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Sample records for adult blood donors

  1. Dengue seroprevalence in the French West Indies: a prospective study in adult blood donors.

    PubMed

    L'Azou, Maïna; Jean-Marie, Janick; Bessaud, Maël; Cabié, André; Césaire, Raymond; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Courbil, Rémi; Richard, Pascale

    2015-06-01

    Using an anti-dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG) indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, seroprevalence was determined among 783 adult blood donors in the French Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique in 2011. Overall, 93.5% [91.5; 95.1] samples were positive for dengue antibodies, 90.7% (350 of 386) in Martinique and 96.2% (382 of 397) in Guadeloupe. Only 30% of these adults recalled having had dengue disease before. Serotype-specific neutralization assays applied to a subset of IgG-positive samples indicated that a majority (77 of 96; 80%) reacted to the four serotypes. These seroprevalence findings are the first reported for Guadeloupe and Martinique and are consistent with the dengue epidemiology in these territories.

  2. Dengue Seroprevalence in the French West Indies: A Prospective Study in Adult Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    L'Azou, Maïna; Jean-Marie, Janick; Bessaud, Maël; Cabié, André; Césaire, Raymond; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Courbil, Rémi; Richard, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Using an anti-dengue immunoglobulin G (IgG) indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, seroprevalence was determined among 783 adult blood donors in the French Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique in 2011. Overall, 93.5% [91.5; 95.1] samples were positive for dengue antibodies, 90.7% (350 of 386) in Martinique and 96.2% (382 of 397) in Guadeloupe. Only 30% of these adults recalled having had dengue disease before. Serotype-specific neutralization assays applied to a subset of IgG-positive samples indicated that a majority (77 of 96; 80%) reacted to the four serotypes. These seroprevalence findings are the first reported for Guadeloupe and Martinique and are consistent with the dengue epidemiology in these territories. PMID:25846291

  3. rhG-CSF does not affect the phenotype of adult donor peripheral blood NK cells.

    PubMed

    Lassailly, F; Sielleur, I; Blaise, D; Chabannon, C

    2005-01-01

    Considerable evidence in preclinical models as well as in human transplantation now suggests that donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells can contribute to alloimmune recognition of recipient residual tumour cells. This makes the NK cell population an attractive target for in vitro or in vivo manipulations, in order to improve the antitumour effect of allogeneic transplantation. However, conditions in which allogeneic donor cells are collected vary; several reports have emphasised the different phenotypic and functional properties of T cells derived from marrow, cord blood or mobilised peripheral blood grafts; others have demonstrated different clinical outcomes following blood or marrow transplantation after myeloablative conditioning regimens. NK cells have been examined in this setting; the availability of new tools to study the expression of a variety of surface antigens that are involved in the control of NK cell activity offered us an opportunity to extensively characterise the phenotypic properties of NK cells from donors, before and after administration of pharmacological doses of rhG-CSF used for haematopoietic progenitor mobilisation. Our study suggests that rhG-CSF does not reproducibly alter blood NK cell phenotype in normal individuals, and thus that donor-derived cells are fully equipped to exert their potential antitumour effect.

  4. Gm antigenic titres in adults with Down's syndrome (mongolism), non-mongoloid mental defectives and healthy blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Hazel; McKay, E.

    1972-01-01

    IgG was studied in adults with Down's syndrome, non-mongoloid mental defectives accommodated in the same institution and in healthy blood donors. Total serum IgG concentration was significantly higher in Down's syndrome than in the other two groups. Maximal inhibiting titres of Gm factors 1, 4, 5, 10 and 11 were measured by haemagglutination inhibition tests. Higher Gm titres were found in homozygotes than heterozygotes. In mongols the titres of Gm 4, and to a greater extent, Gm 5, 10 and 11, were higher than would be expected from the rise in total IgG concentration. The findings suggest that in mongolism an uneven increase occurs in the H chain subgroups and allotypes of IgG. In non-mongoloid mental defectives, although total IgG concentration was similar to that found in healthy normal subjects the Gm titre findings more closely resembled those in mongols. PMID:4265431

  5. Impact of rituximab desensitization on blood-type-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantation: a Japanese multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Egawa, H; Teramukai, S; Haga, H; Tanabe, M; Mori, A; Ikegami, T; Kawagishi, N; Ohdan, H; Kasahara, M; Umeshita, K

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of rituximab prophylaxis on outcomes of ABO-blood-type-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (ABO-I LDLT) in 381 adult patients in the Japanese registry of ABO-I LDLT. Patients underwent dual or triple immunosuppression with or without B cell desensitization therapies such as plasmapheresis, splenectomy, local infusion, intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab. Era before 2005, intensive care unit-bound status, high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score and absence of rituximab prophylaxis were significant risk factors for overall survival and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the univariate analysis. After adjustment for era effects in the multivariate analysis, only absence of rituximab prophylaxis was a significant risk factor for AMR, and there were no significant risk factors for survival. Rituximab prophylaxis significantly decreased the incidence of AMR, especially hepatic necrosis (p < 0.001). In the rituximab group, other B cell desensitization therapies had no add-on effects. Multiple or large rituximab doses significantly increased the incidence of infection, and early administration had no advantage. In conclusion, outcomes in adult ABO-I LDLT have significantly improved in the latest era coincident with the introduction of rituximab.

  6. Dengue antibodies in blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Ribas-Silva, Rejane Cristina; Eid, Andressa Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is an urban arbovirus whose etiologic agent is a virus of the genus Flavorius with four distinct antigen serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4) that is transmitted to humans through the bite of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The Campo Mourão region in Brazil is endemic for dengue fever. Obtective The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies specific to the four serotypes of dengue in donors of the blood donor service in the city of Campo Mourão. Methods Epidemiological records were evaluated and 4 mL of peripheral blood from 213 blood donors were collected in tubes without anticoagulant. Serum was then obtained and immunochromatographic tests were undertaken (Imuno-Rápido Dengue IgM/IgGTM). Individuals involved in the study answered a social and epidemiological questionnaire on data which included age, gender and diagnosis of dengue. Results Only three (1.4%) of the 213 blood tests were positive for IgG anti-dengue antibodies. No donors with IgM antibody, which identifies acute infection, were identified. Conclusions The results of the current analysis show that the introduction of quantitative or molecular serological methods to determine the presence of anti-dengue antibodies or the detection of the dengue virus in blood donors in endemic regions should be established so that the quality of blood transfusions is guaranteed. PMID:23049418

  7. [Clinical selection of blood donors].

    PubMed

    Danic, B

    2003-06-01

    For 20 years, the organization set up to insure the blood transfusion safety has never stopped strengthening. It is based on clinical and epidemiological selection of the blood donation candidates, biologic selection of blood donations and different physico-chemical techniques for pathogens reduction or inactivation in blood products. In France, this organization is optimized by the assertion of the voluntary and non-remunerated character of blood donation registered in the law of January 4th, 1993. The blood donors selection is structured in three successive stages. The first stage is the pre-donation information. The second stage begins with reading and filling out an info-questionnaire which prepare for an interview with a physician. This interview is specially directed to prevention of transfusion-transmitted infections and the prevention of adverse reactions after a 400 to 600 mL collection of whole blood or components. Finally, the third stage is the delivery of a post-donation information which invites the donor to contact the "établissement français du sang" (EFS) in case of a new event arisen after the donation or in case of reviewing of its own answers during the medical interview.

  8. Is There Any Reason to Prefer Cord Blood Instead of Adult Donors for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants?

    PubMed Central

    Beksac, Meral

    2016-01-01

    As cord blood (CB) enables rapid access and tolerance to HLA mismatches, a number of unrelated CB transplants have reached 30,000. Such transplant activity has been the result of international accreditation programs maintaining highly qualified cord blood units (CBUs) reaching more than 600,000 CBUs stored worldwide. Efforts to increase stem cell content or engraftment rate of the graft by ex vivo expansion, modulation by molecules such as fucose, prostaglandin E2 derivative, complement CD26 inhibitors, or CXCR4/CXCL12 axis have been able to accelerate engraftment speed and rate. Furthermore, introduction of reduced intensity conditioning protocols, better HLA matching, and recognition of the importance of HLA-C have improved CB transplants success by decreasing transplant-related mortality. CB progenitor/stem cell content has been compared with adult stem cells revealing higher long-term repopulating capacity compared to bone marrow–mesenchymal stromal cells and lesser oncogenic potential than progenitor-induced stem cells. This chapter summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of CB compared to adult stem cells within the context of stem cell biology and transplantation. PMID:26793711

  9. Citrate anticoagulation: Are blood donors donating bone?

    PubMed

    Bialkowski, Walter; Bruhn, Roberta; Edgren, Gustaf; Papanek, Paula

    2016-10-01

    An estimated 2.4 million volunteer apheresis blood donation procedures were performed in the United States in 2010, and increases in the proportion of transfused blood products derived from apheresis blood collections have been consistently reported. Anticoagulation is required during apheresis and is achieved with citrate. Donor exposure to citrate causes an acute physiological response to maintain serum mineral homeostasis. Some data are available on the sequelae of this acute response in the days and weeks following exposure, raising questions about bone mineral density in regular apheresis donors. New research is emerging that addresses the potential long-term health outcomes of repeated citrate exposure. This article reviews the acute physiological response to citrate anticoagulation in volunteer blood donors, presents contrasting perspectives on the potential effects of citrate exposure on bone density, and identifies key knowledge gaps in our understanding of long-term health outcomes in apheresis donors. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:459-463, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. How to Motivate Whole Blood Donors to Become Plasma Donors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of interventions to recruit new plasma donors among whole blood donors. A sample of 924 donors was randomized to one of three conditions: control; information only by nurse; and information plus self-positive image message by nurse (SPI). Participants in the control condition only received a leaflet describing the plasma donation procedure. In the two experimental conditions the leaflet was explained face-to-face by a nurse. The dependent variables were the proportion of new plasma donors and the number of donations at six months. Overall, 141 (15.3%) new plasma donors were recruited at six months. There were higher proportions of new plasma donors in the two experimental conditions compared to the control condition (P < .001); the two experimental conditions did not differ. Also, compared to the control condition, those in the experimental conditions (all Ps < .001) gave plasma more often (information only by nurse:  d = .26; SPI: d = .32); the SPI intervention significantly outperformed (P < .05) the information only by nurse condition. The results suggest that references to feelings of SPI such as feeling good and being proud and that giving plasma is a rewarding personal experience favor a higher frequency of plasma donation. PMID:25530909

  11. How to motivate whole blood donors to become plasma donors.

    PubMed

    Godin, Gaston; Germain, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of interventions to recruit new plasma donors among whole blood donors. A sample of 924 donors was randomized to one of three conditions: control; information only by nurse; and information plus self-positive image message by nurse (SPI). Participants in the control condition only received a leaflet describing the plasma donation procedure. In the two experimental conditions the leaflet was explained face-to-face by a nurse. The dependent variables were the proportion of new plasma donors and the number of donations at six months. Overall, 141 (15.3%) new plasma donors were recruited at six months. There were higher proportions of new plasma donors in the two experimental conditions compared to the control condition (P < .001); the two experimental conditions did not differ. Also, compared to the control condition, those in the experimental conditions (all Ps < .001) gave plasma more often (information only by nurse:  d = .26; SPI: d = .32); the SPI intervention significantly outperformed (P < .05) the information only by nurse condition. The results suggest that references to feelings of SPI such as feeling good and being proud and that giving plasma is a rewarding personal experience favor a higher frequency of plasma donation.

  12. Potential donor segregation to promote blood donation.

    PubMed

    Martín-Santana, Josefa D; Beerli-Palacio, Asunción

    2008-04-01

    This work is set in the field of social marketing and more specifically in the context of blood donation. Its principal objective focuses on segregating potential donors by using the inhibitors or barriers to a blood donation behaviour as criteria. Moreover, an analysis of the predisposition to donate blood, the intrinsic and extrinsic motivations for donating blood, and the incentives that may stimulate their donation conduct was conducted for each of the four identified groups. The results reveal that the four segments differ significantly in their predisposition to donate, in their motivations and in the incentives that encourage them to donate blood.

  13. Blood Donors on Medication – an Approach to Minimize Drug Burden for Recipients of Blood Products and to Limit Deferral of Donors

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Christian D.K.; Stichtenoth, Dirk O.; Wichmann, Michael G.; Schaefer, Christof; Szinicz, Ladislaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Blood products derived from donors on medication can contain drugs which might pose a risk for the recipients or influence the quality of the product itself. Material and Methods To judge the eligibility of blood donors on medication, 4 drug classes have been formed with respect to their pharmacological properties, and blood products have been divided in accordance with their single-donor plasma contents. Results For drugs with dose-dependent pharmacodynamics, no deferral periods are necessary for donation of blood products containing less than 50 ml single-donor plasma for application to adults. Waiting periods of tmax + 5 t1/2 were calculated for the other blood products. Teratogenic drugs do not require special considerations (exception: retinoids, thalidomide and lenalidomide, dutasteride or finasteride with waiting periods for all blood products). A deferral period of tmax + 24 t1/2 is proposed for every blood product from blood donors on genotoxic drugs. Drugs without systemic effects can be neglected. Irreversible inhibitors of platelet function cause a 10-day waiting period if production of platelet concentrates is intended. Conclusion Donors on medication are allowed to donate blood for blood products containing less than 50 ml plasma of a single donor, like red blood cell concentrates, for the use in adults without deferral periods, except those taking retinoids, thalidomide, lenalidomide, dutasteride, finasteride, or genotoxic drugs. PMID:20823991

  14. A Mobilization Guide for Blood Donor Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    PLATELETS ISOLATED FROM UNITS OF WHOLE BLOOD OR FROM DONORS BY APHERESIS PROCEDURES; FROZEN WITH 6% DMSO AND STORED AT -80 C; AND WASHED WITH SODIUM...8 Meal Pass .............................................. 8 Record of Donation ..................................... 9 UNIT PROCESSING...19 Cryoprecipitate ...................................... 20 Frozen Platelet Concentrates ........................ 20 Frozen Red Cells

  15. [Presence of Australia antigen in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Gota, F

    1980-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of type A and B viral hepatitis is discussed and guidelines for the prevention of post-transfusional hospital hepatitis are proposed. Methods for the immunological demonstration of HBs antigen are illustrated, together with the respective positivity percentages in blood donors.

  16. Haematopoietic transplants combining a single unrelated cord blood unit and mobilized haematopoietic stem cells from an adult HLA-mismatched third party donor. Comparable results to transplants from HLA-identical related donors in adults with acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sebrango, Ana; Vicuña, Isabel; de Laiglesia, Almudena; Millán, Isabel; Bautista, Guiomar; Martín-Donaire, Trinidad; Regidor, Carmen; Cabrera, Rafael; Fernandez, Manuel N

    2010-06-01

    We describe results of the strategy, developed by our group, of co-infusion of mobilized haematopoietic stem cells as a support for single-unit unrelated cord blood transplant (dual CB/TPD-MHSC transplants) for treatment of haematological malignancies in adults, and a comparative analysis of results obtained using this strategy and transplants performed with mobilized haematopoietic stem cells from related HLA-identical donors (RTD) for treatment of adults with acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Our data show that the dual CB/TPD-MHSC transplant strategy results in periods of post-transplant neutropenia, final rates of full donor chimerism and transplant-related mortality rates comparable to those of the RTD. Final survival outcomes are comparable in adults transplanted because of acute leukaemia, with different incidences of the complications that most influence these: a higher incidence of infections related to late recovery of protective immunity dependent on T cell functions, and a lower incidence of serious acute graft-versus-host disease and relapses. Recent advances in cord blood transplant techniques allow allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to be a viable option for almost every patient who may benefit from this therapeutic approach. Development of innovative strategies to improve the post-transplant recovery of T cells function is currently the main challenge to further improving the possibilities of unrelated cord blood transplantation.

  17. Donor Derived Second Hematologic Malignancies after Cord Blood Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ballen, Karen K; Cutler, Corey; Yeap, Beow Y; McAfee, Steven L; Dey, Bimalangshu R; Attar, Eyal C; Chen, Yi-Bin; Haspel, Richard L; Liney, Deborah; Koreth, John; Ho, Vincent; Alyea, Edwin P; Soiffer, Robert J; Spitzer, Thomas R; Antin, Joseph H

    2010-01-01

    Double umbilical cord blood transplantation with a reduced intensity regimen is an effective strategy for adult patients without matched donors. However, the risk of second cancers is not yet established. Ninety-eight adults with hematologic malignancies received a double umbilical cord blood transplant. Seventy patients received the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine 30 mg/m2/day × 6 days, melphalan 100 mg/m2/day × 1 day, and rabbit antithymocyte globulin 1.5 mg/kg/day × 4 days, and 28 patients received an ablative total body radiation containing conditioning regimen. Sixty-three patients received sirolimus-based graft versus host disease prophylaxis and 35 patients received non-sirolimus based graft versus host disease prophylaxis. Median age was 48 (range 19-67) years. Eighteen patients developed a second malignancy at a median of 134 days after transplant. Sixteen patients had lymphoma and two patients had myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative disorder. Sixteen of these second cancers (both MDS/MPD and fourteen of the lymphomas) were donor derived; the origin of the others was not determined. GVHD prophylaxis, HLA matching, primary disease, age, total nucleated cell dose, and CD34+ cell dose were not associated with a higher rate of second malignancy. Second myeloid malignancies of donor origin occur after double umbilical cord blood transplantation, suggesting that a search for donor origin should be performed in all patients with suspected relapse. PMID:20178854

  18. You...as Blood Donor: Teacher Strategies and Student Worksheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degroat, Diane Zagare; And Others

    This curriculum guide for teaching about blood donation was prepared to improve school-community participation in the New York City Blood Donor Program. It contains plans for five lessons on the following topics: (1) the nature of blood; (2) blood and technology--modern-day advances; (3) blood and your personal health; (4) the blood donor as good…

  19. Blood donors screening for blood born viruses in Poland.

    PubMed

    Grabarczyk, Piotr; Kopacz, Aneta; Sulkowska, Ewa; Kubicka-Russel, Dorota; Mikulska, Maria; Brojer, Ewa; Łętowska, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Blood donor screening of viral markers in Poland is based on serologic testing for anti-HCV, HBsAg, anti-HIV1/2 (chemiluminescence tests) and on nucleic acid testing (NAT) for RNA HCV, RNA HIV-1 and DNA HBV performed in minipools of 6 with real-time PCR (MPX 2.0 test on cobas s201) or with TMA in individual donations (Ultrio Plus or Ultrio Elite). Donors of plasma for anti-D and anti-HBs production are tested for parvovirus B19 DNA. Before implementation tests and equipment are evaluated at the Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine (IHTM). The last 20 years witnessed a decreasing trend for HBsAg in both first time and repeat donors (1%-0.3% and 0.1%-0.02% respectively). Prevalence of anti-HCV repeat reactive results was stable and oscillated around 0.8% for first time donors and 0.2% for repeat donors. Elevated prevalence of seropositive HIV infected donors was recently observed (7.5-9 cases/100,000 donors). Since respective molecular markers implementation HCV RNA was detected on average in 1/119,235 seronegative donations, HIV RNA in 1/783,821 and HBV DNA in 1/61,047. HBV NAT yields were mostly occult hepatitis B (1/80,248); window period cases were less frequent (1/255,146). The efficiency of HBV DNA detection depends on the sensitivity of the HBV DNA screening system.

  20. Differences in social representation of blood donation between donors and non-donors: an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    Guarnaccia, Cinzia; Giannone, Francesca; Falgares, Giorgio; Caligaris, Aldo Ozino; Sales-Wuillemin, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Background Both donors and non-donors have a positive image of blood donation, so donors and non-donors do not differ regarding their views on donation but do differ in converting their opinion into an active deed of donation. Several studies have identified altruism and empathy as the main factors underlying blood donation. However, a mixture of various motivational factors mould the complex behaviour of donation. This paper presents an exploratory study on differences of social representations of blood donation between blood donors and non-donors, in order to understand the reasons that bring someone to take the decision to become a blood donor. Materials and methods Participants filled in the Adapted Self-Report Altruism Scale, Toronto Empathy Questionnaire and answered a test of verbal association. Descriptive and correlation analyses were carried out on quantitative data, while a prototypic analysis was used for qualitative data. Results The study was carried out on a convenience sample of 786 individuals, 583 donors (mean age: 35.40 years, SD: 13.01 years; 39.3% female) and 203 non-donors (mean age: 35.10 years, SD: 13.30 years; 67.5% female). Social representations of donors seem to be more complex and articulated than those of non-donors. The terms that appear to be central were more specific in donors (life, needle, blood, help, altruism were the words most associated by non-donors; life, aid, altruism, solidarity, health, love, gift, generosity, voluntary, control, needed, useful, needle were the words most associated by donors). Furthermore, non-donors associated a larger number of terms referring to negative aspects of blood donation. Discussion Aspects related to training and the accuracy of any information on blood donation seem to be important in the decision to become a donor and stabilise the behaviour of donation over time, thus ensuring the highest levels of quality and safety in blood establishments. PMID:26674814

  1. Liver regeneration after living donor transplantation: adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation cohort study.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, Kim M; Emond, Jean C; Shearon, Tempie H; Everson, Greg; Baker, Talia B; Fisher, Robert A; Freise, Chris E; Gillespie, Brenda W; Everhart, James E

    2015-01-01

    Adult-to-adult living donors and recipients were studied to characterize patterns of liver growth and identify associated factors in a multicenter study. Three hundred and fifty donors and 353 recipients in the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL) receiving transplants between March 2003 and February 2010 were included. Potential predictors of 3-month liver volume included total and standard liver volumes (TLV and SLV), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (in recipients), the remnant and graft size, remnant-to-donor and graft-to-recipient weight ratios (RDWR and GRWR), remnant/TLV, and graft/SLV. Among donors, 3-month absolute growth was 676 ± 251 g (mean ± SD), and percentage reconstitution was 80% ± 13%. Among recipients, GRWR was 1.3% ± 0.4% (8 < 0.8%). Graft weight was 60% ± 13% of SLV. Three-month absolute growth was 549 ± 267 g, and percentage reconstitution was 93% ± 18%. Predictors of greater 3-month liver volume included larger patient size (donors and recipients), larger graft volume (recipients), and larger TLV (donors). Donors with the smallest remnant/TLV ratios had larger than expected growth but also had higher postoperative bilirubin and international normalized ratio at 7 and 30 days. In a combined donor-recipient analysis, donors had smaller 3-month liver volumes than recipients adjusted for patient size, remnant or graft volume, and TLV or SLV (P = 0.004). Recipient graft failure in the first 90 days was predicted by poor graft function at day 7 (HR = 4.50, P = 0.001) but not by GRWR or graft fraction (P > 0.90 for each). Both donors and recipients had rapid yet incomplete restoration of tissue mass in the first 3 months, and this confirmed previous reports. Recipients achieved a greater percentage of expected total volume. Patient size and recipient graft volume significantly influenced 3-month volumes. Importantly, donor liver volume is a

  2. [Volunteer blood donors--relation between gender and motivation].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, D

    1991-01-01

    The study included 1,825 persons, aged from 18 to 65 years. A representative sample was formed of 1,325 persons who donated blood for the first time, and of 500 persons who donated blood five or more times till the moment of investigation. Among blood donors in the Republic of Serbia, regardless the number of blood donations, the percentage of female donors is significantly lower compared to the percentage of male blood donors. The first time donor population consisted of 22.26% of female and 77.74% of male blood donors. The multiple blood donor population was composed of 15.8% of female and 84.2% of male blood donors. Motives for blood donation were studied in 500 persons who donated blood five or more times. The following motives were recorded: a) altruism in 85% of multiple donors; b) the other motives (habit, superiority and/or inferiority complex, self-punishment and benefit) were recorded in 8% of them; c) in 7% of donors the primary motive for blood donation could not be determined.

  3. Blood donor well-being: a primary responsibility of blood collection agencies.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Current FDA regulations and AABB standards do not adequately protect the well-being of blood donors. Several practices have adverse consequences for donors, including: elevated incidence of donation related reactions and injuries, iron deficiency anemia in premenopausal women, and inadequate counseling of donors to obtain medical follow-up for health risks identified during pre-donation health screening. These practices can be improved without impacting negatively on the national blood supply. In addition to revising current blood collection operations, blood centers should explore the feasibility of establishing expanded donor health screening programs and determining their effectiveness in improving donor health, donor recruitment, and donor retention.

  4. The History and Challenges of Blood Donor Screening in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Li, Ka Yi; Yan, Ke; Ou, Guojin; Li, Wenhui; Wang, Jue; Song, Ning; Tian, Li; Ji, Xin; Chen, Yongjun; Liang, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhong; Wu, Yanyun

    2017-04-01

    Since the establishment of People's Republic of China in 1949, the Chinese government has encountered several catastrophes related to transfusion transmitted diseases. The government's increasing attention to blood safety has prompted the initiation of a series of policies and measures that have enhanced the level of safety for the blood supply and met the basic clinical demands of blood for 1.3 billion people in the country. Blood donation screening strategies in China predominantly comprise donor screening and donor testing. Donor screening includes selection of low-risk blood donors by the use of a donor history questionnaire, predonation physical examination, and initial rapid donor testing. Donor testing includes direct pathogen detection and serology tests. The year 1998 marked the most transformative change in blood donor selection and screening policies in China. Before 1998, paid donation was the predominant mode of blood donation. Donor screening and donor testing were conducted before donation, and only those who were eligible were allowed to donate. To ensure the safety of blood, donor testing was performed again after donation. After the implementation of the Blood Donation Law in 1998, to promote voluntary and unpaid donation, predonation donor testing was eliminated to reduce the amount of waiting time and to provide a more convenient donation experience for blood donors. However, it is the national requirement that donated blood should undergo 2 rounds of testing using different equipment or reagents, conducted by different personnel. Donor selection has transitioned from paid donation and obligatory donation to voluntary donation with fixed volunteer groups, as the latter mode of donation provides the lowest risks. Donations are currently screened for syphilis, hepatitis C virus, HIV, and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Units, previously typed only for ABO, are now routinely tested for both ABO and Rh(D). Innovations in testing technologies and methods

  5. Laboratory and genetic assessment of iron deficiency in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Joseph E

    2015-03-01

    More than 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the United States. Between 200 and 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion. In an effort to better identify and prevent iron deficiency, blood collection centers are now considering various strategies to manage donor iron loss. This article highlights laboratory and genetic tests to assess the iron status of blood donors and their applicability as screening tests for blood donation.

  6. Iron Replacement Therapy in the Routine Management of Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Barbara J.; Yau, Yu Ying; Arceo, Sarah M.; Daniel-Johnson, Jennifer; Hopkins, Julie A.; Leitman, Susan F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron depletion/deficiency in blood donors frequently results in deferrals for low hemoglobin, yet blood centers remain reluctant to dispense iron replacement therapy to donors. Study Design and Methods During a 39-month period, 1236 blood donors deferred for hemoglobin <12.5 g/dL and 400 non-deferred control donors underwent health history screening and laboratory testing (CBC, iron studies). Iron depletion and deficiency were defined as ferritin of 9–19 mcg/L and <9 mcg/L in females and 18–29 mcg/L and <18 mcg/L in males. Deferred donors and iron-deficient control donors were given a 60-pack of ferrous sulfate 325 mg tablets, and instructed to take one tablet daily. Another 60-pack was dispensed at all subsequent visits. Results In the low hemoglobin group, 30% and 23% of females and 8% and 53% of males had iron depletion or deficiency, respectively, compared with 29% and 10% of females and 18% and 21% of males in the control group. Iron depleted/deficient donors taking iron showed normalization of iron-related laboratory parameters, even as they continued to donate. Compliance with oral iron was 68%. Adverse gastrointestinal effects occurred in 21% of donors. The study identified 13 donors with serious medical conditions, including eight with GI bleeding. No donors had malignancies or hemochromatosis. Conclusion Iron depletion or deficiency was found in 53% of female and 61% of male low hemoglobin donors, and in 39% of female and male control donors. Routine administration of iron replacement therapy is safe, effective, and prevents the development of iron depletion/deficiency in blood donors. PMID:22211316

  7. Evaluation of the return rate of volunteer blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Lourençon, Adriana de Fátima; Almeida, Rodrigo Guimarães dos Santos; Ferreira, Oranice; Martinez, Edson Zangiacomi

    2011-01-01

    Background To convert first-time blood donors into regular volunteer donors is a challenge to transfusion services. Objectives This study aims to estimate the return rate of first time donors of the Ribeirão Preto Blood Center and of other blood centers in its coverage region. Methods The histories of 115,553 volunteer donors between 1996 and 2005 were analyzed. Statistical analysis was based on a parametric long-term survival model that allows an estimation of the proportion of donors who never return for further donations. Results Only 40% of individuals return within one year after the first donation and 53% return within two years. It is estimated that 30% never return to donate. Higher return rates were observed among Black donors. No significant difference was found in non-return rates regarding gender, blood type, Rh blood group and blood collection unit. Conclusions The low percentage of first-time donors who return for further blood donation reinforces the need for marketing actions and strategies aimed at increasing the return rates. PMID:23049294

  8. Frequency of Mia antigen: A pilot study among blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Rosamma, N.L.; Karna, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    The Miltenberger (Mi) classes represent a group of phenotypes for red cells that carry low frequency antigens associated with the MNSs blood group system. This pilot study was aimed at determining the Mia antigen positivity in the blood donor population in a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. The study was performed between June to August 2014 on eligible blood donors willing to participate. Antigen typing was performed using monoclonal anti-Mia antiserum by tube technique. Only one of the 1000 blood donors (0.1%) tested was found to be Mia antigen positive. The Mia antigen can, therefore, be considered as being rare in the Indian blood donor population. PMID:27488007

  9. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... donors at http://www.marrow.org . Category Science & Technology License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ... views 10:58 Susan Solomon: The promise of research with stem cells - Duration: 14:59. TED 61, ...

  10. Socio-demographic characteristics of Danish blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Kristoffer Sølvsten; Simonsen, Jacob; Sundby, Anna; Rostgaard, Klaus; Pedersen, Ole Birger; Sørensen, Erik; Nielsen, Kaspar René; Bruun, Mie Topholm; Frisch, Morten; Edgren, Gustaf; Erikstrup, Christian; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Ullum, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is an essential component of a modern healthcare system. Because knowledge about blood donor demography may inform the design of strategies for donor recruitment and retention, we used nationwide registers to characterize the entire population of blood donors in Denmark in 2010. Methods The study population comprised all Danes in the age range eligible for blood donation (N = 3,236,753) at the end of 2010. From the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT) register, we identified 174,523 persons who donated blood in Danish blood banks at least once in 2010. The association between sociodemographic characteristics and blood donor prevalence was examined using regression models. Results The overall prevalence of blood donation was 5.4% among both women and men. The age-specific prevalence of blood donation peaked at 25 years of age (6.8%) for women and 30 years of age (5.7%) for men. Children of any age were associated with lower prevalence of blood donation among women, while the opposite was seen for men. Middle to high income groups, but not the highest income group, had fourfold higher donor prevalence than the lowest income group (6.7% compared to 1.7%). The prevalence of blood donation was considerably lower among men living with their parents (2.9%) or alone (3.9%) than among men cohabitating with a woman (6.2%). Summary Social marginalization, as indicated by low income and being a male living without a woman, was associated with lower prevalence of blood donation. However, individuals with very high incomes and women with children were underrepresented in the Danish blood donor population. PMID:28182624

  11. Tissue banking: relationship with blood donor and organ donor card status.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, Kenneth D; Fitzpatrick, Patricia E; Sheehan, John D

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationships among altruistic health acts may serve to aid therapeutic research advances. In this paper, we report on the links between two such behaviours-donating blood and carrying an organ donor card-and willingness to donate urological tissue to a tissue bank. Reasons for the differential willingness to do so are examined in this paper. A systematic sample of 259 new and returning attendees at a tertiary urology referral clinic in Ireland completed a self-report questionnaire in an outpatient setting. In addition to demographic details, details of known diagnosis of malignancy and family history of cancer; attitudes to tissue donation for research purposes were gauged using a 5-point Likert scale. Both blood donors and organ donor card carriers were more likely to be willing to donate tissue for research purposes. Blood donors were more likely want to know their overall results in comparison to nonblood donors and want their samples to be used for nonprofit research. Our hypothesis that being a blood donor would be a better predictor to donate urological tissue than being an organ donor card carrier borne out by the trends reported above.

  12. Blood donor selection in European Union directives: room for improvement

    PubMed Central

    de Kort, Wim; Mayr, Wolfgang; Jungbauer, Christof; Vuk, Tomislav; Kullaste, Riin; Seifried, Erhard; Grazzini, Giuliano; de Wit, Jeroen; Folléa, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Background Transfusion-transmissible infections have made both blood bankers and health authorities overly cautious. The general public expects and hence reinforces this policy. To obtain a high level of blood product safety, blood and plasma donors have to meet increasingly stringent eligibility criteria; however, it is not known whether this policy translates into improved outcomes for patients. There is a risk that the management of donors does not match the ambition of greater safety for patients. European directives related to the collection process and donor selection will probably be reconsidered in the next few years. Material and methods The development of European directives on donor selection and their basis in the literature were reviewed with an emphasis on the background and considerations for eligibility criteria to be included in the directives. Results The precautionary principle appears to be the predominant reason behind the set of eligibility criteria. However, the formal eligibility criteria, put into force in 2004, do not balance with the developments of the past decade in laboratory tests and measures that have substantially reduced actual infection risks. In no cases were the effects of eligibility criteria on the donor pool and donor well-being quantified. Regional differences in the epidemiology of transfusion-transmissible infections were not taken into consideration either. Discussion First, the Authors promote the collection of epidemiological data on the incidence and prevalence of conditions in the general population and in blood and plasma donors which could pose a risk for transfused patients, in order to use these data as a basis for decision-making in donor-selection policies. Second, the Authors suggest including allowance for differential deferral criteria throughout Europe, based on factual risk levels. There should be an accepted balance between donor and patient welfare, and also between risk to transfusion safety and risk of

  13. Donor, dad, or…? Young adults with lesbian parents' experiences with known donors.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Abbie E; Allen, Katherine R

    2013-06-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study of 11 young adults, ages 19-29 years, we examine how young people who were raised by lesbian parents make meaning out of and construct their relationships with known donors. In-depth interviews were conducted to examine how participants defined their family composition, how they perceived the role of their donors in their lives, and how they negotiated their relationships with their donors. Findings indicate that mothers typically chose known donors who were family friends, that the majority of participants always knew who their donors were, and that their contact with donors ranged from minimal to involved. Further, participants perceived their donors in one of three ways: as strictly donors and not members of their family; as extended family members but not as parents; and as fathers. The more limited role of donors in participants' construction of family relationships sheds light on how children raised in lesbian, gay, and bisexual families are contributing to the redefinition and reconstruction of complex kinship arrangements. Our findings hold implications for clinicians who work with lesbian-mother families, and suggest that young adulthood is an important developmental phase during which interest in and contact with the donor may shift, warranting a transfer of responsibility from mother to offspring in terms of managing the donor-child relationship.

  14. Seroprevalence of transfusion transmissible infections among blood donors at the blood bank of a Medical College of Kolkata.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Prasanta Ray; Shrivastava, Prabha; Ray, Tapobrata Guha

    2014-01-01

    Seroprevalence of transfusion transmissible infections (TTIs) among blood donors can be used to monitor the prevalence among apparently healthy adult population. The present study was conducted to determine the profile of blood donors and seroprevalence of TTI among them. Retrospective analysis of the donors of a blood bank attached with a tertiary care hospital of Kolkata in 2011 was carried out. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 17. Majority (85%) of the donors were male, two-third in the age group of 21-40 years. Among the donors 2.79% were positive for any of the screened TTIs. Seroprevalence was highest for hepatitis B (1.41%) followed by human immunodeficiency virus (0.60%) and hepatitis C (0.59%) and least for syphilis (0.23%). Seropositivity increased with age up to 50 years. There was no significant difference in seropositivity between male and female. Highly sensitive donor screening and public awareness program can make transfusion of blood products safe.

  15. Effect of laser irradiation of donor blood on erythrocyte shape.

    PubMed

    Baibekov, I M; Ibragimov, A F; Baibekov, A I

    2012-04-01

    Changes in erythrocyte shape in donor blood during storage and after irradiation with He-Ne laser and infrared laser were studied by scanning electron microscopy, thick drop express-method, and morphometry. It was found that laser irradiation delayed the appearance of erythrocytes of pathological shapes (echinocytes, stomatocytes, etc.) in the blood; He-Ne laser produced a more pronounced effect.

  16. Health Education about AIDS among Seropositive Blood Donors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Paul D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews the theoretical and empirical work that resulted in the New York Blood Center health education and psychosocial support program for blood donors who are notified that they are HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) antibody positive. Also describes how the program is being implemented. (Author/CT)

  17. The rights of blood recipients should supersede any asserted rights of blood donors.

    PubMed

    Brooks, J P

    2004-11-01

    Some gay men have argued that the laboratory testing of blood is so accurate that continued deferrals based upon sexual activity are unnecessary and unjust. They also assert that they have a right to donate blood. There has been much debate over altering the rule barring donation from men who have had sex with other men since 1977, with blood organizations disagreeing over the best course of action. Two studies have indicated that changing the rule would increase the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. This dilemma is part of a broader issue, namely: what are the responsibilities of blood services to blood donors and recipients? Blood services should base decisions regarding donor suitability on science rather than on their donors' desires. Blood services must recognize that the rights of blood recipients should supersede any asserted rights of blood donors.

  18. [GBV-C/HGV and TTV infection markers in Polish blood donors and haemophilia patients].

    PubMed

    Grabarczyk, Piotr; Brojer, Ewa; Windyga, Jerzy; łopaciuk, Stanisław; Klukowska, Anna; Mikulska, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Viruses GBV-C/HGV and TTV were identified in patients with hepatitis of unknown etiology. Aim of our study was to assess the frequency of infection markers of these viruses in blood donors and haemophilia patients treated with virucidaly activated and non inactivated blood products. Material and methods. TTV DNA (by PCR using primers to coding ORFI and non-coding region NC) and GBV-C/HGV (RNA by RT-PCR and anti-E2 by EIA) were tested in blood donors (200 for TTV and 219 for GBV-C/HGV), 122 haemophilia patients treated in the past with non inactivated blood products and in 20 haemophilia children treated exclusively with inactivated clotting preparations. Results RNA GBV-C/HGV were identified in 3,2%; 23,7% and in 0%, respectively blood donors, adult and children haemophilia patients. Antibody anti-E2 were found in 23,6%; 37% i 25% of studied groups respectively. DNA TTV was detected most frequently by NC than ORF1 primers: in 78% vs.10% of blood donors, 100% vs 43,5% of adult haemophilia patients and in 95% vs. 15% young haemophiliacs. Conclusions Haemophilia patients were at risk of GBV-C/HGV and TTV infection. Following implementation of viral inactivation methods in the process of clotting factor concentrates production, the risk for GBV-C/HGV transmission was significantly reduced and in less extant for TTV.

  19. Partial phenotyping in voluntary blood donors of Gujarat State

    PubMed Central

    Gajjar, Maitrey; Patel, Tarak; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Patel, Kruti; Shah, Mamta; Prajapati, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Partial phenotyping of voluntary blood donors has vital role in transfusion practice, population genetic study and in resolving legal issues. The Rh blood group is one of the most complex and highly immunogenic blood group known in humans. The Kell system, discovered in 1946, is the third most potent system at triggering hemolytic transfusion reactions and consists of 25 highly immunogenic antigens. Knowledge of Rh & Kell phenotypes in given population is relevant for better planning and management of blood bank; the main goal is to find compatible blood for patients needing multiple blood transfusions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of Rh & Kell phenotype of voluntary donors in Gujarat state. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted by taking 5670 samples from random voluntary blood donors coming in blood donation camp. Written consent was taken for donor phenotyping. The antigen typing of donors was performed by Qwalys-3(manufacturer: Diagast) by using electromagnetic technology on Duolys plates. Results: Out of 5670 donors, the most common Rh antigen observed in the study population was e (99.07%) followed by D (95.40%), C (88.77%), c (55.89%) and E (17.88%). The frequency of the Kell antigen (K) was 1.78 %. Discussion: The antigen frequencies among blood donors from Gujarat were compared with those published for other Indian populations. The frequency of D antigen in our study (95.4%) and north Indian donors (93.6) was significantly higher than in the Caucasians (85%) and lower than in the Chinese (99%). The frequencies of C, c and E antigens were dissimilar to other ethnic groups while the ‘e’ antigen was present in high frequency in our study as also in the other ethnic groups. Kell antigen (K) was found in only 101 (1.78 %) donors out of 5670. Frequency of Kell antigen in Caucasian and Black populations is 9% & 2% respectively. The most common Kell phenotype was K-k+, not just in Indians (96.5%) but also

  20. Relationship between Serum Iron Profile and Blood Groups among the Voluntary Blood Donors of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M M; Adnan, S D; Karim, S; Al-Mamun, M A; Faruki, M A; Islam, K; Nandy, S

    2016-04-01

    Blood donation results in a substantial iron loss and subsequent mobilization from body stores. Chronic iron deficiency is a well-recognized complication of regular blood donation. The present study conducted to compare the level of serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and percentage transferrin saturation in different ABO and Rhesus type blood groups among the voluntary blood donors of Bangladesh. The present prospective study included 100 healthy voluntary donors attending at Department of Blood Transfusion, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka between the periods of July 2013 to Jun 2014. From each donor 10mL venous blood sample was taken and divided into heparinized and non-heparinized tubes for determination of hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), serum iron (SI), total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin by standard laboratory methods. Percentage of transferrin saturation (TS) calculated from serum iron and TIBC. Data were analyzed with SPSS (version 16) software and comparisons between groups were made using student's t-test and one way ANOVA. In the present study mean±SD of age of the respondents was 27.2±6.5 years with a range of 18 to 49 years and 81.0% were male and 19.0% were female. Among the donors 18.0% had blood group A, 35.0% had blood group B, 14.0% had blood group AB and 33.0% had blood group O. Among the donors 91.0% had rhesus positive and 9.0% had rhesus negative. Donors with blood group O had lowest haemoglobin, serum iron and transferring saturation levels. Donors with blood group A had highest TIBC level. Donors with blood group B had lowest serum ferritin level. An independent samples 't' test showed statistically significant difference in serum ferritin and percentage transferrin saturation between blood group AB and blood group O and in percentage transferrin saturation between blood group B and blood group O. One way ANOVA showed that there is no significant difference in haemoglobin, serum iron, serum

  1. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in healthy blood donors: an unexpectedly common finding.

    PubMed

    Shim, Youn K; Rachel, Jane M; Ghia, Paolo; Boren, Jeff; Abbasi, Fatima; Dagklis, Antonis; Venable, Geri; Kang, Jiyeon; Degheidy, Heba; Plapp, Fred V; Vogt, Robert F; Menitove, Jay E; Marti, Gerald E

    2014-02-27

    Circulating monoclonal B cells may be detected in healthy adults, a condition called monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). MBL has also been identified in donated blood, but no systematic study of blood donors has been reported. Using sensitive and specific laboratory methods, we detected MBL in 149 (7.1%; 95% confidence interval, 6.0% to 8.3%) of 2098 unique donors ages 45 years or older in a Midwestern US regional blood center between 2010 and 2011. Most of the 149 donors had low-count MBL, including 99 chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like (66.4%), 22 atypical (14.8%), and 19 CD5(-) (12.8%) immunophenotypes. However, 5 donors (3.4%) had B-cell clonal counts above 500 cells per µL, including 3 with 1693 to 2887 cells per µL; the clone accounted for nearly all their circulating B cells. Four donors (2.7%) had 2 distinct MBL clones. Of 51 MBL samples in which immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH)V-D-J genotypes could be determined, 71% and 29% used IGHV3- and IGHV4-family genes, respectively. Sequencing revealed 82% with somatic hypermutation, whereas 18% had >98% germ-line identity, including 5 with entirely germ-line sequences. In conclusion, MBL prevalence is much higher in blood donors than previously reported, and although uncommon, the presence of high-count MBL warrants further investigations to define the biological fate of the transfused cells in recipients.

  2. Laboratory and Genetic Assessment of Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Over 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the US. Between 200 to 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. This amount represents approximately 25% of the average iron stores in men and almost 75% of the iron stores in women. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion, especially in frequent blood donors (e. g., more than 2 times per year). In large epidemiologic studies, donation frequency, female gender, and younger age (reflecting menstrual status), are particularly associated with iron depletion. Currently, a minimum capillary hemoglobin of 12.5 gm/dl is the sole requirement for donor qualification in the US as far as iron levels are concerned, yet it is known that hemoglobin level is a poor surrogate for low iron. In an effort to better identify and prevent iron deficiency, blood collection centers are now considering various strategies to manage donor iron loss, including changes in acceptable hemoglobin level, donation interval, donation frequency, testing of iron status, and iron supplementation. This chapter highlights laboratory and genetic tests to assess the iron status of blood donors and their applicability as screening tests for blood donation. PMID:25676373

  3. Comparison between psychosocial long-term outcomes of recipients and donors after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Noma, Shun'ichi; Hayashi, Akiko; Uehara, Minako; Uemoto, Shinji; Murai, Toshiya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine psychosocial states of recipients and donors several years after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to find out the pre-transplant predictors of desirable post-transplant psychosocial states. The recipients and donors of adult-to-adult LDLT at Kyoto University Hospital, Japan, from November 2001 through July 2003 were interviewed and examined by means of questionnaires about anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QOL), and the participants were evaluated by the same test batteries sent by mail three to five yr after LDLT. Twenty-seven pairs of recipients and donors, 13 recipients, and three donors participated in this study. The recipients and the donors had a decline in social QOL. The main predictor of psychosocial states of the recipients was the length of wait for LDLT, and the predictors of the donors were family or support system availability and recipients' depressive states at LDLT. The donors who were spouses of the recipients had better QOL than other donors. It might be better to perform LDLT as soon as possible once LDLT has been judged to be necessary, and the relative who is on close terms with the recipient should be selected as donor.

  4. Hepatitis B surface antigen in blood donors. An epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Jayaprakash, P A; Shanmugam, J; Hariprasad, D

    1983-01-01

    Of 8085 volunteer donors attending the blood bank at SCTIMST screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier state by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, 103 (1.27%) were HBsAg positive. The personal data of donors showed a higher rate of HBsAg among men than women and in the age group of 21 to 30 years than in the other age groups. A significantly higher rate was noted among donors belonging to the lower socioeconomic group (p less than 0.05).

  5. [Chagas disease screening in the blood donor population].

    PubMed

    Assal, A; Pelletier, B; David, B; Tiberghien, P

    2009-12-01

    In May 2007, the French Blood Service (Etablissement français du sang, EFS) introduced systematic screening of at-risk blood donors for anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. This concerned donors originating from an endemic area, donors with mothers originating from such an area and individuals who had lived in or travelled to endemic areas, whatever the length of their stay. Five samples out of 163,740 were positive, all from individuals originating from an endemic area. One thousand three hundred seventy-four blood donations were considered as equivocal because they had discordant results on the two Elisa tests used in screening. The authors discuss difficulties presented by routine screening of travellers and residents as well as the advantages and drawbacks of the strategy used. They present arguments in favour of its simplification.

  6. [Progress of improving blood donor screening by nucleic acid technology].

    PubMed

    Cai, Li-Na; Chen, Bao-An

    2014-08-01

    With increasing application of blood transfusion, the research of side-effects such as transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) became more and more important. Up to the 90's of the 20th century, the first blood donor screening for pathogens transfected from blood transfusion entirely depended on serological test. At this time, the detection of virus were performed mainly by using method of detecting antibody, except hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be detected by hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Now, the molecular technologies, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), have been used in clinic. These technologic methods can provide capability of detection for blood donor screening and reduced possibility of infection from blood transfusion. This review summarises the development of nucleic acid amplification technology and describes its current state.

  7. Achieving donor repetition and motivation by block leaders among current blood donors.

    PubMed

    Martín-Santana, Josefa D; Beerli-Palacio, Asunción

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an explicative model on the recommendation of donating blood made to relatives and friends by current donors. This model establishes satisfaction and intention to return as direct antecedents, and the quality perceived in the donation process and the existence of inhibitors as indirect antecedents. The results show that (1) the perceived quality has a positive influence on satisfaction and intention to return; (2) the intention to donate again depends positively on satisfaction, but negatively on the existence of internal and external inhibitors; and lastly (3) the recommendation to donate depends on donor satisfaction and their intention to return to donate, this being the most influential factor. At the same time, we contrasted how the model does not vary, whether it is a first-time donor or a repeat donor.

