'-DDE for nestlings and with data reported in one of five other published studies. In our samples, plasma retinol, triiodothyronine (T3), and T4 were independent of summation operatorPBDEs, whereas summation operatorOH-PBDEs were weakly but significantly correlated with increases in T3 and retinol. Adult bald eagles showed no relationship between contaminants and thyroid hormones, which is consistent with other studies of long-lived birds, perhaps because adult birds have time to adjust to contaminant levels. Measurement of circulating thyroid hormones appears to be a more useful biomarker than retinols, given the more consistent response of T4 to PCBs here and reported in the literature. We conclude that current environmental exposures to PCBs in British Columbia and in southern California are associated with significant decreases in T4, suggesting a potential negative effect on the endocrine system of nestling bald eagles.

  5. Bald eagles and sea otters in the Aleutian Archipelago: indirect effects of trophic cascades.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Robert G; Estes, James A; Ricca, Mark A; Miles, A Keith; Forsman, Eric D

    2008-10-01

    Because sea otters (Enhydra lutris) exert a wide array of direct and indirect effects on coastal marine ecosystems throughout their geographic range, we investigated the potential influence of sea otters on the ecology of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA. We studied the diets, productivity, and density of breeding Bald Eagles on four islands during 1993-1994 and 2000-2002, when sea otters were abundant and scarce, respectively. Bald Eagles depend on nearshore marine communities for most of their prey in this ecosystem, so we predicted that the recent decline in otter populations would have an indirect negative effect on diets and demography of Bald Eagles. Contrary to our predictions, we found no effects on density of breeding pairs on four islands from 1993-1994 to 2000-2002. In contrast, diets and diet diversity of Bald Eagles changed considerably between the two time periods, likely reflecting a change in prey availability resulting from the increase and subsequent decline in sea otter populations. The frequency of sea otter pups, rock greenling (Hexagammus lagocephalus), and smooth lumpsuckers (Aptocyclus ventricosus) in the eagle's diet declined with corresponding increases in Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus), Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens), Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius), and various species of seabirds during the period of the recent otter population decline. Breeding success and productivity of Bald Eagles also increased during this time period, which may be due to the higher nutritional quality of avian prey consumed in later years. Our results provide further evidence of the wide-ranging indirect effects of sea otter predation on nearshore marine communities and another apex predator, the Bald Eagle. Although the indirect effects of sea otters are widely known, this example is unique because the food-web pathway transcended five species and several trophic levels in linking one apex predator

  6. Bald eagles and sea otters in the Aleutian Archipelago: indirect effects of trophic cascades.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anthony, R.G.; Estes, J.A.; Ricca, M.A.; Miles, A.K.; Forsman, E.D.

    2008-01-01

    Because sea otters (Enhydra lutris) exert a wide array of direct and indirect effects on coastal marine ecosystems throughout their geographic range, we investigated the potential influence of sea otters on the ecology of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, USA. We studied the diets, productivity, and density of breeding Bald Eagles on four islands during 1993–1994 and 2000–2002, when sea otters were abundant and scarce, respectively. Bald Eagles depend on nearshore marine communities for most of their prey in this ecosystem, so we predicted that the recent decline in otter populations would have an indirect negative effect on diets and demography of Bald Eagles. Contrary to our predictions, we found no effects on density of breeding pairs on four islands from 1993–1994 to 2000–2002. In contrast, diets and diet diversity of Bald Eagles changed considerably between the two time periods, likely reflecting a change in prey availability resulting from the increase and subsequent decline in sea otter populations. The frequency of sea otter pups, rock greenling (Hexagammus lagocephalus), and smooth lumpsuckers (Aptocyclus ventricosus) in the eagle's diet declined with corresponding increases in Rock Ptarmigan (Lagopus mutus), Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens), Atka mackerel (Pleurogrammus monopterygius), and various species of seabirds during the period of the recent otter population decline. Breeding success and productivity of Bald Eagles also increased during this time period, which may be due to the higher nutritional quality of avian prey consumed in later years. Our results provide further evidence of the wide-ranging indirect effects of sea otter predation on nearshore marine communities and another apex predator, the Bald Eagle. Although the indirect effects of sea otters are widely known, this example is unique because the food-web pathway transcended five species and several trophic levels in linking one apex

  7. Mercury Exposure in Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) Admitted for Rehabilitation in Iowa, USA.

    PubMed

    Blanchong, Julie A; Reiter-Marolf, William J; Dinsmore, Stephen J

    2017-04-01

    To gain insight into mercury exposure in Bald Eagles ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) in Iowa, US we collected blood from 22 rehabilitation eagles in 2012-13. The geometric mean blood mercury level was 0.144 μg/g (95% confidence interval: 0.066-0.314) and was at the lower end of the range of levels reported elsewhere.

  8. Recent distribution and status of nesting bald eagles in Baja California, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Conant, B.; Anderson, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    We studied Bald Eagles(Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nesting in Baja California, Mexico, and vicinity from 1983-1993. The range of nesting Bald Eagles in Baja California has been reduced from a scattering of pairs along both the Pacific and Gulf sides to a remnant population in Magdalena Bay where no more than three pairs were found annually. Low numbers and a restricted distribution make this disjunct population especially vulnerable to human disturbance. Additional protection of present nesting localities and a reintroduction program on remote islands in the Gulf of California where eagles historically nested, are proposed. Limited data on nesting success indicate that the Magdalena Bay population is reproducing successfully with young probably dispersing north following fledging. The Bald Eagles found wintering along the Colorado River Delta in January apparently nest farther north in the United States or Canada.

  9. Wintering Bald Eagle Count Trends in the Conterminous United States, 1986-2010.

    PubMed

    Eakle, Wade L; Bond, Laura; Fuller, Mark R; Fischer, Richard A; Steenhof, Karen

    We analyzed counts from the annual Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey to examine state, regional, and national trends in counts of wintering Bald Eagles (Haliaeetusleucocephalus) within the conterminous 48 United States from 1986 to 2010. Using hierarchical mixed model methods, we report trends in counts from 11,729 surveys along 844 routes in 44 states. Nationwide Bald Eagle counts increased 0.6% per yr over the 25-yr period, compared to an estimate of 1.9% per yr from 1986 to 2000. Trend estimates for Bald Eagles were significant (P≤0.05) and positive in the northeastern and northwestern U.S. (3.9% and 1.1%, respectively), while trend estimates for Bald Eagles were negative (P≤0.05) in the southwestern U.S. (-2.2%). After accounting for potential biases resulting from temporal and regional differences in surveys, we believe trends reflect post-DDT recovery and subsequent early effects of density-dependent population regulation.

  10. Monitoring bald eagles using lists of nests: Response to Watts and Duerr

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, John R.; Otto, Mark C.; Kendall, William L.; Zimmerman, Guthrie S.

    2011-01-01

    The post-delisting monitoring plan for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) roposed use of a dual-frame sample design, in which sampling of known nest sites in combination with additional area-based sampling is used to estimate total number of nesting bald eagle pairs. Watts and Duerr (2010) used data from repeated observations of bald eagle nests in Virginia, USA to estimate a nest turnover rate and used this rate to simulate decline in number of occupied nests in list nests over time. Results of Watts and Duerr suggest that, given the rates of loss of nests from the list of known nest sites in Virginia, the list information will be of little value to sampling unless lists are constantly updated. Those authors criticize the plan for not placing sufficient emphasis on updating and maintaining lists of bald eagle nests. Watts and Duerr's metric of turnover rate does not distinguish detectability or temporary nonuse of nests from permanent loss of nests and likely overestimates turnover rate. We describe a multi-state capture–recapture model that allows appropriate estimation of rates of loss of nests, and we use the model to estimate rates of loss from a sample of nests from Maine, USA. The post-delisting monitoring plan addresses the need to maintain and update the lists of nests, and we show that dual frame sampling is an effective approach for sampling nesting bald eagle populations.

  11. Wintering Bald Eagle Count Trends in the Conterminous United States, 1986-2010

    PubMed Central

    Eakle, Wade L.; Bond, Laura; Fuller, Mark R.; Fischer, Richard A.; Steenhof, Karen

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed counts from the annual Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey to examine state, regional, and national trends in counts of wintering Bald Eagles (Haliaeetusleucocephalus) within the conterminous 48 United States from 1986 to 2010. Using hierarchical mixed model methods, we report trends in counts from 11,729 surveys along 844 routes in 44 states. Nationwide Bald Eagle counts increased 0.6% per yr over the 25-yr period, compared to an estimate of 1.9% per yr from 1986 to 2000. Trend estimates for Bald Eagles were significant (P≤0.05) and positive in the northeastern and northwestern U.S. (3.9% and 1.1%, respectively), while trend estimates for Bald Eagles were negative (P≤0.05) in the southwestern U.S. (-2.2%). After accounting for potential biases resulting from temporal and regional differences in surveys, we believe trends reflect post-DDT recovery and subsequent early effects of density-dependent population regulation. PMID:26392679

  12. 78 FR 18677 - Nittany and Bald Eagle Railroad Company-Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption-Norfolk Southern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Nittany and Bald Eagle Railroad Company--Temporary Trackage Rights Exemption... Nittany and Bald Eagle Railroad Company (N&BE) over NS's line of railroad between milepost BR 194.2,...

  13. Lead exposure in bald eagles from big game hunting, the continental implications and successful mitigation efforts.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Bryan; Craighead, Derek; Crandall, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Studies suggest hunter discarded viscera of big game animals (i.e., offal) is a source of lead available to scavengers. We investigated the incidence of lead exposure in bald eagles in Wyoming during the big game hunting season, the influx of eagles into our study area during the hunt, the geographic origins of eagles exposed to lead, and the efficacy of using non-lead rifle ammunition to reduce lead in eagles. We tested 81 blood samples from bald eagles before, during and after the big game hunting seasons in 2005-2010, excluding 2008, and found eagles had significantly higher lead levels during the hunt. We found 24% of eagles tested had levels indicating at least clinical exposure (>60 ug/dL) during the hunt while no birds did during the non-hunting seasons. We performed driving surveys from 2009-2010 to measure eagle abundance and found evidence to suggest that eagles are attracted to the study area during the hunt. We fitted 10 eagles with satellite transmitters captured during the hunt and all migrated south after the cessation of the hunt. One returned to our study area while the remaining nine traveled north to summer/breed in Canada. The following fall, 80% returned to our study area for the hunting season, indicating that offal provides a seasonal attractant for eagles. We fitted three local breeding eagles with satellite transmitters and none left their breeding territories to feed on offal during the hunt, indicating that lead ingestion may be affecting migrants to a greater degree. During the 2009 and 2010 hunting seasons we provided non-lead rifle ammunition to local hunters and recorded that 24% and 31% of successful hunters used non-lead ammunition, respectively. We found the use of non-lead ammunition significantly reduced lead exposure in eagles, suggesting this is a viable solution to reduce lead exposure in eagles.

  14. Residues of organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and mercury and autopsy data for bald eagles, 1969 and 1970

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belisle, A.A.; Reichel, W.L.; Locke, L.N.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; DeWolf, R.B.; Cromartie, E.

    1972-01-01

    Thirty-nine bald eagles found sick or dead in 13 States during 1969 and 1970 were analyzed for pesticide residues. Residues of DDE, dieldrin, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's), and mercury were detected in all bald eagle carcasses; DDD residues were detected in 38; DDT, heptachlor epoxide, and dichlorobenzophenone (DCBP) were detected less frequently. Six eagles contained possible lethal levels of dieldrin in the brain, and one contained a lethal concentration of DDE (385 ppm) in the brain together with 235 ppm of PCB's. Autopsy revealed that 18 bald eagles were illegally shot; other causes of death were impact injuries, electrocution, emaciation, and infectious diseases.

  15. Effects of organochlorine contaminants on reproduction of bald eagles in the Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, W.W.; Best, D.A.; Williams, L.L.

    1995-12-31

    Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have increased in the number of breeding pairs since the ban of DDT and PCBs in the 1970s. Eagles nesting near the Great Lakes were nearly extirpated by 1960. While reproductive productivity has generally increased, the recovery of the bald eagle has not been uniform. The authors have previously reported on the general impairment of bald eagle reproduction in eagles that nest near four of the Great Lakes (Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie) that they currently occupy. The authors report here on those eagles that nest within the Saginaw Bay, along Lake Huron, and in interior areas in the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. Eagles nesting along the Saginaw Bay and River have much lesser productivity (0.21 young per occupied nest) and much greater concentrations in blood plasma of nestling eagles [mean 558 ppb Total PCBs (range 252--928 ppb; n = 3); mean 66 ppb p,p{prime}-DDE (range 57--78 ppb)] than those along Lake Huron that are not within the Saginaw Bay [0.43 young per occupied nest; mean 88 ppb Total PCBs (range < 10--160; n = 9); mean 24 ppb p,p{prime}-DDE (range < 541 ppb; n = 9)], and those from interior areas of the Lower Peninsula (1.14 young per occupied nest); mean 31 ppb Total PCBs (range < 10--200 ppb; n = 49); mean 10 ppb p,p{prime}-DDE (range < 5--193 ppb; n = 49), for the period 1987--1993. Addled eggs collected during this time period from the Saginaw Bay region also were above all concentrations of PCBs associated with both reproductive impairment and total reproductive failure. The relative potency of these compounds in Saginaw Bay appear to be associated with the current reproductive impairment of bald eagles there.

  16. Behavioral ecology of bald eagles along the northwest coast: a landscape perspective. [Haliaeetus leucocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.J.; Dyer, M.I.; Shugart, H.H.; Boeker, E.L.

    1986-02-01

    Much of the range of the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) has been subjected to anthropogenic disturbance of greater magnitude than the natural regimes of pre-European settlement times. Consequently, many eagle populations are depauperate. Eagle populations are large and stable, however, along the relatively pristine Pacific Northwest Coast of North America. This study examines: (1) the behavior and ecology of bald eagles along the northwest coast; and (2) the effects of environmental disturbance and resource dynamics on the ecology and evolution of eagles. The ephemeral nature of food supplies along the northwest coast apparently results in eagles being limited primarily by food stress. The foraging behavior of eagles was analyzed using evolutionary game theory as a theoretical construct. Productivity was found to be variable and generally declining in southeast Alaska. Eagles maximized energy input for survival by feeding opportunistically, making broad-scale movements to find food patches, locating food within a patch by searching for prey or for conspecifics with prey, assessing prey profitability, acquiring food by hunting and stealing, and by defending food through threat displays or fighting. Eagles obtain food for reproduction by defending feeding territories and by storing food in their nests. These strategies and adaptations translate up scale and influence characteristics of the regional population. 34 figs., 21 tabs.

  17. Disseminated mite infection with ocular involvement in a juvenile bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Bueno-Padilla, Irene; Klauss, Gia; Gardiner, Chris H; Wuenschmann, Arno

    2012-07-01

    A bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was found unable to fly and was admitted to The Raptor Center (TRC). Major clinical signs were thin body condition and a cardiac arrhythmia. Ten days after admission to TRC, ophthalmic examination revealed multiple, distinct serpiginous lesions of chorioretinal atrophy in the ocular fundus of the right eye (OD). The bird was euthanized because of clinical deterioration and poor prognosis. Mites of an undetermined species were found histologically in the retina, episcleral tissues, lungs, and liver at the postmortem examination. Disseminated mite infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of serpiginous chorioretinal lesions in bald eagles (H. leucocephalus).

  18. Bald eagle mortality from lead poisoning and other causes 1963-1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1985-01-01

    In November 1984, the NWHL was assigned the task to:"Prepare a report of bald eagle mortality from lead poisoning and other causes. Determine whether primary causes of lead poisoning are due to ingestion of lead shot pellets. Prepare an appropriate map showing eagle concentrations and location of death. Make management recommendations."This report is the response to that task. Report organization follows a sequence of: background information, findings, discussion, conclusions, recommendations, and references."

  19. A pair of bald eagles on a utility pole at KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A pair of nesting bald eagles share a utility pole on Kennedy Parkway North. Nearby is their 11-foot-deep nest, in a pine tree, which has been home to one or more pairs of eagles for two dozen years. It is one of a dozen eagle nests in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The Southern Bald Eagle ranges throughout Florida and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana, and the south Atlantic states. Bald Eagles are listed as endangered in the U.S., except in five states where they are listed as threatened. The number of nesting pairs of the southern race once numbered several thousand; recent estimates are only 350-375. Most of the southern race nests in Florida Eagles arrive at KSC during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  20. Clinical, pathological, and immunohistochemical findings in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) naturally infected with West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Wünschmann, Arno; Timurkaan, Necati; Armien, Aníbal G; Bueno Padilla, Irene; Glaser, Amy; Redig, Patrick T

    2014-09-01

    Fifteen bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 3 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) were diagnosed with West Nile disease based on 1) presence of lesions in brain, eyes, and heart, 2) viral antigen detection in brain, eyes, heart, kidney, and/or liver by immunohistochemical staining, 3) detection of viral RNA in tissue samples and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by polymerase chain reaction, and/or 4) detection of West Nile virus (WNV)-specific antibodies in CSF by serum neutralization assay. West Nile virus-associated gross lesions included cerebral pan-necrosis with hydrocephalus ex vacuo (7/15 bald eagles), fibrin exudation into the fundus in 1 golden eagle, retinal scarring in 1 bald eagle, and myocardial pallor and rounded heart apex in 4 bald eagles. Histologic lesions included lymphoplasmacytic encephalitis, most prominently in the cerebrum (17 eagles), lymphoplasmacytic pectenitis and choroiditis (15 and 8 eagles, respectively), and myocarditis (12 eagles). West Nile virus antigen was detected in the majority of the eagles in neurons of the brain (cerebrum and cerebellum), and less commonly present in neurons of the retina, tubular epithelial cells of the kidney, and cardiomyocytes. West Nile disease was diagnosed in 2 bald eagles based on the presence of cerebral pan-necrosis and WNV-specific antibodies in the CSF despite lacking viral antigen and RNA. In conclusion, WNV infection causes a fatal disease in bald and golden eagles. A variety of gross and histologic lesions are highly suggestive of WN disease in most eagles. A combination of detection of viral antigen and/or RNA or virus-specific antibodies proved useful in confirming the diagnosis.

  1. Organochlorine contaminants in bald eagles and double-crested cormorants nesting along the lower Columbia River

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, J.; Schuler, C.; Anthony, R.; Tillitt, D.

    1995-12-31

    The Columbia River receives numerous contaminants from municipal and industrial permitted discharges, nonpoint pollution, accidental spills, and hazardous waste sites. Poor reproductive success has been documented in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nesting along the river, and concentrations of DDE and PCBs in eagle eggs has been correlated with reduced productivity and significant eggshell thinning. Recently, elevated 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) concentrations also were detected in embryos of bald eagles and double-crested cormorants. The authors collected eggs from 11 bald eagle nest sites in 1994 and from 10 cormorant nest sites in 1993 and 1994 and found organochlorines at concentrations potentially harmful to the species. DDE, PCBS, and 2,3,7,8-TCDD in bald eagle eggs averaged 6.84 parts per million (ppm), 6.15 ppm, and 30 parts per trillion (pptr)fresh weight, respectively. In cormorant eggs, fresh weight values ranged from 1.14 to 13.1 ppm for DDE, 0.98 to 9.67 for total PCBS, and 4.8 to 58 pptr for 2,3,7,8-TCDD. Cormorant eggs subjected to a H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay indicated the amounts of TCDD-Equivalents (TCDD-EQs) present would relate to a 23% egg mortality when compared to dose-response relationships between H4IIE-derived TCDD-EQs and egg mortality rates in double-crested cormorants in the Great Lakes. Preliminary results suggest DDE continues to impair reproductive success in Columbia River bald eagles, and dioxin and PCB concentrations may be impacting double-crested cormorants. Further egg analysis and productivity studies will be conducted in 1995.

  2. Influence of food supply and chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants on breeding success of bald eagles.

    PubMed

    Gill, Christopher E; Elliott, John E

    2003-01-01

    Food supply and contaminants were investigated as possible causes of low bald eagle productivity near a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill at Crofton on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Over a seven year period, 1992-1998, average productivity of five eagle territories situated south of the pulp mill at Crofton was significantly lower (0.43 young/occupied territory) than six territories north of the mill (1.04 young/occupied territory). A reference population of 32 territories located in Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island demonstrated intermediary mean productivity (0.75 young/occupied territory). Measures of prey biomass delivered to nests were lowest south of the mill, and correlated significantly with nesting success. On average, measures of energy delivered to nests and a parameter determined to be related to prey availability, adult nest attendance time, accounted for about 70% of variability in nest success. Contaminant concentrations, including pulp mill derived polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), as well as dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and calculated tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) were significantly greater in plasma samples of nestlings from south of the mill compared to the other two sites, but did not correlate significantly with individual nest success data. Nests south of the mill concentrate around Maple Bay, which appears to be a deposition area for contaminants transported by tides and currents from sources such as the pulp mill. Concentrations of DDE and PCBs in plasma of nestling eagles from south of the mill were less than the critical values estimated to affect production of young. For TEQs, there are no published critical values for plasma by which to compare our results. We conclude that less than adequate energy provisioning to nests, presumably related to low prey availability, was likely the main cause of

  3. If Animals Could Talk: Bald Eagle, Bear, Florida Panther, Gopher Tortoise, Indigo Snake, Manatee, Otter, Raccoon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinellas County District School Board, Clearwater, FL.

    In this series of booklets, eight Florida animals describe their appearance, habitats, food, behavior, and relationships with humans. Each entry is written for elementary students from the animal's point of view and includes a bibliography. Contained are the life stories of the bald eagle, black bear, Florida panther, gopher tortoise, Eastern…

  4. 50 CFR 22.28 - Permits for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Endangered Species Act. 22.28 Section 22.28 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit... section 7 incidental take statement under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA) (16...

  5. 50 CFR 22.28 - Permits for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Endangered Species Act. 22.28 Section 22.28 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit... section 7 incidental take statement under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA) (16...

  6. 50 CFR 22.28 - Permits for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Endangered Species Act. 22.28 Section 22.28 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit... section 7 incidental take statement under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA) (16...

  7. 50 CFR 22.28 - Permits for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Endangered Species Act. 22.28 Section 22.28 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit... section 7 incidental take statement under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA) (16...

  8. 50 CFR 22.28 - Permits for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Endangered Species Act. 22.28 Section 22.28 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... for bald eagle take exempted under the Endangered Species Act. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit... section 7 incidental take statement under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA) (16...

  9. Assessment of environmental endocrine disruptors in bald eagles of the Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, W W; Best, D A; Grubb, T G; Sikarskie, J G; Giesy, J P

    2000-11-01

    Environmental endocrine disruption in wildlife has primarily focused on estrogenic/androgenic end points and their antagonists. We describe here the work that has occurred within the Great Lakes of North America that has used the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) as a sentinel species of the effects of environmental toxicants, including endocrine disruption. Our data suggests that population level effects of hormone disrupting chemicals, not necessarily estrogen/androgen mimics and their antagonists, have been associated with reproductive and teratogenic effects observed in the bald eagle population within the Great Lakes Basin. Additional laboratory and field studies are necessary to further clarify the role of environmental endocrine disruptors on reproduction in avian populations. The use of sea eagles (Haliaeetus spp.) as biosentinels of pollution in other regions of the world is also discussed.

  10. Bald eagles view their territory atop a utility pole at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This pair of bald eagles appear unhappy as the focus of the camera while they perch together on the top of a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. The Center counts more than half a dozen bald eagles among the denizens of its site, especially since KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The Southern bald eagle is no stranger to Florida as it ranges throughout the state and along the coasts of California, Texas, Louisiana and south Atlantic states. Most southern Florida eagles nesting at KSC arrive during late summer and leave for the north in late spring. They move to nest sites in October and November and lay one to three eggs. The young fledge from February to April. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  11. Long-term monitoring studies of pollutants on public lands: Bald Eagles in the Midwest

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, W.W.

    1995-12-31

    The role of public agencies to monitor the populations of wildlife species with protected status is paramount to the recovery of these species. Since the early 1960s, the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) populations within the Midwest have been monitored to determine number of breeding pairs, nest occupancy, and success rates. In addition to the reproductive outcome studies, abandoned eggs, blood samples, and feather samples have been collected to determine concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and heavy metals. These surveys give an actual measure of population dynamics of a top-predator species in aquatic systems that integrates the effects of many different environmental pollutants. As concentrations of the organochlorine compounds have declined, bald eagle populations have increased in numbers and their reproductive success has improved. The recovery of this species has not been uniform however. In regions where DDT and PCB concentrations are still above thresholds associated with reproductive impairment, eagles still have impaired reproduction. These areas include the shorelines of the Great Lakes and Voyageurs National Park. Some areas such as the Chippewa National Forest have begun to show declines in reproduction due to density dependent factors. Recent proposals for ecosystem management and reclassification of the bald eagle have led to reduced emphasis for maintaining these long-term data sets. The utility and importance of maintaining surveys of top-predators that can give a measure of population-level effects of pollutants rather than an index will be discussed using examples from the Midwest.

  12. Detection and characterization of a Trichomonas isolate from a rehabilitated bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Kelly-Clark, Whitney K; McBurney, Scott; Forzán, María J; Desmarchelier, Marion; Greenwood, Spencer J

    2013-12-01

    A hatching-year bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was presented for clinical examination after being found unable to fly. Upon admission, routine wet-mount microscopy detected no trichomonads. Five months later, oral cavity inspection found no abnormalities, but the eagle was swabbed for research on trichomonosis in maritime birds. The swab was used to inoculate an InPouch TF culture and trichomonads were visible within 24 hr. Genotyping (ITS) revealed a Trichomonas isolate that was 100% identical to an isolate from a bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) from the Czech Republic. The eagle was treated with metronidazole (50 mg/kg q 12h PO for 5 consecutive days). Following treatment, the eagle was swabbed and the inoculated InPouch TF culture was monitored daily for 1 wk. No trichomonads were observed. Rehabilitation centers interested in surveillance should consider combining the InPouch TF technique with clinical inspection of live birds to confirm trichomonosis and for future research.

  13. Hemograms for and nutritional condition of migrant bald eagles tested for exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Wayland, M E; Bortolotti, G R

    2001-07-01

    Plasma proteins, hematocrit, differential blood counts were examined and nutritional condition was estimated for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) trapped (n = 66) during antumn migration, 1994-95 at Galloway Bay (Saskatchewan, Canada), for the purposes of estimating prevalence of exposure to lead. Sex and age differences in hematocrit and plasma proteins were not observed; however, female eagles exhibited larger median absolute heterophil counts than males. Hematologic values were similar to those previously reported from eagles in captivity. Departures from expected hematological values from a healthy population of eagles were not observed in birds with elevated levels of blood lead (> or =0.200 microg/ml). Similarly, nutritional condition was not related to blood-lead concentrations. Therefore, it appears that lead exposure in this population was below a threshold required to indicate toxicological alteration in the hematological values and index of nutritional condition that we measured.

  14. A review of factors affecting productivity of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region: implications for recovery.

    PubMed Central

    Bowerman, W W; Giesy, J P; Best, D A; Kramer, V J

    1995-01-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population in North America declined greatly after World War II due primarily to the eggshell thinning effects of p,p'-DDE, a biodegradation product of DDT. After the banning of DDT in the United States and Canada during the early 1970s, the bald eagle population started to increase. However, this population recovery has not been uniform. Eagles nesting along the shorelines of the North American Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes still exhibit impaired reproduction. We have explored both ecological and toxicological factors that would limit reproduction of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region. Based on our studies, the most critical factors influencing eagle populations are concentrations of environmental toxicants. While there might be some continuing effects of DDE, total PCBs and most importantly 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ) in fishes from the Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes currently represent a significant hazard to bald eagles living along these shorelines or near these rivers and are most likely related to the impaired reproduction in bald eagles living there. PMID:7556024

  15. A review of factors affecting productivity of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region: implications for recovery.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, W W; Giesy, J P; Best, D A; Kramer, V J

    1995-05-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population in North America declined greatly after World War II due primarily to the eggshell thinning effects of p,p'-DDE, a biodegradation product of DDT. After the banning of DDT in the United States and Canada during the early 1970s, the bald eagle population started to increase. However, this population recovery has not been uniform. Eagles nesting along the shorelines of the North American Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes still exhibit impaired reproduction. We have explored both ecological and toxicological factors that would limit reproduction of bald eagles in the Great Lakes region. Based on our studies, the most critical factors influencing eagle populations are concentrations of environmental toxicants. While there might be some continuing effects of DDE, total PCBs and most importantly 2,3,7,8-tetrachlordibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ) in fishes from the Great Lakes and rivers open to spawning runs of anadromous fishes from the Great Lakes currently represent a significant hazard to bald eagles living along these shorelines or near these rivers and are most likely related to the impaired reproduction in bald eagles living there.

  16. Bald eagle winter roost characteristics in Lava Beds National Monument, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    This study provided a survey of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) winter roost habitat (in 4 km2 of potential roost areas) in southern Lava Beds National Monument, California. A systematic-clustered sampling design (n=381 plots) was used to compare forest stand characteristics in two primary roost areas (Caldwell Butte and Eagle Nest Butte) and two potential roost areas (Hidden Valley and Island Butte). A 100 percent inventory of roost trees in Caldwell Butte (n=103 trees) and Eagle Nest Butte (n=44 trees) showed they were spatially clumped and restricted to 12.7 percent and 2.8 percent, respectively, of the study areas. Roost trees, primarily ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), averaged 81.1 ± 1.3 cm dbh (mean ± 1 S.E.) compared to non-roost trees (>35 cm dbh) that averaged 52.2 ± 1.0 cm dbh. Roost trees were generally taller and more open-structured than non-roost trees. All four study sites had adequate numbers of mid-sized trees (10 to 50 cm dbh) to replace the current stock of older, larger roost trees. However, seedling and small trees (<10 cm dbh) in the roost areas were spatially clumped and few, suggesting that maintaining a continuous population of roost trees may be a problem in the distant future. Long-term studies of changing winter roost habitat and eagle use are essential to protect the bald eagle in the northwestern US.

  17. Assessing ground-based counts of nestling bald eagles in northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, M.R.; Hatfield, J.S.; Lindquist, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    We present evidence that the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) productivity survey in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness of northeastern Minnesota may have underestimated the number of nestlings during 1986-1988. Recommendations are provided to achieve more accurate ground-based counts. By conducting ground-based observations for up to 1 hour/nest, an accurate count of the number of bald eagle nestlings can be obtained. If nests are only observed for up to 30 minutes/nest, an accurate determination of nest success can be made. The effort that managers put into counts should be based on the intended use of the productivity data. If small changes in mean productivity would trigger management action, the less acurate ground-based counts should be conducted with caution. Prior to implementing ground-based counts, a study like ours should estimate bias associated with different survey procedures and the observation time needed to achieve accurate results.

  18. Six different plasma enzymes in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and their usefulness in pathological diagnosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1978-01-01

    1. Activities of creatine phosphokinase, glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, fructose diphosphate aldolase and cholinesterase were measured in plasma of bald eagles. 2. There were no sex differences in the plasma enzyme activities. 3. An acute dieldrin dosage (10 mg/kg) of a female bald eagle resulted in 400% increases in activities of plasma creatine phosphokinase and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase and 250% increases in activities of lactate dehydrogenase and glutamic pyruvic transaminase. 4. At 11 days post-dosage all but one of the plasma enzyme activities had returned to normal; glutamic oxalacetic transaminase activity remained 100% above pre-dosage values. 5. Plasma enzyme assays constitute a non-destrcutive procedure that can be used in valuable wildlife species to screen for the presence and prevalence of environmental contaminants.

  19. Organochlorine concentrations in bald eagles: Brain/body lipid relations and hazard evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbehenn, K.R.; Reichel, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    Residue levels of 12 organochlorine compounds found in the brains of bald eagles can be predicted from the corresponding concentrations in the carcass when expressed on a hexane-extractable lipid basis. The compounds varied by a factor of about 3 in the degree to which they accumulated in the brain. An understanding of these relations enhances our ability to assess the toxic hazards of environmental contamination.

  20. Organochlorine pesticide, PCB, and PBB residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 29 states--1975-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, T.E.; Reichel, W.L.; Locke, L.N.; Cromartie, E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    During 1975-77, 168 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found moribund or dead in 29 states were analyzed for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); 32 specimens from 13 states were analyzed for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs). PCBs were present in 166 bald eagle carcasses and DDE was found in 165. TDE and dieldrin were identified in 137 samples, trans-nonachlor in 118, and oxychlordane in 90. Brains of five eagles contained possible lethal levels of dieldrin, and two eagles possibly died of endrin poisoning. Nine eagle livers, analyzed because of suspected lead poisoning, contained high levels of lead. Twenty percent of the eagles died from shooting, the most common cause of death; this cause of death, however, has declined.

  1. Bald Eagle Nestling Mortality Associated with Argas radiatus and Argas ricei Tick Infestation and Successful Management with Nest Removal in Arizona, USA.

    PubMed

    Justice-Allen, Anne; Orr, Kathy; Schuler, Krysten; McCarty, Kyle; Jacobson, Kenneth; Meteyer, Carol

    2016-10-01

    Eight Bald Eagle ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) nestlings heavily infested with larval ticks were found in or under a nest near the confluence of the Verde and Salt rivers in Arizona in 2009-11. The 8-12-wk-old nestlings were slow to respond to stimuli and exhibited generalized muscle weakness or paresis of the pelvic limbs. Numerous cutaneous and subcutaneous hemorrhages were associated with sites of tick attachment. Ticks were identified as Argas radiatus and Argas ricei. Treatment with acaricides and infection with West Nile virus (WNV) may have confounded the clinical presentation in 2009 and 2010. However, WNV-negative birds exhibited similar signs in 2011. One nestling recovered from paresis within 36 h after the removal of all adult and larval ticks (>350) and was released within 3 wk. The signs present in the heavily infested Bald Eagle nestlings resembled signs associated with tick paralysis, a neurotoxin-mediated paralytic syndrome described in mammals, reptiles, and wild birds (though not eagles). Removal of the infested nest and construction of a nest platform in a different tree was necessary to break the cycle of infection. The original nesting pair constructed a new nest on the man-made platform and successfully fledged two Bald Eagles in 2012.

  2. Bald Eagle nestling mortality associated with Argas radiatus and Argas ricei tick infestation and successful management with nest removal in Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Justice-Allen, Anne; Orr, Kathy; Schuler, Krysten L.; McCarty, Kyle; Jacobson, Kenneth; Meteyer, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Eight Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings heavily infested with larval ticks were found in or under a nest near the confluence of the Verde and Salt rivers in Arizona in 2009-11. The 8-12-wk-old nestlings were slow to respond to stimuli and exhibited generalized muscle weakness or paresis of the pelvic limbs. Numerous cutaneous and subcutaneous hemorrhages were associated with sites of tick attachment. Ticks were identified as Argas radiatus and Argas ricei. Treatment with acaricides and infection with West Nile virus (WNV) may have confounded the clinical presentation in 2009 and 2010. However, WNV-negative birds exhibited similar signs in 2011. One nestling recovered from paresis within 36 h after the removal of all adult and larval ticks (>350) and was released within 3 wk. The signs present in the heavily infested Bald Eagle nestlings resembled signs associated with tick paralysis, a neurotoxin-mediated paralytic syndrome described in mammals, reptiles, and wild birds (though not eagles). Removal of the infested nest and construction of a nest platform in a different tree was necessary to break the cycle of infection. The original nesting pair constructed a new nest on the man-made platform and successfully fledged two Bald Eagles in 2012.

  3. Repair of a coracoid luxation and a tibiotarsal fracture in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Bubenik, Loretta J; Lauer, Susanne K; Vasanjee, Sunil; Mitchell, Mark A

    2007-09-01

    A 4.5-kg, adult bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was presented after being found unable to fly. Crepitus was palpated in the left shoulder; however, the wing position was normal. Radiographs revealed caudoventral luxation of the left coracoid, affecting its distal articulation with the clavicle and its proximal articulation with the sternum. The luxation affecting the coracoid-sternum articulation was repaired by using a 4-hole, 1.5-mm T-plate and a 6-hole, 2.0-mm dynamic compression plate (DCP) placed side by side. The luxation affecting the coracoid and the clavicle was repaired by 2 cerclage wires in a simple interrupted pattern. Before a scheduled release, the bird sustained a closed, complete mid diaphyseal transverse fracture of the right tibiotarsus, which most likely occurred during recapture from the flight cage. The fracture was surgically repaired with 2 circumferential cerclage wires, an intramedullary Kirschner wire and one 10-hole, 2.7-mm DCP. The bird was successfully released, 105 days after the first surgery, near the location where it was found.

  4. Captive propagation of bald eagles at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and introductions into the wild, 1976-80

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1981-01-01

    One to 5 pairs of the Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were in the captive propagation project at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center during 1976-80. Four pairs produced viable eggs or young by natural mating in one or more years. Pairs laid second clutches 9 of 11 times when their first clutches were collected within 8 days of clutch completion. Sixty-nine percent of fertile artificially incubated eggs hatched; 93% of fertile parent-incubated eggs hatched. Eleven eaglets from artificially incubated eggs were hand reared. Age of birds at the time they were acquired from the wild was not a factor in their reproductive success. Ten hand-reared and 2 parent-reared young were fostered to adult Bald Eagles at active wild nests; 11 were accepted and survived. Eleven parent-reared young were provided to hacking projects. Egg transplants to wild nests were conducted, but discontinued because of poor success. Double clutching of captive pairs has not resulted in substantially increased numbers of eaglets. Additional research is needed in artificial incubation, artificial insemination, and nutrition and care of hand-reared eaglets.

  5. Bald eagle habitat suitability on Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    The area around Melton Hill Reservoir and sections of the Clinch River along the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide suitable habitat for bald eagles for both breeding and wintering activities. Primary limitations on habitat suitability appear to be human activity in aquatic habitats and along shoreline areas, and human development along shoreline areas. ORR provides the majority of the suitable habitat because shoreline development is very limited. Four eagle management strategies discussed for ORR include planning development away from high-quality habitats, allowing forest stands near water to mature, conducting timber stand improvement to foster growth and development in pines and hardwoods, and using introductions to foster the development of a breeding population. The primary objective of this project was to make a qualitative assessment of bald eagle habitat suitability along Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River and in adjacent areas on the ORR, including the proposed Advanced Neutron Source site. This survey`s aim was to provide ORR managers with an indication of whether suitable habitat exists and, if so, where it occurs on ORR. This information should provide the basis for incorporating eagle management into the overall ORR land management plan.

  6. Care, food consumption, and behavior of bald eagles used in DDT tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chura, N.J.; Stewart, P.A.

    1967-01-01

    Twenty-seven Bald Eagles captured in southeastern Alaska were used in feeding tests to determine the effects of DDT in the diet.....Trapping and housing of eagles are discussed. Various aspects of eagle behavior and handling techniques are also presented. Recommendations are made for preventing injuries and increasing the comfort of captive birds.....The 1962 test birds consumed an average of 274 grams per bird day with a range of 109 to 401 grams per day between birds. Average food intake was 254 grams per bird day for the 1963 test birds with a range of 194 to 324 grams per day between birds.....Weight losses varied from 23 to 49 per cent of normal body weight for the 7 birds which died in the 1962 tests. Tremors and death occurred first for birds on the highest dosage and progressively later for birds on the lower dosages.

  7. West nile virus transmission in winter: the 2013 great salt lake bald eagle and eared grebes mortality event.

    PubMed

    Ip, Hon S; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; McFarlane, Leslie; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie; Dickson, Sammie Lee; Baker, Jodee; Hatch, Gary; Cavender, Kimberly; Long, Renee; Bodenstein, Barbara

    2014-04-18

    West Nile Virus (WNV) infection has been reported in over 300 species of birds and mammals. Raptors such as eagles, hawks and falcons are remarkably susceptible, but reports of WNV infection in Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) are rare and reports of WNV infection in grebes (Podicipediformes) even rarer. We report an unusually large wild bird mortality event involving between 15,000-20,000 Eared Grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) and over 40 Bald Eagles around the Great Salt Lake, Utah, in November-December 2013. Mortality in grebes was first reported in early November during a period when the area was unseasonably warm and the grebes were beginning to gather and stage prior to migration. Ten out of ten Eared Grebes collected during this period were WNV RT-PCR and/or isolation positive. This is the first report of WNV infection in Eared Grebes and the associated mortality event is matched in scale only by the combined outbreaks in American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) colonies in the north central states in 2002-2003. We cannot be sure that all of the grebes were infected by mosquito transmission; some may have become infected through contact with WNV shed orally or cloacally from other infected grebes. Beginning in early December, Bald Eagles in the Great Salt Lake area were observed to display neurological signs such as body tremors, limb paralysis and lethargy. At least 43 Bald Eagles had died by the end of the month. Nine of nine Bald Eagles examined were infected with WNV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest single raptor mortality event since WNV became endemic in the USA. Because the majority of the eagles affected were found after onset of below-freezing temperatures, we suggest at least some of the Bald Eagles were infected with WNV via consumption of infected Eared Grebes or horizontal transmission at roost sites.

  8. West Nile Virus transmission in winter: the 2013 Great Salt Lake Bald Eagle and Eared Grebes Mortality event

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ip, Hon S.; Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; McFarlan, Leslie; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dickson, Sammie L.; Baker, JoDee; Hatch, Gary; Cavender, Kimberly; Long, Renee Romaine; Bodenstein, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) infection has been reported in over 300 species of birds and mammals. Raptors such as eagles, hawks and falcons are remarkably susceptible, but reports of WNV infection in Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) are rare and reports of WNV infection in grebes (Podicipediformes) even rarer. We report an unusually large wild bird mortality event involving between 15,000-20,000 Eared Grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) and over 40 Bald Eagles around the Great Salt Lake, Utah, in November-December 2013. Mortality in grebes was first reported in early November during a period when the area was unseasonably warm and the grebes were beginning to gather and stage prior to migration. Ten out of ten Eared Grebes collected during this period were WNV RT-PCR and/or isolation positive. This is the first report of WNV infection in Eared Grebes and the associated mortality event is matched in scale only by the combined outbreaks in American White Pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) colonies in the north central states in 2002-2003. We cannot be sure that all of the grebes were infected by mosquito transmission; some may have become infected through contact with WNV shed orally or cloacally from other infected grebes. Beginning in early December, Bald Eagles in the Great Salt Lake area were observed to display neurological signs such as body tremors, limb paralysis and lethargy. At least 43 Bald Eagles had died by the end of the month. Nine of nine Bald Eagles examined were infected with WNV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest single raptor mortality event since WNV became endemic in the USA. Because the majority of the eagles affected were found after onset of below-freezing temperatures, we suggest at least some of the Bald Eagles were infected with WNV via consumption of infected Eared Grebes or horizontal transmission at roost sites.

  9. Winter foraging ecology of bald eagles on a regulated river in southwest Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaltenecker, Gregory S.; Steenhof, Karen; Bechard, Marc J.; Munger, James C.

    1998-01-01

    We studied Bald Eagle foraging ecology on the South Fork Boise River,Idaho, during the winters of 1990-92. We compared habitat variables at 29 foraging sites, 94 perch sites, and 131 random sites.Habitat variables included river habitat (pool, riffle, run), distance to the nearest change in river habitat, distance to nearest available perch, number and species of surrounding perches, and average river depth and flow. Eagles foraged more at pools than expected, and closer( (15 m) to changes in river habitat than expected. Where eagles foraged at riffles, those riffles were slower than riffles where they perched or riffles that were available at random. Where eagles foraged at runs, those runs were shallower than runs at either perch or random sites. Eagles perched less at riffles and more at sites where trees were available than expected. Changes in river habitat represent habitat edges where river depth and flow change, making fish more vulnerable to eagle predation. Fish are more susceptible to predation at shallower river depths and slower flows. Slower river flows may be related to decreased surface turbulence, which also increases vulnerability of fish to aerial predation.

  10. Association of bald eagle reproductive impairment with elevated organochlorine exposure in Green Bay, Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Dykstra, C.R.; Meyer, M.W.; Best, D.A.; Bowerman, W.W. IV; Warnke, D.K.

    1995-12-31

    Bald eagles have recently recolonized the shores of the upper Great Lakes following near-extirpation in the DDT-era. However, bald eagles nesting along the shore of Green Bay, Lake Michigan, currently have reproductive rates which are much lower than those of eagles nesting in inland reference areas in the Great Lakes Basin. Productivity of Green Bay eagles averaged only 0.39 young per occupied territory (5-year average; 1990--1994), compared to 1.13 young per occupied territory in inland Wisconsin, and 0.90 young per occupied territory on the Lake Superior shore in Wisconsin. Eaglet plasma samples collected at reference nests in inland Wisconsin averaged 34 ppb total PCBs and 4 ppb p,p{prime}-DDE (geometric mean, n = 31). Eaglets on Green Bay had contaminant loads which were 7--19 times greater (253 ppb total PCBs and 74 ppb DDE, n = 6), while eaglets on Lake Superior had only 3--5x greater contaminant loads (114 ppb total PCBs and 21 ppb DDE, n = 31). Addled eggs collected in Green Bay nests from 1986--1992 averaged 35 ppm total PCBs and 10 ppm DDE, (n = 13 eggs in 8 nest-attempts), and those collected on the south shore of Lake Superior averaged 11 ppm total PCBs and 3 ppm DDE (n = 6, 1986--1993). Levels of contaminants in contemporary Green Bay eagle eggs exceed those levels associated with normal reproduction, and approach or exceed those levels associated with near-total reproductive failure, suggesting that organochlorine contaminants may impair reproduction in Green Bay eagles.

  11. Lead poisoning of bald (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden (Aquila chrysaetos) eagles in the U.S. inland Pacific northwest region--an 18-year retrospective study: 1991-2008.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Erik; Finch, Nickol; Talcott, Patricia A; Gay, John M

    2010-12-01

    To determine risk factors and seasonal trends of lead poisoning in bald (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden (Aquila chrysaetos) eagles, blood lead levels were evaluated in eagles admitted from the inland Pacific Northwest region of the United States to the Raptor Rehabilitation Program, College of Veterinary Medicine at Washington State University from 1991 to 2008. Admissions were from Washington (32 bald eagles, 27 golden eagles), northern Idaho (21 bald eagles, 25 golden eagles), northeastern Oregon (5 bald eagles, 6 golden eagles), Montana (2 bald eagles), Alaska (1 bald eagle), and unrecorded (6 bald eagles, 5 golden eagles). In these birds, 48% (22/46) of bald and 62% (31/50) of golden eagles tested had blood lead levels considered toxic by current standards. Of the bald and golden eagles with toxic lead levels, 91% (20/22) and 58% (18/31) respectively, were admitted after the end of the general deer and elk hunting seasons in December. Coyote hunting intensifies with the end of the large game hunting seasons and coyote carcasses left in the field and contaminated with lead bullet fragments become readily available food sources, exposing scavenging bald and golden eagles to high risk of acute lead poisoning.

  12. PCBs and DDE, but not PBDEs, increase with trophic level and marine input in nestling bald eagles.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Kyle Hamish; Cesh, Lillian S; Dooley, Jessica A; Letcher, Robert J; Elliott, John E

    2009-06-01

    Concentrations of persistent contaminants often vary widely among individuals within a population. We hypothesized that such variation was caused mainly by differences in diet (biomagnification) and in coastal systems by the tendency of marine systems to act as contaminant sinks. We examined the relationship between contaminant concentrations and stable isotope ratios in nestling plasma from an apex predator with a particularly broad diet. Our study included freshwater, estuarine, inshore and pelagic breeding sites. Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) at the pelagic marine sites showed high trophic level and marine input, eagles at the freshwater sites showed low trophic level and marine input, and eagles at the estuarine and inshore marine sites had intermediate values. The relationship between trophic level and marine input may reflect longer food chains in pelagic compared to terrestrial ecosystems. summation operator PCBs and DDE concentrations generally increased with trophic level and marine input, with the exception of the freshwater sites, while summation operator PBDEs, hydroxylated-PBDEs and hydroxylated-PCBs increased with marine input, but were independent of trophic level. The relationships for summation operator PCBs and DDE were often slightly stronger with marine input than trophic level, suggesting that oceanographic processes may be more important than trophic level. At freshwater locations, spatial variation may be more important than trophic level due to the heterogeneity of contaminant profiles between feeding locations (lakes, rivers, agricultural fields). Adults had similar isotopic composition to their chicks but higher contamination. Based on nests where prey composition was determined independently, isotopic enrichment values for nestling plasma were 1.6+/-0.1 (delta(15)N) and -0.4+/-0.2 (delta(13)C). We conclude that trophic level and marine influence are significant factors influencing PCB and DDE concentrations in eagles. However

  13. Mercury exposure and neurochemical impacts in bald eagles across several Great Lakes states.

    PubMed

    Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Nam, Dong-Ha; Cooley, Thomas; Neumann, Kay; Padilla, Irene Bueno; Route, William; Strom, Sean; Basu, Niladri

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we assessed mercury (Hg) exposure in several tissues (brain, liver, and breast and primary feathers) in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) collected from across five Great Lakes states (Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin) between 2002-2010, and assessed relationships between brain Hg and neurochemical receptors (NMDA and GABA(A)) and enzymes (glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)). Brain total Hg (THg) levels (dry weight basis) averaged 2.80 μg/g (range: 0.2-34.01), and levels were highest in Michigan birds. THg levels in liver (r(p) = 0.805) and breast feathers (r(p) = 0.611) significantly correlated with those in brain. Brain Hg was not associated with binding to the GABA(A) receptor. Brain THg and inorganic Hg (IHg) were significantly positively correlated with GS activity (THg r(p) = 0.190; IHg r(p) = 0.188) and negatively correlated with NMDA receptor levels (THg r(p) = -0245; IHg r(p) = -0.282), and IHg was negatively correlated with GAD activity (r(s) = -0.196). We also report upon Hg demethylation and relationships between Hg and Se in brain and liver. These results suggest that bald eagles in the Great Lakes region are exposed to Hg at levels capable of causing subclinical neurological damage, and that when tissue burdens are related to proposed avian thresholds approximately 14-27% of eagles studied here may be at risk.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of intravenous and oral tramadol in the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Souza, Marcy J; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Jones, Michael P; Cox, Sherry K

    2009-12-01

    Analgesia is becoming increasingly important in veterinary medicine, and little research has been performed that examined pain control in avian species. Tramadol is a relatively new drug that provides analgesia by opioid (mu), serotonin, and norepinephrine pathways, with minimal adverse effects. To determine the pharmacokinetics of tramadol and its major metabolite O-desmethyltramadol (M1) in eagles, 6 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were each dosed with tramadol administered intravenously (4 mg/kg) and orally (11 mg/kg) in a crossover study. Blood was collected at various time points between 0 and 600 minutes and then analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography to determine levels of tramadol and M1, the predominate active metabolite. The terminal half-life of tramadol after intravenous dosing was 2.46 hours. The maximum plasma concentration, time of maximum plasma concentration, and terminal half life for tramadol after oral dosing were 2156.7 ng/ml, 3.75 hours, and 3.14 hours, respec vely. In addition, the oral bioavailability was 97.9%. Although plasma concentrations of ramadol and M1 associated with analgesia in any avian species is unknown, based on the obtained data and known therapeutic levels in humans, a dosage of 5 mg/kg PO q12h is recommended for bald eagles. Pharmacodynamic studies are needed to better determine plasma levels of tramadol and M1 associated with analgesia in birds.

  15. Multiple metals exposure and neurotoxic risk in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from two Great Lakes states.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dong-Ha; Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Basu, Niladri

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, the authors determined concentrations of several elements (As, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Mn, Pb, Sb, Zn) in the brains and livers of 46 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from two Great Lakes states, Michigan and Minnesota. To explore whether exposures are of neurological concern, the authors assessed their associations with neurochemical receptors (N-methyl-D-aspartate [NMDA] and γ-aminobutyric acid A [GABA(A)]) and enzymes (glutamine synthetase [GS] and glutamic acid decarboxylase [GAD]) that play critical roles in vertebrate neurobehavior and reproduction. For most elements, levels in the livers and brains did not differ between region and gender. Hepatic Pb levels averaged 33.1 ppm (dry wt), 30.4% of all carcasses exceeded proposed avian Pb thresholds (>26.4 ppm), and in 30.8% of the birds examined evidence of Pb pellets or fragments was found. Significant changes in the activities of GS and GAD were related to brain concentrations of several metals (Pb, Cd, Co, Cu, Zn). No relationships were found among any of the nine elements and NMDA or GABA(A) receptor levels. When combined with the authors' previous study on these same eagles that showed Hg-associated alterations in GS, GAD, and NMDA receptor levels, the present research suggests that bald eagles are exposed to various elements, especially Pb and Hg, that are capable of causing changes in GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission. The functional significance of these neurochemical changes warrants attention.

  16. Fighting behavior in Bald Eagles: a test of game theory. [Haliaeetus leucocephalus

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, A.J.

    1986-06-01

    Seven predictions of evolutionary game theory were examined in field studies of foraging behavior of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) wintering in the Chilkat Valley, Alaska. A cost/benefit analysis revealed that the frequencies of two foraging strategies (hunting and stealing from conspecifics) were balanced such that the payoffs of the two were nearly equal. Asymmetries in probable correlates of fighting ability (size and, possibly, spatial position (being in the air vs. on the ground), but not age) and expected gain in victory (hunger level) influenced the outcome of contests over food. Individuals used conditions strategies: small or young birds appeared to hung (rather than steal) relatively more often than others. Pirating eagles often assessed the size and hunger level of food defenders and attacked those most likely to retreat. Contrary to prediction, ritualized displays served to advertise expected gain in victory and were good indicators of subsequent behavior. The level of escalated fighting was inversely related to resource availability. Finally, a graphical model shows that pirating frequency may or may not be influenced by changes in food abundance. The results generally support the predictions of game theory and explain several aspects of Bald Eagle foraging behavior.

  17. Successful nesting by a Bald Eagle pair in prairie grasslands of the Texas Panhandle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boal, G.W.; Giovanni, M.D.; Beall, B.N.

    2006-01-01

    We observed a breeding Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leitcocephalus) pair nesting in a short-grass prairie and agricultural community on the southern Great Plains of the Texas Panhandle in 2004 and 2005. The nesting eagles produced 1 fledgling in 2004 and 2 fledglings in 2005. Our assessment of landcover types within a 5-km radius of the nest indicated that grasslands accounted for most of the area (90%), followed by agricultural lands (8%). Black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies occupied 2.5% of the area, and single human residences with associated structures (i.e., barns) occupied 2.5 ha in surface area was 51 km from the nest. An analysis of regurgitated castings collected near the nest revealed a mammalian-dominated, breeding-season diet with black-tailed prairie dogs occurring in 80.9% of the castings. Other identified prey included cottontails (Sylvilagus spp., 15.9%), black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus, 3.2%), pronghorn (Antilocapra americana, 3.2%), and plains pocket gopher (Geomys bursarius, 1.6%). Bird remains were also present in 34.9% of the castings. This is the first reported successful nesting of Bald Eagles in the panhandle region of Texas since 1916; the nest is particularly unique because of its distance from any substantial body of water.

  18. Herring gulls and great black-backed gulls as indicators of contaminants in bald eagles in Lake Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Weseloh, D Vaughn; Hughes, Kimberly D; Ewins, Peter J; Best, Dave; Kubiak, Timothy; Shieldcastle, Mark C

    2002-05-01

    In 2000, a pair of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nested successfully along the shorelines of Lake Ontario in North America for the first time since 1957. However, it is a continuing question whether bald eagles will be able to reproduce successfully as they return to nest on Lake Ontario. Great black-backed gulls (Larus marinus) and herring gulls (L. argentatus) were selected as surrogate species to predict contaminant levels in eggs of bald eagles nesting on Lake Ontario. Because of the suspected overlap in the diets of great black-backed gulls and bald eagles (i.e., fish, gull chicks, and waterfowl), the two species probably occupy a similar trophic level in the Lake Ontario food web and, thus, may have similar contaminant levels. Fresh great black-backed gull and herring gull eggs were collected from three study sites in eastern Lake Ontario in 1993 and 1994 and analyzed for contaminants. Average contaminant levels of dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDE), total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and dieldrin in great black-backed gull eggs were 12.85, 26.27, and 0.27 microg/g, respectively. The mean ratio of contaminant levels in great black-backed gull eggs to contaminant levels in herring gull eggs for these three contaminants was 2.09 (range of means, 1.73-2.38). Predicted levels of contaminants in bald eagle eggs in Lake Ontario would be expected to be similar to the mean levels reported for great black-backed gull eggs. As a comparison, contaminant levels in bald eagle eggs collected from other Great Lakes nesting sites were compared to mean levels reported for herring gull eggs collected from nearby sites in 1986 to 1995. The mean ratio of contaminant levels in bald eagle eggs to contaminant levels in herring gull eggs from these sites for DDE, total PCBs, and dieldrin was 2.40 (range of means, 1.73-3.28). These ratios are very similar to those reported using great black-backed gull eggs, illustrating the apparent similarity in trophic status

  19. A new species of Caryospora (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from the bald eagle, Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Accipitriformes: Accipitridae), from Kansas.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Duszynski, Donald W; McKown, Richard D

    2013-04-01

    Between March 1989 and February 1994, 4 bald eagles ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) from various localities in Kansas were examined for coccidia. One (25%) of the bald eagles was found to be passing an undescribed species of Caryospora in its feces. Oocysts of Caryospora hanebrinki n. sp. are ellipsoidal to ovoidal with a bilayered wall and measure 48.1 × 42.1 μm with a shape index of 1.2. A micropyle, oocyst residuum, and polar granule were absent. Sporocysts are spheroidal, 24.8 μm wide. Stieda, substieda, and parastieda bodies were absent; a spheroidal sporocyst residuum is present; it measures 17.5 μm and is composed of many intact homogenous globules with a few dispersed in a loose spiral around the sporocysts. This is the first caryosporan documented from the bald eagle and is the largest known Caryospora from raptors.

  20. Concentrations of lead in liver, kidney, and bone of bald and golden eagles.

    PubMed

    Wayland, M; Neugebauer, E; Bollinger, T

    1999-08-01

    The diagnosis of lead poisoning in eagles relies on autopsy information and residue analysis of lead in certain tissues, usually liver or blood. Similarly, the assessment of elevated lead exposure in eagles depends on the determination of lead concentrations in these tissues. Renal and bone lead concentrations have rarely been examined in eagles. We examined relationships among hepatic, renal, and bone lead concentrations in bald and golden eagles from the Canadian prairie provinces. Hepatic and renal lead concentrations were strongly related (R2 = 0.87) while those in liver and bone were significantly but poorly related (R2 = 0.22). Renal lead concentrations of 5 and 18 microg x g-1 (dry weight) corresponded to hepatic lead concentrations of 6 and 30 microg x g-1, the hepatic concentrations that we used as criterion levels associated with elevated lead exposure and death from lead poisoning, respectively. Lead was elevated in 19 of 119 and 21 of 109 liver and kidney samples, respectively. Of these 19 and 21 liver and kidney samples, 14 and 11, respectively, had lead concentrations compatible with death from lead poisoning. Taken together, lead concentrations were elevated in liver or kidney samples from 25 eagles and were compatible with death from lead poisoning in 15. Mean bone lead was higher in eagles with elevated hepatic lead than in those exhibiting background hepatic lead concentrations. However, even in the former group, bone lead concentrations were lower than those in lead-exposed individuals of other species of birds. Bone is probably not a useful tissue for identifying elevated lead exposure in eagles. Three of eleven birds that had been shot had anomalous renal lead concentrations, suggestive of contamination by residue from lead ammunition. It is important to exclude such birds when assessing lead exposure.http://link.springer-ny. com/link/service/journals/00244/bibs/37n2p267.html

  1. Fatal attack on a Rylands' bald-faced saki monkey (Pithecia rylandsi) by a black-and-white hawk-eagle (Spizaetus melanoleucus).

    PubMed

    Adams, Dara B; Williams, Sean M

    2017-04-01

    Predation risk has played an important role in primate behavioral evolution, yet natural primate-predator interactions are rarely observed. We describe the consumption and probable predation of an adult bald-faced saki monkey (Pithecia rylandsi) by a black-and-white hawk-eagle (Spizaetus melanoleucus) at the Los Amigos Biological Station in lowland Amazonian Peru. To our knowledge, this is the first published case of a black-and-white hawk-eagle consuming any primate species. We contend that while most reported observations of successful and attempted predation by raptors involves the largest and most notorious species (i.e. the harpy eagle), smaller and lesser known species like S. melanoleucus should be considered more seriously as a predator of neotropical primates. We discuss the predation event in the context of understanding what other neotropical primates might be vulnerable to S. melanoleucus predation given its body size and hunting tactic.

  2. Assessing cumulative impacts to wintering Bald Eagles and their habitats in western Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Witmer, G.W.; O'Neil, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) of Washington, the largest wintering population in the lower 48 states, are subject to numerous pressures and impacts from human activites. An evaluative method potential cumulative impacts of multiple hydroelectric development and logging activities on known and potential eagle use areas. Four resource components include food supply, roost sites, mature riparian forest, and disturbance. In addition to actual estimates of losses in food supply (fish biomass in kg) and habitat (km/sup 2/) in one river basin, impact levels from 0 (none) to 4 (high) were assigned for each development and for each component based on the impacts anticipated and the estimated value of the site to eagles. Midwinter eagle surveys, aerial photography, topographic and forest stand maps, and site visits were used in the analysis. Impacts were considered additive for all but the disturbance component, which was adjusted for potential synergism between developments. Adjustments were made for mitigation before the impacts were aggregated into a single, dimensionless cumulative impact score. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. A spatially-dynamic preliminary risk assessment of the bald eagle at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, G.J.; Gallegos, A.F.; Foxx, T.S.; Fresquez, P.R.; Mullen, M.A.; Pratt, L.E.; Gomez, P.E.

    1998-04-01

    The Endangered Species Act of 1973 and the Record of Decision on the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) require that the Department of Energy protect the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), a state and federally listed species, from stressors such as contaminants. A preliminary risk assessment of the bald eagle was performed using a custom FORTRAN code, ECORSK5, and the geographical information system. Estimated exposure doses to the eagle for radionuclide, inorganic metal, and organic contaminants were derived for varying ratios of aquatic vs. terrestrial simulated diet and compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices (His). HI results indicate that no appreciable impact to the bald eagle is expected from contaminants at LANL from soil ingestion and food consumption pathways. This includes a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants that assumes linear additive toxicity. Improving model realism by weighting simulated eagle foraging based on distance from potential roost sites increased the HI by 76%, but still to inconsequential levels. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, eagle habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain risk from contaminants at low levels.

  4. Spatial and Temporal Patterns in Concentrations of Perfluorinated Compounds in Bald Eagle Nestlings in the Upper Midwestern United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are of concern due to their widespread use, persistence in the environment, tendency to accumulate in animal tissues, and growing evidence of toxicity. Between 2006 and 2011 we collected blood plasma from 261 bald eagle nestlings in six study areas...

  5. Recovery distances of nestling Bald Eagles banded in Florida and implications for natal dispersal and philopatry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Petra Bohall

    2009-01-01

    I used band recovery data to examine distances between banding and recovery locations for 154 nestling Florida Bald Eagles and discuss the implications for understanding natal dispersal and philopatry in this species. Band recoveries occurred in 23 U.S. states and five Canadian provinces between 1931–2005. Recovery distance from the natal nest averaged longer for the youngest age classes (ANOVA: F  =  3.59; df  =  5, 153; P  =  0.005), for individuals banded in earlier decades (F  =  1.94; df  =  5, 153; P  =  0.093), and for the months of May through October (F  =  3.10; df  =  12, 153;P < 0.001). Of 35 individuals classed as mature (≥3.9 yr old when recovered; range 3.9–36.5 yr), 31 were located within Florida, which suggested a strong degree of philopatry to the natal state. Among 21 mature eagles of known sex with known banding and recovery locations in Florida, females, particularly younger birds, had longer recovery distances (N  =  9, mean  =  93 km, SE  =  22.4) than did males (N  =  12, mean  =  31 km, SE  =  5.3; t  =  2.67, df  =  19, P  =  0.026). The records examined here suggest a high degree of philopatry and relatively short natal dispersal distances, particularly in male Bald Eagles.

  6. Correlation of brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of spontaneously lead poisoned bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) with histological lesions: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Francisco, Olga Nicolas; Feeney, Daniel; Armién, Anibal G; Wuenschmann, Arno; Redig, Patrick T

    2016-04-01

    Six bald eagles with severe, acute lead poisoning based on blood lead values were analyzed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain and histopathology. The aims of the study were to use MRI to locate brain lesions and correlate the changes in MRI signal with the histological character of the lesions at necropsy. All of the bald eagles presented with neurologic and non-neurologic signs suggestive of severe lead poisoning and had blood lead levels in excess of 1.0 ppm. Areas of change in image intensity in the brainstem, midbrain and cerebellum were detected in the MRI scans. Histopathology confirmed the presence of all suspected lesions. The character of the lesions suggested vascular damage as the primary insult. MRI was useful for detecting lesions and defining their three-dimensional distribution and extent. Future studies are needed to evaluate the utility of MRI for detection of lesions in less severely lead poisoned eagles and determining prognosis for treatment.

  7. A comparison of blood lead levels in bald eagles from two regions on the great plains of North America.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Restani, M; Harmata, A R; Bortolotti, G R; Wayland, M E

    1998-10-01

    The connection between bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and the consumption of waterfowl, lead shotshell pellet ingestion, and subsequent lead exposure is well documented in the United States and is presumed also to be widespread in Canada. We compared blood lead concentrations in samples from bald eagles ranging in age from 0.5- to 1.5-yr-old at Galloway Bay, Saskatchewan, Canada (n = 97) during October-November, 1992-95 and Hauser Lake, Montana, USA (n = 81) during October-December, 1990-94, within the Great Plains region of North America. Abundant prey are available in the form of hunter-injured waterfowl in Saskatchewan and spawning salmon in Montana; both areas attract large numbers of mid-continent bald eagles during fall migration. Blood lead concentrations suggestive of recent lead exposure (> 0.201 microgram/ml) were found in 32% and 8% of eagles at Hauser Lake and Galloway Bay, respectively, when samples from each study area were analyzed independently at two laboratories. To determine if this difference was an artifact of interlaboratory variation, we determined a correction factor by reanalyzing 14 Saskatchewan blood samples at each laboratory and predicted blood lead concentrations from Hauser Lake had the samples been analyzed at the Canadian laboratory. Adjusted blood lead concentrations of samples from Hauser Lake indicated that 21% of eagles were recently exposed to lead, a proportion not significantly different from the proportion of the same exposure category at Galloway Bay. Our data do not support the supposition that a large proportion of bald eagles feeding on waterfowl in areas of high hunting pressure will be exposed to lead via consumption of lead shotshell pellets in waterfowl.

  8. Mercury residues in livers of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found dead or dying in British Columbia, Canada (1987-1994).

    PubMed

    Weech, S A; Wilson, L K; Langelier, K M; Elliott, J E

    2003-11-01

    Postmortem examinations were conducted on 82 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found dead or dying in British Columbia, Canada, from 1987 to 1994. As part of the examination, livers were analyzed for total mercury (Hg) content, as well as methylmercury (meHg) and selenium (Se) in selected individuals. In total, 67 eagles were classed as having low Hg exposure [total Hg liver residues ranging from 0.5 to 17.2 mg/kg dry weight (dw)]. Fourteen eagles were moderately exposed (liver residues ranging from 19.2 to 36.8 mg/kg Hg dw). One eagle was judged to have died of Hg poisoning, with a total liver Hg content of 130.3 mg/kg dw, of which approximately 77% was meHg. The poisoned eagle and most of the exposed eagles were found in locations where effluent from pulp and paper processing plants is discharged along the British Columbia coast. In total, 6% of eagles examined died as a result of acute metal toxicosis (one from Hg poisoning, four from lead poisoning), in comparison to 72% dying from trauma (electrocution, vehicle/power line collision, eagle attack, trap, gunshot, drowning, and asphyxiation) and 11% from disease. The cause of death was undetermined in the remaining 11% of eagles.

  9. Tibiotarsal fracture repair in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) using an interlocking nail.

    PubMed

    Hollamby, Simon; Dejardin, Loic M; Sikarskie, James G; Haeger, Jennifer

    2004-03-01

    A 14-yr-old, 5.13-kg bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was hit by a car and presented to the Michigan State University Small Animal Clinic with an open, grade II, transverse, midshaft, Winquist-Hansen type-II-comminuted left tibiotarsal fracture. The fracture was reduced and fixation established with a 4.7-mm-diameter, 112-mm-long, four-hole veterinary intramedullary interlocking nail maintained in position by single 2-mm transcortical screws placed in the main proximal and distal fragments. The bird was weight bearing on the bandaged limb 48 hr postoperatively. Radiographs obtained 4 wk postoperatively revealed bridging callus over three of four cortices. The bird was released after 5 mo of rehabilitation.

  10. Elemental and organochlorine residues in bald eagles from Adak Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Stout, Jordan H; Trust, Kimberly A

    2002-07-01

    Adak Island is a remote island in the Aleutian Island archipelago of Alaska (USA) and home to various military activities since World War II. To assess the contaminant burden of one of Adak Island's top predators, livers and kidneys were collected from 26 bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) carcasses between 1993 and 1998 for elemental and organochlorine analyses. Mean cadmium, chromium, mercury, and selenium concentrations were consistent with levels observed in other avian studies and were below toxic thresholds. However, elevated concentrations of chromium and mercury in some individuals may warrant concern. Furthermore, although mean polychlorinated biphenyl and pp'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene concentrations were below acute toxic thresholds, they were surprisingly high given Adak Island's remote location.

  11. Case histories of bald eagles and other raptors killed by organophosphorus insecticides topically applied to livestock.

    PubMed

    Henny, C J; Kolbe, E J; Hill, E F; Blus, L J

    1987-04-01

    Since 1982 when secondary poisoning of a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) was documented following the recommended use of famphur applied topically to cattle, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center has tested dead birds of prey for poisoning by famphur and other pour-on organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. Brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was first determined, then if ChE was depressed greater than or equal to 50%, stomach and/or crop contents were evaluated for anti-ChE compounds. This report presents the circumstances surrounding the OP-caused deaths of eight bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), two red-tailed hawks, and one great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) between March 1984 and March 1985. OP poisoning of raptors by pour-on insecticides in the United States is widespread, but its magnitude is unknown.

  12. Case histories of bald eagles and other raptors killed by organophosphorus insecticides topically applied to livestock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Kolbe, E.J.; Hill, E.F.; Blus, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    Since 1982 when secondary poisoning of a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) was documented following the recommended use of famphur applied topically to cattle, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center has tested dead birds of prey for poisoning by famphur and other pour-on organophosphorus (OP) insecticides. Brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity was first determined, then if ChE was depressed greater than or equal to 50%, stomach and/or crop contents were evaluated for anti-ChE compounds. This report presents the circumstances surrounding the OP-caused deaths of eight bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), two red-tailed hawks, and one great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) between March 1984 and March 1985. OP poisoning of raptors by pour-on insecticides in the United States is widespread, but its magnitude is unknown.

  13. Organochlorine contamination in bald eagle eggs and nestlings from the Canadian Great Lakes.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, G M; Shutt, J L; Hunter, P

    1999-01-01

    Unhatched eggs and plasma samples from prefledged bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from a recovering population in the Canadian Great Lakes Basin were contaminated with organochlorine compounds at levels comparable to those reported for eagle populations in several areas of the United States. PCBs were among the most commonly detected contaminants and occurred at high concentrations in plasma. Plasma PCB concentrations in Lake Erie nestlings were significantly higher than in chicks from Lake Nipigon (0.130 and 0.047 mg/kg wet weight, respectively). Blood levels of mirex were higher in nestlings from Lake Superior compared to those from Lake Erie (0.0012 and 0.0006 mg/kg wet weight, respectively). Migration routes and over-winter locations of avian prey that constitute a part of the bald eagle chick's diet are likely to contribute to these spatial contaminant patterns in plasma. Atmospheric deposition and a cold condensation effect for chlordane compounds may have produced higher levels of these compounds in plasma samples from Lake Superior compared to samples from Lake Erie (0.020 and 0.008 mg/kg wet weight, respectively). Levels of DDE in plasma were generally low, ranging in concentration from 0.02 mg/kg wet weight for lakes Erie and Nipigon to 0.06 mg/kg wet weight for Lake Huron. Concentrations of organochlorines in eaglet plasma remained relatively stable between 1990 and 1996; no significant trends associated with year of sampling were detected. The data from Lake Erie showed no correlation between productivity and plasma levels of PCBs or DDE during this time period. There were no indications that the concentrations of contaminants detected were adversely affecting productivity in Canadian Great Lakes bald eagle populations. Residue levels in eggs from Lake Erie eagle territories were equally or more contaminated than eggs from other highly contaminated environments in the United States such as the Great Lakes and Columbia River estuary

  14. Patterns and trends of chlorinated hydrocarbons in nestling bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) plasma in British Columbia and Southern California.

    PubMed

    Cesh, Lillian S; Williams, Tony D; Garcelon, David K; Elliott, John E

    2008-10-01

    Patterns and trends of chlorinated hydrocarbons were assessed in bald eagle nestling plasma from sites along the west coast of North America. Eagle plasma was sampled from four areas in southwestern British Columbia (BC), a reference site in northern BC, and from Santa Catalina Island, off the coast of California. Sites were chosen to reflect variation in contaminant exposure due to differing recent and/or historic anthropogenic activities. Santa Catalina Island had significantly greater mean concentrations of p,p'-DDE, 41.3 microg/kg wet weight (ww), than other sites, and Nanaimo/Crofton, BC had the greatest mean concentration of total PCBs, 28.9 microg/kg ww. Contaminant levels measured in 2003 in BC were compared to levels measured in 1993; over that ten year span, concentrations and patterns of chlorinated hydrocarbons have not significantly changed. There were no significant differences in levels of p,p'-DDE or hexachlorobenzene between 1993 and 2003, but significant decreases were found for trans-nonachlor and PCBs at BC sites. Levels of total PCBs and trans-nonachlor in the central Fraser Valley and Nanaimo/Crofton area have significantly decreased. Mean concentrations of p,p'-DDE measured in bald eagle nestling plasma samples in 2003 exceeded published criteria for effects on bald eagle reproduction at Santa Catalina Island and Barkley Sound, more than 30 years since heavy usage restrictions were imposed.

  15. Relationships among mercury, selenium, and neurochemical parameters in common loons (Gavia immer) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Scheuhammer, A M; Basu, N; Burgess, N M; Elliott, J E; Campbell, G D; Wayland, M; Champoux, L; Rodrigue, J

    2008-02-01

    Fish-eating birds can be exposed to levels of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) known or suspected to adversely affect normal behavior and reproduction, but little is known regarding Hg's subtle effects on the avian brain. In the current study, we explored relationships among Hg, Se, and neurochemical receptors and enzymes in two fish-eating birds--common loons (Gavia immer) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). In liver, both species demonstrated a wide range of total Hg (THg) concentrations, substantial demethylation of MeHg, and a co-accumulation of Hg and Se. In liver, there were molar excesses of Se over Hg up to about 50-60 microg/g THg, above which there was an approximate 1:1 molar ratio of Hg:Se in both species. However, in brain, bald eagles displayed a greater apparent ability to demethylate MeHg than common loons. There were molar excesses of Se over Hg in brains of bald eagles across the full range of THg concentrations, whereas common loons often had extreme molar excesses of Hg in their brains, with a higher proportion of THg remaining as MeHg compared with eagles. There were significant positive correlations between brain THg and muscarinic cholinergic receptor concentrations in both species studied; whereas significant negative correlations were observed between N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor levels and brain Hg concentration. There were no significant correlations between brain Se and neurochemical receptors or enzymes (cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase) in either species. Our findings suggest that there are significant differences between common loons and bald eagles with respect to cerebral metabolism and toxicodynamics of MeHg and Se. These interspecies differences may influence relative susceptibility to MeHg toxicity; however, neurochemical responses to Hg in both species were similar.

  16. Flame retardants and organochlorine pollutants in bald eagle plasma from the Great Lakes region.

    PubMed

    Venier, Marta; Wierda, Michael; Bowerman, William W; Hites, Ronald A

    2010-08-01

    We report measurements of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and of emerging flame retardants in the plasma of nestling bald eagles sampled from early May to late June of 2005. Concentrations of total PBDEs ranged from 0.35 ng g(-1) ww to 29.3 ng g(-1) ww (average=5.7+/-1.9 ng g(-1) ww). The most abundant congeners were BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100. The fully brominated congener, BDE-209, was detected in approximately one third of the samples at an average concentration of 1.2+/-0.72 ng g(-1) ww. Several emerging flame retardants, such as pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and Dechlorane Plus (DP), were detected in these samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides were also detected at levels close to those previously published. A statistically significant relationship was found between total PBDE concentrations and total PCB and p,p'-DDE concentrations, suggesting that these compounds share a common source, which is most likely the eagle's food.

  17. Changes in productivity and contaminants in bald eagles nesting along the lower Columbia River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buck, J.A.; Anthony, R.G.; Schuler, C.A.; Isaacs, F.B.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies documented poor productivity of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the lower Columbia River (LCR), USA, and elevated p,p???-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, and furans in eagle eggs. From 1994 to 1995, we collected partially incubated eggs at 19 of 43 occupied territories along the LCR and compared productivity and egg contaminants to values obtained in the mid-1980s. We found higher productivity at new nesting sites along the river, yet productivity at 23 older breeding territories remained low and was not different (p = 0.713) between studies. Eggshell thickness at older territories had not improved (p = 0.404), and eggshells averaged 11% thinner than shells measured before dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane use. Decreases in DDE (p = 0.022) and total PCBs (p = 0.0004) in eggs from older breeding areas occurred between study periods. Productivity was not correlated to contaminants, but DDE, PCBs, and dioxin-like chemicals exceeded estimated no-effect values. Some dioxin-like contaminants in eggs were correlated to nest location, with highest concentrations occurring toward the river's mouth where productivity was lowest. Although total productivity increased due to the success of new nesting pairs in the region, egg contaminants remain high enough to impair reproduction at older territories and, over time, may alter productivity of new pairs nesting near the river's mouth. ?? 2005 SETAC.

  18. Choroidal Vasculopathy and Retinal Detachment in a Bald Eagle ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) With Lead Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Eid, Ramzi; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Keller, Krista A; Wiggans, K Tomo; Murphy, Christopher J; LaDouceur, Elise E B; Keel, M Kevin; Reilly, Christopher M

    2016-12-01

    A subadult male bald eagle ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) was presented for severe depression and weakness. Physical examination findings included depressed mentation, dehydration, sternal recumbency, poor body condition, and bilateral, whole-head, horizontal nystagmus. A heavy-metal panel was performed, and blood lead levels were 6.1 ppm. Treatment for lead poisoning was initiated, including subcutaneous fluids and parenteral calcium-disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, ceftiofur, and meloxicam. Ophthalmic examination findings included absent menace response, absent dazzle reflex, slow and incomplete direct pupillary light reflex, mild anterior uveitis, incipient cataracts, multifocal retinal tears, and retinal separation in both eyes. Because of poor prognosis for vision and release to the wild, the eagle was euthanatized. No lesions were observed on gross postmortem examination. Histologically, extensive myocardial necrosis and multisystemic arteriolar vasculopathy were identified. The eyes were examined after tissue processing, and the vasculopathy extended into the choriocapillaris and was associated with a secondary, bilateral, exudative, retinal detachment. This is the first report in avian species characterizing the histopathologic ocular lesions of lead poisoning.

  19. Changes in productivity and contaminants in bald eagles nesting along the lower Columbia River, USA.

    PubMed

    Buck, Jeremy A; Anthony, Robert G; Schuler, Carol A; Isaacs, Frank B; Tillitt, Donald E

    2005-07-01

    Previous studies documented poor productivity of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the lower Columbia River (LCR), USA, and elevated p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, and furans in eagle eggs. From 1994 to 1995, we collected partially incubated eggs at 19 of 43 occupied territories along the LCR and compared productivity and egg contaminants to values obtained in the mid-1980s. We found higher productivity at new nesting sites along the river, yet productivity at 23 older breeding territories remained low and was not different (p = 0.713) between studies. Eggshell thickness at older territories had not improved (p = 0.404), and eggshells averaged 11% thinner than shells measured before dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane use. Decreases in DDE (p = 0.022) and total PCBs (p = 0.0004) in eggs from older breeding areas occurred between study periods. Productivity was not correlated to contaminants, but DDE, PCBs, and dioxin-like chemicals exceeded estimated no-effect values. Some dioxin-like contaminants in eggs were correlated to nest location, with highest concentrations occurring toward the river's mouth where productivity was lowest. Although total productivity increased due to the success of new nesting pairs in the region, egg contaminants remain high enough to impair reproduction at older territories and, over time, may alter productivity of new pairs nesting near the river's mouth.

  20. Pesticide, PCB, and lead residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 32 states - 1978-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Schmeling, S.K.; Cromartie, E.; Kaiser, T.E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    In 1978–81, 293 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from 32 states were necropsied and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and lead residues. DDE was found in all carcasses; PCB, DDD, trans-nonachlor, dieldrin and oxychlordane were next in order of percent frequency of detection. The median levels of DDE and PCB have declined when compared with previous collections. Five specimens contained high levels of dieldrin in their brains which may have contributed to their deaths. Seventeen eagles contained liver lead residues greater than 10 ppm and probably died of lead poisoning. Trauma and shooting are the most common causes of death.

  1. Pesticide, PCB, and lead residues and necropsy data for bald eagles from 32 states, 1978-81

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichel, W.L.; Schmeling, S.K.; Cromartie, E.; Kaiser, T.E.; Krynitsky, A.J.; Lamont, T.G.; Mulhern, B.M.; Prouty, R.M.; Stafford, C.J.; Swineford, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    In 1978a??81, 293 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from 32 states were necropsied and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), and lead residues. DDE was found in all carcasses; PCB, DDD, trans-nonachlor, dieldrin and oxychlordane were next in order of percent frequency of detection. The median levels of DDE and PCB have declined when compared with previous collections. Five specimens contained high levels of dieldrin in their brains which may have contributed to their deaths. Seventeen eagles contained liver lead residues greater than 10 ppm and probably died of lead poisoning. Trauma and shooting are the most common causes of death.

  2. Hematology and serum chemistries of nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) in the lower peninsula of MI, USA.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, W W; Stickle, J E; Giesy, J P

    2000-11-01

    Hematology constituents and serum biochemistries were determined in blood collected from 55 nestling bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from nest sites within the lower peninsula of Michigan in 1992. Hematological values were comparable to published ranges for birds for all but eosinophils, which were greater than normal. Serum chemistry values were similar to those of other birds for all but six parameters, uric acid, cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, globulin, and urea nitrogen, which were greater and glucose which was less. Samples of blood collected from wild bald eagles can be used for hematologic parameters and serum chemistry. It is important for other studies of endangered species to obtain baseline data from healthy, wild animals in their natural environment, and for comparison of animals living in environments of greater exposure to those living in areas of lesser exposure to xenobiotics. We caution that arrangements for rapid analysis be done in advance of sample collection.

  3. Using bald eagles to track spatial (1999-2008) and temporal (1987-1992, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008) trends of contaminants in Michigan's aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Wierda, Michael R; Leith, Katherine F; Roe, Amy S; Grubb, Teryl G; Sikarskie, James G; Best, David A; Pittman, H Tyler; Fuentes, Latice; Simon, Kendall L; Bowerman, William

    2016-08-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is an extensively researched tertiary predator. Studies have delineated information about its life history and the influences of various stressors on its reproduction. Due to the bald eagle's position at the top of the food web, it is susceptible to biomagnification of xenobiotics. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality implemented a program in 1999 to monitor persistent chemicals including polychlorinated biphenols (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDE). The objectives of the present study were to evaluate spatial and temporal trends of PCBs and organochlorine pesticides in nestling bald eagles of Michigan. The authors' study found that concentrations of PCBs and DDE were higher in Great Lakes areas with Lakes Michigan and Lake Huron having the highest concentrations of DDE and Lake Erie having the highest concentrations of PCBs. Temporally (1987-1992, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008) the present study found declines in PCB and DDE concentrations with a few exceptions. Continued monitoring of Michigan bald eagle populations is suggested for a couple of reasons. First, nestling blood contaminant levels are an appropriate method to monitor ecosystem contaminant levels. Second, from 1999 to 2008 PCB and DDE concentrations for 30% and 40%, respectively, of the nestling eagles sampled were above the no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) for bald eagles. Lastly, with the continued development and deployment of new chemistries a continuous long term monitoring program is an invaluable resource. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1995-2002. © 2016 SETAC.

  4. Density and productivity of bald eagles in Prince William Sound, Alaska, after the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    White, C.M.; Ritchie, R.J.; Cooper, B.A.