  8. Rates of vaso-vagal reactions among first time teenaged whole blood, double red cell, and plateletpheresis donors.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Robert F; Harkin, Ruth; Lessig, Marvin; Mascari, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Given the paucity of published data regarding reaction rates in younger teenaged donors, we evaluated the reaction rates in all of our first time teenaged donors after New York Blood Center lowered the minimum permissible age for blood donations from 17 to 16 yr in 2005. The overall rates of vaso-vagal reactions in donors aged 16 to 19, and those resulting in syncope, occurring in 72,769 consecutive first time whole blood, 3,822 double red cell, and 777 platelet apheresis donations were calculated. They were correlated with age and compared to those found in donors aged 20-29. Separate rates were calculated by gender, age in yr, and donation type, and then compared to each other. The overall reaction rate among first time teenaged whole blood donors was 8.2% and was significantly greater than among plateletpheresis donors (4.0%; p <0.0002). The rate in female whole blood donors (10.0%) was significantly higher than in males (6.4%; p <0.0002). In male double red cell donors the overall reaction rate of 3.5% was significantly lower than that found in male whole blood donors (p <0.002). Among both male and female whole blood donors a significant correlation with decreasing donor age between 19 and 16 yr was found (r(2) = 0.981; p = 0.01) and (r(2) = 0.988; p = 0.006), respectively. We conclude that teenaged donors have increased reaction rates when compared to adults and the reaction rates increase with decreasing age. In addition, females have higher reaction rates than males. Finally, reaction rates associated with apheresis donations are significantly lower than those associated with whole blood donations.

  9. Donating blood for research: a potential method for enhancing customer satisfaction of permanently deferred blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Daniel; Thijsen, Amanda; Garradd, Allira; Hayman, Jane; Smith, Geoff

    2017-01-01

    Background Each year, a large number of individuals in Australia are deferred from donating blood. A deferral may have a negative impact on donor satisfaction and subsequent word-of-mouth communication. The Australian Red Cross Blood Service (the Blood Service) is, therefore, investigating options for managing service interactions with deferred donors to maintain positive relationships. While public research institutes in Australia have established independent research donor registries, other countries provide programmes allowing deferred donors to donate blood for research via blood collection agencies. This study examined attitudes towards donating blood for research use in a sample of permanently deferred Australian donors. Materials and methods Donors permanently deferred because of a risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (n=449) completed a postal survey that examined attitudes towards research donation. Results The majority of participants were interested in donating blood for research (96%), and joining a registry of research donors (93%). Participants preferred to donate for transfusion or clinical research, and were willing to travel large distances. Results indicated that positive attitudes towards the Blood Service would be extended if the opportunity to donate blood was provided. These findings indicate a desire for continued engagement with the Blood Service despite deferral. Discussion Donating blood for research is a potential way of maintaining positive relationships with permanently deferred donors which also benefits the health research community. Through maintaining positive relationships with deferred donors, positive word-of-mouth activity can be stimulated. Further work is needed to determine the feasibility of implementing research donation through the Blood Service in Australia. PMID:26674813

  10. Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors: The REDS-II Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Ritchard G.; Glynn, Simone A.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Mast, Alan E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Murphy, Edward L.; Wright, David J.; Sacher, Ronald A.; Gottschall, Jerry L.; Tobler, Leslie H.; Simon, Toby L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood donors are at risk of iron deficiency. We evaluated the effects of blood donation intensity on iron and hemoglobin in a prospective study. Methods Four cohorts of frequent and first time or reactivated blood donors (no donation in 2 years), female and male, totaling 2425 were characterized and followed as they donated blood frequently. At enrollment and the final visit, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and hemoglobin were determined. Models to predict iron deficiency and hemoglobin deferral were developed. Iron depletion was defined at two levels: Iron Deficient Erythropoiesis (IDE) [log (soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin ≥ 2.07)] and Absent Iron Stores (AIS) (ferritin < 12 ng/mL). Results Among returning female first time/reactivated donors, 20% and 51% had AIS and IDE at their final visit, respectively; corresponding proportions for males were 8% and 20%. Among female frequent donors who returned, 27% and 62% had AIS and IDE, respectively, while corresponding proportions for males were 18% and 47%. Predictors of IDE and/or AIS included a higher frequency of blood donation in the last 2 years, a shorter interdonation interval, and being female and young; conversely, taking iron supplements reduced the risk of iron depletion. Predictors of hemoglobin deferral included female gender, Black race and a shorter interdonation interval. Conclusions There is a high prevalence of iron depletion in frequent blood donors. Increasing the interdonation interval would reduce the prevalence of iron depletion and hemoglobin deferral. Alternatively, replacement with iron supplements may allow frequent donation without the adverse outcome of iron depletion. PMID:22023513

  11. Prevalence of HBV and HCV among blood donors in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Fejza, Hajrullah; Telaku, Skender

    2009-02-13

    Hepatitis is disease of the liver caused by the infectious and non-infectious agents. The aim of study was to analyze the prevalence of HBV and HCV among voluntary blood donors in Kosovo, during 2000-2003. The data from National Center for Blood Transfusion of Kosovo were collected and analyzed through descriptive and comparative epidemiological method of retrospective study. All samples were tested by ELISA test. Out of 70348 samples of the blood donors, 3145 were positive. From overall positive samples, 2939 were HBV positive, 192 HCV positive while 14 samples were positive for both viruses. The HBV prevalence among the blood donors of Kosovo is 4.2%, which range Kosovo to the second zone according to the CDC classification of the geographical spread of the HBV infection. The HCV prevalence among the blood donors in Kosovo is 0.3%. Compared to the other European countries this level of prevalence is relatively low. Age group 30-39 years old was presented with 34.8% of cases. The higher number was among the workers, 842 or 26.8%. Based on the results we can conclude that Kosovo have the similar prevalence for HBV and HCV infections as other South East European countries.

  12. Frequency of FCGR3B Alleles in Thai Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Kaset, Chollanot; Leetrakool, Nipapan; Intharanut, Kamphon

    2013-01-01

    Background Human neutrophil antigens (HNAs) are involved in autoimmune and alloimmune neutropenia and transfusion-related acute lung injury. The HNA-1 system is important in immunogenetics, and allele frequencies have been described in different populations. This study investigated the frequency of FCGR3B alleles encoding HNA-1a, HNA-1b, and HNA-1c among Thai blood donors and compared these frequencies with those previously reported for other populations. Methods Eight hundred DNA samples obtained from unrelated healthy blood donors at the National Blood Centre, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok, and the Blood Bank, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, were included. Samples were simultaneously typed for each FCGR3B allele using an in-house polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) technique. Results The frequencies of FCGR3B*1, FCGR3B*2, and FCGR3B*3 alleles in central Thai blood donors were 0.548, 0.452, and 0.004, respectively; only FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles were found in northern Thai blood donors (0.68 and 0.32, respectively). Compared with other Asian populations, central Thais had higher frequencies of the FCGR3B*2 allele (P<0.001), while the frequencies of the FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles in northern Thais were similar to those previously reported in Taiwanese and Japanese populations. In contrast, the frequencies of the FCGR3B*1 and FCGR3B*2 alleles in the northern Thai population were statistically different from those observed in central Thai, Korean, German, and Turkish populations. Conclusions FCGR3B allele frequencies were significantly different between central and northern Thai blood donors. Our in-house PCR-SSP method is a simple, cost-effective, and convenient method for FCGR3B allele detection. PMID:24205492

  13. Hepatitis B surface antigen in blood donors: further observations.

    PubMed

    Szmuness, W; Hirsch, R L; Prince, A M; Levine, R W; Harley, E J; Ikram, H

    1975-02-01

    A survey of 128,000 volunteer blood donors from the Greater New York metropolitan area revealed that first-time male donors were positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) 2.5 times more frequently than were first-time female donors; Negroes and Mongols were positive four to 20 times more frequently than Caucasians. The ratio of ad to ay seemed to be higher in non-Caucasian antigen carriers than in Caucasian carriers. Among both Caucasians and non-Caucasians the rate of positivity declined after the age of 50. An excess prevalence of HBsAg was observed in donors with the lowest level of education and in those with the highest level. HBsAg was detectable nine times less frequently among repeat donors than among first-time donors (0.2 vs.1.90 per 1,000). Detection of HBsAg was unrelated to ABO-Rh blood groups. Several mechanisms for these wide variations of antigen detection are possible.

  14. Infectious Complications after Umbilical Cord-Blood Transplantation from Unrelated Donors

    PubMed Central

    Montoro, Juan; Piñana, José Luis; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord-blood (UCB) is a well-recognized alternative source of stem cells for unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). As compared with other stem cell sources from adult donors, it has the advantages of immediate availability of cells, absence of risk to the donor and reduced risk of graft-versus-host disease despite donor-recipient HLA disparity. However, the use of UCB is limited by the delayed post-transplant hematologic recovery due, at least in part, to the reduced number of hematopoietic cells in the graft and the delayed or incomplete immune reconstitution. As a result, severe infectious complications continue to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality following UCB transplantation (UCBT). We will address the complex differences in the immune properties of UCB and review the incidence, characteristics, risk factors, and severity of bacterial, fungal and viral infectious complications in patients undergoing UCBT. PMID:27872731

  15. Molecular genotyping of HCV infection in seropositive blood donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarin, Siti Noraziah Abu; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    This study is to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in seropositive blood donor. RNA was extracted from 32 positive samples in National Blood Centre and Melaka Hospital. The core and NS5B sequences were obtained from 23 samples. Genotype 3a is most prevalent in this study followed by genotype 1a. Evidence of mixed-genotypes (3a and 1b) infections was found in 5 subjects.

  16. SOME CLINICALLY IMPORTANT ERYTHROCYTE BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS IN DONORS.

    PubMed

    Tsintsadze, I; Gorgoshadze, T; Donskov, S; Akhvlediani, L; Nagervadze, M

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of erythrocyte blood group antigens was evaluated among 656 donors; samples were provided by the diagnostic laboratory "Medina" Ltd Health Centre of Batumi. Lab analysis of the sample was conducted by the immunogenetics laboratory at Batumi Shota Rustaveli State University. The frequency of the ABO allele system in donors was as follows: r (0.70), q (0.23), p (0.07). The distribution of Rhesus (Rh) factor in the donor population was as follows: Rh(-) was found among 16.3±1.43% of investigated donors; the Rh(+) phenotype was found in 83.7±1.43% of donors. Additionally, the CcDee phenotype frequency was 29.9±1.78%; CCD-ee was 17.2±1.47%; ccddee was 14.9±1.38%; and CcD-Ee was 13.9±1.34%; ccD-Ee phenotype was 11.1±1.22%; ccD-ee was 5.5±0.88%; same phenotype indicators -2.1±0.55 were observed for CcD-EE and ccD-EE; CCD-Ee was 1.4±0.45%, CCD-EE was 0.4±0.26%; and finally, the frequency of Ccddee phenotype amounts was 1.1±0.40%, ccddEe and CCddee phenotypes were both 0.2±0.17%. The analysis of the Kell system allele revealed a low frequency for the p allele at 0.05, whereas the frequency of the q allele was 0.95. This large epidemiologic analysis of donor blood provides valuable information for hematological and transfusion centers to inform the preparation of blood components for transfusion.

  17. Prevalence of immediate vasovagal reaction in blood donors visiting two blood banks of Karachi.

    PubMed

    Rohra, D K; Juriasinghani, V; Rai, K; Azam, S I

    2010-06-01

    Vasovagal reaction (VVR) is a very common adverse event related to blood donation. No study has been conducted in Pakistan to estimate the prevalence of VVR in blood donors. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of immediate VVR in blood donors of Karachi, Pakistan. The study was conducted in two blood banks of Karachi. Data regarding the development of immediate VVR were documented. The effect of blood donation on vital parameters like pulse rate, blood pressure (BP), temperature and respiratory rate was also observed. Six hundred and seventy-four blood donors were recruited. All the donors who consented were males. Weakness and dizziness were two most common symptoms which were reported by 91 (13.5%) and 73 (10.8%) of the participants, respectively. Out of 91 donors in whom signs and symptoms of immediate VVR were observed, a significant drop in systolic BP (13.5 +/- 2.5 mmHg) and decrease in pulse rate (13.3 +/- 3.6) were concurrently noted in 55 donors (8.2% of all the participants). There was lack of association of age, body mass index (BMI), estimated blood volume, ethnicity, educational status, profession and first time donation status with the frequency of VVR. Only marital status was found to be significantly associated with higher frequency of immediate VVR, where married donors were having higher odds as compared to singles. The prevalence of VVR in the blood donors at two blood banks of Karachi is at least 8.2%. Furthermore, married men are at more risk of experiencing VVR in our population.

  18. Titers of ABO antibodies in group O blood donors

    PubMed Central

    de França, Natalia Dallaval Galvão; Poli, Mônica Caamaño Cristovão; Ramos, Patrícia Guilhem de Almeida; Borsoi, Cláudia Strang da Rocha; Colella, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasma components of group O blood donations are rarely submitted to ABO antibody titrations even though it is well known that passively acquired antibodies may destroy the recipient's own red cells and tissue grafts. Objective Thus, group O donations stratified by gender and age were randomly titrated to identify the best source of products for apheresis and exsanguinous transfusion. Methods Samples from 603 blood donors were tested by ABO antibody titration using the conventional tube technique at room temperature. ABO antibody levels higher than 64 were considered high. After correction for gender, statistical analyses were performed using the Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results Most donors in the blood bank were male (65.7%). ABO antibody titers ranged from 1 to 2048. The estimations of prevalence for the titers were: anti-A,B < 128 = 86.9% and = 128 = 2.16%; Anti-A = 128 = 9.29% and anti-B = 128 = 4.81%. Low mean titers for both anti-A and anti-B antibodies were found in over 50-year-old men (p-value = 0.040). High anti-B antibody levels were found in young women (p-value = 0.002). Conclusion This study confirms that over 50-year-old O group men should be selected as blood donors in non-identical ABO transfusion situations. Also, titration of ABO antibodies in blood banks will increase safety in non-identical ABO transfusions. PMID:23049315

  19. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Across ABO-Incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Fang; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Yu-Chao; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Wu, Tsung-Han; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chan, Kun-Ming; Lee, Ching-Song; Lee, Wei-Chen

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation (LDLT).ABO-incompatible LDLT is an aggressive treatment that crosses the blood-typing barrier for saving lives from liver diseases. Although graft and patient survival have been improved recently by various treatments, the results of adult ABO-incompatible LDLT require further evaluation.Two regimens were designed based on isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers and the time course of immunological reactions at this institute. When isoagglutinin IgG and IgM titers were ≤64, liver transplantation was directly performed and rituximab (375 mg/m) was administrated on postoperative day 1 (regimen I). When isoagglutinin titers were >64, rituximab (375 mg/m) was administered preoperatively with or without plasmapheresis and boosted on postoperative day 1 (regimen II). Immunosuppression was achieved by administration of mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and steroids.Forty-six adult ABO-incompatible and 340 ABO-compatible LDLTs were performed from 2006 to 2013. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores for ABO-incompatible recipients ranged from 7 to 40, with a median of 14. The graft-to-recipient weight ratio ranged from 0.61% to 1.61% with a median of 0.91%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 81.7%, 75.7%, and 71.0%, respectively, for ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients, compared to 81.0%, 75.2%, and 71.5% for ABO-C recipients (P = 0.912). The biliary complication rate was higher in ABO-incompatible LDLT recipients than in the ABO-compatible recipients (50.0% vs 29.7%, P = 0.009).In the rituximab era, the blood type barrier can be crossed to achieve adult ABO-incompatible LDLT with survival rates comparable to those of ABO-compatible LDLT, but with more biliary complications.

  20. [Risk behavior among blood donors: efficacy of a new questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Courtois, F; Voultoury, P; Ducot, B; Boulard, G; Poutier, P; Tir, R; Worms, B; Bajos, N; Spira, A; Wild, A M

    1999-07-01

    The clinical selection of volunteers for blood donation is essential to reduce the risk of viral transmission by blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate a new questionnaire for a pre-donation medical interview. This questionnaire was developed by transfusion practitioners, epidemiologists and professional investigators, and focused on risk behaviors of blood donors and their partners. Five blood banks in the French Ile-de-France region (around Paris), participated in the study from May 1995 to January 1996. All participating doctors were specifically trained by professional investigators. The sex and the age of donors, the type of collection, the duration of interviews and the reasons for exclusion from donation were recorded. The results were compared to those of a prior study dealing with a sample of 15,000 donors presenting the same characteristics, whose blood was taken of at the same collection sites in 1993. Of the 1,527 volunteers donating blood, 14% were interviewed in fixed centers and 86% by moving teams (38% in firms, 22% in towns, 13% in civil service facilities, 13% in school or academic centers). For 15.9% of the volunteers, this was the first donation (range: 7.3% in fixed centers to 41.5% in school and academic centers). The mean duration of the interview was 11 min (10 min for volunteers included, 14 min for donors excluded from donation). It decreased from 14 min at the beginning of the study to 10 min by the end of the study. The percentage of donors excluded for risk behavior (3.7% in 1995-96 vs 1.5% in 1993, P < 0.001), or medical reasons (12.2% in 1995-96 vs 8.4%, in 1993, P < 0.001) was significantly greater in 1995-96 than in 1993 (15.9% vs 9.9%, P < 0.001). In 1995-96, 35.0% of exclusions for risk behavior were related to male homosexuality, multiple partners or the risk behavior of the partner vs 12% in 1993 (P < 0.001). The risk of exclusion was 5.5 times higher for donors not living in a couple. The results obtained

  1. Signalment and blood types in cats being evaluated as blood donors at two italian university blood banks.

    PubMed

    Spada, Eva; Miglio, Arianna; Proverbio, Daniela; Antognoni, Maria Teresa; Bagnagatti De Giorgi, Giada; Ferro, Elisabetta; Mangili, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Data from potential feline blood donors presented at two university blood banks in Italy were recorded. Blood typing was performed using an immunochromatographic method. Over the three years of the study 357 cats representing 15 breeds, 45.3% female and 54.7% male, with a mean age of 3.8 years were evaluated. Of these 90.5% were blood type A, 5.6% type B, and 3.9% type AB. The majority of the cats (54.6%) were European DSH (92.3% were type A, 5.1% type B, and 2.6% type AB), and 21% were Maine Coon (MCO) cats (100% blood type A). The estimated frequencies of transfusion reactions following an unmatched transfusion between DSH (donors and recipients), MCO (donor and recipients), DSH donors and MCO recipients, and MCO donors and DSH recipients were 4.8%, 0%, 0%, and 5.1% for major reactions and 7.2%, 0%, 7.7%, and 0% for minor transfusions reactions, respectively. In a population of blood donors that includes DSH and MCO the risk of transfusion reaction is between 5% and 8% if typing is not performed on donor and recipient blood. Blood typing should therefore be performed before transfusion to remove the risk of transfusion reactions due to blood type incompatibilities.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected blood donors: behavioral characteristics and reasons for donation. The HIV Blood Donor Study Group.

    PubMed

    Doll, L S; Petersen, L R; White, C R; Ward, J W

    1991-10-01

    Between May 1988 and September 1989, 829 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive donors were identified from 3,919,000 units of blood donated at 20 United States (US) blood centers. Of the 829,512 (62%) were interviewed to assess behavioral characteristics of the largest subgroup, men reporting sex with men, use of the confidential unit exclusion (CUE) and reasons for donation among all donors. Among 216 men reporting sex with men, 97 percent had male and 72 percent had female sexual contact since 1978. The majority identified themselves as bisexual (29%) or heterosexual (26%). Although 61 percent of 512 donors were aware of their risk behavior at donation, including 57 percent of those infected through heterosexual transmission, only 5 percent used the CUE. Reasons for donation included failure to read carefully (46%) or comprehend (15%) the deferral materials, pressure to donate (27%), a desire to be tested for HIV-1 (15%), and a reliance on screening to identify infected blood (10%). Reasons given for a perception of being at low risk included no recent risk behaviors, infrequent risk behaviors, or modification of risk behaviors. To reach high-risk donors, centers should assess whether referral materials provide necessary medical information and are clearly written for persons with diverse cultural and language backgrounds. Staff should be encouraged to avoid the use of culturally stigmatized terms and behaviors that may be perceived as high pressure.

  3. Donor Safety in Adult-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation: A Single-Center Experience of 356 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Haipeng; Yang, Jiayin; Yan, Lunan

    2016-01-01

    Background As an important means to tackle the worldwide shortage of liver grafts, adult-adult living donor liver transplantation (A-ALDLT) is the most massive operation a healthy person could undergo, so donor safety is of prime importance. However, most previous research focused on recipients, while complications in donors have not been fully described or investigated. Material/Methods To investigate donor safety in terms of postoperative complications, the clinical data of 356 A-ALDLT donors in our center from January 2002 to September 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were divided into a pre-2008 group (before January 2008) and a post-2008 group (after January 2008). Donor safety was evaluated with regard to the type, frequency, and severity of postoperative complications. Results There were no donor deaths in our center during this period. The overall complication rate was 23.0% (82/356). The proportion of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 51.2% (42/82), 25.6% (21/82), 22.0% (18/82), and 1.2% (1/82), respectively. In all the donors, the incidence of Clavien I, II, III, and IV complications was 11.8% (42/356), 5.9% (21/356), 5.1% (18/356), and 0.3% (1/356), respectively. The overall complication rate in the post-2008 group was significantly lower than that in the pre-2008 group (18.1% (41/227) vs. 32.6% (42/129), P<0.01). Biliary complications were the most common, with an incidence of 8.4% (30/356). Conclusions The risk to A-ALDLT donors is controllable and acceptable with improvement in preoperative assessment and liver surgery. PMID:27178367

  4. Blood donors' motivation and attitude to non-remunerated blood donation in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Buciuniene, Ilona; Stonienë, Laimutë; Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Kazlauskaite, Ruta; Skudiene, Vida

    2006-01-01

    Background In the Soviet period, the blood donation system operated in Lithuania exclusively on a remunerative basis. After joining the EU, Lithuania committed itself to meeting the EU requirements to provide all consumers within its boundaries with safe blood products made from voluntary unpaid blood donations. However, the introduction of a non-remunerated donation system may considerably affect donors' motivation and retention. Thus the aim of the current research was to determine blood donation motives among the present donors and investigate their attitude towards non-remunerated donation. Methods A questionnaire survey of 400 blood donors. Survey data processed using SPSS statistical analysis package. Statistical data reliability checked using Fisher's exact test (p < 0.05). Results Paid donors comprised 89.9%, while non-paid ones made 10.1% of the respondents. Research findings show that 93 per cent of the paid donors give blood on a regular basis; while among the non-remunerated donors the same figure amounted merely to 20.6 per cent. The idea of the remuneration necessity is supported by 78.3 per cent of the paid donors, while 64.7 per cent of the non-remunerated respondents believe that remuneration is not necessary. The absolute majority of the paid donors (92%) think they should be offered a monetary compensation for blood donation, while more than half of the non-remunerated donors (55.9) claim they would be content with a mere appreciation of the act. Provided no remuneration were offered, 28.44 per cent of the respondents would carry on doing it, 29.6 per cent would do it only in emergency, 29.6 per cent would donate blood merely for their family or friends, and 12.3 per cent would quit it completely. Conclusion Most respondents admitted having donated blood for the following reasons: willingness to help the ill or monetary compensation. Majority would consent to free blood donation only in case of emergency or as a family replacement, which leads to

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi screening in Texas blood donors, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M N; Woc-Colburn, L; Rossmann, S N; Townsend, R L; Stramer, S L; Bravo, M; Kamel, H; Beddard, R; Townsend, M; Oldham, R; Bottazzi, M E; Hotez, P J; Murray, K O

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease is an important emerging disease in Texas that results in cardiomyopathy in about 30% of those infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Between the years 2008 and 2012, about 1/6500 blood donors were T. cruzi antibody-confirmed positive. We found older persons and minority populations, particularly Hispanic, at highest risk for screening positive for T. cruzi antibodies during routine blood donation. Zip code analysis determined that T. cruzi is associated with poverty. Chagas disease has a significant disease burden and is a cause of substantial economic losses in Texas.

  6. Motivating Factors and Potential Deterrents to Blood Donation in High School Aged Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Phan-Tang, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background. To ensure an adequate supply of blood, collection centers must design campaigns that successfully recruit and maintain an active donor pool. Understanding factors that motivate and deter individuals from donating may help centers develop targeted recruitment campaigns. These factors among high school aged blood donors have not yet been fully investigated. Study Design and Methods. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to student donors at high school mobile blood drives. The survey instrument asked the students to rate several potential motivating factors in their importance in the decision to donate blood and several potential deterring factors in their future decision whether or not to donate blood again. The survey also asked the students to rate the desirability of several potential incentives. Results. Motivating factors that reflected prosocial, empathetic, and altruistic thoughts and beliefs were rated highly by students. Pain from phlebotomy was most commonly chosen as potential deterrent. Movie tickets and cookies/snacks at the drive were rated as the most attractive incentives. Conclusion. High school aged blood donors are similar to other donor groups in their expressed motives for donating blood. This group may be unique in the factors that deter them from donating and in their preferences for different incentives. PMID:27293985

  7. The association between blood group and the risk of vascular disease in Quebec blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Claudia; Germain, Marc; Delage, Gilles; Grégoire, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between antigens A and B and arterial thrombosis, such as coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease or peripheral vascular disease, is still unclear. We evaluated the association between blood groups and thrombotic events in a cohort of blood donors from the province of Quebec, Canada. Material and methods Among all whole blood donors aged ≥18 years in Quebec between June 1990 and March 2009, a study sample with known blood groups was linked with the provincial hospitalisation and death records to count vascular events. All hospital admissions and deaths with codes for primary and relevant secondary diagnoses of coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases, including coronary heart disease interventions, were included. Cox regression was used to evaluate the hazard ratio associated between blood groups and these events adjusted for other baseline characteristics. Results Among the blood donors, 64,686 had a known blood group and were linked with the provincial health databases. The mean age of these donors was 38 years. The Cox multivariate adjusted hazard ratio for coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases was 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.40) for subjects with blood group AB compared to those with blood group O. There were no statistically significant associations with other blood groups. Only among women aged ≥40 years did those with blood group A have a higher hazard ratio for coronary heart disease (1.40 [1.01–1.92]) than those with blood group O, after adjusting for other characteristics. Discussion When compared to blood group O, only blood group AB was associated with a higher risk of hospitalisation or death because of thrombotic events such as coronary, cerebrovascular or peripheral diseases. However, the associations differed according to age and sex because only females aged ≥40 years with blood group A had a higher risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:27177404

  8. Prevalence of blood donor iron deficiency and feasibility ferritin-based iron replacement: a blood collection agency-based study.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, J; Katz, L; Elsmore, D; Kirbach, K; Erickson, Y; Hove, A; Black, C; Walsh-Jahnke, R

    2016-08-01

    Iron depletion is high in frequent whole-blood donors. It is of interest to blood centres to develop ways to mitigate this risk while maintaining the current blood supply. Our feasibility study shows that blood collection agencies can measure iron stores and safely offer iron replacement in frequent blood donors with low ferritin to reduce the risk of iron depletion and future donor deferrals for low haemoglobin.

  9. Too Many Blood Donors – Response Bias in the Swiss Health Survey 2012

    PubMed Central

    Volken, Thomas; Bänziger, Andreas; Buser, Andreas; Castelli, Damiano; Fontana, Stefano; Frey, Beat M.; Sarraj, Amira; Sigle, Jörg; Thierbach, Jutta; Weingand, Tina; Mansouri-Taleghani, Behrouz

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on blood donor status obtained from general surveys and health interview surveys have been widely used. However, the integrity of data on self-reported blood donor status from surveys may be threatened by sampling and non-sampling error. Our study aimed to compare self-reported blood donors (including one-time as well as regular donors) from the Swiss Health Survey 2012 (SHS) with register-based blood donors recorded by blood establishments and evaluate the direction and magnitude of bias in the SHS. Methods We compared population-weighted SHS point estimates of the number of blood donors with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals to the respective figures from blood donor registries (birth cohorts 1978-1993) and estimates of donors based on period donor tables derived from blood donor registries (birth cohorts 1920-1993). Results In the birth cohorts 1978-1993, the SHS-predicted number of donors was 1.8 times higher than the respective number of donors based on registry data. Adjusting for foreign and naturalized Swiss nationals that immigrated after their 18th birthday, the SHS overall predicted number of donors was 1.6 times higher. Similarly, SHS estimates for the 1920-1993 birth cohorts were 2.4 and 2.1 times higher as compared to register-based estimates. Generally, the differences between SHS and register-based donors were more pronounced in men than in women. Conclusion Self-reported blood donor status in the SHS is biased. Estimates of blood donors are substantially higher than respective estimates based on blood donor registries. PMID:27994526

  10. Evaluation of blood donor deferral causes in the Trinidad and Tobago National Blood Transfusion Service.

    PubMed

    Charles, K S; Hughes, P; Gadd, R; Bodkyn, C J; Rodriguez, M

    2010-02-01

    The majority of blood donations in Trinidad and Tobago are made as replacement by family members or friends. National Blood Transfusion Policy was drafted in 2007 to promote voluntary, repeated donation. The objective of this study is to assess the current rate and reasons for donor deferral, and the aim is to guide the proposed donor education and recruitment programme. A retrospective study of pre-donation deferral of prospective blood donors at the National Blood Transfusion Centre, Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, was conducted. Records of all pre-donation deferrals over a 12-month period were studied. As many as 11,346 pre-donation screening interviews were conducted. There were 4043 (35.6%) deferrals. The most common reasons for donor deferral were exposure to high-risk sexual activity (27.6%), low haemoglobin 22.2% and hypertension 17.5%. Other reasons such as medication, chronic medical illness, tattoos, travel history, recent pregnancy, surgery or presentation outside the accepted age limit caused 33.8% of all deferrals and the majority (34.7%) of male deferrals. Low haemoglobin (44.5%) was the most common reason among females. The rate of deferral of voluntary donors was not significantly different from that for replacement donors (31.7 vs. 35.4%, P = 0.25). This study exposed a lack of public awareness as the principal reason for an unacceptably high rate of donor deferral. Donor education about selection criteria needs to be urgently addressed as an objective of the National Policy. Monitoring and evaluation of deferral rates and reasons could be used as one indicator of the effectiveness of the Policy.

  11. [Seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 in blood donors from Misiones Province].

    PubMed

    Malan, Richard; Berini, Carolina A; Eirin, María E; Delfino, Cecilia M; Pedrozo, Williams; Krupp, Ramón; García Plichta, Atilio; Biglione, Mirna M

    2010-01-01

    Human T-cell Lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human oncoretrovirus to be discovered, is the etiologic agent of Adult T-cell Leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1 Associated Mielopathy or Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP). It is endemic worldwide, including the North of Argentina where both associated diseases have also been detected. No etiologic role has been described for HTLV-2, although it has been associated with HAM/TSP-like neurologic syndromes. Both retroviruses are endemic in native populations of The Americas, Africa and at-risk populations. They are transmitted through sex contact, parenterally and from mother to child. The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 in a blood donor population from Misiones province. A total of 6912 accepted blood donations in 2008 were analyzed. HTLV-1/2 screening was performed with ELISA and particle agglutination, and reactive samples were confirmed by Western Blot. From the total, 5 samples resulted seropositive with a final prevalence of 0.00072. Out of the 5 positive samples, one was an HTLV, three HTLV-1 and one HTLV-2. These blood donors were residents of Posadas, Eldorado and Oberá, with no risk antecedents. This study demonstrates the presence of HTLV-1/2 in a population of Misiones with a prevalence rate similar to those reported among blood donors from non-endemic areas.

  12. Management of blood donors and blood donations from individuals found to have a positive direct antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Judith L

    2012-04-01

    The medical literature is replete with articles addressing the diagnosis and management of patients with a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). However, there is scant information addressing the management of blood donors and blood donations found to have a positive DAT. Practices vary considerably between countries and blood suppliers within countries, and there is no standardized approach to the management of these blood donors or the blood products prepared from their donations. Recent evidence from Israel suggests that the finding of a positive DAT in a blood donor may not be as benign as previously thought. Therefore, it may be prudent for blood collection agencies to periodically reexamine their approach to the management of blood donors with a positive DAT and their donations. This article reviews the available literature and explores options for the management of DAT-positive blood donors and their blood donations.

  13. Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation with ABO-Incompatible Grafts: A German Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Goralczyk, Armin D.; Obed, Aiman; Schnitzbauer, Andreas; Doenecke, Axel; Tsui, Tung Yu; Scherer, Marcus N.; Ramadori, Giuliano; Lorf, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Adult living donor liver transplantations (ALDLTs) across the ABO blood group barrier have been reported in Asia, North Americas, and Europe, but not yet in Germany. Several strategies have been established to overcome the detrimental effects that are attached with such a disparity between donor and host, but no gold standard has yet emerged. Here, we present the first experiences with three ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantations in Germany applying different immunosuppressive strategies. Four patient-donor couples were considered for ABO-incompatible ALDLT. In these patients, resident ABO blood group antibodies (isoagglutinins) were depleted by plasmapheresis or immunoadsorption and replenishment was inhibited by splenectomy and/or B-cell-targeted immunosuppression. Despite different treatments ALDLT could safely be performed in three patients and all patients had good initial graft function without signs for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Two patients had long-term graft survival with stable graft function. We thus propose the feasibility of ABO-incompatible ALDLT with these protocols and advocate further expansion of ABO incompatible ALDLT in multicenter trials to improve efficacy and safety. PMID:20148072

  14. Applying self-determination theory to the blood donation context: The blood donor competence, autonomy, and relatedness enhancement (Blood Donor CARE) trial.

    PubMed

    France, Christopher R; France, Janis L; Carlson, Bruce W; Frye, Victoria; Duffy, Louisa; Kessler, Debra A; Rebosa, Mark; Shaz, Beth H

    2017-02-01

    The Blood Donor Competency, Autonomy, and Relatedness Enhancement (Blood Donor CARE) project was designed as a practical application of self-determination theory to encourage retention of first-time donors. Self-determination theory proposes that people are more likely to persist with behaviors that are internally-motivated, and that externally-motivated behavior can evolve and become internalized given the appropriate socio-environmental conditions. According to self-determination theory, motivation to engage in blood donation may become increasingly self-determined if the behavior satisfies fundamental human needs for competence (a sense of self-efficacy to achieve specific goals), autonomy (a sense of volitional control over one's behavior), and relatedness (a sense of connection to a larger group). The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial is to examine the effect of competence, autonomy, and/or relatedness interventions on donor retention. Using a full factorial design, first-time donors will be assigned to a control condition or one of seven intervention conditions. Donation competence, autonomy, and relatedness, along with additional constructs associated with return donation, will be assessed before and after the intervention using online surveys, and donation attempts will be tracked for one-year using blood center donor databases. We hypothesize that, compared to the control condition, the interventions will increase the likelihood of a subsequent donation attempt. We will also examine intervention-specific increases in competence, autonomy, and relatedness as potential mediators of enhanced donor retention. By promoting first-time donor competence, autonomy, and relatedness our goal is to enhance internal motivation for giving and in so doing increase the likelihood of future donation.

  15. Association of ABO and Rh Blood Groups to Blood-Borne Infections among Blood Donors in Tehran-Iran

    PubMed Central

    MOHAMMADALI, Fatemeh; POURFATHOLLAH, Aliakbar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV and syphilis infections in blood donors referred to Tehran Blood Transfusion Center (TBTC), and determine any association between blood groups and blood- borne infections between the years of 2005 and 2011. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted at TBTC. All of the donor serum samples were screened for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis by using third generation ELISA kits and RPR test. Initial reactive samples were tested in duplicate. Confirmatory tests were performed on all repeatedly reactive donations. Blood group was determined by forward and reverse blood grouping. The results were subjected to chi square analysis for determination of statistical difference between the values among different categories according to SPSS program. Results Overall, 2031451 donor serum samples were collected in 2005-2011. Totally, 10451 were positive test for HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis. The overall seroprevalence of HBV, HCV, HIV, and syphilis was 0.39%, 0.11%, 0.005%, and 0.010%, respectively. Hepatitis B and HIV infections were significantly associated with blood group of donors (P <0.05) ; percentage of HIV Ag/Ab was higher in donors who had blood group “A” and percentage of HBs Ag was lower in donors who had blood group O. There was no significant association between Hepatitis C and syphilis infections with ABO and Rh blood groups (P>0.05). Conclusion Compared with neighboring countries and the international standards, prevalence of blood-borne infections is relatively low. PMID:25909065

  16. Recruitment of prospective donors: what do they expect from a homepage of a blood transfusion service?

    PubMed

    Moog, R; Fourné, K

    2007-08-01

    In times of shrinking donor population, the recruitment of donors is of utmost importance. Recruitment can be done by personal communication, advertisement/information, classical mass media (newspaper, radio, TV) or new computerized media. The aim of this study was to gain information about the donors' demands of an Internet presentation of a blood transfusion service. Between October and December 2004 inclusive, prospective donors were asked to complete a survey about the impact of Internet information for blood donors. The survey contained questions measuring demographics, education and motivation for blood donation. In addition, the survey included questions that measured Internet access, duration of online time and donors' demands for an Internet presentation of a blood transfusion service. Donors were asked to tick a box with predefined answers. In cases where no options were applied, donors were requested to specify their answers. One hundred and fourteen prospective donors (71 female, 43 male) with a median age of 25 years (range 18-57 years) completed the survey. Most donors (57.9%) were 18-30 years old. Forty-two (36.8%) of the surveyed donors were repeat donors, whereas 72 (63.2%) were first-time donors. The majority of donors were informed about blood donation from relatives or friends (70.7% repeat donors and 67.7% first-time donors). Most of them had Internet access (85.7% repeat donors and 90.3% first-time donors). Exclusive use of private access was more often reported in repeat donors (77.8%), whereas both private and professional access was more frequently used in first-time donors (32.3%). Most donors used the Internet access daily, followed by weekly and monthly use. Multiple answers were given about the importance of desired information about the topic 'blood donation'. Both first-time and repeat donors wanted to be informed about organizational details of blood donation such as opening times, eligibility criteria, donation process and the kind

  17. Donor blood procurement and utilisation at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City.

    PubMed

    Enosolease, M E; Imarengiaye, C O; Awodu, O A

    2004-08-01

    Banked blood is a limited resource in Nigeria. We sought to evaluate factors that may further limit the effective utilisation of donor blood in a tertiary hospital in Benin City. The records of the blood transfusion unit of the hospital were studied to identify the methods of blood procurement and utilisation from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002. A total of 11,021 units of blood were received in the blood transfusion unit within this period out of which 1491 (13.5%) donor blood samples were found unfit for transfusion and, hence, discarded. Commercial blood donation accounted for 95.3%, compared to 4.7% from replacement and volunteer donors. Commercial blood donation was a major risk factor for likely disposal of donor blood (chi2 = 74.3, p < 0.0001, OR = 21.1. 95% CI = 7.8-56.7). Expired units of blood with low PCV were discarded for lack of infrastructure to fractionate and store them. Over 0.8million naira (US$6000.00) is wasted annually on discarded units of donor blood mainly from commercial donors. A policy on blood procurement to include subgroup selection of donors and improved funding of blood banking services may enhance efficient and effective utilisation of donor blood.

  18. (C)ces haplotype screening in Tunisian blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Hajer; Ghommen, Néjiba; Romdhane, Houda; Abdelkefi, Saadia; Chakroun, Taher; Houissa, Batoul; Jemni, Saloua Yacoub

    2014-01-01

    Background The (C)ces haplotype, mainly found in black individuals, contains two altered genes: a hybrid RHD-CE-Ds gene segregated with a ces allele of RHCE with two single nucleotide polymorphisms, c. 733C>G (p.Leu245Val) in exon 5 and c. 1006G>T (Gly336Cys) in exon 7. This haplotype could be responsible for false positive genotyping results in RhD-negative individuals and at a homozygous level lead to the loss of a high incidence antigen RH34. The aim of this study was to screen for the (C)ces haplotype in Tunisian blood donors, given its clinico-biological importance. Material and methods Blood samples were randomly collected from blood donors in the blood transfusion centre of Sousse (Tunisia). A total of 356 RhD-positive and 44 RhD-negative samples were tested for the (C)ces haplotype using two allele-specific primer polymerase chain reactions that detect c. 733C>G (p.Leu245Val) and c. 1006G>T (p. Gly336Cys) substitutions in exon 5 and 7 of the RHCE gene. In addition, the presence of the D-CE hybrid exon 3 was evaluated using a sequence-specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Results Among the 400 individuals only five exhibited the (C)ces haplotype in heterozygosity, for a frequency of 0.625%. On the basis of the allele-specific primer polymerase chain reaction results, the difference in (C)ces haplotype frequency was not statistically significant between RhD-positive and RhD-negative blood donors. Discussion These data showed the presence of the (C)ces haplotype at a low frequency (0.625%) compared to that among Africans in whom it is common. Nevertheless, the presence of RHD-CE-Ds in Tunisians, even at a lower frequency, should be considered in the development of a molecular genotyping strategy for Rh genes, to ensure better management of the prevention of alloimmunisation. PMID:24333089

  19. [Prevalence of human herpesvirus 7 in Mexican blood donors].

    PubMed

    Rojo Medina, J; Krueger, G R; Bonifaz Gracias, R; Berneman, Z; Koch, B

    1995-01-01

    The human herpes virus 7 (HHV-7) has been recently isolated from CD4 cells of healthy persons. The present study describes the antibody prevalence of this virus in a healthy Mexican population. Two hundred blood samples from candidates for blood donation at the Hospital General de Mexico were studied with the indirect immunofluorescence test (IFA) in HHV-7 infected SupT1 cells. The testing was done in the University of Cologne, Germany; 167 were males and 33 female; the donors came from 12 of the 31 states in the Mexican republican, predominantly from Mexico City (60.5%) and the State of Mexico (28%). Their mean age was 29.2 years. All but three samples were positive to the HHV-7 (98.5% positivity). Nearly 85% had high titers (> or = 1:80). Other serology testing in the samples revealed 1% positive tests to hepatitis B, 2% to syphilis, and 0.5% to brucella. Hepatitis C and the HIV test were negative in all. The high prevalence of HHV-7 in our donor population should be further studied in order to determine titers indicative of an active infection and of their association with illnesses.

  20. Seroepidemiology of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-I in blood donors of Northeastern Iran, Sabzevar

    PubMed Central

    Maghsudlu, Mahtab; Safabakhsh, Hamidreza; Jamili, Parastoo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I) infection is considered as a public health challenge in endemic areas. The virus is associated with severe diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. One of the major routes of the HTLV-I transmission includes blood transfusion. Sabzevar is located in the endemic region of HTLV-I infection. The aim of the present study was to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-I infection in the blood donors in Sabzevar. Materials and Methods: A total of 35,067 blood donors in Sabzevar from March 2009 to April 2012 who were screened with HTLV-I on the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay screening test were included in this survey. Reactive samples that confirmed by western blot were considered to be seropositive cases. The required data were obtained from blood donors’ database of blood transfusion service. Results: The overall prevalence of HTLV-1 based on the positive result of western blot test was 0.14%. The seropositive donors aged 17–59 years with a mean age of 38.10 ± 11.82. The prevalence rates of HTLV-I infection in 3 years of study were 0.19%, 0.14%, and 0.09%, respectively. A significant relation between age, sex, educational level, and history of blood donation was observed with seropositivity of HTLV-I. Conclusion: The improvement of donor selection and laboratory screening caused a decline in the prevalence of infection in blood donors. Given the lower prevalence of infection in regular donors with lower age and higher educational level, more efforts should be done to attract blood donors from these populations. PMID:26420946

  1. Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors: Analysis of Enrollment Data from the REDS-II Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Ritchard G.; Glynn, Simone A.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Mast, Alan E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Murphy, Edward L.; Wright, David J.; Sacher, Ronald A.; Gottschall, Jerry L.; Vij, Vibha; Simon, Toby L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Regular blood donors are at risk of iron deficiency, but characteristics which predispose to this condition are poorly defined. Methods 2425 red cell donors, either first time (FT) or reactivated donors (no donations for 2 years) or frequent donors were recruited for follow-up. At enrollment, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and hemoglobin were determined. Donor variables included demographics, smoking, dietary intake, use of iron supplements, and menstrual/pregnancy history. Models to predict two measures of iron deficiency were developed: Absent iron stores (AIS) were indicated by ferritin < 12 ng/mL and iron deficient erythropoiesis (IDE) by log (sTfR/ferritin) ≥ 2.07. Results 15.0% of donors had AIS, 41.7% IDE. In frequent donors, 16.4% and 48.7% of males had AIS and IDE, respectively, with corresponding proportions of 27.1% and 66.1% for females. Donation intensity was most closely associated with AIS/IDE (ORs from 5.3 to 52.2 for different donation intensity compared to FT donors). Being female, younger, and/or menstruating also increased the likelihood of having AIS/IDE, as did having a lower weight. Marginally significant variables for AIS and/or IDE were being a non-smoker, previous pregnancy and not taking iron supplements. Dietary variables were in general unrelated to AIS/IDE, as was race/ethnicity. Conclusion A large proportion of both female and male frequent blood donors have iron depletion. Donation intensity, gender/menstrual status, weight, and age are important independent predictors of AIS/IDE. Reducing the frequency of blood donation is likely to reduce the prevalence of iron deficiency among blood donors, as might implementing routine iron supplementation. PMID:20804527

  2. Umbilical cord blood transplantation in adult myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tse, W W; Zang, S L; Bunting, K D; Laughlin, M J

    2008-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is a life-saving procedure for hematopoietic malignancies, marrow failure syndromes and hereditary immunodeficiency disorders. However, wide application of this procedure is limited by availability of suitable human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched adult donors. Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been increasingly used as an alternative HSC source for patients lacking matched-HSC donors. The clinical experience of using UCB transplantation to treat pediatric acute leukemias has already shown that higher-level HLA-mismatched UCB can be equally as good as or even better than matched HSC. Recently, large registries and multiple single institutional studies conclusively demonstrated that UCB is an acceptable source of HSCs for adult acute leukemia patients who lack HLA-matched donors. These studies will impact the future clinical allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is the most common acute leukemia in adults. UCB has unique advantages of easy procurement, absence of risk to donors, low risk of transmitting infections, immediate availability, greater tolerance of HLA disparity and lower-than-expected incidence of severe graft-versus-host disease. These features of UCB permit successful transplantation available to almost every patient who needs it. We anticipate that using UCB as a HSC source for allogeneic transplantation for adult AML will increase dramatically over the next 5 years, by expanding the available allogeneic donor pool. Clinical studies are needed with focus on disease-specific UCB transplantation outcomes, including AML, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and lymphoma.