    1995-12-31

    Helicopter surveys were conducted in Prince William Sound (PWS) to assess the effects of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill on the reproductive success and densities of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) one and two years after the spill (1990 and 1991). Densities of bald eagles were compared between an oiled area in southwestern PWS and an unoiled area in northern PWS. In all surveys (four in 1990, one in 1991) densities of eagles in the oiled areas generally were similar to or higher than those in the unoiled area. Reproductive success was compared between nesting territories that were oiled within 1 km of nests and nesting territories that were unoiled. In 1990, all measures of nest productivity, nest occupancy, and nesting success were similar between oiled and unoiled territories. In 1991, however, the number of young per successful nest was lower in oiled territories. The number of successful nests was slightly lower in 1991 than in 1990 in oiled territories but was significantly lower in 1991 in unoiled territories. Comparisons of nest occupancy and nesting success could not be made in 1991 because early surveys were not conducted. Differences between areas, territories, and years could not be attributed to oil, but rather appeared to be related to natural annual variability. Overall, no demonstrable effects of the oil spill on eagle density or reproduction could be detected in PWS one and two years after the spill. 70 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  5. Effects of lead shot ingestion on delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, hemoglobin concentration, and serum chemistry in bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Pattee, O.H.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Mulhern, B.

    1981-01-01

    Lead shot ingestion by bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is considered to be widespread and has been implicated in the death of eagles in nature. It was recently demonstrated under experimental conditions that ingestion of as few as 10 lead shot resulted in death within 12 to 20 days. In the present study hematological responses to lead toxicity including red blood cell ALAD activity, hemoglobin concentration and 23 different blood serum chemistries were examined in five captive bald eagles that were unsuitable for rehabilitation and release. Eagles were dosed by force-feeding with 10 lead shot; they were redosed if regurgitation occurred. Red blood cell ALAD activity was inhibited by nearly 80% within 24 hours when mean blood lead concentration had increased to 0.8 parts per million (ppm). By the end of 1 week there was a significant decrease (20-25%) in hematocrit and hemoglobin, and the mean blood lead concentration was over 3 ppm. Within as little as 1-2 weeks after dosing, significant elevations in serum creatinine and serum alanine aminotransferase occurred, as well as a significant decrease in the ratio of serum aspartic aminotransferase to serum alanine aminotransferase. The mean blood lead concentration was over 5 ppm by the end of 2 weeks. These changes in serum chemistry may be indicative of kidney and liver alterations.

  6. Using nestling feathers to assess spatial and temporal concentrations of mercury in bald eagles at Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Pittman, H T; Bowerman, W W; Grim, L H; Grubb, T G; Bridges, W C

    2011-10-01

    Bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) have been utilized as a biosentinel of aquatic ecosystem health in the Great Lakes Region since the early 1960s. Bald eagle populations have been monitored at Voyageurs National Park (VNP), Minnesota, since 1973. For the past 20 years, researchers have collected feathers from nestling bald eagles to assess their dietary exposure to mercury (Hg) on Rainy, Kabetogama, and Namakan lakes in VNP. Mercury is an environmental pollutant with both natural and anthropogenic sources, and negatively affects many species of wildlife. In a previous study, geometric mean concentrations of Hg in feathers of nestling bald eagles were greater at VNP (20 mg/kg Dry Weight (DW)) than in nestling feathers from other Great Lakes subpopulations (~7 mg/kg DW), for the period 1985-1989. Current geometric mean concentrations have declined by 77.4% since 1989 at VNP. While all samples from 1985 to 1989 had detectable concentrations of Hg, 10% of current samples had concentrations below the reportable detection limit (0.001 mg/kg DW, n = 180). The major lakes at VNP are impounded, and Hg concentrations also declined greatly after the lake level stabilization order by the International Joint Commission was implemented in 1999. Mercury concentrations in feathers of nestling bald eagles from 1989 to 2010 ranged from ND (<0.001) to 34.97 mg/kg DW. The highest single concentration in a nestling was from Namakan Lake in 2010. The five-year geometric means for Rainy, Kabetogama, and Namakan lakes for 2006-2010 were 6.08, 1.07, and 5.56 mg/kg DW (n = 28, n = 32, n = 27) respectively. Although Hg concentrations in feathers of nestlings greatly declined after the change in water level management in 1999 and are lower than 1989 concentrations, recent samples suggest a gradual increase. Continued monitoring of nestling feather concentrations will be essential to assess this increase, to determine the source of Hg, to determine if there are changes to methylation

  7. Perfluorooctane sulfonate in fish-eating water birds including bald eagles and albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Kannan, K; Franson, J C; Bowerman, W W; Hansen, K J; Jones, P D; Giesy, J P

    2001-08-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was measured in 161 samples of liver, kidney, blood, or egg yolk from 21 species of fish-eating water birds collected in the United States including albatrosses from Sand Island, Midway Atoll, in the central North Pacific Ocean. Concentrations of PFOS in the blood plasma of bald eagles collected fromthe midwestern United States ranged from 13 to 2,220 ng/mL (mean: 330 ng/mL), except one sample that did not contain quantifiable concentrations of PFOS. Concentrations of PFOS were greater in blood plasma than in whole blood. Among 82 livers from various species of birds from inland or coastal U.S. locations, Brandt's cormorant from San Diego, CA, contained the greatest concentration of PFOS (1,780 ng/g, wet wt). PFOS was also found in the sera of albatrosses from the central North Pacific Ocean at concentrations ranging from 3 to 34 ng/mL. Occurrence of PFOS in birds from remote marine locations suggests widespread distribution of PFOS and related fluorochemicals in the environment.

  8. Isolation of mixed subtypes of influenza A virus from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Goyal, Sagar M; Jindal, Naresh; Chander, Yogesh; Ramakrishnan, Muthanan A; Redig, Patrick T; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2010-07-28

    From April 2007 to March 2008, cloacal swabs were obtained from 246 casualty raptors recovered by various wildlife rehabilitation centers in the United States. The swabs were placed in a virus transport medium and transported to the laboratory on ice packs. At the laboratory, the samples were pooled with each pool consisting of five samples. All pools (n = 50) were screened for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV) using a real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR); one of the pools was found positive. All five samples in this pool were tested individually by rRT-PCR; one sample from a bald eagle was found positive. This sample was inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs for virus isolation and a hemagglutinating virus was isolated. Complete genome sequencing of the isolate revealed a mixed infection with H1N1 and H2N1 subtypes. Further analysis revealed that the PB1-F2 gene sequence of H1N1 virus had the N66S virulence-associated substitution. Further studies on ecology and epidemiology of AIV in raptors are needed to help understand their role in the maintenance and evolution of AIV.

  9. Perfluorooctane sulfonate in fish-eating water birds including bald eagles and albatrosses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kannan, K.; Franson, J.C.; Bowerman, W.W.; Hansen, K.J.; Jones, P.D.; Giesy, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) was measured in 161 samples of liver, kidney, blood, or egg yolk from 21 species of fish-eating water birds collected in the United States including albatrosses from Sand Island, Midway Atoll, in the central North Pacific Ocean. Concentrations of PFOS in the blood plasma of bald eagles collected from the midwestern United States ranged from 13 to 2220 ng/mL (mean: 330 ng/mL), except one sample that did not contain quantifiable concentrations of PFOS. Concentrations of PFOS were greater in blood plasma than in whole blood. Among 82 livers from various species of birds from inland or coastal U.S. locations, Brandt's cormorant from San Diego, CA, contained the greatest concentration of PFOS (1780 ng/g, wet wt). PFOS was also found in the sera of albatrosses from the central North Pacific Ocean at concentrations ranging from 3 to 34 ng/mL. Occurrence of PFOS in birds from remote marine locations suggests widespread distribution of PFOS and related fluorochemicals in the environment.

  10. Sensitivity of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) hepatocyte cultures to induction of cytochrome P4501A by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Sean W; Jones, Stephanie P; Elliott, John E

    2003-01-01

    Graded doses of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were added to primary hepatocyte cultures of bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) embryos to determine their sensitivity to induction of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and porphyrin accumulation. No porphyrin accumulation was observed, but both CYP1A catalytic activity (using the ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay) and immunodetectable CYP1A were induced by relatively high concentrations of TCDD. Bald eagle hepatocytes were less sensitive to CYP1A induction than hepatocytes from any other avian species that we have studied to date. These in vitro results are in general agreement with recent assessments of field data, which indicate that bald eagles are relatively insensitive to some of the effects of TCDD and related compounds. Preparation of bald eagle hepatocytes was challenging because existing methods did not yield monolayers of cells. Here we describe details of a new method that was successful for bald eagle hepatocytes. This new method is used routinely in our laboratory to prepare hepatocyte cultures from birds for examination of various biochemical responses to environmental contaminants.

  11. Effects of the Cabinet Gorge Kokanee Hatchery on Wintering Bald Eagles in the Lower Clark Fork River and Lake Pend, Oreille, Idaho: 1986 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, John G.

    1987-12-01

    The abundance and distribution of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) on the lower Clark Fork River, Lake Pend Oreille, and the upper Pend Oreille River, Idaho, were documented during the winters of 1985--86 and 1986--87. Peak counts of bald eagles in weekly aerial censuses were higher in 1985--86 (274) and 1986--87 (429) than previously recorded in mid-winter surveys. Differences in eagle distribution within and between years were apparently responses to changes in prey availability. Eight bald eagles were captured and equipped with radio transmitters in the winter and spring of 1986. Residencies within the study area averaged 13.9 days in 1985--86 and 58.3 days for the four eagles that returned in 1986-87. The eagles exhibited considerable daily movement throughout the study area. After departing the area, one eagle was later sighted approximately 1185 km to the southwest in northern California. Eagle behavioral activity was recorded at time budget sessions at areas of heavy use. Perching in live trees was the most common behavior observed. 34 refs., 39 figs., 17 tabs.

  12. Reference intervals, longitudinal analyses, and index of individuality of commonly measured laboratory variables in captive bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael P; Arheart, Kristopher L; Cray, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine reference intervals, perform longitudinal analyses, and determine the index of individuality (IoI) of 8 hematologic, and 13 biochemical and electrophoretic variables for a group of captive bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Reference intervals were determined from blood samples collected during annual wellness examinations for 41 eagles (23 male and 18 female) with ages ranging between 6 and 43 years (18.7 +/- 7.4, mean +/- SD) at the time of sample collection. Longitudinal analyses and IoI were determined for measured hematologic, biochemical, and protein electrophoretic variables, both individually and as a group, for a subset of 16 eagles (10 male and 6 female) during a 12-year period. This smaller group of eagles ranged in age between 2 and 20 years at the start of the study period, and between 14 and 32 years (21.9 +/- 5.0, mean +/- SD) at the end of the study period. Significant increases with age within the group of 16 eagles were observed only for red blood cells, percent heterophils, total protein, and beta-globulin protein fraction, while albumin:globulin decreased significantly with age. A low IoI (> or = 1.4) was determined for all hematologic and biochemical variables except gamma globulins, which had high IoI (< or = 0.6) for 3 individuals within the subset of 16.

  13. Relationships between bald eagle productivity and dynamics of fish populations and fisheries in the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior, 1983-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoff, Michael H.; Meyer, Michael W.; Van Stappen, Julie; Fratt, Thomas W.

    2004-01-01

    Bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) abundance declined in the 1950s and 1960s along the Wisconsin waters of Lake Superior, and were nearly absent along Wisconsin's Lake Superior shoreline. The population began to increase again between 1980 and 1983, and since then bald eagles nesting on islands along Wisconsin's Lake Superior shoreline (i.e., Apostle Islands) reproduced at a lower rate than have those nesting along the mainland shoreline of the lake and inland. Recent research indicated that bioaccumulation of toxic chemicals in the aquatic food chain no longer limits bald eagle reproduction there, and that productivity at island nests was lower than at mainland nests and inland nests as the result of low food availability. Management agencies have sought models that accurately predict productivity and explain ecological relationships, but no satisfactory models had previously been developed. Modeling was conducted here to determine which factors best explained productivity variability. The Ricker stock-recruitment model derived from only the bivariate breeding pair and productivity data explained only 1% of the variability in productivity data. The functional relationship that explained the greatest amount of productivity variation (83%) included the number of breeding pairs, burbot (Lota lota) biomass, longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus) biomass, and commercial harvest of nontarget fishes. Model results were interpreted to mean that productivity was positively affected by populations of burbot and longnose sucker, which are important prey items, and by commercial fishermen feeding nontarget fish to bald eagles. Harvest of nontarget fishes by tribal fishermen and burbot and longnose sucker populations have not tended to change during the entire study period, although the burbot population has declined since 1991. Therefore, bald eagle productivity is not predicted to increase unless burbot, longnose sucker, or other preferred prey of bald eagles increases

  14. Distribution and elimination of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, biphenyls, and p,p'-DDE in tissues of bald eagles from the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kurunthachalam Senthil; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Giesy, John P; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2002-07-01

    Liver, muscle, fat, kidney, and gall bladder of eight bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found dead in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan during 2000 were analyzed for the presence of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and biphenyls (including coplanar PCBs), p,p'-DDE, and hexachlorobenzene (HCB). Necropsy results showed that the birds suffered from peritonitis, bacterial infection, or trauma. Concentrations of PCDD/DFs in livers ranged from 23 to 4500 pg/g on a wet weight basis (wet wt), whereas the least concentrations were found in blood plasma of bald eagle nestlings (2.3-49 pg/g, wet wt). A maximum total PCB concentration of 280,000 ng/g, wet wt, was found in the liver of a dead bald eagle affected by peritonitis. The greatest concentrations of p,p'-DDE and HCB in eagle livers were 17,000 and 120 ng/g, wet wt, respectively. Eagles with elevated 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or total PCB concentrations tended to have great TCDD/TCDF or PCB126/PCB77 ratios, hypothesized to be due to induction of cytochrome P450 enzymes and subsequent metabolism of TCDF and PCB77. Concentrations of TCDD toxic equivalents (TEQs) in the tissues of bald eagles exceeded the thresholds for toxicity in a few avian species. Non-ortho coplanar PCBs accounted for 68-88% of the total TEQs in bald eagle tissues. PCDDs and PCDFs collectively accounted for, on average, 17% of the total TEQs. On the basis of the analysis of a single gall bladder with bile, biliary excretion rates of PCDDs, PCDFs, and PCBs were estimated as 0.015-0.02% per day.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior to radiography in evaluating spinal cord trauma in three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Stauber, Erik; Holmes, Shannon; DeGhetto, Darlene L; Finch, Nickol

    2007-09-01

    Three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found along highways and unable to fly were presented for evaluation. All eagles exhibited sternal recumbency, as well as flaccid hind limb and tail paralysis. Vertebral column and spinal cord trauma were suspected as the cause. One bird died, whereas the remaining 2 birds were stabilized for diagnostic imaging studies. All 3 birds were evaluated by radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for diagnosis and for prognosis in the live birds. Radiographic findings in all 3 birds were inconclusive, whereas MRI results showed extensive damage of the spinal cord and vertebral column, precluding functional recovery. The 2 surviving birds were euthanatized. In all birds, MRI assessments correlated well with necropsy and histopathologic findings.

  16. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and mercury levels in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) found dead in British Columbia, 1988--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.E.; Wilson, L.K.; Norstrom, R.J.; Langelier, K.M.

    1994-12-31

    Liver samples from 70 bald eagles found dead or dying in British Columbia between 1988 and 1993 were analyzed for organochlorine and mercury levels. A subset of 11 eagles found around the Strait of Georgia, an area of known pulp mill pollution, in summer (and therefore presumably resident birds) were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDS) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs). Levels of DDE and PCBs ranged from less than 1 mg/kg to 190 and 65 mg/kg respectively. Levels of other organochlorines were generally less than 1 mg/kg, with the exception of some chlordane-related compounds which were occasionally over 2 mg/kg. All birds analyzed for PCDDs/PCDFs contained detectable levels of the major 2,378-substituted isomers. Some birds had extremely high levels, one eagle collected near a kraft pulp mill site contained: 400 ng/kg 2378-TCDD, 1400 ng/kg 12378-PnCDD and 4400 ng/kg 123678-HxCDD. All but two eagles had > 1 mg/kg dry wt. of mercury in liver; most contained less than 1 0 mg/kg d.w. but one bird had 130 mg/kg, a level of toxicological concern. All carcasses were autopsied and cause of death determined wherever possible. The relationship between cause of death and sublethal exposure to OCs and Hg is analyzed and discussed.

  17. Utilization Probability Map for Migrating Bald Eagles in Northeastern North America: A Tool for Siting Wind Energy Facilities and Other Flight Hazards.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Elizabeth K; Watts, Bryan D; Turrin, Courtney L

    2016-01-01

    Collisions with anthropogenic structures are a significant and well documented source of mortality for avian species worldwide. The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is known to be vulnerable to collision with wind turbines and federal wind energy guidelines include an eagle risk assessment for new projects. To address the need for risk assessment, in this study, we 1) identified areas of northeastern North America utilized by migrating bald eagles, and 2) compared these with high wind-potential areas to identify potential risk of bald eagle collision with wind turbines. We captured and marked 17 resident and migrant bald eagles in the northern Chesapeake Bay between August 2007 and May 2009. We produced utilization distribution (UD) surfaces for 132 individual migration tracks using a dynamic Brownian bridge movement model and combined these to create a population wide UD surface with a 1 km cell size. We found eagle migration movements were concentrated within two main corridors along the Appalachian Mountains and the Atlantic Coast. Of the 3,123 wind turbines ≥100 m in height in the study area, 38% were located in UD 20, and 31% in UD 40. In the United States portion of the study area, commercially viable wind power classes overlapped with only 2% of the UD category 20 (i.e., the areas of highest use by migrating eagles) and 4% of UD category 40. This is encouraging because it suggests that wind energy development can still occur in the study area at sites that are most viable from a wind power perspective and are unlikely to cause significant mortality of migrating eagles. In siting new turbines, wind energy developers should avoid the high-use migration corridors (UD categories 20 & 40) and focus new wind energy projects on lower-risk areas (UD categories 60-100).

  18. Utilization Probability Map for Migrating Bald Eagles in Northeastern North America: A Tool for Siting Wind Energy Facilities and Other Flight Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Elizabeth K.; Watts, Bryan D.; Turrin, Courtney L.

    2016-01-01

    Collisions with anthropogenic structures are a significant and well documented source of mortality for avian species worldwide. The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is known to be vulnerable to collision with wind turbines and federal wind energy guidelines include an eagle risk assessment for new projects. To address the need for risk assessment, in this study, we 1) identified areas of northeastern North America utilized by migrating bald eagles, and 2) compared these with high wind-potential areas to identify potential risk of bald eagle collision with wind turbines. We captured and marked 17 resident and migrant bald eagles in the northern Chesapeake Bay between August 2007 and May 2009. We produced utilization distribution (UD) surfaces for 132 individual migration tracks using a dynamic Brownian bridge movement model and combined these to create a population wide UD surface with a 1 km cell size. We found eagle migration movements were concentrated within two main corridors along the Appalachian Mountains and the Atlantic Coast. Of the 3,123 wind turbines ≥100 m in height in the study area, 38% were located in UD 20, and 31% in UD 40. In the United States portion of the study area, commercially viable wind power classes overlapped with only 2% of the UD category 20 (i.e., the areas of highest use by migrating eagles) and 4% of UD category 40. This is encouraging because it suggests that wind energy development can still occur in the study area at sites that are most viable from a wind power perspective and are unlikely to cause significant mortality of migrating eagles. In siting new turbines, wind energy developers should avoid the high-use migration corridors (UD categories 20 & 40) and focus new wind energy projects on lower-risk areas (UD categories 60–100). PMID:27336482

  19. Patterns and trends in brominated flame retardants in bald eagle nestlings from the upper midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Route, William T; Dykstra, Cheryl R; Rasmussen, Paul W; Key, Rebecca L; Meyer, Michael W; Mathew, John

    2014-11-04

    We report on patterns and trends in polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the plasma of 284 bald eagle nestlings sampled between 1995 and 2011 at six study areas in the upper Midwestern United States. Geometric mean concentrations of total PBDEs (Σ of nine congeners) ranged from 1.78 ng/mL in the upper St. Croix River watershed to 12.0 ng/mL on the Mississippi River. Lake Superior nestlings fell between these two extremes. Between 2006 and 2011, trends differed among study areas with three declining, two remaining stable, and one increasing. Variation in ΣPBDE trends among study areas was linked to trends in individual congeners. The lower brominated PBDEs (BDE-47, -99, and -100) declined 4-10% while the higher brominated congeners (BDE-153 and -154) increased by about 7.0% annually from 2006 to 2011. This increase was the greatest in nestlings from the St. Croix River and below its confluence with the Mississippi River. Region-wide, our data suggest ΣPBDEs increased in bald eagle nestlings from 1995 through the mid-2000s and then declined by 5.5% annually from 2006 to 2011. These regional trends are consistent with the removal of penta- and octa-PBDEs from the global market.

  20. Epizootic vacuolar myelinopathy of the central nervous system of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and American coots (Fulica americana).

    PubMed

    Thomas, N J; Meteyer, C U; Sileo, L

    1998-11-01

    Unprecedented mortality occurred in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) at DeGray Lake, Arkansas, during the winters of 1994-1995 and 1996-1997. The first eagles were found dead during November, soon after arrival from fall migration, and deaths continued into January during both episodes. In total, 29 eagles died at or near DeGray Lake in the winter of 1994-1995 and 26 died in the winter of 1996-1997; no eagle mortality was noted during the same months of the intervening winter or in the earlier history of the lake. During the mortality events, sick eagles were observed overflying perches or colliding with rock walls. Signs of incoordination and limb paresis were also observed in American coots (Fulica americana) during the episodes of eagle mortality, but mortality in coots was minimal. No consistent abnormalities were seen on gross necropsy of either species. No microscopic findings in organs other than the central nervous system (CNS) could explain the cause of death. By light microscopy, all 26 eagles examined and 62/77 (81%) coots had striking, diffuse, spongy degeneration of the white matter of the CNS. Vacuolation occurred in all myelinated CNS tissue, including the cerebellar folia and medulla oblongata, but was most prominent in the optic tectum. In the spinal cord, vacuoles were concentrated near the gray matter, and occasional swollen axons were seen. Vacuoles were uniformly present in optic nerves but were not evident in the retina or peripheral or autonomic nerves. Cellular inflammatory response to the lesion was distinctly lacking. Vacuoles were 8-50 microns in diameter and occurred individually, in clusters, or in rows. In sections stained by luxol fast blue/periodic acid-Schiff stain, the vacuoles were delimited and transected by myelin strands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intramyelinic vacuoles formed in the myelin sheaths by splitting of one or more myelin lamellae at the intraperiodic line. This lesion is characteristic of

  1. Epizootic vacuolar myelinopathy of the central nervous system of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and American coots (Fulica americana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.J.; Meteyer, C.U.; Sileo, L.

    1998-01-01

    Unprecedented mortality occurred in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) at DeGray Lake, Arkansas, during the winters of 1994-1995 and 1996-1997. The first eagles were found dead during November, soon after arrival from fall migration, and deaths continued into January during both episodes. In total, 29 eagles died at or near DeGray Lake in the winter of 1994-1995 and 26 died in the winter of 1996-1997; no eagle mortality was noted during the same months of the intervening winter or in the earlier history of the lake. During the mortality events, sick eagles were observed overflying perches or colliding with rock walls. Signs of incoordination and limb paresis were also observed in American coots (Fulica americana) during the episodes of eagle mortality, but mortality in coots was minimal. No consistent abnormalities were seen on gross necropsy of either species. No microscopic findings in organs other than the central nervous system (CNS) could explain the cause of death. By light microscopy, all 26 eagles examined and 62/77 (81%) coots had striking, diffuse, spongy degeneration of the white matter of the CNS. Vacuolation occurred in all myelinated CNS tissue, including the cerebellar folia and medulla oblongata, but was most prominent in the optic tectum. In the spinal cord, vacuoles were concentrated near the gray matter, and occasional swollen axons were seen. Vacuoles were uniformly present in optic nerves but were not evident in the retina or peripheral or autonomic nerves. Cellular inflammatory response to the lesion was distinctly lacking. Vacuoles were 8-50 microns in diameter and occurred individually, in clusters, or in rows. In sections stained by luxol fast blue/periodic acid-Schiff stain, the vacuoles were delimited and transected by myelin strands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intramyelinic vacuoles formed in the myelin sheaths by splitting of one or more myelin lamellae at the intraperiodic line. This lesion is characteristic of

  2. Productivity, embryo and eggshell characteristics, and contaminants in bald eagles from the Great Lakes, USA, 1986 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Best, David A; Elliott, Kyle H; Bowerman, William W; Shieldcastle, Mark; Postupalsky, Sergej; Kubiak, Timothy J; Tillitt, Donald E; Elliott, John E

    2010-07-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations in eggs of fish-eating birds from contaminated environments such as the Great Lakes of North America tend to be highly intercorrelated, making it difficult to elucidate mechanisms causing reproductive impairment, and to ascribe cause to specific chemicals. An information- theoretic approach was used on data from 197 salvaged bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) eggs (159 clutches) that failed to hatch in Michigan and Ohio, USA (1986-2000). Contaminant levels declined over time while eggshell thickness increased, and by 2000 was at pre-1946 levels. The number of occupied territories and productivity increased during 1981 to 2004. For both the entire dataset and a subset of nests along the Great Lakes shoreline, polychlorinated biphenyls (SigmaPCBs, fresh wet wt) were generally included in the most parsimonious models (lowest-Akaike's information criterion [AICs]) describing productivity, with significant declines in productivity observed above 26 microg/g SigmaPCBs (fresh wet wt). Of 73 eggs with a visible embryo, eight (11%) were abnormal, including three with skewed bills, but they were not associated with known teratogens, including SigmaPCBs. Eggs with visible embryos had greater concentrations of all measured contaminants than eggs without visible embryos; the most parsimonious models describing the presence of visible embryos incorporated dieldrin equivalents and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE). There were significant negative correlations between eggshell thickness and all contaminants, with SigmaPCBs included in the most parsimonious models. There were, however, no relationships between productivity and eggshell thickness or Ratcliffe's index. The SigmaPCBs and DDE were negatively associated with nest success of bald eagles in the Great Lakes watersheds, but the mechanism does not appear to be via shell quality effects, at least at current contaminant levels, while it is not clear what other mechanisms were

  3. Plasma to egg conversion factor for evaluating polychlorinated biphenyl and DDT exposures in great horned owls and bald eagles.

    PubMed

    Strause, Karl D; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Im, Sook Hyeon; Newsted, John L; Kay, Denise P; Bradley, Patrick W; Blankenship, Alan L; Williams, Lisa L; Giesy, John P

    2007-07-01

    The benefits of nondestructive sampling techniques, such as plasma sampling, to directly measure contaminant exposure levels in at-risk or protected raptor populations are many. However, such assays are generally inconsistent with the most certain source of toxicity reference values, which are based on feeding studies and quantified as dietary or "in ovo" (egg-based) concentrations. An accurate conversion factor to translate nondestructive plasma-based contaminant concentrations to comparable egg-based concentrations will prove valuable to risk assessors investigating the potential effects of chemical exposures to raptors. We used databases describing the concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in great horned owls (GHO; Bubo virginianus) and total PCBs and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from the Great Lakes region (Michigan, Wisconsin, USA) to develop a relationship to predict concentrations of PCBs and DDE in eggs. To develop a robust predictive relationship, all of the source data included concentrations of both total PCBs and/or DDE for nestling blood plasma and egg samples collected from within discrete active nesting territories and, in most instances, the same nest. The key characteristics (slope and elevation) of each relationship were tested for differences related to species and geographic region. Predicted variability of relationships were examined and compared to variability associated with natural systems. The results of statistical testing indicate that applying the conversion factors between species (GHO to bald eagle) and among geographic regions yields predicted egg concentrations that are not statistically dissimilar and are within the natural variability observed for residue concentrations among eggs of raptors within species and region.

  4. Environmental contaminants in bald eagle eggs--1980-84--and further interpretations of relationships to productivity and shell thickness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Bunck, C.M.; Stafford, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    Bald eagle (Haljaeetus leucocephalus) eggs were collected in 15 States in the United States in 1980-84 and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides. polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury. Data were compared and combined with data from earlier studies to examine trends and refine relationships of contaminants to shell thickness and young production. Moderate shell thinning occurred in eggs from several States. The frequency of occurrence of detectable residues of several contaminants declined during 1969-84. DDE concentrations declined significantly in Wisconsin, Maine, and the Chesapeake Bay region. Some other contaminant residues declined, but usually not significantly. During 1980-84. DDE, PCB and mercury concentrations were highest in eggs from Maine, whereas most contaminant concentrations were lowest in eggs from Arizona. DDE was most closely related to shell thickness and young production at sampled breeding areas. Fifteen percent shell thinning was associated with 16 ?g/g DDE (wet weight) for eggs collected early in incubation. Young production was normal when eggs at sampled breeding areas contained < 3.6 ?g/g DDE (wet weight), was nearly halved between 3.6 to 6.3 ?g/g, and halved again when concentrations exceeded 6.3 ?g/g. Several other contaminants were also associated with poor reproduction and eggshell thinning; however, their impact appeared to be secondary to that of DDE and was probably related to their high correlation with DDE. Data relating contaminant concentrations to mean 5-year production are applicable only to breeding areas where eggs are collected after failure to hatch. because such breeding areas are not representative of all nesting bald eagles in a given population.

  5. Biological effects of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) chicks

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, J.E. |; Norstrom, R.J.; Lorenzen, A.; Kennedy, S.W.; Hart, L.E.; Bellward, G.D.; Cheng, K.M.; Philibert, H.; Stegeman, J.J.

    1996-05-01

    During the 1992 breeding season, eggs of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) were collected within a gradient of exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon pollutants on the southern coast of British Columbia. Twenty-five eggs were placed in a laboratory incubator, of which 18 hatched; chicks were sacrificed within 24 h. Hatching success was not significantly different between eggs taken from pulp mill sites and reference sites. A hepatic cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) cross-reactive protein was induced nearly sixfold in chicks from near a pulp mill at Powell River compared to those from a reference site. Hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) and benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylase (BROD) activities were also significantly elevated in chicks from nests located near pulp mills compared to reference sites. A hepatic CYP2B cross-reactive protein was threefold higher in chicks from pulp mill versus reference sites, but the difference was not significant. Residual yolk sacs of eggs collected near pulp mill sites contained greater concentrations of 2,3,7,8-substituted polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) compared to reference areas. No significant differences in concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), non-ortho congeners, and organochlorine pesticides occurred among sites. Regressions showed that the hepatic CYP1A cross-reactive protein and EROD and BROD activities were positively correlated with 2,3,7,8-TCDD, 2,3,7,8-TCDF, and toxic equivalents (TEQs{sub WHO}--World Health Organization toxic equivalence factors) in yolk sacs. No significant concentration-related effects were found for morphological, physiological, or histological parameters, such as chick growth, edema, or density of thymic lymphocytes. Using hepatic CYP1A induction as a biomarker, a no-observed-effect-level of 100 ng/kg and a lowest-observed-effect-level of 210 ng/kg TEQs{sub WHO} on a whole egg (wet weight basis) are suggested for bald eagle chicks.

  6. Contaminants in fishes from great lakes-influenced sections and above dams of three Michigan Rivers: III. Implications for health of bald eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giesy, J.P.; Bowerman, W.W.; Mora, M.A.; Verbrugge, D.A.; Othoudt, R. A.; Newsted, J.L.; Summer, C. L.; Aulerich, R.J.; Bursian, S.J.; Ludwig, J. P.; Dawson, G. A.; Kubiak, T.J.; Best, D. A.; Tillitt, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, there have been discussions of the relative merits of passage of fishes around hydroelectric dams on three rivers (Au Sable, Manistee, and Muskegon) in Michigan. A hazard assessment was conducted to determine the potential for adverse effects on bald eagles that could consume such fishes from above and below dams on the three primary rivers. The hazard assessments were verified by comparing the reproductive productivities of eagles nesting in areas where they ate primarily fish from either above or below dams on the three primary rivers, as well as on two additional rivers in Michigan, the Menominee and Thunder Bay. Concentrations of organochlorine insecticides (OCI), polychlorinated biphenyls (total PCBs), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TCDD-EQ), and total mercury (Hg) were measured in composite samples of fishes from above and below hydroelectric dams on the Manistee and Muskegon Rivers, which flow into Lake Michigan, and the Au Sable River, which flows into Lake Huron. Mean concentrations of OCI, total PCBs, and TCDD-EQ were all greater in fishes from below the dams than in those from above. The hazard assessment indicated that current concentrations of Hg and OCI other than DDT (DDT + DDE + DDD) in fish from neither above nor below dams would present a significant hazard to bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Both total PCBs and TCDD-EQ in fishes from below the dams currently present a significant hazard to bald eagles, since their mean hazard quotients (HQ) were all greater than one.

  7. Hepatic polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels in Wisconsin river otters (Lontra canadensis) and Michigan bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Dornbos, Peter; Chernyak, Sergei; Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Cooley, Thomas; Strom, Sean; Batterman, Stuart; Basu, Niladri

    2015-03-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent and toxic flame-retardant chemicals widespread in the Great Lakes ecosystem. These chemicals are now being regulated and phased-out of the region; therefore it remains important to understand the extent of contamination in order to track the efficacy of recent actions. Here, Σ4PBDE congeners (PBDE-47, 99, 100, 153;wetweight basis unless indicated)were determined in liver tissues from Wisconsin river otters (Lontra canadensis; n = 35; 2009-2010) and Michigan bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus; n = 33; 2009-2011). In otters, Σ4PBDE ranged from0.5 to 72.9 ng/g, with a mean (±SD) and median (25th-75th percentile inter-quartile range) of 16.3 ± 16.4 ng/g and 11.3 (5.6-18.9) ng/g, respectively. The mean lipid-adjusted Σ4PBDE was 1377 ± 1485 ng/g. In eagles, Σ4PBDE ranged from 0 to 1,538.8 ng/g, with a mean and median of 74.3 ± 266.7 ng/g and 21.2 (5.7-28.9) ng/g, respectively. The mean lipid-adjusted Σ4PBDE was 5274.5 ± 19,896.1 ng/g. In both species, PBDE-47 accounted for >50% of the Σ4PBDE, followed by PBDE-99 and PBDE-100 (each ~17-19% of the total). The PBDE levels reported here in otters are similar to mammalian wildlife elsewhere, though the levels in eagles are among the highest worldwide across studied birds. The findings indicate that apex Great Lakes wildlife remain exposed to appreciable levels of PBDEs and more work is needed to understand whether such exposures are associated with adverse health outcomes.

  8. Hepatic polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) levels in Wisconsin river otters (Lontra canadensis) and Michigan bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

    PubMed Central

    Dornbos, Peter; Chernyak, Sergei; Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Cooley, Thomas; Strom, Sean; Batterman, Stuart; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are persistent and toxic flame-retardant chemicals widespread in the Great Lakes ecosystem. These chemicals are now being regulated and phased-out of the region; therefore it remains important to understand the extent of contamination in order to track the efficacy of recent actions. Here, Σ4PBDE congeners (PBDE-47, 99, 100, 153;wetweight basis unless indicated)were determined in liver tissues from Wisconsin river otters (Lontra canadensis; n = 35; 2009–2010) and Michigan bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus; n = 33; 2009–2011). In otters, Σ4PBDE ranged from0.5 to 72.9 ng/g, with a mean (±SD) and median (25th–75th percentile inter-quartile range) of 16.3 ± 16.4 ng/g and 11.3 (5.6–18.9) ng/g, respectively. The mean lipid-adjusted Σ4PBDE was 1377 ± 1485 ng/g. In eagles, Σ4PBDE ranged from 0 to 1,538.8 ng/g, with a mean and median of 74.3 ± 266.7 ng/g and 21.2 (5.7–28.9) ng/g, respectively. The mean lipid-adjusted Σ4PBDE was 5274.5 ± 19,896.1 ng/g. In both species, PBDE-47 accounted for >50% of the Σ4PBDE, followed by PBDE-99 and PBDE-100 (each ~17–19% of the total). The PBDE levels reported here in otters are similar to mammalian wildlife elsewhere, though the levels in eagles are among the highest worldwide across studied birds. The findings indicate that apex Great Lakes wildlife remain exposed to appreciable levels of PBDEs and more work is needed to understand whether such exposures are associated with adverse health outcomes. PMID:25745277

  9. Use of a locking compression plate as an external fixator for repair of a tarsometatarsal fracture in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Ronald D; Crandall, Elizabeth; Bellah, Jamie R

    2011-06-01

    We describe the successful treatment of a tarsometatarsal fracture in a mature bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) using a locking compression plate as an external fixator. The anatomy of the area (inelastic dermis and minimal subcutaneous space) and the high forces placed on a fracture at that site necessitated a unique approach to fixation. The unconventional use of a locking compression plate as an external fixator was minimally invasive, well tolerated by the eagle, and provided adequate stability in opposing fracture forces. This technique may serve as a method of fixation for tarsometatarsal fractures in other large avian species.

  10. Morbidity and mortality of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and peregrine falcons (Falco peregrinus) admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia, 1993-2003.

    PubMed

    Harris, M Camille; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Medical records from 111 threatened bald eagles (86%, Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and peregrine falcons (14%, Falco peregrinus) admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia from 1993 to 2003 were reviewed to identify submitters, causes of morbidity and mortality, and final disposition. Half of all patients admitted were submitted by the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries personnel. Trauma was the most common reason for presentation in bald eagles (70%) and peregrine falcons (81%). Additional causes of morbidity and mortality in bald eagles included toxicoses (10%), infectious diseases (8%), and orphaned young (1%). Neoplasia was confirmed in two trauma cases, suggesting underlying disease might have increased susceptibility to acute traumatic injuries. Peregrine falcons were also admitted for infectious disease (19%). The most frequent infectious disease for both species was West Nile virus. Thirty-nine percent of patients were released back into the wild, 28% were euthanized, 20% died, and 13% were placed in captivity. Postrelease monitoring that would determine whether rehabilitated animals survived to contribute to threatened populations was not performed in this study.

  11. Accumulation profiles of parabens and their metabolites in fish, black bear, and birds, including bald eagles and albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jingchuan; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-09-01

    Although several studies have reported the ubiquitous occurrence of parabens in human specimens and the environment, little is known about the accumulation of these estrogenic chemicals in fish and birds. In this study, accumulation profiles of six parabens and their metabolites were determined in 254 tissue (including liver, kidney, egg, and plasma) samples from 12 species of fish and seven species of birds collected from inland, coastal, and remote aquatic ecosystems. In addition, liver and kidney tissues from black bears were analyzed. Methyl paraben (MeP) was found in a majority of the tissues, with the highest concentration (796ng/g (wet weight [wet wt])) found in the liver of a bald eagle from Michigan. 4-Hydroxy benzoate (HB) was the major metabolite, found in 91% of the tissue samples analyzed at concentrations as high as 68,600ng/g, wet wt, which was found in the liver of a white-tailed sea eagle from the Baltic Sea coast. The accumulation pattern of MeP and 4-HB varied, depending on the species. The mean concentrations of MeP measured in fishes from Michigan, New York, and Florida waters were <2.01 (fillet), 152 (liver), and 32.0 (liver) ng/g, wet wt, respectively, and the corresponding 4-HB concentrations were 39.5, 10,500, and 642ng/g, wet wt. The mean hepatic and renal concentrations of 4-HB in black bears were 1,720 and 1,330ng/g, wet wt, respectively. The concentrations of MeP and 4-HB were significantly positively correlated with each other in various tissues and species, which suggested a common source of exposure to these compounds in fish and birds. Trace concentrations of MeP and 4-HB also were found in the tissues of albatrosses from Midway Atoll, Northwestern Pacific Ocean, which suggested widespread distribution of these compounds in the marine environment.

  12. A rapid postmortem screening test for lead toxicosis in common loons (Gavia immer) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Kornetsky, Rachel; Rock, Meagan; Pokras, Mark

    2013-07-01

    In live animals, lead poisoning can be diagnosed by analyzing blood samples. For postmortem testing, blood samples are not available and analysis of liver or kidney is often used for diagnosis. Liver and kidney analysis is relatively expensive and results might not be quickly available. We examined an inexpensive, rapid method to screen animals for lead toxicosis postmortem by testing the mixture of body fluids (termed "tissue fluids") that pool in the body cavity at necropsy for lead. At necropsy we collected body fluid and liver samples from Common Loon (Gavia immer) and Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) carcasses and determined concentrations of lead in tissue fluid using a desk-top blood lead analyzer. Concentrations of lead in liver were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. There was strong correlation between tissue fluid and liver tissue lead concentrations, and receiver-operating characteristic analysis gave an area under the curve of 0.91, indicating that postmortem measurements of lead in tissue fluids can be utilized as a screening method for lead toxicosis.

  13. Spatial and temporal patterns in concentrations of perfluorinated compounds in bald eagle nestlings in the upper Midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Route, William T; Russell, Robin E; Lindstrom, Andrew B; Strynar, Mark J; Key, Rebecca L

    2014-06-17

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are of concern due to their widespread use, persistence in the environment, tendency to accumulate in animal tissues, and growing evidence of toxicity. Between 2006 and 2011 we collected blood plasma from 261 bald eagle nestlings in six study areas from the upper Midwestern United States. Samples were assessed for levels of 16 different PFCs. We used regression analysis in a Bayesian framework to evaluate spatial and temporal trends for these analytes. We found levels as high as 7370 ng/mL for the sum of all 16 PFCs (∑PFCs). Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorodecanesulfonate (PFDS) were the most abundant analytes, making up 67% and 23% of the PFC burden, respectively. Levels of ∑PFC, PFOS, and PFDS were highest in more urban and industrial areas, moderate on Lake Superior, and low on the remote upper St. Croix River watershed. We found evidence of declines in ∑PFCs and seven analytes, including PFOS, PFDS, and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA); no trend in two analytes; and increases in two analytes. We argue that PFDS, a long-chained PFC with potential for high bioaccumulation and toxicity, should be considered for future animal and human studies.