  3. Cutaneous Manifestations in HTLV-I Positive Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Maleki, Masoud; Joneidi, Nasaibe; Khalighi, Amir Reza; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza; Khajedaluee, Mohammad; Tehranian, Farahnaz; Shahabi, Majid; Esmaeil Khayami, Mohammad; Livani, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Infection with the human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-I (HTLV-I) is endemic in Mashhad, Iran. In our research we evaluated the relation between exposure to this infection and the occurrence of dermatologic manifestations. Materials and Methods: 100 blood donors, who were seropositive but asymptomatic for infection with HTLV-I, were selected as case group. They were identified by the Blood Transfusion Organization Mashhad via the ELISA test and documented by PCR. Another 100 blood donors, that were seronegative for HTLV-I via the ELISA test and who were matched to the case group for age, gender, and existence of systemic diseases, were considered as the controls. Dermatologic evaluations and skin biopsies were performed if deemed necessary, and the results were statistically analyzed. Results: 73% of the case and control groups were male, while 27% in each of these groups were female. The mean age in both groups was 40.96±11.94 years. The examination indicated that 58% of the case group and 37% of the control group had cutaneous manifestations (P<0.01). The most common diseases found in the case group were aphthous stomatitis, herpes labialis, and non-genital warts, while common diseases found in the control group were herpes labialis, aphthous stomatitis, and skin tag. The frequency of aphthous stomatitis, eczema, and non-genital warts in the case group were significantly more than the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion : Cutaneous diseases can be found more frequent in asymptomatic carriers of HTLV-I than those who are HTLV-I seronegative. The aphthous stomatitis, eczema, and non-genital warts are more prevalent in those infected by HTLV-I. PMID:24470876

  4. Screening for insulitis in adult autoantibody-positive organ donors.

    PubMed

    In't Veld, Peter; Lievens, Dirk; De Grijse, Joeri; Ling, Zhidong; Van der Auwera, Bart; Pipeleers-Marichal, Miriam; Gorus, Frans; Pipeleers, Daniel

    2007-09-01

    Antibodies against islet cell antigens are used as predictive markers of type 1 diabetes, but it is unknown whether they reflect an ongoing autoimmune process in islet tissue. We investigated whether organs from adult donors that are positive for autoantibodies (aAbs) against islet cell antigens exhibit insulitis and/or a reduced beta-cell mass. Serum from 1,507 organ donors (age 25-60 years) was analyzed for islet cell antibodies (ICAs), glutamate decarboxylase aAbs (GADAs), insulinoma-associated protein 2 aAbs (IA-2As), and insulin aAbs. Tissue from the 62 aAb+ donors (4.1%) and from matched controls was examined for the presence of insulitis and for the relative area of insulin+ cells. Insulitis was detected in two cases; it was found in 3 and 9% of the islets and consisted of CD3+/CD8+ T-cells and CD68+ macrophages; in one case, it was associated with insulin+ cells that expressed the proliferation marker Ki67. Both subjects belonged to the subgroup of three donors with positivity for ICA, GADA, and IA-2-Ab and for the susceptible HLA-DQ genotype. Comparison of relative beta-cell area in aAb+ and aAb- donors did not show a significant difference. Insulitis was found in two of the three cases that presented at least three aAbs but in none of the other 59 antibody+ subjects or 62 matched controls. It was only detected in <10% of the islets, some of which presented signs of beta-cell proliferation. No decrease in beta-cell mass was detected in cases with insulitis or in the group of antibody+ subjects.

  5. Prevalence of IgG diphtheria antitoxin in blood donors in Rio de Janeiro.

    PubMed

    Damasco, P V; Pimenta, F P; Filardy, A A; Brito, S M; Andrade, A F B; Lopes, G S; Hirata, R; Mattos-Guaraldi, A L

    2005-10-01

    The lack of information on the immunity of adults in Brazil against diphtheria prompted us to analyse sera from 234 blood donors aged 18-61 years (30.3% females and 69.7% males). IgG diphtheria antitoxin levels determined by means of an ELISA, validated by toxin neutralization test in Vero cells, showed that 30.7% (95% CI 25.0-37.1) of the population was fully protected (>or=1 IU/ml). The highest percentage of subjects fully protected was in the 31-40 years age group. Most of the subjects with uncertain or no protection (<1 IU/ml) were found in the 18-30 years age group (43.8%, OR 2.18, P=0.01). Antitoxin levels were not influenced by the increase in age. Males were more protected than females (80.5%, OR 0.44, P=0.01). The prevalence of 30% of individuals fully protected against diphtheria in blood donors in Rio de Janeiro supports the fact that immunity to diphtheria among healthy Brazilian adults is inadequate. To avoid diphtheria epidemics in the future the immunity among adults should be raised in the coming years.

  6. [Prevalence of antitoxoplasma antibodies in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and blood donors in Bamako].

    PubMed

    Maïga, I; Kiemtoré, P; Tounkara, A

    2001-08-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a cosmopolitan disease. Our aim was to evaluate the epidemiological importance of toxoplasmosis in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and blood donors in Bamako (Mali, West Africa). A one year study of toxoplasmosis prevalence was carried out among patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and blood donors in Bamako. The toxoplasmosis prevalence was 60% from AIDS patients, 22.6% from the HIV-seropositive blood donors and 21% from the HIV-seronegative blood donors. The specific antibodies were IgG and IgA. The specific IgM were not detected.

  7. Genotyping of 28 blood group alleles in blood donors from Mali: Prediction of rare phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Ba, Alhassane; Bagayoko, Seydou; Chiaroni, Jacques; Baiily, Pascal; Silvy, Monique

    2016-04-01

    We determined the frequencies of clinically relevant blood group alleles in 300 blood donors from Mali. Multiplex test based on xMAP technology was used to investigate six blood group systems (RH, KEL, MNS, FY, JK, DO, HPA) and complementary analysis were conducted for MNS and RH systems. Polymorphisms that affect the specificity of molecular tests leading to discrepant genotype results are discussed. Antigen expressions were predicted showing that 50% of donors expressed at least one traditional low prevalence antigen, and 11.6% lacked the ability to express at least one high prevalence antigen compatible with Dob-, HPA1a-, S-s-U-, Jsb-, RH:-31 and/or RH:-34 phenotypes.

  8. Donor demographic and laboratory predictors of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in an ethnically diverse population.

    PubMed

    Vasu, Sumithira; Leitman, Susan F; Tisdale, John F; Hsieh, Matthew M; Childs, Richard W; Barrett, A John; Fowler, Daniel H; Bishop, Michael R; Kang, Elizabeth M; Malech, Harry L; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Khuu, Hanh M; Wesley, Robert; Yau, Yu Y; Bolan, Charles D

    2008-09-01

    A reliable estimate of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may identify donors at risk for poor mobilization and help optimize transplantation approaches. We studied 639 allogeneic PBSC collections performed in 412 white, 75 black, 116 Hispanic, and 36 Asian/Pacific adult donors who were prescribed G-CSF dosed at either 10 or 16 microg/kg per day for 5 days followed by large-volume leukapheresis (LVL). Additional LVL (mean, 11 L) to collect lymphocytes for donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) and other therapies was performed before G-CSF administration in 299 of these donors. Day 5 preapheresis blood CD34(+) cell counts after mobilization were significantly lower in whites compared with blacks, Hispanics, and Asian/Pacific donors (79 vs 104, 94, and 101 cells/microL, P < .001). In addition, donors who underwent lymphapheresis before mobilization had higher CD34(+) cell counts than donors who did not (94 vs 79 cells/microL, P < .001). In multivariate analysis, higher post-G-CSF CD34(+) cell counts were most strongly associated with the total amount of G-CSF received, followed by the pre-G-CSF platelet count, pre-G-CSF mononuclear count, and performance of prior LVL for DLI collection. Age, white ethnicity, and female gender were associated with significantly lower post-G-CSF CD34(+) cell counts.

  9. Donor demographic and laboratory predictors of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in an ethnically diverse population

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Sumithira; Leitman, Susan F.; Tisdale, John F.; Hsieh, Matthew M.; Childs, Richard W.; Barrett, A. John; Fowler, Daniel H.; Bishop, Michael R.; Kang, Elizabeth M.; Malech, Harry L.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Khuu, Hanh M.; Wesley, Robert; Yau, Yu Y.

    2008-01-01

    A reliable estimate of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may identify donors at risk for poor mobilization and help optimize transplantation approaches. We studied 639 allogeneic PBSC collections performed in 412 white, 75 black, 116 Hispanic, and 36 Asian/Pacific adult donors who were prescribed G-CSF dosed at either 10 or 16 μg/kg per day for 5 days followed by large-volume leukapheresis (LVL). Additional LVL (mean, 11 L) to collect lymphocytes for donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) and other therapies was performed before G-CSF administration in 299 of these donors. Day 5 preapheresis blood CD34+ cell counts after mobilization were significantly lower in whites compared with blacks, Hispanics, and Asian/Pacific donors (79 vs 104, 94, and 101 cells/μL, P < .001). In addition, donors who underwent lymphapheresis before mobilization had higher CD34+ cell counts than donors who did not (94 vs 79 cells/μL, P < .001). In multivariate analysis, higher post–G-CSF CD34+ cell counts were most strongly associated with the total amount of G-CSF received, followed by the pre–G-CSF platelet count, pre–G-CSF mononuclear count, and performance of prior LVL for DLI collection. Age, white ethnicity, and female gender were associated with significantly lower post–G-CSF CD34+ cell counts. PMID:18523146

  10. Adverse Reactions in Allogeneic Blood Donors: A Tertiary Care Experience from a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Sadia; Baig, Mohammad Amjad; Irfan, Syed Mohammed; Ahmed, Syed Ijlal; Hasan, Syeda Faiza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Fragmented blood transfusion services along with an unmotivated blood donation culture often leads to blood shortage. Donor retention is crucial to meet the increasing blood demand, and adverse donor reactions have a negative impact on donor return. The aim of this study was to estimate adverse donor reactions and identify any demographic association.   Methods We conducted a prospective study between January 2011 and December 2013. A total of 41,759 healthy donors were enrolled. Professionally trained donor attendants drew blood and all donors were observed during and following donation for possible adverse events for 20 minutes. Blood donors were asked to report if they suffered from any delayed adverse consequences.   Results Out of 41,759 blood donors, 537 (1.3%) experienced adverse reactions. The incidence was one in every 78 donations. The mean age of donors who experienced adverse events was 26.0±6.8 years, and all were male. Out of 537 donors, 429 (80%) developed vasovagal reaction (VVR), 133 (25%) had nausea, 63 (12%) fainted, 35 (6%) developed hyperventilation, 9 (2%) had delayed syncope, and 9 (2%) developed hematoma. Arterial prick, nerve injury, cardiac arrest, and seizures were not observed. Donors aged less than < 30 years and weighing < 70 kg were significantly associated with VVR, hyperventilation, and nausea (p < 0.005). Undergraduates and Urdu speaking donors also had a significant association with fainting and nausea, respectively (p < 0.05).   Conclusion The prevalence of adverse events was low at our tertiary center. A VVR was the predominant adverse reaction and was associated with age and weight. Our study highlights the importance of these parameters in the donation process. A well-trained and experienced phlebotomist and pre-evaluation counseling of blood donors could further minimize the adverse reactions. PMID:27168923

  11. Assessing anxiety levels and empathic tendency in blood and platelet donors.

    PubMed

    Kılıç, Suar Çakı; Doğan, Erdoğan; Sevimligül, Gülgün; Yücel, Birsen; Bolat, Fatih; Kavakçı, Onder; Sencan, Mehmet

    2013-06-01

    In spite of a constantly-increasing requirement for blood transfusion in the world, blood donation does not exhibit an increase at the same rate. In Turkey with a population of 74 million, only 15 per 10,000 people donate blood regularly and rate of voluntary blood donation is very low compared to developed countries. The aim of this study is to determine empathic level of donors and anxiety levels of blood and platelet donors and also to enable comfort and motivation of donors by taking precautions for reducing their anxieties. This prospective and descriptive study was conducted with 100 voluntary donors (50 blood donors, 50 platelet donors) who admitted to Blood Centre of Cumhuriyet University Hospital between 15 March 2012 and 30 April 2012. Average age of these donors was 27 (19-48)years. The mean scores of donors from Empathic Tendency Scale (ETS), State Anxiety Invertory (SAI) and Trait Anxiety Inventory (TAI) were 70 (49-83), 40 (33-45) and 34 (30-44), respectively. ETS score of those donating blood/platelet for the first time was low, >1 is higher in those who donated previously. SAI and TAI scores of blood donors were higher than those of platelet donors (p<0.001) and TAI score was higher in those who donate for the first time (p<0.007) compared to previously donated precipitants. In conclusion, this study underscores that the request of the donor to help others is the most important factor for donation. People frequently donate blood to unfamiliar people and recurring blood donations increase the level of empathy. Donation made during the continuous disclosure is an important factor for being a donor.

  12. [Problems of insufficient number of voluntary blood donors among student youth population in Belgrade].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, D; Gligorović, P; Budisin, Z

    1995-01-01

    The study included 71,918 individuals (70,093 Belgrade University students, 1,325 individuals that donated blood once, 500 individuals that donated blood from 5 to 100 times). The following results of the study were obtained: among voluntary blood donors in Belgrade, in 1991, only 1.02% were students; students comprise 1.66% of the first blood-donor-population; in 1990 among multiblood-donors-population (>5 donations) 1.44% were students; during 1991/92 school year among secondary school pupils there were 14.62% blood donors, that is 1.333% more compared to the group of university students; every fourth secondary school pupil continued to donate blood during his/her university studies. A programme for the formation of the Students voluntary blood donor assocation in all university schools in Belgrade, is also presented.

  13. Motivation and Social Capital among prospective blood donors in three large blood centers in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalez, Thelma T.; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Claudia; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara F.; Moreno, Elizabeth C.; Miranda, Carolina; Larsen, Nina; Wright, David; Leão, Silvana; Loureiro, Paula; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Lopes, Maria-Inês; Proietti, Fernando A.; Custer, Brian; Sabino, Ester

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies analyzing motivation factors that lead to blood donation have found altruism to be the primary motivation factor; however social capital has not been analyzed in this context. Our study examines the association between motivation factors (altruism, self-interest and response to direct appeal) and social capital (cognitive and structural) across three large blood centers in Brazil. Study Design and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 7,635 donor candidates from October 15 through November 20, 2009. Participants completed self-administered questionnaires on demographics, previous blood donation, HIV testing and knowledge, social capital and donor motivations. Enrollment was determined prior to the donor screening process. Results Among participants, 43.5% and 41.7% expressed high levels of altruism and response to direct appeal respectively, while only 26.9% expressed high levels of self-interest. More high self-interest was observed at Hemope-Recife (41.7%). Of participants, 37.4% expressed high levels of cognitive social capital while 19.2% expressed high levels of structural social capital. More high cognitive and structural social capital was observed at Hemope-Recife (47.3% and 21.3%, respectively). High cognitive social capital was associated with high levels of altruism, self-interest and response to direct appeal. Philanthropic and high social altruism was associated with high levels of altruism and response to direct appeal. Conclusion Cognitive and structural social capital and social altruism are associated with altruism and response to direct appeal, while only cognitive social capital is associated with self-interest. Designing marketing campaigns with these aspects in mind may help blood banks attract potential blood donors more efficiently. PMID:22998740

  14. Preoperative Thromboelastometry as a Predictor of Transfusion Requirements during Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fayed, Nirmeen; Mourad, Wessam; Yassen, Khaled; Görlinger, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability to predict transfusion requirements may improve perioperative bleeding management as an integral part of a patient blood management program. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate preoperative thromboelastometry as a predictor of transfusion requirements for adult living donor liver transplant recipients. Methods The correlation between preoperative thromboelastometry variables in 100 adult living donor liver transplant recipients and intraoperative blood transfusion requirements was examined by univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis. Thresholds of thromboelastometric parameters for prediction of packed red blood cells (PRBCs), fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements were determined with receiver operating characteristics analysis. The attending anesthetists were blinded to the preoperative thromboelastometric analysis. However, a thromboelastometry-guided transfusion algorithm with predefined trigger values was used intraoperatively. The transfusion triggers in this algorithm did not change during the study period. Results Univariate analysis confirmed significant correlations between PRBCs, FFP, platelets or cryoprecipitate transfusion requirements and most thromboelastometric variables. Backward stepwise logistic regression indicated that EXTEM coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) and INTEM CT, clot formation time (CFT) and MCF are independent predictors for PRBC transfusion. EXTEM CT, CFT and FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for FFP transfusion. Only EXTEM and INTEM MCF were independent predictors of platelet transfusion. EXTEM CFT and MCF, INTEM CT, CFT and MCF as well as FIBTEM MCF are independent predictors for cryoprecipitate transfusion. Thromboelastometry-based regression equation accounted for 63% of PRBC, 83% of FFP, 61% of cryoprecipitate, and 44% of platelet transfusion requirements. Conclusion Preoperative thromboelastometric analysis is

  15. Legionella pneumophila Seropositivity-Associated Factors in Latvian Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Valciņa, Olga; Pūle, Daina; Lucenko, Irina; Krastiņa, Dita; Šteingolde, Žanete; Krūmiņa, Angelika; Bērziņš, Aivars

    2015-01-01

    Continuous environmental exposure of humans to Legionella may induce immune responses and generation of antibodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of Legionella pneumophila serogroups (SG) 1–6 in the general healthy population and identify the associated host-related and environmental risk factors. L. pneumophila SG 1–6 seroprevalence among a total of 2007 blood samples collected from healthy donors was 4.8%. Seroprevalence was higher in women (5.9%) than men (3.3%) and in areas with a larger number of inhabitants, ranging from 3.5% in rural regions to 6.8% in the capital, Riga. Blood samples from inhabitants of apartment buildings tested positive for L. pneumophila in more cases (5.8%) compared to those from inhabitants of single-family homes (2.7%). Residents of buildings with a municipal hot water supply system were more likely to be seropositive for L. pneumophila (OR = 3.16, 95% CI 1.26–7.91). Previous episodes of fever were additionally identified as a risk factor (OR = 2.42, 95% CI 1.43–4.1). In conclusion, centralized hot water supply, female gender and previous episodes of fever were determined as the main factors associated with L. pneumophila seropositivity in our study population. PMID:26703696

  16. Umbilical cord blood as a new and promising source of unrelated-donor hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Newburger, P E; Quesenberry, P J

    1996-02-01

    A rapidly accelerating number of transplantations of hematopoietic stem cells from human umbilical cord blood have been performed for malignancies and for congenital disorders. Umbilical cord blood presents multiple advantages over bone marrow as a source of stem cells. Harvesting presents no donor risk or discomfort, the product carries less likelihood of infectious disease transmission, and collection can be targeted to include minority groups underrepresented in bone marrow donor registries. Furthermore, the interval from initiation of a search to the transplantation procedure has been much shorter than for bone marrow, and the lack of mature T lymphocytes in cord blood reduces the incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease in transplant recipients. Potential problems under current investigations include whether cord blood provides a sufficient quantity of stem cells for adult recipients or an effective level of "graft-versus-leukemia" effect.

  17. Characterization of rubella seronegative females in the zambian blood donor community.

    PubMed

    Mazaba, Mazyanga L; Monze, Mwaka; Babaniyi, Olusegun A; Siziya, Seter; Michelo, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Rubella is an acute, contagious viral infection caused by a teratogenic enveloped single-stranded RNA virus, rubella virus, a member of the togaviridae family. Though causing generally mild infections in children and adults, it is a disease of public health importance in pregnant women causing major problems including abortions, miscarriages, and congenital rubella syndrome in more than 20% of the susceptible population. This study was carried out to determine the characteristics associated with rubella seronegativity among female blood donors in Zambia. Rubella-specific IgG antibody levels were measured in the blood serum. Proportions were compared using the Chi-squared test at the 5% significance level, and magnitudes of associations were determined using the odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval. Of the 124 female blood donors tested for rubella IgG 46.0% were aged <20 years. Overall, 66.7% of the participants had never been married. More than half (62.1%) of the participants resided in rural areas of the country. Of the 114 participants with recorded level of education, 50.1% had at least completed secondary school. Out of 43 participants with recorded current employment status, 44.2% were not working for pay. A total of 10 (8.1%) participants were seronegative to rubella IgG antibodies. No factors were associated with seronegativity. Protection against rubella through natural infection appears inadequate to protect the population, increasing the risk of CRS.

  18. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Types 1 and 2 Seropositivity among Blood Donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank, South Western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Uchenna Tweteise, Patience; Natukunda, Bernard; Bazira, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV 1/2) are retroviruses associated with different pathologies. HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP); HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with a known clinical disease. Both viruses may be transmitted by whole blood transfusion, from mother to child predominantly through breastfeeding, and by sexual contact. Presently, none of the regional blood banks in Uganda perform routine pretransfusion screening for HTLV. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) antibodies among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank in South Western Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2014. Methodology. Consecutive blood samples of 368 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive on a first HTLV-1/2 ELISA were further retested in duplicate using the same ELISA. Of the three hundred and sixty-eight blood donors (229 (62.2%) males and 139 (37.8%) females), only two male donors aged 20 and 21 years were HTLV-1/2 seropositive, representing a prevalence of 0.54%. Conclusion. HTLV-1/2 prevalence is low among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank. Studies among other categories of people at risk for HTLV 1/2 infection should be carried out.

  19. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Types 1 and 2 Seropositivity among Blood Donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank, South Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Uchenna Tweteise, Patience; Natukunda, Bernard; Bazira, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 (HTLV 1/2) are retroviruses associated with different pathologies. HTLV-1 causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP); HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with a known clinical disease. Both viruses may be transmitted by whole blood transfusion, from mother to child predominantly through breastfeeding, and by sexual contact. Presently, none of the regional blood banks in Uganda perform routine pretransfusion screening for HTLV. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) antibodies among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank in South Western Uganda. A cross-sectional study was conducted between June 2014 and September 2014. Methodology. Consecutive blood samples of 368 blood donors were screened for anti-HTLV-1/2 antibodies using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples reactive on a first HTLV-1/2 ELISA were further retested in duplicate using the same ELISA. Of the three hundred and sixty-eight blood donors (229 (62.2%) males and 139 (37.8%) females), only two male donors aged 20 and 21 years were HTLV-1/2 seropositive, representing a prevalence of 0.54%. Conclusion. HTLV-1/2 prevalence is low among blood donors at Mbarara Regional Blood Bank. Studies among other categories of people at risk for HTLV 1/2 infection should be carried out. PMID:27034840

  20. Adult to adult right lobe living donor liver transplantation: does biological relationship matter?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Tan, Yifei; Shen, Shu; Jiang, Li; Yan, Lunan; Yang, Jiayin; Li, Bo; Wen, Tianfu; Zeng, Yong; Wang, WenTao; Xu, Mingqing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The influence of the biological relationship between the donor and the recipient is rarely discussed in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), although it is believed to be an important risk factor in other types of organ transplantations. A total of 272 consecutive patients undergoing adult to adult right lobe LDLT were retrospectively analyzed and stratified into a nonbiologically related (NBR) group (69 patients) and a biologically related (BR) group (203 patients). The preoperative data and postoperative outcomes of both recipients and donors were evaluated. More than two-thirds of the recipients had histories of HBV infection, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was the main reason for the patients undergoing LDLT in both groups. The percentage of female donors in the NBR group was more than the percentage in the BR group (P = 0.000). There were no differences between the groups in postoperative laboratory testing or daily immunosuppression dose, and the complication rates in both the recipient and donor surgeries showed no significant differences. For patients with benign diseases, the cumulative 1-, 3-, 5-, and 10-year survival rate were 92.9% in the 4 periods in the NBR group and 89.1%, 87.6%, 83.7%, and 83.7%, respectively, in BR group, while for the patients diagnosed as HCC, if patients exceeding the Milan criteria were involved, the 5-year survival rate was 41.2%, compared to 82% for patients within the Milan criteria, which was nearly the same as for those with the benign disease. In conclusion, our findings suggested that the biological relationship between the donor and the recipient in adult to adult LDLT was not associated with the short- and long-term outcomes of recipients diagnosed with benign liver diseases and early stage HCC. Moreover, the criteria for patients diagnosed with HCC to undergo LDLT should be restrictively selected. PMID:28121912

  1. Plasma selenium status in a group of Australian blood donors and fresh blood components.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles; Colebourne, Kathryn; Faddy, Helen M; Flower, Robert; Fraser, John F

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess plasma selenium levels in an Australian blood donor population and measure extra-cellular selenium levels in fresh manufactured blood components. Selenium levels were measured using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background correction. The mean plasma selenium level in healthy plasmapharesis donors was 85.6±0.5 μg/L and a regional difference was observed between donors in South East Queensland and Far North Queensland. Although participants had selenium levels within the normal range (55.3-110.5 μg/L), 88.5% had levels below 100 μg/L, a level that has been associated with sub-optimal activity of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Extra-cellular selenium levels in clinical fresh frozen plasma (cFFP) and apheresis-derived platelets (APH Plt) were within the normal range. Packed red blood cells (PRBC) and pooled buffy coat-derived platelets (BC Plt) had levels at the lower limit of detection, which may have clinical implications to the massively transfused patient.

  2. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study (REDS-III): A research program striving to improve blood donor and transfusion recipient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Steven; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L; Shan, Hua; Ness, Paul; Glynn, Simone A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study -III (REDS-III) is a 7-year multicenter transfusion safety research initiative launched in 2011 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Study design The domestic component involves 4 blood centers, 12 hospitals, a data coordinating center, and a central laboratory. The international component consists of distinct programs in Brazil, China, and South Africa which involve US and in-country investigators. Results REDS-III is using two major methods to address key research priorities in blood banking/transfusion medicine. First, there will be numerous analyses of large “core” databases; the international programs have each constructed a donor/donation database while the domestic program has established a detailed research database that links data from blood donors and their donations, the components made from these donations, and data extracts from the electronic medical records of the recipients of these components. Secondly, there are more than 25 focused research protocols involving transfusion recipients, blood donors, or both that are either in progress or scheduled to begin within the next 3 years. Areas of study include transfusion epidemiology and blood utilization; transfusion outcomes; non-infectious transfusion risks; HIV-related safety issues (particularly in the international programs); emerging infectious agents; blood component quality; donor health and safety; and other donor issues. Conclusions It is intended that REDS-III serve as an impetus for more widespread recipient and linked donor-recipient research in the US as well as to help assure a safe and available blood supply in the US and in international locations. PMID:24188564

  3. Survey of the seroprovalence of HTLV I/II in hemodialysis patients and blood donors in Urmia.

    PubMed

    Khameneh, Zakieh Rostamzadeh; Baradaran, Mohammad; Sepehrvand, Nariman

    2008-09-01

    Human T lymphocytotropic virus HTLV is a virus from retroviridae family, and more than 20 million people are infected with this virus worldwide. It can cause leukemia/lymphoma in adults, tropical spastic paralysis, HTLV associated myelopathy, spastic paraparesis, tropical myelopathy (HAM/TSP), and some other nervous system diseases. It is transmitted by means of blood products via blood transfusion. In Iran, except the Great Khorasan region, none of blood products undergo screening for HTLV. Immunodeficiency in HD patients, results in increased risk of infection. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anti-HTLV-I/II antibody among hemo-dialysis patients and healthy blood donors in Urmia, Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 2005 to January 2006 among healthy blood donors and in 2006 among hemodialysis patients. The serum of 2046 blood donors and 95 Hemodialysis patients was checked with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti HTLV-I/II, and positive cases were confirmed by western blot. Three seropositive cases among 95 hemodialysis patients were detected, and only one of them was confirmed by western blot. Of the healthy blood donors 1910 (93.4%) were males and 136 (6.6%) were females. Serum of 1997 (97.6%) subjects was negative, and 49 (2.6%) cases were positive for HTLV by ELISA. Among the positive cases western blot confirmed only 7 (14.3%) persons as HTLV positive, 37 (75.5%) as negative, and 5 (10.2%) as indeterminate. Among the 7 positive cases 6 (85.6%) were infected with HTLV-I, and only one (14.3%) with HTLV-I /II infection. Total Serologic prevalence of HTLV in healthy blood donors was 0.34%. We conclude that such high serologic prevalence in the population of blood donors in Urmia city, suggests the high probability of transmission through blood transfusion, and therefore screening of blood donors for human T-lymphocyte virus is essential in this region. HD patients should be screened for HTLV and positive

  4. The effect of plasmapheresis on blood pressure in voluntary plasma donors

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Bray, M; Wisdom, C; Marier, J F; Mouksassi, M-S; Wada, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Donor plasmapheresis involves the removal of a weight-adjusted volume of plasma and the return of cellular components to the donor. Although plasma volume generally returns to normal, some residual effect on vital signs may be possible. This analysis was performed to determine the possible effects of plasmapheresis on blood pressure. Materials and Methods A 16-week study was conducted to evaluate the effects of plasma donations on cholesterol levels in healthy donors. From this study, the vital signs obtained prior to donation were analysed using statistical and dynamic analytical predictive models. Results Preliminary analyses revealed a change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure from the corresponding baseline values (Pearson Coefficient −0·44 and −0·47, respectively). Statistical models predicted a marked decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure following multiple donations in donors with baseline pressure in the Stage 2 hypertension range with less pronounced decreases predicted in Stage 1 donors. Little or no change in blood pressure was predicted in donors with baseline normal blood pressure or prehypertension. Dynamic models including time between donations supported these results and predicted a recovery period of about 14 days without donation in donors with Stage 2 baseline levels. Conclusions Results suggest that systolic and diastolic blood pressure may be decreased following plasmapheresis used for plasma donations at intervals of <14 days in donors with high baseline blood pressure levels. PMID:25169580

  5. Screening of blood donors for IgA deficiency: a study of the donor population of south-west England.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, P D; Tandy, N P; Anstee, D J

    1977-01-01

    Altogether 29 745 English blood donors were screened for IgA deficiency by double diffusion analysis; 57 had apparent absence of IgA, a frequency of 1:522. Further examination by the more sensitive haemagglutination inhibition assay revealed 34 samples having no detectable IgA, a frequency of 1:875. All donors negative by double diffusion analysis were tested for the presence of antibodies to IgA. Six class specific anti IgA antibodies and four anti IgA antibodies of limited specificity were detected. Three of these had the specificity anti alpha2 and one anti A2m(2). The 34 IgA deficient donors detected provide a source of IgA deficient blood for transfusion to patients with anti IgA antibodies. PMID:304071

  6. Seroepidemiology of infection with Toxoplasma gondii in healthy blood donors of Durango, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Mercado-Suarez, Miguel Francisco; Rodríguez-Briones, Alfredo; Fallad-Torres, Laura; Ayala-Ayala, Julio Octavio; Nevarez-Piedra, Luis Jorge; Duran-Morales, Ehecatl; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Márquez-Conde, José Ángel; Martínez-García, Sergio Arturo

    2007-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection in blood donors could represent a risk for transmission in blood recipients. There is scarce information about the epidemiology of T. gondii infection in blood donors in Mexico. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalence of T. gondii infection and associated socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics in a population of healthy blood donors of Durango City, Mexico. Methods Four hundred and thirty two blood donors in two public blood banks of Durango City, Mexico were examined for T. gondii infection between August to September 2006. Blood donors were tested for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by using enzyme-linked immunoassays (Diagnostic Automation Inc., Calabasas, CA, USA). Socio-demographic and behavioral characteristics from each participant were also obtained. Results Thirty two (7.4%) of 432 blood donors had IgG anti-T. gondii antibodies. Eight (1.9%) of them had also IgM anti-T. gondii antibodies. Multivariate analysis using logic regression showed that T. gondii infection was associated with the presence of cats at home (adjusted OR = 3.81; 95% CI: 1.45–10.01). The age group of 45–60 years showed a significantly higher frequency of T. gondii infection than the group of 25–34 years (p = 0.02). Blood donors without education had a significantly higher frequency of infection (15.8%) than those with 13–19 years of education (4.5%) (p = 0.04). Other characteristics of blood donors including male gender, consumption of undercooked meat or blood transfusion did not show an association with infection. Conclusion The prevalence of T. gondii infection in healthy blood donors of Durango City, Mexico is lower than those reported in blood donors of south and central Mexico, and is one of the lowest reported in blood donors worldwide. T. gondii infection in our blood donors was most likely acquired by contact with cats. Prevalence of infection increased with age and decreased with educational

  7. Collaboration between hematopoietic stem cell donor registry and cord blood banks.

    PubMed

    Raffoux, C

    2010-10-01

    Despite the huge number of volunteer donors registered worldwide, only a mean of 50% of patients not having a family donor are transplanted with an unrelated donor. Since 1990, a network has been implemented among some European registries. With the help of the European Community, a more sophisticated network has been developed, the European Marrow Donor Information System (EMDIS). A new project underwent development by registries and the Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide: the EMDIS Cord Blood Registry. It will in the future permit to obtain after a search request, one report containing all of the best donors worldwide and best umbilic cord blood for each patient, taking into account possible double cord blood transplantations and other factors, such as number of nucleated cells, number of CD34+ cells, and methods of reduction. Only a strong collaboration between all hematopoietic stem cell registries and cord blood banks would allow a Registry to propose the best donor/cord blood unit for each patient in each country. Progress in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be obtained by the parallel development of cord blood banks worldwide and bone marrow donor registries among countries that include minorities.

  8. Whole blood and apheresis donors in Quebec, Canada: Demographic differences and motivations to donate.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Johanne; Cloutier, Marie-Soleil; Carrier, Élianne

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to compare demographics and donation motivations among plasma/platelet donors (PPDs) and whole blood donors (WBDs), in a voluntary and non-remunerated context. Motives to donate blood and demographic characteristics were collected through questionnaires completed by 795 WBDs and 473 PPDs. Comparison of WBDs and PPDs under chi-square tests showed that 17 out of 23 motivators were statistically different according to various demographic variables. These results demonstrate the existence of specific donor profiles both for WBDs and PPDs. Agencies should develop new recruitment strategies tailored to these donors, especially if they wish to convince WBDs to convert to apheresis donation.

  9. Effects of plateletpheresis on blood coagulation parameters in healthy donors at National Blood Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Siti Nadiah, A K; Nor Asiah, M; Nur Syimah, A T; Normi, M; Anza, E; Aini, A Nor; Mohd Zahari, T H; Shahnaz, M; Faraizah, A K; Faisal, M A

    2013-12-01

    Plateletpheresis is a method used to remove platelet from the body either from random volunteer donors, patient's family members or HLA matched donors. A cross sectional study was carried out on 59 plateletpheresis donors aged between 18 and 55 years at National Blood Center (NBC), Kuala Lumpur. We compared the blood parameters before and after plateletpheresis and we found that the platelet count, FVIII, fibrinogen and thrombophilia markers anti-thrombin (AT), protein C and protein S were significantly reduced (p<0.05) with prolonged PT and APTT. There were significant changes in blood coagulation parameters but it is within acceptable range.

  10. Left lobe living donor liver transplantation in adults: What is the safety limit?

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toru; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Sakata, Kazuhito; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Harimoto, Norifumi; Harada, Noboru; Itoh, Shinji; Nagatsu, Akihisa; Soejima, Yuji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Small-for-size syndrome (SFSS) is the most significant cause of graft loss after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), especially after left lobe (LL) LDLT in adults. The safety limit of applying LL-LDLT in adults without severe SFSS with a high rate of lethality needs to be determined. A total of 207 LL-LDLTs in adults since September 2005 were evaluated to analyze the risk factors for severe SFSS, defined as a serum total bilirubin concentration of ≥20.0 mg/dL after LDLT. Although there were no significant differences in cumulative graft survival after LDLT between medium grafts (graft volume [GV] to standard liver volume [SLV] ratio ≥ 40.0%), small grafts (35.0% ≤ GV/SLV < 40.0%), and extra small grafts (GV/SLV < 35.0%), patients with severe SFSS showed a significantly lower 5-year graft survival rate than those without (42.9% versus 94.3%, respectively; P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis for severe SFSS after LL-LDLT showed that donor age of ≥48 years (P = 0.01), Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of ≥ 19 (P < 0.01), and end portal venous pressure of ≥19 mm Hg (P = 0.04) were the significant and independent factors for severe SFSS after LL-LDLT. Within such high-risk subgroups of patients with a donor age of ≥48 years or MELD score of ≥ 19 before LDLT, operative blood loss volume of ≥8.0 L was a risk factor for severe SFSS. LL-LDLT in adults could be indicated and provide acceptable outcomes for the combinations of donors aged < 48 years and recipients with a MELD score of <19. Smaller grafts might yield acceptable outcomes in appropriately selected donor-recipient combinations. Liver Transplantation 22 1666-1675 2016 AASLD.

  11. Prevalence of Syphilis among Blood and Stem Cell Donors in Saudi Arabia: An Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Elyamany, Ghaleb; Al amro, Mohamed; Pereira, Winston Costa; Alsuhaibani, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syphilis is one of the known transfusion-transmissible infections and causes 100,000 deaths yearly, with around 90% of these deaths occurring in the developing world. Little data is available regarding the prevalence of syphilis among Saudi blood and stem cell donors. We conducted a survey on the incidence of syphilis among all blood and stem cell donors. Methods This study was conducted at the Prince Sultan Military Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in the 10 years period data during 2006–2015. Data were analyzed about full history, physical examination, age, sex, weight, profession, marital status, number of the donations, data of last donation, having a relation who received blood transfusion, as well as the screening test results of the donated blood. We determined the seroprevalence of infection and compared by sex and other variable through frequency analysis, Chi square, Fisher, and prevalence ratios. Results Approximately 240,000 blood donors were screened and studied in the period of study. Most of the blood donors were male (98.3%) and 89% of them were citizens of Saudi Arabia. According to our findings, we estimated that, in the last 10 years, approximately 0.044% of all the blood donors were syphilis positive cases. No cases were detected as positive for syphilis among stem cell donors. Only 60 blood donors tested positive for syphilis. In addition, we studied 202 stem cell transplant donors during the same period, of which 59% were male and none texted positive for syphilis. Conclusions A concerted effort between the government, health care providers, regulatory bodies and accreditation agencies have all contributed in eliminating the risk of spreading syphilis among blood donors. PMID:27757184

  12. Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation: Operative techniques to optimize the recipient's outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Peng Soon; Chan, See Ching

    2017-01-01

    Adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is widely accepted today with good outcomes and safety reported worldwide for both donor and recipient. Nonetheless, it remained a highly demanding technical and complex surgery if undertaken. The last two decades have seen an increased in adult-to-adult LDLT following our first report of right lobe LDLT in overcoming graft size limitation in adults. In this article, we discussed the operative techniques and challenges of adult right lobe LDLT incorporating the middle hepatic vein, which is practiced in our center for the recipient operation. The various issues and challenges faced by the transplant surgeon in ensuring good recipient outcome are explored and discussed here as well. Hence, it is important to understand that a successful recipient operation is dependent of multifactorial events starting at the preoperative stage of planning, understanding the intraoperative technical challenges and the physiology of flow modulation that goes hand-in-hand with the operation. Therefore, one needs to arm oneself with all the possible knowledge in overcoming these technical challenges and the ability to be flexible and adaptable during LDLT by tailoring the needs of each patient individually. PMID:28250667

  13. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators.

  14. Occult hepatitis B viral infection among blood donors in South–Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Nna, Emmanuel; Mbamalu, Chinenye; Ekejindu, Ifeoma

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is endemic in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria. Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) is a challenging clinical problem characterized by the absence of Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) and low viral DNA load. We aimed at determining the prevalence of OBI among repeat blood donors in Abakaliki, south-eastern Nigeria. Of 113 informed consented repeat blood donors enrolled into the study, 12 donors (10.6%) tested positive to both serological HBsAg screening, anti-HBc total and hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA Nested PCR tests. One donor (0.9%) tested HBsAg positive, anti-HBC positive but Nested PCR negative. All donors were negative for HIV 1 and 2 and HCV infections. Of the 100 HbsAg negative repeat blood donors, 8.0% (eight donors) were HBV DNA positive by nested PCR method and anti-HBc total positive by ELISA. The median viral load, determined by real time PCR-Taqman chemistry, in the OBI blood samples was 51 IU/ml compared to 228 IU/ml of the HBsAg screen positive donors. The observed OBI prevalence of 8.0% corroborated with high endemicity of HBV infection in Abakaliki. We therefore recommend routine HBV DNA testing by real time PCR method on all sero-negative blood donations in Abakaliki and for a similar policy to be evaluated across the sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24995918

  15. A behavior model for blood donors and marketing strategies to retain and attract them

    PubMed Central

    Aldamiz-echevarria, Covadonga; Aguirre-Garcia, Maria Soledad

    2014-01-01

    Objective analyze and propose a theoretical model that describes blood donor decisions to help staff working in blood banks (nurses and others) in their efforts to capture and retain donors. Methods analysis of several studies on the motivations to give blood in Spain over the last six years, as well as past literature on the topic, the authors' experiences in the last 25 years in over 15 Non Governmental Organizations with different levels of responsibilities, their experiences as blood donors and the informal interviews developed during those 25 years. Results a model is proposed with different internal and external factors that influence blood donation, as well as the different stages of the decision-making process. Conclusion the knowledge of the donation process permits the development of marketing strategies that help to increase donors and donations. PMID:25029059

  16. An analysis of the lack of donor pancreas utilization from younger adult organ donors.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Alexander C; Wainright, Jennifer L; Sleeman, Elizabeth; McBride, Maureen A; Baker, Tim; Samana, Ciara; Stock, Peter

    2010-09-15

    Donor pancreas utilization rates for whole organ transplant have remained low and have decreased over time. To identify the reasons for nonuse of pancreas from donors who meet common baseline acceptance criteria, we examined Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network data from 2005 to 2007 and identified a subgroup of 1763 "potential pancreas donors" defined by age (19-40 years), body mass index (<30 kg/m), successful liver donation, and negative viral serology testing, which were not used. We characterize this cohort of potential donors including reasons for refusal, factors that may contribute to pancreas acceptance and function, and potential explanations for the lack of growth in pancreas organ utilization.

  17. [Seroprevalence of viral markers among blood donors at the Blood Donor Center of Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital of Rabat, Morocco].

    PubMed

    Uwingabiye, Jean; Zahid, Hafidi; Unyendje, Loubet; Hadef, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among blood donors at the Blood Donor Center, Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital between 2010 and 2012. We conducted a retrospective study among military blood donors aged 18-50 years, with a male predominance (95%). Pre-donation interview is the first selection barrier for individuals at risk. Biological screening was performed by liquid enzyme immunoassay technique using antibodies and/or antigen. Fourth generation combined HCV and HIV antigen/antibody ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) test was used. The Blood Donor Center and the laboratory of virology used the same technique performed in duplicate to confirm results. Out of 25661 tested samples, the prevalence rate of HBV infections was 3.97 ‰ (n = 102), the prevalence rate of HCV infections was 2.45 ‰ (n = 63) and the prevalence rate of HIV infections was 0.15 ‰ (n = 4). A single case with HBV and HCV virus co-infection (0.039 ‰) was registered, no association between HIV-HBV, HIV-HCV or HBV, HCV and HIV infections was recorded. The low seroprevalence rates of viral markers recorded in our study show improvement in preventive measures for donor selection and screening tests. The registered prevalence encourages the use of combined reagent, which is the only alternative to molecular biology in developing countries.

  18. Blood group genotyping: from patient to high-throughput donor screening.

    PubMed

    Veldhuisen, B; van der Schoot, C E; de Haas, M

    2009-10-01

    Blood group antigens, present on the cell membrane of red blood cells and platelets, can be defined either serologically or predicted based on the genotypes of genes encoding for blood group antigens. At present, the molecular basis of many antigens of the 30 blood group systems and 17 human platelet antigens is known. In many laboratories, blood group genotyping assays are routinely used for diagnostics in cases where patient red cells cannot be used for serological typing due to the presence of auto-antibodies or after recent transfusions. In addition, DNA genotyping is used to support (un)-expected serological findings. Fetal genotyping is routinely performed when there is a risk of alloimmune-mediated red cell or platelet destruction. In case of patient blood group antigen typing, it is important that a genotyping result is quickly available to support the selection of donor blood, and high-throughput of the genotyping method is not a prerequisite. In addition, genotyping of blood donors will be extremely useful to obtain donor blood with rare phenotypes, for example lacking a high-frequency antigen, and to obtain a fully typed donor database to be used for a better matching between recipient and donor to prevent adverse transfusion reactions. Serological typing of large cohorts of donors is a labour-intensive and expensive exercise and hampered by the lack of sufficient amounts of approved typing reagents for all blood group systems of interest. Currently, high-throughput genotyping based on DNA micro-arrays is a very feasible method to obtain a large pool of well-typed blood donors. Several systems for high-throughput blood group genotyping are developed and will be discussed in this review.

  19. Is seroprevalence of HTLV-I/II among blood donors in Lebanon relevant?

    PubMed

    Tamim, Hala; Musharrafieh, Umayya; Ramia, Sami; Almawi, Wassim Y; Al-Jisr, Tamima; Ayoub, Tanios; Nabulsi-Majzoub, Malak; Kazma, Hassan; Baz, Elizabeth Kfoury

    2004-06-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with certain hematologic and neurologic disorders. Seroprevalence studies demonstrated that the distribution of HTLV-I is heterogeneous worldwide and not specific to 1 region. Because blood is one of the major routes of transmission of the virus, blood banks of several countries routinely screen all blood donations for HTLV-I. The aim of the present study was to assess the seroprevalence rate of HTLV-I/II antibodies among Lebanese blood donors. Between August 2001 and March 2002, consecutive blood samples of 3529 blood donors were collected at blood banks of 4 major hospitals in Lebanon. Initial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening resulted in 23 (0.7%) positive samples, of which 12 (0.3%) were reconfirmed positive by ELISA. Further analysis by Western blot resulted in 2 (0.06%) positive samples, of which 1 tested positive for HTLV-I by PCR (0.028%). Although its very low prevalence among Lebanese blood donors does not support routine screening of Lebanese blood donors for HTLV-I, screening of blood donors from other nationalities may be exercised, especially those from HTLV-I endemic areas.

  20. A question of clarity: redesigning the American Association Of Blood Banks blood donor history questionnaire--a chronology and model for donor screening.

    PubMed

    Fridey, Joy L; Townsend, Mary J; Kessler, Debra A; Gregory, Kay R

    2007-07-01

    A new donor history questionnaire, introduced by the American Association of Blood Banks in 2004 and approved by Food and Drug Administration in 2006, is now in widespread use in the United States. The development of this questionnaire involved an in-depth look at the entire system of donor screening questions, and is notable for its use of survey design experts as well as blood banking experts, government agencies, and an ethicist who represented the public interest in developing the actual questions. The end result is a questionnaire that uses capture questions in a time bounded format, donor educational materials, and a medication deferral list. Detailed instructions for donor screeners include follow-up questions in easy-to-follow flow-charts. Most importantly, for the first time in the history of developing donor history questions, all materials were tested for donor comprehension using cognitive interview evaluation. This article discusses the development of the questionnaire, explains the methodology, and describes the thinking and rationale for decisions made during redesign of the questionnaire.

  1. BLISS: a computer program for the protection of blood donors. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Catsimpoolas, N.; Cooke, C.; Valeri, C.R.

    1982-06-28

    A BASIC program has been developed for the Hewlett-Packard Model 9845 desk-top computer which allows the creation of blood donor files for subsequent retrieval, update, and correction. A similar modified version was developed for hte HP 9835 Model. This software system has been called BLISS which stands for Blood Information and Security System. In addition to its function as a file management system, BLISS provides warnings before a donation is performed to protect the donor from excessive exposure to radioactivity and DMSO levels, from too frequent of donations of blood, and from adverse reactions. The program can also be used to select donors who have participated in specific studies and to list the experimental details which have been stored in the file. The BLISS system has been actively utilized at the Naval Blood Research Laboratory in Boston and contains the files of over 750 donors.

  2. Differentiation of Donor-Derived Cells Into Microglia After Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kakuda, Yumiko; Munemoto, Saori; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Nozaki, Ichiro; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recent studies have indicated that microglia originate from immature progenitors in the yolk sac. After birth, microglial populations are maintained under normal conditions via self-renewal without the need to recruit monocyte-derived microglial precursors. Peripheral cell invasion of the brain parenchyma can only occur with disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Here, we report an autopsy case of an umbilical cord blood transplant recipient in whom cells derived from the donor blood differentiated into ramified microglia in the recipient brain parenchyma. Although the blood-brain barrier and glia limitans seemed to prevent invasion of these donor-derived cells, most of the invading donor-derived ramified cells were maintained in the cerebral cortex. This result suggests that invasion of donor-derived cells occurs through the pial membrane. PMID:26226134

  3. Epidemiologic characteristics of blood donors with antibody to human immunodeficiency virus: Thailand.

    PubMed

    Nuchprayoon, C; Tanprasert, S; Chumnijarakij, T; Thanomchat, S; O'Prasert, B; Adulwijit, S

    1995-03-01

    Of 782,190 volunteer blood donors in Bangkok and nearby areas, who were screened for infection with human immunodeficiency type 1 (HIV-1) from January 1988 through December 1992, 3,219 tested positive on both enzyme immuno assay and Western blot assay. The identification variables of the donor were collected. The majority of HIV seropositive blood donors were male. The average age (median) of HIV seropositive was 26-29 years all through 1988-2992. The prevalence of HIV seropositive in male donors was higher than that in females. HIV seropositivity was confirmed in blood donations from first-time male donors in this study during 1988-1992. This rate has increased progressively from 0.87/1,000 in 1988 to 15.95/1,000 in 1992 with much higher rates in repeat donors. The repeat male donors increased from 0.77/1,000 in 1988 to 5.26/1,000 in 1991 and since then showed a decreased rate to 3.93/1,000 in 1992. Female donors were infected with HIV more frequently with the prevalence by sex ratio M:F rising from 27:1 in 1988 to 6.6:1 in 1992. Comparing the seropositive rate between first time and repeat female donors, the results showed an increase in rate from 0.11/1,000 in 1990 to 2.02/1,000 in 1992, but essentially the same rate in report donors. A majority of HIV seropositive blood donors (1990-1992) lived in Bangkok (42-49%) and among those who lived in one eastern province (Samut Prakan), 90-93% lived in the industrial areas. Of those who lived in Chon Buri Province, 73-88% lived in Sattaheep District, which is a naval base.