  14. Hydrologic reconnaissance of the Chilkat River basin, Southeast Alaska; with special reference to the Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bugliosi, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Chilkat River Basin of Alaska is characterized by glaciers, highly dissected mountains with steep-gradient streams, and braided rivers in broad, alluvium-filled valleys. Orographic effects and a wide seasonal range in temperature cause variations in the amount and distribution of precipitation, and thus in the resulting runoff and streamflow. Seeps and springs flowing from alluvial fans contribute to streamflow year round. Infiltration of water from the Tsirku River and its distributary channels is the most important source of groundwater recharge on the river 's alluvial fan, 20 mi north of Haines. Groundwater discharge along the toe of the fan maintains open leads in a reach of the Chilkat River downstream from the fan. This ice-free reach provides spawning habitat for a late run of salmon, which in turn attracts the world 's largest concentration of bald eagles (more than 3,000 birds). Both surface and groundwater are a calcium bicarbonate type. Stream samples had dissolved-solids concentrations < 115 mg/L; values for groundwater were slightly greater. The glacier-fed Chilkat, Tsirku, and Klehini Rivers carry large concentrations of suspended sediment during periods of high flow. (USGS)

  15. Spatial and temporal patterns in concentrations of perfluorinated compounds in bald eagle nestlings in the Upper Midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Route, William T.; Russell, Robin E.; Lindstrom, Andrew B.; Strynor, Mark J.; Key, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are of concern due to their widespread use, persistence in the environment, tendency to accumulate in animal tissues, and growing evidence of toxicity. Between 2006 and 2011 we collected blood plasma from 261 bald eagle nestlings in six study areas from the upper Midwestern United States. Samples were assessed for levels of 16 different PFCs. We used regression analysis in a Bayesian framework to evaluate spatial and temporal trends for these analytes. We found levels as high as 7370 ng/mL for the sum of all 16 PFCs (∑PFCs). Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorodecanesulfonate (PFDS) were the most abundant analytes, making up 67% and 23% of the PFC burden, respectively. Levels of ∑PFC, PFOS, and PFDS were highest in more urban and industrial areas, moderate on Lake Superior, and low on the remote upper St. Croix River watershed. We found evidence of declines in ∑PFCs and seven analytes, including PFOS, PFDS, and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA); no trend in two analytes; and increases in two analytes. We argue that PFDS, a long-chained PFC with potential for high bioaccumulation and toxicity, should be considered for future animal and human studies.

  16. Relation of lineaments to sulfide deposits: Bald Eagle Mountain, Centre County, Pennsylvania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Krohn, M. D.; Gold, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Discrete areas of finely-fractured and brecciated sandstone float are present along the crest of Bald Mountain and are commonly sites of sulfide mineralization, as evidenced by the presence of barite and limonite gossans. The frequency distributions of the brecciated float as the negative binomial distribution supports the interpretation of a separate population of intensely fractured material. Such zones of concentrated breccia float have an average width of one kilometer with a range from 0.4 to 1.6 kilometers and were observed in a quarry face to have subvertical dips. Direct spatial correlation of the Landsat-derived lineaments to the fractured areas on the ridge is low; however, the mineralized and fracture zones are commonly assymetrical to the lineament positions. Such a systematic dislocation might result from an inherent bias in the float population or could be the product of the relative erosional resistance of the silicified material in the mineralized areas in relation to the erosionally weak material at the stream gaps.

  17. 77 FR 27174 - Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... (Aquila chrysaetos) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) where the take is associated with, but not... of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), where the take is... Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 668-668d) to Federal, State, tribal, or...

  18. Integrating the Forensic Sciences in Wildlife Case Investigations: A Case Report of Pentobarbital and Phenytoin Toxicosis in a Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Viner, T C; Hamlin, B C; McClure, P J; Yates, B C

    2016-09-01

    The application of medical knowledge to the purpose of law is the foundation of forensic pathology. A forensic postmortem examination often involves the expertise of multiple scientific disciplines to reconstruct the full story surrounding the death of an animal. Wildlife poses additional challenges in forensic investigations due to little or no associated history, and the disruptive effects of decomposition. To illustrate the multidisciplinary nature of wildlife forensic medicine, the authors outline a case of secondary pentobarbital/phenytoin toxicosis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). The eagle was the single fatality in a group of 8 birds that fed on euthanized domestic cat remains that had been improperly disposed of in a landfill. Cooperation between responding law enforcement officers, pathologists, and other forensic scientists led to the successful diagnosis and resolution of the case.

  19. Characterization of an Avipoxvirus From a Bald Eagle ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) Using Novel Consensus PCR Protocols for the rpo147 and DNA-Dependent DNA Polymerase Genes.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Alexa A; Leone, Angelique M; Toplon, David E; Archer, Linda L; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-12-01

    A juvenile female bald eagle ( Haliaeetus leucocephalus ) was presented with emaciation and proliferative periocular lesions. The eagle did not respond to supportive therapy and was euthanatized. Histopathologic examination of the skin lesions revealed plaques of marked epidermal hyperplasia parakeratosis, marked acanthosis and spongiosis, and eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were done to amplify and sequence DNA polymerase and rpo147 genes. The 4b gene was also analyzed by a previously developed assay. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the obtained sequences found it to be poxvirus of the genus Avipoxvirus and clustered with other raptor isolates. Better phylogenetic resolution was found in rpo147 rather than the commonly used DNA polymerase. The novel consensus rpo147 PCR assay will create more accurate phylogenic trees and allow better insight into poxvirus history.

  20. Using nestling plasma to assess long-term spatial and temporal concentrations of organochlorine compounds in bald eagles within Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA.

    PubMed

    Pittman, H Tyler; Bowerman, William W; Grim, Leland H; Grubb, Teryl G; Bridges, William C; Wierda, Michael R

    2015-03-01

    The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) population at Voyageurs National Park (VNP) provides an opportunity to assess long-term temporal and spatial trends of persistent environmental contaminants. Nestling bald eagle plasma samples collected from 1997 to 2010 were analyzed for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides. Trends of total PCBs, total DDTs, 4,4'-DDE, and Dieldrin were analyzed since >50% of nestling plasma samples had detectable concentrations. Total PCBs, total DDTs, and 4,4'-DDE concentrations have all decreased over time (26.09%, 24.09%, and 40.92% respectively). Concentrations of Dieldrin have increased by 50.25%. In this study, 61.1% of all nestlings sampled had detectable concentrations of Dieldrin from all time periods and all areas of VNP. Since Dieldrin is a banned pesticide in North America, the source of this increase is unknown. However, increases and fluctuations in Dieldrin concentration suggest contaminant levels in VNP may be linked to a new source or environmental process.

  1. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... activity. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit authorizes take of bald eagles and golden eagles where the take is compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle and the golden eagle; necessary to protect... definition applies in this section: Eagle means a live bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), live...

  2. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... activity. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit authorizes take of bald eagles and golden eagles where the take is compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle and the golden eagle; necessary to protect... definition applies in this section: Eagle means a live bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), live...

  3. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... activity. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit authorizes take of bald eagles and golden eagles where the take is compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle and the golden eagle; necessary to protect... definition applies in this section: Eagle means a live bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), live...

  4. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... activity. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit authorizes take of bald eagles and golden eagles where the take is compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle and the golden eagle; necessary to protect... definition applies in this section: Eagle means a live bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), live...

  5. 50 CFR 22.26 - Permits for eagle take that is associated with, but not the purpose of, an activity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... activity. (a) Purpose and scope. This permit authorizes take of bald eagles and golden eagles where the take is compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle and the golden eagle; necessary to protect... definition applies in this section: Eagle means a live bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), live...

  6. Chemical and biological conditions in Bald Eagle Creek and prognosis of trophic characteristics of Foster Joseph Sayers Reservoir, Centre County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flippo, Herbert N.

    1970-01-01

    Foster Joseph Sayers. Reservoir will b.e impounded on moderately fertile soils; however, its water source, Bald Eagle Creek, is a bicarbonate-water stream that is over~y-enriched with nutrients. About 650 of the 1,730 acres to be inundated in summer are subject to infestation with aquatic weeds. Nuisance algal "blooms" are expected to occur in summer. The reservoir will stratify in early summer and water · releas·ed for conservation purposes and acid neutralization will consist mostly of hypolimnetic water. This water will be nearly depleted in. dissolved oxygen and will, at times, contain relatively high concentrations of heavy metallic ions and hydrogen:!sulfide.

  7. Poisoning of bald eagles and red-tailed hawks by carbofuran and fensulfothion in the Fraser Delta of British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J E; Langelier, K M; Mineau, P; Wilson, L K

    1996-07-01

    During the winter of 1990 in the Fraser Delta of British Columbia, Canada, nine birds of prey were found with symptoms of anticholinesterase poisoning. Immediate surgical removal of crop contents of three birds decreased mortality and recovery time. Chemical analysis was conducted on crop contents, which contained mainly duck parts. A bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) contained 200 micrograms/g and a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 2.2 micrograms/g carbofuran, while the crop of another red-tailed hawk contained 30 micrograms/g fensulfothion. There was evidence that granular carbofuran and fensulfothion persisted long enough in the wet, low pH conditions of the Fraser Delta to kill waterfowl and cause secondary poisoning of raptors several months after application of the pesticides.

  8. Lead and eagles: demographic and pathological characteristics of poisoning, and exposure levels associated with other causes of mortality.

    PubMed

    Franson, J Christian; Russell, Robin E

    2014-11-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis to evaluate demographic and pathologic characteristics in 484 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 68 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) diagnosed with lead poisoning at the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center. As part of our analysis, we compared characteristics of lead poisoned eagles with those that died of other causes. Odds of lead poisoning were greater for bald eagles versus golden eagles, females versus males, adults versus juveniles, and eagles from the Mississippi and Central flyways versus the Atlantic and Pacific flyways. In addition to spatial, species, and demographic associations, we detected a distinct temporal trend in the collection date of lead poisoned bald eagle carcasses. These carcasses were found at greater frequency in late autumn and winter than spring and summer. Lesions in lead poisoned birds included emaciation, evidence of bile stasis, myocardial degeneration and necrosis, and renal tubular nephrosis and necrosis. Ingested lead ammunition or fragments were found in 14.2% of bald eagles and 11.8% of golden eagles. The overall mean liver lead concentration (wet weight basis) for eagles diagnosed with lead poisoning was 28.9 ± 0.69 SE mg/kg in bald eagles and 19.4 ± 1.84 SE mg/kg in golden eagles. In eagles diagnosed with collision trauma, electrocution, poisoning (other than lead), emaciation, infectious disease, trapping death, other, and undetermined causes, average liver lead concentrations were low (<1 mg/kg) and did not differ among causes of mortality. Thus, based on our data, we found no evidence that lead exposure of eagles predisposed them to other causes of mortality.

  9. Lead and eagles: demographic and pathological characteristics of poisoning, and exposure levels associated with other causes of mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Russell, Robin E.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis to evaluate demographic and pathologic characteristics in 484 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 68 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) diagnosed with lead poisoning at the U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center. As part of our analysis, we compared characteristics of lead poisoned eagles with those that died of other causes. Odds of lead poisoning were greater for bald eagles versus golden eagles, females versus males, adults versus juveniles, and eagles from the Mississippi and Central flyways versus the Atlantic and Pacific flyways. In addition to spatial, species, and demographic associations, we detected a distinct temporal trend in the collection date of lead poisoned bald eagle carcasses. These carcasses were found at greater frequency in late autumn and winter than spring and summer. Lesions in lead poisoned birds included emaciation, evidence of bile stasis, myocardial degeneration and necrosis, and renal tubular nephrosis and necrosis. Ingested lead ammunition or fragments were found in 14.2 % of bald eagles and 11.8 % of golden eagles. The overall mean liver lead concentration (wet weight basis) for eagles diagnosed with lead poisoning was 28.9 ± 0.69 SE mg/kg in bald eagles and 19.4 ± 1.84 SE mg/kg in golden eagles. In eagles diagnosed with collision trauma, electrocution, poisoning (other than lead), emaciation, infectious disease, trapping death, other, and undetermined causes, average liver lead concentrations were low (<1 mg/kg) and did not differ among causes of mortality. Thus, based on our data, we found no evidence that lead exposure of eagles predisposed them to other causes of mortality.

  10. Comparison of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and comparison with common eider (Somateria mollissima), glaucous-winged gull (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemot (Cepphus columba), and tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata) from the Aleutian Chain of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2009-05-01

    There is an abundance of field data for levels of metals from a range of places, but relatively few from the North Pacific Ocean and Bering Sea. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in feathers from common eiders (Somateria mollissima), glaucous-winged gulls (Larus glaucescens), pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba), tufted puffins (Fratercula cirrhata) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) from the Aleutian Chain of Alaska. Our primary objective was to test the hypothesis that there are no trophic levels relationships for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium among these five species of birds breeding in the marine environment of the Aleutians. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels. As predicted bald eagles had the highest levels of arsenic, chromium, lead, and manganese, but puffins had the highest levels of selenium, and pigeon guillemot had higher levels of mercury than eagles (although the differences were not significant). Common eiders, at the lowest trophic level had the lowest levels of some metals (chromium, mercury and selenium). However, eiders had higher levels than all other species (except eagles) for arsenic, cadmium, lead, and manganese. Levels of lead were higher in breast than in wing feathers of bald eagles. Except for lead, there were no significant differences in metal levels in feathers of bald eagles nesting on Adak and Amchitka Island; lead was higher on Adak than Amchitka. Eagle chicks tended to have lower levels of manganese than older eagles.

  11. Eagles nesting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Earth System Science Office scientists have helped find ways to increase populations of the American Bald Eagle by studying the thermal energy balance of eggs. This information will contribute to the development of artificial incubation techniques that more closely match natural conditions in the wild.

  12. 50 CFR 22.27 - Removal of eagle nests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... factors affecting eagle populations, are compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Removal of eagle nests. 22.27 Section 22... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) EAGLE PERMITS Eagle Permits § 22.27 Removal of eagle nests. (a) Purpose...

  13. 50 CFR 22.27 - Removal of eagle nests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... factors affecting eagle populations, are compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Removal of eagle nests. 22.27 Section 22... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) EAGLE PERMITS Eagle Permits § 22.27 Removal of eagle nests. (a) Purpose...

  14. 50 CFR 22.27 - Removal of eagle nests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... factors affecting eagle populations, are compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Removal of eagle nests. 22.27 Section 22... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) EAGLE PERMITS Eagle Permits § 22.27 Removal of eagle nests. (a) Purpose...

  15. 50 CFR 22.27 - Removal of eagle nests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... factors affecting eagle populations, are compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Removal of eagle nests. 22.27 Section 22... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) EAGLE PERMITS Eagle Permits § 22.27 Removal of eagle nests. (a) Purpose...

  16. 50 CFR 22.27 - Removal of eagle nests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... factors affecting eagle populations, are compatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Removal of eagle nests. 22.27 Section 22... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS (CONTINUED) EAGLE PERMITS Eagle Permits § 22.27 Removal of eagle nests. (a) Purpose...

  17. Retracted: Using bald eagles to track spatial (1999-2008) and temporal (1987-1992, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008) trends of contaminants in Michigan's aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Wierda, Michael R; Leith, Katherine F; Grubb, Teryl G; Sikarskie, James G; Best, David A; Bowerman, William

    2016-08-01

    Retraction: 'Using bald eagles to track spatial (1999-2008) and temporal (1987-1992, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008) trends of contaminants in Michigan's aquatic ecosystems' by Michael R. Wierda, Katherine F. Leith, Teryl G. Grubb, James G. Sikarskie, David A. Best, and William Bowerman The above article from Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, published online on 10 February 2015 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor in Chief, G.A. Burton, Jr., SETAC and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed since the authors determined that some of the plasma samples run at Clemson University had failed quality assurance/quality control and were retested. The concentrations have since been corrected and validated. Reference Wierda MR, Leith KF, Grubb TG, Sikarskie JG, Best DA, Bowerman W. 2015. Using bald eagles to track spatial (1999-2008) and temporal (1987-1992, 1999-2003, and 2004-2008) trends of contaminants in Michigan's aquatic ecosystems. Environ ToxicolChem doi:10.1002/etc.2859.

  18. Measurement of ridge-spreading movements (Sackungen) at Bald Eagle Mountain, Lake County, Colorado, II : continuation of the 1975-1989 measurements using a Global Positioning System in 1997 and 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varnes, David J.; Coe, J.A.; Godt, J.W.; Savage, W.Z.; Savage, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements of ridge-spreading movements at Bald Eagle Mountain in north-central Colorado were reported in USGS Open-File Report 90-543 for the years 1975-1989. Measurements were renewed in 1997 and 1999 using the Global Positioning System (GPS). Movements are generally away from a ridge-top graben and appear to be concentrated along 3 or 4 trenches with uphill facing scarps that are parallel with slope contours. A point just below the lowest trench has moved the most? a total of 8.3 cm horizontally and slightly downward from 1977 to 1999 relative to an assumed stable point on the periphery of the graben. Movements from 1997 to 1999 are less than 1 cm or within the error of measurement.

  19. 5. VIEW SOUTHWEST, INTERIOR CANAL WALL (Original Fabric) Bald ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW SOUTHWEST, INTERIOR CANAL WALL (Original Fabric) - Bald Eagle Cross-Cut Canal Lock, North of Water Street along West Branch of Susquehanna River South bank, 500 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  20. Isolation of 22 new Haliaeetus microsatellite loci and their characterization in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) and three other Haliaeetus eagle species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tingay, R.E.; Dawson, D.A.; Pandhal, J.; Clarke, M.L.; David, V.A.; Hailer, F.; Culver, M.

    2007-01-01

    We isolated a total of 22 microsatellite loci from two Haliaeetus species: the Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Five loci were monomorphic in both the Madagascar fish-eagle (n = 24-43) and the bald eagle (n = 2-8) but were found to be polymorphic in other Haliaeetus species. Haliaeetus loci have proved useful for investigating gene flow in Haliaeetus and Aquila eagles. Ten loci were polymorphic in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle and will be used to investigate the genetic population structure and mating system in this species. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  1. [Baldness surgery].

    PubMed

    Dardour, J-C; Hennebert, H

    2003-10-01

    Redistribution from hair-rich to hair-poor areas is the fundamental principle of baldness surgery. Success of hair transplantation is based on the fact that transplanted hair follicles will behave as they did in their original area and continue to grow. Three basic techniques are employed: scalp flaps, scalp reductions and hair grafts. Each technique has undergone considerable refinements answering to initial wrong results and criticisms. The typical doll-hair tufted effect of old macro-grafts has disappeared with micro-graft shift. The unaesthetic cheese-like Hippocratic crown donor defect aspect ended when harvesting a long strip of occipital hair bearing scalp. The posteriorly directed hair growth has disappeared by using superiorly based flaps. Respective indications and tension-free closure ensure that the incidence of necrosis is low. Limited results of old scalp reductions have decreased by testing preoperative laxity of the scalp and using extensive undermining of the scalp. The future may release on medical treatment avoiding dihydrotestosterone to act on genetically predisposed follicles avoiding miniaturization of the hair and baldness development. However, when baldness has appeared, as the hair follicle's culture is not actually effective, the state of art is still to plan a surgical strategy using successive stages of this large panel of techniques to reach a natural effect with the best hair orientation and density.

  2. Hematocrit and plasma chemistry values in adult collared scops owls (Otus lettia) and crested serpent eagles (Spilornis cheela hoya).

    PubMed

    Chan, Fang-Tse; Lin, Pei-I; Chang, Geng-Ruei; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Hsu, Tien-Huan

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we report hematocrit and plasma chemistry values for adult captive collared scops owls (Otus lettia) and crested serpent eagles (Spilornis cheela hoya). In particular, we address the gender-specific differences within these values. We measured hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values for uric acid (UA), plasma urea nitrogen (BUN), total protein (TP), albumin (ALB), glucose (GLU), cholesterol (CHO), triglyceride (TG), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin (TBIL), creatine (CRE), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), amylase (AMY), calcium (CA), ionic phosphorous (IP) and sodium (NA), potassium (K) and chloride ions (CL) in 37 adult captive collared scops owls and 39 adult captive crested serpent eagles. Significant differences between the sexes were found for UA, GLU and CPK in the collared scope owls. UA and GLU concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.01 and P<0.05) among males than females, while the CPK concentration was significantly lower (P<0.05) in males. There were no significant differences in of all of the measured parameters between male and female eagles. These finding suggested that HCT and plasma chemistry values of raptors vary individually according to species and sex. Our results provide the 1st available reference data for ranges of plasma values in adult captive collared scops owls and crested serpent eagles, making them a potentially useful complementary diagnostic tool for veterinary care of individuals for both species in captivity.

  3. Hydrology and the hypothetical effects of reducing nutrient applications of water quality in the Bald Eagle Creek Headwaters, southeastern Pennsylvania prior to implementation of agricultural best-management practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishel, D.K.; Langland, M.J.; Truhlar, M.V.

    1991-01-01

    The report characterizes a 0.43-square-mile agricultural watershed in York County, underlain by albite-chlorite and oligoclase-mica schist in the Lower Susquehanna River basin, that is being studied as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program. The water quality of Bald Eagle Creek was studied from October 1985 through September 1987 prior to the implementation of Best-Management Practices to reduce nutrient and sediment discharge into Muddy Creek, a tributary to the Chesapeake Bay. About 88 percent of the watershed is cropland and pasture, and nearly 33 percent of the cropland is used for corn. The animal population is entirely dairy cattle. About 85,640 pounds of nitrogen (460 pounds per acre) and 21,800 pounds of phosphorus (117 pounds per acre) were applied to fields; 52 percent of the nitrogen and 69 percent of the phosphorus was from commercial fertilizer. Prior to fertilization, nitrate nitrogen in the soil ranged from 36 to 136 pounds per acre and phosphorus ranged from 0.89 to 5.7 pounds per acre in the top 4 feet of soil. Precipitation was about 18 percent below normal and streamflow about 35 percent below normal during the 2-year study. Eighty-four percent of the 20.44 inches of runoff was base flow. Median concentrations of total nitrogen and dissolved phosphorous in base flow were 0.05 and 0.04 milligrams per liter as phosphorus, respectively. Concentrations of dissolved nitrate in base flow increased following wet periods after crops were harvested and manure was applied. During the growing season, concentrations decreased similarly to those observed in carbonate-rock areas as nutrient uptake and evapotranspiration by corn increased. About 4,550 pounds of suspended sediment, 5,250 pounds of nitrogen, and 66.6 pounds of phosphorus discharged in base flow during the 2-year period. The suspended sediment load was about 232,000 pounds in stormflow from 26 storms that contributed 51 percent of the total stormflow. The

  4. Natural fatal Sarcocystis falcatula infections in free-ranging eagles in North America.

    PubMed

    Wünschmann, Arno; Rejmanek, Daniel; Conrad, Patricia A; Hall, Natalie; Cruz-Martinez, Luis; Vaughn, Samuel B; Barr, Bradd C

    2010-03-01

    Three bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 1 golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) were admitted to rehabilitation facilities with emaciation, lethargy, and an inability to fly. Intravascular schizonts and merozoites were present in 2 bald eagles, mainly in the lung tissue, whereas the third bald eagle and the golden eagle had lymphohistiocytic encephalitis with intralesional schizonts and merozoites. In all eagles, protozoal tissue cysts were present in skeletal musculature or heart. The protozoal organisms were morphologically compatible with a Sarcocystis sp. By immunohistochemistry, the protozoal merozoites were positive for Sarcocystis falcatula antigen in all cases when using polyclonal antisera. Furthermore, the protozoa were confirmed to be most similar to S. falcatula by polymerase chain reaction in 3 of the 4 cases. To the authors' knowledge, this report presents the first cases of natural infection in eagles with S. falcatula as a cause of mortality.

  5. Causes of mortality in eagles submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center 1975-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, Robin E.; Franson, J. Christian

    2014-01-01

    We summarized the cause of death for 2,980 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 1,427 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin, USA, for diagnosis between 1975 and the beginning of 2013. We compared the proportion of eagles with a primary diagnosis as electrocuted, emaciated, traumatized, shot or trapped, diseased, poisoned, other, and undetermined among the 4 migratory bird flyways of the United States (Atlantic, Mississippi, Central, and Pacific). Additionally, we compared the proportion of lead-poisoned bald eagles submitted before and after the autumn 1991 ban on lead shot for waterfowl hunting. Trauma and poisonings (including lead poisoning) were the leading causes of death for bald eagles throughout the study period, and a greater proportion of bald eagles versus golden eagles were diagnosed as poisoned. For golden eagles, the major causes of mortality were trauma and electrocution. The proportion of lead poisoning diagnoses for bald eagles submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center displayed a statistically significant increase in all flyways after the autumn 1991 ban on the use of lead shot for waterfowl hunting. Thus, lead poisoning was a significant cause of mortality in our necropsied eagles, suggesting a continued need to evaluate the trade-offs of lead ammunition for use on game other than waterfowl versus the impacts of lead on wildlife populations. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Long-term survival despite low genetic diversity in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.A.; Tingay, R.E.; Culver, M.; Hailer, F.; Clarke, M.L.; Mindell, D.P.

    2009-01-01

    The critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) is considered to be one of the rarest birds of prey globally and at significant risk of extinction. In the most recent census, only 222 adult individuals were recorded with an estimated total breeding population of no more than 100-120 pairs. Here, levels of Madagascar fish-eagle population genetic diversity based on 47 microsatellite loci were compared with its sister species, the African fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer), and 16 of these loci were also characterized in the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Overall, extremely low genetic diversity was observed in the Madagascar fish-eagle compared to other surveyed Haliaeetus species. Determining whether this low diversity is the result of a recent bottleneck or a more historic event has important implications for their conservation. Using a Bayesian coalescent-based method, we show that Madagascar fish-eagles have maintained a small effective population size for hundreds to thousands of years and that its low level of neutral genetic diversity is not the result of a recent bottleneck. Therefore, efforts made to prevent Madagascar fish-eagle extinction should place high priority on maintenance of habitat requirements and reducing direct and indirect human persecution. Given the current rate of deforestation in Madagascar, we further recommend that the population be expanded to occupy a larger geographical distribution. This will help the population persist when exposed to stochastic factors (e.g. climate and disease) that may threaten a species consisting of only 200 adult individuals while inhabiting a rapidly changing landscape. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  7. Long-term survival despite low genetic diversity in the critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeff A; Tingay, Ruth E; Culver, Melanie; Hailer, Frank; Clarke, Michèle L; Mindell, David P

    2009-01-01

    The critically endangered Madagascar fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vociferoides) is considered to be one of the rarest birds of prey globally and at significant risk of extinction. In the most recent census, only 222 adult individuals were recorded with an estimated total breeding population of no more than 100-120 pairs. Here, levels of Madagascar fish-eagle population genetic diversity based on 47 microsatellite loci were compared with its sister species, the African fish-eagle (Haliaeetus vocifer), and 16 of these loci were also characterized in the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) and the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Overall, extremely low genetic diversity was observed in the Madagascar fish-eagle compared to other surveyed Haliaeetus species. Determining whether this low diversity is the result of a recent bottleneck or a more historic event has important implications for their conservation. Using a Bayesian coalescent-based method, we show that Madagascar fish-eagles have maintained a small effective population size for hundreds to thousands of years and that its low level of neutral genetic diversity is not the result of a recent bottleneck. Therefore, efforts made to prevent Madagascar fish-eagle extinction should place high priority on maintenance of habitat requirements and reducing direct and indirect human persecution. Given the current rate of deforestation in Madagascar, we further recommend that the population be expanded to occupy a larger geographical distribution. This will help the population persist when exposed to stochastic factors (e.g. climate and disease) that may threaten a species consisting of only 200 adult individuals while inhabiting a rapidly changing landscape.

  8. Male pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by looking ...

  9. Female pattern baldness

    MedlinePlus

    Alopecia in women; Baldness - female; Hair loss in women; Androgenetic alopecia in women; Hereditary balding or thinning in women ... male hormones). For example, after reaching menopause , many women find that the hair on their head is ...

  10. Hydrology and the effects of selected agricultural best-management practices in the Bald Eagle Creek Watershed, York County, Pennsylvania, prior to and during nutrient management : Water-Quality Study for the Chesapeake Bay Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langland, Michael J.; Fishel, David K.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Susquehanna River Basin Commission and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, conducted a study as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program to determine the effects of nutrient management of surface-water quality by reducing animal units in a 0.43-square-mile agricultural watershed in York County. The study was conducted primarily from October 1985 through September 1990 prior to and during the implementation of nutrient-management practices designed to reduce nutrient and sediment discharges. Intermittent sampling continued until August 1991. The Bald Eagle Creek Basin is underlain by schist and quartzite. About 87 percent of the watershed is cropland and pasture. Nearly 33 percent of the cropland was planted in corn prior to nutrient management, whereas 22 percent of the cropland was planted in corn during the nutrient-management phase. The animal population was reduced by 49 percent during nutrient management. Average annual applications of nitrogen and phosphorus from manure to cropland were reduced by 3,940 pounds (39 percent) and 910 pounds (46 percent), respectively, during nutrient management. A total of 94,560 pounds of nitrogen (538 pounds per acre) and 26,400 pounds of phosphorus (150 pounds per acre) were applied to the cropland as commercial fertilizer and manure during the 5-year study. Core samples from the top 4 feet of soil were collected prior to and during nutrient management and analyzed from concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus. The average amount of nitrate nitrogen in the soil ranged from 36 to 135 pounds per acre, and soluble phosphorus ranged from 0.39 to 2.5 pounds per acre, prior to nutrient management. During nutrient management, nitrate nitrogen in the soil ranged from 21 to 291 pounds per acre and soluble phosphorus ranged from 0.73 to 1.7 pounds per acre. Precipitation was about 18 percent below normal and streamflow was about 35

  11. Hair and Physiological Baldness

    PubMed Central

    Mercantini, Edward S.

    1965-01-01

    Human hair is one of the structures of the body about which little is generally known. Disease affecting the hair is often minimized or ignored by physicians because of lack of knowledge of this rudimentary organ. However, the patient's attitude toward hair loss is very different from the doctor's and he feels great concern about such loss. The development, growth and morphology of human hair are briefly presented. Experimental work which will increase our knowledge of hair growth and loss is reviewed. The various forms of physiological alopecia from birth onward are discussed, with special emphasis on the least-known type of physiological baldness, “male-pattern baldness” in the adult female. PMID:14312445

  12. Distinct and extinct: genetic differentiation of the Hawaiian eagle.

    PubMed

    Hailer, Frank; James, Helen F; Olson, Storrs L; Fleischer, Robert C

    2015-02-01

    Eagles currently occur in the Hawaiian Islands only as vagrants, but Quaternary bones of Haliaeetus eagles have been found on three of the major islands. A previous study of a ∼3500-year-old skeleton from Maui found its mtDNA more similar to White-tailed (H. albicilla) than to Bald (H. leucocephalus) Eagles, but low intraspecific resolution of the markers and lack of comparative data from mainland populations precluded assessment of whether the individual was part of the diversity found in Eurasia, or whether it represented an endemic Hawaiian lineage. Using ancient DNA techniques, we sequenced part of the rapidly evolving mtDNA control region from the same specimen, and compared it to published range-wide control region data from White-tailed Eagles and newly generated sequences from Bald Eagles. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Hawaiian eagle represents a distinct (>3% divergent) mtDNA lineage most closely related to those of extant White-tailed Eagles. Based on fossil calibration, we estimate that the Hawaiian mtDNA lineage diverged from mainland sequences around the Middle Pleistocene. Although not clearly differentiated morphologically from mainland forms, the Hawaiian eagle thus likely constituted an isolated, resident population in the Hawaiian archipelago for more than 100,000 years, where it was the largest terrestrial predator.

  13. Eagle Island: The Dream That Didn't Come True.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Dru

    1982-01-01

    A teacher, an aide, and four students from Manhattan High (Kansas) set out to defeat a bill to allow a young man to homestead an island important for its overwintering bald eagle habitat. Through research, lobbying the state legislature, and help from the National Audubon Society, the bill is defeated. (LC)

  14. 1. EAGLE MILL EXTERIOR FROM NORTHWEST, c. 1907. SHOWS INITIAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAGLE MILL EXTERIOR FROM NORTHWEST, c. 1907. SHOWS INITIAL MILL CONFIGURATION WITH FULLY EXPOSED CRUDE ORE BIN CONCRETE RETAINING WALL, SINGLE (SOUTH) CRUDE ORE BIN, AND EXPOSED CRUSHER HOUSE. NOTE THE LACK OF MACHINE SHOP OR SNOW SHEDS. CREDIT JW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  15. 3. EAGLE MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BIN FROM NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE MILL, DETAIL OF CRUDE ORE BIN FROM NORTH, c. 1908-10. SHOWS EXPOSED CRUSHER HOUSE IN FRONT OF (SOUTH) CRUDE ORE BIN AND SNOW SHED ADDED OVER TRAM TRACKS. NOTE LACK OF EAST OR WEST CRUDE ORE BINS. CREDIT JW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  16. 2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. EAGLE MOUNTAIN SWITCHYARD. EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP PLANT CAN BE SEEN THROUGH SWITCHYARD IN BACKGROUND. 165MM LENS. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  17. 76 FR 1666 - Susquehanna Union Railroad Company-Control Exemption-North Shore Railroad Company, Nittany & Bald...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Susquehanna Union Railroad Company--Control Exemption--North Shore Railroad Company, Nittany & Bald Eagle Railroad Company, Shamokin Valley Railroad Company, Juniata Valley Railroad Company, Lycoming Valley Railroad Company, and Union County Industrial Railroad Company On April 12,...

  18. 1. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF EAGLE CREEK TRAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EAGLE CREEK RECREATION AREA, VIEW OF EAGLE CREEK TRAIL REGISTRY BOOTH. - Historic Columbia River Highway, Eagle Creek Recreation Area, Historic Columbia River Highway at Eagle Creek, Troutdale, Multnomah County, OR

  19. 77 FR 129 - Golden Eagles; Programmatic Take Permit Application; Draft Environmental Assessment; West Butte...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... permit issued to a wind- energy company. Background BGEPA allows us to authorize bald eagle and golden... copies or more information by one of the following methods. Email: pacific_birds@fws.gov . Include ``DEA... written comments to Michael Green, Acting Chief, Division of Migratory Birds and Habitat Programs,...

  20. 'Mighty Eagle' Takes Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    The "Mighty Eagle," a NASA robotic prototype lander, had a successful first untethered flight Aug. 8 at the Marshall Center. During the 34-second flight, the Mighty Eagle soared and hovered at 30 f...

  1. Wind Energy Industry Eagle Detection and Deterrents: Research Gaps and Solutions Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, Karin; DeGeorge, Elise

    2016-04-13

    The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (BGEPA) prohibits the 'take' of these birds. The act defines take as to 'pursue, shoot, shoot at, poison, wound, kill, capture, trap, collect, destroy, molest or disturb.' The 2009 Eagle Permit Rule (74 FR 46836) authorizes the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to issue nonpurposeful (i.e., incidental) take permits, and the USFWS 2013 Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance provides a voluntary framework for issuing programmatic take permits to wind facilities that incorporate scientifically supportable advanced conservation practices (ACPs). Under these rules, the Service can issue permits that authorize individual instances of take of bald and golden eagles when the take is associated with, but not the purpose of, an otherwise lawful activity, and cannot practicably be avoided. To date, the USFWS has not approved any ACPs, citing the lack of evidence for 'scientifically supportable measures.' The Eagle Detection and Deterrents Research Gaps and Solutions Workshop was convened at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in December 2015 with a goal to comprehensively assess the current state of technologies to detect and deter eagles from wind energy sites and the key gaps concerning reducing eagle fatalities and facilitating permitting under the BGEPA. During the workshop, presentations and discussions focused primarily on existing knowledge (and limitations) about the biology of eagles as well as technologies and emerging or novel ideas, including innovative applications of tools developed for use in other sectors, such as the U.S. Department of Defense and aviation. The main activity of the workshop was the breakout sessions, which focused on the current state of detection and deterrent technologies and novel concepts/applications for detecting and minimizing eagle collisions with wind turbines. Following the breakout sessions, participants were asked about their individual impressions of the relative priority of each of

  2. Slowly balding black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; McKinney, Jonathan C.

    2011-10-15

    The 'no-hair' theorem, a key result in general relativity, states that an isolated black hole is defined by only three parameters: mass, angular momentum, and electric charge; this asymptotic state is reached on a light-crossing time scale. We find that the no-hair theorem is not formally applicable for black holes formed from the collapse of a rotating neutron star. Rotating neutron stars can self-produce particles via vacuum breakdown forming a highly conducting plasma magnetosphere such that magnetic field lines are effectively ''frozen in'' the star both before and during collapse. In the limit of no resistivity, this introduces a topological constraint which prohibits the magnetic field from sliding off the newly-formed event horizon. As a result, during collapse of a neutron star into a black hole, the latter conserves the number of magnetic flux tubes N{sub B}=e{Phi}{sub {infinity}}/({pi}c({h_bar}/2{pi})), where {Phi}{sub {infinity}}{approx_equal}2{pi}{sup 2}B{sub NS}R{sub NS}{sup 3}/(P{sub NS}c) is the initial magnetic flux through the hemispheres of the progenitor and out to infinity. We test this theoretical result via 3-dimensional general relativistic plasma simulations of rotating black holes that start with a neutron star dipole magnetic field with no currents initially present outside the event horizon. The black hole's magnetosphere subsequently relaxes to the split-monopole magnetic field geometry with self-generated currents outside the event horizon. The dissipation of the resulting equatorial current sheet leads to a slow loss of the anchored flux tubes, a process that balds the black hole on long resistive time scales rather than the short light-crossing time scales expected from the vacuum no-hair theorem.

  3. Lead and mercury in fall migrant golden eagles from western North America.

    PubMed

    Langner, Heiko W; Domenech, Robert; Slabe, Vincent A; Sullivan, Sean P

    2015-07-01

    Lead exposure from ingestion of bullet fragments is a serious environmental hazard to eagles. We determined blood lead levels (BLL) in 178 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) captured during fall migration along a major North American flyway. These eagles spent the breeding season distributed over a large range and are the best currently available representation of free flying golden eagles on the continent. We found 58 % of these eagles containing increased BLL > 0.1 mg/L; 10 % were clinically lead poisoned with BLL > 0.6 mg/L; and 4 % were lethally exposed with BLL > 1.2 mg/L. No statistical difference in BLL existed between golden and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Golden eagles captured on carrion had higher BLL than those captured using live bait suggesting differences in feeding habits among individuals. Median BLL increased with age class. We propose a conceptual model for the long-term increase in BLL after ingestion of lead particles. The mean blood mercury level in golden eagles was 0.023 mg/L. We evaluate a field test for BLL that is based on anodic stripping voltammetry. This cost-effective and immediate method correlated well with results from inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, although results needed to be corrected for each calibration of the test kit.

  4. Anatomy and histochemistry of spread-wing posture inbirds. 4. Eagles soar with fast, not slow muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Ron A; McFarland, Joshua C

    2016-07-01

    Slow fibers are typically characterized as functioning in avian postural behaviors such as soaring flight, and are described for a number of elite soarers such as vultures, pelicans and albatrosses. Golden Eagles and Bald Eagles also display soaring behavior and we examined their flight muscles for the presence of slow fibers. Surprisingly, eagles lack a deep layer to the pectoralis found in other soaring species. Additionally, the pectoralis as well as other shoulder muscles had few to no slow muscle fibers. The lack of functionally meaningful numbers of slow muscle fibers in eagle flight muscles indicates that they must rely on fast fibers for posture; these can function in that role due to their high aerobic capacity and also perhaps a "tuning" of muscle contraction frequency to function more efficiently at isometric contractions.

  5. A pilot golden eagle population study in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, G.

    1995-05-01

    Orloff and Flannery (1992) estimated that several hundred reports are annually killed by turbine collisions, wire strikes, and electrocutions at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (WRA). The most common fatalities were those of red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), American kestrels (Falco sparvatius), and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), with lesser numbers of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), common ravens (Corvus corax), bam owls (Tyto alba), and others. Among the species of raptors killed at Altamont Pass, the one whose local population is most likely to be impacted is the golden eagle. Besides its being less abundant than the others, the breeding and recruitment rates of golden eagles are naturally slow, increasing their susceptibility to decline as a result of mortality influences. The golden eagle is a species afforded special federal protection because of its inclusion within the Bald Eagle Protection Act as amended in 1963. There are no provisions within the Act which would allow the killing ``taking`` of golden eagles by WRA structures. This report details the results of field studies conducted during 19941. The primary purpose of the investigation is to lay the groundwork for determining whether or not turbine strikes and other hazards related to energy at Altamont Pass may be expected to affect golden eagles on a population basis. We also seek an understanding of the physical and biotic circumstances which attract golden eagles to the WRA within the context of the surrounding landscape and the conditions under which they are killed by wind turbines. Such knowledge may suggest turbine-related or habitat modifications that would result in a lower incidence of eagle mortality.

  6. Annual movements of a steppe eagle (Aquila nipalensis) summering in Mongolia and wintering in Tibet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Moon, S.L.; Robinson, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    An adult female steppe eagle (Aquila nipalensis Hodgson) was captured and fitted with a satellite transmitter in June 1995 in southeastern Mongolia. In fall, it traveled southwest towards India as expected, but stopped in southeastern Tibet and wintered in a restricted zone within the breeding range of the steppe eagle. In spring, the bird returned to the same area of Mongolia where it was captured. These observations, though derived from the movements of a single bird, suggest three things that are contrary to what is generally believed about steppe eagle biology. First, not all steppe eagles move to warmer climes in winter. Second, not all steppe eagles are nomadic in winter. Finally, because our bird wintered at the periphery of the steppe eagle breeding range in Tibet, perhaps birds that breed in this same area also winter there. If so, not all steppe eagles are migratory.

  7. Solar Eagle 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberto, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    During a 22-month period from February 1991 to December 1993, a dedicated group of students, faculty, and staff at California State University, Los Angeles completed a project to design, build, and race their second world class solar-powered electric vehicle, the Solar Eagle 2. This is the final report of that project. As a continuation of the momentum created by the success of the GM-sponsored Sunrayce USA in 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) picked up the banner from General Motors as sponsors of Sunrayce 93. In February 1991, the DOE sent a request for proposals to all universities in North America inviting them to submit a proposal outlining how they would design, build, and test a solar-powered electric vehicle for a seven-day race from Arlington, Texas to Minneapolis, Minnesota, to be held in June 1993. Some 70 universities responded. At the end of a proposal evaluation process, 36 universities including CSLA were chosen to compete. This report documents the Solar Eagle 2 project--the approaches take, what was learned, and how our experience from the first Solar Eagle was incorporated into Solar Eagle 2. The intent is to provide a document that would assist those who may wish to take up the challenge to build Solar Eagle 3.

  8. Eagle Writing Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    Describes a Wyoming junior high school teacher's expansion of a library research assignment to an Eagle Writing Project stressing practical skills applications, including critical thinking, listening, note taking, reviewing, respecting different opinions, communicating with government officials, writing as a practical tool, and respecting the…

  9. 14. BALD MOUNTAIN MILL, INTERIOR SHOWING GOLD TANKS FROM WEST, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BALD MOUNTAIN MILL, INTERIOR SHOWING GOLD TANKS FROM WEST, c. 1937. DATE BASED ON USE IN PUBLICATION. CREDIT WR. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  10. Secondary poisoning of eagles following intentional poisoning of coyotes with anticholinesterase pesticides in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Wobeser, G; Bollinger, T; Leighton, F A; Blakley, B; Mineau, P

    2004-04-01

    Records of eagles, coyotes (Canis latrans), and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) necropsied at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, between 1967 and 2002 were reviewed for cases suggestive of anticholinesterase poisoning. From 1993 to 2002, 54 putative poisoning incidents involving 70 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and 10 golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetus) were identified. Of these, 50 incidents occurred in Saskatchewan, two were in Manitoba, and one occurred in each of Alberta and the Northwest Territories. The diagnosis was confirmed in eight instances by demonstration of pesticide in ingesta from eagles or known use of pesticide at the site together with brain cholinesterase (AChE) reduction of >50% in at least one animal. A presnmptive diagnosis of poisoning was made in 33 incidents based on brain AChE reduction of >50% in at least one animal; 13 incidents were considered suspicious because of circumstantial evidence of the death of eagles in association with other species and limited AChE reduction. Other wild species were found dead in 85% of the incidents involving eagles. Coyotes, foxes, black-billed magpies (Pica pica), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) were associated with 34, six, six, and three incidents, respectively. There were eight additional incidents that did not involve eagles in which poisoning was diagnosed in coyotes. Carbofuran was identified in nine incidents. Carbamate poisoning was indicated on the basis of reactivation of brain AChE activity in two additional incidents. Brain AChE activity was not reduced from normal in eagles in four of seven incidents in which carbofuran was identified. The organophosplorous insecticide terbufos was found together with carbofuran in one incident. Brain AChE activity was measured in wild canids and in eagles in 15 incidents; in all of these incidents, brain AChE was redulced by >50% in at least one mammal, whereas this level of reduction occrred in eagles in

  11. Use of rotation scalp flaps for treatment of occipital baldness.

    PubMed

    Juri, J; Juri, C; Arufe, H N

    1978-01-01

    We have used 25 rotation scalp flaps to treat occipital baldness associated with fronto-parietal baldness (the third flap), and 35 such flaps for the correction of isolated occipital baldness. We have not had any flap necrosis, and our patients have been well satisfied with the results of this surgery.

  12. Characterization of the genome of bald cypress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bald cypress (Taxodium distichum var. distichum) is a coniferous tree of tremendous ecological and economic importance. It is a member of the family Cupressaceae which also includes cypresses, redwoods, sequoias, thujas, and junipers. While the bald cypress genome is more than three times the size of the human genome, its 1C DNA content is amongst the smallest of any conifer. To learn more about the genome of bald cypress and gain insight into the evolution of Cupressaceae genomes, we performed a Cot analysis and used Cot filtration to study Taxodium DNA. Additionally, we constructed a 6.7 genome-equivalent BAC library that we screened with known Taxodium genes and select repeats. Results The bald cypress genome is composed of 90% repetitive DNA with most sequences being found in low to mid copy numbers. The most abundant repeats are found in fewer than 25,000 copies per genome. Approximately 7.4% of the genome is single/low-copy DNA (i.e., sequences found in 1 to 5 copies). Sequencing of highly repetitive Cot clones indicates that most Taxodium repeats are highly diverged from previously characterized plant repeat sequences. The bald cypress BAC library consists of 606,336 clones (average insert size of 113 kb) and collectively provides 6.7-fold genome equivalent coverage of the bald cypress genome. Macroarray screening with known genes produced, on average, about 1.5 positive clones per probe per genome-equivalent. Library screening with Cot-1 DNA revealed that approximately 83% of BAC clones contain repetitive sequences iterated 103 to 104 times per genome. Conclusions The BAC library for bald cypress is the first to be generated for a conifer species outside of the family Pinaceae. The Taxodium BAC library was shown to be useful in gene isolation and genome characterization and should be an important tool in gymnosperm comparative genomics, physical mapping, genome sequencing, and gene/polymorphism discovery. The single/low-copy (SL) component of

  13. Tim Becomes an Eagle Scout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredericks, Bud

    1987-01-01

    A parent recounts his Downs Syndrome son's integration into a regular Boy Scout troop and subsequent earning of the Eagle rank. His Eagle project involved speaking about his disability in local elementary, junior high, and senior high schools. Policies of the Boy and Girl Scout organizations concerning disabled members are summarized. (CB)

  14. Eagle Feathers, the Highest Honor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverhead, Pete

    Following his own advice that elders of the tribe share their knowledge so that "the way of the Indians would come back to the children of today," Pete Beaverhead (1899-1975) tells of the traditions of respect and honor surrounding the eagle feather in a booklet illustrated with black and white drawings. The eagle is an Indian symbol of…

  15. Lead Levels in Utah Eagles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle

    2006-10-01

    Lead is a health hazard to most animals, causing adverse effects to the nervous and reproductive systems if in sufficient quantity. Found in most fishing jigs and sinkers, as well as some ammunition used in hunting, this metal can poison wildlife such as eagles. Eagles are raptors, or predatory birds, and their lead exposure would most likely comes from their food -- a fish which has swallowed a sinker or lead shot in carrion (dead animal matter). As part of an ongoing project to investigate the environment lead levels in Utah, the bone lead levels in the wing bones of eagles have been measured for eagle carcasses found throughout Utah. The noninvasive technique of x-ray fluorescence was used, consisting of a Cd-109 radioactive source to activate lead atoms and a HPGe detector with digital electronics to collect the gamma spectra. Preliminary results for the eagles measured to date will be presented.

  16. EAGLES NEST WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tweto, Ogden; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a geologic and mineral survey, a primitive area that constitutes the nucleus of the Eagles Nest Wilderness, Colorado was appraised to offer little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Among the additional areas later incorporated in the wilderness, only a strip near a major fault west and northwest of Frisco and Dillon is classed as having probable mineral-resource potential. If mineral deposits exist, they probably are of the silver-lead-zinc or fluorspar types.

  17. 76 FR 22393 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Cancellation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy... and Wildlife Service for the proposed Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project....

  18. 77 FR 47628 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy... Management Act and the Federal Power Act), on the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric...

  19. 75 FR 27332 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC; Eagle Creek Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC; Eagle Creek Water Resources... Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC.... For the transferee: Mr. Paul Ho, Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC,...

  20. 77 FR 13592 - AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, Eagle Creek Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission AER NY-Gen, LLC; Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources... Power, LLC, Eagle Creek Water Resources, LLC, and Eagle Creek Land Resources, LLC (transferees) filed an...) 805-1469. Transferees: Mr. Bernard H. Cherry, Eagle Creek Hydro Power, LLC, Eagle Creek...

  1. EAGLE: 'EAGLE'Is an' Algorithmic Graph Library for Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-16

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) and SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language (SPARQL) were introduced about a decade ago to enable flexible schema-free data interchange on the Semantic Web. Today data scientists use the framework as a scalable graph representation for integrating, querying, exploring and analyzing data sets hosted at different sources. With increasing adoption, the need for graph mining capabilities for the Semantic Web has emerged. Today there is no tools to conduct "graph mining" on RDF standard data sets. We address that need through implementation of popular iterative Graph Mining algorithms (Triangle count, Connected component analysis, degree distribution, diversity degree, PageRank, etc.). We implement these algorithms as SPARQL queries, wrapped within Python scripts and call our software tool as EAGLE. In RDF style, EAGLE stands for "EAGLE 'Is an' algorithmic graph library for exploration. EAGLE is like 'MATLAB' for 'Linked Data.'

  2. A Rare Cause for Cervical Pain: Eagle's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Massimo; Toro, Corrado; Tenani, Giulia

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pharyngodynia and neck pain symptoms can lead to an extensive differential diagnosis. Eagle's syndrome must be taken in account. Eagle defined “stylalgia” as an autonomous entity related to abnormal length of the styloid process or to mineralization of the stylohyoid ligament complex. The stylohyoid complex derives from Reichert's cartilage of the second branchial arch. The styloyd process is an elongated conical projection of the temporal bone that lies anteriorly to the mastoid process. The incidence of Eagle's syndrome varies among population. Usually asymptomatic, it occurs in adult patients. It is characterized by pharyngodynia localized in the tonsillar fossa and sometimes accompanied by disphagia, odynophagia, foreign body sensation, and temporary voice changes. In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus compresses the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibers, resulting in a persistent pain irradiating in the carotid territory. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is still under discussion. PMID:20339566

  3. A Rare Cause for Cervical Pain: Eagle's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Politi, Massimo; Toro, Corrado; Tenani, Giulia

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pharyngodynia and neck pain symptoms can lead to an extensive differential diagnosis. Eagle's syndrome must be taken in account. Eagle defined "stylalgia" as an autonomous entity related to abnormal length of the styloid process or to mineralization of the stylohyoid ligament complex. The stylohyoid complex derives from Reichert's cartilage of the second branchial arch. The styloyd process is an elongated conical projection of the temporal bone that lies anteriorly to the mastoid process. The incidence of Eagle's syndrome varies among population. Usually asymptomatic, it occurs in adult patients. It is characterized by pharyngodynia localized in the tonsillar fossa and sometimes accompanied by disphagia, odynophagia, foreign body sensation, and temporary voice changes. In some cases, the stylohyoid apparatus compresses the internal and/or the external carotid arteries and their perivascular sympathetic fibers, resulting in a persistent pain irradiating in the carotid territory. The pathogenesis of the syndrome is still under discussion.

  4. Eagle Crater Traverse Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows an overhead view of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landing site at Meridiani Planum, nicknamed 'Eagle Crater.' Scientists are conducting a soil survey here to see how the soils in this crater relate to the soils near the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop, as well as on the plains outside the crater. Scientists have studied the soils in great detail on the north and west sides of the crater, and plan to study five more locations before Opportunity exits the crater. As of sol 54 of Opportunity's journey (March 18, 2004), the rover is stationed at the sol 53 stop, located in the bottom right quadrant of this image. Scientists are examining light and dark soil targets at this spot, dubbed 'Neopolitan' because it is a triple boundary between light soil, dark soil, and an airbag bounce mark.

    This 3-D visualization was displayed using software developed by NASA's Ames Research Center and images from Opportunity's panoramic camera, taken while the rover was still on the lander.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Eagle Crater Traverse Map Figure 1 shows an overhead view of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landing site at Meridiani Planum, nicknamed 'Eagle Crater.' Scientists are conducting a soil survey here to see how the soils in this crater relate to the soils by the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop, as well as on the plains outside the crater. They have studied the soils in great detail on the north and west sides of the crater. Locations within the crater where scientists have taken microscopic images of the soil are shown in blue.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2

    Sampling 'Eagle Crater' Scientists have studied five unique target soil patches on the south and east sides of the crater using the microscopic imager and Moessbauer spectrometer. 'Goal 5' is a wind-rippled spot on the upper part of the crater, which the miniature thermal emission spectrometer shows is

  5. 10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SLIGHTLY OBLIQUE VIEW OF EAGLE MOUNTAIN PUMP COMPLEX. NOTE AUXILIARY STRUCTURES. - Eagle Mountain Pump Plant, Ten miles north of Route 10, southeast of Eagle Mountain, Eagle Mountain, Riverside County, CA

  6. Effects of sediment remediation on reproductive function in English sole from Eagle Harbor, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.L.; Sol, S.Y.; Lomax, D.P.; Myers, M.S.; Collier, T.K.

    1995-12-31

    Eagle Harbor, near Bainbridge Island in Puget Sound, WA is currently designated as an EPA Superfund site because of high levels of creosote-derived PAHs in the sediments. In 1986--88, the authors conducted a series of studies evaluating reproductive function in English sole from Eagle Harbor. These studies showed that only about 60% of adult female sole from the Eagle Harbor site entered vitellogenesis, in comparison to 80--90% of females of comparable age and size from minimally contaminated Puget Sound sites. Eagle Harbor fish also exhibited reduced spawning success and lowered egg viability in comparison to fish from unpolluted sites. Both types of reproductive function were associated with depressed plasma levels of reproductive steroids (e.g. 17-B estradiol) in Eagle Harbor fish. In September of 1993 the EPA began placement of a cap of uncontaminated sediment over the most contaminated portions of Eagle Harbor, as a means of providing clean habitat for benthic organisms and reducing risk from the contaminants contained in the sediments. Since the time of capping, the authors have been monitoring reproductive development in English sole and related benthic flatfish to determine whether this restoration will result in improved reproductive success in the resident flatfish of Eagle Harbor. Preliminary results indicate that the proportion of maturing females has increased to approximately 75%. Other reproductive parameters, including plasma steroid hormone concentration and ovarian atresia, are currently being assessed. Nonetheless, the initial data suggest that sediment remediation is associated with improved reproductive function in Eagle Harbor bottom fish.

  7. Bald Eagles consume Emperor Geese during late-winter in the Aleutian Archipelago

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ricca, Mark A.; Anthony, Robert G.; Williams, Jeffrey C.

    2004-01-01

    Emperor Geese (Chen canagica) are a species of concern because their population has declined rapidly since the mid-1960s and continues to remain below management objectives (Petersen et al. 1994). Emperor Geese are restricted primarily to Alaska and exhibit an east-west migration pattern, whereby most birds begin breeding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta by mid-May, stage on the Alaska Peninsula by late September, and migrate westward to winter in the Aleutian Archipelago from late November to mid-April (Eisenhauer and Kirkpatrick 1977, Petersen et al. 1994). Demographic and movement studies have been conducted on breeding grounds and stagmg areas (e.g., Schmutz et al. 1994, 1997); however, the winter ecology of Emperor Geese is poorly understood due in part to the extremely remote nature of the Aleutian Archipelago (Petersen et al. 1994). 

  8. Response of wintering bald eagles to industrial construction in southeastern Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, James M.

    2002-12-01

    The Columbia River at the Hanford Site is a regionally important refugium for overwintering birds. Some of the river shoreline has been designated by the U.S. Department of Energy for environmental clean-up following past production of materials for nuclear weapons. We evaluated the effects of soil remediation on winter birds at six inactive nuclear reactor areas. Remediation activities consisted of daily removal of approximately 1,035 t of contaminated soil from previously herbicided and denuded areas located between 30 m and 400 m and in partial line-of-sight of the river shoreline. Remediation activities had no apparent effect on numbers of riverine or terrestrial birds using adjacent undisturbed shoreline and riparian habitat.

  9. Watching Bald Eagles Change Shifts: Seeking Digital Curriculum Access across Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Lorayne; Thomson, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    There is an inconsistency between a growing need for national research on issues of child and adolescent health and the wide range of diverse curriculum responses to health issues undertaken by individual provinces and territories in Canada. Measuring the effect of interventions is more difficult in this contradiction. In this study, the authors…

  10. 77 FR 33765 - Proposed Information Collection; Bald Eagle Post-delisting Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... additional information about this IC, contact Hope Grey at INFOCOL@fws.gov (email) or 703-358- 2482... to this notice are a matter of public record. We will include or summarize each comment in...

  11. Philadelphia Eagles Honor NASA Astronaut Chris Ferguson

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA astronaut Chris Ferguson returned to his hometown on Nov. 7 to serve as the Philadelphia Eagles' Honorary Captain during the NFL's "Monday Night Football" game. The Eagles hosted the Chicago B...

  12. 15. BALD MOUNTAIN MILL, INTERIOR SHOWING PRECIPITATION AREA FROM NORTH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. BALD MOUNTAIN MILL, INTERIOR SHOWING PRECIPITATION AREA FROM NORTH, c. 1934. SHOWS PRECIPITATION TANK No. 1 (NOTE LOCKS), ZINC FEEDER WITH MIXING CONE, VACUUM RECEIVER AND PIPING. CREDIT WR. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  13. 11. BALD MOUNTAIN MILL, EXTERIOR FROM NORTHEAST, c. 194059. ROASTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BALD MOUNTAIN MILL, EXTERIOR FROM NORTHEAST, c. 1940-59. ROASTER AND OTHER UNOXIDIZED ORE CIRCUIT ADDITIONS PRESENT, ALONG WITH SECONDARY THICKENER No. 7 AND ADDITIONS TO MACHINE SHOP. CREDIT JW. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  14. Geologic map of the Eagle Quadrangle, Eagle County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidke, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Eagle quadrangle covers an area that straddles the Eagle River and Interstate 70 (I-70) and it includes the town of Eagle, Colo., which is located in the southwestern part of the quadrangle, just south of I-70 and the Eagle River, about 37 km west of Vail, Colo. The map area is part of the I-70 urban corridor, which is experiencing rapid and escalating urban growth. Geologic mapping along this corridor is needed for ongoing land-use planning. A variety of rocks and deposits characterize the map area and areas nearby. Sedimentary rocks present in the map area range in age from Pennsylvanian rocks, which were deposited in the ancestral Eagle basin during the formation of the ancestral Rocky Mountains, to Late Cretaceous rocks that were deposited just prior to the formation of the present Rocky Mountains. The Pennsylvanian rocks in the map area include a thick sequence of evaporitic rocks (Eagle Valley Evaporite). These evaporitic rocks are commonly complexly folded throughout the southern part of the quadrangle where they are exposed. In general, in the central and northern parts of the quadrangle, the sedimentary rocks overlying the evaporite dip gently to moderately northward. Consequently, the youngest sedimentary rocks (Late Cretaceous rocks) are exposed dipping gently to the north in the northern part of the quadrangle; landslide complexes are widespread along the northerly dipping, dip slopes in shaly rocks of the Cretaceous sequence in the northeastern part of the map area. During the Early Miocene, basaltic volcanism formed extensive basaltic flows that mantled the previously deformed and eroded sedimentary rocks. Erosional remnants of the basaltic flows are preserved in the southeastern, west-central, and north-central parts of the map area. Some of these basaltic flows are faulted and downdropped in a manner that suggests they were downdropped in areas where large volumes of the underlying evaporitic rocks were removed from the subsurface, beneath the

  15. The Eagle's EGGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-12-01

    VLT ISAAC Looks for Young Stars in the Famous "Pillars of Creation" Summary Through imaging at infrared wavelengths, evidence has been found for recent star formation in the so-called "Pillars of Creation" in the Eagle Nebula (also known as Messier 16 ), made famous when the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) obtained spectacular visible-wavelength images of this object in 1995. Those huge pillars of gas and dust are being sculpted and illuminated by bright and powerful high-mass stars in the nearby NGC 6611 young stellar cluster . The Hubble astronomers suggested that perhaps even younger stars were forming inside. Using the ISAAC instrument on the VLT 8.2-m ANTU telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory , European astronomers have now made a wide-field infrared image of the Messier 16 region with excellent spatial resolution, enabling them to penetrate the obscuring dust and search for light from newly born stars . Two of the three pillars are seen to have very young, relatively massive stars in their tips. Another dozen or so lower-mass stars seem to be associated with the small "evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs)" that the Hubble astronomers had discovered scattered over the surface of the pillars. These findings bring new evidence to several key questions about how stars are born . Was the formation of these new stars triggered as the intense ultraviolet radiation from the NGC 6611 stars swept over the pillars, or were they already there? Will the new stars be prematurely cut off from surrounding gas cloud, thus stunting their growth? If the new stars have disks of gas and dust around them, will they be destroyed before they have time to form planetary systems? PR Photo 37a/01 : Full wide-field ISAAC image of the Eagle Nebula. PR Photo 37b/01 : Close-up view of the ISAAC image , showing the famous "Pillars of Creation". PR Photo 37c/01 : Enlargement of the head of Column 1 . PR Photo 37d/01 : Enlargement of the head of Column 2 . PR Photo 37e/01

  16. Male pattern baldness and risk of colorectal neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Keum, N; Cao, Y; Lee, D H; Park, S M; Rosner, B; Fuchs, C S; Wu, K; Giovannucci, E L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Male pattern baldness is positively associated with androgens as well as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin, all of which are implicated in pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia. Methods: From 1992 through 2010, we prospectively followed participants in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Hair pattern at age 45 years was assessed at baseline with five image categories (no baldness, frontal-only baldness, frontal-plus-mild-vertex baldness, frontal-plus-moderate-vertex baldness, and frontal-plus-severe-vertex baldness). Cancer analysis included 32 782 men and used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Restricted to men who underwent at least one endoscopy over the study period, adenoma analysis included 29 770 men and used logistic regressions for clustered data to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs. Results: Over the mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 710 cases of colorectal cancer (478 for colon, 152 for rectum, and 80 unknown site) developed. Significantly increased risks associated with frontal-only baldness and frontal-plus-mild-vertex baldness relative to no baldness were observed for colon cancer with respective HR being 1.29 (95% CI, 1.03–1.62) and 1.31 (95% CI, 1.01–1.70). Over the 19-year study period, 3526 cases of colorectal adenoma were detected. Evidence for an increased risk of colorectal adenoma relative to no baldness was significant with frontal-only baldness (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.06–1.26) and borderline insignificant with frontal-plus-severe-vertex baldness (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.98–1.33). Conclusions: Subtypes of male pattern baldness at age 45 years were positively associated with colorectal neoplasia. Future studies are warranted to confirm our results and to determine the predictive value of male pattern baldness to identify those at high risk for colorectal neoplasia. PMID:26757425

  17. Eagle syndrome revisited: cerebrovascular complications.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tsuyoshi; Alexander, Michael; Stokol, Colin; Lyden, Patrick; Braunstein, Glenn; Gewertz, Bruce

    2012-07-01

    Cervical pain caused by the elongation of the styloid process (Eagle syndrome) is well known to otolaryngologists but is rarely considered by vascular surgeons. We report two patients with cerebrovascular symptoms of Eagle syndrome treated in our medical center in the past year. Case 1: an 80-year-old man with acromegaly presented with dizziness and syncope with neck rotation. The patient was noted to have bilateral elongated styloid processes impinging on the internal carotid arteries. After staged resections of the styloid processes through cervical approaches, the symptoms resolved completely. Case 2: a 57-year-old man presented with acute-onset left-sided neck pain radiating to his head immediately after a vigorous neck massage. Hospital course was complicated by a 15-minute transient ischemic attack resulting in aphasia. Angiography revealed bilateral dissections of his internal carotid arteries, with a dissecting aneurysm on the right. Both injuries were immediately adjacent to the bilateral elongated styloid processes. Despite immediate anticoagulation therapy, he experienced aphasia and right hemiparesis associated with an occlusion of his left carotid artery. He underwent emergent catheter thrombectomy and carotid stent placement, with near-complete resolution of his symptoms. Elongated styloid processes characteristic of Eagle syndrome can result in both temporary impingement and permanent injury to the extracranial carotid arteries. Although rare, Eagle syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with cerebrovascular symptoms, especially those induced by positional change.

  18. Brominated flame retardants and halogenated phenolic compounds in North American west coast bald eaglet (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) plasma.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Melissa A; Cesh, Lillian S; Elliott, John E; Williams, Tony D; Garcelon, David K; Letcher, Robert J

    2006-10-15

    We report on the identity, characterization, and spatial trends of several brominated flame retardants and hydroxylated (OH-) and methoxylated (MeO-) organohalogen contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestling plasma collected from sites along the west coast of North America. Samples were from four southwestern British Columbia (BC) locations, a reference site in northern BC (Fort St. James; FSJ), and from Santa Catalina Island, CA (SCI), an area of high DDT and PCB contamination. Mean concentrations of sigma polybrominated diphenyl ether (sigma PBDE (8 congeners monitored); 1.78-8.49 ng/g), sigma OH-polychlorinated biphenyl (sigma OH-PCB (30 congeners monitored); 0.44-0.87 ng/g), and sigma OH-PBDE (14 congeners monitored; 0.31-0.92 ng/g) were similar in eaglets from southwestern BC yet lower than for SCl and significantly higher than for FSJ. Dominant PBDE congeners were BDE47, BDE99, and BDE100, but SCl eaglets also contained low levels of higher brominated congeners. 4-OH-CB187 and 4'-OH-CB202 accounted for 65-100% of sigma OH-PCB in all BC eaglets, with 4'-OH-CB202 as well as 3'-OH-CB138 and 4-OH-CB146 dominating in SCl eaglets. Ostensibly of biogenic origin, 6'-OH-BDE49 and 6-OH-BDE47 were found in BC nestlings. Only 4'-OH-BDE49 (2.10 ng/g) was found in SCl eaglets. MeO-PBDEs and total hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were not found in any birds, but the polybrominated biphenyl BB101 was detected in southwestern BC samples. This study demonstrates that west coast North American bald eagles contain previously unreported organohalogens, which have the potential to impact the health and survival of these raptors.

  19. Genetic prediction of male pattern baldness

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Sarah E.; Ritchie, Stuart J.; Davies, Gail; Gale, Catharine R.; Porteous, David J.; Deary, Ian J.; Marioni, Riccardo E.

    2017-01-01

    Male pattern baldness can have substantial psychosocial effects, and it has been phenotypically linked to adverse health outcomes such as prostate cancer and cardiovascular disease. We explored the genetic architecture of the trait using data from over 52,000 male participants of UK Biobank, aged 40–69 years. We identified over 250 independent genetic loci associated with severe hair loss (P<5x10-8). By splitting the cohort into a discovery sample of 40,000 and target sample of 12,000, we developed a prediction algorithm based entirely on common genetic variants that discriminated (AUC = 0.78, sensitivity = 0.74, specificity = 0.69, PPV = 59%, NPV = 82%) those with no hair loss from those with severe hair loss. The results of this study might help identify those at greatest risk of hair loss, and also potential genetic targets for intervention. PMID:28196072

  20. 3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER, OPERATIONS CONTROL. AS SYSTEM BECOMES INCREASINGLY AUTOMATED, EAGLE ROCK WILL BECOME MORE AND MORE THE CENTRAL CONTROL SYSTEM OF THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. - Eagle Rock Operations Control Center, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Davis Pond Freshwater Prediversion Biomonitoring Study: Freshwater Fisheries and Eagles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Bourgeois, E. Beth; Jeske, Clint W.

    2008-01-01

    In January 2001, the construction of the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure was completed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The diversion of freshwater from the Mississippi River is intended to mitigate saltwater intrusion from the Gulf of Mexico and to lessen the concomitant loss of wetland areas. In addition to the freshwater inflow, Barataria Bay basin would receive nutrients, increased flows of sediments, and water-borne and sediment-bound compounds. The purpose of this biomonitoring study was, therefore, to serve as a baseline for prediversion concentrations of selected contaminants in bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nestlings (hereafter referred to as eaglets), representative freshwater fish, and bivalves. Samples were collected from January through June 2001. Two similarly designed postdiversion studies, as described in the biological monitoring program, are planned. Active bald eagle nests targeted for sampling eaglet blood (n = 6) were generally located southwest and south of the diversion structure. The designated sites for aquatic animal sampling were at Lake Salvador, at Lake Cataouatche, at Bayou Couba, and along the Mississippi River. Aquatic animals representative of eagle prey were collected. Fish were from three different trophic levels and have varying feeding strategies and life histories. These included herbivorous striped mullet (Mugil cephalus), omnivorous blue catfish (Ictalurus furcatus), and carnivorous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Three individuals per species were collected at each of the four sampling sites. Freshwater Atlantic rangia clams (Rangia cuneata) were collected at the downstream marsh sites, and zebra mussels (Dreissena spp.) were collected on the Mississippi River. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) protocols served as guides for fish sampling and health assessments. Fish are useful for monitoring aquatic ecosystems because they accumulate

  2. The Eagle Nebula on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Cooper, Amy; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Pound, Marc

    2011-10-01

    In one of the eight Science on NIF campaigns, dynamics of molecular clouds such as the Eagle Nebula will be studied in scaled laboratory astrophysics experiments, focusing on new hydrodynamic stabilities of ablation fronts induced by strong directionality of a sustained radiation drive, and on the formation of cometary structures as a model for the famous Eagle Pillars. The NIF Radiation Transport Platform will be adapted to drive a foam target stood off several mm from the halfraum to simulate a molecular cloud illuminated by a distant O-type star, with the drive collimated by an aperture. Pulses of length 20-100 ns generating effective radiation temperatures of 100 eV are being sought. Design of the experiment, theory of the directional radiation instabilities, and supporting astrophysical modeling will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. 77 FR 43280 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Management Act and the Federal Power Act), on the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project. e. All... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With the Bureau of Land Management a. Date and Time of Meeting: Wednesday, August...

  4. NIF Discovery Science Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Martinez, David; Pound, Marc; Heeter, Robert; Huntington, Channing; Casner, Alexis; Villette, Bruno; Mancini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    For almost 20 years a team of astronomers, theorists and experimentalists have investigated the creation of the famous Pillars of the Eagle Nebula and similar parsec-scale structures at the boundaries of HII regions in molecular hydrogen clouds, using a combination of astronomical observations, astrophysical simulations, and recently, scaled laboratory experiments. Eagle Nebula, one of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science programs, has completed four NIF shots to study the dense `shadowing' model of pillar formation, and been awarded more shots to study the `cometary' model. These experiments require a long-duration drive, 30 ns or longer, to generate deeply nonlinear ablative hydrodynamics. A novel x-ray source featuring multiple UV-driven hohlraums driven is used. The source directionally illuminates a science package, mimicking a cluster of stars. The first four NIF shots generated radiographs of shadowing-model pillars, and suggested that cometary structures can be generated. The velocity and column density profiles of the NIF shadowing and cometary pillars have been compared with observations of the Eagle Pillars made at millimeter observatories, and indicate cometary growth is key to matching observations. Supported in part by a Grant from the DOE OFES HEDLP program. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image is the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside 'Eagle Crater,' the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions--each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across---that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as 'lag deposit,' or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as 'Homeplate' and the one behind it as 'First Base.' The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

  6. Science on NIF Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Martinez, David; Pound, Marc; Heeter, Robert; Casner, Alexis; Villette, Bruno; Mancini, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    For over fifteen years astronomers at the University of Maryland and scientists at LLNL have investigated the origin and dynamics of the famous Pillars of the Eagle Nebula and similar parsec-scale structures at the boundaries of HII regions in molecular hydrogen clouds. Eagle Nebula is one of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Science programs, and has been awarded two days of NIF shots to study the cometary model of pillar formation. The NIF shots will feature a new long-duration x-ray source prototyped at the Omega EP laser, in which multiple hohlraums mimicking a cluster of stars are driven with UV light in series for 10 ns each to create a 30 ns output x-ray pulse. The drive generates deeply nonlinear hydrodynamics in the Eagle science package, which consists of a dense layered plastic and foam core embedded in lower-density background foam. The scaled Omega EP shots validated the multi-hohlraum concept, showing that earlier time hohlraums do not degrade later time hohlraums by preheat or by ejecting ablated plumes that deflect the later beams. The Omega EP shots illuminated three 2.8 mm long by 1.4 mm diameter Cu hohlraums with 4.3 kJ per hohlraum. At NIF each hohlraum will be 4 mm long by 3 mm in diameter and will be driven with 80-100 kJ. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Avian vacuolar myelinopathy: a newly recognized fatal neurologic disease of eagles, waterfowl, and other birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, John R.; Lewis, L.A.; Augspurger, T.; Rocke, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife biologists and health specialists have been frustrated by a long list of negative findings in their AVM investigations, however studies continue to provide pieces of information to aid the determination of the cause and its source. Available data indicated that AVM may have been present since at least 1990, occurs in at least five states, has been documented during October through April at sites of wintering populations of birds where the exposure apparently occurs, and has killed at least 90 bald eagles. Birds with AVM have difficulty or inability to fly, swim, walk, or perch, but there has been resolution of clinical signs in some affected coots. The list of affected species continues to grow, but remains confined to wild avians, including bald eagle, American coot, great horned owl, killdeer, Canada goose, mallard, ring-necked duck and bufflehead. The effects of the AVM agent on mammals, including human beings, are unknown. A neurotoxicant of manmade or natural origin is the suspected cause of AVM because no infectious disease agents, such as viruses, bacteria, parasites and prions, have been found, and the lesion and epizootiology of AVM resemble those of toxicoses. Additionally it is documented, experimentally, that exposure to raptors can occur through ingestion of infected coots. Collaborative studies will continue in the effort to identify the cause of AVM, its geographic distribution, and the range of species susceptibility. Hopefully, this information can be used to identify measures that might be taken to reduce the impact of AVM on the wildlife resource. Multiple agencies, institutions, and individuals must rely on each other's expertise in the multidisciplinary approach to this problem, persevere in their efforts and take advantage of serendipity that presents itself during investigations of this newly recognized cause of wild bird mortality.

  8. Guardian or threat: does golden eagle predation risk have cascading effects on forest grouse?

    PubMed

    Lyly, Mari S; Villers, Alexandre; Koivisto, Elina; Helle, Pekka; Ollila, Tuomo; Korpimäki, Erkki

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies on intraguild predation have mainly focused on within-class assemblages, even though avian top predators may also influence mammalian mesopredator prey. By using nation-wide long-term data from Finland, northern Europe, we examined the impacts of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) together with red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and pine martens (Martes martes) on forest-dwelling herbivores, black grouse (Tetrao tetrix) and hazel grouse (Tetrastes bonasia). We hypothesized that eagles may alleviate the overall predation pressure on grouse by imposing intraguild predation risk on mesopredators. The predation impact of eagle was modelled using eagle density estimates and distance to eagle nest. Wildlife triangle counts were used as predation impact proxies of mammalian mesopredators and as measures of response in grouse. Our results show that eagle density correlated negatively with black grouse abundance indices while being positively associated with the proportion of juveniles in both grouse species, irrespective of the abundance of mesopredators. Yet, foxes and martens alone had a negative effect on the abundance indices and the proportion of young in the two grouse species. This suggests that the possible cascading effects of eagles are not mediated by decreased mesopredator numbers, but instead by fear effects. Alternatively, they may be mediated by other species than fox or marten studied here. In conclusion, we found support for the hypothesis that eagles provide protection for juvenile black and hazel grouse, whereas they are a threat for adult grouse. This important information helps us to better understand the role of avian top predators in terrestrial ecosystems.

  9. ASBO Eagle Institute: A Leadership Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharff, James

    2012-01-01

    Each summer, ASBO International conducts an Eagle Institute leadership session in the Washington, D.C., area that provides a group of about 25 participants, including Eagle Award recipients, an opportunity to network with and learn from exemplary leaders inside and outside the field of school business management. Each year, the focus of the…

  10. Frequency of nest use by golden eagles in southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kochert, Michael N.; Steenhof, Karen

    2012-01-01

    We studied nest use by Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) from 1966 to 2011 to assess nest reuse within territories, ascertain the length of time that elapses between uses of nests, and test the hypotheses that reproductive success and adult turnover influence nest switching. Golden Eagles used 454 nests in 66 territories and used individual nests 1 to 26 times during 45 continuous years of observation. Time between reuse ranged from 1 to 39 yr. Distances between nearest adjacent alternative nests within territories ranged between 5 times. Two nests were unused for 21 and 27 yr after 1971 before being used every 1 to 3 yr thereafter. Eagles used 43% of the nests in series of consecutive years (range 3 to 20 consecutive nestings). Protecting unused nests for a proposed 10 yr after the last known use would not have protected 34% of all 300 nests that were reused during the study and 49% of 37 reused nests monitored consistently for 41 yr. The 102 nests that would not have received protection were in 56 of the 66 territories.

  11. Baldness and testicular cancer: the EPSAM case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moirano, G; Zugna, D; Grasso, C; Lista, P; Ciuffreda, L; Segnan, N; Merletti, F; Richiardi, L

    2016-03-01

    The etiology of testicular cancer is largely unexplained. Research has mainly focused on prenatal exposures, especially to sex hormones, while less attention has been paid to exposures that may act also postnatally. As baldness has been previously associated with testicular cancer risk we focused on baldness and body hairiness, which are both associated with androgen activity. We used data of the Postnatal Exposures and Male Health (EPSAM) study, a case-control study on testicular cancer conducted in the Province of Turin, Italy, involving cases diagnosed between 1997 and 2008. Information was collected using mailed questionnaires. Analyses included 255 cases and 459 controls. We calculated ORs and 95% CIs to estimate testicular cancer risk among those who developed baldness and among those with body hairiness. We found an inverse association between testicular cancer and baldness (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.46-0.98) and body hairiness (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.53-1.16), although the latter had wider CIs. The inverse association between baldness and testicular cancer is consistent with the results from previous studies. These results suggest that androgens activity may influence testicular cancer risk.

  12. EAGLE: relay mirror technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Mary; Restaino, Sergio R.; Baker, Jeffrey T.; Payne, Don M.; Bukley, Jerry W.

    2002-06-01

    EAGLE (Evolutionary Air & Space Global Laser Engagement) is the proposed high power weapon system with a high power laser source, a relay mirror constellation, and the necessary ground and communications links. The relay mirror itself will be a satellite composed of two optically-coupled telescopes/mirrors used to redirect laser energy from ground, air, or space based laser sources to distant points on the earth or space. The receiver telescope captures the incoming energy, relays it through an optical system that cleans up the beam, then a separate transmitter telescope/mirror redirects the laser energy at the desired target. Not only is it a key component in extending the range of DoD's current laser weapon systems, it also enables ancillary missions. Furthermore, if the vacuum of space is utilized, then the atmospheric effects on the laser beam propagation will be greatly attenuated. Finally, several critical technologies are being developed to make the EAGLE/Relay Mirror concept a reality, and the Relay Mirror Technology Development Program was set up to address them. This paper will discuss each critical technology, the current state of the work, and the future implications of this program.

  13. A population study of golden eagles in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource area. Second-year progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    Since January 1994, the Predatory Bird Research Group, University of California, Santa Cruz, has been conducting a field investigation of the ecology of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the vicinity of the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (WRA). The 190 km{sup 2} facility lies just east of San Francisco Bay in California and contains about 6,500 wind turbines. Grassland and oak savanna habitats surrounding the WRA support a substantial resident population of golden eagles. Each year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service receivers reports from the wind industry of about 30 golden eagle casualties occurring at the WRA, and it is probable that many more carcasses go unnoticed. Over 90 percent of the casualties are attributed to collisions with wind turbines. The main purpose of this study is to estimate the effect of turbine-related mortality on the golden eagle population of the area. Assessing the impact of the WRA kills on the population requires quantification of both survival and reproduction. To estimate survival rates of both territorial and non-territorial golden eagles, we tagged 179 individuals with radio-telemetry transmitters expected to function for about four years and equipped with mortality sensors. Population segments represented in the tagged sample include 79 juveniles, 45 subadults, 17n floaters (non-territorial adults), and 38 breeders. Effective sample sizes in the older segments increase as younger eagles mature or become territorial. Since the beginning of the study, we have conducted weekly roll-call surveys by airplane to locate the tagged eagles in relation to the WRA and to monitor their survival. The surveyed area extends from the Oakland Hills southeast through the Diablo Mountain Range to San Luis Reservoir about 75 km southeast of the WRA. The surveys show that breeding eagles rarely enter the WRA while the non-territorial eagles tend to move about freely throughout the study area and often visit the WRA.

  14. An Eagle of Cosmic Proportions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    Today ESO has released a new and stunning image of the sky around the Eagle Nebula, a stellar nursery where infant star clusters carve out monster columns of dust and gas. Located 7000 light-years away, towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake), the Eagle Nebula is a dazzling stellar nursery, a region of gas and dust where young stars are currently being formed and where a cluster of massive, hot stars, NGC 6611, has just been born. The powerful light and strong winds from these massive new arrivals are shaping light-year long pillars, seen in the image partly silhouetted against the bright background of the nebula. The nebula itself has a shape vaguely reminiscent of an eagle, with the central pillars being the "talons". The star cluster was discovered by the Swiss astronomer, Jean Philippe Loys de Chéseaux, in 1745-46. It was independently rediscovered about twenty years later by the French comet hunter, Charles Messier, who included it as number 16 in his famous catalogue, and remarked that the stars were surrounded by a faint glow. The Eagle Nebula achieved iconic status in 1995, when its central pillars were depicted in a famous image obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. In 2001, ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) captured another breathtaking image of the nebula in the near-infrared, giving astronomers a penetrating view through the obscuring dust, and clearly showing stars being formed in the pillars. The newly released image, obtained with the Wide-Field Imager camera attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at La Silla, Chile, covers an area on the sky as large as the full Moon, and is about 15 times more extensive than the previous VLT image, and more than 200 times more extensive than the iconic Hubble visible-light image. The whole region around the pillars can now be seen in exquisite detail. The "Pillars of Creation" are in the middle of the image, with the cluster of young stars, NGC 6611, lying above and to the right. The

  15. City of Eagle Butte NPDES Permit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under NPDES permit SD-0020192, the City of Eagle Butte, South Dakota, is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility within the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in Dewey County, South Dakota, to Green Grass Creek.

  16. Mighty Eagle Gets a New View

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mighty Eagle, NASA¹s robotic prototype lander managed out ofNASA¹s Marshall Space Flight Center, recently completed a test seriesto monitor its systems functionality after coming out of win...

  17. Mighty Eagle 'Rocks' Flight Testing Series

    NASA Video Gallery

    The "Mighty Eagle," a NASA robotic prototype lander, recently completed a series of test objectives – even going as high as 100 feet for several free flights. The vehicle is a three-legged protot...

  18. EAGLE can do Efficient LTL Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barringer, Howard; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Sen, Koushik

    2003-01-01

    We briefly present a rule-based framework, called EAGLE, that has been shown to be capable of defining and implementing finite trace monitoring logics, including future and past time temporal logic, extended regular expressions, real-time logics, interval logics, forms of quantified temporal logics, and so on. In this paper we show how EAGLE can do linear temporal logic (LTL) monitoring in an efficient way. We give an upper bound on the space and time complexity of this monitoring.

  19. Satellite tracking of two lesser spotted eagles Aquila pomarina, migrating from Namibia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyburg, B.-U.; Ellis, D.H.; Meyburg, C.; Mendelsohn, J.; Scheller, W.

    2001-01-01

    One immature and one subadult Lesser Spotted Eagle, Aquila pomarina, were followed by satellite telemetry from their non-breeding areas in Namibia. Both birds were fitted with transmitters (PTTs) in February 1994 and tracked, the immature for six months and two weeks, over distances of 10084 and 16773 km, respectively. During their time in Namibia both birds? movements were in response to good local rainfall. The immature eagle left Namibia at the end of February, the subadult at the end of March. They flew to their respective summer quarters in Hungary and the Ukraine, arriving there 2.5 and 1.5 months later than the breeding adults. The immature eagle took over two months longer on the homeward journey than a breeding male followed by telemetry in a previous study. On returning, the immature eagle followed the narrow flightpath through Africa used by other Lesser Spotted Eagles on their outward migration. It reached this corridor, which runs roughly between longitudes 31? and 36? East from Suez to Lake Tanganyika, veering from the shortest route in a direction east-northeast through Angola and Zambia to the southern end of Lake Tanganyika. The route taken by the subadult bird on its return migration differed markedly from that of all Lesser Spotted Eagles tracked to date, running further west through the Democratic Republic of Congo where, level with the equator, it flew over the eastern rainforest of that country. The outward migration, however, followed the same corridor and coincided in time with the migration of adults.