  4. Vasovagal syncope and blood donor return: examination of the role of experience and affective expectancies.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Etzel, Erin N; Ciesielski, Bethany G

    2010-03-01

    Vasovagal sensations (e.g., dizziness, nausea, and fainting) are one of the main reasons people find blood donation unpleasant. A better understanding of predictors of vasovagal sensations during blood donation could inform interventions designed to increase donor return rates. The present investigation examined the extent to which experience with blood donation and vasovagal sensations during blood donation uniquely predict the likelihood of donor return, even when controlling for affective expectancies. Participants presenting at community blood drives indicated how many times they have given blood and provided ratings of expected anxiety, pain, disgust, as well as fear of fainting before giving blood. After donating, participants completed a measure of vasovagal sensations experienced during blood donation. They also rated the pleasantness of the experience and willingness to donate blood in the future. The findings showed that experience with blood donation and vasovagal sensations during blood donation uniquely predicted willingness to donate blood in the future even when controlling for age and negative affective expectancies about giving blood. This finding suggests that vasovagal sensations and experience with blood donation have unique (and perhaps additive) effects on willingness to donate blood in the future, suggesting that behavior modification interventions that directly target these variables could potentially increase donor retention.

  5. ABO-Incompatible Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Under the Desensitization Protocol With Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Song, G-W; Lee, S-G; Hwang, S; Kim, K-H; Ahn, C-S; Moon, D-B; Ha, T-Y; Jung, D-H; Park, G-C; Kim, W-J; Sin, M-H; Yoon, Y-I; Kang, W-H; Kim, S-H; Tak, E-Y

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility is no longer considered a contraindication for adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT) due to various strategies to overcome the ABO blood group barrier. We report the largest single-center experience of ABO-incompatible (ABOi) ALDLT in 235 adult patients. The desensitization protocol included a single dose of rituximab and total plasma exchange. In addition, local graft infusion therapy, cyclophosphamide, or splenectomy was used for a certain time period, but these treatments were eventually discontinued due to adverse events. There were three cases (1.3%) of in-hospital mortality. The cumulative 3-year graft and patient survival rates were 89.2% and 92.3%, respectively, and were comparable to those of the ABO-compatible group (n = 1301). Despite promising survival outcomes, 17 patients (7.2%) experienced antibody-mediated rejection that manifested as diffuse intrahepatic biliary stricture; six cases required retransplantation, and three patients died. ABOi ALDLT is a feasible method for expanding a living liver donor pool, but the efficacy of the desensitization protocol in targeting B cell immunity should be optimized.

  6. Hepatitis A Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Seroprevalence Among Blood Donors in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Sharafi, Heidar; Keyvani, Hossein; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Najafi-Tireh Shabankareh, Azar; Sharifi Olyaie, Roghiyeh; Keshvari, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and Hepatitis E virus (HEV) are both transmitted by the fecal-oral route and are known as the leading causes of acute viral hepatitis in the world, especially in developing countries. There is a lack of updated data on HAV and HEV seroprevalence in Iran. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HAV and HEV among a group of blood donors in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed from July 2014 to December 2014, on a total of 559 blood donors referred to the Tehran blood transfusion center. The serum samples were tested for antibodies to HAV and HEV, using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In the present study, 536 (95.9%) cases were male and 23 (4.1%) female with mean age of 38 years. Out of 559 blood donors, 107 (19.1%) were first-time donors, 163 (29.2%) lapsed donors and 289 (51.7%) regular donors. Anti-HAV was found in 395 (70.7%) and anti-HEV in 45 (8.1%) of the blood donors. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence increased by age. There was no significant difference between genders in terms of anti-HAV and anti-HEV status. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence was significantly related to the level of education, where the donors with higher level of education had lower rate of HAV and HEV seroprevalence. The HAV and HEV seroprevalence was significantly higher in regular and lapsed donors than in first-time donors. Conclusions The present study showed that both HAV and HEV infections are still endemic in Iran. PMID:27110256

  7. Paying donors and the ethics of blood supply.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez del Pozo, P

    1994-01-01

    Countries may be erring in the current trend towards relying entirely on volunteers to fulfil blood and plasma needs. Complementing uncompensated blood with compensated blood is vitally necessary not only effectively to meet the blood and plasma needs of most countries, but it is also ethically sound. PMID:8035437

  8. Change in haematological and selected biochemical parameters measured in feline blood donors and feline whole blood donated units.

    PubMed

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; Baggiani, Luciana; Bagnagatti De Giorgi, Giada; Ferro, Elisabetta; Perego, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    Objectives The quality of whole blood (WB) units is influenced by many factors, starting with selection of donors and the method of blood collection. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes that occur in haematological and selected biochemical parameters in blood transferred from a feline blood donor to feline WB unit. Methods Data from 27 feline blood donations were used in this study. Cats were anaesthetised with a combination of tiletamine and zolazepam. Blood (10 ml/kg body weight to a maximum of 60 ml/cat) was collected in citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine (CPDA) anticoagulant. Lactated Ringer's solution (10 ml/kg) was administered intravenously starting halfway through the donation. Haematological and selected biochemical parameters (complete blood count, free haemoglobin, % haemolysis, glucose, sodium, potassium, pH) were measured in the blood donor before donation and in the corresponding donated WB unit soon after collection. Results Significant decreases occurred between blood donor and WB unit in red blood cells (mean difference -1.06 × 10(12)/l; P <0.0001), haemoglobin (mean difference -1.6 g/dl; P <0.0001), haematocrit (mean difference -4.6%; P <0.0001), red cell distribution width (mean difference -0.9%; P = 0.0003), white blood cells (mean difference -2.17 × 10(9)/l; P <0.0001), pH (mean difference -0.5; P <0.0001) and potassium (mean difference -1.4 mmol/l; P <0.0001). Significant increases occurred between blood donor and WB unit in platelets (mean difference +87.00 ×10(9)/l; P = 0.0039), glucose (mean difference +25.42 mmol/l; P <0.0001) and sodium (mean difference +20 mmol/l; P <0.0001). Conclusions and relevance When using a blood collection protocol with intravenous fluid administration midway through the donation and a CPDA:blood ratio of 1:7, there were significant changes in both the haematological and biochemical characteristics between the blood donors and WB units. The majority of these changes may be the result of the

  9. Romanian blood donors screening: is it really necessary and/or mandatory?

    PubMed

    Hâţu, Giorgiana; Brumboiu, Maria Irina; Gorgan, Iuliana Nela; Bocşan, I S

    2013-01-01

    Blood services are required to provide the safest possible products, but no transfusion can ever be totally free of the risk of transfusion transmissible infections (TTI). Over the past decade, the risk of TTI through transfusion has been reduced (e.g. 1 in 300 000 for HBV to 1 in 2 million for HIV). With the introduction in 1999 of sensitive and expensive nucleic acid testing (NAT) technology in some countries, the disease transmission rate and the window period have been significantly reduced, but a remaining concern is the chance that a blood donor will be infected and not detected by such tests. To obtain safe blood and blood components it is important to ensure that the donors are healthy and free from TTI by using a donor selection procedure meticulously made, using a donor questionnaire to assess donor health and safety and for reducing the risk of transmission of infection, in particular for infections for which no suitable screening tests are available. In Romania the prevalence of TTI among donor population is high in comparison with other European Union (EU) countries. This may require significant improvements in the screening process of both donors and donations to minimize the infectious risk.

  10. Viral metagenomics applied to blood donors and recipients at high risk for blood-borne infections

    PubMed Central

    Sauvage, Virginie; Laperche, Syria; Cheval, Justine; Muth, Erika; Dubois, Myriam; Boizeau, Laure; Hébert, Charles; Lionnet, François; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Eloit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterisation of human-associated viral communities is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to be able to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. In high-resource countries, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) is currently considered to be under control. However, other unknown or unsuspected viruses may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. To investigate this, the virome of plasma from individuals at high risk for parenterally and sexually transmitted infections was analysed by high throughput sequencing (HTS). Materials and methods Purified nucleic acids from two pools of 50 samples from recipients of multiple transfusions, and three pools containing seven plasma samples from either HBV−, HCV− or HIV-infected blood donors, were submitted to HTS. Results Sequences from resident anelloviruses and HPgV were evidenced in all pools. HBV and HCV sequences were detected in pools containing 3.8×103 IU/mL of HBV-DNA and 1.7×105 IU/mL of HCV-RNA, respectively, whereas no HIV sequence was found in a pool of 150 copies/mL of HIV-RNA. This suggests a lack of sensitivity in HTS performance in detecting low levels of virus. In addition, this study identified other issues, including laboratory contaminants and the uncertainty of taxonomic assignment of short sequence. No sequence suggestive of a new viral species was identified. Discussion This study did not identify any new blood-borne virus in high-risk individuals. However, rare and/or viruses present at very low titre could have escaped our protocol. Our results demonstrate the positive contribution of HTS in the detection of viral sequences in blood donations. PMID:27136432

  11. [Investigation of West Nile virus RNA in blood donors by real-time RT-PCR].

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Fatih; Avcı, Ismail Yaşar; Bedir, Orhan; Koru, Ozgür; Sener, Kenan; Yapar, Mehmet; Kubar, Ayhan

    2012-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a member of Flaviviridae family, is an enveloped, icosahedral symmetric RNA virus. Primary reservoir hosts of WNV are birds, but the virus can cause various infections in humans and other mammals. The most common and natural transmission way of WNV infections is mosquito bites, however, humans can be infected by different routes. The most important non-mosquito transmission route is contaminated blood and blood products. In this study, we aimed to investigate the risk of WNV transmission through blood and blood products in Ankara, Turkey. The presence of WNV RNA was investigated by in house real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in serum samples obtained from 729 healthy blood donors (mean age: 27.7 years; 711 were male), regardless of the donor's seropositivity status since the virus can be transmitted at the early stages of infection when seroconversion has not yet developed. Serum samples were collected in August-September 2009, the period when these infections are more frequent due to mosquito activity. The vast majority of donors (n= 702, 96.3%) have been inhabiting in Ankara and 569 (78%) of donors have had risk factors for arboviral infections (e.g. outdoor activity, mosquito and tick bites). WNV RNA was not detected by real-time RT-PCR analysis in any serum sample included in this study. According to the results of our study, it can be said that the risk of WNV transmission through blood and blood products is low in Ankara. However, WNV seropositivity was detected within the range of 0.56 to 2.4% among blood donors in previous studies and probable and confirmed WNV infections have been reported in our region. In addition, WNV outbreaks have emerged in some countries neighbouring Turkey recently. Thus, the risk of WNV transmission through blood and blood products should not be ignored and blood donor questionnaires should be evaluated in detail.

  12. Measures to decrease the risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome transmission by blood transfusion. Evidence of volunteer blood donor cooperation.

    PubMed

    Pindyck, J; Waldman, A; Zang, E; Oleszko, W; Lowy, M; Bianco, C

    1985-01-01

    We studied whether volunteers giving blood to the Greater New York Blood Program (GNYBP) cooperated with procedures implementing public health recommendations intended to decrease the risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) transmission by blood transfusion. Predonation medical screening was expanded to exclude donors who might be ill with AIDS. To exclude possible asymptomatic carriers of the disease, members of groups at increased risk of AIDS were asked either not to give blood or to give it for laboratory studies. A confidential questionnaire, administered to all donors after medical screening, provided the vehicle for donors to advise the GNYBP whether their donation was for laboratory studies or for patient transfusion. We found that the number of male donors decreased; AIDS-related questions in medical history led to a 2 percent increase in donor rejections; 97 percent of donors said their blood could be used for transfusions; 1.4 percent said their blood could be used for laboratory studies only; and 1.6 percent did not respond. Only units designated for transfusion were released to hospitals. People who indicated that their donation was for laboratory studies had a higher prevalence of markers for hepatitis B virus and of antibodies to cytomegalovirus. White cell counts and helper/suppressor T lymphocyte ratios were not significantly different in the two groups. We conclude that volunteer donors have cooperated with the established procedures. None of the laboratory assays identified blood units donated by individuals who, based on information about AIDS high-risk groups, designated their donation for laboratory studies.

  13. Phenotypic Profile of Rh and Kell Blood Group Systems among Blood Donors in Cote d'Ivoire, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Siransy Bogui, L.; Dembele, B.; Sekongo, Y.; Abisse, S.; Konaté, S.; Sombo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Few countries in sub-Saharan Africa make systematic searches for antigens C, c, E, and e of the Rh and Kell system antigens in the donor and recipient, thereby exposing transfused patients. Purpose and Objectives. In this paper, we propose to determine the red cell Rh and Kell blood groups among blood donors from traditional techniques to improve medical care of transfused patients. This study will allow us to assess the frequency of blood group antigens in these systems. Study Design and Methods. We carried out a study on the red cell typing in the blood donor population of the National Blood Transfusion Center in Abidjan. This study was performed on 651 blood donors. Results. For the Rh system, the antigen frequencies of D, c, e, C, and E are, respectively, 92.93%, 99.85%, 99.85%, 21.97%, and 13.82%. K antigen is found in 0.77% of donors. Discussion and Conclusion. Although the frequencies of the most immunogenic antigens are lower than in the white race, lack of preventive measures makes the immunological risk high in Africa. Furthermore, Africa is full of specificities that are important to note for a better care of our patients. PMID:25328758

  14. Discovering blood donor arrival patterns using data mining: a method to investigate service quality at blood centers.

    PubMed

    Testik, Murat Caner; Ozkaya, Banu Yuksel; Aksu, Salih; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami

    2012-04-01

    Blood centers without fixed appointments for collecting blood often experience nonconstant donor arrival rates, which vary due to time-of-day, day-of-week, etc. When a constant workforce size is employed in such blood centers, there is either idle personnel, or donor satisfaction is compromised due to long waiting times, or both conditions alternate over time. Consequently, a method to obtain adaptive workforce requirements might be valuable. This study utilized the Two-Step Cluster method and the Classification and Regression Trees method in succession to identify both daily and hourly donor arrival patterns at Hacettepe University Hospitals' Blood Center. A serial queuing network model of the donation process was then employed for each of the identified donor arrival patterns. By considering and accommodating variations in the donor arrival patterns, required workforce sizes and their decomposition among process steps were predicted to achieve predetermined target values of expected waiting times and to balance workforce utilizations in the blood donation processes. Although a blood center is considered for the proposed methodology, the approach is general and applications in various operations of healthcare organizations are possible.

  15. Incidence of Cytomegaloviremia in Blood-Bank Donors and in Infants with Congenital Cytomegalic Inclusion Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirkovic, R.; Werch, J.; South, M. A.; Benyesh-Melnick, M.

    1971-01-01

    During a 15-month period, cytomegalovirus (CMV) isolations were attempted from leukocytes derived from 290 healthy blood-bank donors. The major proportion of the specimens were tested 2 to 5 hr after donation. However, CMV was not recovered from any of the specimens examined. At the time of donation, 75% of donors had CMV complement-fixing antibodies demonstrable in titers of 10 to ≥320. The age of the study group ranged from 17 to 57 years. During the same time period and with the use of identical isolation techniques, postnatal cytomegaloviremia was demonstrated in four infants with cytomegalic inclusion disease. Failure to detect cytomegaloviremia in 290 normal blood donors questions its occurrence outside pathological conditions. These results do not support the concept that CMV infection, concurrent with post-transfusion mononucleosis syndrome, is transmitted through the blood donor's leukocytes. PMID:16557945

  16. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    PubMed Central

    Yousefinejad, Vahid; Darvishi, Nazila; Arabzadeh, Masoumeh; Soori, Masoumeh; Magsudlu, Mahtab; Shafiayan, Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC) and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X2, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05). A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them. PMID:20859513

  17. Selective Testing of At-Risk Blood Donors for Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium spp. in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Niederhauser, Christoph; Gottschalk, Jochen; Tinguely, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Population migrations and overseas recreational travel to regions at risk for tropical diseases are increasing. A major challenge in non-endemic countries is to decrease the number of blood donor deferrals due those tropical disease pathogens, without compromising the high level of blood safety. The protozoans Trypanosoma cruzi and Plasmodium spp., the causative organisms of Chagas disease (CD) and malaria are becoming a major focus in the blood transfusion community. Methods: National guidelines of the Blood Transfusion Service of the Swiss Red Cross propose an algorithm for dealing with these pathogens, including a mandatory selective serological testing of donors at risk. Results 6,978 donors at risk for CD were tested. Three of them were confirmed anti-T. cruzi -positive, and in one case a transfusion-transmitted infection was highly possible. The specificity of the assay was 99.94%. For malaria 12,887 donors were at risk and 178 were confirmed positive. The specificity of the assays was 92.8%. Conclusion CD and malaria in non-endemic countries may represent a certain risk for blood transfusion. Switzerland chose a selective testing approach. The specificity of the assays is a crucial topic for this approach because it ensures a minimal loss of false-reactive donors and helps towards an easier counselling of implicated donors. PMID:27403088

  18. The use of vascular access ports for blood collection in feline blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Isabelle; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C.G.; Sylvestre, Anne M.; Dyson, Doris H.; Allen, Dana G.; Johnstone, Ian B.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated vascular access ports for feline blood donation. Eight cats were anesthetized for conventional blood collection by jugular venipuncture at the beginning and end of the study. In-between conventional collections, vascular access ports were used for collection with or without sedation every 6 to 8 wk for 6 mo. Ports remained functional except for one catheter breakage, but intermittent occlusions occurred. Systolic blood pressure was lower during conventional collection. Behavioral abnormalities occurred during 3 port collections. Packed red cells prepared from collected blood were stored at 4°C for 25 d and assessed for quality pre- and post-storage. With both collection methods, pH and glucose level declined, and potassium level, lactate dehydrogenase activity and osmotic fragility increased. There were no differences between methods in pre-storage albumin and HCO3− levels, and pre and post-storage hematocrit, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and glucose and potassium levels. Pre-storage pH and pCO2 were higher with conventional collection, and pre- and post-storage osmotic fragility were greater with port collection. One port became infected, but all cultures of packed red cells were negative. Tissue inflammation was evident at port removal. In a second study of conventional collection in 6 cats, use of acepromazine in premedication did not exacerbate hypotension. The use of vascular access ports for feline blood donation is feasible, is associated with less hypotension, and may simplify donation, but red cell quality may decrease, and effects on donors must be considered. PMID:21461192

  19. Blood Donor Screening for West NiIe Virus in Oklahoma and Its Contribution to Disease Surveillance, 2003 -2013.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Walter E; Bradley, Kristy; Duncan, Ashten; Smith, James

    2015-08-01

    Upon recognition that West Nile virus (WNV) was transmissible by transfusion, universal testing of blood donors by nucleic acid testing (NAT) was initiated in 2003. A retrospective review of 2003-2013 blood donor records and public health surveillance data in Oklahoma was undertaken to determine the percentage of WNV-positive blood donors who developed clinical symptoms post-donation and to examine the incidence and timing of WNV viremic donors in the context of WNV disease reported statewide. Among all WNV NAT-positive blood donors, 19% had self-described symptoms consistent with WNV disease. A viremic blood donor was the seasonal index case of WNV transmission in Oklahoma during one year [2006] of the study period. Blood donors remain an important surveillance component for epidemiologic monitoring of WNV in Oklahoma.

  20. Working with previously anonymous gamete donors and donor-conceived adults: recent practice experiences of running the DNA-based voluntary information exchange and contact register, UK DonorLink.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Marilyn; Gunter, Christine; Tidy, Christine; Atherton, Freda

    2013-03-01

    This article describes recent practice experiences with donor conceived adults, donors, non-donor-conceived adult children of donors using the voluntary DNA-based register, UK DonorLink. It highlights additional complexities faced when using DNA rather than paper records for searching, in particular from the risk of false positives, low chances of success and potential inclusion of biological parents' DNA. Professionals' experiences in supporting those being "linked" suggest challenges as well as rewards. Registration carries the potential to be therapeutic for donor-conceived adults and donors and to enhance their political awareness regardless of links being made. Registrants value both peer and professional support, providing the latter can respond flexibly and be delivered by staff experienced in intermediary work. Given that the majority of those affected by donor conception internationally come from anonymous donation systems, these findings are highly pertinent and argue the need for political and moral debate about such service provision.

  1. Effect of blood bank storage on the rheological properties of male and female donor red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daly, Amanda; Raval, Jay S; Waters, Jonathan H; Yazer, Mark H; Kameneva, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that red blood cell (RBC) deformability progressively decreases during storage along with other changes in RBC mechanical properties. Recently, we reported that the magnitude of changes in RBC mechanical fragility associated with blood bank storage in a variety of additive solutions was strongly dependent on the donor gender [15]. Yet, the potential dependence of changes in the deformability and relaxation time of stored blood bank RBCs on donor gender is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of donor gender and blood bank storage on RBC deformability and relaxation time through the measurement of RBC suspension viscoelasticity. Packed RBC units preserved in AS-5 solution from 12 male and 12 female donors (three from each ABO group) were obtained from the local blood center and tested at 1, 4 and 7 weeks of storage at 1-6°C. At each time point, samples were aseptically removed from RBC units and hematocrit was adjusted to 40% before assessment of cell suspension viscoelasticity. RBC suspensions from both genders demonstrated progressive increases (p < 0.05) in viscosity, elasticity and relaxation time at equivalent shear rates over seven weeks of storage indicating a decrease in RBC deformability. No statistically significant differences in RBC deformability or relaxation time were observed between male and female RBCs at any storage time. The decrease in RBC deformability during blood bank storage may reduce tissue perfusion and RBC lifespan in patients receiving blood bank RBCs.

  2. Vasovagal Syncope and Blood Donor Return: Examination of the Role of Experience and Affective Expectancies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Etzel, Erin N.; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    Vasovagal sensations (e.g., dizziness, nausea, and fainting) are one of the main reasons people find blood donation unpleasant. A better understanding of predictors of vasovagal sensations during blood donation could inform interventions designed to increase donor return rates. The present investigation examined the extent to which experience with…

  3. Chagas Disease Screening in Maternal Donors of Publicly Banked Umbilical Cord Blood, United States

    PubMed Central

    Gilner, Jennifer B.; Hernandez, Jose; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Heine, R. Phillips

    2016-01-01

    To assess patterns of Chagas disease, we reviewed results of screening umbilical cord blood from a US public cord blood bank during 2007–2014. Nineteen maternal donors tested positive for Trypanosoma cruzi parasites (0.04%). Because perinatal transmission of Chagas disease is associated with substantial illness, targeted prenatal programs should screen for this disease. PMID:27433974

  4. Is there a right to donate blood? Patient rights; donor responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Ian M

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse and assess critically whether there is a right to donate blood in the UK. The aim was to provide a basis for blood services, in particular within the UK and European Union (EU), to address claims from deferred donors that there is a right to donate. Recent and ongoing campaigns to change the current life-long deferral from blood donation in the UK, Canada and USA of men who have/have had sex with men (MSM) have highlighted issues over whether individuals have a right to donate blood. The issue is complicated by allegations of discriminatory behaviour, and in some countries politicians have contributed to the argument. As anti-discrimination and equality legislation is strengthened in the UK, other groups in addition to MSM may wish to claim a right to donate blood. The methods adopted included discussions with colleagues in UK and European blood services and a review of the medical literature and wider sources using Internet search engines. No clear right to donate blood is apparent, although it is recommended that donor deferral criteria should have a sound basis of evidence. Potential donors have a right to expect a clear explanation of the reason(s) for refusing a donation. Legal safeguards for recipients to receive safe blood transfusions exist. It is concluded that blood recipients in the EU have a right to receive safe blood, and that this should be viewed as the overriding responsibility of blood services.

  5. Blood donors at high risk of transmitting the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Contreras, M; Hewitt, P E; Barbara, J A; Mochnaty, P Z

    1985-03-09

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) occurs most commonly in homosexual men. This group carries the greatest risk of transmitting AIDS by blood transfusion. Both promiscuous and nonpromiscuous male homosexuals should refrain from giving blood. A leaflet stating this advice was prepared by the Department of Health and Social Security, United Kingdom. In July 1984 a questionnaire was given to all donors attending a blood donor clinic in the west end of London, England. 53% were male. Donors were given a leaflet on AIDS and a questionnaire to complete in private. Those who considered themselves to be in a high risk group were asked to designate their blood for research purposes only. Serum samples from donors who confirmed that they were in the high risk category were tested for antihepatitis B core antigen and anti-human T lymphotropic virus type III (anti-HTLV-III) in addition to the routine screening of donors for hepatitis B surface antigen and syphilis. All high risk donors were men. Homosexuality was the only high risk factor. Of 5000 questionnaires administered between July and October, 614 were not completed or had ambiguous answers. 38 donors who completed the questionnaire beonged to a high risk group. Of these, 7 were positive for antihepatitis B core antigen; none were positive for anti-HTLV-III, T pallidum hemagglatination, or hepatits B surface antigen. Although the homosexual donors had a much lower incidence of sexually transmitted disease than those attending special clinics, this should not encourage complacency. All possible measures must be taken to prevent homosexuals from donating blood.

  6. Detection of Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 1 Among Blood Donors From Southwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Rahil; Adibzadeh, Setare; Behzad Behbahani, Abbas; Farhadi, Ali; Yaghobi, Ramin; Rafiei Dehbidi, Gholam Reza; Hajizamani, Saeideh; Rahbar, Sanaz; Nikouyan, Negin; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Naderi, Samaneh; Salehi, Saeede; Alizadeh, Marzieh; Ranjbaran, Reza; Zarnegar, Golnoosh; Alavi, Parnian

    2016-01-01

    Background Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) is endemic in developing countries and reveals significant regional differences. Several studies have reported virus transmission via blood transfusion. To date, however, no cases of HEV RNA detection in blood donors have been reported from Iran. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HEV RNA in plasma samples of blood donors referred to a blood transfusion center in Shiraz in the southwest of Iran. The HEV genotypes were also investigated using nucleotide sequencing. Patients and Methods Blood samples were collected from 700 blood donors who were referred to Fars blood transfusion organization from January to March 2014. Plasma samples were screened for the presence of HEV IgG and IgM antibodies by standard enzyme immunoassay. Samples seroreactive to anti-HEV were further tested for the presence of HEV RNA using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with universal primers for detection of all four HEV genotypes. Positive PCR samples were then subjected to DNA sequencing for further analysis. Results Fifty (50, 7.1%) out of 700 plasma samples tested positive for anti-HEV antibodies. HEV RNA was detected in 7/50 (12%) of the antibody-positive samples, the majority of which were IgM positive. Sequence analysis of seven isolates of the HEV RNA ORF 2 gene region revealed > 80% similarity with genotype 1. Conclusions The analysis indicates that the HEV isolated from blood donors in the southwest of Iran belongs to genotype 1. However, more samples from other geographic regions of Iran are needed to confirm these findings. Because transmission of HEV by administration of blood or blood components is likely to occur, it may be sensible to screen donor blood for HEV to eliminate transfusion-transmitted HEV infection when the recipient is immunocompromised. PMID:27630719

  7. [Prevalence for seropositivity for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Rivera-López, María Rebeca F; Zavala-Méndez, Celia; Arenas-Esqueda, Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    Despite utilizing different actions to render blood safe for transfusions, we continue to have the risk of transmitting some viral infections. For this reason, it is important to determine prevalence of infections due to HIV and hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses in blood donors. Previous studies from Mexico indicate that HIV prevalence is 0.01 to 0.13%, while it is 0.11 to 1.22% for hepatitis B, and for hepatitis C, prevalence is 0.47 to 1.47%. We are checking the results of the screening tests (ELISA 3rd generation and chemiluminescent immunoassays) from blood donors studied at the Central Blood Bank (Banco Central de Sangre) at the Mexican Institute of Social Security's (IMSS) Twentieth First Century National Medical Center in Mexico City from 1995 to 2002. Reactive results were studied by confirmatory tests, Western Blot for HIV, AgHBs neutralization test for hepatitis B, and RIBA-HCV3.0 for hepatitis C. Reactive results from 513,062 blood donors confirmed for HV were 0.07%, reactive results and confirmation of hepatitis B from 511,733 blood donors were 0.13%, and reactive results and confirmation of hepatitis C from 511,115 blood donors were 0.31%. Rates obtained are low when compared with results of previous studies in Mexico for HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. It may be possible than these low rates indicate the positive impact obtained from preventive actions, better strategies of detection of blood donors with high risk, and the advantage of working with a fully automated test system with state-of-the-art technology.

  8. Defining and measuring blood donor altruism: a theoretical approach from biology, economics and psychology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R; Ferguson, E

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives While blood donation is traditionally described as a behaviour motivated by pure altruism, the assessment of altruism in the blood donation literature has not been theoretically informed. Drawing on theories of altruism from psychology, economics and evolutionary biology, it is argued that a theoretically derived psychometric assessment of altruism is needed. Such a measure is developed in this study that can be used to help inform both our understanding of the altruistic motives of blood donors and recruitment intervention strategies. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional survey (N = 414), with a 1-month behavioural follow-up (time 2, N = 77), was designed to assess theoretically derived constructs from psychological, economic and evolutionary biological theories of altruism. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) variables and co-operation were also assessed at time 1 and a measure of behavioural co-operation at time 2. Results Five theoretical dimensions (impure altruism, kinship, self-regarding motives, reluctant altruism and egalitarian warm glow) of altruism were identified through factor analyses. These five altruistic motives differentiated blood donors from non-donors (donors scored higher on impure altruism and reluctant altruism), showed incremental validity over TPB constructs to predict donor intention and predicted future co-operative behaviour. Conclusions These findings show that altruism in the context of blood donation is multifaceted and complex and, does not reflect pure altruism. This has implication for recruitment campaigns that focus solely on pure altruism. PMID:24117697

  9. Differences between blood donors and a population sample: implications for case–control studies

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Jean; Northstone, Kate; Miller, Laura L; Davey Smith, George; Pembrey, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Background Selecting appropriate controls for studies of genetic variation in case series is important. The two major candidates involve the use of blood donors or a random sample of the population. Methods We compare and contrast the two different populations of controls for studies of genetic variation using data from parents enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). In addition we compute different biases using a series of hypothetical assumptions. Results The study subjects who had been blood donors differed markedly from the general population in social, health-related, anthropometric, and personality-related variables. Using theoretical examples, we show that blood donors are a poor control group for non-genetic studies of diseases related to environmentally, behaviourally, or socially patterned exposures. However, we show that if blood donors are used as controls in genetic studies, these factors are unlikely to make a major difference in detecting true associations with relatively rare disorders (cumulative incidence through life of <10%). Nevertheless, for more common disorders, the reduction in accuracy resulting from the inclusion in any control population of individuals who have or will develop the disease in question can create a greater bias than can socially patterned factors. Conclusions Information about the medical history of a control and the parents of the control (as a proxy for whether the control will develop the disease) is more important with regard to the choice of controls than whether the controls are a random population sample or blood donors. PMID:23825379

  10. Knowledge, Attitudes and Motivations Among Blood Donors in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Goncalez, Thelma T.; Sabino, Ester C.; Chen, Sanny; Salles, Nanci Alves; Chamone, Dalton A. F.; McFarland, Willi; Murphy, Edward L.

    2013-01-01

    Recruiting safe, volunteer blood donors requires understanding motivations for donating and knowledge and attitudes about HIV. We surveyed 1,600 persons presenting for blood donation at a large blood bank in São Paulo, Brazil using a self-administered, structured questionnaire, and classified motivations into three domains as well as categorizing persons by HIV test-seeking behavior. Motivations, in descending order, and their significant associations were: “altruism”: female gender, volunteer donor and repeat donor status; “direct appeal”: female gender, repeat donor status and age 21–50 years; “self-interest”: male gender, age under 20 years, first-time donor status and lower education. HIV test-seekers were more likely to give incorrect answers regarding HIV risk behavior and blood donation and the ability of antibody testing to detect recent HIV infections. Altruism is the main motivator for blood donation in Brazil; other motivators were associated with specific demographic subgroups. HIV test-seeking might be reduced by educational interventions. PMID:18389356

  11. Population-based screening for anemia using first-time blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Alan E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Johnson, Bryce; Wright, David J.; Cable, Ritchard G.; Carey, Patricia; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Simon, Toby L.; Murphy, Edward L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anemia is an important public health concern. Data from population-based surveys such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) are the gold standard, but are obtained infrequently and include only small samples from certain minority groups. Objectives We assessed whether readily available databases of blood donor hemoglobin values could be used as a surrogate for population hemoglobin values from NHANES. Design Blood donor venous and fingerstick hemoglobin values were compared to 10,254 NHANES 2005-2008 venous hemoglobin values using demographically stratified analyses and ANOVA. Fingerstick hemoglobins or hematocrits were converted to venous hemoglobin estimates using regression analysis. Results Venous hemoglobin values from 1,609 first time donors correlated extremely well with NHANES data across different age, gender and demographic groups. Cigarette smoking increased hemoglobin by 0.26 to 0.59 g/dL depending on intensity. Converted fingerstick hemoglobin from 36,793 first time donors agreed well with NHANES hemoglobin (weighted mean hemoglobin of 15.53 g/dL for donors and 15.73 g/dL for NHANES) with similar variation in mean hemoglobin by age. However, compared to NHANES, the larger donor dataset showed reduced differences in mean hemoglobin between Blacks and other races/ethnicities. Conclusions Overall, first-time donor fingerstick hemoglobins approximate U.S. population data and represent a readily available public health resource for ongoing anemia surveillance. PMID:22460662

  12. Transfusion safety in francophone African countries: an analysis of strategies for the medical selection of blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Tayou, Claude Tagny; Kouao, Maxime Diané; Touré, Hamane; Gargouri, Jalel; Fazul, Ahamada Said; Ouattara, Siaka; Anani, Ludovic; Othmani, Habiba; Feteke, Lochina; Dahourou, Honorine; Mbensa, Guy Olivier; Molé, Simplice; Nébié, Yacouba; Mbangue, Madeleine; Toukam, Michel; Boulahi, Mahommed Ould; Andriambelo, Lalatiana Valisoa; Rakoto, Olivat; Baby, Mounirou; Yahaya, Rakia; Bokilo, Amelia; Senyana, Florent; Mbanya, Dora; Shiboski, Caroline; Murphy, Edward L.; Lefrère, Jean Jacques

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The goal of selecting a healthy blood donor is to safeguard donors and reduce the risks of infections and immunologic complications for recipients. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS To evaluate the blood donor selection process, a survey was conducted in 28 blood transfusion centers located in 15 francophone African countries. Data collected included availability of blood products, risk factors for infection identified among blood donor candidates, the processing of the information collected before blood collection, the review process for the medical history of blood donor candidates, and deferral criteria for donor candidates. RESULTS During the year 2009, participating transfusion centers identified 366,924 blood donor candidates. A mean of 13% (range, 0%–36%) of the donor candidates were excluded based solely on their medical status. The main risk factors for blood-borne infections were having multiple sex partners, sexual intercourse with occasional partners, and religious scarification. Most transfusion centers collected this information verbally instead of having a written questionnaire. The topics least addressed were the possible complications relating to the donation, religious scarifications, and history of sickle cell anemia and hemorrhage. Only three centers recorded the temperature of the blood donors. The deferral criteria least reported were sickle cell anemia, piercing, scarification, and tattoo. CONCLUSIONS The medical selection process was not performed systemically and thoroughly enough, given the regional epidemiologic risks. It is essential to identify the risk factors specific to francophone African countries and modify the current medical history questionnaires to develop a more effective and relevant selection process. PMID:22014098

  13. [Guidelines for Chagas disease: Part III. Chagas disease in donors to blood banks].

    PubMed

    Apt B, Werner; Heitmann G, Ingrid; Jercic L, M Isabel; Jotré M, Leonor; Muñoz C del V, Patricia; Noemí H, Isabel; San Martin V, Ana M; Sapunar P, Jorge; Torres H, Marisa; Zulantay A, Inés

    2008-08-01

    In this chapter it is emphasized the importance to guarantee safety and high quality blood transfusions. Besides, the following topics are analyzed: the importance of Trypanosoma cruzi infection acquired by blood transfusions, the obligatory screening implemented in Chilean blood banks and serological diagnostic techniques used that for, the seroprevalence observed, the importance to confirm results and methods recommended in this purpose and, to notify the donor once the infection is confirmed. In addition a facsímil of a letter used to notify the positive donor is included as guidelines to make advice after, attaching a pro-forma of clinical-epidemiological registration to refer the donor to medical evaluation and treatment.

  14. Diphtheria toxin IgG levels in military and civilian blood donors in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Speranza, F A B; Ishii, S K; Hirata, R; Mattos-Guaraldi, A L; Milagres, L G

    2010-01-01

    Serologic data on diseases that are preventable by vaccines are necessary to evaluate the success of immunization programs and to identify susceptible subgroups. In the present study, we determined serum IgG levels against diphtheria toxin of military and civilian blood donors (N = 75; 69.3% males and 30.7% females) aged 18-64 years, from the Brazilian Army Biology Institute, Rio de Janeiro, using a commercial diphtheria kit (Diphtheria IgG ELISA; IBL, Germany). Most (63%) unprotected military donors were from the older age group of 41 to 64 years. In contrast, the majority (71%) of young military donors (18 to 30 years) were fully protected. About half of the military donors aged 31 to 40 years were protected against diphtheria. Among the civilians, about 50% of persons aged 18 to 30 years and 31 to 40 years had protective antibody levels against diphtheria as also did 64% of individuals aged 41 to 64 years. All civilians had a similar antibody response (geometric mean = 0.55 IU/mL) independent of age group. Military donors aged 18-30 years had higher IgG levels (geometric mean = 0.82 IU/mL) than military donors of 41-64 years (geometric mean = 0.51 IU/mL; P > 0.05). In conclusion, the existence of a considerable proportion of susceptible adults supports the position that reliable data on the immune status of the population should be maintained routinely and emphasizes the importance of adequate immunization during adulthood.

  15. A retrospective analysis of false-positive infectious screening results in blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Michelle T.; Bruhn, Roberta; Kaidarova, Zhanna; Custer, Brian S.; Murphy, Edward L.; Bloch, Evan M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND False-positive infectious transfusion screening results remain a challenge with continued loss of both donors and blood products. We sought to identify associations between donor demographic characteristics (age, race, sex, education, first-time donor status) and testing false positive for viruses during routine blood donation screening. In addition the study assessed the prevalence of high-risk behaviors in false-positive donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Blood Systems, Inc. donors with allogeneic donations between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2012, were compared in a case-control study. Those with a false-positive donation for one of four viruses (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], human T-lymphotropic virus [HTLV], hepatitis B virus [HBV], and hepatitis C virus [HCV]) were included as cases. Those with negative test results were controls. For a subset of cases, infectious risk factors were evaluated. RESULTS Black race and Hispanic ethnicity were associated with HCV and HTLV false-positive results. Male sex and lower education were associated with HCV false positivity, and age 25 to 44 was associated with HTLV false positivity. First-time donors were more likely to be HCV false positive although less likely to be HBV and HTLV false positive. No significant associations between donor demographics and HIV false positivity were observed. A questionnaire for false-positive donors showed low levels of high-risk behaviors. CONCLUSION Demographic associations with HCV and HTLV false-positive results overlap with those of true infection. While true infection is unlikely given current testing algorithms and risk factor evaluation, the findings suggest nonrandom association. Further investigation into biologic mechanisms is warranted. PMID:26509432

  16. Laboratory variables for assessing iron deficiency in REDS-II Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Joseph E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Wright, David J.; Mast, Alan E.; Carey, Patricia M.; Murphy, Edward L.; Gottschall, Jerry L.; Simon, Toby L.; Cable, Ritchard G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Iron deficiency is common in regular blood donors. We evaluated the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of red blood cell (RBC) hematology analyzer indices to assess iron status as a part of donor management. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1659 male and female donors from the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II) Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) study who were either first-time/reactivated (FT/ RA; no donations for 2 years) or frequent donors were recruited into a longitudinal study of regular donation of RBCs. Of these, 1002 donors returned 15 to 24 months later for a final assessment. Absent iron stores (AIS) was defined as plasma ferritin level of less than 12 µ.g/L. Logarithm of the ratio of soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin of at least 2.07 (≥97.5% in FT/RA males) was used to define iron-deficient erythropoiesis (IDE). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed to assess selected RBC indices (e.g., percentage of hypochromic mature RBCs, proportion of hypochromic mature RBCs [HYPOm], and hemoglobin [Hb] content of reticulocytes [CHr]) in identifying AIS and IDE. RESULTS HYPOm and CHr detected IDE with comparable sensitivity, 72% versus 69%, but differed in specificity: HYPOm 68% and CHr 53%. For detecting AIS, sensitivity was improved to 85% for HYPOm and 81% for CHr but specificity was reduced for both. Venous Hb had high specificity but poor sensitivity for IDE and AIS. A plasma ferritin level of less than 26.7 u.g/L was a good surrogate for assessing IDE. CONCLUSION RBC indices correlate with AIS and IDE and are more informative than Hb measurement, but lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be used as diagnostic tools in blood donors at risk for iron deficiency. PMID:23617531

  17. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeven, Loan R; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K; Kemper, Peter; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion recipients are linked. This paper describes the design of the data warehouse, challenges and illustrative applications. Study design and methods Quantitative data on blood donors (eg, age, blood group, antibodies) and products (type of product, processing, storage time) are obtained from the national blood bank. These are linked to data on the transfusion recipients (eg, transfusions administered, patient diagnosis, surgical procedures, laboratory parameters), which are extracted from hospital electronic health records. Applications Expected scientific contributions are illustrated for 4 applications: determine risk factors, predict blood use, benchmark blood use and optimise process efficiency. For each application, examples of research questions are given and analyses planned. Conclusions The DTD project aims to build a national, continuously updated transfusion data warehouse. These data have a wide range of applications, on the donor/production side, recipient studies on blood usage and benchmarking and donor–recipient studies, which ultimately can contribute to the efficiency and safety of blood transfusion. PMID:27491665

  18. A randomized comparison of plateletpheresis with the same donors using four blood separators at a single blood center.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Grace C; Strauss, Ronald G; Wieland, Martha J; Behlke, Timothy A; Ludwig, Gerald A

    2002-01-01

    At one blood center, each of 20 donors underwent plateletpheresis on four blood cell separators in random order. We compared the CS3000+, Amicus V 2.41, MCS Plus, and Spectra LRS V 7 Turbo regarding platelet (PLT) yield, pre- and post-procedure PLT counts, percent fall in donor PLT count, process time, efficiency, PLT product and donor PLT volume (MPV). Using >or= 150 x 10(9) PLTs/L pre-donation counts, a goal was set of 4.5 x 10(11) PLTs unit in up to 100 minutes processing time. Results were (mean values) PLT yields of Amicus, Spectra, CS3000+, and MCS Plus: 4.3, 4.6, 4.3, 4.0 x 10(11) PLTS, respectively; percent donor PLT fall: 24, 32, 30, 29%, respectively; processing times: 50, 74, 87, 101 minutes, respectively; relative efficiency (RE): 2.2, 1.6, 1.2,1.0, respectively (based on the MCS Plus performance with RE of 1 = 4 x 10(9) PLTS/min); PLT product MPV: 6.7, 7.4, 6.8,7.1 fL, respectively; pre-procedure donor MPV: 7.7, 7.3, 7.6 and 7.6 fL, respectively; and percent donor MPV change: -5.2, 0, -6.6, and -10%, respectively. Significant changes in the donor MPV were noted (P < 0.05) but could not be related to product MPV. Spectra seemed to collect larger PLTs (higher MPV); the significance remains unknown for both donors and recipients. Importantly, all four separators gave acceptable and comparable PLT yields (P < 0.05) with Spectra trending higher. The short process time and high RE together indicate highly efficient collections particularly by Amicus and Spectra.

  19. Effectiveness of DNA-recombinant anti-hepatitis B vaccines in blood donors: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kupek, Emil; de Souza, Denise ER; Petry, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Background Although various studies have demonstrated efficacy of DNA-recombinant anti-hepatitis B vaccines, their effectiveness in health care settings has not been researched adequately. This gap is particularly visible for blood donors, a group of significant importance in the reduction of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis B. Methods This is a double cohort study of 1411 repeat blood donors during the period 1998–2002, involving a vaccinated and an unvaccinated cohort, with matching of the two in terms of sex, age and residence. Average follow-up was 3.17 person-years. The outcome measure was infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV), defined by testing positive on serologic markers HBsAg or anti-HBC. All blood donors were from the blood bank in Joaçaba, federal state of Santa Catarina, Brazil. Results The cohorts did not differ significantly regarding sex, age and marital status but the vaccinated cohort had higher mean number of blood donations and higher proportion of those residing in the county capital Joaçaba. Hepatitis B incidences per 1000 person-years were zero among vaccinated and 2,33 among non-vaccinated, resulting in 100% vaccine effectiveness with 95% confidence interval from 30,1% to 100%. The number of vaccinated persons necessary to avoid one HBV infection in blood donors was estimated at 429 with 95% confidence interval from 217 to 21422. Conclusion The results showed very high effectiveness of DNA-recombinant anti-HBV vaccines in blood donors. Its considerable variation in this study is likely due to the limited follow-up and the influence of confounding factors normally balanced out in efficacy clinical trials. PMID:17986330

  20. Cord Blood Stem Cell Procurement in Minority Donors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Acute Biphenotypic leukemia 0 1 Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia 0 2 Myelodysplastic syndrome 0 1 Myeloma 1 0 Non-Hodgkin...arrived at the destination thawed and this unit could not be used clinically. 8 Acute lymphoid leukemia 3 5 Acute myeloid leukemia 2...information but there is one additional death due to relapse of acute lymphocytic leukemia in an adult patient who received a second cord

  1. Surface antigen-negative hepatitis B virus infection in Dutch blood donors.

    PubMed

    Lieshout-Krikke, R W; Molenaar-de Backer, M W A; van Swieten, P; Zaaijer, H L

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) is a reliable marker for HBV infection, but HBsAg-negative forms of HBV infection occur. The introduction of HBV DNA screening of Dutch blood donors, which were not preselected for absence of HBV core antibodies, enabled the characterization of HBsAg-negative HBV infection in healthy persons and a comparison of the HBV genomes involved. The screening of 4.4 million Dutch blood donations identified 23 HBsAg-negative, HBV DNA-positive persons. Serological testing of the index donations, follow-up samples and archived earlier samples was performed to determine the nature of each HBV DNA-only case. Despite low viral loads HBV DNA could be sequenced in 14 out of 23 donors, allowing HBV genotyping and the analysis of mutations in the HBV surface gene. Four types of HBsAg-negative HBV infection were detected: infection in the early stage before occurrence of HBsAg; suppressed infection after vaccination; HBV genotype G infection with decreased HBsAg production; and chronic occult (HBsAg negative) HBV infection. In the donors with occult HBV genotype D infection the HBV surface gene showed multiple "escape" mutations in the HBsAg a-determinant and CTL epitopes, while in an occult genotype A case the surface gene showed no mutations. HBsAg-negative forms of HBV infection in healthy blood donors explain the ongoing transmission of HBV via blood transfusion, if donor screening is limited to HBsAg. The screening of blood donors for HBV DNA and HBV core antibodies seems to cover all stages and variants of HBV infection.

  2. HIV, HCV, HBV and syphilis rate of positive donations among blood donations in Mali: lower rates among volunteer blood donors.

    PubMed

    Diarra, A; Kouriba, B; Baby, M; Murphy, E; Lefrere, J-J

    2009-01-01

    Good data on background seroprevalence of major transfusion transmitted infections is lacking in Mali. We gathered data on the rate of positive donations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and syphilis among blood donations in Mali for calendar year 2007. Donations with repeatedly reactive results on screening enzyme immunoassay (EIA) were considered to be seropositive. Rate of positive donations per blood unit collected was 2.6% for HIV, 3.3% for HCV, 13.9% for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and 0.3% for syphilis. For HIV, HBsAg and syphilis, rate of positive donations was significantly (p<0.001) higher among donations from replacement donors than those from volunteer donors, while HCV rate of positive donations was similar in the two groups. Rate of positive donations was also significantly (p<0.0001) lower in blood units from regular than from first-time donors. These data reinforce WHO recommendations for increasing the number of regular, volunteer blood donors in Africa.