  20. Satellite tracking of two Lesser Spotted Eagles, Aquila pomarina, migrating from Namibia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyburg, B.-U.; Ellis, D.H.; Meyburg, C.; Mendelsohn, J.M.; Scheller, W.

    2001-01-01

    One immature and one subadult Lesser Spotted Eagle, Aquila pomarina, were followed by satellite telemetry from their nonbreeding areas in Namibia. Both birds were fitted with transmitters (PTTs) in February 1994 and tracked, the immature for six months and three weeks, the subadult for eight months and two weeks, over distances of 10 084 and 16 773 km, respectively. During their time in Namibia both birds' movements were in response to good local rainfall. The immature eagle left Namibia at the end of February, the subadult at the end of March. They flew to their respective summer quarters in Hungary and the Ukraine, arriving there 2.5 and 1.5 months later than the breeding adults. The immature eagle took over two months longer on the homeward journey than a breeding male followed by telemetry in a previous study. On returning, the immature eagle followed the narrow flightpath through Africa used by other Lesser Spotted Eagles on their outward migration. It reached this corridor, which runs roughly between longitudes 31?? and 36?? East from Suez to Lake Tanganyika, veering from the shortest route in a direction east-northeast through Angola and Zambia to the southern end of Lake Tanganyika. The route taken by the subadult bird on its return migration differed markedly from that of all Lesser Spotted Eagles tracked to date, running further west through the Democratic Republic of Congo where, level with the equator, it flew over the eastern rainforest of that country. The outward migration, however, followed the same corridor and coincided in time with the migration of adults. [A German translation of the abstract is provided on p. 40.].

  1. Excessive lead burden among golden eagles in the Swiss Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madry, Milena M.; Kraemer, Thomas; Kupper, Jacqueline; Naegeli, Hanspeter; Jenny, Hannes; Jenni, Lukas; Jenny, David

    2015-03-01

    Fragments from lead ammunition pose a poisoning risk for predators like golden eagles that scavenge on non-retrieved carcasses or offal left behind by hunters. Three golden eagles were found in the Swiss Alps with an acute lead poisoning. To investigate whether the few cases of lead-poisoned golden eagles are exceptional events or whether a substantial proportion of the Alpine golden eagle population is affected by lead at sublethal levels, we measured body burdens in golden eagles from Switzerland in comparison to eagle owls from the same area and to their respective prey. These two raptor species differ in their food as eagle owls feed on live-caught prey. Lead levels in soft tissues were significantly higher in golden eagles (median 1.14 μg g-1 dry weight in liver, 0.99 μg g-1 in kidney) than in eagle owls (0.14 and 0.23 μg g-1). Bones of golden eagles contained 10 times more lead (median of 12.45 μg g-1 dry weight) than owl bones (1.28 μg g-1), which represent substantially higher levels than previously reported for golden eagles. Bones of prey of both golden eagles and eagle owls had low lead concentrations. In order to investigate whether the sublethal lead of golden eagles originates from ammunition or from generic environmental contamination, we examined lead isotope ratios. Lead isotope signatures of golden eagle bones were very similar to those of ammunition, but differed from the signatures of bones of their prey, eagle owls and soil. Isotope signatures did not change with increasing bone lead concentration in golden eagles or any other group examined. These findings indicate that in the Alps, most golden eagles take up lead from spent ammunition in carcasses or their offal in sublethal quantities throughout their life and a few in lethal quantities leading to acute lead poisoning.

  2. 78 FR 26358 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With the Bureau of Land Management a. Date and Time of Meeting: Wednesday, May 8, 2013... with the staff of the Bureau of Land Management to improve agency coordination and discuss the...

  3. 78 FR 25263 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Meeting With the Bureau of Land Management a. Date and Time of Meeting: Wednesday, May 8, 2013... meet with the staff of the Bureau of Land Management to improve agency coordination and discuss...

  4. MQ-1C Gray Eagle Unmanned Aircraft System (MQ-1C Gray Eagle)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-420 MQ-1C Gray Eagle Unmanned Aircraft System (MQ-1C Gray Eagle) As of FY 2017 President’s...Program Manager POE - Program Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service

  5. 77 FR 22267 - Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... have relatively little information on the impacts of wind energy on eagles. The impacts could be due to... taking eagles. We strongly encourage wind energy developers and other project proponents to avoid known... of these plants are expected to last longer than 30 years. According to the American Wind...

  6. 76 FR 15971 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference a. Date and Time of Meeting: Friday, April 15, 2011 at 9 a.m. (Pacific Time)....

  7. 76 FR 22699 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference a. Date and Time of Meeting: Friday, May 6, 2011 at 1 p.m. (Pacific Time)....

  8. A resolution designating June 20, 2012, as "American Eagle Day", and celebrating the recovery and restoration of the bald eagle, the national symbol of the United States.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2012-06-19

    06/19/2012 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4308-4310; text as passed Senate: CR S4309-4310; text of measure as introduced: CR S4305) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. A resolution designating June 20, 2013, as "American Eagle Day", and celebrating the recovery and restoration of the bald eagle, the national symbol of the United States.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2013-06-18

    06/18/2013 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4620; text as passed Senate: CR S4590-4591) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  10. A resolution designating June 20, 2010, as "American Eagle Day", and celebrating the recovery and restoration of the bald eagle, the national symbol of the United States.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2010-05-27

    05/27/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S4560-4562; text as passed Senate: CR S5460-4561; text of measure as introduced: CR S4554-4555) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. A resolution designating June 20, 2014, as "American Eagle Day", and celebrating the recovery and restoration of the bald eagle, the national symbol of the United States.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2014-06-17

    06/17/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3771-3772; text as passed Senate: CR S3723-3724) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. A resolution designating June 20, 2011, as "American Eagle Day", and celebrating the recovery and restoration of the bald eagle, the national symbol of the United States.

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Alexander, Lamar [R-TN

    2011-06-08

    06/08/2011 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S3629-3630; text as passed Senate: CR S3629-3630; text of measure as introduced: CR S3620-3621) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Baldness and myocardial infarction in men: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eyal; Heiss, Gerardo; Rosamond, Wayne D; Szklo, Moyses

    2008-03-15

    Because hair loss may be a surrogate measure of androgenic activity-possibly a determinant of coronary atherosclerosis-several studies have explored the presence and magnitude of an association between male pattern baldness and myocardial infarction (MI). In particular, vertex baldness, but not frontal baldness alone, was strongly associated with incident MI in a large, hospital-based, case-control study. The authors examined these associations in a cross-sectional sample of 5,056 men aged 52-75 years, of whom 767 had a history of MI. The sample was derived from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study (1987-1998). As compared with a baldness-free reference group, the estimated odds ratios for prevalent MI from a multivariable model were 1.28 (frontal baldness), 1.02 (mild vertex baldness), 1.40 (moderate vertex baldness), and 1.18 (severe vertex baldness). Other regression models have yielded similar results, including the absence of a monotonic "dose-response relation" between the extent of vertex baldness and prevalent MI. The authors also examined the relation of baldness pattern to carotid intimal-medial thickness, a measure of atherosclerosis, among those who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease. The estimated mean differences in carotid intimal-medial thickness between groups of men with various types of baldness and their baldness-free counterparts were all close to zero. The results of this study suggest that male pattern baldness is not a surrogate measure of an important risk factor for myocardial infarction or asymptomatic atherosclerosis.

  14. Coexistence in a multispecies assemblage of eagles in central Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katzner, Todd; Bragin, E.; Knick, Steven T.; Smith, Andrew T.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated factors that permit species coexistence in an exceptional assemblage of similar raptor species at the Naurzum Zapovednik (a national nature reserve) in north-central Kazakhstan. White-tailed Sea-Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca), Golden Eagle (A. chrysaetos), and Steppe Eagle (A. nipalensis) all breed at the Zapovednik. Steppe Eagle use of nesting resources was distinct from that of tree-nesting species. We evaluated differences in nest tree and nest habitat characteristics, nest dimensions and positions, and nest spacing among the three forest-dwelling eagle species to distinguish between the effects of inter- and intraspecific resource limitations on species coexistence. Although the different species bred in similar habitat and sometimes reused other species' nests, the dimensions, positions and locations of their nests often differed. These differences did not appear to result from interspecific competition. Nest spacing trends were also species specific; Imperial Eagles generally nested farther from other eagle nests than did Golden Eagles and White-tailed Sea-Eagles. Intraspecific variation in habitat, physical characteristics, and spacing patterns of Imperial Eagle nests was extensive throughout the nature reserve. Although interspecific partitioning of nesting habitat may allow coexistence of ground-nesting Steppe Eagles, interspecific competition did not appear to be a primary determinant of the use of nest habitat, space, or nests by tree-nesting species. Rather, interspecific effects appeared secondary to intraspecific effects in determining coexistence of tree-nesting eagles at this site.

  15. 4. INTERIOR, EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER. NOTE MAP ON WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR, EAGLE ROCK CONTROL CENTER. NOTE MAP ON WALL SHOWING POWER AND WATER LINES, LOCATIONS OF ALL AQUEDUCT FACILITIES IN AREA, INCLUDING COLORADO RIVER AQUEDUCT SYSTEM. - Eagle Rock Operations Control Center, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. 36 CFR 71.5 - Golden Eagle Passport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Golden Eagle Passport. 71.5 Section 71.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.5 Golden Eagle Passport. (a) The Golden Eagle Passport is an annual permit, valid on...

  17. 36 CFR 71.5 - Golden Eagle Passport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Golden Eagle Passport. 71.5 Section 71.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.5 Golden Eagle Passport. (a) The Golden Eagle Passport is an annual permit, valid on...

  18. 36 CFR 71.5 - Golden Eagle Passport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Golden Eagle Passport. 71.5 Section 71.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION FEES § 71.5 Golden Eagle Passport. (a) The Golden Eagle Passport is an annual permit, valid on...

  19. Ahmad's NPRT System: A Practical Innovation for Documenting Male Pattern Baldness.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Various classifications for male pattern baldness are mentioned in the literature. The 'Norwood's classification is the most commonly used but it has certain limitations. The new system has included 'three' extra features which were not mentioned in any other classification. It provides an opportunity to document the full and correct picture while documenting male pattern baldness. It also aids in assessing the treatment for various degrees of baldness.

  20. Topical antiandrogens in the treatment of male-pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Rittmaster, R S

    1988-01-01

    Antiandrogen therapy for androgen-induced baldness is in its infancy. In men, because of side effects, topical antiandrogens appear to hold the most promise. Assessing changes in scalp hair growth may be difficult, however, and hirsutism provides a useful model for testing the efficacy of topical antiandrogens. Systemic administration of 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors may also eventually prove to be helpful in the treatment of male-pattern baldness, but side effects and long-term risks are unknown. In women, systemic antiandrogens appear to be a reasonable option for therapy and produce a good subjective response. Further research is needed, however, to document the long-term risks and efficacy of systemic antiandrogen therapy in women.

  1. 78 FR 72926 - Bald and Golden Eagles; Migratory Birds; Phase I Development of the Chokecherry-Sierra Madre Wind...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... Chokecherry-Sierra Madre Wind Energy Project AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...-Sierra Madre Wind Energy Project. Our draft EIS will analyze the environmental impacts associated with... Wind Energy Project Comments.'' Email: Comments should be sent to: CCSM_EIS@fws.gov . U.S....

  2. 76 FR 54711 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Bald Eagles Nesting in Sonoran Desert Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ...-2513. Individuals who are hearing-impaired or speech-impaired may call the Federal Relay Service at...), that the petition did not present substantial scientific or commercial information indicating that...

  3. Whooping crane preyed upon by golden eagle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Stiles, H.E.; Drewien, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    The Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is the largest predatory bird in North America and is well known for its predatory abilities. Attacks have been reported on mammals such as whitetail jackrabbits (Lepus townsendi) (McGahan 1967, J. Wildl. Mgmt. 31: 496), pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) (Bruhns 1970, Can. Field-Natur. 84: 301), Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) (Kelleher and O'Malia 1971, Auk 88: 186), and Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) (Carnie 1954, Condor 56: 3). This communication describes an attack on an immature Whooping Crane (Grus americana) by a Golden Eagle and the subsequent necropsy findings.

  4. White phosphorus at Eagle River Flats, Alaska: a case history of waterfowl mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John=

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY--White phosphorus has a limited distribution in the environment because it only occurs where it has been directly used by humans. It is not transported aerially for any distance and, due to its density, has a limited ability to disperse through water. Therefore, it is not a contaminant of broad-scale concern. However, where it does occur, it can cause substantial mortality or critically injure populations of waterfowl. This chronic harm includes impaired liver and kidney functioning, decreased respiratory efficiency, increased susceptibility to predation, loss of body mass, general weakening and malaise, and curtailment of reproductive functioning. Lethal effects occur around 3---4 mg/kg or approximately 3-6 ingested particles; sublethal effects can occur with ingestion of as little as a single particle. The impact of P4 on waterfowl populations nesting around ERF has never been estimated. Even if direct mortality on ERF could be estimated accurately in ducks, the delayed toxicity of P4 in swans (and presumably other species that use small grit size) and the potential for swans to fly away after ingesting a lethal dose of P4 could greatly underestimate the overall mortality. Inhibition of laying, reduced fertility and hatchability, and teratogenesis in hens ingesting even a small amount of P4 could potentially have, an effect on populations greater than that exhibited by direct mortality. Predators such as bald eagles and gulls are also at risk due to the toxicity of pelletized, dissolved, and assimilated P4 in prey organisms. Although the U.S. Army stopped using P4 in wetlands in 1993 and remediation efforts have been underway since 1995, waterfowl mortality is expected to continue for several more years. Because Eagle River Flats is only one of several sites where P4 has been found in wetland conditions, further biological investigation is warranted at these other sites.

  5. Mighty Eagle Scores Longest, Highest Flight Yet

    NASA Video Gallery

    The “Mighty Eagle,” a NASA robotic prototype lander, reached its highest altitude and velocity -- and longest duration -- on Oct. 25 when it soared to a height of more than 150 feet during a fl...

  6. Genetic structure and viability selection in the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), a vagile raptor with a Holarctic distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, Jacqueline M.; Katzner, Todd E.; Roemer, Gary; Cain, James W.; Millsap, Brian; McIntyre, Carol; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Fernandez, Nadia B.; Wheeler, Maria; Bulut, Zafer; Bloom, Peter; DeWoody, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Molecular markers can reveal interesting aspects of organismal ecology and evolution, especially when surveyed in rare or elusive species. Herein, we provide a preliminary assessment of golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) population structure in North America using novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These SNPs included one molecular sexing marker, two mitochondrial markers, 85 putatively neutral markers that were derived from noncoding regions within large intergenic intervals, and 74 putatively nonneutral markers found in or very near protein-coding genes. We genotyped 523 eagle samples at these 162 SNPs and quantified genotyping error rates and variability at each marker. Our samples corresponded to 344 individual golden eagles as assessed by unique multilocus genotypes. Observed heterozygosity of known adults was significantly higher than of chicks, as was the number of heterozygous loci, indicating that mean zygosity measured across all 159 autosomal markers was an indicator of fitness as it is associated with eagle survival to adulthood. Finally, we used chick samples of known provenance to test for population differentiation across portions of North America and found pronounced structure among geographic sampling sites. These data indicate that cryptic genetic population structure is likely widespread in the golden eagle gene pool, and that extensive field sampling and genotyping will be required to more clearly delineate management units within North America and elsewhere.

  7. Ranging behaviour and habitat preferences of the Martial Eagle: Implications for the conservation of a declining apex predator.

    PubMed

    van Eeden, Rowen; Whitfield, D Philip; Botha, Andre; Amar, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the ranging behaviours of species can be helpful in effective conservation planning. However, for many species that are rare, occur at low densities, or occupy challenging environments, this information is often lacking. The Martial Eagle (Polemaetus bellicosus) is a low density apex predator declining in both non-protected and protected areas in southern Africa, and little is known about its ranging behaviour. We use GPS tags fitted to Martial Eagles (n = 8) in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa to describe their ranging behaviour and habitat preference. This represents the first time that such movements have been quantified in adult Martial Eagles. Territorial eagles (n = 6) held home ranges averaging ca. 108 km2. Home range estimates were similar to expectations based on inter-nest distances, and these large home range sizes could constrain the carrying capacity of even the largest conservation areas. Two tagged individuals classed as adults on plumage apparently did not hold a territory, and accordingly ranged more widely (ca. 44,000 km2), and beyond KNP boundaries as floaters. Another two territorial individuals abandoned their territories and joined the 'floater' population, and so ranged widely after leaving their territories. These unexpected movements after territory abandonment could indicate underlying environmental degradation. Relatively high mortality of these wide-ranging 'floaters' due to anthropogenic causes (three of four) raises further concerns for the species' persistence. Habitat preference models suggested Martial Eagles used areas preferentially that were closer to rivers, had higher tree cover, and were classed as dense bush rather than open bush or grassland. These results can be used by conservation managers to help guide actions to preserve breeding Martial Eagles at an appropriate spatial scale.

  8. Ranging behaviour and habitat preferences of the Martial Eagle: Implications for the conservation of a declining apex predator

    PubMed Central

    van Eeden, Rowen; Whitfield, D. Philip; Botha, Andre; Amar, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the ranging behaviours of species can be helpful in effective conservation planning. However, for many species that are rare, occur at low densities, or occupy challenging environments, this information is often lacking. The Martial Eagle (Polemaetus bellicosus) is a low density apex predator declining in both non-protected and protected areas in southern Africa, and little is known about its ranging behaviour. We use GPS tags fitted to Martial Eagles (n = 8) in Kruger National Park (KNP), South Africa to describe their ranging behaviour and habitat preference. This represents the first time that such movements have been quantified in adult Martial Eagles. Territorial eagles (n = 6) held home ranges averaging ca. 108 km2. Home range estimates were similar to expectations based on inter-nest distances, and these large home range sizes could constrain the carrying capacity of even the largest conservation areas. Two tagged individuals classed as adults on plumage apparently did not hold a territory, and accordingly ranged more widely (ca. 44,000 km2), and beyond KNP boundaries as floaters. Another two territorial individuals abandoned their territories and joined the ‘floater’ population, and so ranged widely after leaving their territories. These unexpected movements after territory abandonment could indicate underlying environmental degradation. Relatively high mortality of these wide-ranging ‘floaters’ due to anthropogenic causes (three of four) raises further concerns for the species’ persistence. Habitat preference models suggested Martial Eagles used areas preferentially that were closer to rivers, had higher tree cover, and were classed as dense bush rather than open bush or grassland. These results can be used by conservation managers to help guide actions to preserve breeding Martial Eagles at an appropriate spatial scale. PMID:28306744

  9. Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'(3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'(3-D) (QTVR)

    This is a 3-D version of the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside 'Eagle Crater,' the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions--each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across---that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as 'lag deposit,' or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as 'Homeplate' and the one behind it as 'First Base.' The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

  10. Golden Eagle Territories and Ecology at Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Fratanduono, M.

    2015-09-29

    Garcia and Associates (GANDA) was contracted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to collect information on golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) use of Site 300. During 2014, we conducted surveys at Site 300 and for an area including a 10-mile radius of Site 300. Those surveys documented 42 golden eagle territories including two territories that overlapped with Site 300. These were named ‘Tesla’ and ‘Linac Road’. In 2015, we conducted surveys to refine the territory boundaries of golden eagle territories that overlapped with Site 300 and to document eagle activity at Site 300.

  11. Program Monitoring with LTL in EAGLE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barringer, Howard; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Sen, Koushik

    2004-01-01

    We briefly present a rule-based framework called EAGLE, shown to be capable of defining and implementing finite trace monitoring logics, including future and past time temporal logic, extended regular expressions, real-time and metric temporal logics (MTL), interval logics, forms of quantified temporal logics, and so on. In this paper we focus on a linear temporal logic (LTL) specialization of EAGLE. For an initial formula of size m, we establish upper bounds of O(m(sup 2)2(sup m)log m) and O(m(sup 4)2(sup 2m)log(sup 2) m) for the space and time complexity, respectively, of single step evaluation over an input trace. This bound is close to the lower bound O(2(sup square root m) for future-time LTL presented. EAGLE has been successfully used, in both LTL and metric LTL forms, to test a real-time controller of an experimental NASA planetary rover.

  12. Thinking about feathers: Adaptations of Golden Eagle rectrices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Lish, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The striking black and white plumage of the juvenile Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) provides an excellent opportunity to examine the possible selective forces influencing the strategic placement of dark pigment in birds. The conflict between opposing selective pressures (first, toward large white patches, which may allay aggression in adults, and second, toward dark plumage to promote camouflage and limit solar and abrasive wear) provides the stage whereon are revealed a score of pigmentation traits of potential adaptive value. The general pigmentation trend is for zones that are more exposed to the sun to be darker than elsewhere. More specifically: (1) for rectrices and remiges, outer webs are darker than inner; (2) for those few feathers (e.g., central rectrices, some scapulars, and some tertials), where both inner and outer webs are heavily and nearly equally solar exposed, pigmentation is supplied similarly on both webs; (3) outermost primaries and rectrices are darkest of all and are structurally similar; (4) for central rectrices, subject to high levels of abrasion with substrate, the tip is paler (resultant flexibility may limit breakage); and (5) pigment is heavier along or on the rachis than on the webs. Many of the traits listed above for the Golden Eagle are also found in other families of birds. Traits of the tail common to many species were a terminal pale tip, a subterminal dark band, rachis darker than vane, and outer webs darker than inner for both remiges and rectrices. The most widespread traits likely have adaptive value. ?? 2006 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  13. Daedalus Project's Light Eagle - Human powered aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Michelob Light Eagle is seen here in flight over Rogers Dry Lake at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The Light Eagle and Daedalus human powered aircraft were testbeds for flight research conducted at Dryden between January 1987 and March 1988. These unique aircraft were designed and constructed by a group of students, professors, and alumni of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology within the context of the Daedalus project. The construction of the Light Eagle and Daedalus aircraft was funded primarily by the Anheuser Busch and United Technologies Corporations, respectively, with additional support from the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, MIT, and a number of other sponsors. To celebrate the Greek myth of Daedalus, the man who constructed wings of wax and feathers to escape King Minos, the Daedalus project began with the goal of designing, building and testing a human-powered aircraft that could fly the mythical distance, 115 km. To achieve this goal, three aircraft were constructed. The Light Eagle was the prototype aircraft, weighing 92 pounds. On January 22, 1987, it set a closed course distance record of 59 km, which still stands. Also in January of 1987, the Light Eagle was powered by Lois McCallin to set the straight distance, the distance around a closed circuit, and the duration world records for the female division in human powered vehicles. Following this success, two more aircraft were built, the Daedalus 87 and Daedalus 88. Each aircraft weighed approximately 69 pounds. The Daedalus 88 aircraft was the ship that flew the 199 km from the Iraklion Air Force Base on Crete in the Mediterranean Sea, to the island of Santorini in 3 hours, 54 minutes. In the process, the aircraft set new records in distance and endurance for a human powered aircraft. The specific areas of flight research conducted at Dryden included characterizing the rigid body and flexible dynamics of the Light Eagle, investigating sensors for an

  14. Fitting the Balding-Nichols model to forensic databases.

    PubMed

    Rohlfs, Rori V; Aguiar, Vitor R C; Lohmueller, Kirk E; Castro, Amanda M; Ferreira, Alessandro C S; Almeida, Vanessa C O; Louro, Iuri D; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2015-11-01

    Large forensic databases provide an opportunity to compare observed empirical rates of genotype matching with those expected under forensic genetic models. A number of researchers have taken advantage of this opportunity to validate some forensic genetic approaches, particularly to ensure that estimated rates of genotype matching between unrelated individuals are indeed slight overestimates of those observed. However, these studies have also revealed systematic error trends in genotype probability estimates. In this analysis, we investigate these error trends and show how they result from inappropriate implementation of the Balding-Nichols model in the context of database-wide matching. Specifically, we show that in addition to accounting for increased allelic matching between individuals with recent shared ancestry, studies must account for relatively decreased allelic matching between individuals with more ancient shared ancestry.

  15. 78 FR 73704 - Eagle Permits; Changes in the Regulations Governing Eagle Permitting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    .../migratorybirds/PDFs/Eagle%20Conservation%20Plan%20Guidance-Module%201.pdf . A recent assessment of the status of... Environmental Assessment (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Final Environmental Assessment: Proposal to Permit... models and predictive tools that we have approved to demonstrate that take is expected to be less than...

  16. 36 CFR 71.5 - Golden Eagle Passport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... RECREATION FEES § 71.5 Golden Eagle Passport. (a) The Golden Eagle Passport is an annual permit, valid on a... other motor vehicle which is used for private recreation purposes. (2) “Accompanying,” for the purpose... Designated Recreation Use Facility for which a recreation use fee is charged or any Special Recreation...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. 165.1309 Section 165.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  1. Knemidocoptic Mange in Wild Golden Eagles, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Nicole; Rogers, Krysta; Hawkins, Michelle G.; Sadar, Miranda; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Bell, Douglas A.; Smallwood, Kenneth S.; Wells, Amy; Shipman, Jessica; Foley, Janet

    2014-01-01

    During 2012–2013 in California, USA, 3 wild golden eagles were found with severe skin disease; 2 died. The cause was a rare mite, most closely related to Knemidocoptes derooi mites. Cautionary monitoring of eagle populations, habitats, and diseases is warranted. PMID:25271842

  2. 3. PHOTOCOPY OF HALFTONE, LEMBECK & BETZ EAGLE BREWING COMPANY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PHOTOCOPY OF HALF-TONE, LEMBECK & BETZ EAGLE BREWING COMPANY, FROM MUIRHEAD, WALTER G., EDITOR, JERSEY CITY OF TO-DAY, 1910. AVAILABLE AT THE NEW JERSEY ROOM OF THE JERSEY CITY PUBLIC LIBRARY. - Lembeck & Betz Eagle Brewery, 164-190 Ninth Street, 515-519 Luis Munez Marin Boulevard, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  3. Proximate causes of the red face of the bald uakari monkey (Cacajao calvus)

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, P.; Mamani, J.; Montes, D.; González-Crespo, C.; Sebastián, M. A.; Bowler, M.

    2015-01-01

    In social species, such as primates, facial appearances transmit a variety of social signals. Although it is suggested that the intense red colour of the face of the bald uakari monkey might be an indicator of health, this hypothesis still has not been verified. This study describes the histological structure of the skin of the face in the bald uakari, compared with other non-red neotropical primates, to better understand the maintenance of its colour. The facial skin of the bald uakari monkey is characterized by a thinner epidermis, absence of melanin pigments and a high density of vascular capillaries that spread below the epidermis. These vascular capillaries are larger and more tortuous than in other neotropical primates. The skin of the face of the bald uakari monkey allows a direct external assessment of haematological status, suggesting that the colour of the face would be an honest indicator of health, but could also signal sexual or behavioural states. PMID:26587272

  4. Male pattern baldness and risk of incident skin cancer in a cohort of men.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Qing; Cho, Eunyoung; Han, Jiali; Weinstock, Martin A; Qureshi, Abrar A

    2016-12-15

    We examined the association between male-pattern baldness and risk of incident skin cancer, including invasive melanoma, invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a prospective analysis, based on 36,032 participants from the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study. In 1992, participants reported their status of male-pattern baldness at age 45 years by choosing from five crown-view pictograms based on Norwood's classification. Diagnosis of skin cancers was reported biennially and information on melanoma and SCC was pathologically confirmed. We identified 327 melanoma cases, 1324 SCC cases, and 8438 BCC cases during the follow-up. Male-pattern baldness was not significantly associated with risk of incident melanoma, but was significantly associated with increased risk of SCC and BCC. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) (95% confidence interval, CI) for the highest category of baldness (frontal plus severe vertex baldness) was 1.33 (1.06-1.68) for SCC (ptrend  = 0.001) and 1.23 (1.12-1.35) for BCC (ptrend  < 0.0001), compared with no baldness. Analyses by body sites found significant associations between frontal plus moderate to severe vertex baldness and risk of melanoma (HR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.01-3.34) and SCC (HR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.02-1.66) at head and neck. The associations were particularly stronger for scalp melanoma (HR = 7.15, 95% CI: 1.29-39.42) and scalp SCC (HR = 7.09, 95% CI: 3.84-13.08), but not for non-scalp head and neck sites. Information on body sites was not available for BCC. In conclusion, male pattern baldness may be associated with increased risk of skin cancer, but the associations may only exist for those occurring at head and neck, particularly at scalp.

  5. Interactive effects of prey and weather on golden eagle reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steenhof, Karen; Kochert, Michael N.; McDonald, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    The reproduction of the golden eagle Aquila chrysaetos was studied in southwestern Idaho for 23 years, and the relationship between eagle reproduction and jackrabbit Lepus californicus abundance, weather factors, and their interactions, was modelled using general linear models. Backward elimination procedures were used to arrive at parsimonious models. 2. The number of golden eagle pairs occupying nesting territories each year showed a significant decline through time that was unrelated to either annual rabbit abundance or winter severity. However, eagle hatching dates were significantly related to both winter severity and jackrabbit abundance. Eagles hatched earlier when jackrabbits were abundant, and they hatched later after severe winters. 3. Jackrabbit abundance influenced the proportion of pairs that laid eggs, the proportion of pairs that were successful, mean brood size at fledging, and the number of young fledged per pair. Weather interacted with prey to influence eagle reproductive rates. 4. Both jackrabbit abundance and winter severity were important in predicting the percentage of eagle pairs that laid eggs. Percentage laying was related positively to jackrabbit abundance and inversely related to winter severity. 5. The variables most useful in predicting percentage of laying pairs successful were rabbit abundance and the number of extremely hot days during brood-rearing. The number of hot days and rabbit abundance were also significant in a model predicting eagle brood size at fledging. Both success and brood size were positively related to jackrabbit abundance and inversely related to the frequency of hot days in spring. 6. Eagle reproduction was limited by rabbit abundance during approximately twothirds of the years studied. Weather influenced how severely eagle reproduction declined in those years. 7. This study demonstrates that prey and weather can interact to limit a large raptor population's productivity. Smaller raptors could be affected more

  6. 75 FR 53266 - United States Army Restricted Area, Designated Portions of Eagle Bay and Eagle River, Fort...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers 33 CFR Part 334 United States Army Restricted Area, Designated Portions of Eagle Bay and Eagle River, Fort Richardson, AK AGENCY: United States Army Corps of Engineers... interference with existing waterway traffic, and accordingly, certifies that this proposed rule will have...

  7. Biomarker and histopathologic responses in flatfish following initial site remediation in Eagle Harbor, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, M.S.; Anulacion, B.F.; French, B.; Hom, T.; Collier, T.K.

    1995-12-31

    Eagle Harbor is designated as an EPA Superfund site due to high sediment concentrations of creosote-derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) released chronically from a nearby creosoting facility. Previous (1984--86) field and laboratory studies with adult English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus) from this site demonstrated high prevalences of toxicopathic liver lesions including neoplasms in resident sole, and inducibility of several neoplasia-related lesion types by injections of a PAH-rich fraction extracted from Eagle Harbor sediment. Further studies (1986--88) expanded the target species to also include starry flounder (Platichthys stellatus) and rock sole (Lepidopsetta bilineata), and incorporated biomarkers of PAH exposure and effect, including hepatic CYP1A expression and biliary fluorescent aromatic compounds to estimate PAH exposure and metabolism, and bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts to estimate PAHs bound to hepatic DNA. Hepatic lesion prevalences and biomarker values in these three species from Eagle Harbor were among the highest found at Puget Sound sites. In the initial phase of site remediation, a cap of uncontaminated sediment was placed over the most contaminated portions of Eagle Harbor from September `93 to March `94, to provide improved benthic habitat and sequester PAH-contaminated sediments. Lesion prevalences and biomarker values in these three flatfish species just before capping began were generally reduced compared to historical data, possibly as a result of creosoting facility closure and site-based source controls. Similar data from fish collected immediately after and at 3, 6, and 12 months after cap completion are presented to determine the efficacy of the capping in ameliorating PAH exposure and associated effects in resident flatfish species.

  8. Angular momentum evolution of galaxies in EAGLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagos, Claudia del P.; Theuns, Tom; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Cortese, Luca; Padilla, Nelson D.; Davis, Timothy A.; Contreras, Sergio; Croton, Darren

    2017-02-01

    We use the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulation suite to study the specific angular momentum of galaxies, j, with the aims of (i) investigating the physical causes behind the wide range of j at fixed mass and (ii) examining whether simple, theoretical models can explain the seemingly complex and non-linear nature of the evolution of j. We find that j of the stars, jstars, and baryons, jbar, are strongly correlated with stellar and baryon mass, respectively, with the scatter being highly correlated with morphological proxies such as gas fraction, stellar concentration, (u-r) intrinsic colour, stellar age and the ratio of circular velocity to velocity dispersion. We compare with available observations at z = 0 and find excellent agreement. We find that jbar follows the theoretical expectation of an isothermal collapsing halo under conservation of specific angular momentum to within ≈50 per cent, while the subsample of rotation-supported galaxies are equally well described by a simple model in which the disc angular momentum is just enough to maintain marginally stable discs. We extracted evolutionary tracks of the stellar spin parameter of EAGLE galaxies and found that the fate of their jstars at z = 0 depends sensitively on their star formation and merger histories. From these tracks, we identified two distinct physical channels behind low jstars galaxies at z = 0: (i) galaxy mergers, and (ii) early star formation quenching. The latter can produce galaxies with low jstars and early-type morphologies even in the absence of mergers.

  9. The Eagle Nebula Science on NIF experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Heeter, Robert; Martinez, David; Pound, Marc; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    The Eagle Nebula NIF experiment was one of nine selected for laser time through the Science on NIF program. The goal of this scale laboratory experiment is to study the dynamic evolution of distinctive structures in star forming regions of astrophysical molecular clouds such as the Pillars of the Eagle Nebula. That evolution is driven by photoionizing radiation from nearby stars. A critical aspect of the radiation is its very directional nature at the photoionization front. The long duration of the drive and its directionality can generate new classes of instabilities and dynamic flows at the front that may be responsible for the shapes of Pillars and other structures. The experiment will leverage and modify the existing NIF Radiation Transport platform, replacing the target at the back end of the halfraum with a collimating aperture, and extending the existing 20 ns drive to longer times, using a combination of gas fill and other new design features. The apertured, quasi-collimated drive will be used to drive a target placed 2 mm away from the aperture. The astrophysical background and the status of the experimental design will be presented.

  10. Opportunity Traverse Map, 'Eagle' to 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Image

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity reached the rim of 'Victoria Crater' on Sept. 27, 2006, during the 951st Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work in the Meridian Planum region of Mars. Opportunity drove 9.28 kilometers (5.77 miles) in the explorations that took it from 'Eagle Crater,' where it landed in January 2004, eastward to 'Endurance Crater,' which it investigated for about half of 2004, then southward to Victoria.

    This map of Opportunity's trek so far is overlaid onto images taken by the Mars Orbiter Camera on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. Victoria is about 800 meters (one-half mile) in diameter, or about five times wider than Endurance and 40 times wider than Eagle. The scale bar at lower right shows the length of 800 meters (0.50 mile). North is up.

    The Martian sol dates in the annotated image are as follows: sol 58 was March 24, 2004 sol 315 was December 12, 2004 sol 446 was April 26, 2005 sol 654 was November 25, 2005 sol 833 was May 28, 2006 sol 898 was August 3, 2006 sol 952 was September 28, 2006

  11. Joe Camel with Feathers. How the NRA with Gun and Tobacco Industry Dollars Uses Its Eddie Eagle Program To Market Guns to Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Susan; Sugarmann, Josh

    The National Rifle Association (NRA) has developed its Eddie Eagle program as a school-based curriculum that claims to teach gun safety to children in preschool through grade six. The program uses a four-part message for children to follow when they see a gun, admonishing them to stop, not touch it, leave the area, and tell an adult. The NRA has…

  12. Doctors and baldness: a five thousand year old challenge.

    PubMed

    Campo, Daniele; D'Acunzo, Valeria

    2016-02-01

    The history of trichology follows a thread that continually intersects with that of the history of medicine in general. Even Hippocrates believed that the approach to baldness should be of a medical nature. This confrontation between doctors and hair loss, which has lasted for five thousand years, begins with the invocations of the head physicians in the Egyptian era and ends with the recent institution of postgraduate Master's degrees at Faculties of Medicine and Surgery. The biggest names in medicine concerned themselves with trichology beginning with Hippocrates, who dealt with the topic in his most famous work: the Aphorisms. Even the most celebrated doctors of the Roman era, such as Galen and Pliny the Elder, did not disdain considering hair loss, leaving important scientific contributions before passing on the baton to their distinguished colleagues of the Byzantine Empire. The narrative then flows through the most prestigious institutions of the Middle Ages, such as the Salerno School of Medicine and the Siena Accademia del Fisiocritici where, at the end of the 1600s, the distinguished anatomical describer Marcello Malpighi also taught trichology, and left his contribution to "Hair Science" with a fine description of the hair follicle in the pages of his Opera Posthuma. At the turn of the late Middle Ages and the early modern era, barbers formed the primordial nucleus of surgery and at the same time became the ones to concern themselves with hair loss. In the 1800s, several doctors published the first texts dealing with the anatomy and physiology of the hair and taking into account the principal forms of alopecia, but at the therapeutic level did not yet propose anything scientifically valid. Until a few decades ago trichology still lent itself to various commercial speculations. It was not until the twentieth century that the pathogenetic mechanisms of baldness were clarified in a scientific manner. With this knowledge, the pharmaceutical industry has been

  13. World Perspective Case Descriptions on Educational Programs for Adults: Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balde, Maatje; And Others

    Twenty adult education programs being conducted in the Netherlands are described in the case studies in this packet. The courses range from adult basic education to continuing education courses in languages, from basic nursing courses to advanced neurology. The following programs are profiled: (1) open school (Balde); (2) study house for adults…

  14. Eagle Class small satellite for LEO applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, Jason; Goralczyk, Steve

    1991-07-01

    The 'Eagle' Class small satellite is a modular Lightsat capable of supporting a wide variety of LEO applications. This paper highlights the key parameters of the spacecraft - power, stabilization, payload accommodation, etc., which make it useful as a platform for scientific experiments. The satellite consists of modules such as core, payload, deployables and orbit insertion subsystem which are integrated into a stacked configuration. The 38 in. diameter is sized for the Pegasus or Air Force SLV. Although considered a 'Lightsat', the satellite can offer as much as 500 watts of power and .01 degree attitude knowledge. It is suitable for a wide variety of earth observation and sensing missions. The satellite can be commanded by an economical desk-size Master Ground Station.

  15. EAGLE Monitors by Collecting Facts and Generating Obligations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrnger, Howard; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Sen, Koushik

    2003-01-01

    We present a rule-based framework, called EAGLE, that has been shown to be capable of defining and implementing a range of finite trace monitoring logics, including future and past time temporal logic, extended regular expressions, real-time and metric temporal logics, interval logics, forms of quantified temporal logics, and so on. A monitor for an EAGLE formula checks if a finite trace of states satisfies the given formula. We present, in details, an algorithm for the synthesis of monitors for EAGLE. The algorithm is implemented as a Java application and involves novel techniques for rule definition, manipulation and execution. Monitoring is achieved on a state-by-state basis avoiding any need to store the input trace of states. Our initial experiments have been successful as EAGLE detected a previously unknown bug while testing a planetary rover controller.

  16. Mighty Eagle' Lander Takes 100-Foot Free Flight

    NASA Video Gallery

    With a whistle and a roar, the "Mighty Eagle," a NASA robotic prototype lander, sailed to an altitude of 100 feet during another successful free flight Aug. 28 at the Marshall Center. During the 35...

  17. Adaptive EAGLE dynamic solution adaptation and grid quality enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luong, Phu Vinh; Thompson, J. F.; Gatlin, B.; Mastin, C. W.; Kim, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    In the effort described here, the elliptic grid generation procedure in the EAGLE grid code was separated from the main code into a subroutine, and a new subroutine which evaluates several grid quality measures at each grid point was added. The elliptic grid routine can now be called, either by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to generate a new adaptive grid based on flow variables and quality measures through multiple adaptation, or by the EAGLE main code to generate a grid based on quality measure variables through static adaptation. Arrays of flow variables can be read into the EAGLE grid code for use in static adaptation as well. These major changes in the EAGLE adaptive grid system make it easier to convert any CFD code that operates on a block-structured grid (or single-block grid) into a multiple adaptive code.

  18. Detail view of bracket, arched window and eagle from building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bracket, arched window and eagle from building 18 section. Jet Lowe, Haer staff photographer, summer 1995 - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Machine Shops, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. Golden Eagle predation on experimental Sandhill and Whooping Cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Clegg, K.R.; Lewis, J.C.; Spaulding, E.

    1999-01-01

    There are very few published records of Golden Eagles preying upon cranes, especially in North America. During our experiments to lead cranes on migration behind motorized craft in the western United States, we experienced 15 attacks (four fatal) and believe many more attacks would have occurred (and more would have been fatal) without human intervention. We recognize eagle predation as an important risk to cranes especially during migration.

  20. 78 FR 47004 - Change in Dates of Seasonal Closure of Public Land in the Bald Ridge Area, Park County, WY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Change in Dates of Seasonal Closure of Public Land in the Bald Ridge Area, Park County, WY AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given to change the dates of the seasonal closure of public land in the Bald Ridge Area that was...

  1. Eagle II: A prototype for multi-resolution combat modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, D.R.; Hutchinson, J.L.

    1993-02-01

    Eagle 11 is a prototype analytic model derived from the integration of the low resolution Eagle model with the high resolution SIMNET model. This integration promises a new capability to allow for a more effective examination of proposed or existing combat systems that could not be easily evaluated using either Eagle or SIMNET alone. In essence, Eagle II becomes a multi-resolution combat model in which simulated combat units can exhibit both high and low fidelity behavior at different times during model execution. This capability allows a unit to behave in a highly manner only when required, thereby reducing the overall computational and manpower requirements for a given study. In this framework, the SIMNET portion enables a highly credible assessment of the performance of individual combat systems under consideration, encompassing both engineering performance and crew capabilities. However, when the assessment being conducted goes beyond system performance and extends to questions of force structure balance and sustainment, then SISMNET results can be used to ``calibrate`` the Eagle attrition process appropriate to the study at hand. Advancing technologies, changes in the world-wide threat, requirements for flexible response, declining defense budgets, and down-sizing of military forces motivate the development of manpower-efficient, low-cost, responsive tools for combat development studies. Eagle and SIMNET both serve as credible and useful tools. The integration of these two models promises enhanced capabilities to examine the broader, deeper, more complex battlefield of the future with higher fidelity, greater responsiveness and low overall cost.

  2. Boundary of the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This vector data set delineates the approximate boundary of the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA). This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. The boundary of the ERWVFA was developed by combining information from two data sources. The first data source was a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the Leadville quadrangle developed by Day and others (1999). The location of Quaternary sediments was used as a first approximation of the ERWVFA. The boundary of the ERWVFA was further refined by overlaying the geologic map with Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) scanned images of 1:24,000 topographic maps (U.S. Geological Survey, 2001). Where appropriate, the boundary of the ERWVFA was remapped to correspond with the edge of the valley-fill aquifer marked by an abrupt change in topography at the edge of the valley floor throughout the Eagle River watershed. The boundary of the ERWVFA more closely resembles a hydrogeomorphic region presented by Rupert (2003, p. 8) because it is based upon general geographic extents of geologic materials and not on an actual aquifer location as would be determined through a rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

  3. Complete Analytical Data for Samples of Jurassic Igneous Rocks in the Bald Mountain Mining District, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents all petrographic, major oxide, and trace element data for a set of 109 samples collected during an investigation of Jurassic igneous rocks in the Bald Mountain mining district, Nevada. Igneous rocks in the district include the Bald Mountain stock, quartz-feldspar porphyry dikes, basaltic andesite dikes, aplite sills, and rare lamprophyre dikes. These rocks, although variably altered near intrusion-related mineral deposits, are fresh in many parts of the district. Igneous rocks in the district are hosted by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

  4. 50 CFR 22.11 - What is the relationship to other permit requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... relationship to other permit requirements? You may not take, possess, or transport any bald eagle (Haliaeetus... covers take of bald eagles or golden eagles under 50 CFR part 17 for purposes of providing prospective or... that the activity is incompatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden eagle...

  5. 50 CFR 22.11 - What is the relationship to other permit requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... relationship to other permit requirements? You may not take, possess, or transport any bald eagle (Haliaeetus... covers take of bald eagles or golden eagles under 50 CFR part 17 for purposes of providing prospective or... that the activity is incompatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden eagle...

  6. 50 CFR 22.11 - What is the relationship to other permit requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... relationship to other permit requirements? You may not take, possess, or transport any bald eagle (Haliaeetus... covers take of bald eagles or golden eagles under 50 CFR part 17 for purposes of providing prospective or... that the activity is incompatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden eagle...

  7. 50 CFR 22.11 - What is the relationship to other permit requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... relationship to other permit requirements? You may not take, possess, or transport any bald eagle (Haliaeetus... covers take of bald eagles or golden eagles under 50 CFR part 17 for purposes of providing prospective or... that the activity is incompatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden eagle...

  8. 50 CFR 22.11 - What is the relationship to other permit requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... relationship to other permit requirements? You may not take, possess, or transport any bald eagle (Haliaeetus... covers take of bald eagles or golden eagles under 50 CFR part 17 for purposes of providing prospective or... that the activity is incompatible with the preservation of the bald eagle or the golden eagle...

  9. Eagle Nebula Flaunts its Infrared Feathers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Figure 3

    This set of images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Eagle nebula in different hues of infrared light. Each view tells a different tale. The left picture shows lots of stars and dusty structures with clarity. Dusty molecules found on Earth called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons produce most of the red; gas is green and stars are blue.

    The middle view is packed with drama, because it tells astronomers that a star in this region violently erupted, or went supernova, heating surrounding dust (orange). This view also reveals that the hot dust is shell shaped, another indication that a star exploded.

    The final picture highlights the contrast between the hot, supernova-heated dust (green) and the cooler dust making up the region's dusty star-forming clouds and towers (red, blue and purple).

    The left image is a composite of infrared light with the following wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue); 4.5 microns (green); 5.8 microns (orange); and 8 microns (red). The right image includes longer infrared wavelengths, and is a composite of light of 4.5 to 8.0 microns (blue); 24 microns (green); and 70 microns (red). The middle image is made up solely of 24-micron light.

  10. Eagle RTS: A design for a regional transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryer, Paul; Buckles, Jon; Lemke, Paul; Peake, Kirk

    1992-01-01

    This university design project concerns the Eagle RTS (Regional Transport System), a 66 passenger, twin turboprop aircraft with a range of 836 nautical miles. It will operate with a crew of two pilots and two flight attendents. This aircraft will employ the use of aluminum alloys and composite materials to reduce the aircraft weight and increase aerodynamic efficiency. The Eagle RTS will use narrow body aerodynamics with a canard configuration to improve performance. Leading edge technology will be used in the cockpit to improve flight handling and safety. The Eagle RTS propulsion system will consist of two turboprop engines with a total thrust of approximately 6300 pounds, 3150 pounds thrust per engine, for the cruise configuration. The engines will be mounted on the aft section of the aircraft to increase passenger safety in the event of a propeller failure. Aft mounted engines will also increase the overall efficiency of the aircraft by reducing the aircraft's drag. The Eagle RTS is projected to have a takeoff distance of approximately 4700 feet and a landing distance of 6100 feet. These distances will allow the Eagle RTS to land at the relatively short runways of regional airports.

  11. Eagle RTS: A design of a regional transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryer, Paul; Buckles, Jon; Lemke, Paul; Peake, Kirk

    1992-01-01

    The Eagle RTS (Regional Transport System) is a 66-passenger aircraft designed to satisfy the need for accessible and economical regional travel. The first design objective for the Eagle RTS is safety. Safety results primarily from avoidance of the hub airport air traffic, implementation of anti-stall characteristics by tailoring the canard, and proper positioning of the engines for blade shedding. To provide the most economical aircraft, the Eagle RTS will use existing technology to lower production and maintenance costs by decreasing the amount of new training required. In selecting the propulsion system, the effects on the environment were a main consideration. Two advantages of turbo-prop engines are the high fuel efficiency and low noise levels produced by this type of engine. This ensures the aircraft's usage during times of rising fuel costs and growing aircraft noise restrictions. The design of the Eagle RTS is for spoke-to-spoke transportation. It must be capable of landing on shorter runways and have speeds comparable to that of the larger aircraft to make its service beneficial to the airlines. With the use of turbo-prop engines and high lift devices, the Eagle RTS is highly adaptable to regional airports. The design topics discussed include: aerodynamics, stability, structures and materials, propulsion, and cost.

  12. Army’s Management of Gray Eagle Spare Parts Needs Improvement (REDACTED)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-29

    No. DODIG-2016-080 A P R I L 2 9 , 2 0 1 6 Army’s Management of Gray Eagle Spare Parts Needs Improvement FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY FOR OFFICIAL USE... Management of Gray Eagle Spare Parts Needs Improvement Objective The objective of the audit was to determine whether the Department of the Army (Army...effectively managed MQ-1C Gray Eagle (Gray Eagle) spare parts. Specifically, we determined whether the Army effectively managed its spare-parts

  13. From the inside out: Eagle Rock School Producing a New Generation of CES Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condon, Dan

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author gives an overview of Eagle Rock School's Teaching Fellowship Program which he founded in collaboration with Public Allies, Inc. and under the auspices of Eagle Rock's Professional Development Center. Eagle Rock's Teaching Fellowship has two perspectives: (1) local; and (2) global. Locally, Fellows contribute skills,…

  14. 76 FR 65563 - Pricing for 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins AGENCY: United... the re-pricing of the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins. The price of the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coins will be lowered from $68.45 to $58.95, and the price of the 2011...

  15. 77 FR 839 - Pricing for 2011 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coins

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for 2011 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coins Agency: United States Mint... the 2011 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coins. The price of the 2011 American Eagle...

  16. 77 FR 5505 - Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project In accordance with... Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 13123), located on the site of the largely inactive Eagle Mountain mine in... proposal and the alternatives for a licensee for the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric...

  17. 50 CFR 22.25 - What are the requirements concerning permits to take golden eagle nests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Mitigation measures may include reclaiming disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging...) Whether suitable golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat unaffected by the resource development or... disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat, relocating in suitable habitat...

  18. 50 CFR 22.25 - What are the requirements concerning permits to take golden eagle nests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Mitigation measures may include reclaiming disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging...) Whether suitable golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat unaffected by the resource development or... disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat, relocating in suitable habitat...

  19. 50 CFR 22.25 - What are the requirements concerning permits to take golden eagle nests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Mitigation measures may include reclaiming disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging...) Whether suitable golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat unaffected by the resource development or... disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat, relocating in suitable habitat...

  20. 50 CFR 22.25 - What are the requirements concerning permits to take golden eagle nests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Mitigation measures may include reclaiming disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging...) Whether suitable golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat unaffected by the resource development or... disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat, relocating in suitable habitat...

  1. 50 CFR 22.25 - What are the requirements concerning permits to take golden eagle nests?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Mitigation measures may include reclaiming disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging...) Whether suitable golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat unaffected by the resource development or... disturbed land to enhance golden eagle nesting and foraging habitat, relocating in suitable habitat...

  2. Total PCBs and PCB congeners in Spanish Imperial Eagle eggs

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, L.M.; Fernandez, M.A.; Gonzalez, M.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The Spanish Imperial Eagle Aquila (heliaca) adalberti is the only directly endangered bird of prey in Europe. Lowered reproductive success in numerous bird species has been associated with eggshell thinning and reduced production caused by DDE, the most common organochlorine residue found in wild birds. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are usually the second most common organochlorine pollutant found in wild birds. Research to evaluate the incidence of organochlorine pollutants in the Spanish Imperial Eagle has been previously conducted. The authors have now determined the levels of total PCBs and selected PCB congeners in 34 eggs of Spanish Imperial Eagle collected at Donana National Park, Castile Plateau and Nature Park of Monfrague, since this has considerable significance when attempts are made to correlate the embryonic mortality of avian wildlife with PCB residue levels.

  3. Heptachlor seed treatment contaminates hawks, owls, and eagles of Columbia Basin, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Blus, L.J.; Kaiser, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated organochlorine residues in 12 species of hawks. owls, and eagles from the Columbia Basin of Oregon between 1978 and 1981. Companion studies showed that heptachlor epoxide (HE) induced adult mortality and reduced productivity of the Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) and American Kestrel (Falco sparverius).ln this study, brain tissue from raptors found dead and sample eggs from 90 nests were analyzed for organochlorines. The primary concern was HE that entered raptor food chains through the ingestion of heptachlor-treated seed by their prey. HE residues were detected in eggs from 9 of 10 species and ranged as high as 4.75 ppm (wet wt), but no definite effects of HE on productivity were readily apparent from the limited series of nests. However, the hazard of heptachlor seed treatments to birds of prey was demonstrated by the occurrence of lethal residues of HE in brain tissue of 3 Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) and 1 Rough-legged Hawk (Buteo lagopus). Other organochlorine pesticides were present in the eggs and significant relationships were found between DDE and eggshell thickness for the Swainson's Hawk (Buteo swainsoni) and Western Screech-Owl (Otus kennicotti), although shell thinning (9.6% and 7.4%) was below the generally accepted range where reproductive problems have been known to occur.

  4. Predators as prey at a Golden Eagle Aquila chrysaetos eyrie in Mongolia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Tsengeg, Pu; Whitlock, P.; Ellis, Merlin H.

    2000-01-01

    Although golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) have for decades been known to occasionally take large or dangerous quarry, the capturing of such was generally believed to be rare and/or the act of starved birds. This report provides details of an exceptional diet at a golden eagle eyrie in eastern Mongolia with unquantified notes on the occurrence of foxes at other eyries in Mongolia. Most of the prey we recorded were unusual, including 1 raven (Corvus corax), 3 demoiselle cranes (Anthropoides virgo), 1 upland buzzard (Buteo hemilasius), 3 owls, 27 foxes, and 11 Mongolian gazelles. Some numerical comparisons are of interest. Our value for gazelle calves (10 minimum count, 1997) represents 13% of 78 prey items and at least one adult was also present. Our total of only 15 hares (Lepus tolai) and 4 marmots (Marmota sibirica) compared to 27 foxes suggests not so much a preference for foxes, but rather that populations of more normal prey were probably depressed at this site. Unusual prey represented 65% of the diet at this eyrie.

  5. Eagle syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Esther; Hansen, Karla; Frizzi, James

    2008-11-01

    Eagle syndrome, which is an uncommon sequela of elongation of the styloid process, can manifest as pain in the anterolateral neck, often with referred pain to the ear. In most cases, the elongation is an acquired condition, often occurring as a result of a traumatic incident, including tonsillectomy. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who experienced unremitting right neck pain for several years following an accidental fall. A multidisciplinary investigation identified an elongated styloid process. Surgical shortening of the structure provided definitive relief of the patient's symptoms. We review the anatomy of the peristyloid structures and discuss the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of Eagle syndrome.

  6. Estimating the Potential Impacts of Large Mesopredators on Benthic Resources: Integrative Assessment of Spotted Eagle Ray Foraging Ecology in Bermuda

    PubMed Central

    Ajemian, Matthew J.; Powers, Sean P.; Murdoch, Thaddeus J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Declines of large sharks and subsequent release of elasmobranch mesopredators (smaller sharks and rays) may pose problems for marine fisheries management as some mesopredators consume exploitable shellfish species. The spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) is the most abundant inshore elasmobranch in subtropical Bermuda, but its predatory role remains unexamined despite suspected abundance increases and its hypothesized specialization for mollusks. We utilized a combination of acoustic telemetry, benthic invertebrate sampling, gut content analysis and manipulative experiments to assess the impact of spotted eagle rays on Bermudian shellfish resources. Residency and distribution of adult spotted eagle rays was monitored over two consecutive summers in Harrington Sound (HS), an enclosed inshore lagoon that has historically supported multiple recreational and commercial shellfish species. Telemetered rays exhibited variable fidelity (depending on sex) to HS, though generally selected regions that supported relatively high densities of potential mollusk prey. Gut content analysis from rays collected in HS revealed a diet of mainly bivalves and a few gastropods, with calico clam (Macrocallista maculata) representing the most important prey item. Manipulative field and mesocosm experiments with calico clams suggested that rays selected prey patches based on density, though there was no evidence of rays depleting clam patches to extirpation. Overall, spotted eagle rays had modest impacts on local shellfish populations at current population levels, suggesting a reduced role in transmitting cascading effects from apex predator loss. However, due to the strong degree of coupling between rays and multiple protected mollusks in HS, ecosystem-based management that accounts for ray predation should be adopted. PMID:22802956

  7. The Dusk Chorus from an Owl Perspective: Eagle Owls Vocalize When Their White Throat Badge Contrasts Most

    PubMed Central

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Delgado, Maria del Mar

    2009-01-01

    Background An impressive number of studies have investigated bird vocal displays, and many of them have tried to explain the widespread phenomenon of the so-called dawn and dusk chorus, the sunrise and sunset peaks in bird song output. As many as twelve non-exclusive hypotheses have been proposed to explain why twilight peaks in vocal display might be advantageous; but, even after more than two decades of study, the basis underlying the dusk and dawn chorus is still unclear. Moreover, to date, the majority of studies on this topic have focused on songbirds. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigate here a novel hypothesis on why nocturnal birds with patches of white feathers call at twilight. We propose that white plumage patches and the timing of visual signaling have co-evolved to maximize the effectiveness of social communication such as the dusk chorus. This hypothesis centers on the recent discovery that eagle owls can adopt specific forms of visual signaling and is supported by the observation that adult eagle owls possess a white throat badge that is only visible during vocal displays. By monitoring the calling of eagle owls at dusk, a peak time for bird call output, we found that white throat badges contrasted most with the surrounding background during the owls' twilight chorusing. Conclusions/Significance Crepuscular and nocturnal species appear to have evolved white patches that, shown in association with vocal displays, allow them to communicate in dark surroundings. The evolution of a white badge that operates jointly with call displays at dawn and dusk may be relevant to the eagle owls' social dynamics. Our explanation for the dusk chorus may possibly represent an overlooked but common pattern of signaling among crepuscular and nocturnal birds that combine patches of white feathers with twilight displays. Furthermore, our findings could be relevant to songbirds that breed in dark forest habitats and have contrasting white badges, as well as birds

  8. 75 FR 56093 - Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, LP; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, LP; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline September 8, 2010. Take notice that on September 8, 2010, Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P. (Eagle Rock) filed a request to extend the date for filing its next rate case to May 1, 2012. Eagle...

  9. Photographic images captured while sampling for bald eagles near the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure in Barataria Bay, Louisiana (2009-10)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Jeske, Clinton W.; Allain, Larry K.

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of freshwater diversions in large-scale coastal restoration schemes presents several scientific and management considerations. Large-scale environmental restructuring necessitates aquatic biomonitoring, and during such field studies, photographs that document animals and habitat may be captured. Among the biomonitoring studies performed in conjunction with the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure south of New Orleans, Louisiana, only postdiversion study images are readily available, and these are presented here.

  10. A comparison of techniques for assessing central tendency in left-censored data using PCB and p,p'DDE contaminant concentrations from Michigan's Bald Eagle Biosentinel Program.

    PubMed

    Leith, Katherine F; Bowerman, William W; Wierda, Michael R; Best, Dave A; Grubb, Teryl G; Sikarske, James G

    2010-06-01

    Monitoring of contaminants in the environment is an important part of understanding the fate of ecosystems after a chemical insult. Frequently, such monitoring efforts result in datasets with observations below the detection limit (DL) that are reported as 'non-detect' or '

  11. Sensitivity of water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica) and bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) seedlings to manganese enrichment under water-saturated conditions.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Kenneth W; Ciravolo, Thomas G

    2003-12-01

    In anaerobic soils of wetlands, Mn is highly available to plants because of the decreasing redox potential and pH of flooded soil. When growing adjacent to each another in wetland forests, water tupelo (Nyssa aquatica L.) had 10 times greater leaf manganese concentration than bald cypress (Taxodium distichum [L.] Richard). This interspecific difference was examined over a range of manganese-enriched soil conditions in a greenhouse experiment. Water tupelo and bald cypress seedlings were grown in fertilized potting soil enriched with 0, 40, 80, 160, 240, 320, and 400 mg Mn/L of soil and kept at saturated to slightly flooded conditions. Leaf Mn concentration was greater in water tupelo than bald cypress for all but the highest Mn addition treatment. Growth of water tupelo seedlings was adversely affected in treatments greater than 160 mg Mn/L. Total biomass of water tupelo in the highest Mn treatment was less than 50% of the control. At low levels of added Mn, bald cypress was able to restrict uptake of Mn at the roots with resulting low leaf Mn concentrations. Once that root restriction was exceeded, Mn concentration in bald cypress leaves increased greatly with treatment; that is, the highest treatment was 40 times greater than control (4,603 vs 100 microg/g, respectively), but biomass of bald cypress was unaffected by manganese additions. Bald cypress, a tree that does not naturally accumulate manganese, does so under manganese-enriched conditions and without biomass reduction in contrast to water tupelo, which is severely affected by higher soil Mn concentrations. Thus, bald cypress would be less affected by increased manganese availability in swamps receiving acidic inputs such as acid mine drainage, acid rain, or oxidization of pyritic soils.

  12. 3. VIEW OF CONTINENTAL EAGLE GIN CO. ACROSS CREEK, TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF CONTINENTAL EAGLE GIN CO. ACROSS CREEK, TAKEN FROM DAM, LOOKING SOUTH. FROM RIGHT TO LEFT: CUPOLA TOWER ON 1854 CONTINENTAL GIN CO., 1848, 1852, 1912 CONTINENTAL GIN CO. BUILDINGS. - Prattville Manufacturing Company, Number One, 242 South Court Street, Prattville, Autauga County, AL

  13. Eagle Syndrome Causing Vascular Compression with Cervical Rotation: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Demirtaş, Hakan; Kayan, Mustafa; Koyuncuoğlu, Hasan Rıfat; Çelik, Ahmet Orhan; Kara, Mustafa; Şengeze, Nihat

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Eagle syndrome is a condition caused by an elongated styloid process. Unilateral face, neck and ear pain, stinging pain, foreign body sensation and dysphagia can be observed with this syndrome. Rarely, the elongated styloid process may cause pain by compressing the cervical segment of the internal carotid and the surrounding sympathetic plexus, and that pain spreading along the artery can cause neurological symptoms such as vertigo and syncope. Case Report In this case report we presented a very rare eagle syndrome with neurological symptoms that occurred suddenly with cervical rotation. The symptoms disappeared as suddenly as they occurred, with the release of pressure in neutral position. We also discussed CT angiographic findings of this case. Conclusions Radiological diagnosis of the Eagle syndrome that is manifested with a wide variety of symptoms and causes diagnostic difficulties when it is not considered in the differential diagnosis is easy in patients with specific findings. CT angiography is a fast and effective examination in terms of showing compression in patients with the Eagle syndrome that is considered to be atypical and causes vascular compression. PMID:27354882

  14. Eagles, Otters, and Unicorns: An Anatomy of Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Stephen R.; King, Margaret J.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes three archetypal workers: eagles who innovate by improvements, otters who innovate by extension, and unicorns who innovate by paradigm. Each of these innovators is discussed in terms of domain-relevant skills, manipulative skills, and motivation. Needs of each type in terms of business culture are discussed. (PB)

  15. 76 FR 9529 - Migratory Birds; Draft Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... construction, operation and maintenance of land-based, wind energy facilities in the United States. DATES: We... Guidance describes a process by which wind energy developers can collect and analyze information that could lead to a programmatic permit to authorize unintentional take of eagles at wind energy facilities....

  16. The "Oklahoma Eagle": A Study of Black Press Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Karen F.

    Analyzing the history of the "Oklahoma Eagle" provides insight into the problems and the opportunities involved in operating a black newspaper and reveals the factors responsible for the paper's longevity. The paper has been owned and operated by members of the Edward Lawrence Goodwin family since 1938 and has been staffed by excellent…

  17. Research resources: curating the new eagle-i discovery system

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Nicole; Johnson, Tenille; Corday, Karen; Torniai, Carlo; Brush, Matthew; Segerdell, Erik; Wilson, Melanie; Shaffer, Chris; Robinson, David; Haendel, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Development of biocuration processes and guidelines for new data types or projects is a challenging task. Each project finds its way toward defining annotation standards and ensuring data consistency with varying degrees of planning and different tools to support and/or report on consistency. Further, this process may be data type specific even within the context of a single project. This article describes our experiences with eagle-i, a 2-year pilot project to develop a federated network of data repositories in which unpublished, unshared or otherwise ‘invisible’ scientific resources could be inventoried and made accessible to the scientific community. During the course of eagle-i development, the main challenges we experienced related to the difficulty of collecting and curating data while the system and the data model were simultaneously built, and a deficiency and diversity of data management strategies in the laboratories from which the source data was obtained. We discuss our approach to biocuration and the importance of improving information management strategies to the research process, specifically with regard to the inventorying and usage of research resources. Finally, we highlight the commonalities and differences between eagle-i and similar efforts with the hope that our lessons learned will assist other biocuration endeavors. Database URL: www.eagle-i.net PMID:22434835

  18. 33 CFR 165.1309 - Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1309 Eagle Harbor, Bainbridge Island, WA. (a) Regulated area. A regulated navigation area is established...

  19. Isolated Horner Syndrome From an Elongated Styloid Process (Eagle Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Chang, Caitlin A; Lin, Tony; Fung, Kevin; Sharma, Manas; Fraser, J Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs when an elongated styloid process causes otolaryngological or neurological symptoms or signs. We report a patient who had an isolated asymptomatic Horner syndrome that resulted from a pinned internal carotid artery being dynamically injured by an elongated styloid process during chiropractic neck manipulation. There was no evidence of arterial dissection.

  20. "The Story of Running Eagle" and "The Cause of Things."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, James Willard

    The two illustrated children's stories are part of a series about the Blackfeet Indians. The first story, originally published in 1916, is the story of Weasel Woman, an orphaned girl who stole her way into a raiding party and became a successful warrior and, ultimately, a war chief named Running Eagle. The second story is a Blackfeet creation tale…

  1. 36 CFR 71.5 - Golden Eagle Passport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall admit the permittee and any persons accompany him in a single, private, noncommercial vehicle, or alternatively, the permittee and his spouse, children, and parents accompanying him where entry to the area is... Eagle Passport coverage does not include a permittee and his spouse, children, or parents entering...

  2. 36 CFR 71.15 - The Golden Eagle Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Insignia” (hereinafter “Insignia”) as used in this section, means the words “The Golden Eagle” and the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Golden Eagle Insignia. 71.15 Section 71.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 36 CFR 71.15 - The Golden Eagle Insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Insignia” (hereinafter “Insignia”) as used in this section, means the words “The Golden Eagle” and the... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Golden Eagle Insignia. 71.15 Section 71.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 76 FR 60583 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ...) et seq.]. 7. Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act [16 U.S.C. 688-688d]. Previous actions taken by the... affect, but not jeopardize, the bald eagle. The USFWS also concluded that the project was not likely to... Bald Eagle Take Exempted Under ESA permit (No. MB218918-0) for the incidental take of the bald...

  5. 78 FR 52999 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ....C. 470(f) et seq.]. 7. Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act [16 U.S.C. 688-688d]. Notice is hereby... adversely affect, but not jeopardize, the bald eagle. The USFWS also concluded that the project was not... Bald Eagle Take Exempted under ESA permit (NO. MB218918-0) for the incidental take of the bald...

  6. Interactions between a group of Golden Eagles and a herd of North American elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, Matt P.; Kochert, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    Raptors are generally considered solitary predators (Schoener 1969), but occasionally they interact socially (Brown and Amadon 1968). Certain raptor species (e.g., Swallow-tailed Kites [Elanoides forficatus] and Swainson's Hawks [Buteo swainsoni]) concentrate in aggregations in response to localized, abundant food sources (Ellis et al. 1993). Many raptor species engage in group hunting (Ellis et al. 1993), and social foraging is a routine strategy for some species (e.g., Harris's Hawks [Parabuteo unicinctus]; Bednarz 1988, Ellis et al. 1993]. Raptors generally engage in group hunting to pursue elusive or large prey (Ellis et al. 1993). Occasionally individuals of conspecific raptors engage in play as a group sometimes involving chases of prey species (Palmer 1988). In this letter, we report interactions between a large group of Golden Eagles and a herd of adult and juvenile Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus canadensis nelsoni) in late autumn.

  7. Lack of efficacy of polysorbate 60 in the treatment of male pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Groveman, H D; Ganiats, T; Klauber, M R

    1985-08-01

    Anecdotal reports have indicated that the nonionic detergent polysorbate 60 may be of some value in male pattern baldness. In this double-blind placebo-controlled trial, a photographic and objective scalp measurement system was developed to assess new hair growth. No significant difference was detected between subjects treated for 16 weeks with polysorbate 60 and control subjects treated with glycerin, indicating that polysorbate 60 is ineffective. Of the 141 subjects who completed the trial, 25% perceived that they grew new hair, 67% said they did not, and 8% were uncertain. Subject-reported new hair growth did not correlate with measurements, indicating that the placebo effect may be a major factor in reports of baldness "cures".

  8. MicroRNAs take part in pathophysiology and pathogenesis of Male Pattern Baldness.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Hamed R; Abbasi, Ali; Saffari, Mojtaba; Tabei, Mohammad B; Noori Daloii, Mohammad R

    2010-07-01

    Male Pattern Baldness (MPB) or androgenetic alopecia is a common form of hair loss with androgens and genetics having etiological significance. Androgens are thought to pathophysiologically power on cascades of chronically dramatic alterations in genetically susceptible scalp dermal papillas, specialized cells in hair follicles in which androgens react, and finally resulting in a patterned alopecia. However, the exact mechanisms through which androgens, positive regulators of growth and anabolism in most body sites, paradoxically exert their effects on balding hair follicles, are not yet known. The role of microRNAs, a recently discovered class of non-coding RNAs, with a wide range of regulatory functions, has been documented in hair follicle formation and their deregulation in cancer of prostate, a target organ of androgens has also been delineated. Yet, there is a lack of knowledge in agreement with microRNAs' contribution in pathophysiology of MPB. To investigate the role of microRNAs in pathogenesis of MPB, we selected seven microRNAs, predicted bioinformatically on a reverse engineering basis, from previously published microarray gene expression data and analyzed their expression in balding relative to non-balding dermal papillas. We found for the first time upregulation of four microRNAs (miR-221, miR-125b, miR-106b and miR-410) that could participate in pathogenesis of MPB. Regarding microRNAs' therapeutic potential and accessibility of hair follicles for gene therapy, these microRNAs can be considered as good candidates for a new revolutionized generation of treatments.

  9. Analysis of a gene that suppresses the morphological defect of bald mutants of Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed Central

    McCue, L A; Kwak, J; Wang, J; Kendrick, K E

    1996-01-01

    When present in multiple copies, orf1590 restored sporulation to class IIIA bald mutants of Streptomyces griseus, which form sporulation septa and thick spore walls prematurely. The orf1590 alleles from class IIIA bald mutants restored sporulation upon introduction at a high copy number into those same mutants, and the nucleotide sequence of one of these alleles was identical to that of the wild-type strain. We conclude that overexpression of orf1590 suppresses the defect in class IIIA bald mutants. Previous nucleotide sequence and transcript analyses suggested that orf1590 could encode two related proteins, P56 and P49.5, from nested coding sequences. A mutation that prevented the synthesis of P56 without altering the coding sequence for P49.5 eliminated the function of orf1590, as did amino acid substitutions in the putative helix-turn-helix domain located at the N terminus of P56 and absent from P49.5. To determine the coding capacity of orf1590, we analyzed translational fusions between orf1590 and the neo gene from Tn5. Measurement of the expression of fusions to the wild-type and mutant alleles of orf1590 indicated that P56 was the sole product of orf1590 during vegetative growth. Attempts to generate a nonfunctional frameshift mutation in orf1590 were unsuccessful in the absence of a second-site bald mutation, suggesting that orf1590 may be required during vegetative growth by preventing early sporulation. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that P56 at a high level delays the premature synthesis of sporulation septa and spore walls in class IIIA mutants. PMID:8631675

  10. 50 CFR 22.22 - What are the requirements concerning permits for Indian religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the United States of lawfully acquired bald eagles or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or... transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles, or any live eggs of these... United States lawfully acquired bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs for...

  11. 50 CFR 22.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reasonably foreseeable future actions. Disturb means to agitate or bother a bald or golden eagle to a degree..., maintained, or used by bald eagles or golden eagles for the purpose of reproduction. Export for the purpose of this part does not include the transportation of any dead bald or golden eagles, or their...

  12. 50 CFR 22.22 - What are the requirements concerning permits for Indian religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the United States of lawfully acquired bald eagles or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or... transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles, or any live eggs of these... United States lawfully acquired bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs for...

  13. 50 CFR 22.22 - What are the requirements concerning permits for Indian religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the United States of lawfully acquired bald eagles or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or... transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles, or any live eggs of these... United States lawfully acquired bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs for...

  14. 50 CFR 21.31 - Rehabilitation permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... feathers. (C) You must send all dead bald and golden eagles, and their parts and feathers to: National... you to notify State wildlife officers of a dead bald or golden eagle before sending the eagle to the... acquiring a threatened or endangered migratory bird species, or bald or golden eagle, whether live or...

  15. 50 CFR 22.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... reasonably foreseeable future actions. Disturb means to agitate or bother a bald or golden eagle to a degree..., maintained, or used by bald eagles or golden eagles for the purpose of reproduction. Export for the purpose of this part does not include the transportation of any dead bald or golden eagles, or their...

  16. 50 CFR 22.22 - What are the requirements concerning permits for Indian religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the United States of lawfully acquired bald eagles or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or... transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles, or any live eggs of these... United States lawfully acquired bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs for...

  17. 50 CFR 22.22 - What are the requirements concerning permits for Indian religious purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the United States of lawfully acquired bald eagles or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or... transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles, or any live eggs of these... United States lawfully acquired bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs for...

  18. Asbestos occurrence in the Eagle C-4 quadrangle, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Helen Laura

    1969-01-01

    An asbestos occurrence was discovered in a remote part of the Eagle quadrangle, Alaska, in the summer of 1968 during geologic reconnaissance in connection with the U.S. Geological Survey's Heavy Metals program. The exposed part of the deposit consists of large joint blocks of serpentine which are cut by closely spaced subparallel veins. Most of the veins are about ? inch thick, and they consist of cross-fiber chrysotile asbestos. The asbestos appears to be of commercial quality, but the total quantity is unknown. The asbestos occurs in a serpentinized ultramafic mass which appears to intrude metamorphic rocks. Many other serpentinized ultramafic masses are known in the Eagle quadrangle, but this is the first one in which considerable asbestos has been found. The deposit is of importance because it shows that geologic conditions are locally favorable for the formation of asbestos in the Yukon-Tanana Upland, and hope of finding commercial asbestos deposits thus seems possible.

  19. An improved PCR method for gender identification of eagles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Chou, Ta-Ching; Gu, De-Leung; Cheng, Chun-An; Chang, Chia-Che; Yao, Cheng-Te; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Wen, Cheng-Hao; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Tan, Kock-Yee; Cheng, Chien-Chung

    2008-06-01

    Eagles are sexually monomorphic and therefore it is difficult to determine their gender, which is a crucial need for management purposes. In this study, we have developed an improved gender identification method by exploiting length differences between the Chromo-Helicase-DNA binding protein (CHD)-Z and CHD-W genes of Spilornis cheela hoya. By comparing DNA sequences for CHD-W and CHD-Z from 10 species of Falconiformes eagles we designed universal gender identification PCR primers that exploit differences in product size. Standard agarose gels were shown to easily distinguish between the 148-bp CHD-ZW and the 258-bp CHD-W PCR products. When used with 28 samples of S. cheela hoya, our improved universal primers provided a fast and precise gender identification assay.

  20. Application of Future State Decision Making in the Eagle Combat Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    development by the TRADOC Analysis Command at Fort Leavenworth. EAGLE is written using the Artificial Intelligence (Al) language LISP, which is...Analysis Command at Fort Leavenworth. EAGLE is written using the Aitificial Intellegence (AI) language LISP, which is ideally suited for describing both...Leavenworth and which contains several novel and significant features. First, EAGLE is written using the object-oriented Artifi- cial Intellegence (AI

  1. Environmental Assessment: Eagle Heights Housing Area Revitalization Dover Air Force Base, Delaware

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    anticipated Biological Resources • Demolition and construction activities would create a short-term impact to wildlife • Most species within the Eagle ... biological resources comprises the Environmental Assessment for Eagle Heights Housing Revitalization 711510412:27 PMI039-o4 Dover Air Force Base...COVERED 00-00-2004 to 00-00-2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Environmental Assessment Eagle Heights Housing Area Revitalization Dover Air Force Base

  2. Airbase Structural Facility Postattack Recovery - FOAL EAGLE demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    glued laminated timber (glulam) repair column by a light-gage steel column recently developed to brace concrete formwork (11). E. TEST DESCRIPTION...steel column recently developed to brace concrete formwork (11). Upon completion of the FOAL EAGLE facility recovery demonstration, the Osan AB BCE...concrete formwork . The product, called ’Super-Stud’" m and manufactured by the Economy Forms Corporation (EFCO), of Des Moines, IA, turned out to be a very

  3. Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'(Right-eye)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater' (QTVR)

    This is the right-eye version of the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside 'Eagle Crater,' the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions -- each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across -- that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as 'lag deposit,' or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as 'Homeplate' and the one behind it as 'First Base.' The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

  4. Enhancement of surface definition and gridding in the EAGLE code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Joe F.

    1991-01-01

    Algorithms for smoothing of curves and surfaces for the EAGLE grid generation program are presented. The method uses an existing automated technique which detects undesirable geometric characteristics by using a local fairness criterion. The geometry entity is then smoothed by repeated removal and insertion of spline knots in the vicinity of the geometric irregularity. The smoothing algorithm is formulated for use with curves in Beta spline form and tensor product B-spline surfaces.

  5. Distribution, nesting activities, and age-class of territorial pairs of golden eagles at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area, California, 2014–16

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolar, Patrick S.; Wiens, J. David

    2017-03-22

    The substantial numbers of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) killed by collisions with oldgeneration wind turbines each year at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA) in California has been well documented from previous studies. Few eagle nests have been documented in the APWRA, however, and adults and subadults 3+ years of age killed by turbines were generally not associated with nearby territories. We searched a subset of randomly selected survey plots for territorial pairs of golden eagles and associated nesting attempts within the APWRA as part of a broader investigation of population dynamics in the surrounding northern Diablo Range. In contrast to limited historical observations from 1988 to 2013, our surveys documented up to 15 territorial pairs within 3.2 kilometers (km) of wind turbines at the APWRA annually, 9 of which were not previously documented or only observed intermittently during historical surveys. We found evidence of nesting activity by adult pairs at least once during our study at six of these territories. We also determined that 23–36 percent of territories identified within 3.2 km of the APWRA had a subadult pair member, but that no pairs with a subadult member attempted to nest. These data will be useful to developers, wildlife managers, and future raptor studies in the area to evaluate and minimize the potential effects of wind energy or other development activities on previously unknown territorial pairs in the area.

  6. The influence of weather on Golden Eagle migration in northwestern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, R.E.; McClelland, B.R.; Mcclelland, P.T.; Key, C.H.; Bennetts, R.E.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed the influence of 17 weather factors on migrating Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) near the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park, Montana, U.S.A. Local weather measurements were recorded at automated stations on the flanks of two peaks within the migration path. During a total of 506 hr of observation, the yearly number of Golden Eagles in autumn counts (1994-96) averaged 1973; spring counts (1995 and 1996) averaged 605 eagles. Mean passage rates (eagles/hr) were 16.5 in autumn and 8.2 in spring. Maximum rates were 137 in autumn and 67 in spring. Using generalized linear modeling, we tested for the effects of weather factors on the number of eagles counted. In the autumn model, the number of eagles increased with increasing air temperature, rising barometric pressure, decreasing relative humidity, and interactions among those factors. In the spring model, the number of eagles increased with increasing wind speed, barometric pressure, and the interaction between these factors. Our data suggest that a complex interaction among weather factors influenced the number of eagles passing on a given day. We hypothesize that in complex landscapes with high topographic relief, such as Glacier National Park, numerous weather factors produce different daily combinations to which migrating eagles respond opportunistically. ?? 2001 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  7. Looking Back at 'Eagle Crater'(Left-eye)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is the left-eye version of the first 360-degree view from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's new position outside 'Eagle Crater,' the small crater where the rover landed about two months ago. Scientists are busy analyzing Opportunity's new view of the plains of Meridiani Planum. The plentiful ripples are a clear indication that wind is the primary geologic process currently in effect on the plains. The rover's tracks can be seen leading away from Eagle Crater. At the far left are two depressions--each about a meter (about 3.3 feet) across---that feature bright spots in their centers. One possibility is that the bright material is similar in composition to the rocks in Eagle Crater's outcrop and the surrounding darker material is what's referred to as 'lag deposit,' or erosional remnants, which are much harder and more difficult to wear away. These twin dimples might be revealing pieces of a larger outcrop that lies beneath. The depression closest to Opportunity is whimsically referred to as 'Homeplate' and the one behind it as 'First Base.' The rover's panoramic camera is set to take detailed images of the depressions today, on Opportunity's 58th sol. The backshell and parachute that helped protect the rover and deliver it safely to the surface of Mars are also visible near the horizon, at the left of the image. This image was taken by the rover's navigation camera.

  8. Evaluation of DNA variants associated with androgenetic alopecia and their potential to predict male pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Marcińska, Magdalena; Pośpiech, Ewelina; Abidi, Sarah; Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; van den Berge, Margreet; Carracedo, Ángel; Eduardoff, Mayra; Marczakiewicz-Lustig, Anna; Morling, Niels; Sijen, Titia; Skowron, Małgorzata; Söchtig, Jens; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Weiler, Natalie; Schneider, Peter M; Ballard, David; Børsting, Claus; Parson, Walther; Phillips, Chris; Branicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia, known in men as male pattern baldness (MPB), is a very conspicuous condition that is particularly frequent among European men and thus contributes markedly to variation in physical appearance traits amongst Europeans. Recent studies have revealed multiple genes and polymorphisms to be associated with susceptibility to MPB. In this study, 50 candidate SNPs for androgenetic alopecia were analyzed in order to verify their potential to predict MPB. Significant associations were confirmed for 29 SNPs from chromosomes X, 1, 5, 7, 18 and 20. A simple 5-SNP prediction model and an extended 20-SNP model were developed based on a discovery panel of 305 males from various European populations fitting one of two distinct phenotype categories. The first category consisted of men below 50 years of age with significant baldness and the second; men aged 50 years or older lacking baldness. The simple model comprised the five best predictors: rs5919324 near AR, rs1998076 in the 20p11 region, rs929626 in EBF1, rs12565727 in TARDBP and rs756853 in HDAC9. The extended prediction model added 15 SNPs from five genomic regions that improved overall prevalence-adjusted predictive accuracy measured by area under the receiver characteristic operating curve (AUC). Both models were evaluated for predictive accuracy using a test set of 300 males reflecting the general European population. Applying a 65% probability threshold, high prediction sensitivity of 87.1% but low specificity of 42.4% was obtained in men aged <50 years. In men aged ≥50, prediction sensitivity was slightly lower at 67.7% while specificity reached 90%. Overall, the AUC=0.761 calculated for men at or above 50 years of age indicates these SNPs offer considerable potential for the application of genetic tests to predict MPB patterns, adding a highly informative predictive system to the emerging field of forensic analysis of externally visible characteristics.

  9. Evaluation of DNA Variants Associated with Androgenetic Alopecia and Their Potential to Predict Male Pattern Baldness

    PubMed Central

    Marcińska, Magdalena; Pośpiech, Ewelina; Abidi, Sarah; Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; van den Berge, Margreet; Carracedo, Ángel; Eduardoff, Mayra; Marczakiewicz-Lustig, Anna; Morling, Niels; Sijen, Titia; Skowron, Małgorzata; Söchtig, Jens; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Weiler, Natalie; Schneider, Peter M.; Ballard, David; Børsting, Claus; Parson, Walther; Phillips, Chris; Branicki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia, known in men as male pattern baldness (MPB), is a very conspicuous condition that is particularly frequent among European men and thus contributes markedly to variation in physical appearance traits amongst Europeans. Recent studies have revealed multiple genes and polymorphisms to be associated with susceptibility to MPB. In this study, 50 candidate SNPs for androgenetic alopecia were analyzed in order to verify their potential to predict MPB. Significant associations were confirmed for 29 SNPs from chromosomes X, 1, 5, 7, 18 and 20. A simple 5-SNP prediction model and an extended 20-SNP model were developed based on a discovery panel of 305 males from various European populations fitting one of two distinct phenotype categories. The first category consisted of men below 50 years of age with significant baldness and the second; men aged 50 years or older lacking baldness. The simple model comprised the five best predictors: rs5919324 near AR, rs1998076 in the 20p11 region, rs929626 in EBF1, rs12565727 in TARDBP and rs756853 in HDAC9. The extended prediction model added 15 SNPs from five genomic regions that improved overall prevalence-adjusted predictive accuracy measured by area under the receiver characteristic operating curve (AUC). Both models were evaluated for predictive accuracy using a test set of 300 males reflecting the general European population. Applying a 65% probability threshold, high prediction sensitivity of 87.1% but low specificity of 42.4% was obtained in men aged <50 years. In men aged ≥50, prediction sensitivity was slightly lower at 67.7% while specificity reached 90%. Overall, the AUC=0.761 calculated for men at or above 50 years of age indicates these SNPs offer considerable potential for the application of genetic tests to predict MPB patterns, adding a highly informative predictive system to the emerging field of forensic analysis of externally visible characteristics. PMID:26001114

  10. Methane emissions from bald cypress tree trunks in a bottomland forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schile, L. M.; Pitz, S.; Megonigal, P.