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions Among Non-Blood Donor Female Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Muhammad; Haseeb, Abdul; Zahid, Ibrahim; Lashkerwala, Sehan Siraj; Saeeduddin, Fawad; Saad, Muhammad; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham; Moorpani, Manpreet; Khan, Midhat Zafar; Tariq, Ahsan; Habib, Haya; Islam, Tehrema; Advani, Rohan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Blood donation is necessary in order to maintain an adequate supply of blood to patients who are suffering from any kind of disease or trauma, which requires them to have blood transfusion. Female non-blood donors are generally low in number. Therefore, this research was carried out to assess the main reasons behind the lack of blood donations made by females, and their knowledge, attitude and perceptions towards voluntary blood donation. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 664 female health professionals, who were selected by non-probability convenience sampling from two tertiary care hospitals. A pretested questionnaire was presented to the sample population, and the data was entered and analyzed on SPSS (V17). Results: 94.6 % were aware with the fact that blood is screened for AIDS, Hepatitis B and C before transfusion. Moreover, 83.7% said that they will only donate blood if a family, relative or friend would need it and similarly 83.4% suggested that they would donate blood if blood donation camps are arranged in hospital premises. 81.8 % thought that blood donors can contract Hepatitis B after donation whereas only 29.5% did not blood due already blood loss in menstrual cycle. Conclusion: The participants had adequate knowledge about the benefits of blood donation. The most important reason identified for not donating blood is the lack of facilities within the workplace or lack of approach by responsible authorities. The results of the study may help in minimizing the misconceptions of the participants about blood transfusion, which would increase their contribution towards blood donation. PMID:26573048

  4. Statistical Analysis of Human Blood Cytometries: Potential Donors and Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Segovia-Olvera, P.; Mancilla-Escobar, B. E.; Palomares, P.

    2004-09-01

    The histograms of the cell volume from human blood present valuable information for clinical evaluation. Measurements can be performed with automatic equipment and a graphical presentation of the data is available, nevertheless, an statistical and mathematical analysis of the cell volume distribution could be useful for medical interpretation too, as much as the numerical parameters characterizing the histograms might be correlated with healthy people and patient populations. In this work, a statistical exercise was performed in order to find the most suitable model fitting the cell volume histograms. Several trial functions were tested and their parameters were tabulated. Healthy people exhibited an average of the cell volume of 85 femto liters while patients had 95 femto liters. White blood cell presented a small variation and platelets preserved their average for both populations.

  5. Deferral of blood donors with risk factors for HIV infection saves lives and money in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    McFarland, W; Kahn, J G; Katzenstein, D A; Mvere, D; Shamu, R

    1995-06-01

    We compared the cost-effectiveness of three strategies to avert transfusion-associated HIV infection in Zimbabwe: HIV antibody testing, deferral of donors with HIV risk factors, and deferral of donors with risk factors followed by antibody testing ("Defer/Test"). The Defer/Test strategy averted the most HIV infections. Compared with antibody testing alone, the Defer/Test strategy, using history of genital ulcer or any sexually transmitted disease as a criterion for deferral, resulted in net savings. The cost per HIV-infected unit averted using history of paying for sex or having had multiple sex partners was $ 127 and $ 773, respectively. We discern four benefits of risk factor-based deferral before antibody testing. First, deferring donors at risk lessens collection of blood in the window period. Second, deferring donors likely to be HIV positive minimizes the number of units discarded. Third, ascertainment of donor risk provides an opportunity for AIDS education and prevention. Fourth, the number of false negatives is lower with a lower HIV prevalence among accepted donors. The Defer/Test strategy is cost-effective in Zimbabwe because additional recruitment costs are offset by discarding fewer HIV-positive units. We predict the Defer/Test strategy will be cost-effective in other sub-Saharan African donor populations.

  6. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE AMONG BLOOD DONOR CANDIDATES IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    LOPES, Patrícia da Silva; RAMOS, Eliezer Lucas Pires; GÓMEZ-HERNÁNDEZ, César; FERREIRA, Gabriela Lícia Santos; REZENDE-OLIVEIRA, Karine

    2015-01-01

    Despite public health campaigns and epidemiological surveillance activities, Chagas disease remains a major health problem in Latin America. According to data from the World Health Organization, there are approximately 7-8 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi worldwide, a large percentage of which in Latin America. This study aims to examine the serological profile of blood donors in blood banks of Hemominas hematology center, in the town of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sample consisted of 53,941 blood donors, which were grouped according to gender and age. Sample collections were performed from January 1991 to December 2011, and 277 donors (0.5%) were considered serologically ineligible due to Chagas disease. Analysis of data showed no significant difference between genders. As for age, the highest proportion of ineligible donors was from 40 to 49 years (30%), and there was a positive correlation between increasing age and the percentage of patients seropositive for Chagas disease. Therefore, adopting strategies that allow the safe identification of donors with positive serology for Chagas disease is essential to reduce or eliminate indeterminate serological results. PMID:27049698

  7. Hepatitis E in blood donors: investigation of the natural course of asymptomatic infection, Germany, 2011.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Tanja; Diekmann, Juergen; Eberhardt, Matthias; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Asymptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections have been found in blood donors from various European countries, but the natural course is rarely specified. Here, we compared the progression of HEV viraemia, serostatus and liver-specific enzymes in 10 blood donors with clinically asymptomatic genotype 3 HEV infection, measuring HEV RNA concentrations, plasma concentrations of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and bilirubin and anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG antibodies. RNA concentrations ranged from 77.2 to 2.19×10(5) IU/mL, with viraemia lasting from less than 10 to 52 days. Donors showed a typical progression of a recent HEV infection but differed in the first detection of anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG and seropositivity of the antibody classes. The diagnostic window between HEV RNA detection and first occurrence of anti-HEV antibodies ranged from eight to 48 days, depending on the serological assay used. The progression of laboratory parameters of asymptomatic HEV infection was largely comparable to the progression of symptomatic HEV infection, but only four of 10 donors showed elevated liver-specific parameters. Our results help elucidate the risk of transfusion-associated HEV infection and provide a basis for development of screening strategies. The diagnostic window illustrates that infectious blood donors can be efficiently identified only by RNA screening.

  8. PREVALENCE OF CHAGAS DISEASE AMONG BLOOD DONOR CANDIDATES IN TRIANGULO MINEIRO, MINAS GERAIS STATE, BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Patrícia da Silva; Ramos, Eliezer Lucas Pires; Gómez-Hernández, César; Ferreira, Gabriela Lícia Santos; Rezende-Oliveira, Karine

    2015-12-01

    Despite public health campaigns and epidemiological surveillance activities, Chagas disease remains a major health problem in Latin America. According to data from the World Health Organization, there are approximately 7-8 million people infected with Trypanosoma cruzi worldwide, a large percentage of which in Latin America. This study aims to examine the serological profile of blood donors in blood banks of Hemominas hematology center, in the town of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sample consisted of 53,941 blood donors, which were grouped according to gender and age. Sample collections were performed from January 1991 to December 2011, and 277 donors (0.5%) were considered serologically ineligible due to Chagas disease. Analysis of data showed no significant difference between genders. As for age, the highest proportion of ineligible donors was from 40 to 49 years (30%), and there was a positive correlation between increasing age and the percentage of patients seropositive for Chagas disease. Therefore, adopting strategies that allow the safe identification of donors with positive serology for Chagas disease is essential to reduce or eliminate indeterminate serological results.

  9. Prevalence of hepatitis A viral RNA and antibodies among Chinese blood donors.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Su, N; Lin, F Z; Ma, L; Wang, H J; Rong, X; Dai, Y D; Li, J; Jian, Z W; Tang, L H; Xiao, W; Li, C Q

    2015-12-09

    Like other developing countries, China was reported to have a relatively high seroprevalence of anti-hepatitis A antibodies (anti-HAV). However, no studies have evaluated the prevalence of anti-HAV and HAV RNA among voluntary blood donors with or without elevated serum alanine transaminase (ALT) levels. Anti-HAV antibodies were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction was carried out for detection of HAV RNA. In the current study, we analyzed a total of 450 serum samples with elevated ALT levels (≥40 U/L) and 278 serum samples with non-elevated ALT levels. Seroprevalence rates of anti-HAV were 51.6% in donors with elevated ALT and 41.4% in donors with non-elevated ALT; however, none of the samples was positive for HAV RNA. The results of our study showed lower seroprevalence rates of anti-HAV in blood donors (irrespective of ALT levels) than those in published data on Chinese populations. Although donors with elevated ALT had statistically higher prevalence rates of anti- HAV than did those with non-elevated ALT, none of the serum samples had detectable levels of the active virus. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the transmission of hepatitis A by blood transfusion will occur rarely.

  10. Hepatitis E in blood donors: investigation of the natural course of asymptomatic infection, Germany, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, Tanja; Diekmann, Juergen; Eberhardt, Matthias; Knabbe, Cornelius; Dreier, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections have been found in blood donors from various European countries, but the natural course is rarely specified. Here, we compared the progression of HEV viraemia, serostatus and liver-specific enzymes in 10 blood donors with clinically asymptomatic genotype 3 HEV infection, measuring HEV RNA concentrations, plasma concentrations of alanine/aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and bilirubin and anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG antibodies. RNA concentrations ranged from 77.2 to 2.19×105 IU/mL, with viraemia lasting from less than 10 to 52 days. Donors showed a typical progression of a recent HEV infection but differed in the first detection of anti-HEV IgA, IgM and IgG and seropositivity of the antibody classes. The diagnostic window between HEV RNA detection and first occurrence of anti-HEV antibodies ranged from eight to 48 days, depending on the serological assay used. The progression of laboratory parameters of asymptomatic HEV infection was largely comparable to the progression of symptomatic HEV infection, but only four of 10 donors showed elevated liver-specific parameters. Our results help elucidate the risk of transfusion-associated HEV infection and provide a basis for development of screening strategies. The diagnostic window illustrates that infectious blood donors can be efficiently identified only by RNA screening. PMID:27608433

  11. Prospective Audit of Blood Donor Selection Process in a Tertiary Care Hospital of a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Naila

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to emphasize the significance of internal audits of the blood donor selection process and documentation in a resource-limited country by assessing compliance with the established protocols, and to identify weak areas in the process. Materials and Methods: This audit reviewed the donor selection process at the blood bank of Liaquat National Hospital & Medical College, Karachi, over a 6-month period. Seven variables selected as performance indicators were graded as very good (%90-100%), good (80%-89%), satisfactory (70%-79%), or unacceptable (<70%). Blood bank staff was asked for feedback and suggestions. Results: Documentation of donor demographics was not within the acceptable range (documentation rates of 65.14%), donor status records were satisfactory (77.64%), and donor physical exam records were graded as good (86.34%). Five performance indicators were graded as very good (90%-100%). Conclusion: The audit proved productive in identifying major causes of irregularities in documentation and in making valuable suggestions for their rectification. PMID:26376585

  12. Effect of Graft Source on Unrelated Donor Haemopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation in Adults with Acute Leukemia: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Mary; Rocha, Vanderson; Sanz, Guillermo; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Arcese, William; Sirvent, Anne; Champlin, Richard E.; Chao, Nelson; Gee, Adrian P.; Isola, Luis; Laughlin, Mary J.; Marks, David I.; Nabhan, Samir; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Soiffer, Robert; Horowitz, Mary M.; Gluckman, Eliane; Wagner, John E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Umbilical cord blood (UCB) is increasingly considered as an alternative to peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) or bone marrow (BM), especially when a HLA-matched adult unrelated donor is not available. Methods In order to establish the appropriateness of current graft selection practices, we retrospectively compared leukemia-free survival and other outcomes for each graft source in patients aged >16 years transplanted for acute leukemia using Cox regression. Data were available on 1525 patients transplanted between 2002 and 2006 using UCB (n=165), PBPC (n=888) and BM (n=472). UCB units were matched at HLA-A and B at antigen level and DRB1 at allele level (n=10) or mismatched at one (n=40) or two antigens (n=115). PBPC and BM grafts from unrelated adult donors were matched for allele-level HLA-A, B, C and DRB1 (n=632; n=332) or mismatched at one locus (n=256; n=140). Findings Leukemia-free survival after UCB transplantation was comparable to that observed after 8/8 and 7/8 allele-matched PBPC or BM transplantation. Transplant-related mortality, however, was higher after UCB transplantation compared to 8/8 allele-matched PBPC (HR 1.62, p<0.01) or BM (HR 1.69, p<0.01). Grades 2–4 acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were lower in UCB recipients compared to allele-matched PBPC (HR 0.57, p<0.01 and HR 0.38, p<0.01, respectively), while chronic and not acute graft-versus-host disease was lower after UCB compared to allele-matched BM transplantation (HR 0.63, p=0.01). Interpretation Together, these data support the use of UCB for adults with acute leukemia when an HLA-matched unrelated adult donor is lacking and when transplant is urgently needed. PMID:20558104

  13. [Social marketing of blood donation: an analysis of new donors' predisposition].

    PubMed

    Barboza, Stephanie Ingrid Souza; Costa, Francisco José da

    2014-07-01

    This article aims to understand the motivational factors that influence individuals to donate blood, in order to support the social marketing measures for recruiting new donors. Based on theoretical research, a structural model was developed to analyze influences and interactions of constructs in individuals' intentions to donate blood. A field survey used a structured questionnaire with a sample of 346 individuals. The analysis included descriptive analysis, evaluation of psychometric consistency, and structural equation modeling with partial least squares estimation. Fear showed a negative influence and the reference group a positive influence on individual predisposition to donate blood. This indicated that social marketing for blood donation can be more effective in encouraging new donors if it remains focused on these two factors.

  14. Significant Improvements in the Practice Patterns of Adult Related Donor Care in US Transplantation Centers.

    PubMed

    Anthias, Chloe; Shaw, Bronwen E; Kiefer, Deidre M; Liesveld, Jane L; Yared, Jean; Kamble, Rammurti T; D'Souza, Anita; Hematti, Peiman; Seftel, Matthew D; Norkin, Maxim; DeFilipp, Zachariah; Kasow, Kimberly A; Abidi, Muneer H; Savani, Bipin N; Shah, Nirali N; Anderlini, Paolo; Diaz, Miguel A; Malone, Adriana K; Halter, Joerg P; Lazarus, Hillard M; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Paul V

    2016-03-01

    Recent investigations have found a higher incidence of adverse events associated with hematopoietic cell donation in related donors (RDs) who have morbidities that if present in an unrelated donor (UD) would preclude donation. In the UD setting, regulatory standards ensure independent assessment of donors, one of several crucial measures to safeguard donor health and safety. A survey conducted by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Donor Health and Safety Working Committee in 2007 reported a potential conflict of interest in >70% of US centers, where physicians had simultaneous responsibility for RDs and their recipients. Consequently, several international organizations have endeavored to improve practice through regulations and consensus recommendations. We hypothesized that the changes in the 2012 Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy and the Joint Accreditation Committee-International Society for Cellular Therapy and European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation standards resulting from the CIBMTR study would have significantly impacted practice. Accordingly, we conducted a follow-up survey of US transplantation centers to assess practice changes since 2007, and to investigate additional areas where RD care was predicted to differ from UD care. A total of 73 centers (53%), performing 79% of RD transplantations in the United States, responded. Significant improvements were observed since the earlier survey; 62% centers now ensure separation of RD and recipient care (P < .0001). This study identifies several areas where RD management does not meet international donor care standards, however. Particular concerns include counseling and assessment of donors before HLA typing, with 61% centers first disclosing donor HLA results to an individual other than the donor, the use of unlicensed mobilization agents, and the absence of long-term donor follow-up. Recommendations for improvement are made.

  15. [Demography and donation frequencies of blood and plasma donor populations in Germany. Update 2010 and 5-year comparison].

    PubMed

    Ritter, S; Hamouda, O; Offergeld, R

    2012-08-01

    The Robert Koch Institute collects and evaluates nationwide data on the incidence and prevalence of transfusion-relevant infections among blood and plasma donors in Germany. Since 2006 data not only on the number of donations tested but also on the number of the respective donors have become available. The demographic profile and donation frequencies of German whole blood, plasma and platelet donors in 2010 and the percentages among the general population are described and compared to data from 2006. Although the general population eligible to donate blood is on the decline since 2003, with a loss of 2% between 2006 and 2010, this has not led to a decrease in the number of blood donors and donations. Instead, the number of new and repeat whole blood donors increased by 8% and 7%, respectively. At the same time, the number of new plasma donors grew by 23%, that of repeat plasma donors by 41%. In 2010 more than 4.3% of the population aged 18-68 years was active as repeat whole blood donors; 0.4% repeatedly donated plasma or platelets. Since 2006 the percentage of donors among the general population increased significantly, especially among the youngest age group (18-24 years). Donation frequency varied depending on donor age and sex, with an average of 1.9 per year for whole blood donations, 12.5 for plasmapheresis and 5.0 for plateletpheresis. While the donation frequency for whole blood remained unchanged since 2006, the frequency of apheresis donations increased, especially among older donors. By recruiting more new donors and retaining and reactivating existing ones more effectively, the number of whole blood and apheresis donations was augmented.

  16. [IgA-IgG-IgM serum levels in blood donors. Examination of some variables].

    PubMed

    Ghessi, A; Azzario, F; Marinig, C; Mancini, L; Polese, T C; Pozzessere, V

    1976-07-31

    IgA, IgG and IgM serum levels in 603 normal blood donors (510 males and 93 females) have been calculated by the method of single radial immunodiffusion. In every immunoglobulin class the normal values and other important statistical parameters have been determined. Several statistical examinations have been executed to test the influence of some factors as sex, weight, age and number of blood donations on IgA, IgG and IgM serum levels.

  17. Etiology of anemia of blood donor candidates deferred by hematologic screening

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Michel Alves; de Souza, Renata Andréia Volpe; Carlos, Aline Meneses; Soares, Sheila; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Pereira, Gilberto de Araujo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia and one of the main factors in the clinical deferral of blood donors. This fact prompted the current study that aimed to determine the prevalence and etiology of anemia in blood donor candidates and to evaluate the hematological screening technique used for the exclusion of these donors. Methods: This was a prospective study that compared two groups (Anemic and Non-anemic). Initially screening for anemia was performed by manually measuring hemoglobin (Bioclin® Kit); the results were subsequently compared with an automated screening method (Coulter T-890). The etiology was investigated by hemoglobin electrophoresis in alkaline and acid pH, Hb A2 dosage and measurement of the ferritin concentration by immunoagglutination. Differences and associations of interest were analyzed using the Yates and McNemar's Chi-square tests and the Fisher, Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: The deferral rate due to anemia was 4.2%; iron deficiency was identified in 37.5% and beta thalassemia in 9.3% of the excluded candidates. There was a significant discrepancy between the two techniques used to measure hemoglobin with 38.1% of initially deferred donors presenting normal hemoglobin levels by the automated method. Conclusion: The results show a high rate of blood donors being deferred for anemia and confirm that iron deficiency is the most prevalent cause. The discrepancies found by comparing screening methods suggest that hemoglobin and hematocrit levels should be confirmed before deferring a donor due to anemia; this may increase supplies in blood banks. PMID:23125544

  18. Gene frequencies of human neutrophil antigens in the Tunisian blood donors and Berbers.

    PubMed

    Abid, S; Zili, M; Bouzid, L; Kibech, R; Foudhaili, N; Joudi, K; Ren Regaya, Z; Abdennaji, B; Mrad, R; Boukef, K

    2001-08-01

    Human neutrophil antigens play an important role in provoking immune neutropenia and transfusion-reactions. The aim of this study was to determine granulocyte-specific antigens on the neutrophil Fc gamma receptor IIIb (Fc gamma RIIIb, CD16b), namely, the HNA-1a(NA1) and HNA-1b(NA2) antigens and their gene frequencies in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers. One hundred and ninety-nine unrelated healthy Tunisian blood donors and Berbers were typed for HNA-1a and HNA-1b(NA1 and NA2), using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). In 24 granulocyte samples, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b phenotypes was additionally determined by the granulocyte immunofluorescence test (GIFT) and correlated with the genotyping results. A subsequent analysis of the genotyping study showed that, the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed, were 0.342 and 0.658 for Berbers, and 0.311 and 0.668 for blood donors, respectively. In the genotyping study conducted, it was determined that the HNA-1a and HNA-1b gene frequencies observed in Tunisian blood donors and Berbers are similar to those previously reported in other white populations.

  19. 75 FR 22813 - Guidance for Industry: Requalification Method for Reentry of Blood Donors Deferred Because of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... Blood Donors Deferred Because of Reactive Test Results for Antibody to Hepatitis B Core Antigen (Anti... Hepatitis B Core Antigen (Anti- HBc),'' dated May 2010. The guidance document provides recommendations to... previous tests that were repeatedly reactive for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc)...

  20. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Hemoglobin... discuss blood donor hemoglobin and hematocrit qualification standards in the United States, its impact...

  1. [Hepatitis B and delta: the prevalence of seroepidemiological markers in volunteer blood donors and their families].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Muñoz, M T; Bustamante-Calvillo, M E; Guiscafré-Gallardo, J P; Muñoz, O

    1991-01-01

    41 volunteer blood donors and his relatives were studied in order to know about the prevalence of hepatitis B and D virus infections in selected groups. Frequency of HBsAg+ carriers was 0.34 per cent in the Centro Nacional de la Transfusión Sanguínea and 0.15 per cent in the Banco Central de Sangre, IMSS. Most of the HBsAg+ blood donors were 21 to 40 years old (87.8%); 21.9 per cent had IgM antibodies against HBc and just 2.4 per cent were HBeAg positive. Forty one (26.9%) of 152 relatives had one or more of the HBV markers, 3.9 per cent were HBsAg carriers and 1.3 per cent were HBeAg positive. In the infected relatives group 36.6 per cent were ancestory or brothers and just 14.6 per cent of wives were infected. None of the HBsAg+ blood donors or his relatives had antibodies against delta agent. These results support the fact that the frequency of asymptomatic carriers of HBsAg in the volunteer blood donors group is similar to he frequency in the general population and identifies the group of relatives as those with the highest risk to acquire HBV infection.

  2. TT virus (TTV) genotyping in blood donors and multiple transfused patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Castro Amarante, Maria Fernanda; Kashima, Simone; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2007-12-01

    TT virus (TTV) is widely distributed in the general population. The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of TTV genotypes among blood donor candidates and multiple transfused patients in the Southeast region of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. TTV-DNA detection by amplification of a segment of the ORF-1 region, presented a prevalence of 11.9% in 270 serum samples from blood donors, of 46.2% in 18 samples from patients with coagulopathies, and of 31.8% in 15 samples from patients with hemoglobinopathies. When specific primers for the non-coding (UTR) region of the TTV genome were used the prevalences were 50.5%, 95.0%, and 82.0% for blood donors, patients with coagulopathies and patients with hemoglobinopathies, respectively. Positive samples from 49 individuals were sequenced and partial segments of 230 base pairs referring to the ORF-1 region of the TTV genome were used for the determination of their genotypes with the aid of phylogenetic analysis. The most frequent genotype was 1 (74.0%), followed by genotype 2 (26.0%). These data indicate a high prevalence of this virus in the populations of blood donors and transfused patients, providing further evidence for the role of transfusions as an efficient pathway in the transmission chain.

  3. Epidemiology of viral infections in the Swedish blood-donor population.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, A

    1994-12-01

    The epidemiological situation regarding blood-borne infections in Sweden is favourable and under very good control. The prevalence of infectious markers in the blood-donor population is low. In 1993 the frequencies of confirmed positive tests were three in 1,000,000 for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1), one in 100,000 for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and three in 100,000 for hepatitis C virus (HCV). The safety of the blood supply is high and relies on strict donor selection, information on risky behaviour, and screening for syphilis, HBV and antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen, HCV, HIV-1, HIV-2 and human T-cell leukaemia virus type I and II (HTLV-I/-II). No donors with syphilis have been identified for many years. Screening for anti-HTLV-I/-II was introduced in February 1994 and no results have been reported yet. Donation is usually not permitted at the first visit, as the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections is greater in first-time donors. The risk of acquiring a transfusion-transmitted infection is low, but still a few cases of HBV and HCV infection occur each year among about 150,000 patients receiving transfusions. As far as we know, HIV infection has not been transmitted by blood components in Sweden since 1985.

  4. Phenotypic and allelic profile of ABO and Rhésus D blood group system among blood donor in Antananarivo.

    PubMed

    Randriamanantany, Z A; Rajaonatahina, D H; Razafimanantsoa, F E; Rasamindrakotroka, M T; Andriamahenina, R; Rasoarilalamanarivo, F B; Hanitriniala, S P; Herisoa, F R; Rasamindrakotroka, A; Rakoto Alson, O A

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the phenotypic and allelic profiles of ABO and Rhesus D blood group system among first time blood donors at the National Centre of Blood Supply of Antananarivo. We collected through this retrospective study all data registered during 7 years of practice (from 2003 to 2009). Age and sex were analysed with the result of ABO and RhD screening. They were tested both with Beth Vincent and Simonin tests which were performed in a plate, by using commercial monoclonal antibody (Diaclone(®) et Eryclone(®)), and home-made red cells tests. The Rh D was performed with the same commercial kits. The frequencies of alleles were calculated by using Bernstein method. Data about 45,857 donors were obtained. A male predominance (80.46%) was found and most of our donors were aged <40 (74.92%). 98.90% of the donors were Rh D positive. Phenotypic distribution of each ABO antigen was, respectively, 22.61, 29.66, 6.13 and 41.60% for A, B, AB and O antigen. Allelic frequencies of A, B and O were 0.1559, 0.1987 and 0.6454. These results confirmed the fact that Madagascan population had admixed ethnic origin.

  5. Prevalence of Principal Rh Blood Group Antigens in Blood Donors at the Blood Bank of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, Sreedhar Babu Kinnera; Rajendran, Arun; Sarella, Jothibai Dorairaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rhesus (Rh) antigen was discovered in 1940 by Karl Landsteiner and Wiener. Due to its immunogenicity along with A, B antigens, Rh D antigen testing was made mandatory in pre-transfusion testing. Presently there are more than 50 antigens in Rh blood group system but major ones are D, C, E, c, and e. Very few reports are available regarding their prevalence in India and no reports are available from Andhra Pradesh. Aim To study the prevalence of principal Rh blood group antigens like D, C, E, c & e in the voluntary blood donors attending our blood bank. Materials and Methods A prospective cross-sectional non interventional study was carried out on 1000 healthy blood donors from August 2013 to July 2014 at our blood bank. Donors were grouped and typed for ABO and Rh major antigens using monoclonal blood grouping reagents as per the manufacturer’s instructions. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS version 16. Comparison of categorical data between antigen positive and negative individuals was done using Chi-square test. Descriptive statistics for the categorical variables were performed by computing the frequencies (percentages) in each category. Incidence was given in proportion with 95% confidence interval. Results A total of 1000 blood samples from donors were phenotyped. Among Rh antigens, e was the most common antigen (98.4%), followed by D-94.1%, C-88%, c-54.9% and E-18.8% with DCe/DCe (R1R1) (43.4%) being the most common phenotype and the least common phenotype is r’r’ (0.1%). Conclusion Database for antigen frequency to at least Rh blood group system in local donors helps to provide antigen negative blood to patients with multiple alloantibodies, minimize alloimmunization rate, and thereby improve blood safety. PMID:27437223

  6. Stress and coping in HIV-positive former plasma/blood donors in China: a test of cognitive appraisal theory.

    PubMed

    Meade, Christina S; Wang, Jianping; Lin, Xiuyun; Wu, Hao; Poppen, Paul J

    2010-04-01

    Throughout the 1990s, many villagers in rural China were infected with HIV through commercial plasma/blood donation. These former plasma/blood donors (FPDs) experienced many HIV-related stressors. This study tested a cognitive appraisal model of stress and coping in a sample of HIV-positive adult FPDs. Participants (N = 207) from multiple villages completed a battery of questionnaires assessing HIV-related stress, HIV symptoms, cognitive appraisal, coping behaviors, and psychological distress. Participants reported high levels of HIV-related stress, depression, and anxiety. In a structural equation model, greater HIV-related stress, HIV symptoms, and threat appraisal were directly associated with psychological distress. HIV-related stress was also indirectly associated with psychological distress through threat appraisal. In a second model, coping was found to mediate the relationship between challenge appraisal and psychological distress. Results support the utility of cognitive appraisal theory. Stress management interventions targeting HIV-positive FPDs in China are indicated.

  7. Reduction of exposure to blood donors in preterm infants submitted to red blood cell transfusions using pediatric satellite packs

    PubMed Central

    Uezima, Cristina Lika; Barreto, Ariane Moreira; Guinsburg, Ruth; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Bordin, José Orlando; Barros, Melca Maria O.; dos Santos, Amélia Miyashiro N.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In preterm newborn infants transfused with erythrocytes stored up to 28 days, to compare the reduction of blood donor exposure in two groups of infants classified according to birth weight. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted with preterm infants with birth weight <1000g (Group 1) and 1000-1499g (Group 2), born between April, 2008 and December, 2009. Neonates submitted to exchange transfusions, emergency erythrocyte transfusion, or those who died in the first 24 hours of life were excluded. Transfusions were indicated according to the local guideline using pediatric transfusion satellite bags. Demographic and clinical data, besides number of transfusions and donors were assessed. . Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with multiple transfusions. RESULTS: 30 and 48 neonates were included in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The percentage of newborns with more than one erythrocyte transfusion (90 versus 11%), the median number of transfusions (3 versus 1) and the median of blood donors (2 versus 1) were higher in Group 1 (p<0.001), compared to Group 2. Among those with multiple transfusions, 14 (82%) and one (50%) presented 50% reduction in the number of blood donors, respectively in Groups 1 and 2. Factors associated with multiple transfusions were: birth weight <1000g (OR 11.91; 95%CI 2.14-66.27) and presence of arterial umbilical catheter (OR 8.59; 95%CI 1.94-38.13), adjusted for confounders. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of pediatrics satellites bags on blood donor reduction was higher in preterm infants with birth weight <1000g. PMID:24142309

  8. Action plan to regain unnecessary deferred blood donors due to malaria risk in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Değirmenci, Aysu; Döşkaya, Mert; Caner, Ayşe; Nergis, Sebnem; Gül, Kadri; Aydınok, Yeşim; Ertop, Tufan; Aksoy, Nurten; Korkmaz, Metin; Alkan, Mehmet Ziya; Üner, Ahmet; Gürüz, Yüksel

    2012-06-01

    Malaria was expected to be a major problem during blood donation in Turkey due to existence of malaria cases in southeastern region of Turkey. The present study aimed for the first time, to investigate malaria in "donors deferred for malaria risk" and to determine the regional rates of malaria deferral in Turkey. Blood samples were collected from several Blood Banks of southeastern provinces where local malaria cases still exist and from Blood Bank of Ege University Medical School (EUMS) located in western Turkey where malaria is eradicated decades ago. Plasmodium spp. and specific antibodies were investigated by stained smears, antigen detection, PCR and ELISA. Among the donors deferred for malaria risk, Plasmodium spp. were not detected by microscopy, PCR or antigen detection. Seroprevalances were 2% and 3.92% in western and southeastern regions, respectively. Rate of donor deferral for malaria risk was 0.9% in EUMS and deferrals were exclusively because of travel to southeastern Turkey. In southeastern provinces, deferrals were mainly due to malaria like fever history. The present study first time assessed regional rates of donor deferral due to malaria risk in Turkey. Previously, malaria was expected to be a major problem during blood donation in Turkey due to existence of malaria cases in southeastern region of Turkey. The results of the study showed that 97% of the deferrals were unnecessary. In conclusion, to reduce unnecessary donor deferrals in Turkey, in addition to comprehensive questioning for malaria history, the usage of a malaria antibody screening method should be initiated prior to deferral decision.

  9. Failure to Influence the Rejection Time of Homologous Skin Grafts in the Rabbit by Prior Injection of Donor Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, S.; Brooke, M. S.

    1961-01-01

    Intravenous injection of rabbits with homologous whole blood or erythrocytes did not influence the rejection time of subsequent grafts from the blood donors. In some animals warm agglutinins developed, and donor erythrocytes labelled with chromium had an immune disappearance slope. PMID:14486825

  10. Norovirus-Specific Memory T Cell Responses in Adult Human Donors

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Maria; Tamminen, Kirsi; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in people of all ages worldwide. NoV-specific serum antibodies which block the binding of NoV virus-like particles (VLPs) to the cell receptors have been thoroughly investigated. In contrast, only a few publications are available on the NoV capsid VP1 protein-specific T cell responses in humans naturally infected with the virus. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of eight healthy adult human donors previously exposed to NoV were stimulated with purified VLPs derived from NoV GII.4-1999, GII.4-2012 (Sydney), and GI.3, and IFN-γ production was measured by an ELISPOT assay. In addition, 76 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the entire 539-amino acid sequence of GII.4 VP1 were pooled into two-dimensional matrices and used to identify putative T cell epitopes. Seven of the eight subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the peptides and five subjects produced IFN-γ in response to the VLPs of the same origin. In general, stronger T cell responses were induced with the peptides in each donor compared to the VLPs. A CD8+ T cell epitope in the shell domain of the VP1 (134SPSQVTMFPHIIVDVRQL151) was identified in two subjects, both having human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A∗02:01 allele. To our knowledge, this is the first report using synthetic peptides to study NoV-specific T cell responses in human subjects and identify T cell epitopes. PMID:27752254

  11. Cysticercus antibodies and antigens in serum from blood donors from Pondicherry, India.

    PubMed

    Parija, Subhash Chandra; Balamurungan, N; Sahu, Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan; Subbaiah, S P

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to screen the serum of blood donors, which are apparently healthy and residing in Pondicherry or its neighboring districts of Tamil Nadu State, for specific detection of Cysticercus antigens and antibodies. A total of 216 blood samples were collected from blood donors at the Central Blood Bank, JIPMER Hospital, Pondicherry, India during January and February 2004. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to demonstrate anti-Cysticercus antibodies and the Co-agglutination (CoA) was used to detect antigen in sera. 14 (6.48 %) males were positive for either anti-Cysticercus antibodies or antigens. Of these eight sera were positive for anti-Cysticercus antibodies and six were positive for antigens. Results of the present study show that serum Cysticercus antigen detection may be a useful adjunct to antibody testing for seroprevalence studies of cysticercosis in the community. The present study is the first kind of study, carried out to determine both cysticercal antibodies as well as antigens in the serum samples collected from the healthy blood donors.

  12. Prevalence of HLA antibodies in remotely transfused or alloexposed volunteer blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Kakaiya, Ram M.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Wright, David J.; Steele, Whitney R.; Kleinman, Steven H.; Busch, Michael P.; Norris, Philip J.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Rios, Jorge A.; Carey, Patricia; Glynn, Simone A.

    2010-01-01

    Background HLA antibody testing of previously transfused or pregnant donors may help reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). However, the prevalence of HLA antibodies in transfused donors has not been well characterized. Methods Transfusion and pregnancy history was obtained from consenting donors. HLA Class I & II antibody testing was performed by multi-antigen bead Luminex platform. Cut off values for class I & II antibodies used normalized background ratio of 10.8 and 6.9 respectively. Linear probability models were used to evaluate potential associations between HLA alloimmunization and donor characteristics. Results 7,920 donors (2,086 males and 5,834 females) were tested. HLA antibody prevalence did not significantly differ between 895 transfused (1.7%) and 1138 non-transfused males (1.0%), [odds ratio (OR) 1.75; 95% CI 0.80, 3.82]. Prevalence in 45 transfused nulliparous females (4.4%, 95% CI 0.1%, 11.8%) was not statistically different from the 1.6% prevalence in 1732 non-transfused nulliparous females (odds ratio 2.94, 95% CI 0.68, 12.74). Transfused parous females had higher prevalence than non-transfused counterparts (p=0.004), odds ratio 1.39 (95% CI 1.07, 1.80). In a linear probability model, the estimated additive risk of transfusion-induced alloimmunization was only 0.8% (95% CI -0.2%, 1.8%), (p=0.10). Donor transfusion history showed that 58% of transfusions occurred >10 years previously. Conclusion Transfused volunteer blood donors do not appear to have a significantly higher prevalence of HLA antibodies than their non-transfused counterparts. Thus, in an effort to reduce TRALI risk, ascertaining past history of transfusion and testing these donors for HLA antibodies is not necessary. PMID:20070615

  13. Significant improvements in the practice patterns of adult related donor care in US transplant centers

    PubMed Central

    MBChB, Chloe Anthias; Shaw, Bronwen E; Kiefer, Deidre M; Liesveld, Jane L; Yared, Jean; Kambl, Rammurti T; D'Souza, Anita; Hematti, Peiman; Seftel, Matthew D; Norkin, Maxim; DeFilipp, Zachariah M; Kasow, Kimberly A; Abidi, Muneer H; Savani, Bipin N; Shah, Nirali N; Anderlini, Paolo; Diaz, Miguel A; Malone, Adriana K; Halter, Joerg P; Lazarus, Hillard M; Logan, Brent R; Switzer, Galen E; Pulsipher, Michael A; Confer, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Paul V

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations have found a higher incidence of adverse events associated with hematopoietic cell donation in related donors (RDs) who have morbidities that if present in an unrelated donor (UD) would preclude donation. In the UD setting, regulatory standards ensure independent assessment of donors, one of several crucial measures to safeguard donor health and safety. A survey conducted by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) Donor Health and Safety Working Committee in 2007 reported a potential conflict of interest in >70% US centers, where physicians had simultaneous responsibility for RDs and their recipients. Consequently, several international organizations have endeavored to improve practice through regulations and consensus recommendations. We hypothesized that the changes in the 2012 FACT-JACIE Standards, resulting from the CIBMTR study, will have significantly impacted practice. Accordingly, a follow-up survey of US transplant centers was conducted to assess practice changes since 2007, and investigate additional areas where RD care was predicted to differ from UD care. 73 centers (53%), performing 79% of US RD transplants responded. Significant improvements were observed since the earlier survey; 62% centers now ensure separation of RD and recipient care (P<0.0001). However, this study identifies several areas where RD management does not meet international donor care standards. Particular concerns include counseling and assessment of donors before HLA typing, with 61% centers first disclosing donor HLA results to an individual other than the donor, the use of unlicensed mobilization agents, and the absence of long-term donor follow-up. Recommendations for improvement are described. PMID:26597080

  14. Iron-deficient erythropoiesis in blood donors and red blood cell recovery after transfusion: initial studies with a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; Brittenham, Gary M.; Francis, Richard O.; Zimring, James C.; Hod, Eldad A.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Most frequent red cell (RBC) donors and many first-time donors are iron deficient, but meet haemoglobin standards. However, the effects of donation-induced iron deficiency on RBC storage quality are unknown. Thus, we used a mouse model to determine if donor iron deficiency reduced post-transfusion RBC recovery. Methods Weanling mice received a control diet or an iron-deficient diet. A third group receiving the iron-deficient diet was also phlebotomised weekly. This provided 3 groups of mice with different iron status: (1) iron replete, (2) mild iron deficiency with iron-deficient erythropoiesis, and (3) iron-deficiency anaemia. At ten weeks of age, blood was collected, leucoreduced, and stored at 4 ºC. After 12 days of storage, 24-hour (h) post-transfusion RBC recovery was quantified in recipients by flow cytometry. Results Before blood collection, mean haemoglobin concentrations in the iron-replete, iron-deficient, and iron-deficiency anaemia donor mice were 16.5±0.4, 11.5±0.4, and 7.0±1.4 [g/dL± 1 standard deviation (SD)], respectively (p<0.01 for all comparisons between groups). The 24-h post-transfusion RBC recoveries in recipients receiving transfusions from these three cohorts were 77.1±13.2, 66.5±10.9, and 46.7±15.9 (% ±1 SD), respectively (p<0.05 for all comparisons between groups). Discussion In summary, donor iron deficiency significantly reduced 24-h post-transfusion RBC recovery in recipient mice. RBCs from mice with mild iron deficiency and iron-deficient erythropoiesis, with haemoglobin levels similar to those used for human autologous blood donation, had intermediate post-transfusion RBC recovery, as compared to iron-replete donors and those with iron-deficiency anaemia. This suggests that, in addition to the effects of iron deficiency on donor health, frequent blood donation, leading to iron-deficient erythropoiesis, may also have adverse effects for transfusion recipients. PMID:28263174

  15. [Investigation of Bartonella henselae seroprevalence and related risk factors in blood donors admitted to Pamukkale University Blood Center].

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cansev; Ergin, Cağri; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2009-07-01

    Bartonella henselae is an emerging infectious agent that mainly causes cat scratch disease, basillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatitis. Although many basillary angiomatosis cases have been reported especially from the Mediterranean region of Turkey, adequate data about the seroprevalence of B. henselae in Turkey does not exist. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of B. henselae in volunteer blood donors and the related risk factors. In this study, sera samples were randomly collected from 800 (771 man, 29 women; age range: 18-60 years) voluntary healthy blood donors admitted to Pamukkale University Research and Training Hospital. B. henselae (Houston-1 strain) total antibodies were investigated by an in-house indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay. Seropositivity was detected in 6% (48/800) of the donors. B. henselae (Houston-1) antibody titer was 1/64 in 40 of the donors, 1/128 in 4, 1/256 in 2, 1/512 in 1 and 1/1024 in 1 of the donors. Statistical analysis of epidemiological and demographical data revealed that high seroprevalence rates have been found in rabbit stockfarmers (p = 0.004), students staying at hostels (p = 0.04) and people with history of tick-bite (p = 0.03). No significant statistical differences were found in each related groups in terms of age, sex, chronic disorders, sport activities, outside behaviors, being injured by any wild or domestic animals, working outdoors, geographical properties of the area of inhabitance, hunting and travelling (p > 0.05). One of the high titer (1/512) antibody positive subjects was a cat owner and had a history of phlebotomus bite, pediculosis and sporting in open area while 1/1024 titer positive case was a farmer and a dog owner. Our healthy blood donors' seroprevalence results are similar to those of other Mediterranean countries. The analysis of epidemiological data revealed that tick bite history and rabbit stockfarming were the risk factors for B. henselae infection. Variability

  16. Blood and bioidentity: ideas about self, boundaries and risk among blood donors and people living with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Waldby, Catherine; Rosengarten, Marsha; Treloar, Carla; Fraser, Suzanne

    2004-10-01

    Clinical medicine and biotechnology increasingly utilise and transform human bodily tissues in novel ways. Today more and more tissues--blood, whole organs, ova, embryos, sperm, skin, bone, heart valves, cellular material, bone marrow and corneas--can be transferred between donors and recipients. Hence more and more people in developed nations have the experience of giving a fragment of their body to another, or receiving such a fragment as part of some kind of therapy. These systems for the circulation of tissues raise the question of what we have termed 'bioidentity'. Bioidentity describes our common-sense understanding of our bodies as 'ours', as both supporting and being included in our social and subjective identities. Within this framework, how are we to understand the status of detachable bodily fragments like blood, ova or organs? As parts of our bodies do they retain a trace of our identity after donation, or are they detachable things? What is our relationship, if any, to the patient who receives our tissues as part of their treatment? This paper investigates the specific case of blood transfusion and donation. It draws upon in depth interviews with 55 people who have specific experience with blood. They either have hepatitis C (are HCV+) acquired by transfusion or intravenous drug use, or have donated blood or received a blood transfusion but are free of hepatitis C (are HCV-). We analyse this material according to the themes--Donated Blood as 'Self', Blood as Alienable, Blood as Communal Substance, and Contaminated Gifts and the Blood of Strangers. We find that, generally speaking the HCV+ and HCV- groups share very similar ideas about blood donation and transfusion. For a minority of both groups, blood was understood as a decisive site of self irrespective of location, but for the remainder donated blood was either ambiguous with regard to identity, a shared substance, or not considered to have any lingering relationship to the self once given. However

  17. Child-to-Adult Liver Transplantation With Donation After Cardiac Death Donors: Three Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangshuo; Liu, Xuemin; Zhang, Xiaogang; Yu, Liang; Sha, Huanchen; Zhou, Ying; Tian, Min; Shi, Jianhua; Wang, Wanli; Liu, Chang; Guo, Kun; Lv, Yi; Wang, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Development of organ transplantation is restricted by the discrepancy between the lack of donors and increasing number of patients. The outcome of pediatric donors transplanted into adult recipients especially with donation after circulatory death (DCD) pattern has not been well studied. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience of 3 successful DCD donor child-to-adult liver transplantations lately. Three DCD donors were separately 7, 5, and 8 years old. The ratio between donor graft weight and recipient body weight was 1.42%, 1.00%, and 1.33%, respectively. Ratio between the volume of donor liver and the expected liver volume was 0.65, 0.46, and 0.60. Splenectomy was undertaken for the second recipient according to the portal vein pressure (PVP) which was observed during the operation. Two out of 3 of the recipients suffered with acute kidney injury and got recovered after renal replacement therapy. The first recipient also went through early allograft dysfunction and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The hospital course of the third recipient was uneventful. After 1 year of follow-up visit, the first and second recipients maintain good quality of life and liver function. The third patient was followed up for 5 months until now and recovered well. DCD child-to-adult liver transplantation should only be used for comparatively matched donor and recipient. PVP should be monitored during the operation. The short-term efficacy is good, but long-term follow-up and clinical study with large sample evaluation are still needed.

  18. High prevalence of HIV p24 antigen among HIV antibody negative prospective blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Japhet, Margaret Oluwatoyin; Adewumi, Moses Olubusuyi; Adesina, Olufisayo Adeyemi; Donbraye, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Blood transfusion service centers in Nigeria screen donated blood for markers of HIV infection using antibody- (Ab) based rapid test and in some centers, positives are re-tested using Ab-based ELISA. Paucity of data exists on p24 antigen prevalence among HIV Ab-negative donors in Nigeria. This study aims at detecting HIV p24 antigen among prospective blood donors in Osun State, Nigeria. Prospective blood donors negative for HIV antibodies using Determine test kit were re-tested using BIORAD GENSCREEN Ultra Ag-Ab ELISA kit, a fourth-generation ELISA kit that detects HIV antibodies/p24 antigen. Of the 169 HIV Ab-negative prospective donors, 10 (5.9%) were positive for HIV p24 antigen and 70% (7/10) of them were in the age range 18-30 years. Results of this study show that blood transfusion is still one of the major routes of HIV transmission in Nigeria and a higher proportion is among youth. Inclusion of p24 antigen testing into the blood donor screening will help reduce transfusion associated HIV in Nigeria if Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) of all blood donor samples is not affordable; also, HIV enlightenment programs tailored toward youth may help reduce this rate among donors since more young people donate blood in low/middle-income countries than in high-income countries.

  19. [Prevalence of HTLV-I/II infection among blood donors in Santa Fe Province, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Brun, Roque O; Astarloa, Laura; Salomon, Horacio E; Biglione, Mirna M

    2004-01-01

    Subsequent to the National Epidemiologic Surveillance Program developed in 1997 by the National AIDS Program, anti-HTLV-I/II antibodies among blood donors in Santa Fe Province started to be detected. On the basis of this initial finding, it was regarded of interest to evaluate the true HTLV-I/II seroprevalence in this population during a four-year survey. Thus, from 1997 up to 2002, 9425 samples were studied from 17 out of the 19 provincial departments. Out of the total sampling, 38 proved reactive by agglutination techniques, 18 of which were confirmed by western blot (WB). Out of the latter, 10 were HTLV-I/II seropositive with a final prevalence of 0.1% (10/9425), whereas 7 were indeterminate and 1 negative. Among these 10 confirmed sera, 2 (0.02%) were HTLV, 3 (0.03%) HTLV-I and 5 (0.05%) HTLV-II. It should be highlighted that the presence of HTLV-I/II infection in blood donors in Santa Fe Province was demonstrated for the first time, with a prevalence greater than that reported for blood donors in non-endemic Argentine areas. Such findings confirm the need of corresponding systematic screening through regulatory blood bank norms in Santa Fe Province.

  20. Optimizing Donor Selection for Public Cord Blood Banking: Influence of Maternal, Infant and Collection Characteristics on Cord Blood Unit Quality

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kristin M.; Mendizabal, Adam; Betz-Stablein, Brigid; Wease, Stephen; Shoulars, Kevin; Gentry, Tracy; Prasad, Vinod K.; Sun, Jessica; Carter, Shelly; Balber, Andrew E.; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Background Banked unrelated donor umbilical cord blood (CB) has improved access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients without a suitably matched donor. In a resource-limited environment, ensuring that the public inventory is enriched with high-quality cord blood units (CBUs) addressing the needs of a diverse group of patients is a priority. Identification of donor characteristics correlating with higher CBU quality could guide operational strategies to increase the yield of banked high-quality CBUs. Methods Characteristics of 5267 CBUs donated to the Carolinas Cord Blood Bank, a public bank participating in the National Cord Blood Inventory, were retrospectively analyzed. Eligible CBUs, collected by trained personnel, were processed using standard procedures. Routine quality and potency metrics [post-processing total nucleated cell count (post-TNCC), CD34+, colony-forming units (CFUs)] were correlated with maternal, infant, and collection characteristics. Results High-quality CBUs were defined as those with higher post-TNCC (>1.25×109), and CD34+ + CFU in the upper quartile. Factors associated with higher CD34+ or CFU content included a shorter interval from collection to processing (<10 hours), younger gestational age (34–37 weeks; CD34++CFU) Caucasian race, higher birth weight (>3500grams) and larger collection volumes (>80ml). Conclusions We describe characteristics identifying high-quality CBUs, which can be used to inform strategies for CBU collection for public banks. Efforts should be made to prioritize collections from larger babies born before 38 weeks of gestation. CBUs should be rapidly transported to the processing laboratory. The lower quality of CBUs from non-Caucasian donors highlights the challenges of building a racially diverse public CB inventory. PMID:23711284

  1. Hepatitis B, HIV, and Syphilis Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women and Blood Donors in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Rahel; Rembert, Nicole J.; Tancho, Samuel; Halle-Ekane, Gregory E.; Enah, Comfort; Welty, Thomas K.; Tih, Pius M.; Tita, Alan T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated seroprevalence and correlates of selected infections in pregnant women and blood donors in a resource-limited setting. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of laboratory seroprevalence data from pregnant women and voluntary blood donors from facilities in Cameroon in 2014. Rapid tests were performed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen, syphilis treponemal antibodies, and HIV-1/2 antibodies. Blood donations were also tested for hepatitis C and malaria. Results. The seroprevalence rates and ranges among 7069 pregnant women were hepatitis B 4.4% (1.1–9.6%), HIV 6% (3.0–10.2%), and syphilis 1.7% (1.3–3.8%) with significant variability among the sites. Correlates of infection in pregnancy in adjusted regression models included urban residence for hepatitis B (aOR 2.9, CI 1.6–5.4) and HIV (aOR 3.5, CI 1.9–6.7). Blood donor seroprevalence rates and ranges were hepatitis B 6.8% (5.0–8.8%), HIV 2.2% (1.4–2.8%), syphilis 4% (3.3–4.5%), malaria 1.9%, and hepatitis C 1.7% (0.5–2.5%). Conclusions. Hepatitis B, HIV, and syphilis infections are common among pregnant women and blood donors in Cameroon with higher rates in urban areas. Future interventions to reduce vertical transmission should include universal screening for these infections early in pregnancy and provision of effective prevention tools including the birth dose of univalent hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:27578957

  2. Hematopoietic SCT in Europe 2013: recent trends in the use of alternative donors showing more haploidentical donors but fewer cord blood transplants.

    PubMed

    Passweg, J R; Baldomero, H; Bader, P; Bonini, C; Cesaro, S; Dreger, P; Duarte, R F; Dufour, C; Falkenburg, J H F; Farge-Bancel, D; Gennery, A; Kröger, N; Lanza, F; Nagler, A; Sureda, A; Mohty, M

    2015-04-01

    A record number of 39,209 HSCT in 34,809 patients (14,950 allogeneic (43%) and 19,859 autologous (57%)) were reported by 658 centers in 48 countries to the 2013 survey. Trends include: more growth in allogeneic than in autologous HSCT, increasing use of sibling and unrelated donors and a pronounced increase in haploidentical family donors when compared with cord blood donors for those patients without a matched related or unrelated donor. Main indications were leukemias, 11,190 (32%; 96% allogeneic); lymphoid neoplasias, 19,958 (57%; 11% allogeneic); solid tumors, 1543 (4%; 4% allogeneic); and nonmalignant disorders, 1975 (6%; 91% allogeneic). In patients without a matched sibling or unrelated donor, alternative donors are used. Since 2010 there has been a marked increase of 96% in the number of transplants performed from haploidentical relatives (802 in 2010 to 1571 in 2013), whereas the number of unrelated cord blood transplants has slightly decreased (789 in 2010 to 666 in 2013). The use of donor type varies greatly throughout Europe.

  3. Hematopoietic SCT in Europe 2013: recent trends in the use of alternative donors showing more haploidentical donors but fewer cord blood transplants

    PubMed Central

    Passweg, J R; Baldomero, H; Bader, P; Bonini, C; Cesaro, S; Dreger, P; Duarte, R F; Dufour, C; Falkenburg, J H F; Farge-Bancel, D; Gennery, A; Kröger, N; Lanza, F; Nagler, A; Sureda, A; Mohty, M

    2015-01-01

    A record number of 39 209 HSCT in 34 809 patients (14 950 allogeneic (43%) and 19 859 autologous (57%)) were reported by 658 centers in 48 countries to the 2013 survey. Trends include: more growth in allogeneic than in autologous HSCT, increasing use of sibling and unrelated donors and a pronounced increase in haploidentical family donors when compared with cord blood donors for those patients without a matched related or unrelated donor. Main indications were leukemias, 11 190 (32% 96% allogeneic); lymphoid neoplasias, 19 958 (57% 11% allogeneic); solid tumors, 1543 (4% 4% allogeneic); and nonmalignant disorders, 1975 (6% 91% allogeneic). In patients without a matched sibling or unrelated donor, alternative donors are used. Since 2010 there has been a marked increase of 96% in the number of transplants performed from haploidentical relatives (802 in 2010 to 1571 in 2013), whereas the number of unrelated cord blood transplants has slightly decreased (789 in 2010 to 666 in 2013). The use of donor type varies greatly throughout Europe. PMID:25642761

  4. Comprehensive banking of sibling donor cord blood for children with malignant and nonmalignant disease.

    PubMed

    Reed, William; Smith, Renée; Dekovic, Florinna; Lee, Joanna Y; Saba, Julie D; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Epstein, Joanna; Haaz, Steffany; Walters, Mark C; Lubin, Bertram H

    2003-01-01

    Banking of cord blood (CB) for unrelated hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is well established. However, directed-donor banking of CB for siblings in a current good tissue practices (cGTP) environment has not previously been investigated. Families were eligible for the present study if they were caring for a child with a disorder treatable by HSC transplantation and expecting the birth of a full sibling. We devised standard operating procedures and policies to address eligibility, donor recruitment, donor and recipient evaluation, CB collection, shipping, graft characterization, storage, and release of CB from quarantine. Many of these policies are distinctly different from those established for unrelated-donor CB banks. We enrolled 540 families from 42 states. Collections occurred at several hundred different hospitals. No family was deferred on the basis of health history or infectious disease testing, but departures from standard donor suitability criteria were documented. Disease categories for sibling recipients included malignancy, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia major, nonmalignant hematological conditions, and metabolic errors. Mean CB volume (including anticoagulant) was 103.1 mL; mean nucleated cell count was 8.9 x 10(8). Cell dose exceeded 1.5 x 10(7) nucleated cells per kilogram for 90% of banked units. Seventeen units (3.4%) have been transplanted. Sixteen of the 17 CB allograft recipients had stable engraftment of donor cells. Remote-site collection of sibling donor CB can be accomplished with a high success rate and in a cGTP-guided environment. The cellular products have been used successfully for transplantation; their number and characteristics should be adequate to support the first prospective clinical investigations of sibling CB transplantation.

  5. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among blood donors from the Brazilian Amazon: implications for transfusion policy

    PubMed Central

    Moresco, M. N. dos S.; Virgolino, H. de A.; de Morais, M. P. E.; da Motta-Passos, I.; Gomes-Gouvêa, M. S.; de Assis, L. M. S.; Aguiar, K. R. de L.; Lombardi, S. C. F.; Malheiro, A.; Cavalheiro, N. de P.; Levi, J. E.; Torres, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Brazil requires the performance of both a test for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and a test for antibodies to the core of hepatitis B for blood donor screening. Blood centres in regions of high HBV endemicity struggle to maintain adequate stocks in face of the high discard rates due to anti-HBc reactivity. We evaluated the potential infectivity of donations positive for anti-HBc in search of a rational approach for the handling of these collections. Study Design and Methods We tested anti-HBc reactive blood donations from the state of Amazonas for the presence of HBV DNA and for titres of anti-HBs. The study population consists of village-based donors from the interior of Amazonas state. Results Among 3600 donations, 799 were anti-HBc reactive (22·2%). We were able to perform real-time PCR for the HBV S gene on specimens from 291 of these donors. Eight of these samples were negative for HBsAg and positive for HBV DNA and were defined as occult B virus infections (2·7%). Six of those eight specimens had anti-HBs titres above 100 mIU/ml, indicating the concomitant presence of the virus with high antibody titres. Conclusion A small proportion of anti-HBc reactive donors carry HBV DNA and anti-HBs testing is not useful for predicting viremia on them. This finding indicates the possibility of HBV transmission from asymptomatic donors, especially in areas of high HBV prevalence. Sensitive HBV DNA nucleic acid testing may provide another level of safety, allowing eventual use of anti-HBc reactive units in critical situations. PMID:24697276

  6. Risk Factors for Bartonella species Infection in Blood Donors from Southeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Pedro Paulo Vissotto de Paiva; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Barjas-Castro, Maria Lourdes; Sowy, Stanley; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria from the genus Bartonella are emerging blood-borne bacteria, capable of causing long-lasting infection in marine and terrestrial mammals, including humans. Bartonella are generally well adapted to their main host, causing persistent infection without clinical manifestation. However, these organisms may cause severe disease in natural or accidental hosts. In humans, Bartonella species have been detected from sick patients presented with diverse disease manifestations, including cat scratch disease, trench fever, bacillary angiomatosis, endocarditis, polyarthritis, or granulomatous inflammatory disease. However, with the advances in diagnostic methods, subclinical bloodstream infection in humans has been reported, with the potential for transmission through blood transfusion been recently investigated by our group. The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with Bartonella species infection in asymptomatic blood donors presented at a major blood bank in Southeastern Brazil. Five hundred blood donors were randomly enrolled and tested for Bartonella species infection by specialized blood cultured coupled with high-sensitive PCR assays. Epidemiological questionnaires were designed to cover major potential risk factors, such as age, gender, ethnicity, contact with companion animals, livestock, or wild animals, bites from insects or animal, economical status, among other factors. Based on multivariate logistic regression, bloodstream infection with B. henselae or B. clarridgeiae was associated with cat contact (adjusted OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.1–9.6) or history of tick bite (adjusted OR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.3–13.4). These risk factors should be considered during donor screening, as bacteremia by these Bartonella species may not be detected by traditional laboratory screening methods, and it may be transmitted by blood transfusion. PMID:26999057

  7. Distribution of Dengue Virus Types 1 and 4 in Blood Components from Infected Blood Donors from Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Añez, Germán; Heisey, Daniel A. R.; Chancey, Caren; Fares, Rafaelle C. G.; Espina, Luz M.; Souza, Kátia P. R.; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Krysztof, David E.; Foster, Gregory A.; Stramer, Susan L.; Rios, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease caused by the four dengue viruses (DENV-1 to 4) that can also be transmitted by blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The distribution of DENV in the components of blood from infected donors is poorly understood. Methods We used an in-house TaqMan qRT-PCR assay to test residual samples of plasma, cellular components of whole blood (CCWB), serum and clot specimens from the same collection from blood donors who were DENV-RNA-reactive in a parallel blood safety study. To assess whether DENV RNA detected by TaqMan was associated with infectious virus, DENV infectivity in available samples was determined by culture in mosquito cells. Results DENV RNA was detected by TaqMan in all tested blood components, albeit more consistently in the cellular components; 78.8% of CCWB, 73.3% of clots, 86.7% of sera and 41.8% of plasma samples. DENV-1 was detected in 48 plasma and 97 CCWB samples while DENV-4 was detected in 21 plasma and 31 CCWB samples. In mosquito cell cultures, 29/111 (26.1%) plasma and 32/97 (32.7%) CCWB samples were infectious. A subset of samples from 29 donors was separately analyzed to compare DENV viral loads in the available blood components. DENV viral loads did not differ significantly between components and ranged from 3–8 log10 PCR-detectable units/ml. Conclusions DENV was present in all tested components from most donors, and viral RNA was not preferentially distributed in any of the tested components. Infectious DENV was also present in similar proportions in cultured plasma, clot and CCWB samples, indicating that these components may serve as a resource when sample sizes are limited. However, these results suggest that the sensitivity of the nucleic acid tests (NAT) for these viruses would not be improved by testing whole blood or components other than plasma. PMID:26871560

  8. Clinical and haematological responses of feline blood donors anaesthetised with a tiletamine and zolazepam combination.

    PubMed

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; Bagnagatti De Giorgi, Giada; Perego, Roberta; Valena, Emanuela; Della Pepa, Alessandra; Baggiani, Luciana

    2015-04-01

    This prospective study investigated the effect on clinical and haematological variables of the anaesthetic combination of tiletamine and zolazepam in feline blood donors. Blood (10 ml/kg bodyweight to a maximum volume of 60 ml) was collected from the jugular vein of 31 owned healthy cats anaesthetised with 2.5 mg/kg of tiletamine and 2.5 mg/kg of zolazepam intramuscularly. Rectal temperature (RT), systolic arterial pressure (SAP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), heart rate (HR) and complete blood count (including red blood cells [RBC], haemoglobin [HB], haematocrit [HT], platelet [PLT] count, white blood cells [WBC], lymphocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and basophils) were evaluated pre- and postdonation. RT decreased significantly (P <0.01) after blood donation (mean change in RT -0.7°C). Significant increases in SAP (P = 0.03), MAP (P <0.01) and DAP (P <0.01) occurred after blood donation (mean increase 13 mmHg, 12 mmHg and 11 mmHg, respectively). Although RBC, HT, HB, WBC, PLT, neutrophil and monocyte counts decreased, and HR, and lymphocyte, eosinophil and basophil counts increased after blood donation this change was not statistically significant. Mean time from pre- to postdonation evaluation was 39 ± 11 mins (range 24-76 mins). None of the cats had evidence of pallor or collapse after recovery from anaesthesia. The collection of blood at 10 ml/kg bodyweight to a maximum volume of 60 ml in healthy cats using a low dose tiletamine and zolazepam anaesthetic appears to be well tolerated by feline blood donors.

  9. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Alemu, Getaneh; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22 ± 0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean). Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%), A (136, 32.7%), B (87, 20.9%), and AB (18, 4.3%). Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%). The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416). ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P = 0.022). High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P = 0.003) compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia. PMID:26925291

  10. Assessing ABO/Rh Blood Group Frequency and Association with Asymptomatic Malaria among Blood Donors Attending Arba Minch Blood Bank, South Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Alemu, Getaneh; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2016-01-01

    Background. Determination of the various ABO/Rh blood group distributions and their association with malaria infection has paramount importance in the context of transfusion medicine and malaria control. Methods. Facility based cross-sectional study was conducted from February to June, 2015, to assess ABO/Rh blood groups distribution and their association with asymptomatic malaria. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Blood grouping was done using monoclonal antibodies. Thin and thick blood films were examined for Plasmodium parasites. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0. Results. A total of 416 blood donors participated with median age of 22 ± 0.29 (median ± standard error of the mean). Distribution of ABO phenotypes, in decreasing order, was O (175, 42.1%), A (136, 32.7%), B (87, 20.9%), and AB (18, 4.3%). Most of them were Rh+ (386, 92.8%). The overall malaria prevalence was 4.1% (17/416). ABO blood group is significantly associated with malaria infection (P = 0.022). High rate of parasitemia was seen in blood group O donors (6.899, P = 0.003) compared to those with other ABO blood groups. Conclusion. Blood groups O and AB phenotypes are the most and the least ABO blood groups, respectively. There is significant association between ABO blood group and asymptomatic malaria parasitemia.

  11. Race and ethnicity influences collection of G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells from unrelated donors, a CIBMTR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jack W.; Wingard, John R.; Logan, Brent R.; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Akpek, Gorgun; Anderlini, Paolo; Artz, Andrew S.; Bredeson, Chris; Goldstein, Steven; Hale, Gregory; Hematti, Pieman; Joshi, Sarita; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; O'Donnell, Paul V.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Savani, Bipin; Schears, Raquel M.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Confer, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Little information exists on the effect of race and ethnicity on collection of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) for allogeneic transplantation. We studied 10776 donors from the National Marrow Donor Program who underwent PBSC collection from 2006-2012. Self-reported donor race/ethnic information included Caucasian, Hispanic, Black/African American (AA), Asian/Pacific Islander (API), and Native American (NA). All donors were mobilized with subcutaneous filgrastim (G-CSF) at an approximate dose of 10 µg/kg/d for 5 days. Overall, AA donors had the highest median yields of mononuclear cells (MNC)/L and CD34+ cells/L blood processed (3.1 × 109 and 44 × 106 respectively) while Caucasians had the lowest median yields at 2.8 × 109 and 33.7 × 106 respectively. Multivariate analysis of CD34+/L mobilization yields using Caucasians as the comparator and controlling for age, gender, body mass index, and year of apheresis revealed increased yields in overweight and obese AA and API donors. In Hispanic donors, only male obese donors had higher CD34+/L mobilization yields compared to Caucasian donors. No differences in CD34+/L yields were seen between Caucasian and NA donors. Characterization of these differences may allow optimization of mobilization regimens to allow enhancement of mobilization yields without compromising donor safety. PMID:25316111

  12. Demographic Correlates of Low Hemoglobin Deferral among Prospective Whole Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Alan E.; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Wright, David J.; Custer, Brian; Spencer, Bryan; Murphy, Edward L.; Simon, Toby L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Approximately 10% of attempted blood donations are not allowed because of low hemoglobin deferral. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Low hemoglobin deferrals were tracked in over 715,000 whole blood donors at six blood centers across the United States. A multivariable logistic regression model was developed to comprehensively assess demographic correlates for low hemoglobin deferral. RESULTS Demographic factors significantly associated with low hemoglobin deferral include female gender (11 times greater odds than males), increasing age in men (men over 80 have 29 times greater odds than men under 20); African American race (2–2.5 times greater odds than Caucasians); Hispanic ethnicity in women (1.29 times greater odds than Caucasian women) and weight in men (men under 124 pounds have 2.5 times greater odds than men over 200 pounds). Interestingly, increasing donation frequency is associated with decreased odds for low hemoglobin deferral (women with 1 donation in the previous 12 months have 2 times greater odds than those with 6 donations). CONCLUSIONS Low hemoglobin deferral is associated with female gender, older age, African-American race/ethnicity and lower body weight in men. An inverse association with donation frequency suggests a selection bias in favor of donors able to give more frequently. These data provide useful information that can be utilized to manage blood donors in order to limit low hemoglobin deferrals and assist in policy decisions such as changing the hemoglobin cut-off or permissible frequency of donation. They also generate hypotheses for new research of the causes of anemia in defined groups of donors. PMID:20412525

  13. Prevalence and characterization of occult hepatitis B infection among blood donors in central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alshayea, Areej I.; Eid, Gamal E.; El-Hazmi, Malak M.; Alhetheel, Abdulkarim F.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of occult hepatitis B viral infections (OBIs) among blood donors considering the clinical and epidemiological importance of identifying OBIs. Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia between January 2011 and January 2012. Blood donors (n=8501) were screened for Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B core antibodies (HBcAb). All HBsAg-negative and HBcAb-positive samples were tested further for hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb), hepatitis B virus (HBV)-DNA, and HBV genotyping. Results: Of the 8501 serum samples tested, 56 (0.7%) were positive and 8445 (99.3%) were negative for HBsAg. Among the HBsAg-negative samples, 198 (2.3%) were positive for HBcAb and these patients were suspected to have OBIs. Among the HBcAb-positive samples, 119 (60.1%) were positive while 79 (39.9%) were negative for HBsAb. Analysis of HBV-DNA for the suspected OBIs showed that 17 out of 198 samples (8.6%) yielded positive results, and all of them were HBsAb-negative. The viral load was low (<20-186 IU/mL) in all OBIs. Hepatitis B virus genotyping showed that 15 out of 17 samples (88.2%) were genotype D, and the other 2 samples (11.8%) were genotype E. Conclusion: The prevalence of OBIs among blood donors in Riyadh was 0.2%. Therefore, it is recommended that HBV molecular testing should be incorporated with serological assays for screening of blood donors. PMID:27652363

  14. Systematic Evaluation of Different Nucleic Acid Amplification Assays for Cytomegalovirus Detection: Feasibility of Blood Donor Screening.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2015-10-01

    Acute primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, which commonly occur asymptomatically among blood donors, represent a significant risk for serious morbidity in immunocompromised patients (a major group of transfusion recipients). We implemented a routine CMV pool screening procedure for plasma for the identification of CMV DNA-positive donors, and we evaluated the sensitivities and performance of different CMV DNA amplification systems. Minipools (MPs) of samples from 18,405 individual donors (54,451 donations) were screened for CMV DNA using the RealStar CMV PCR assay (Altona Diagnostic Technologies), with a minimum detection limit of 11.14 IU/ml. DNA was extracted with a high-volume protocol (4.8 ml, Chemagic Viral 5K kit; PerkinElmer) for blood donor pool screening (MP-nucleic acid testing [NAT]) and with the Nuclisens easyMAG system (0.5 ml; bioMérieux) for individual donation (ID)-NAT. In total, six CMV DNA-positive donors (0.03%) were identified by routine CMV screening, with DNA concentrations ranging from 4.35 × 10(2) to 4.30 × 10(3) IU/ml. Five donors already showed seroconversion and detectable IgA, IgM, and/or IgG antibody titers (IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(-) or IgA(+)/IgM(+)/IgG(+)), and one donor showed no CMV-specific antibodies. Comparison of three commercial assays, i.e., the RealStar CMV PCR kit, the Sentosa SA CMV quantitative PCR kit (Vela Diagnostics), and the CMV R-gene PCR kit (bioMérieux), for MP-NAT and ID-NAT showed comparably good analytical sensitivities, ranging from 10.23 to 11.14 IU/ml (MP-NAT) or from 37.66 to 57.94 IU/ml (ID-NAT). The clinical relevance of transfusion-associated CMV infections requires further investigation, and the evaluated methods present powerful basic tools providing sensitive possibilities for viral testing. The application of CMV MP-NAT facilitated the identification of one donor with a window-phase donation during acute primary CMV infection.

  15. Serological Patterns and Molecular Characterization of Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection among Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Zhao, Hong; Tang, Xinyi; Hu, Wenjia; Jiang, Nizheng; Zhu, Shaowen; Huang, Chengyin

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B infections, characterized by the presence of a viral genome without detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg; Occult hepatitis B infection [OBI]), have been reported recently. Objectives We performed serological and molecular characterization of OBI among blood donors at Jiangsu province blood center during years 2013 and 2014. Methods All donor samples were routinely screened by double enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Treponema pallidum (TP), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Single-reactive, nonreactive, and ALT-elevated samples were pooled or resolved by nucleic acid testing (NAT). Seromarkers were examined in HBsAg-/DNA+ samples. After 1 to 12 months of follow up, seromarkers were screened again to verify OBI samples. Results We studied 157119 samples from blood donors. A total of 154397 ELISA nonreactive donor samples were identified, and HBV DNA was detected in 81 samples; no samples were positive for HIV or HCV RNA. Hepatitis B virus viral loads in most donors were less than 20 - 200 IU/mL. There was only one HBsAg-positive sample. Eighty HBsAg-/DNA+ samples were evaluated further. Of these samples, 85% (68/80) were reactive for anti-HBc and 36.2% (29/800) were reactive for anti-HBc and anti-HBs; 11.3% (9/80) did not have any detectable serological markers. Twenty-nine donors were followed up. One was HBsAg ELISA positive, and of six seronegative donors, all had anti-HBc and anti-HBs, but were negative for DNA. Samples were HBV genotypes B, C and D. Mutations in the S region of HBV DNA included S114T, G119R, P120S, T125M, C139Y, T140I, C147W, T148A, A159V/G, E164D, V168A, and R169C. Conclusions Overall, we found that OBI was rare, but that the prevalence of OBI was slightly higher in Jiangsu than in other areas of China. PMID:27882070

  16. Serologic survey on hantavirus in blood donors from the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Caio Maurício Mendes de; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Emergent diseases such as Hantavirus Cardio-pulmonary Syndrome (HCPS) are able to create a significant impact on human populations due to their seriousness and high fatality rate. Santa Catarina, located in the South of Brazil, is the leading state for HCPS with 267 reported cases from 1999 to 2011. We present here a serological survey on hantavirus in blood donors from different cities of the state of Santa Catarina, with an IgG-ELISA using a recombinant nucleocapsid protein from Araraquara hantavirus as an antigen. In total, 314 donors from blood banks participated in the study, geographically covering the whole state. Among these, 14 individuals (4.4%) had antibodies to hantavirus: four of 50 (8% positivity) from Blumenau, four of 52 (7.6%) from Joinville, three of 50 (6%) from Florianópolis, two of 50 (4%) from Chapecó and one of 35 (2.8%) from Joaçaba. It is possible that hantaviruses are circulating across almost the whole state, with important epidemiological implications. Considering that the seropositive blood donors are healthy individuals, it is possible that hantaviruses may be causing unrecognized infections, which are either asymptomatic or clinically nonspecific, in addition to HCPS. It is also possible that more than one hantavirus type could be circulating in this region, causing mostly benign infections.

  17. The impact of a regular blood donation on the hematology and EEG of healthy young male blood donors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxia; Zhang, Gencang; Yang, Jie; Ynag, Jie; Chen, Andrew C N

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 400 ml whole blood donation on the human electroencephalogram (EEG) and hematology, not earlier reported in the literature. EEG activity was recorded from ten male blood donors (experiment group) before, during and after blood donation (i.e., 400 ml whole blood withdrawal). EEG topography and regional spectral field powers analyses were carried out via fast Fourier transformation. The venous hemoglobin (Hb) concentration was measured with a hematology analyzer. In the control investigation, 12 male age-matched volunteers (control group) were kept in semi-sitting position for the duration of a blood donation without actually vena puncture. The volunteers had no prior experiences of blood donation. Within the experiment group, post-donation Hb concentration decreased by 3.7% compared with the pre-donation Hb values (P < 0.01). Before blood donation, Hb concentration in control group was significantly higher compared to the experiment group (P < 0.05). For the experiment group, the field power of alpha-1 (7.5-9.5 Hz) EEG during blood withdrawal was significantly lower compared to that after blood withdrawal (P < 0.05). In contrast for the control group, all seven bands of regional spectral field powers showed no significantly discrepancies in the three periods. Blood donation attenuates the alpha-1 at the parietal-frontal area on human EEG-DMN transiently with no lasting effect at post-donation period. The blood donation-related effects on brain function may be of little consequence due to slight hemodynamic change and the results may facilitate the opinion that blood donation is a safe process and that should not discourage volunteers.

  18. Translation strategies, contradiction, and the theory of social representations: Why discussing needles may improve blood donor retention.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Gail; Hayman, Jane; Gamble, Marguerite; Smith, Geoff; Hall, Rob

    2017-02-15

    Retaining blood donors is a cost-effective way of ensuring a safe blood supply, yet despite the plethora of research, only 5.1% of the eligible population in Australia donate blood and 40% of these do not make a second donation. We offer an alternative to traditional approaches by conceptualizing blood donation within social representations theory as socially derived symbolic knowledge with a specific focus on cognitive polyphasia and Guimelli's (1998) normative and functional dimensions. An online survey, completed by 703 residents from NSW Australia, comprised a blood donation word association task, Likert-style questions constructed from previous word association data and contextualized blood donation statements. Individual difference scaling analysis revealed all donor groups (including non-donors) associated blood donation with a few central, albeit contradictory ideas/beliefs. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis performed on a split data set of the Likert-style items reiterated this finding. Interpreted through Guimelli's dichotomy, all donor groups were aware of these contradictory normative and functional ideas/beliefs but when explicitly asked, it was the functional aspect that differentiated the groups. We argue the key to retaining donors is understanding the interdependence between how blood donation is socially understood at the societal level of discourse and donor behaviour. Translational strategies for recruitment and retention are discussed.

  19. Hepatitis C virus infection in blood donors from the state of Puebla, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Worldwide, 130 million persons are estimated to be infected with HCV. Puebla is the Mexican state with the highest mortality due to hepatic cirrhosis. Therefore, it is imperative to obtain epidemiological data on HCV infection in asymptomatic people of this region. The objective of present study was to analyze the prevalence of antibodies and genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in blood donors from Puebla, Mexico. Results The overall prevalence was 0.84% (515/61553). Distribution by region was: North, 0.86% (54/6270); Southeast, 1.04% (75/7197); Southwest, 0.93% (36/3852); and Central, 0.79% (350/44234). Ninety-six donors were enrolled for detection and genotyping of virus, from which 37 (38.5%) were HCV-RNA positive. Detected subtypes were: 1a (40.5%), 1b (27.0%), mixed 1a/1b (18.9%), undetermined genotype 1 (5.4%), 2a (2.7%), 2b (2.7%), and mixed 1a/2a (2.7%). All recovered donors with S/CO > 39 were HCV-RNA positive (11/11) and presented elevated ALT; in donors with S/CO < 39 HCV-RNA, positivity was of 30.4%; and 70% had normal values of ALT. The main risk factors associated with HCV infection were blood transfusion and surgery. Conclusions HCV prevalence of donors in Puebla is similar to other Mexican states. The most prevalent genotype is 1, of which subtype 1a is the most frequent. PMID:20100349

  20. Risk factors for deferral due to low hematocrit and iron depletion among prospective blood donors in a Brazilian center

    PubMed Central

    Dauar, Eloísa Tedeschi; Patavino, Giuseppina Maria; Mendrone Júnior, Alfredo; Gualandro, Sandra Fátima Menosi; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Deferral of blood donors due to low hematocrit and iron depletion is commonly reported in blood banks worldwide. This study evaluated the risk factors for low hematocrit and iron depletion among prospective blood donors in a large Brazilian blood center. Method A case–control study of 400 deferred donors due to low hematocrit and 456 eligible whole blood donors was conducted between 2009 and 2011. Participants were interviewed about selected risk factors for anemia, and additional laboratory tests, including serum ferritin, were performed. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the association between predictors and deferral due to low hematocrit in the studied population and iron depletion in women. Results Donors taking aspirins or iron supplementation, those who reported stomachache, black tarry stools or hematochezia, and women having more than one menstrual period/month were more likely to be deferred. Risk factors for iron depletion were repeat donation and being deferred at the hematocrit screening. Smoking and lack of menstruation were protective against iron depletion. Conclusion This study found some unusual risk factors related to gastrointestinal losses that were associated with deferral of donors due to low hematocrit. Knowledge of the risk factors can help blood banks design algorithms to improve donor notification and referral. PMID:26408364

  1. Seroprevalence and trends in transfusion transmitted infections among blood donors in a university hospital blood bank: a 5 year study.

    PubMed

    Pallavi, P; Ganesh, C K; Jayashree, K; Manjunath, G V

    2011-03-01

    Blood is life. Transfusion of blood and blood components, as a specialized modality of patient management saves millions of lives worldwide each year and reduce morbidity. It is well known that blood transfusion is associated with a large number of complications, some are only trivial and others are potentially life threatening, demanding for meticulous pretransfusion testing and screening particularly for transfusion transmissible infections (TTI). These TTI are a threat to blood safety. The priority objective of BTS is thus to ensure safety, adequacy, accessibility and efficiency of blood supply at all levels. The objective of the present study was to assess the prevalence and trend of transfusion transmitted infections (TTI) among voluntary and replacement donors in the Department of Blood bank and transfusion Medicine of JSS College Hospital, a teaching hospital of Mysore during the period from 2004 to 2008. A retrospective review of donors record covering the period between 2004 and 2008 at the blood bank, JSS Hospital, Mysore was carried out. All samples were screened for HIV, HBsAg, HCV, syphilis and malaria. Of the 39,060, 25,303 (64.78%) were voluntary donors and the remaining 13,757 (35.22%) were replacement donors. The overall prevalence of HIV, HbsAg, HCV and syphilis were 0.44, 1.27, 0.23 and 0.28%, respectively. No blood donor tested showed positivity for malarial parasite. Majority were voluntary donors with male preponderance. In all the markers tested there was increased prevalence of TTI among the replacement donors as compared to voluntary donors. With the implementation of strict donor criteria and use of sensitive screening tests, it may be possible to reduce the incidence of TTI in the Indian scenario.

  2. [Reference intervals for peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in healthy adults in Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Cóndor, José M; Álvarez, Marco; Cano, Luis; Matos, Edgar; Leiva, Christian; Paredes, José A

    2013-04-01

    In order to establish the reference intervals (RIs) of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets (PBL) in healthy adults in Lima (Peru), a cross-sectional study was conducted among blood donors taken in between 2011 and 2012. Based on the criteria obtained from the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI C28-A3), 318 samples were processed, 61.9% (197/318) coming from male donors. For PBL count, a flow cytometer with a simple platform was used. The RIs are established for each PBL in adults based on sex with their respective reference limits and 90% confidence intervals. Differences were found in CD3+ percentage counts (p=0.001) and in CD3-CD56+ absolute (p=0.003) and percentage counts (p?0.001). The RIs found are different to those described in studies conducted in other countries due to the characteristics of the population and the study model.

  3. Real-time PCR diagnosis of Plasmodium vivax among blood donors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When selecting blood donors in transfusion centres, one important problem is to identify, during screening, individuals with infectious diseases that can be transmitted by blood, such as malaria, especially when the parasite densities are very low. This problem is particularly severe in endemic areas, such as the Brazilian Amazon. In the present study, molecular diagnostic (real-time PCR) of Plasmodium vivax was used to identify blood donors infected with malaria parasites. Methods Samples from 595 blood donors were collected in seven haemotherapy centres in northern Brazil located in areas at risk for malaria transmission, and the analyses were performed by real-time PCR with TaqMan probes on 7500 Real-Time PCR Systems, to genotype the mitochondrial DNA region specific to P. vivax. The experiment was designed for hybridization of the cytochrome c oxidase genes of the mitochondrial genome (GenBank GI63022502). The serological data were obtained using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay - ELISA (Anti-HIV, Anti-HTLV I-II; Anti-HVC, HBsAg, Anti-HBc, Chagas disease) and VDRL (Syphilis) from the Blood Bank System of the Haematology and Haemotherapy Centre of Pará. Results The assay identified eight individuals in the sample (1.34%) infected with P. vivax at the time of blood donation. This percentage was higher than the altered serological results (reactive or inconclusive) of the prevalence of anti-HIV (0.67%), anti-hepatitis C virus (0.34%), anti-hepatitis B surface antigen (0.67%), anti-human T-lymphotropic virus I/II (1.18%), anti-Chagas disease (0.17%) and syphilis (VDRL) (0.50%), but not higher than anti-hepatitis B core antigen antibodies (4.37%). This result indicates the need to use more sensitive methods of diagnosing malaria in blood banks. Conclusion The real-time PCR with TaqMan probes enabled the identification of P. vivax in a high proportion of clinically healthy donors, highlighting the potential risk for transfusion-transmitted malaria

  4. The JAK2V617F tyrosine kinase mutation in blood donors with upper-limit haematocrit levels

    PubMed Central

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Di Gaetano, Rosanna; Sartori, Roberto; Zanotto, Daniela; Belvini, Donata; Radossi, Paolo; Risato, Renzo; Roveroni, Giovanni; Salviato, Roberta; Tassinari, Cristina; Toffano, Nunzio

    2009-01-01

    Background It is not rare to observe in blood donors a level of haematocrit (Hct) above or close to the highest normal limit. In the case of blood donors the diagnosis and clinical evaluation of this alteration may be complicated by regular blood donations that can mask an underlying disease such as polycythaemia vera. Recently a single acquired mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) on chromosome 9 was identified and it was found that the incidence of this mutation was high in patients with polycythaemia vera. Material and Methods From the January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2006 all consecutive donors with a Hct above 50% if males (n=84) and 46% if females (n=19) underwent JAK2 mutation analysis. Seventy-nine donors (59 males and 20 females) whose Hct was normal at their last blood donation were randomly selected and used as controls. Results Among the group of blood donors with a high Hct, we identified one donor who was positive for the JAK2 mutation. This man had a Hct of 50.6% at his last donation, while his average Hct in the preceding year was 51.7%. The prevalence of the JAK2 mutation could be estimated to be 1%, 0.6% or 0.02% in the three different populations considered: donors with a Hct level above the upper limit of normal, all tested donors or the entire donor cohort attending our transfusion service, respectively. Conclusions The present study suggests that apparently healthy subjects with repeatedly high levels of Hct may have the acquired mutation in JAK2. Laboratory screening tests for JAK2 may be offered to blood donors at transfusion services with expertise in molecular genetics. PMID:19503632

  5. Distribution of ABO and Rh types in voluntary Blood donors in Jharkhand area as a study conducted by RIMS, Ranchi

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Anu; Srivastava, Ramesh Kumar; Deogharia, Kabita S.; Singh, Kranti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was done to know the distribution and frequencies of blood groups among blood donors attending voluntary blood donation camps organized by the Rajendra Institute of Medical Sciences (RIMS), Ranchi, Jharkhand so that demand and supply ratio of the four blood groups can be maintained so that no patient dies due to lack of a particular blood group. Context: Up till now about 400 red cells antigen have been identified. The majority follow Mendelian inheritance. The ABO and Rhesus (Rh) blood group system are most important for blood transfusion purposes, parental testing, legal medicine, and in population genetic study. Aims: This study was conducted to determine and compare the frequency and distribution of ABO and Rh blood groups among voluntary blood donors attending blood donation camps in Jharkhand organized by RIMS. The aim is to know the demand and supply ratio of a particular blood group in light of their distribution in the society so that no patient dies due to the deficient supply of blood. Settings and Design: It is a retrospective study carried out at blood bank. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted at Blood bank, RIMS, Ranchi, Jharkhand, over a period of 4 years from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2015. Blood group of the blood donors was determined by commercially available standard monoclonal antisera by test tube agglutination technique accompanied by reverse grouping. Results: Out of 20,455 subjects, 18,717 (91.73%) were male and 1738 (8.27%) were female subjects. The ABO blood group present was B (35.15%) followed by O (34.73%), A (22.09%), and AB (8.03%) in blood donors while in Rh system, (96.46%) donors were Rh +ve and (3.54%) donors were Rh −ve. The study has a significant implication regarding the inventory management of blood bank and transfusion services for the indoor patients of RIMS and for emergency supply to other hospitals of Jharkhand in dire need of blood. Conclusions: The knowledge of distribution of

  6. West Nile fever characteristics among viremic persons identified through blood donor screening.

    PubMed

    Zou, Shimian; Foster, Gregory A; Dodd, Roger Y; Petersen, Lyle R; Stramer, Susan L

    2010-11-01

    Nucleic acid testing (NAT) of blood donors provides opportunities for identifying West Nile virus (WNV)-infected persons before symptoms develop and for characterizing subsequent illness. From June 2003 through 2008, the American Red Cross performed follow‐up interviews with and additional laboratory testing for 1436 donors whose donations had initial test results that were reactive for WNV RNA; 821 of the donors were subsequently confirmed to have WNV infection, and the remainder were unconfirmed or determined to have false‐positive results. Symptoms attributed to WNV infection were determined by comparing symptom frequency among 576 donors identified with early WNV infection (immunoglobulin M antibody negative) and those with unconfirmed infection. We estimate that 26% of WNV‐infected persons become symptomatic, defined by the presence of at least 3 of 8 indicator symptoms. Nearly one‐half of symptomatic persons sought medical care; only 5% received a diagnosis of WNV infection. Female subjects and persons with higher viral loads detected in the index donation were more likely than other subjects to develop symptoms.

  7. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) in graft by blood donor antibodies against host leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jodi; Tinckam, Kathryn; denHollander, Neal; Haroon, Ayesha; Keshavjee, Shaf; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine M

    2010-09-01

    It is unknown the extent to which transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) contributes to primary graft dysfunction (PGD), the leading cause of death after lung transplantation. In this case of suspected transfusion-associated acute bilateral graft injury in a 61-year-old idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patient, recipient sera from before and after transplantation/transfusion, as well as the sera of 22 of the 24 implicated blood donors, were individually screened by Luminex bead assay for the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, with recipient and lung donor HLA typing to explore for cognate relationships. A red-cell-unit donor-source anti-Cw6 antibody, cognate with the HLA type of the recipient, was identified. This is the second reported case of TRALI in the setting of lung transplantation, and the first to show an associated interaction between donor antibodies (in a low-plasma volume product) with recipient leukocytes (rather than graft antigens); therefore, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of PGD.

  8. How do we design, implement, and manage an ongoing program to provide iron supplements to women blood donors?

    PubMed

    White, Linda K; Harris, Vicki J; Cruz, Julie L; Waxman, Dan A

    2014-11-01

    Here we describe the design and management of Indiana Blood Center's 10-year Iron For Women program, an ongoing community blood center-based program with continual program and donor management providing iron supplements to healthy women blood donors. Donor iron supplementation has typically been limited to research study protocols, for a defined period, with the associated resources and funding. The results of studies have supported the utility of iron supplementation: iron supplementation will enhance dietary iron for increased gastrointestinal absorption triggered as a normal homeostatic response to blood loss, thereby providing a suitable dietary iron source in the event the donor's usual diet lacks sufficient iron. Despite proven results, blood centers have been reluctant to adopt the practice due to barriers such as donor selection, ensuring the appropriateness of iron supplementation relative to the health of the donor, supplement costs, provision logistics, and program management costs. We present here how we designed our program and why it is in the Blood Center's interest to help willing women participate in volunteer blood donation by attempting to mitigate associated iron loss.

  9. [The prevalence of hepatitis C antibodies among volunteer blood donors with elevated blood transaminase and antibodies to the B virus core antigen].

    PubMed

    Gavilán Carrasco, J C; González Santos, P; Rosario Díaz, E

    1996-05-01

    The use of non-specific markers before 1989 (increased serum transaminase values and antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen) as a screening method for blood donors in an attempt to decrease the incidence of post-transfusional non-A non-B hepatitis (currently hepatitis C virus) was a matter of controversy. To determine the impact of the use of these markers on the detection of blood donors infected with hepatitis C virus, a prospective study was undertaken in Málaga (1988-1989) with 5,003 volunteer donors with two objectives: a) to know the prevalence of these non-specific markers (anti-HBc and increased serum transaminase) and antibodies to HCV (anti-C100) in our blood donor population; b) to determine whether the presence of some of these non specific markers in blood donors was associated with a higher rate of virus C infection. The prevalence of antibodies to HCV in blood donors with increased serum transaminase and/or anti-HBc was significantly higher than the prevalence found among the general blood donor population.

  10. [Single-donor (apheresis) platelets and pooled whole-blood-derived platelets--significance and assessment of both blood products].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter E

    2014-01-01

    The transfusion efficacy of ATK, which contain fully functional platelets, is beyond all doubt. The equivalence of ATK and PTK has been subject of many studies. Some of those studies show the superiority of ATK's, while others do not, but there have been no studies that demonstrated a superiority of PTK's. The superiority of platelets stored in plasma and in third generation additive solution was demonstrated in clinical studies; therefore, it cannot be said that all the platelet concentrates on the German market are equivalent in efficacy. Of decisive importance, above all, is the risk of transfusion-transmitted infections with known pathogens, or those not yet discovered. This risk is different for ATK compared to PTK. Taking this difference in risk and the difference in donor exposure of transfused patients into account, it can definitely be said that ATK and PTK are not equivalent. In 2012, the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) published a mathematical risk model for different platelet concentrates and assessed the risk of transmitting known pathogens such as HIV, HCV, and HBV. The risk was higher for PTK compared to ATK. The relative risks for PTK derived from 4BCs were 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.1-2.4) for HIV, 2.7 (95%--CI: 2.5-3.0) for HCV, and 2.2 (95%--CI: 2.8-3.7) for HBV. At the present time, these are the relative risks of transfusion-transmitted infections with the traditional pathogens for PTK compared to ATK. In addition to the RKI assessed risks, there is the theoretical risk of a new, unknown agent, transmitted through blood exposure. The magnitude of this risk is hardly predictable for PTK. The experience gathered so far, especially in the last three decades, with the emergence of HIV, prions, and West Nil virus, shows that the biological nature of a next transfusion-transmissible infectious agent cannot be predictable. This agent, if we think at a conventional sexually transmissible agent with nucleic acid and long latent period, would spread first in areas with

  11. Cord blood transplants supported by co-infusion of mobilized hematopoietic stem cells from a third-party donor.

    PubMed

    Bautista, G; Cabrera, J R; Regidor, C; Forés, R; García-Marco, J A; Ojeda, E; Sanjuán, I; Ruiz, E; Krsnik, I; Navarro, B; Gil, S; Magro, E; de Laiglesia, A; Gonzalo-Daganzo, R; Martín-Donaire, T; Rico, M; Millán, I; Fernández, M N

    2009-03-01

    This open label clinical study provides updated evaluation of the strategy of single unit cord blood transplants (CBTs) with co-infusion of third-party donor (TPD) mobilized hematopoietic stem cells (MHSC). Fifty-five adults with high-risk hematological malignancies, median age 34 years (16-60 years) and weight 70 kg (43-95 kg), received CBTs (median 2.39 x 10(7) total nucleated cell (TNC) per kg and 0.11 x 10(6) CD34+ per kg) and TPD-MHSC (median 2.4 x 10(6) CD34+ per kg and 3.2 x 10(3) CD3+ per kg). Median time to ANC and to CB-ANC >0.5 x 10(9)/l as well as to full CB-chimerism was 10, 21 and 44 days, with maximum cumulative incidences (MCI) of 0.96, 0.95 and 0.91. Median time to unsupported platelets >20 x 10(9)/l was 32 days (MCI 0.78). MCI for grades I-IV and III-IV acute GVHD (aGVHD) were 0.62 and 0.11; 12 of 41 patients (29%) who are at risk developed chronic GVHD, becoming severely extensive in three patients. Relapses occurred in seven patients (MCI=0.17). The main causes of morbi-mortality were post-engraftment infections. CMV reactivations were the most frequent, their incidence declining after the fourth month. Five-year overall survival and disease-free survival (Kaplan-Meier) were 56 % and 47% (63% and 54% for patients adult patients who lack a readily available adequate adult donor.