    2013-12-01

    Studies on natural methane emissions predominantly have occurred on wetland soils with herbaceous plant species. Less attention, however, has been placed on the role of woody wetland plant species in the methane cycle. Recent studies on methane emissions from tree trunks document that they are a significant source of emissions that previously has been not accounted for. In this study, we examine methane emissions from trunks of mature bald cypress (Taxodium distichum), which is a dominant tree species in bottomland hardwood forests of the Southeastern United States. To date, little is known about soil methane emissions in these systems, and published tree emissions have been limited to a single study conducted on bald cypress knees. In May 2013, we established a plot in a monospecific bald cypress stand planted approximately 70 years ago on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland and are monitoring methane emissions on 12 tree trunks, soil chambers, and pore-water over the course of a year. Custom-made 30 cm tall open face rectangular tree chambers were constructed out of white acrylic sheets and secured on each tree at a midpoint of 45 cm above the soil surface. Chambers were lined with neoprene along the tree surface and sealed with an epoxy. On three trees that varied in trunk diameter, chambers were placed at average heights of 95, 145, 195, and 345 cm from the soil surface in order to calculate a decay curve of methane emissions. Once a month, chambers were sealed with lids and head-space samples were collected over the course of an hour. Methane flux was calculated and compared to emissions from soil chambers. Average cypress trunk methane fluxes ranged from 17.7 μmole m-2 hr-1 in May to 49.5 and 116.5 μmole m-2 hr-1 in June and July, respectively. Soil fluxes averaged 28.5 μmole m-2 hr-1 in May and June, and decreased to 13.7 μmole m-2 hr-1 in July. Methane emissions decreased exponentially up the tree trunk, with fluxes of 2 μmole m-2 hr-1 and less calculated

  11. Hair-raising. The latest news on male-pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Proctor, P H

    1999-04-01

    The initiating event in balding seems to be an abnormal sensitivity to the male sex hormones. In addition, a multifactorial model is emerging in which hormones affect the hair follicle in a way that causes it to be perceived as a foreign body by the immune system, which then mounts an attack. Several new classes of agents have the potential to treat hair loss. More than 40 U.S. and several hundred foreign patents have been issued for hair-loss treatment agents. As is common in dermatology, no single agent works universally against hair loss, so the treatment process is often one of trial and error.

  12. Hair biology and its comprehensive sequence in female pattern baldness: diagnosis and treatment modalities--Part I.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Midha, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Hair may be a source of concern for patients when there is a change in its texture, amount, or thickness. It can present in women as androgenic alopecia also called female pattern baldness, and in men as adrogenic alopecia, also called male pattern baldness. Thinning/rarefaction affecting the vertex is a progressive condition, and hair loss in women has been interpreted and classified differently from that in men. The Ludwig classification for women's hair loss seems to be the most accepted assessment, which will be outlined in this review, along with the hair growth cycle that encompasses anagen, catagen, telogen, exogen, and kenogen.

  13. 78 FR 28010 - Issuance of an Amendment to the Presidential Permit for the City of Eagle Pass International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... of an Amendment to the Presidential Permit for the City of Eagle Pass International Bridge Board Regarding the Port of Entry Known as Eagle Pass II SUMMARY: The Department of State issued an amendment to the Presidential Permit to the City of Eagle Pass International Bridge Board on May 2,...

  14. 50 CFR 22.31 - Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State. 22.31 Section 22.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... Golden Eagles § 22.31 Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State....

  15. 50 CFR 22.31 - Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State. 22.31 Section 22.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... Golden Eagles § 22.31 Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State....

  16. 50 CFR 22.31 - Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State. 22.31 Section 22.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... Golden Eagles § 22.31 Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State....

  17. 50 CFR 22.31 - Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State. 22.31 Section 22.31 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE... Golden Eagles § 22.31 Golden eagle depredations control order on request of Governor of a State....

  18. Assessment of exposure of fish to emerging contaminants in the Eagle Creek Watershed

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Eagle Creek Watershed (ECW) encompasses 162 square miles in central Indiana upstream of the Eagle Creek Reservoir, a public drinking water source for the city of Indianapolis. The dominant land-cover is agriculture, although some portions are undergoing urbanization, with th...

  19. 78 FR 924 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Alaska: Eagle River PM10

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ...EPA is proposing to approve the Limited Maintenance Plan (LMP) submitted by the State of Alaska on September 29, 2010, for the Eagle River nonattainment area (Eagle River NAA) and the State's request to redesignate the area to attainment for the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to a nominal 10 micrometers......

  20. 76 FR 387 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC (Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; AREVA Enrichment Services, LLC (Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility... Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF)--in Bonneville County, Idaho; and (2) the receipt, possession,...

  1. 77 FR 28375 - Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on May 1, 2012, Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P. (Desoto) filed a Rate Election pursuant...

  2. 76 FR 20971 - Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 7, 2011, Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P. filed a revised Statement of Operating Conditions...

  3. Growing Leaders in Native American Communities: An Interview with Gerald Eagle Bear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Sara

    2006-01-01

    In the summer of 2005, I interviewed Gerald Eagle Bear about his work to promote civic and cultural engagement among Native American youth. Eagle Bear is program manager of the Oyate Networking Project, an affiliate of Christian Children's Fund, in Mission, South Dakota. The organization focuses on early childhood education, youth violence…

  4. 78 FR 57629 - Eagle Valley Clean Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Valley Clean Energy, LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on September 9, 2013, Eagle Valley Clean Energy, LLC filed Form 556 and a petition for certification as...

  5. 76 FR 27182 - Pricing for American Eagle and American Buffalo Bullion Presentation Cases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... United States Mint Pricing for American Eagle and American Buffalo Bullion Presentation Cases AGENCY... announcing the price increase of the American Eagle/Buffalo Bullion Presentation Cases. A lot of 100 presentation cases will be offered for sale at a price of $299.95. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: B. B....

  6. 75 FR 62895 - Notice of Availability of Safety Evaluation Report; AREVA Enrichment Services LLC, Eagle Rock...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Availability of Safety Evaluation Report; AREVA Enrichment Services LLC, Eagle Rock... Project Manager, Advanced Fuel Cycle, Enrichment, and Uranium Conversion, Division of Fuel Cycle Safety... special nuclear material. This proposed facility is known as the Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility (EREF)...

  7. 76 FR 33026 - Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin. The coin will be offered for sale at a price of $59.95....

  8. 77 FR 43662 - Price for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... American Eagle Silver Proof Coin. The product will now be offered for sale at a price of $54.95....

  9. 76 FR 67799 - Pricing for the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set AGENCY: United States... price of the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set. The coin set will be offered for sale at...

  10. 76 FR 53717 - Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin. The price of the coins will be raised from $59.95 to...

  11. 77 FR 40704 - Price for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... 2012 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coin. The coin will be offered for sale at a price of...

  12. 78 FR 24816 - Pricing for the 2013 American Eagle West Point Two-Coin Silver Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2013 American Eagle West Point Two-Coin Silver Set AGENCY: United... the price of the 2013 American Eagle West Point Two-Coin Silver Set. The coin set will be offered...

  13. 77 FR 15457 - Pricing for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin. The coins will be offered for sale at a price of $59.95....

  14. 76 FR 1149 - Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project and Notice of Public... Regulations (CFR) (18 CFR part 380 ), the Office of Energy Projects has reviewed the application for license for the Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 13123), located on the site...

  15. Spatial structure in the diet of imperial eagles Aquila heliaca in Kazakhstan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katzner, T.E.; Bragin, E.A.; Knick, S.T.; Smith, A.T.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the relationship between spatial variability in prey and food habits of eastern imperial eagles Aquila heliaca at a 90,000 ha national nature reserve in north-central Kazakhstan. Eagle diet varied greatly within the population and the spatial structure of eagle diet within the population varied according to the scale of measurement. Patterns in dietary response were inconsistent with expectations if either ontogenetic imprinting or competition determined diet choice, but they met expectations if functional response determined diet. Eagles nesting near a high-density prey resource used that resource almost exclusively. In contrast, in locations with no single high-density prey species, eagles' diet was more diverse. Our results demonstrate that spatial structuring of diet of vertebrate predators can provide important insight into the mechanisms that drive dietary decisions. ?? OIKOS.

  16. Flight Testing of Guidance, Navigation and Control Systems on the Mighty Eagle Robotic Lander Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Mike; Rickman, Doug; Chavers, Greg; Adam, Jason; Becker, Chris; Eliser, Joshua; Gunter, Dan; Kennedy, Logan; O'Leary, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    During 2011 a series of progressively more challenging flight tests of the Mighty Eagle autonomous terrestrial lander testbed were conducted primarily to validate the GNC system for a proposed lunar lander. With the successful completion of this GNC validation objective the opportunity existed to utilize the Mighty Eagle as a flying testbed for a variety of technologies. In 2012 an Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) algorithm was implemented in flight software and demonstrated in a series of flight tests. In 2012 a hazard avoidance system was developed and flight tested on the Mighty Eagle. Additionally, GNC algorithms from Moon Express and a MEMs IMU were tested in 2012. All of the testing described herein was above and beyond the original charter for the Mighty Eagle. In addition to being an excellent testbed for a wide variety of systems the Mighty Eagle also provided a great learning opportunity for many engineers and technicians to work a flight program.

  17. The EAGLE simulations: atomic hydrogen associated with galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, Robert A.; Bahé, Yannick M.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Rahmati, Alireza; Schaye, Joop; McCarthy, Ian G.; Marasco, Antonino; Bower, Richard G.; Schaller, Matthieu; Theuns, Tom; van der Hulst, Thijs

    2017-02-01

    We examine the properties of atomic hydrogen (H I) associated with galaxies in the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) simulations of galaxy formation. EAGLE's feedback parameters were calibrated to reproduce the stellar mass function and galaxy sizes at z = 0.1, and we assess whether this calibration also yields realistic H I properties. We estimate the self-shielding density with a fitting function calibrated using radiation transport simulations, and correct for molecular hydrogen with empirical or theoretical relations. The `standard-resolution' simulations systematically underestimate H I column densities, leading to an H I deficiency in low-mass (M⋆ < 1010 M⊙) galaxies and poor reproduction of the observed H I mass function. These shortcomings are largely absent from EAGLE simulations featuring a factor of 8 (2) better mass (spatial) resolution, within which the H I mass of galaxies evolves more mildly from z = 1 to 0 than in the standard-resolution simulations. The largest volume simulation reproduces the observed clustering of H I systems, and its dependence on H I richness. At fixed M⋆, galaxies acquire more H I in simulations with stronger feedback, as they become associated with more massive haloes and higher infall rates. They acquire less H I in simulations with a greater star formation efficiency, since the star formation and feedback necessary to balance the infall rate is produced by smaller gas reservoirs. The simulations indicate that the H I of present-day galaxies was acquired primarily by the smooth accretion of ionized, intergalactic gas at z ≃ 1, which later self-shields, and that only a small fraction is contributed by the reincorporation of gas previously heated strongly by feedback. H I reservoirs are highly dynamic: over 40 per cent of H I associated with z = 0.1 galaxies is converted to stars or ejected by z = 0.

  18. Mate Recognition and Expression of Affective State in Croop Calls of Northern Bald Ibis (Geronticus eremita)

    PubMed Central

    Szipl, Georgine; Boeckle, Markus; Werner, Sinja A. B.; Kotrschal, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Northern Bald Ibis are socially monogamous and year-round colonial birds with a moderate repertoire of calls. Their ‘croop’, for example, is used during greeting of mates, but also during agonistic encounters, and provides an ideal case to study whether calls are revealing with respect to motivational states. We recorded croop calls in a semi-tame and free-roaming flock of Northern Bald Ibis in Austria, and analysed the vocal structure to identify parameters (e.g. call duration, fundamental frequency) potentially differing between social contexts, sexes and individuals. Additionally, we conducted playback experiments to test whether mated pairs would discriminate each other by their greeting croops. Acoustic features showed highly variable temporal and structural parameters. Almost all calls could be classified correctly and assigned to the different social contexts and sexes. Classification results of greeting croops were less clear for individuality. However, incubating individuals looked up more often and longer in response to playbacks of the greeting calls of their mate than to other colony members, indicating mate recognition. We show that acoustic parameters of agonistic and greeting croops contain features that may indicate the expression of affective states, and that greeting croops encode individual differences that are sufficient for individual recognition. PMID:24505455

  19. EAGLE, a 2 TW Pulsed Power Research Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    four water- dielectric triplate transmission lines with adjustable impedances. The first line is a gas- switched transfer capacitor. Next are two water... dielectric breakdown. EAGLE is a wedge-shaped 1/20th "slice" (module) of ROULETTE, PI’s conceptual design for a 40 to 50 TW, disk-shaped, modular accelerator ...improved s p ark gap, demonstrated < 2 ns jitter f r om a 3 MV triggered gas switch , and des igne d a nd built an immersible , fiber- optic -coupled trigge

  20. Battery WOX93E (Eagle-Picher CAP 6243)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    fiberfrax . A drawing of the tube type insulator is shown. The final two minths of 1974 involved comparison testing of the new tube type insulation...tests being performed at Eagle-Plcher, since accurate data was not possible at this time. -5- RIGID INSULATOR MIN-K. OR FIBERFRAX 6< I The...34 fiberfrax « 1-1/8" wide x 8-3/4" long (1 piece wrapped around twice) e) 2 wraps of .007" glass cloth tape « 1/2" wide x 48" long (1 piece wrapped around

  1. Probability of Elevated Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  2. Probability of Elevated Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  3. 50 CFR 21.53 - Control order for purple swamphens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Migratory Bird Treaty Act, or the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, that person must immediately report... threatened or endangered species or any bird species protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act...

  4. 50 CFR 21.53 - Control order for purple swamphens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Migratory Bird Treaty Act, or the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, that person must immediately report... threatened or endangered species or any bird species protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act...

  5. Baldness may be caused by the weight of the scalp: gravity as a proposed mechanism for hair loss.

    PubMed

    Ustuner, E Tuncay

    2008-10-01

    Available theories on the etiology and pathogenesis of male pattern baldness have not been satisfactory. Nonetheless, the most widely adopted theory today is the androgenetic theory. The current article introduces a new theory. According to the new theory the pressure created by the weight of the scalp is the cause of the baldness. The weight of the whole scalp over the loose areolar tissue is the operative weight. Hair follicles are pressed between the scalp skin and the cranial bones. The soft tissues around the hair follicles work as a buffer against the pressure. When the buffer decreases and becomes inadequate with age the effective pressure on the hair follicles increases. Unlike the existing theories, the new theory is able to explain every feature of male and female pattern baldness and agrees completely with all scientifically established facts and produced data. The new theory promises a radical change in how baldness is conceived and treated. Notice by the author: The materials and methods that utilize the new theory described in this article for prevention and treatment of hair loss are in patent pending status.

  6. Baldness and the androgen receptor: the AR polyglycine repeat polymorphism does not confer susceptibility to androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Justine A; Scurrah, Katrina J; Cobb, Joanna E; Zaloumis, Sophie G; Duncan, Anna E; Harrap, Stephen B

    2007-05-01

    Androgenetic alopecia, or male pattern baldness, is a complex condition with a strong heritable component. In 2001, we published the first significant evidence of a genetic association between baldness and a synonymous coding SNP (rs6152) in the androgen receptor gene, AR. Recently, this finding was replicated in three independent studies, confirming an important role for AR in the baldness phenotype. In one such replication study, it was claimed that the causative variant underlying the association was likely to be the polyglycine (GGN) repeat polymorphism, one of two apparently functional triplet repeat polymorphisms located in the exon 1 transactivating domain of the gene. Here, we extend our original association finding and present comprehensive evidence from approximately 1,200 fathers and sons drawn from 703 families of the Victorian Family Heart Study, a general population Caucasian cohort, that neither exon 1 triplet repeat polymorphism is causative in this condition. Seventy-eight percent of fathers (531/683) and 30% of sons (157/520) were affected to some degree with AGA. We utilised statistical methods appropriate for the categorical nature of the phenotype and familial structure of the cohort, and determined that whilst SNP rs6152 was strongly associated with baldness (P < 0.0001), the GGN triplet repeat was not (P = 0.13). In the absence of any other known common functional coding variants, we argue that the causative variant is likely to be in the non-coding region, and yet to be identified. The identification of functional non-coding variants surrounding AR may have significance not only for baldness, but also for the many other complex conditions that have thus far been linked to AR.

  7. Landscapes for Energy and Wildlife: Conservation Prioritization for Golden Eagles across Large Spatial Scales

    PubMed Central

    Tack, Jason D.; Fedy, Bradley C.

    2015-01-01

    Proactive conservation planning for species requires the identification of important spatial attributes across ecologically relevant scales in a model-based framework. However, it is often difficult to develop predictive models, as the explanatory data required for model development across regional management scales is rarely available. Golden eagles are a large-ranging predator of conservation concern in the United States that may be negatively affected by wind energy development. Thus, identifying landscapes least likely to pose conflict between eagles and wind development via shared space prior to development will be critical for conserving populations in the face of imposing development. We used publically available data on golden eagle nests to generate predictive models of golden eagle nesting sites in Wyoming, USA, using a suite of environmental and anthropogenic variables. By overlaying predictive models of golden eagle nesting habitat with wind energy resource maps, we highlight areas of potential conflict among eagle nesting habitat and wind development. However, our results suggest that wind potential and the relative probability of golden eagle nesting are not necessarily spatially correlated. Indeed, the majority of our sample frame includes areas with disparate predictions between suitable nesting habitat and potential for developing wind energy resources. Map predictions cannot replace on-the-ground monitoring for potential risk of wind turbines on wildlife populations, though they provide industry and managers a useful framework to first assess potential development. PMID:26262876

  8. Landscapes for energy and wildlife: conservation prioritization for golden eagles across large spatial scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tack, Jason D.; Fedy, Bradley C.

    2015-01-01

    Proactive conservation planning for species requires the identification of important spatial attributes across ecologically relevant scales in a model-based framework. However, it is often difficult to develop predictive models, as the explanatory data required for model development across regional management scales is rarely available. Golden eagles are a large-ranging predator of conservation concern in the United States that may be negatively affected by wind energy development. Thus, identifying landscapes least likely to pose conflict between eagles and wind development via shared space prior to development will be critical for conserving populations in the face of imposing development. We used publically available data on golden eagle nests to generate predictive models of golden eagle nesting sites in Wyoming, USA, using a suite of environmental and anthropogenic variables. By overlaying predictive models of golden eagle nesting habitat with wind energy resource maps, we highlight areas of potential conflict among eagle nesting habitat and wind development. However, our results suggest that wind potential and the relative probability of golden eagle nesting are not necessarily spatially correlated. Indeed, the majority of our sample frame includes areas with disparate predictions between suitable nesting habitat and potential for developing wind energy resources. Map predictions cannot replace on-the-ground monitoring for potential risk of wind turbines on wildlife populations, though they provide industry and managers a useful framework to first assess potential development.

  9. Landscapes for Energy and Wildlife: Conservation Prioritization for Golden Eagles across Large Spatial Scales.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jason D; Fedy, Bradley C

    2015-01-01

    Proactive conservation planning for species requires the identification of important spatial attributes across ecologically relevant scales in a model-based framework. However, it is often difficult to develop predictive models, as the explanatory data required for model development across regional management scales is rarely available. Golden eagles are a large-ranging predator of conservation concern in the United States that may be negatively affected by wind energy development. Thus, identifying landscapes least likely to pose conflict between eagles and wind development via shared space prior to development will be critical for conserving populations in the face of imposing development. We used publically available data on golden eagle nests to generate predictive models of golden eagle nesting sites in Wyoming, USA, using a suite of environmental and anthropogenic variables. By overlaying predictive models of golden eagle nesting habitat with wind energy resource maps, we highlight areas of potential conflict among eagle nesting habitat and wind development. However, our results suggest that wind potential and the relative probability of golden eagle nesting are not necessarily spatially correlated. Indeed, the majority of our sample frame includes areas with disparate predictions between suitable nesting habitat and potential for developing wind energy resources. Map predictions cannot replace on-the-ground monitoring for potential risk of wind turbines on wildlife populations, though they provide industry and managers a useful framework to first assess potential development.

  10. Does the Order of Invasive Species Removal Matter? The Case of the Eagle and the Pig

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul W.; Latta, Brian C.; Roemer, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Invasive species are recognized as a primary driver of native species endangerment and their removal is often a key component of a conservation strategy. Removing invasive species is not always a straightforward task, however, especially when they interact with other species in complex ways to negatively influence native species. Because unintended consequences may arise if all invasive species cannot be removed simultaneously, the order of their removal is of paramount importance to ecological restoration. In the mid-1990s, three subspecies of the island fox Urocyon littoralis were driven to near extinction on the northern California Channel Islands owing to heightened predation by golden eagles Aquila chrysaetos. Eagles were lured to the islands by an abundant supply of feral pigs Sus scrofa and through the process of apparent competition pigs indirectly facilitated the decline in foxes. As a consequence, both pigs and eagles had to be removed to recover the critically endangered fox. Complete removal of pigs was problematic: removing pigs first could force eagles to concentrate on the remaining foxes, increasing their probability of extinction. Removing eagles first was difficult: eagles are not easily captured and lethal removal was politically distasteful. Methodology/Principal Findings Using prey remains collected from eagle nests both before and after the eradication of pigs, we show that one pair of eagles that eluded capture did indeed focus more on foxes. These results support the premise that if the threat of eagle predation had not been mitigated prior to pig removal, fox extinction would have been a more likely outcome. Conclusions/Significance If complete eradication of all interacting invasive species is not possible, the order in which they are removed requires careful consideration. If overlooked, unexpected consequences may result that could impede restoration. PMID:19759894

  11. A Capture to Remember: Monitoring the Health of Avian Scavengers on the Pacific Coast.

    PubMed

    Varland, Daniel E

    2015-09-01

    Because of concern over risks to the health of avian communities on the Washington and Oregon coasts, the nonprofit Coastal Raptors and other partners initiated a study where, to date, Coastal Raptors has live-captured and sampled 27 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), 27 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), and 6 common ravens (Corvus corax) for contaminants and disease study. In this article, the author highlights the events of one of the nearly 100 days on which trapping has occurred. An adult bald eagle was captured north of Ocean Shores, WA, USA, and the trapping team was visited by Quinault Indian Nation members.

  12. Caribou antlers as nest materials for golden eagles in northwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, D.H.; Bunn, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    There are few published records of antlers in golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nests. This note reports extensive use of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) antlers in three golden eagle nests in the Cape Kruzenstern region of northwestern Alaska. The importance of antlers to this population of eagles can be explained at least in part by (1) the lack of suitable woody vegetation on the open tundra, (2) the similarity of antlers to sticks, and (3) the abundance of antlers, especially cow caribou antlers, in the region.

  13. Reduction of Genetic Diversity of the Harpy Eagle in Brazilian Tropical Forests

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation intensify the effects of genetic drift and endogamy, reducing genetic variability of populations with serious consequences for wildlife conservation. The Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja) is a forest dwelling species that is considered near threatened and suffers from habitat loss in the forests of the Neotropical region. In this study, 72 historical and current samples were assessed using eight autosomal microsatellite markers to investigate the distribution of genetic diversity of the Harpy Eagle of the Amazonian and Atlantic forests in Brazil. The results showed that the genetic diversity of Harpy Eagle decreased in the regions where deforestation is intense in the southern Amazon and Atlantic Forest. PMID:26871719

  14. Interpretive aeromagnetic map of the Eagle Mountains Wilderness Study Area, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Eagle Mountains Wilderness Study Area consists of about 49,723 acres in the southeastern and east-central part of the Eagle Mountains, Riverside County, California, just north of Interstate 10 about 170 mi east-southeast of Los Angeles. The western boundary of the WSA abuts Joshua Tree National Monument, the northern boundary skirts the Eagle Mountains mining district, and parts of the southern and eastern boundaries follow the Colorado River aqueduct. Principal access to the interior of the WSA is provided by jeep trails in Big Wash and an unnamed, major north-draining wash in the western part of the study area.

  15. 50 CFR 22.2 - What activities does this part apply to?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: (i) Any live or dead bald eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs that were lawfully acquired before... transport into or out of the United States any lawfully acquired dead bald or golden eagles, their parts... shipments containing bald or golden eagles, alive or dead, their parts, nests, or eggs as directed in §...

  16. 50 CFR 22.21 - What are the requirements concerning scientific and exhibition purpose permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... United States, or transportation into or out of the United States of lawfully possessed bald eagles or... that authorizes the transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles... States lawfully acquired live or dead bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or live or dead...

  17. 50 CFR 22.2 - What activities does this part apply to?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: (i) Any live or dead bald eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs that were lawfully acquired before... transport into or out of the United States any lawfully acquired dead bald or golden eagles, their parts... shipments containing bald or golden eagles, alive or dead, their parts, nests, or eggs as directed in §...

  18. 50 CFR 22.2 - What activities does this part apply to?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: (i) Any live or dead bald eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs that were lawfully acquired before... transport into or out of the United States any lawfully acquired dead bald or golden eagles, their parts... shipments containing bald or golden eagles, alive or dead, their parts, nests, or eggs as directed in §...

  19. 77 FR 1716 - James River National Wildlife Refuge, Prince George County, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... in 1991 to protect nationally significant nesting and roosting habitat for the bald eagle (Haliaeetus... to limit disturbance to bald eagles, as well as to minimize risks to public safety while habitat... of bald eagles and management of their nesting and roosting habitat; The protection of...

  20. 50 CFR 22.21 - What are the requirements concerning scientific and exhibition purpose permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... United States, or transportation into or out of the United States of lawfully possessed bald eagles or... that authorizes the transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles... States lawfully acquired live or dead bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or live or dead...

  1. 50 CFR 22.2 - What activities does this part apply to?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: (i) Any live or dead bald eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs that were lawfully acquired before... transport into or out of the United States any lawfully acquired dead bald or golden eagles, their parts... shipments containing bald or golden eagles, alive or dead, their parts, nests, or eggs as directed in §...

  2. 76 FR 43372 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ....C. 470(f) et seq.]. 7. Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act [16 U.S.C. 688-688d]. 8. Clean Water Act... jeopardize, the bald eagle. The USFWS also concluded that the project was not likely to jeopardize the... either the bald eagle or the eastern fanshell mussel (Cyprogenia stegaria), and the...

  3. 50 CFR 22.2 - What activities does this part apply to?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: (i) Any live or dead bald eagles, or their parts, nests, or eggs that were lawfully acquired before... transport into or out of the United States any lawfully acquired dead bald or golden eagles, their parts... shipments containing bald or golden eagles, alive or dead, their parts, nests, or eggs as directed in §...

  4. 75 FR 8786 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Highway in Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended [16 U.S.C. 470(f) et seq.]. 7. Bald and Golden Eagle... stegaria) and that the project was likely to adversely affect, but not jeopardize, the bald eagle. The... issued a Bald Eagle Take Exempted Under ESA permit (No. MB218918-0) for the incidental take of the...

  5. 50 CFR 22.21 - What are the requirements concerning scientific and exhibition purpose permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... United States, or transportation into or out of the United States of lawfully possessed bald eagles or... that authorizes the transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles... States lawfully acquired live or dead bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or live or dead...

  6. 50 CFR 22.21 - What are the requirements concerning scientific and exhibition purpose permits?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... United States, or transportation into or out of the United States of lawfully possessed bald eagles or... that authorizes the transportation into or out of the United States of any live bald or golden eagles... States lawfully acquired live or dead bald or golden eagles, or their parts, nests, or live or dead...

  7. Year-round movements of a Wahlberg's eagle Aquila wahlbergi tracked by satellite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyburg, B.-U.; Mendelsohn, J.M.; Ellis, D.H.; Smith, D.G.; Meyburg, C.; Kemp, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    An adult female Wahlberg's Eagle from northern Namibia was tracked by satellite ovcr a total distance of 8816 km and located 104 times between 11 February and 4 November 1994. It migrated on an almost due north heading to northern Cameroon, north-eastern Nigeria and western Chad through the rain forest belt of the Congo and Zaire after the breeding season. The total trans-equatorial distance between the breeding and non-breeding ranges was 3520 km. During the non-breeding season the bird ranged over a large area (ca. 60 000 km2) for about six weeks (29 April - 14 June) in these three countries in a rather nomadic pattern covering a minimum distance of 1256 km. During two further months (14 June - 14 August) it restricted its movements to an area of about 50002 km near Maiduguri in the Sudan savannah of north-eastern Nigeria. The return migration took about two weeks longer than that to the north, which took about a month.

  8. EFFECTS OF THE 1906 EARTHQUAKE ON THE BALD HILL OUTLET SYSTEM, SAN MATEO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pampeyan, Earl H.

    1986-01-01

    Following the earthquake of April 18, 1906, it was discovered that a brick forebay and other parts of the reservoir outlet system were in the slip zone of the San Andreas fault. The original outlet through which water was directed to San Francisco consisted of two tunnels joined at the brick forebay; one tunnel extends 2,820 ft to the east under Bald Hill on Buri Buri Ridge, and the other tunnel intersects the lake bottom about 250 ft west of the forebay. In 1897 a second intake was added to the system, also joining the original forebay. During the present study the accessible parts of this original outlet system were examined with the hope of learning how the system had been affected by fault slip in 1906.

  9. Does prostaglandin D2 hold the cure to male pattern baldness?

    PubMed

    Nieves, Ashley; Garza, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    Lipids in the skin are the most diverse in the entire human body. Their bioactivity in health and disease is underexplored. Prostaglandin D2 has recently been identified as a factor which is elevated in the bald scalp of men with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and has the capacity to decrease hair lengthening. An enzyme which synthesizes it, prostaglandin D2 synthase (PTGDS or lipocalin-PGDS), is hormone responsive in multiple other organs. PGD2 has two known receptors, GPR44 and PTGDR. GPR44 was found to be necessary for the decrease in hair growth by PGD2 . This creates an exciting opportunity to perhaps create novel treatments for AGA, which inhibit the activity of PTGDS, PGD2 or GPR44. This review discusses the current knowledge surrounding PGD2 , and future steps needed to translate these findings into novel therapies for patients with AGA.

  10. Acne tarda and male-pattern baldness unmasking primary ovarian insufficiency: a case and review.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Achenbach, Alexander; Makrantonaki, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman presented with recurrent acne lesions and progressing male-pattern baldness. Furthermore, she reported amenorrhea, weight loss, mucosal xerosis and dyspareunia since discontinuation of hormonal contraception 6 months earlier in order to conceive. Acne tarda and androgenetic alopecia of female pattern were diagnosed. Hormonal and immunologic serological and ultrasound examinations revealed an autoimmune hypergonadotropic primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) with no ovarian cysts but ovarian fibrosis with marked reduced follicle pool. Immediate ovarian stimulation and in vitro fertilization led to pregnancy and the patient gave birth to a healthy child. Though presenting with clinical findings similar to menopause, 50% of patients with POI exhibit varying and unpredictable ovarian function, and only 5-10% are able to accomplish pregnancy. Genetic disorders affect the X chromosome. In 14-30% of cases POI has been associated with autoimmunity. POI may occur after discontinuation of hormonal contraception, like in our case.

  11. Geochemistry of highly aluminiferous Vendian-Cambrian sediments of the Tunka Bald Mountains, East Sayan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkol'Nik, S. I.; Barash, I. G.; Belichenko, V. G.; Letnikova, E. F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive geochemical characteristics of highly aluminiferous schists discovered in the Tunka Bald Mountains and associated with the Vendian-Cambrian cover of the Tuva-Mongolian Microcontinent. The Al2O3 content varies within a wide range, the maximum being up to 36.11 wt. %. A specific feature of the geochemical composition of these rocks is the simultaneously high contents of Cr (up to 1400 ppm), V (up to 2700 ppm), and Zr (up to 800 ppm). The origin has been interpreted, and the conditions in which the highly aluminiferous rocks formed have been considered. Based on geochemical data, it is assumed that the main origin could be weathering crusts formed after ultramafic and mafic rocks, with a felsic source playing a secondary role.

  12. Geologic map of the Vail West quadrangle, Eagle County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Robert B.; Lidke, David J.; Grunwald, Daniel J.

    2002-01-01

    This new 1:24,000-scale geologic map of the Vail West 7.5' quadrangle, as part of the USGS Western Colorado I-70 Corridor Cooperative Geologic Mapping Project, provides new interpretations of the stratigraphy, structure, and geologic hazards in the area on the southwest flank of the Gore Range. Bedrock strata include Miocene tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, Mesozoic and upper Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, and undivided Early(?) Proterozoic metasedimentary and igneous rocks. Tuffaceous rocks are found in fault-tilted blocks. Only small outliers of the Dakota Sandstone, Morrison Formation, Entrada Sandstone, and Chinle Formation exist above the redbeds of the Permian-Pennsylvanian Maroon Formation and Pennsylvanian Minturn Formation, which were derived during erosion of the Ancestral Front Range east of the Gore fault zone. In the southwestern area of the map, the proximal Minturn facies change to distal Eagle Valley Formation and the Eagle Valley Evaporite basin facies. The Jacque Mountain Limestone Member, previously defined as the top of the Minturn Formation, cannot be traced to the facies change to the southwest. Abundant surficial deposits include Pinedale and Bull Lake Tills, periglacial deposits, earth-flow deposits, common diamicton deposits, common Quaternary landslide deposits, and an extensive, possibly late Pliocene landslide deposit. Landscaping has so extensively modified the land surface in the town of Vail that a modified land-surface unit was created to represent the surface unit. Laramide movement renewed activity along the Gore fault zone, producing a series of northwest-trending open anticlines and synclines in Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata, parallel to the trend of the fault zone. Tertiary down-to-the-northeast normal faults are evident and are parallel to similar faults in both the Gore Range and the Blue River valley to the northeast; presumably these are related to extensional deformation that occurred during formation of the northern end of the

  13. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Analyses of Sleep Duration in Children: The EAGLE Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Marcella; Pappa, Irene; Bustamante, Mariona; Bonilla, Carolina; Suarez, Anna; Tiesler, Carla M.; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Zafarmand, Mohammad Hadi; Alvarez-Pedrerol, Mar; Andersson, Sture; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Estivill, Xavier; Evans, David M.; Flexeder, Claudia; Forns, Joan; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Guxens, Monica; Huss, Anke; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Julvez, Jordi; Lahti, Jari; López-Vicente, Mónica; Lopez-Espinosa, Maria-Jose; Manz, Judith; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R.; Perola, Markus; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Salo, Perttu P.; Shahand, Shayan; Schulz, Holger; Standl, Marie; Thiering, Elisabeth; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G.; Smith, George Davey; Estarlich, Marisa; Heinrich, Joachim; Räikkönen, Katri; Vrijkotte, Tanja G.M.; Tiemeier, Henning; Sunyer, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Low or excessive sleep duration has been associated with multiple outcomes, but the biology behind these associations remains elusive. Specifically, genetic studies in children are scarce. In this study, we aimed to: (1) estimate the proportion of genetic variance of sleep duration in children attributed to common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), (2) identify novel SNPs associated with sleep duration in children, and (3) investigate the genetic overlap of sleep duration in children and related metabolic and psychiatric traits. Methods: We performed a population-based molecular genetic study, using data form the EArly Genetics and Life course Epidemiology (EAGLE) Consortium. 10,554 children of European ancestry were included in the discovery, and 1,250 children in the replication phase. Results: We found evidence of significant but modest SNP heritability of sleep duration in children (SNP h2 0.14, 95% CI [0.05, 0.23]) using the LD score regression method. A novel region at chromosome 11q13.4 (top SNP: rs74506765, P = 2.27e-08) was associated with sleep duration in children, but this was not replicated in independent studies. Nominally significant genetic overlap was only found (rG = 0.23, P = 0.05) between sleep duration in children and type 2 diabetes in adults, supporting the hypothesis of a common pathogenic mechanism. Conclusions: The significant SNP heritability of sleep duration in children and the suggestive genetic overlap with type 2 diabetes support the search for genetic mechanisms linking sleep duration in children to multiple outcomes in health and disease. Citation: Marinelli M, Pappa I, Bustamante M, Bonilla C, Suarez A, Tiesler CM, Vilor-Tejedor N, Zafarmand MH, Alvarez-Pedrerol M, Andersson S, Bakermans-Kranenburg MJ, Estivill X, Evans DM, Flexeder C, Forns J, Gonzalez JR, Guxens M, Huss A, van IJzendoorn MH, Jaddoe VW, Julvez J, Lahti J, López-Vicente M, Lopez-Espinosa MJ, Manz J, Mileva-Seitz VR, Perola M, Pesonen AK

  14. 75 FR 27774 - Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Rate Election

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Rate Election May 11, 2010. Take notice that on May 3, 2010, Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P., (Desoto) filed a Notice of Rate Election pursuant to section...

  15. Common Raven (Corvus corax) kleptoparasitism at a Golden Eagle (Aquila chyrsaetos) nest in southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simes, Matthew; Johnson, Diego R.; Streit, Justin; Longshore, Kathleen; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.

    2017-01-01

    The Common Raven (Corvus corax) is a ubiquitous species in the Mojave Desert of southern Nevada and California. From 5 to 24 May 2014, using remote trail cameras, we observed ravens repeatedly kleptoparasitizing food resources from the nest of a pair of Golden Eagles (Aquila chyrsaetos) in the Spring Mountains of southern Nevada. The ravens fed on nine (30%) of the 30 prey items delivered to the nest during the chick rearing period. Kleptoparasitic behavior by the ravens decreased as the eagle nestling matured to seven weeks of age, suggesting a narrow temporal window in which ravens can successfully engage in kleptoparasitic behavior at eagle nests. The observation of kleptoparasitism by Common Ravens at the nest suggests potential risks to young Golden Eagles from Common Ravens.

  16. 75 FR 77826 - White River National Forest; Eagle County, CO; Beaver Creek Mountain Improvements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... at: http://www.fs.usda.gov/whiteriver under ``Land & Resources Management'' and ``Projects.'' FOR...: Don Dressier, Winter Sports Administrator, Eagle/Holy Cross Ranger District, 24747 U.S. Highway 24,...

  17. Predatory threat of harpy eagles for yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys in the Atlantic Forest.

    PubMed

    Suscke, Priscila; Verderane, Michele; de Oliveira, Robson Santos; Delval, Irene; Fernández-Bolaños, Marcelo; Izar, Patrícia

    2017-01-01

    We describe seven encounters between different harpy eagle individuals (Harpia harpyja) and a group of yellow-breasted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus xanthosternos) in Una Biological Reserve. These interactions lasted 58 min on average. In each of those encounters, the capuchin monkeys used particular behavioral strategies against the harpy eagle that were not employed in reaction to other aerial predators. We did not observe any successful predation events, but after one of those encounters an infant disappeared from the capuchin group. As a whole, these observations indicate that the presence of harpy eagles in the group's home range increases predation risk for capuchin monkeys. The present report also suggests a reoccupation by H. harpyja of this area, as no previous recent records identify harpy eagle occurrence in Una Biological Reserve.

  18. Ancient DNA Provides New Insights into the Evolutionary History of New Zealand's Extinct Giant Eagle

    PubMed Central

    Szulkin, Marta; Lerner, Heather R. L; Barnes, Ian; Shapiro, Beth; Cooper, Alan; Holdaway, Richard N

    2005-01-01

    Prior to human settlement 700 years ago New Zealand had no terrestrial mammals—apart from three species of bats—instead, approximately 250 avian species dominated the ecosystem. At the top of the food chain was the extinct Haast's eagle, Harpagornis moorei. H. moorei (10–15 kg; 2–3 m wingspan) was 30%–40% heavier than the largest extant eagle (the harpy eagle, Harpia harpyja), and hunted moa up to 15 times its weight. In a dramatic example of morphological plasticity and rapid size increase, we show that the H. moorei was very closely related to one of the world's smallest extant eagles, which is one-tenth its mass. This spectacular evolutionary change illustrates the potential speed of size alteration within lineages of vertebrates, especially in island ecosystems. PMID:15660162

  19. Modeling Late-Summer Distribution of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in the Western United States

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Increasing development across the western United States (USA) elevates concerns about effects on wildlife resources; the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) is of special concern in this regard. Knowledge of golden eagle abundance and distribution across the western USA must be improved to help identify and conserve areas of major importance to the species. We used distance sampling and visual mark-recapture procedures to estimate golden eagle abundance from aerial line-transect surveys conducted across four Bird Conservation Regions in the western USA between 15 August and 15 September in 2006–2010, 2012, and 2013. To assess golden eagle-habitat relationships at this scale, we modeled counts of golden eagles seen during surveys in 2006–2010, adjusted for probability of detection, and used land cover and other environmental factors as predictor variables within 20-km2 sampling units randomly selected from survey transects. We found evidence of positive relationships between intensity of use by golden eagles and elevation, solar radiation, and mean wind speed, and of negative relationships with the proportion of landscape classified as forest or as developed. The model accurately predicted habitat use observed during surveys conducted in 2012 and 2013. We used the model to construct a map predicting intensity of use by golden eagles during late summer across our ~2 million-km2 study area. The map can be used to help prioritize landscapes for conservation efforts, identify areas where mitigation efforts may be most effective, and identify regions for additional research and monitoring. In addition, our map can be used to develop region-specific (e.g., state-level) density estimates based on the latest information on golden eagle abundance from a late-summer survey and aid designation of geographic management units for the species. PMID:27556735

  20. Management of Dysphagia Pre- and Postoperatively in a Case of Eagle's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Vicki; Hoffman Ruddy, Bari; Spector, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Eagle's syndrome (ES) is rare condition, most frequently described within the context of case study presentation. ES results from elongation of the styloid process, contributing to symptoms such as globus sensation in the throat, as well as pain localized to the ear, neck, face, or tongue. Additional symptoms can include hypersalivation, change in vocal quality, submandibular swelling, and dysphagia. This report discusses evaluation, diagnosis, and surgical intervention with respect to Eagle's Syndrome in a patient presenting with moderate-severe dysphagia. PMID:25852957