  12. Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Nigerian Blood Donors and Hepatitis B Virus Transmission Risks

    PubMed Central

    Fagbami, Ademola H.; Adekanle, Olusegun; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Bock, C.-Thomas; Kremsner, Peter G.; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) characterized by the absence of detectable HBsAg remains a potential threat in blood safety. We investigated the actual prevalence, viral factors and genotype of OBI infections in Nigerian blood donors. Methods Serum collected from two blood banks were reconfirmed as HBsAg seronegative by ELISA. Forty HBsAg positive samples were employed as controls. HBV-DNA was amplified from all donors and viral loads were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Antibodies to the HBV core, surface and HBe antigen (anti-HBc,anti-HBs,HBeAg) were measured. The PreS/S and PreC/C regions of the HBV genome were sequenced. Results Of the 429 blood donors, 72(17%) were confirmed as OBI by DNA detection in different reference labs and excluded the concern of possible contamination. Of the 72 OBI samples, 48(67%) were positive for anti-HBc, 25(35%) positive for anti-HBs, and 2(3%) positive for HBeAg. Of the 72 OBI samples, 31(43%) were seropositive for either anti-HBc, anti-HBs or HBeAg, 21 (30%) positive for both anti-HBc and anti-HBs,one positive for both anti-HBc and HBeAg. None of the OBI samples were positive for all three serological markers. The viral load was <50copies/ml in the OBI samples and genotype E was predominant. The L217R polymorphism in the reverse transcriptase domain of the HBV polymerase gene was observed significantly higher in OBI compared with HBsAg positive individuals (P<0.0001). Conclusion High incidence of OBI is relevant in high endemic areas worldwide and is a general burden in blood safety. This study signifies the high prevalence of OBI and proposes blood donor samples in Nigeria should be pre-tested for OBI by nucleic acid testing (NAT) and/or anti-HBc prior to transfusion to minimize the HBV infection risk. PMID:26148052

  13. Donor cell-derived acute myeloblastic leukemia after allogeneic peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Zafer; Tezcan, Gulsun; Karauzum, Sibel Berker; Kupesiz, Alphan; Manguoglu, Ayse Esra; Yesilipek, Akif; Luleci, Guven; Hazar, Volkan

    2006-11-01

    Despite its rarity, donor cell leukemia (DCL) is a most intriguing entity. We report here the case of a 5 year-old girl with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and normal female karyotype who developed acute myeloblastic leukemia with a karyotype of 46, X, t(X; 7) (p21; p11.2), der(7) t(3; 7) (q13.3; q22) 5 months after peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from her HLA-matched sister. We performed the analysis of short tandem repeat sequence markers to DNA obtained from donor peripheral blood, patient's peripheral blood including leukemic blasts and patient's hair root. This analysis showed that the leukemic blood DNA matched the donor blood DNA and not the patient's DNA, thus confirming DCL. To our knowledge, this is the first case of DCL after peripheral blood SCT for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

  14. Dombrock genotyping in Brazilian blood donors reveals different regional frequencies of the HY allele

    PubMed Central

    Piassi, Fabiana Chagas Camargos; Santos, Silvana Maria Eloi; de Castilho, Lilian Maria; Baleotti Júnior, Wilson; Suzuki, Rodrigo Buzinaro; da Cunha, Débora Moura

    2013-01-01

    Background Dombrock blood group system genotyping has revealed various rearrangements of the Dombrock gene and identified new variant alleles in Brazil (i.e., DO*A-SH, DO*A-WL and DO*B-WL). Because of the high heterogeneity of the Brazilian population, interregional differences are expected during the investigation of Dombrock genotypes. Objective The present study aims to determine the frequencies of Dombrock genotypes in blood donors from Minas Gerais and compare the frequencies of the HY and JO alleles to those of another population in Brazil. Methods The frequencies of the DO alleles in Minas Gerais, a southeastern state of Brazil, were determined from the genotyping of 270 blood donors. Genotyping involved polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis to identify the 323G>T, 350C>T, 793A>G, and 898C>G mutations, which are related to the HY, JO, DO*A/DO*B, and DO*A-WL/DO*B-WL alleles, respectively. Moreover, the frequencies of rare HY and JO alleles were statistically compared using the chi-square test with data from another Brazilian region. Results The HY allele frequency in Minas Gerais (2.4%) was almost twice that of the JO allele (1.5%). The frequency of the HY allele was significantly higher (p-value = 0.001) than that in another Brazilian population and includes a rare homozygous donor with the Hy- phenotype. In addition, the DO*A-WL and DO*B-WL alleles, which were first identified in Brazil, were found in the state of Minas Gerais. Conclusions The data confirm that the frequencies of DO alleles differ between regions in Brazil. The population of Minas Gerais could be targeted in a screening strategy to identify the Hy- phenotype in order to develop a rare blood bank. PMID:24478605

  15. Evolutionary analysis of HBV "S" antigen genetic diversity in Iranian blood donors: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza; Sharifi, Zohre; Soleimani, Ali; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Elsadek Fakhr, Ahmed; Sijmons, Steven; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Karimi, Gharib; Lemey, Philippe; Maes, Piet; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Van Ranst, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the HBV S gene has a significant impact on the prophylaxis and treatment of hepatitis B infection. The effect of selective pressure on this genetic alteration has not yet been studied in Iranian blood donors. To explore HBV evolution and to analyze the effects and patterns of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) mutations on blood screening assays, 358 Iranian blood donors diagnosed as asymptomatic HBV carriers were enrolled in this nationwide study. Large S and partial S genes were amplified and sequenced. HBV (sub) genotypes and synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations were investigated. The impact of naturally occurring mutations on HBsAg ELISA results was explored. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that isolated strains were of genotype D. The dominant subgenotype/subtype was D1/ayw2. Deletions and naturally occurring stop codons in the pre-S1 and major hydrophilic region (MHR) were identified. In total, 32.8% of the studied strains harbored 195 single or multiple mutations in the MHR, the majority of which were located at the first loop of the "a determinant" domain. The ayw2 subtype showed a significant effect on the ELISA signal/cut-off value and carried fewer mutations in the MHR. Nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution value indicated that negative selection was the dominant evolutionary force in the HBV S gene. This nationwide study revealed that mutation frequency of HBsAg among Iranian blood donors was much higher than previous reports from the different local regions. These findings regarding the significant differences in reactivity of ELISA among different subtypes of HBV and its correlation with the number of mutations at the MHR will be valuable to public health authorities.

  16. Asymptomatic Leprosy Infection among Blood Donors May Predict Disease Development and Suggests a Potential Mode of Transmission.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Isabela Maria Bernardes; Araujo, Sergio; Filho, Adilson Botelho; de Paiva, Paulo Henrique Ribeiro; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Blood donor samples (1,007) were assessed for anti-phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1) IgM antibodies and Mycobacterium leprae DNA presence, which had 3.8% and 0.3% positivity, respectively. After a 5-year follow-up period, six individuals with positive markers developed leprosy, raising the hypothesis that asymptomatic infection among blood donors may be an undisclosed mode of leprosy transmission via transfusion.

  17. Low Seroprevalence of West Nile Virus in Blood Donors from Catalonia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Piron, Maria; Plasencia, Antoni; Fleta-Soriano, Eric; Martinez, Ana; Martinez, Javier P; Torner, Nuria; Sauleda, Silvia; Meyerhans, Andreas; Escalé, Josefina; Trilla, Antoni; Pumarola, Tomás; Martinez, Miguel Julian

    2015-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging arbovirus first recognized in Europe in the 1950s. Since then, outbreaks have been reported in several European countries. In 2010, the first WNV outbreak was recorded in Spain, affecting the southern part of the country. We conducted a seroprevalence study in the Catalonia region (northeastern Spain), an area considered at high risk of arbovirus transmission. A total of 800 serum samples from blood donors were collected and screened for antibodies against WNV by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by a microneutralization assay. More than 50 samples tested positive by ELISA, but only one sample contained neutralizing antibodies against WNV and was obtained from a donor native of Pakistan. The low seroprevalence detected may serve as reference baseline data for monitoring WNV activity in our region in future years.

  18. Detection of antibodies to hepatitis C virus in U.S. blood donors.

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, G J; Lesniewski, R R; Stewart, J L; Boardway, K M; Gutierrez, R A; Pendy, L; Johnson, R G; Alcalde, X; Rote, K V; Devare, S G

    1991-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) which utilizes a solid phase coated with a recombinant antigen (c100-3) derived from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome was evaluated for efficacy in the detection of antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV). The sensitivity of the antibody test was demonstrated by the detection of anti-HCV in a well-characterized panel of human specimens known to contain the infectious agent of non-A, non-B hepatitis. The specificity of the anti-HCV test was evaluated by testing 6,118 serum specimens from volunteer blood donors considered to be at low risk for exposure to HCV. The specificity of the anti-HCV EIA was demonstrated to be 99.56%, since 6,069 of 6,096 specimens from this low-risk group were nonreactive. A total of 49 (0.80%) of the 6,118 specimens were repeatedly reactive in the test, and 22 (46.81%) of the 47 specimens available for additional testing were confirmed as positive for antibodies to HCV c100-3. Among commercial plasma donors, 390 (10.49%) of 3,718 specimens were repeatedly reactive in the EIA. A total of 375 (97.40%) of the 385 specimens available for further testing were confirmed as positive. These limited data indicate that the prevalence of antibodies to HCV is 0.36% (22 confirmed positives among 6,118 specimens) among volunteer blood donors and 10.08% (375 confirmed positives among 3,718 specimens) among commercial plasma donors. The importance of confirmatory testing is discussed. PMID:1709949

  19. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America.

  20. Quality standards in Biobanking: authentication by genetic profiling of blood spots from donor's original sample

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Sergio; Valverde, Laura; Odriozola, Adrian; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2010-01-01

    The field of Biobanking requires extensive work to maintain traceability of samples. However, sometimes the necessity to authenticate a sample may arise. To address these circumstances, we herein present a method for authenticating derivatives by using a blood spot from each donor, attached to a sample authentication form, by means of genetic profiling. Blood spots are collected at the time a blood sample is donated at a health centre and before processing the blood sample at the biobank. To test the validity of our approach over time, we analyzed 26 blood spots stored at room temperature in our facilities for more than 15 years. DNA was successfully extracted from the three storage materials tested in this study and 15 STR markers plus amelogenin were subsequently analyzed. The storage of a small blood spot attached to a sample authentication form proved to be efficient for genetic profiling and, therefore, may constitute a long-lasting (at least 15 years), cost-effective and effortless approach for genetic authentication of samples in biobanks. PMID:20234395

  1. Non-detection of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA in HHV-8-seropositive blood donors from three Brazilian regions.

    PubMed

    Levi, José Eduardo; Nascimento, Maria Claudia; Sumita, Laura Masami; de Souza, Vanda Akico Ueda Fick; Freire, Wilton S; Mayaud, Philippe; Pannuti, Claudio S

    2011-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the etiologic agent of all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and the plasmablastic cell variant of multicentric Castleman disease. In endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa, blood transfusions have been associated with a substantial risk of HHV-8 transmission. By contrast, several studies among healthy blood donors from North America have failed to detect HHV-8 DNA in samples of seropositive individuals. In this study, using a real-time PCR assay, we investigated the presence of HHV-8 DNA in whole-blood samples of 803 HHV-8 blood donors from three Brazilian states (São Paulo, Amazon, Bahia) who tested positive for HHV-8 antibodies, in a previous multicenter study. HHV-8 DNA was not detected in any sample. Our findings do not support the introduction of routine HHV-8 screening among healthy blood donors in Brazil. (WC = 140).

  2. ABO/Rh Blood Groups and Risk of HIV Infection and Hepatitis B Among Blood Donors of Abidjan, Côte D’ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Siransy, Liliane Kouabla; Nanga, Zizendorf Yves; Zaba, Flore Sandrine; Tufa, Nyasenu Yawo; Dasse, Sery Romuald

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B and HIV infection are two viral infections that represent real global public health problems. In order to improve their management, some hypotheses suggest that genetic predispositions like ABO and Rh blood groups would influence the occurrence of these diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between ABO and Rhesus blood groups and the susceptibility to HIV infection and hepatitis B. We conducted a cross-sectional and analytical study in a population of voluntary blood donors in the Blood Transfusion Center of Abidjan. All blood donors who donated blood between January and June 2014 were tested for HBs antigen and anti-HIV antibodies (ELISA tests) and were ABO typed. The total number of examined blood donors during this period was 45,538, of which 0.32% and 8.07% were respectively infected with HIV and hepatitis B virus. O-group donors were more infected than non-O donors. Our study is an outline concerning the search for a link between ABO and Rh blood groups and hepatitis B and HIV infection. Further studies should be conducted to confirm the interaction between these two infections and contribute to the search for new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26495131

  3. The effect of pneumatic tube system on complete blood count parameters and thrombocyte donation in healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ismail; Arslan, Aliriza; Ozlu, Can; Hacioglu, Sibel; Dogu, Mehmet Hilmi; Isler, Kamil; Keskin, Ali

    2012-08-01

    This paper is the first report whether or not pneumatic tube system affects the selection of apheresis donors according to the results of complete blood count. According to the apheresis guidelines, hemoglobin level must be ≥12.5g/dL and platelet level ≥150/μL to be a donor. Paired blood samples of 26 healthy volunteers were transported by either hand delivered or a pneumatic tube system to the laboratory. No statistically significant differences were observed in order to mean values of routine complete blood cell count and white cell differential parameters that were send for selection of apheresis donor before the procedure. Therefore, all healthy volunteers decided as a donor according to the laboratory results independent from transport method.

  4. The Prevalence of SEN Virus and Occult Hepatitis B (OBI) Virus Infection Among Blood Donors in Ahvaz City

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Samaneh; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Karimi, Gharib; Neisi, Niloofar

    2016-01-01

    Background The SEN virus (SENV) is a prevalent blood borne pathogen that has a worldwide incidence. SENV is comprised of eight genotypes; genotypes H and D are frequently associated with the pathogenesis of non-A - E hepatitis and post-transfusion hepatitis in blood donors and hepatitis patients. So far, no SENV pathogenesis has been reported in the liver biopsies of SENV carriers, but the frequency of SENV and its related genotypes requires further molecular epidemiology studies in different regions of the world. Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) is another global public health problem that is primarily transmitted via blood transfusions. Therefore, the identification of OBI among blood donors is key to preventing the spread of this disease. The relationship between SENV and OBI requires further evaluation. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of SENV-D and SENV-H in blood donors in Ahvaz city with a particular focus on co-infection with OBI. Patients and Methods This study had a cross-sectional design and included 184 healthy consecutive blood donors who visited a blood transfusion center in Ahvaz city from October-November 2013. The sera of all blood donors negative for HBsAg, anti-HCV antibody, and anti-HIV antibody were tested for SENV-D and SENV-H using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition, tests for HBV DNA (PCR), HBcIgG (ELISA), liver function (aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase), and alkaline phosphatase were carried out. Results Liver function tests in the healthy blood donors were within the normal range. The incidence rates of SENV-D and SENV-H in the 184 total blood donors were 10 (5.4%) (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1% - 9.0%) and 32 (17.4%) cases (95% CI: 12.0% - 23.0%), respectively. SENV-H/D co-infection occurred in 2 (1.1%) patients. The sera of 8/184 (4.3%) were positive for anti-HBc antibody but negative for HBV DNA. Conclusions Regardless of the presence of nonpathogenic SENV, 44

  5. Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation: the 20-year experience in the Rome Cord Blood Bank.

    PubMed

    Screnci, Maria; Murgi, Emilia; Valle, Veronica; Tamburini, Anna; Pellegrini, Maria Grazia; Strano, Sabrina; Corona, Francesca; Ambrogi, Eleonora Barbacci; Girelli, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) represents a source of hematopoietic stem cells for patients lacking a suitably matched and readily available related or unrelated stem cell donor. As UCB transplantation from compatible sibling provides good results in children therefore directed sibling UCB collection and banking is indicated in family who already have a child with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Particularly, related UCB collection is recommended when the patients urgently need a transplantation. To provide access to all patients in need, we developed a "Sibling cord blood donor program for hematopoietic cell transplantation". Here we report results of this project started 20years ago. To date, in this study a total of 194 families were enrolled, a total of 204 UCB samples were successfully collected and 15 pediatric patients have been transplanted. Recently, some authors have suggested novel role for UCB other than in the transplantation setting. Therefore, future studies in the immunotherapy and regenerative medicine areas could expand indication for sibling directed UCB collection.

  6. Low Blood Sodium in Older Adults: A Concern?

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Hyponatremia Why is low blood sodium a health concern for older adults? How is ... from Paul Y. Takahashi, M.D. Low blood sodium (hyponatremia) occurs when you have an abnormally low ...

  7. Donor Tag Game

    MedlinePlus

    ... Games > Donor Tag Game Printable Version Donor Tag Game This feature requires version 6 or later of ... LGBTQ+ Donors Blood Donor Community Real Stories SleevesUp Games Facebook Avatars and Badges Banners eCards Enter your ...

  8. [Giving blood: an individual right or the expression of a social responsibility? The donors' position in the debates on blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bastard, B

    2006-09-01

    This debate questions the donor's position within the transfusional framework. How are blood donation regulations initiated and implemented? Experts called upon this question insist on the necessity to better inform about such regulations so that they can be rapidly approved and in order to keep donors from adverse reactions linked to blood donations. How to make donors' rejections more tolerable? Contra-indications are a source of anxiety for the person whose blood sample is not accepted. While blood transfusion has never been safer in the past than it is today in wealthy countries, one should ask the question whether the donor is or not the victim of doubts still weighing down on this activity. Implementing the precautionary principle may indeed lead transfusion supervisors to take brutal decisions detrimental to the donor, seeming rather inspired by political or media pressures than calling on scientific or economic rigorous principles. What does the donor selection aim at in terms of prevention and public health? What about the renewal of donor associations' directors? Where are we at with the homosexual rejection trends? Such are the issues as those induced by the current debate.

  9. Mobilization and collection of peripheral blood stem cells: guidelines for blood volume to process, based on CD34-positive blood cell count in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Anguita-Compagnon, A T; Dibarrart, M T; Palma, J; Paredes, L; Mosso, C; Montalva, R; Salas, L; Araos, D; Delgado, I; Majlis, A

    2010-01-01

    We report 189 mobilizations and 489 collections of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) performed in 139 autologous transplantation patients and in 28 donors for allogeneic transplantations whose ages ranged from 2-68 years. We observed a correlation (P < .001; Pearson's coefficient 0.64) between CD34-positive cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units examined to estimate PBSC. In a subset of 287 collections (97 adults and 49 children) we obtained peripheral blood (PB) CD34-positive cell counts at 2 to 4 hours before leukapheresis. We noted a correlation between PB CD34-positive cell counts before leukapheresis and the number of CD34-positive cells per kilogram of body weight collected in the whole apheresis of the day (P < .001; Pearson's coefficient 0.82). An even better correlation was obtained between PB CD34-positive cells preapheresis and the yield of each individual blood volume (BV) processed (P < .001; Pearson's coefficient 0.87). Healthy donors and patients in each age group behaved similarly. In addition, the collection yield was greater among children than adults. These findings allowed us to develop a simple predictive model to estimate the BV to process for a target dose of CD34-positive cells per kilogram, based on the level of PBSC before apheresis in children and adults.

  10. Women as whole blood donors: offers, donations and deferrals in the province of Huelva, south-western Spain

    PubMed Central

    Madrona, Dalmiro Prados; Herrera, María Dolores Fernández; Jiménez, Dalmiro Prados; Giraldo, Sonsoles Gómez; Campos, Rita Robles

    2014-01-01

    Background Women seem more willing to donate blood than men despite the limitations that affect their donation rate. The aim of our study was to determine the role of women in altruistic donation of blood in Huelva, a province in south-western Spain. Materials and methods We registered 87,601 offers to donate whole blood between January 1st, 2005 and December 31st, 2009. We statistically analysed variables such as sex, age, offers, deferrals and donations, problems in venous access, vasovagal reactions, weight and blood pressure to establish their significance according to donor gender. Results With regards to gender, 52.3% of donors were women and 47.7% men. Of the 87,601 offers to donate blood, 46.5% were from females and 53.5% from males. More females than males made their first donation during the study period. However, 43.9 % of donations were from women, whereas 56.1% were from men. Overall 8.7% of offers were deferred, 62.7% of which due to a low haemoglobin concentration, which was the most frequent cause of deferral in women. Difficulties in venous access and vasovagal reactions were also more frequent in female donors than in male donors. By the end of the study period, donor fidelity was 58.6% for men and 48.6% for women. Discussion In the province of Huelva, women are more altruistically inclined than men to give blood, with the percentages of donors and first-time donors being higher among females. However, there are restrictions to women giving blood, especially low haemoglobin concentration, which reduce the number of female blood donations. Women also have more difficulty when blood is withdrawn and are more susceptible to vasovagal reactions, which negatively affect their experience as donors. Measures should be taken to reduce these barriers to encourage women to continue to offer to donate blood, thereby ensuring that they become regular donors, which is a key factor in guaranteeing an adequate supply of blood within the region of Andalusia. PMID

  11. A complete treatment of adult living donor liver transplantation: a review of surgical technique and current challenges to expand indication of patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, S-G

    2015-01-01

    The growing disparity between the number of liver transplant candidates and the supply of deceased donor organs has motivated the development of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Over the last two decades, the operation has been markedly improved by innovations rendering modern results comparable with those of deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT). However, there remains room for further innovation, particularly in adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). Unlike whole-size DDLT and pediatric LDLT, size-mismatching between ALDLT graft and recipient body weight and changing dynamics of posttransplant allograft regeneration have remained major challenges. A better understanding of the complex surgical anatomy and physiologic differences of ALDLT helps avoid small-for-size graft syndrome, graft congestion from outflow obstruction and graft hypoperfusion from portal flow steal. ALDLT for high-urgency patients (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score >30) can achieve results comparable to DDLT in high volume centers. Size limitations of partial grafts and donor safety issues can be overcome with dual grafts and modified right-lobe grafts that preserve the donor's middle hepatic vein trunk. Extended application of LDLT for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma above Milan criteria is an optional strategy at the cost of slightly compromised survival. ABO-blood group incompatibility obstacles have been broken down by introducing a paired donor exchange program and refined peri-operative management of ABO-incompatible ALDLT. This review focuses on recent innovations of surgical techniques, safe donor selection, current strategies to expand ALDLT with broadened patient selection criteria and important aspects of teamwork required for success.

  12. Acute, Recent and Past HEV Infection among Voluntary Blood Donors in China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meiyu; Fu, Ping; Yin, Yonghua; He, Miao; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis E virus is one of new threats to blood safety which was usually considered to be transmitted via fecal-oral route. China is one of the hyperendemic regions where frequent outbreaks of hepatitis E are noted. However, the overall prevalence of HEV infection among mainland Chinese blood donors is not clear until now. Method The peer-reviewed literatures reporting the prevalence of HEV in Chinese blood donors were identified by systematic searching of five electronic databases. The systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement issued in 2009. Data manipulation and statistical analyses were performed by Stata 12.0. Results Fourteen eligible articles involving 22 independent studies were included. Pooled prevalence of HEV infection biomarkers (anti-HEV IgG, anti-HEV IgM, RNA and antigen) among mainland Chinese blood donors were 29.2%, 1.1%, 0.1% and 0.1%, respectively which were higher than the data reported in other countries. The analysis of HEV genotypes indicated that the most prevalent strains in Chinese blood donors were genotype 1 and 4. Conclusions Mainland China is indicated with a relatively higher risk of transmission of hepatitis E through transfusion and the screening of blood donors for HEV RNA, especially in HEV-endemic areas, might reduce the potential risk of HEV infection via transfusion. PMID:27597991

  13. [Prevalences of HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C in blood donors in the Republic of Djibouti].

    PubMed

    Dray, X; Dray-Spira, R; Bronstein, J A; Mattera, D

    2005-01-01

    Screening for hepatitis B (HBV) surface antigen (Ag HBs) and for antibodies to hepatitis C (HCV) and human: immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was carried out in 9006 volunteer blood donors at the National Blood Bank in the Republic of Djibouti from 1998 to 2000. Results demonstrated the presence of Ag HBs in 934 patients (10.4%), antibodies to HCV in 21 patients (0.3%), and antibodies to HIV in 175 patients (1.9%). In comparison with neighboring countries the prevalence of HBV, HCV, and HIV infection in Djibouti was low. These findings should be used to guide preventive action against these viral infections in the Republic of Djibouti. Estimations of HIV infection (11.7%) based on modeling by the World Health Organization should be reviewed.

  14. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in volunteer blood donors from Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tianxiang; Zhao, Xin; Luo, Yijia; Hong, Ying; Li, Shuping; Fu, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant pathogen of global concern. The virus is usually spread through blood contact, such as transfusion, hemodialysis and injection of illegal drugs. HCV genotypes have a geographic distribution in different areas. In this paper, we focus on the distribution of HCV genotypes from volunteer blood donors in Chengdu. The prevalence of genotypes was analyzed using phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic trees were constructed based on the HCV core and NS5B regions from 313 sequences. HCV sequences were classified into six subtypes, and HCV genotypes were determined with the following results: 1b in 283, 2a in 14, 3b in seven, 3a in three, 6a in five and 6u in one. Subtype 1b was the most common and accounted for approximately 90.41 % (283/313), and a virus of subtype 6u was isolated for the first time from the Chengdu area. Genotypes 4 and 5 were not detected.

  15. Blood donation, deferral, and discrimination: FDA donor deferral policy for men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Charlene

    2010-02-01

    U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) policy prohibits blood donation from men who have had sex with men (MSM) even one time since 1977. Growing moral criticism claims that this policy is discriminatory, a claim rejected by the FDA. An overview of U.S. blood donation, recent donor deferral policy, and the conventional ethical debate introduce the need for a different approach to analyzing discrimination claims. I draw on an institutional understanding of injustice to discern and describe five features of the MSM policy and its FDA context that contribute to its discriminatory effect. I note significant similarities in the 1980s policy of deferring Haitians, suggesting an historical pattern of discrimination in FDA deferral policy. Finally, I point to changes needed to move toward a nondiscriminatory deferral policy.

  16. High frequency of donor chimerism after allogeneic transplantation of CD34+-selected peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed

    Briones, J; Urbano-Ispizua, A; Lawler, M; Rozman, C; Gardiner, N; Marín, P; Salgado, C; Féliz, P; McCann, S; Montserrat, E

    1998-05-01

    Ex vivo T cell depletion of allogeneic grafts is associated with a high (up to 80%) rate of mixed chimerism (MC) posttransplantation. The number of transplanted progenitor cells is an important factor in achieving complete donor chimerism in the T cell depletion setting. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) peripheral blood allografts allows the administration of large numbers of CD34+ cells. We studied the chimeric status of 13 patients who received allogeneic CD34+-selected peripheral blood progenitor cell transplants (allo-PBPCTs/CD34+) from HLA-identical sibling donors. Patients were conditioned with cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and total-body irradiation (13 Gy in four fractions). Apheresis products were T cell-depleted by the immunoadsorption avidin-biotin method. The median number of CD34+ and CD3+ cells infused was 2.8x10(6)/kg (range 1.9-8.6x10(6)/kg) and 0.4x10(6)/kg (range 0.3-1x10(6)/kg), respectively. Molecular analysis of the engraftment was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (PCR-STR) sequences in peripheral blood samples. MC was detected in two (15%) of 13 patients. These two patients relapsed at 8 and 10 months after transplant, respectively. The remaining 11 patients showed complete donor chimerism and were in clinical remission after a maximum follow-up period of 24 months (range 6-24 months). These results were compared with those obtained in 10 patients who were treated with T cell-depleted bone marrow transplantation by means of elutriation and who received the same conditioning treatment and similar amounts of CD3+ cells (median 0.45x10(6)/kg; not significant) but a lower number of CD34+ cells (median 0.8x10(6)/kg; p = 0.001). MC was documented in six of 10 patients (60%), which was significantly higher than in the allo-PBPCT/CD34+ group (p = 0.04). We conclude that a high frequency of complete donor chimerism is achieved in patients receiving allo-PBPCT/CD34

  17. Distribution of Hepatitis B virus genotypes among healthy blood donors in eastern part of North India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kailash; Kumar, Manoj; Rahaman, Sk. H.; Singh, T. B.; Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Nath, Gopal

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated the distribution HBV genotypes among non-remunerated healthy blood donors in eastern North India. Materials and Methods: During screening of donated blood, 176 consecutive HBsAg positive, samples comprised the study. HBV-DNA was quantitative detected in 150 samples by PCR. HBV genotype was determined by identifying genotype-specific DNA band using nested PCR. Results: Majorities were of age group 31-40 yrs (65.3%). Males (92.7%) outnumbered females (7.3%) and were HbeAg-negative HBsAg carriers. Over all, genotype-A was the most prevalent (54%) followed by D (21.3%). We did not find genotype-G and H. Districts under study, divided into four zones: Zone–I genotype-A was most common (62.3%) followed by D (18.8%); Zone–II genotype–C (41.2%) was more frequent followed by D (20.6% and A (17.7%). Zone–III in adjoining Bihar state close to Zone–I, A was more prevalent (81.8%) followed by B and C (9.1%). In Zone-IV adjoining Zone- II had genotype-A (100%) only. Genotype–D had more sporadic distribution. Genotype-E and F were prevalent in Zone I and II (3/150, 2%). Conclusions: Among blood donors HBV genotype-A followed by D was the most prevalent in eastern North India. Genotype–A had pattern of distribution signifying common focus, while D was more sporadic and C had single large pocket (Zone-II) probably common focus but restricting to particular area. Evidences are suggestive of association of HBV genotype in liver dysfunction. An effective treatment and preventive strategies based of genotypes will reduce the disease burden and increase the blood safety. PMID:21897593

  18. Blood safety implications of donors using HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Seed, C R; Yang, H; Lee, J F

    2017-03-31

    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is the use of one or more antiretroviral medications (in combination) to prevent HIV infection. The most commonly used PrEP medication (Truvada(®) , Gilead Sciences, Inc.) acts by inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. If someone who is using PrEP unknowingly becomes HIV infected (termed 'PrEP breakthrough infection'), there may be suppressed viral replication resulting in a virus level undetectable by the most sensitive HIV NAT. Failure to seroconvert and seroreversion (loss of previously detectable HIV antibodies) have also both been observed with 2nd, 3rd and 4th generation screening immunoassays, as well as Western blot assays. If such a person was tested in the course of donating blood, the results may therefore be difficult to interpret. The index of suspicion for possible PrEP 'interference' should be highest in the context of concomitant low-level positive or 'greyzone' reactivity on HIV NAT and serological tests, which is an unusual pattern in acutely HIV-infected blood donors. Another possibility is detectable HIV RNA with negative HIV serology (i.e. a potential 'NAT yield' case) but without subsequent HIV seroconversion (or disappearance of HIV RNA). Excluding antiretroviral therapy or PrEP use by the donor in such circumstances would be important. The current rarity of PrEP breakthrough infection indicates that any potential safety risk is likely very small. However, considering the increasing use of PrEP we feel it is prudent for those interpreting HIV donor screening test results to consider the potential for PrEP interference.

  19. Sibling donor cord blood banking for children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Reed, W; Walters, M; Trachtenberg, E; Smith, R; Lubin, B H

    2001-01-01

    Although hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has curative potential for selected patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), most patients who are eligible for transplantation do not have a suitable donor. Cord blood (CB) from a sibling could provide an alternative stem cell source that, while not as well established as marrow, may offer certain advantages for selected families. These potential advantages include low risk to the infant donor, the possibility that mismatched CB units from sibling donors may be acceptable for transplantation, prompt availability of a stored CB unit for transplant, and decreased risk of clinically significant graft-versus-host disease. When families with SCD (or other transplant-treatable condition) conceive a sibling, no comprehensive research resource exists to assist the family in collecting the new infant's CB. With support from the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, we are developing a noncommercial research-based CB Banking Program specifically for medically indicated sibling donations. In preliminary experience, we have collected CB from 52 SCD families across 19 states. Of these, 2 CB units have thus far been used for transplantation and 9 others are HLA-identical. We conclude that a CB bank focusing on sibling-donations may be feasible, but further study is required to determine whether such a bank can collect CB units of sufficient quantity and quality to support controlled trials of sibling CB transplantation. Families with a specific medical need, such as those already caring for a child with SCD, should consider collecting sibling CB as part of comprehensive care if the opportunity becomes available.

  20. Quantitation of TIMP-1 in plasma of healthy blood donors and patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, M N; Murphy, G; Nielsen, H J; Pedersen, A N; Christensen, I J; Høyer-Hansen, G; Brünner, N; Stephens, R W

    1999-01-01

    A kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 was developed in order to examine the potential diagnostic and prognostic value of TIMP-1 measurements in cancer patients. The ELISA enabled specific detection of total TIMP-1 in EDTA, citrate and heparin plasma. The assay was rigorously tested and requirements of sensitivity, specificity, stability and good recovery were fulfilled. TIMP-1 levels measured in citrate plasma (mean 69.2 ± 13.1 μg l−1) correlated with TIMP-1 measured in EDTA plasma (mean 73.5 ± 14.2 μg l−1) from the same individuals in a set of 100 healthy blood donors (Spearman's rho = 0.62, P < 0.0001). The mean level of TIMP-1 in EDTA plasma from 143 patients with Dukes' stage D colorectal cancer was 240 ± 145 μg l−1 and a Mann–Whitney test demonstrated a highly significant difference between TIMP-1 levels in healthy blood donors and colorectal cancer patients (P < 0.0001). Similar findings were obtained for 19 patients with advanced breast cancer (mean 292 ± 331 μg l−1). The results show that TIMP-1 is readily measured in plasma samples by ELISA and that increased levels of TIMP-1 are found in patients with advanced cancer. It is proposed that plasma measurements of TIMP-1 may have value in the management of cancer patients. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408859

  1. [Standardization of serological tests for Chagas disease: an immunoenzymatic test for blood donors triage].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A W; Belem, Z R; Moura, M E; Camargo, M E

    1991-01-01

    In the serological diagnosis of Chagas disease large divergences may be found even between laboratories with experience, as a consequence of different criteria for the standardization of the tests. To standardize a immunoenzymatic test developed primarily for screening blood donors, serum panels were carefully chosen so as to best represent chagasic and non-chagasic populations. Produced for the highest sensibility and stability, the new reagent (bioELISA cruzi, Biolab Diagnóstica S/A, Brasil), was tested in serum from 1648 patients 219 with Chagas disease and 104 with other diseases, plus a comparison with well standardized immunofluorescence and hemagglutination tests in 1325 sera. In the immunoenzymatic assays, the cut off was indicated by the absorbance value of a chagasic serum showing a minimal reactivity. ELISA sensibility was 0.9954 and specificity 0.9969, as co-negativity. False positive results were absent with sera from syphilis, toxoplasmosis, mononucleosis and high titered sera for antistreptolysin 0 antibodies. However they were seen in 5 to 15 cases of tegumentar leishmaniasis, 1 of 12 Kala-azar 1 of 15 rheumatoid arthritis and 1 of 12 systemic lupus erythematosus. The high sensibility in chagasics and high specificity in the general population indicate the confiability of the immunoenzymatic assay for screening blood donors and even to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Chagas' disease.

  2. Distribution and genetic analysis of TTV and TTMV major phylogenetic groups in French blood donors.

    PubMed

    Biagini, Philippe; Gallian, Pierre; Cantaloube, Jean-François; Attoui, Houssam; de Micco, Philippe; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2006-02-01

    TTV and TTMV (recently assigned to the floating genus Anellovirus) infect human populations (including healthy individuals) at high prevalence (>80%). They display notably high levels of genetic diversity, but very little is known regarding the distribution of Anellovirus genetic groups in human populations. We analyzed the distribution of the major genetic groups of TTV and TTMV in healthy voluntary blood donors using group-independent and group-specific PCR amplifications systems, combined with sequence determination and phylogenetic analysis. Analysis of Anellovirus groups revealed a non-random pattern of group distribution with a predominant prevalence of TTV phylogenetic groups 1, 3, and 5, and of TTMV group 1. Multiple co-infections were observed. In addition, TTMV sequences exhibiting a high genetic divergence with reference sequences were identified. This study provided the first picture of the genetic distribution of the major phylogenetic groups of members of the genus Anellovirus in a cohort of French voluntary blood donors. Obtaining such data from a reference population comprising healthy individuals was an essential step that will allow the subsequent comparative analysis of cohorts including patients with well-characterized diseases, in order to identify any possible relationship between Anellovirus infection and human diseases.

  3. [Contributions of the Council of Europe's Blood Transfusion Steering Committee to the determination of rules for the selection of donors of blood and blood components and the study of sexual behaviors having an impact on blood safety].

    PubMed

    Behr-Gross, M-E; Heiden, M; Norda, R

    2013-05-01

    In November 2009, the Council of Europe's Blood Transfusion Steering Committee created a group of experts to explore the problem of behaviors having an impact on the management of donors of blood and blood components and on blood transfusion safety in Europe. This ad hoc group sought a harmonised interpretation of temporary exclusion (or temporary deferral), as opposed to permanent exclusion (or permanent deferral), in the context of the selection of donors of blood and blood components. It was also given the mandate to assess, on the basis of available data, the possibility of differentiating "at risk" behaviours from behaviours "at high risk" of contamination by serious infectious diseases transmitted by blood, blood components or derived therapeutic products. The primary objective of this work was to ensure the safety of blood, blood components and derived therapeutic products for future recipients by promoting a risk analysis-based approach, given that some countries envisaged amending their provisions for donor selection. However, a risk analysis can only be performed on groups, not individuals, which may give the impression of a discriminatory approach, so it needed to be justified in the context of transfusion safety. A collaborative project, which included an investigation phase, led to the drafting of a technical memorandum that summarised the data collected in ten Council of Europe member states on the selection criteria for blood donors and the epidemiology of infectious diseases (with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus) in the general population and among blood donors. The technical memorandum was published in 2011 on the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and Healthcare website dedicated to this project. A draft resolution of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe was then developed by the Council of Europe's Blood Transfusion Steering Committee. This text was circulated among member and observer states of the Council

  4. Effect of plateletpheresis on complete blood count values using three different cell separator systems in healthy donors.

    PubMed

    Beyan, Cengiz; Cetin, Türker; Kaptan, Kürbat; Nevruz, Oral

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate changes of CBC values after plateletpheresis in healthy and volunteer donors by using three different cell separator systems. The platelets were collected from 95 donors using the COBE Spectra, from 87 donors using the Fenwal CS-3000 Plus, and from 83 donors using the Fresenius AS-204. After plateletpheresis, white blood cells (WBC), hemoglobin (HGB), hematocrit (HCT), and platelets (PLT) were decreased significantly. When we used the COBE Spectra, the drop in the values of HGB and HCT was significantly less than for the other devices. It is recommended that hematological parameters should be monitored carefully in donors who are supposed to undergo long-term regular apheresis, and to prevent the occurrence of an artificial anemia, which is likely to happen. Selection of cell separator systems should be based on this possibility.

  5. Quantification of print, radio and television exposure among previous blood donors in Kenya: an opportunity for encouraging repeat donation in a resource-limited setting?

    PubMed

    Basavaraju, S V; Mwangi, J; Kellogg, T A; Odawo, L; Marum, L H

    2010-10-01

    Blood services in sub-Saharan Africa experience blood shortages and low retention of voluntary, non-remunerated donors. To boost collections by encouraging repeat donations, the Kenya National Blood Transfusion Service is exploring the likelihood of reaching previous donors through targeted print, radio and television advertising. We analysed data from a national AIDS Indicator Survey to determine whether previous donors have significant exposure to media. Respondents reporting history of blood donation had significantly higher exposure to print, radio and television media than those without history of blood donation. Targeted media campaigns encouraging repeat donation are likely to reach previous donors even in resource-limited settings.

  6. [The antioxidant activity of components of blood serum of donors and recipients before liver transplantation].

    PubMed

    Sazhina, N N; Titov, V N; Popov, I N; Solonin, S A; Godkov, M A

    2014-08-01

    The antioxidant activity is implemented in human blood serum by ascorbic acid, uric acid, amino acids, glucose, mono unsaturated fatty acids (in the first instance Ω-9 oleic acid), essential polyenoic fatty acids, thiol groups of albumins and proteins, tripeptide and pigment of bilirubin. The antioxidant activity of blood serum of donors and recipients before liver transplantation was determined The input of particular biochemical analytes into liver transplantation was determined too. The antioxidant parameters were detected using technique of termo-induced chemiluminescence under application of set of corresponding reagents. The analysis of antioxidant activity of blood serum in donors and recipients with hepatic pathology revealed in vivo a significant disorder in the syndrome of compensatory anti-inflammatory defense. Under hepatic pathology, absence of endogenous ascorbic acid, deficiency of exogenous ascorbic acid and disorder of antioxidant activity the uric acid and bilirubin become the major hydrophilic acceptors of active forms of oxygen and inhibitors of oxidative processes in vivo. In patients with physiological level of bilirubin the uric acid provides 40%-80% of antioxidant activity. In case of high hyperbilirubinemia in recipients only 9.6%. It is possible to consider hyperiricosuria under aphysiological processes as a nonspecific test of activation of biological reaction of inflammation, syndrome of compensatory anti-inflammatory defense and test of disorder of biological function of endoecology. To activate the syndrome of compensatory anti-inflammatory defense it is very important to decrease both hyperiricosuria and compensatory function of uric acid as an acceptor of active forms of oxygen by force of prolonged intake of optimal amount of ascorbic acid.

  7. Molecular characterization, distribution, and dynamics of hepatitis C virus genotypes in blood donors in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Mora, Mónica Viviana Alvarado; Romano, Camila Malta; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele Soares; Gutiérrez, Maria Fernanda; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a frequent cause of acute and chronic hepatitis and a leading cause for cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is classified in six major genotypes and more than 70 subtypes. In Colombian blood banks, serum samples were tested for anti-HCV antibodies using a third-generation ELISA. The aim of this study was to characterize the viral sequences in plasma of 184 volunteer blood donors who attended the "Banco Nacional de Sangre de la Cruz Roja Colombiana," Bogotá, Colombia. Three different HCV genomic regions were amplified by nested PCR. The first of these was a segment of 180 bp of the 5'UTR region to confirm the previous diagnosis by ELISA. From those that were positive to the 5'UTR region, two further segments were amplified for genotyping and subtyping by phylogenetic analysis: a segment of 380 bp from the NS5B region; and a segment of 391 bp from the E1 region. The distribution of HCV subtypes was: 1b (82.8%), 1a (5.7%), 2a (5.7%), 2b (2.8%), and 3a (2.8%). By applying Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation, it was estimated that HCV-1b was introduced into Bogotá around 1950. Also, this subtype spread at an exponential rate between about 1970 to about 1990, after which transmission of HCV was reduced by anti-HCV testing of this population. Among Colombian blood donors, HCV genotype 1b is the most frequent genotype, especially in large urban conglomerates such as Bogotá, as is the case in other South American countries.

  8. Markers of hepatitis C and B virus infections among blood donors in Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi, Vietnam.

    PubMed Central

    Song, P; Duc, D D; Hien, B; Nakata, S; Chosa, T; Watanabe, J; Tsuda, F; Murata, K; Okamoto, H

    1994-01-01

    Blood donors in two cities in Vietnam were tested for markers of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus infections. Antibody to HCV was detected by passive hemagglutination with antigens of the second generation in 101 (20.6%) of 491 donors in Ho Chi Minh City; it was detected less frequently (P < 0.001) in donors in hanoi (4 [0.8%] of 499). HCV RNA was tested for in donors with antibody by PCR with nested primers from the 5'-noncoding region and detected in 79 donors in Ho Chi Minh City and 4 donors in Hanoi. HCV RNA was genotyped by PCR with type-specific primers from the core gene. Of 83 HCV carriers from Vietnam, 24 (29%) were infected with HCV of genotype I/1a 19 (23%) were infected with II/1b, 4 (5%) were infected with III/2a, and 2 (2%) were infected with mixed genotypes (I/1a and II/1b); HCV genotypes in the remaining 34 (41%) donors, including all 4 donors in Hanoi, were not classifiable into I/1a, II/2a, IV/2b, or V/3a. Of the 10 isolates with unclassifiable genotypes, 2 showed substantial sequence divergence within the 5'-noncoding region from reported isolates with known genotypes (I/1a to 6a). An analysis of part of the core gene sequence indicated that six of the remaining isolates most likely represented new HCV genotypes. Hepatitis B surface antigen and the corresponding antibody, respectively, were detected in 15 (3.1%) and 234 (47.7%) donors in Ho Chi Minh City as well as 15 (3.0%) and 248 (49.7%) donors in Hanoi. These results indicate an extensive spread of HCV among Ho Chi Minh City donors and HCV of novel genotypes in vietnam. PMID:8556478

  9. Profile of Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, and Diego blood group systems among blood donors in the Southwest region of the Paraná state, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zacarias, Joana Maira Valentini; Langer, Ieda Bernadete Volkweis; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of alleles and genotypes of the blood group systems Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, and Diego in 251 regular blood donors registered in the hemotherapy unit of the Southwestern region of Paraná, Southern Brazil. The frequencies were obtained by direct counting on a spreadsheet program and statistical analyses were conducted in order to compare them with other Brazilian populations using chi-squared with Yates correction on OpenEpi software. The frequencies of RHD* negative, RHCE*c/c and RHCE*e/e were higher than expected for the Caucasian population. A difference was also observed for FY alleles, FY*01/FY*01 genotype and FY*02N.01 -67T/C (GATA Box mutation). Two homozygous individuals were defined as a low frequency phenotype K + k- (KEL*01.01/KEL*01.01) and, for Diego blood group system the rare DI*01 allele was found in ten blood donors, of which one was DI*01/DI* 01 (0.4%). The allele and genotype frequencies of Kidd blood group system were similar to expected to Caucasians. The results showed the direction in which to choose donors, the importance of extended genotyping in adequate blood screening and the existence of rare genotypes in Brazilian regular blood donors.

  10. Revaluing donor and recipient bodies in the globalised blood economy: Transitions in public policy on blood safety in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Julie; Farrell, Anne-Maree

    2014-01-01

    The clinical use of blood has a long history, but its apparent stability belies the complexity of contemporary practices in this field. In this article, we explore how the production, supply and deployment of blood products are socially mediated, drawing on theoretical perspectives from recent work on ‘tissue economies’. We highlight the ways in which safety threats in the form of infections that might be transmitted through blood and plasma impact on this tissue economy and how these have led to a revaluation of donor bodies and restructuring of blood economies. Specifically, we consider these themes in relation to the management of recent threats to blood safety in the United Kingdom. We show that the tension between securing the supply of blood and its products and ensuring its safety may give rise to ethical concerns and reshape relations between donor and recipient bodies. PMID:23467898

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis B and C virus infections among the general population and blood donors in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Viral hepatitis is a serious public health problem affecting billions of people globally. Limited information is available on this issue in Morocco. This cross-sectional study was undertaken with the aim of determining the seroprevalence and risk factors of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among the general population and among blood donors. Methods Blood samples from volunteers, have been screened with ELISA tests for detecting the hepatitis-B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV. Within the seroreactive patients for HCV in the general population, RT-PCR was performed by the Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas Amplicor. Results HCV and HBV-seropositivity was documented in 1.58% and 1.81% out of 41269 and 23578 participants respectively from the general population. Two patients were found to be co-infected. HCV-RNA was detected by PCR in 70.9% of the 195 anti-HCV positive subjects. The anti-HCV prevalence was not different among males and females (P = 0.3). It increased with age; the highest prevalence was observed among subjects with >50 years old (3.12%). Various risk factors for acquiring HCV infection were identified; age, dental treatment, use of glass syringes and surgical history. In addition to these factors, gender and sexual risk behaviors were found to be associated with higher prevalence of hepatitis B. The HBV positivity was significantly higher among males than females participants in all age groups (P < 0.01). The peak was noticed among males aged 30–49 years (2.4%). None of the 152 persons younger than 20 years had HBsAg or anti-HCV. The prevalence of anti-HCV and HBsAg among 169605 blood donors was 0.62% and 0.96% respectively. Conclusions Our study provided much important information concerning hepatitis B and C prevalence and risk factors; it confirmed the intermediate endemicity for HCV infection and pointed to a decreasing trend of HBV incidence, which might reclassify Morocco in low HBV endemicity area. This could be

  12. Surgical illustration of en-bloc (dual) kidney transplant from a 16-month old brain-dead donor to an adult recipient.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vikas; Jain, Saurabh; Singhal, Paras; Nayak, Suman Lata; Mathur, Rajendra P

    2017-01-01

    Transplantable organs from pediatric donors have been contributing significantly to donor pool worldwide. Pediatric donors are excellent resources that should be procured whenever available, and with the recent increase in deceased donations in India, more pediatric donors will be available for organ harvesting. We share a rare instance of multi-organ harvesting from a 16-month old brain dead donor and implanting both kidneys en-bloc in an adult male, while liver went to a 4-year old child. The report provides the surgical illustration of salient steps of transplanting both kidneys from pediatric donor into an adult, in an en-bloc manner.

  13. Surgical illustration of en-bloc (dual) kidney transplant from a 16-month old brain-dead donor to an adult recipient

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vikas; Jain, Saurabh; Singhal, Paras; Nayak, Suman Lata; Mathur, Rajendra P.

    2017-01-01

    Transplantable organs from pediatric donors have been contributing significantly to donor pool worldwide. Pediatric donors are excellent resources that should be procured whenever available, and with the recent increase in deceased donations in India, more pediatric donors will be available for organ harvesting. We share a rare instance of multi-organ harvesting from a 16-month old brain dead donor and implanting both kidneys en-bloc in an adult male, while liver went to a 4-year old child. The report provides the surgical illustration of salient steps of transplanting both kidneys from pediatric donor into an adult, in an en-bloc manner. PMID:28197039

  14. A Survey on the Prevalence of Depression in Blood Donors with Hepatitis C in Shiraz

    PubMed Central

    Kasraian, Leila; Negarestani, Neda; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Dehbidi, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder associated with hepatitis C. Objectives This study aimed to survey the prevalence rate of depression in patients with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) before they were aware of their HCV test result. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on all blood donors with confirmed positive HCV test results who donated blood between March 21, 2012 to March 21, 2013 at Fars blood transfusion center in Iran as case group and age- and sex-matched blood donors with negative screening test results as control group. A semi-structured interview based on DSM IV-TR depressive disorder criteria and Beck depression inventory (BDI) was conducted. BDI contained 21 items, each scored from 0 to 3 and total score of 0 to 63 for the whole scale computed by summing up all the items. A cut-off score of ≥ 19 indicated clinically significant depressive symptoms. The prevalence rate and risk factors of depression were determined. Results The most frequent risk factors for HCV infection were intravenous drug abuse (59.3%), unsafe sexual contact (30.5%), and history of being imprisoned (25.4%). The prevalence rate of depression in the HCV group was 55.9 % (95% CI: 42.99% - 68.87%) that was significantly higher than the corresponding rate of the control group as 17.7 % ( 95% CI: 8.49% - 28.79%) (P < 0.001). The severity of depression was also more in the HCV group (P < 0.001). Besides, the prevalence rate of depression was higher among HCV patients with lower education level, previous history of drug abuse, unsafe sexual contact, and previous history of psychiatric diseases. The prevalence rate of depression was higher in the case group even after adjusting for other variables. Conclusions Our study underlined the remarkable prevalence of depression among HCV patients. Therefore, designing depression screening tests is suggested to help such patients before starting the treatment. PMID:28070197

  15. Adult-to-adult living related donor renal transplantation in Yemen: the first experience.

    PubMed

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Asba, Nagieb W Abu; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Al-Massani, Mokhtar M; Noman, Morshed A; Al-Shargabe, Soliman; Al-Mansour, Mohamed M; Nassar, Mogahed Y

    2007-06-01

    Between May 1998 and June 2006, 31 patients (21 males and 10 females) received a renal allograft from live-related donors at the Urology and Nephrology Center in the Al-Thawra Modern General Hospital Sana'a, Republic of Yemen. The cold ischemia time ranged between 48 and 68 minutes. The immunosuppressive protocol was double therapy (steroids and mycophenolate) in the first 8 cases. The subsequent cases received triple therapy with steroids, cyclosporine and mycophenolate. Episodes of acute rejection were treated with high dose steroids while anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was also used in cases of vascular or steroid resistant rejection. Primary graft function was achieved in 29 recipients (93.5%). The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those reported in the literature. The kidney transplantation program started sporadically in Yemen since 1998. However, a well-established program has been running regularly since the beginning of 2005.

  16. Blood discard rate and the prevalence of infectious and contagious diseases in blood donors from provincial towns of the state of Paraná, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Mazzola, Jocimara Costa; Matta, Alessandra Cristina Gobbi; Takemoto, Angélica Yukari; Bértoli, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Background So that an improvement in the selection of donors can be achieved and the risk to the recipient of transfused blood can be reduced, prospective donors are submitted to clinical and serological screening. Objective This study investigated the blood discard rate and the rate of infectious and contagious diseases in blood donors from provincial towns of the state of Paraná, Brazil. Methods This study was an exploratory cross-sectional descriptive investigation with a quantitative approach of donations between January and December 2011. Results In the study period the Regional Blood center in Maringá, Brazil received 8337 blood donations from people living in the city and neighboring towns. However, 278 (3.33%) donations were discarded during serological screening owing to one or more positive serological markers. A total of 46.4% of the discarded blood units were confirmed positive by serology with anti-HBc being the most common (66.7%), followed by syphilis (22.5%), HBsAg (4.7%), anti-hepatitis C virus (3.1%), human immunodeficiency virus (1.5%) and Chagas' disease (1.5%). The rate of infectious-contagious diseases that can be transmitted by blood transfusions was 1.55% (129/8337) of the donor population with a frequency of 1.03% for anti-HBc and 0.35% for syphilis. Conclusion This study demonstrates a high prevalence of the anti-HBc marker in prospective blood donors from provincial towns in the state of Paraná, Brazil. PMID:24478604

  17. High Blood Pressure: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... below to read more. High Blood Pressure and Edema : You may notice swelling in some parts of ... blood pressure. This buildup of fluids, called peripheral edema, usually occurs in your ankles, feet, lower legs, ...

  18. Strategies to enhance umbilical cord blood stem cell engraftment in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Colleen; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Laughlin, Mary J

    2010-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been used successfully as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for allogeneic transplantation in children and adults in the treatment of hematologic diseases. However, compared with marrow or mobilized peripheral blood stem cell grafts from adult donors, significant delays in the rates and kinetics of neutrophil and platelet engraftment are noted after UCB transplant. These differences relate in part to the reduced numbers of HSCs in UCB grafts. To improve the rates and kinetics of engraftment of UCB HSC, several strategies have been proposed, including ex vivo expansion of UCB HSCs, addition of third-party mesenchymal cells, intrabone delivery of HSCs, modulation of CD26 expression, and infusion of two UCB grafts. This article will focus on ex vivo expansion of UCB HSCs and strategies to enhance UCB homing as potential solutions to overcome the problem of low stem cell numbers in a UCB graft. PMID:20835351

  19. Prevalence and trends of markers of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and human Immunodeficiency virus in Argentine blood donors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transfusion-transmitted infections are a major problem associated with blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence and trends of HBV, HCV and HIV in blood donors in Argentina. Methods A retrospective study was carried out in blood donors of 27 transfusion centers covering the whole country over a period of eight years (2004-2011). Serologic screening assays for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HCV, and anti-HIV were performed in all centers and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) was performed in 2 out of the 27 centers. Results The 2,595,852 samples tested nationwide from 2004 to 2011 showed that the prevalence of HBsAg decreased from 0.336% to 0.198% (p < 0.0001), that of anti-HBc from 2.391% to 2.007% (p < 0.0001), that of anti-HCV from 0.721% to 0.460%, (p < 0.0001) and that of anti-HIV from 0.208% to 0.200 (p = 0.075). The prevalence of HBV, HCV and HIV was unevenly distributed among the different regions of the country. Two out of 74,838 screening- negative samples were positive in NAT assays (1 HIV-RNA and 1 HCV-RNA); moreover, HBV-DNA, HCV-RNA and HIV-RNA were detected in 60.29, 24.54 and 66.67% of screening-positive samples of the corresponding assays. As regards donors age, positive HBV-DNA and HCV-RNA donors were significantly older than healthy donors (46.6, 50.5 and 39.5 y respectively, p < 0.001). Conclusions Argentina has a low prevalence of HBsAg, anti-HCV and anti-HIV in blood donors, with a decreasing trend for HBsAg, anti-HBc and anti-HCV but not for anti-HIV over the last 8 years. The uneven distribution of transfusion-transmitted infections prevalence among the different regions of the country highlights the need to implement regional awareness campaigns and prevention. The discrepancy between samples testing positive for screening assays and negative for NAT assays highlights the problem of blood donors who test repeatedly reactive in screening assays but are not confirmed as positive upon further testing. The

  20. High prevalence of anti-hepatitis E virus antibodies among blood donors in central Italy, February to March 2014.

    PubMed

    Lucarelli, Claudia; Spada, Enea; Taliani, Gloria; Chionne, Paola; Madonna, Elisabetta; Marcantonio, Cinzia; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Bruni, Roberto; La Rosa, Giuseppina; Pisani, Giulio; Dell'Orso, Luigi; Ragone, Katia; Tomei, Carla; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita

    2016-07-28

    Prevalence of anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) antibodies is highly variable in developed countries, which seems partly due to differences in assay sensitivity. Using validated sensitive assays, we tested 313 blood donors attending a hospital transfusion unit in central Italy in January and February 2014 for anti-HEV IgG and IgM and HEV RNA. Data on HEV exposure were collected from all donors. Overall anti-HEV IgG prevalence was 49% (153/313). Eating raw dried pig-liver sausage was the only independent predictor of HEV infection (adjusted prevalence rate ratio = 2.14; 95% confidence interval: 1.23-3.74). Three donors were positive for either anti-HEV IgM (n = 2; 0.6%) or HEV RNA (n = 2; 0.6%); they were completely asymptomatic, without alanine aminotransferase (ALT) abnormalities. Of the two HEV RNA-positive donors (both harbouring genotype 3), one was anti-HEV IgG- and IgM-positive, the other was anti-HEV IgG- and IgM-negative. The third donor was positive for anti-HEV IgG and IgM but HEV RNA-negative. HEV infection is therefore hyperendemic among blood donors (80% men 18-64 years-old) from central Italy and associated with local dietary habits. Nearly 1% of donors have acute or recent infection, implying potential transmission to blood recipients. Neither ALT nor anti-HEV IgM testing seems useful to prevent transfusion-transmitted HEV infection.

  1. A case of nearly mistaken AB para-Bombay blood group donor transplanted to a group 'O' recipient.

    PubMed

    Townamchai, Natavudh; Watanaboonyongcharoen, Phandee; Chancharoenthana, Wiwat; Avihingsanon, Yingyos

    2014-10-31

    Unintentional ABO mismatch kidney transplantation can cause detrimental hyperacute rejection. We report the first successful ABO incompatible kidney transplantation from an AB para-Bombay donor to O recipient. At the initial evaluation, the donor's ABO type was discordance on the cell typing and serum typing, which typed to be 'O' as cell typing and 'AB' as serum typing. At the second investigation, it was confirmed that the donor had a unique, rare but not uncommon blood type AB para-Bombay which was incompatible with the recipient's blood group. The kidney transplantation was successfully performed by an ABO incompatible preconditioning, double filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP) and rituximab. The serum creatinine at 12 months post-transplantation was 1.3 mg/dL. The pathology of the kidney biopsy showed no signs of rejection.

  2. Risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection among blood donors in southern Brazil: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Ajacio BM; Costa Fuchs, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Background In Brazil, it is estimated that between 2.5 and 4.9% of the general population present anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies, which corresponds to as many as 3.9 to 7.6 million chronic carriers. Chronic liver disease is associated with HCV infection in 20% to 58% of the Brazilian patients. The objective of this case-control study was to investigate the risk factors for presence of anti-HCV antibody in blood donors in southern Brazil. Methods One hundred and seventy eight blood donors with two positive ELISA results for anti-HCV were cases, and 356 controls tested negative. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect data concerning demographic and socioeconomic aspects, history of previous hepatitis infection, social and sexual behaviors, and number of donations. Variables were grouped into sets of hierarchical categories. Cases and controls were compared using logistic regression, odds ratios, and 95% confidence intervals. The statistical significance of the associations was assessed through likelihood ratio tests based on a P value < 0.05. Results The prevalence of anti-HCV among blood donors was 1.1%. Most of the donors were white and males. In the multivariate analysis, independent predictors of anti-HCV positivity were: intravenous drug use, blood transfusion >10 years earlier, having had two to four sexually transmitted diseases, incarceration, tattooing, sex with a hepatitis B or C virus carrier or with intravenous drug users. Conclusion Intravenous drug use, blood transfusion, and tattooing were the main risk factors for anti-HCV positivity among blood donors from southern Brazil, but sexual HCV transmission should also be considered. PMID:12169200

  3. Stored blood--an effective immunosuppressive method for transplantation of kidneys from unrelated donors. An 11-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Galvão, M M; Peixinho, Z F; Mendes, N F; Sabbaga, E

    1997-06-01

    Thirty-seven patients were submitted to kidney transplantation after transfusion at 2-week intervals with 4-week stored blood from their potential donors. All patients and donors were typed for HLA-A-B and DR antigens. The patients were also tested for cytotoxic antibodies against donor antigens before each transfusion. The percentage of panel reactive antibodies (PRA) was determined against a selected panel of 30 cell donors before and after the transfusions. The patients were immunosuppressed with azathioprine and prednisone. Rejection crises were treated with methylprednisolone. The control group consisted of 23 patients who received grafts from an unrelated donor but who did not receive donor-specific pretransplant blood transfusion. The incidence and reversibility of rejection episodes, allograft loss caused by rejection, and patient and graft survival rates were determined for both groups. Non-parametric methods (chi-square and Fisher tests) were used for statistical analysis, with the level of significance set at P < 0.05. The incidence and reversibility of rejection crises during the first 60 post-transplant days did not differ significantly between groups. The actuarial graft and patient survival rates at five years were 56% and 77%, respectively, for the treated group and 39.8% and 57.5% for the control group. Graft loss due to rejection was significantly higher in the untreated group (P = 0.0026) which also required more intense immunosuppression (P = 0.0001). We conclude that transfusions using stored blood have the immunosuppressive effect of fresh blood transfusions without the risk of provoking a widespread formation of antibodies. In addition, this method permits a reduction of the immunosuppressive drugs during the process without impairing the adequate functioning of the renal graft.

  4. Prevalence and trend of hepatitis C virus infection among blood donors in Iran: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khodabandehloo, Mazaher; Roshani, Daem; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the main causative agent of post-transfusion hepatitis. The virus is distributed worldwide with varying prevalence in different countries, which could easily lead to chronic infections, cirrhosis, and even hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence of HCV infection and its trend in Iranian blood donors. Materials and Methods: Literatures on the HCV prevalence among blood donors in Iran were acquired through searching PubMed, Magiran, IranMedex, Scientific Information Databank, and Google databases. All the potentially relevant papers were reviewed independently by two investigators by assessing the eligibility of each paper and abstracting data. Prevalence was calculated using random effects model for meta-analysis. Results: Forty-eight studies with total samples of 10,739,221 persons from 1996 to 2011 were combined and meta-analyzed, the pooled prevalence of HCV infection among blood donors in Iran provinces and cities was 0.5% (95% CI: 0.4-0.6%). Trend of HCV infection was decreasing in recent years. Conclusion: This study provides a comprehensive and reliable data on the prevalence and trend of HCV infection among blood donors and may be helpful in providing insight into disease burden and opportunities for prevention. In comparison with countries in this geographic region, Iran has the lowest rate of HCV infection. PMID:24379843

  5. A Bayesian Meta-Analysis on Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection among Chinese Volunteer Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guang-ying; Zheng, Yang; Deng, Yan; Gao, Yan-yan; Wang, Lie

    2013-01-01

    Background Although transfusion-transmitted infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) threatens the blood safety of China, the nationwide circumstance of HBV infection among blood donors is still unclear. Objectives To comprehensively estimate the prevalence of HBsAg positive and HBV occult infection (OBI) among Chinese volunteer blood donors through bayesian meta-analysis. Methods We performed an electronic search in Pub-Med, Web of Knowledge, Medline, Wanfang Data and CNKI, complemented by a hand search of relevant reference lists. Two authors independently extracted data from the eligible studies. Then two bayesian random-effect meta-analyses were performed, followed by bayesian meta-regressions. Results 5957412 and 571227 donors were identified in HBsAg group and OBI group, respectively. The pooled prevalence of HBsAg group and OBI group among donors is 1.085% (95% credible interval [CI] 0.859%∼1.398%) and 0.094% (95% CI 0.0578%∼0.1655%). For HBsAg group, subgroup analysis shows the more developed area has a lower prevalence than the less developed area; meta-regression indicates there is a significant decreasing trend in HBsAg positive prevalence with sampling year (beta = −0.1202, 95% −0.2081∼−0.0312). Conclusion Blood safety against HBV infection in China is suffering serious threats and the government should take effective measures to improve this situation. PMID:24236110

  6. Plerixafor and Filgrastim For Mobilization of Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Before A Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-15

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular

  7. Serum γ-Glutamyltransferase, Alanine Aminotransferase and Aspartate Aminotransferase Activity in Healthy Blood Donor of Different Ethnic Groups in Gorgan

    PubMed Central

    Mehrpouya, Masoumeh; Pourhashem, Zeinab

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Measure of liver enzymes may help to increase safety of blood donation for both blood donor and recipient. Determination of liver enzymes may prepare valuable clinical information. Aim To assess serum γ-Glutamyltransferase (GGT), Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT), and Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) activities in healthy blood donors in different ethnic groups in Gorgan. Materials and Methods This study was performed in 450 healthy male blood donors, in three ethnic groups (Fars, Sistanee and Turkman) who attended Gorgan blood transfusion center. Liver enzymes (GGT, ALT and AST) were determined. Results Serum AST and ALT in three ethnic groups were significant except for serum GGT levels. There was significant correlation between family histories of liver disease and systolic blood pressure and AST in Fars, and GGT in Sistanee ethnic groups. Conclusion Several factors, such as age, family history of diabetes mellitus, family history of liver disease and smoking habit had no effect on some liver enzymes in different ethnic groups in this area. Variation of AST, ALT, and GGT enzyme activities in healthy subjects was associated with some subjects in our study groups. According to our study, it suggests that screening of AST and GGT enzymes in subjects with family history of liver disease is necessary in different ethnic groups. PMID:27630834

  8. [Seroprevalence of HBV and HCV in blood donors at the Blood Transfusion Center of Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat Morocco].

    PubMed

    Zohoun, A; Hadef, R; Zahid, H; Benkirane, M

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings of a retrospective study (2008-2009) to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C virus in blood donors at the Blood Transfusion Center of Military Teaching Hospital Mohammed V in Rabat, Morocco. Samples from 19,801 consecutive blood donors were analyzed by the immuno-enzymatic method (Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay, third generation). The overall seroprevalence of HBV and HCV was 0.8% and 0.2% respectively. A total of 98 units were rejected because of elevated alanine transaminase. No case of co-infection was found. From 1991 to 2010, HBV and HCV seropositivity showed a significant declining trend. In spite of the low prevalence observed, this study confirms that the risk of transfusion transmitted infection exists and thus underlines the need to implement preventive strategies to improve blood transfusion safety.

  9. Patterns and Predictors of Sexual Function After Liver Donation: the Adult to Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study (A2ALL)

    PubMed Central

    DiMartini, AF.; Dew, MA.; Butt, Z.; Simpson, MA.; Ladner, DP.; Smith, AR.; Hill-Callahan, P.; Gillespie, BW.

    2015-01-01

    Although sexual functioning is an important facet of living donor quality of life, it has not received extensive evaluation in this population. Using data from the Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study, we examined donor sexual functioning across the donation process from the predonation evaluation to 3 months and 1 year postdonation. Donors (n=208) and a comparison group of non-donors (n=155) completed self-reported surveys with specific questions on sexual desire, satisfaction, orgasm, and (for men) erectile function. Across the three time points, donor sexual functioning was lower at the evaluation phase and 3 months postdonation than at one year postdonation. In the early recovery period, abdominal pain was associated with difficulty reaching orgasm (OR = 3.98, 95% CI 1.30–12.16), concerns over appearance with lower sexual desire (OR = 4.14, 95% CI 1.02–16.79), and not feeling back to normal was associated with dissatisfaction with sexual life (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.43–8.99). Efforts to educate donors before the surgery and prepare them for the early recovery phase may improve recovery and reduce distress regarding sexual functioning. PMID:25779554

  10. Modelling the prevalence of hepatitis C virus amongst blood donors in Libya: An investigation of providing a preventive strategy

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Mohamed A; Shabash, Amira; El-Bouzedi, Abdallah; Dau, Aghnya A; Habas, Moktar; Libyan Study Group of Hepatitis and HIV

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine hepatitis C virus (HCV) seroprevalence among the Libyan population using blood donors and applying the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model to predict future trends and formulate plans to minimize the burden of HCV infection. METHODS: HCV positive cases were collected from 1008214 healthy blood donors over a 6-year period from 2008 to 2013. Data were used to construct the ARIMA model to forecast HCV seroprevalence among blood donors. The validity of the model was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error between the observed and fitted seroprevalence. The fitted ARIMA model was used to forecast the incidence of HCV beyond the observed period for the year 2014 and further to 2055. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of HCV among blood donors was 1.8%, varying over the study period from 1.7% to 2.5%, though no significant variation was found within each calendar year. The ARIMA model showed a non-significant auto-correlation of the residuals, and the prevalence was steady within the last 3 years as expressed by the goodness-of-fit test. The forecast incidence showed an increase in HCV seropositivity in 2014, ranging from 500 to 700 per 10000 population, with an overall prevalence of 2.3%-2.7%. This may be extended to 2055 with minimal periodical variation within each 6-year period. CONCLUSION: The applied model was found to be valuable in evaluating the seroprevalence of HCV among blood donors, and highlighted the growing burden of such infection on the Libyan health care system. The model may help in formulating national policies to prevent increases in HCV infection and plan future strategies that target the consequences of the infection. PMID:26870670

  11. Use of terahertz electromagnetic radiation for correction of blood rheology parameters in patients with unstable angina under conditions of treatment with isoket, an NO donor.

    PubMed

    Kirichuk, V F; Andronov, E V; Mamontova, N V; Tupicin, V D; Mayborodin, A V

    2008-09-01

    The effect of terahertz electromagnetic radiation at the emission and absorption frequencies of NO molecular spectrum on blood rheology were studied in vitro in patients with unstable angina treated with isoket (NO donor). Irradiated NO donor isoket produced better normalizing effect on blood viscosity and erythrocyte deformability in patients with unstable angina.

  12. Detection of Donor-Derived Microparticles in the Peripheral Blood of a Hand Transplant Recipient During Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joseph Y.; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Yang, Otto O.

    2017-01-01

    Background Microparticles (MPs) are released from the plasma membrane of activated or dying cells and bear surface molecules from those cells. We examined whether donor-derived MPs in the peripheral blood of the recipient could serve as a marker of tissue damage due to rejection of a transplanted hand. Methods Platelet-free plasma from the recipient of the transplanted hand was analyzed for MPs bearing the donor-specific HLA molecule A*02 using flow cytometry. Rejection status of the transplanted hand was monitored by histopathology of skin punch biopsies. Results Donor-specific MPs expressing HLA A*02 were quantifiable in the peripheral blood of the recipient. Levels of these MPs increased with worsening rejection of the transplanted hand. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the ability to detect donor specific MPs through staining of graft cell-specific HLA and promote further investigation into the potential utility of flow cytometry for donor-derived MPs as a noninvasive tool to assess rejection in solid organ transplantation patients.

  13. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  14. Infections after Transplantation of Bone Marrow or Peripheral Blood Stem Cells from Unrelated Donors.

    PubMed

    Young, Jo-Anne H; Logan, Brent R; Wu, Juan; Wingard, John R; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Mudrick, Cathryn; Knust, Kristin; Horowitz, Mary M; Confer, Dennis L; Dubberke, Erik R; Pergam, Steven A; Marty, Francisco M; Strasfeld, Lynne M; Brown, Janice Wes M; Langston, Amelia A; Schuster, Mindy G; Kaul, Daniel R; Martin, Stanley I; Anasetti, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Infection is a major complication of hematopoietic cell transplantation. Prolonged neutropenia and graft-versus-host disease are the 2 major complications with an associated risk for infection, and these complications differ according to the graft source. A phase 3, multicenter, randomized trial (Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network [BMT CTN] 0201) of transplantation of bone marrow (BM) versus peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) from unrelated donors showed no significant differences in 2-year survival between these graft sources. In an effort to provide data regarding whether BM or PBSC could be used as a preferential graft source for transplantation, we report a detailed analysis of the infectious complications for 2 years after transplantation from the BMT CTN 0201 trial. A total of 499 patients in this study had full audits of infection data. A total of 1347 infection episodes of moderate or greater severity were documented in 384 (77%) patients; 201 of 249 (81%) of the evaluable patients had received a BM graft and 183 of 250 (73%) had received a PBSC graft. Of 1347 infection episodes, 373 were severe and 123 were life-threatening and/or fatal; 710 (53%) of these episodes occurred on the BM arm and 637 (47%) on the PBSC arm, resulting in a 2-year cumulative incidence 84.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 79.6 to 89.8) for BM versus 79.7% (95% CI, 73.9 to 85.5) for PBSC, P = .013. The majority of these episodes, 810 (60%), were due to bacteria, with a 2-year cumulative incidence of 72.1% and 62.9% in BM versus PBSC recipients, respectively (P = .003). The cumulative incidence of bloodstream bacterial infections during the first 100 days was 44.8% (95% CI, 38.5 to 51.1) for BM versus 35.0% (95% CI, 28.9 to 41.1) for PBSC (P = .027). The total infection density (number of infection events/100 patient days at risk) was .67 for BM and .60 for PBSC. The overall infection density for bacterial infections was .4 in both arms; for viral infections

  15. [Quantitative bacteriological evaluation of a method for skin disinfection in blood donors].

    PubMed

    Folléa, G; Saint-Laurent, P; Bigey, F; Gayet, S; Bientz, M; Cazenave, J P

    1997-12-01

    Skin disinfection at the site of venipuncture is a critical point in every blood transfusion collection procedure, as it contributes to ensure the bacterial safety of transfusion. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria present in the antecubital fossae before and after skin disinfection may be one method of assessing the anti-bacterial efficiency of disinfection. Swab culture systems and contact plates are the two techniques usually employed for this purpose. A washing and swabbing technique was used to quantify bacteria before and skin disinfection of the antecubital fossae in blood donors. This contra-placebo study was carried out on 32 donors, each of whom served as his own control, with a random choice of test arm and opposing control arm. Bacterial counts were determined in the antecubital fossae without skin disinfection (control, n = 32) and after a 3 step skin preparation procedure (cleaning, wiping, disinfection) using placebo (distilled water, n = 16) or an antiseptic product (mixture of chlorexidine, benzalkonium chloride and benzylic alcohol, n = 16). The absence of a statistical difference in bacterial counts between the right and left antecubital fossae without disinfection was controlled in a preliminary study of 20 subjects. Mean bacterial counts were 25,000/cm2 and 27,400/cm2 respectively for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria before disinfection, with a wide variation in results between individuals. When using placebo, preparation of the venipuncture site by the 3 step method (cleaning, wiping, disinfection) resulted in a non significant mean reduction of 0.56 log in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Using the antiseptic product, the same method resulted in a significant mean reduction of 1.8 and 1.7 log respectively in aerobic (p = 0.015) and anaerobic flora (p = 0.005). On an average, 2,750 aerobic bacteria/cm2 and 2,910 anaerobic bacteria/cm2 remained after disinfection, while qualitative analysis showed that disinfection suppressed the

  16. Failure of self-disclosure of deferrable risk behaviors associated with transfusion-transmissible infections in blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Horas Tze Hoo; Lee, Shui Shan; Lee, Cheuk-Kwong; Chan, Denise Pui Chung

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To date, most studies on deferral of blood donors have focused on men who have sex with men (MSM) and/or injecting drug users. Few have examined deferrable risk behaviors relating to transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs) in general. This study aimed to examine the prevalence of, and factors associated with, nondisclosure of TTI-related risk behaviors in donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Chinese-speaking donors who had just given blood in Hong Kong were invited to self-complete an anonymous questionnaire. Practices of one or more of seven deferrable risk behaviors associated with TTI were inquired. Factors associated with noncompliance with self-disclosure were evaluated by logistic regression. RESULTS Over a 4-week study period in 2012, a total of 1143 donors were recruited. Overall, 0.2% gave a history of drug injection, 1.7% had had sex with sex worker(s), and 0.3% had had sex with a human immunodeficiency virus–infected partner, while none had been paid for sex. Some 1.5% of male donors reported having same-sex behaviors. Factors associated with noncompliance were male gender (odds ratio [OR] 31.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.7-263.6), having multiple sex partners (OR, 89.7; 95% CI, 28.7-279.9), and previous history of temporary deferral (OR, 11.4; 95% CI, 2.5-53.3). If suspected noncompliance was included, the overall prevalence of nondisclosure of deferrable behaviors could be high at 6.5%. CONCLUSION Albeit uncommon, some donors fail to provide accurate answers to predonation screening questions and are not deferred appropriately. There is room for improvement to make deferral policy acceptable and understandable, so as to minimize the risk of TTI. Efforts are also needed to tackle the paucity of data on noncompliance of non-MSM donors. PMID:25846739

  17. Paucity of HLA-identical unrelated donors for African-Americans with hematologic malignancies: the need for new donor options.

    PubMed

    Dew, Alexander; Collins, Demetria; Artz, Andrew; Rich, Elizabeth; Stock, Wendy; Swanson, Kate; van Besien, Koen

    2008-08-01

    Identification of an HLA identical donor/recipient pair using high-resolution techniques at HLA A, B, C, and DRB1 optimizes survival after adult unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplant. It has been estimated that roughly 50% of African-Americans have suitable unrelated donors based on serologic typing, but there is little information on the likelihood of identifying an HLA-identical unrelated donor using molecular techniques. From February 2002 to May 2007, we performed 51 unrelated donor searches for African-American patients using the National Marrow Donor Program and found HLA identical unrelated donors for only 3. By contrast, 50 (98%) had at least 1, and often multiple, appropriately matched cord blood units available. Very few African-American recipients have HLA-identical unrelated donors. To allow more African-American patients to proceed to transplant, innovative donor strategies, including adult cord blood transplantation, haploidentical transplant, or the identification of permissive mismatches should be investigated.

  18. Giving blood donors something to drink before donation can prevent fainting symptoms: is there a physiological or psychological reason?

    PubMed

    Vavic, Nataša; Pagliariccio, Antonella; Bulajic, Milica; Dinić, Radovan; Marinozzi, Maria

    2014-08-01

    The vasovagal reaction has been widely studied but its anatomic and physiological nature remains uncertain. The mechanisms underlying vasovagal reaction related to blood donation are not completely understood either. Does its occurrence depend on the blood donors' physical characteristics and health variables or psychological factors? On the basis that a psychological approach considerably prevents donor reactions, the effect of fruit juice ingestion was studied in a group of 1849 first-time high-school students as a simple strategy to avoid systemic reactions at blood donation. The reasons for the psychological effect of this hydration protocol are stressed also in light of previous physiological studies on the hemodynamic effects of water or carbohydrate drinks.

  19. Epidemiology of Chikungunya Virus Outbreaks in Guadeloupe and Martinique, 2014: An Observational Study in Volunteer Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Gallian, Pierre; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Richard, Pascale; Maire, Françoise; Flusin, Olivier; Djoudi, Rachid; Chiaroni, Jacques; Charrel, Remi; Tiberghien, Pierre; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Background During Dec-2013, a chikungunya virus (CHIKV) outbreak was first detected in the French-West Indies. Subsequently, the virus dispersed to other Caribbean islands, continental America and many islands in the Pacific Ocean. Previous estimates of the attack rate were based on declaration of clinically suspected cases. Methods/Principal findings Individual testing for CHIKV RNA of all (n = 16,386) blood donations between Feb-24th 2014 and Jan-31st 2015 identified 0·36% and 0·42% of positives in Guadeloupe and Martinique, respectively. The incidence curves faithfully correlated with those of suspected clinical cases in the general population of Guadeloupe (abrupt epidemic peak), but not in Martinique (flatter epidemic growth). No significant relationship was identified between CHIKV RNA detection and age-classes or blood groups. Prospective (Feb-2014 to Jan-2015; n = 9,506) and retrospective (Aug-2013 to Feb-2014; n = 6,559) seroepidemiological surveys in blood donors identified a final seroprevalence of 48·1% in Guadeloupe and 41·9% in Martinique. Retrospective survey also suggested the absence or limited "silent" CHIKV circulation before the outbreak. Parameters associated with increased seroprevalence were: Gender (M>F), KEL-1, [RH+1/KEL-1], [A/RH+1] and [A/RH+1/KEL-1] blood groups in Martiniquan donors. A simulation model based on observed incidence and actual seroprevalence values predicted 2·5 and 2·3 days of asymptomatic viraemia in Martiniquan and Guadeloupian blood donors respectively. Conclusions/Significance This study, implemented promptly with relatively limited logistical requirements during CHIKV emergence in the Caribbean, provided unique information regarding retrospective and prospective epidemiology, infection risk factors and natural history of the disease. In the stressful context of emerging infectious disease outbreaks, blood donor-based studies can serve as robust and cost-effective first-line tools for public health surveys. PMID

  20. Decreased graft survival in liver transplant recipients of donors with positive blood cultures: a review of the United Network for Organ Sharing dataset.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Vilchez, Valery; Mei, Xiaonan; Shah, Malay B; Daily, Michael F; Berger, Jonathan; Gedaly, Roberto

    2016-11-29

    Liver transplantation using blood culture positive donors (BCPD) has allowed a significant expansion of the donor pool. We aimed to characterize BCPD and assess the outcomes of BCPD liver transplant recipients. We retrieved data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) registry on all adults who underwent primary, single-organ deceased-donor liver transplantation in the USA between 2008 and 2013. Patients were classified into two cohorts: the BCPD cohort and the non-BCPD cohort. One-year graft and patient survival were compared between cohorts using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox models. A total of 28 961 patients were included. There were 2316 (8.0%) recipients of BCPD. BCPD were more likely to be older, female, black, diabetic, hypertensive, and obese compared to non-BCPD. Graft survival was significantly lower in BCPD recipients compared to non-BCPD recipients (Kaplan-Meier, 0.85 vs. 0.87; P = 0.009). Results remained significant in propensity-matched analysis (P = 0.038). BCPD was independently associated with decreased graft survival (adjusted HR; 1.10, 95% CI 1.01-1.20; P = 0.04). There were no significant differences in patient survival between study groups. BCPD was associated with decreased graft survival in liver transplant recipients. Studies are needed to identify subgroups of BCPD with the highest risk of graft failure and characterize the underlying pathogenic mechanisms.

  1. A novel hepatitis B virus subgenotype, D7, in Tunisian blood donors.

    PubMed

    Meldal, Birgit H M; Moula, Najet Mojaat; Barnes, If H A; Boukef, Kamel; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2009-07-01

    Tunisia is a medium-level epidemic country for hepatitis B virus (HBV). This study characterizes, for the first time, full genome HBV strains from Tunisia. Viral load quantification and phylogenetic analyses of full genome or pre-S/S sequences were performed on 196 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive plasma samples from Tunisian blood donors. The median viral load was 64.65 IU ml(-1) (range<5-7.7x10(8) IU ml(-1)) and 89% of samples had viral loads below 10,000 IU ml(-1). Fifty-nine strains formed a novel subgenotype D7, 41 strains clustered in subgenotype D1, seven strains in subgenotype A2 and one strain in genotype C. The novel subgenotype D7 was defined by maximum Bayesian posterior probability, a genetic divergence from other HBV/D subgenotypes by >4% and a stronger HBV/E signal in the X to core genes than subgenotype D1. In conclusion, HBV/D is dominant in asymptomatic Tunisian HBsAg carriers and a novel subgenotype, D7, was the most common subgenotype found in this population.

  2. HBsAg-positive Swedish blood donors: natural history and origin of infection.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, J; Lindholm, A

    1988-01-01

    99 HBsAg-positive blood donors (BDs) were discovered in Göteborg during 1970-84. Of the 82 patients where the outcome is known 46 had transient and 36 persistent antigenemia. Chronic hepatitis was found in 6 patients while 30 were asymptomatic carriers. Three BDs had died, 1 of them from cholangiocellular cancer. An obvious mode of transmission was demonstrated for 19 BDs, i.v. drug abuse being the most frequent one. Five BDs originated from countries with a known high prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Family contacts of the remaining carriers had serological markers for HBV in the following frequencies: mothers 46%, siblings 39%, fathers 25%, children 13%, spouses 10%. Only children of female carriers had markers for HBV infection. Intrafamiliar transmission during childhood is an important route of transmission even in a country with low HBV endemicity and amongst people without connection with endemic regions. This population may be susceptible to the consequences of a long-term carriership of HBV.

  3. Transfusion-associated HIV infection in Mexico related to paid blood donors; HIV epidemic.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Patricia; Velasco, Silvia Ruiz; Mueller, Nancy; Ponce de Leon, Samuel; Sierra-Madero, Juan Gerardo; Sada, Eduardo; Soto, José Luis; Perez-Ancona, Franz; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; Castillo, José Ramón; Mohar, Alejandro

    2004-05-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the clinical, epidemiological profile and conditional incubation period in a group of transfusion-associated HIV-infected (TAHI) patients seen in five national tertiary care centres in Mexico from 1983 to April 1998. Date of transfusions, AIDS diagnoses, opportunistic infections and malignancies were collected. The incubation period was estimated through a non-parametric conditional analysis. One hundred and fifty-seven TAHI cases were analysed. The frequency of TAHI by year of transfusion was: 0.6% in 1980 and 1981, 4.5% in 1984, 22.4% in 1985, 54.5% in 1986, 10.3% in 1987, 0.6% in 1988, 1.9% in 1989 and 1990, 1.3% in 1993 and 0.6% in 1994 and 1996. The median incubation period was 4.3 years. A well-defined epidemic period of HIV-infection among blood-recipients was identified that coincided with the HIV-epidemic among paid donors. TAHI patients in Mexico developed AIDS in a shorter time than that described for other populations.

  4. Pediatric Blood Pressure and Adult Preclinical Markers of Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Costan G; Smith, Kylie J

    2016-01-01

    A high blood pressure level in adults is considered the single most important modifiable risk factor for global disease burden, especially those of cardiovascular (CV) origin such as stroke and ischemic heart disease. Because blood pressure levels have been shown to persist from childhood to adulthood, elevations in pediatric levels have been hypothesized to lead to increased CV burden in adulthood and, as such, might provide a window in the life course where primordial and primary prevention could be focused. In the absence of substantive data directly linking childhood blood pressure levels to overt adult CV disease, this review outlines the available literature that examines the association between pediatric blood pressure and adult preclinical markers of CV disease.

  5. Pediatric Blood Pressure and Adult Preclinical Markers of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Costan G.; Smith, Kylie J.

    2016-01-01

    A high blood pressure level in adults is considered the single most important modifiable risk factor for global disease burden, especially those of cardiovascular (CV) origin such as stroke and ischemic heart disease. Because blood pressure levels have been shown to persist from childhood to adulthood, elevations in pediatric levels have been hypothesized to lead to increased CV burden in adulthood and, as such, might provide a window in the life course where primordial and primary prevention could be focused. In the absence of substantive data directly linking childhood blood pressure levels to overt adult CV disease, this review outlines the available literature that examines the association between pediatric blood pressure and adult preclinical markers of CV disease. PMID:27168729

  6. Strategic breakthrough in adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation: preliminary results of consecutive seven cases.

    PubMed

    Soejima, Yuji; Muto, Jyun; Matono, Rumi; Ninomiya, Mizuki; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Ikegami, Toru; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2013-01-01

    ABO-incompatibility is a major obstacle to expanding exiguous donor pools in adult liver transplantation, especially in countries where grafts from deceased donors are uncommon. We present our preliminary results of ABO-incompatible (ABO-I) adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using a new, simple protocol. Seven consecutive cases of ABO-I LDLT were managed by the same protocol including pre-operative administration of a single dose of rituximab (375 mg/m(2) ) followed by three to five sessions of plasma exchange before LDLT without portal infusion therapy. The triple immunosuppression protocol consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and steroids, with mycophenolate mofetil starting seven d before LDLT. Splenectomy was performed for all cases. All patients are alive (100% survival) with a mean follow-up of 852 d (715-990 d). Neither antibody-mediated nor hyperacute rejection were encountered. There was only one episode of mild acute cellular rejection, for which steroid augmentation was effective. The median preformed isoagglutinin antibody titer before plasma exchange was 256, while the median antibody titer immediately before LDLT was 16. In conclusion, adult ABO-I LDLT results were excellent - comparable or even superior to those of ABO-compatible LDLT. ABO-I adult LDLT has now become a more applicable modality without the need for an appropriate donor.

  7. Risk Factors for Transfusion Transmissible Infections Elicited on Post Donation Counselling in Blood Donors: Need to Strengthen Pre-donation Counselling.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Suchet; Mittal, Kshitija; Patidar, Gopal; Marwaha, Neelam; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Duseja, Ajay Kumar; Chawla, Yogesh Kumar; Arora, Sunil Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Donor notification and counselling transforms the legal and ethical requirement of disclosure of transfusion transmissible infection (TTI) in a blood donor into practice. The present study was done to assess the response to the disclosure of TTI reactivity results in blood donors, assess the risk factors in blood donors and follow the compliance of the disclosure and clinical referral in a population of blood donors who are difficult to convince that they may be harbouring infections apparently in a healthy state today but with possible clinical disease consequences in the future. A retrospective study was conducted from April 2011 to November 2012. Screening was done using third generation ELISA kits used according to the manufacturer's directions; these kits were approved for use in blood banks by the Drug Controller General of India. Those testing repeat reactive were referred for further confirmation and management. The total number of TTI reactive donors was 787 (0.93 %, N = 83,865). The observed response rate in the present study is 21.6 % (167, N = 787). The risk factors for acquiring infections in TTI reactive donors were statistically significant history of high risk behaviour (20.3 %) for human immunodeficiency virus infection and history of jaundice in themselves, family or close contacts (16.1 %) for hepatitis B virus infection. One hundred and ten (65.8 %) of the referred donors were on outpatient clinical care when post-referral follow up was conducted. The study emphasises on continuing sensitization of blood donation camp organisers to the need of privacy during blood donor selection. The study also stresses the need to strengthen the pre-donation counselling at outdoor blood donation at the same time raise awareness amongst blood donors about the importance of post-donation counselling and follow up.

  8. Risk Factors for Intractable Ascites After Adult-to-Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Using Left Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Shinichi; Ishizaki, Yoichi; Yoshimoto, Jiro; Fujiwara, Noriko; Kawasaki, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Background Intractable ascites is one of the causes of graft loss after adult-to-adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using a small graft. Identification of factors associated with increasing posttransplant ascites has important implications for prevention and treatment. Methods All 59 consecutive adult patients who underwent left lobe LDLT without portal inflow modulation between October 2002 and February 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Factors associated with the average daily amount of ascites for 2 weeks after LDLT were assessed. Results The median daily amount of ascites during the 2 weeks was 1052 mL (range, 52-3480 mL). Although 16 of the 59 patients developed intractable ascites, exceeding 1500 mL daily (massive ascites group), the remaining 43 patients produced less than 1500 mL of ascites daily (nonmassive ascites group). The presence of pretransplant ascites (P = 0.001), albumin (P = 0.011), albumin/globulin ratio (P = 0.026), cold ischemia time (P = 0.004), operation time (P = 0.022), and pretransplant portal vein pressure (PVP) (P = 0.047) differed significantly between the 2 groups. Neither posttransplant PVP nor portal vein flow differed between the 2 groups. The variables associated with intractable ascites that remained significant after logistic regression analysis were pretransplant PVP (P = 0.047) and cold ischemia time (P = 0.049). After appropriate fluid resuscitation for intractable ascites, 58 (98%) of the 59 recipients were discharged from hospital after removal of the indwelling drains. Conclusions It is important to shorten the scold ischemia time to reduce massive ascites after LDLT. Pretransplant portal hypertension is more closely associated with ascites production than posttransplant hemodynamic status. PMID:28361122

  9. Using ultrasonography to monitor liver blood flow for liver transplant from donors supported on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xian-Sheng; Wang, Sha-Sha; Cheng, Qi; Ye, Chuang-Wen; Huo, Feng; Li, Peng

    2016-02-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been used to support brain-dead donors for liver procurement. This study investigated the potential role of ultrasonographic monitoring of hepatic perfusion as an aid to improve the viability of liver transplants obtained from brain-dead donors who are supported on ECMO. A total of 40 brain-dead patients maintained on ECMO served as the study population. Hepatic blood flow was monitored using ultrasonography, and perioperative optimal perfusion was maintained by calibrating ECMO. Liver function tests were performed to assess the viability of the graft. The hepatic arterial blood flow was well maintained with no significant changes observed before and after ECMO (206 ± 32 versus 241 ± 45 mL/minute; P = 0.06). Similarly, the portal venous blood flow was also maintained throughout (451 ± 65 versus 482 ± 77 mL/minute; P = 0.09). No significant change in levels of total bilirubin, alanine transaminase, and lactic acid were reported during ECMO (P = 0.17, P = 0.08, and P = 0.09, respectively). Before the liver is procured, ultrasonographic monitoring of hepatic blood flow could be a valuable aid to improve the viability of a liver transplant by allowing for real-time calibration of ECMO perfusion in brain-dead liver donors. In our study, ultrasonographic monitoring helped prevent warm ischemic injury to the liver graft by avoiding both overperfusion and underperfusion of the liver.

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus antibodies and genotypes in asymptomatic, first-time blood donors in Namibia.

    PubMed Central

    Vardas, E.; Sitas, F.; Seidel, K.; Casteling, A.; Sim, J.

    1999-01-01

    Reported is the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Namibia as determined using a third-generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on samples of blood collected from all asymptomatic, first-time blood donors between 1 February and 31 July 1997 (n = 1941). The HCV seroprevalence was 0.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-1.5%) and no associations were detected between a positive HCV serostatus and the person's sex, region of residence, or previous hepatitis B exposure or hepatitis B carrier status, as determined by hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The only significant association in a logistic regression model was an increase in HCV positivity with increasing age (P = 0.04). Viral RNA was amplified from 2 out of 18 (11.1%) specimens that were ELISA positive. Genotyping of these specimens, by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), showed the presence of genotypes 5 and 1a. The positive predictive value of using HBsAg positivity as a surrogate screening marker for HCV in Namibian blood donors was poor (1.6%), with low sensitivity (16.7%) and specificity (89.3%), and detecting only 3 out of 18 serologically HCV-positive specimens. The results of this first study of the prevalence and epidemiology of HCV infection in Namibia suggest that donor blood should be screened for HCV by ELISA in order to prevent the transmission of hepatitis C virus. PMID:10680243

  11. Trend of transfusion transmitted infections frequency in blood donors: provide a road map for its prevention and control

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transfusion transmitted infections create significant burden on health care system. Donor selection is of paramount importance because infected individuals serve as an asymptomatic reservoir and a potential source of transmission. Methods A retrospective study was carried out in healthy blood donors in the Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar, Pakistan over a period of three and a half years i.e., from January 2008 to June 2011, to determine the prevalence of HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis in order to provide information for relevant polices. Results Out of 1,27,828 sample of blood donors, recorded mean prevalence for HBs Ag, anti-HCV, anti-HIV and syphilis was 2.68%, 2.46%, 0.06% and 0.43%, respectively, with an increasing trend in frequencies of transfusion transmitted infections (TTIs). Conclusions This study reflects that blood transfusion is one of the leading risk factor of spread of the TTIs, which showed the need and importance of the mandatory screening of these infectious markers in blood donations. PMID:22293125

  12. Human dendritic cell subsets from spleen and blood are similar in phenotype and function but modified by donor health status.

    PubMed

    Mittag, Diana; Proietto, Anna I; Loudovaris, Thomas; Mannering, Stuart I; Vremec, David; Shortman, Ken; Wu, Li; Harrison, Leonard C

    2011-06-01

    Mouse dendritic cells (DC) have been extensively studied in various tissues, especially spleen, and they comprise subsets with distinct developmental origins, surface phenotypes, and functions. Considerably less is known about human DC due to their rarity in blood and inaccessibility of other human tissues. The study of DC in human blood has revealed four subsets distinct in phenotype and function. In this study, we describe four equivalent DC subsets in human spleen obtained from deceased organ donors. We identify three conventional DC subsets characterized by surface expression of CD1b/c, CD141, and CD16, and one plasmacytoid DC subset characterized by CD304 expression. Human DC subsets in spleen were very similar to those in human blood with respect to surface phenotype, TLR and transcription factor expression, capacity to stimulate T cells, cytokine secretion, and cross-presentation of exogenous Ag. However, organ donor health status, in particular treatment with corticosteroid methylprednisolone and brain death, may affect DC phenotype and function. DC T cell stimulatory capacity was reduced but DC were qualitatively unchanged in methylprednisolone-treated deceased organ donor spleen compared with healthy donor blood. Overall, our findings indicate that human blood DC closely resemble human spleen DC. Furthermore, we confirm parallels between human and mouse DC subsets in phenotype and function, but also identify differences in transcription factor and TLR expression as well as functional properties. In particular, the hallmark functions of mouse CD8α(+) DC subsets, that is, IL-12p70 secretion and cross-presentation, are not confined to the equivalent human CD141(+) DC but are shared by CD1b/c(+) and CD16(+) DC subsets.

  13. HBV vaccination of HCV-infected patients with occult HBV infection and anti-HBc-positive blood donors.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J S F; Gonçales, N S L; Silva, C; Lazarini, M S K; Pavan, M H P; Fais, V C; Gonçales Júnior, F L

    2006-04-01

    Anti-HBc positivity is a frequent cause of donation rejection at blood banks. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may also occur in HBsAg-negative patients, a situation denoted occult infection. Similarly, very low levels of HBV-DNA have also been found in the sera of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, even in the absence of serum HBsAg. Initially we searched for HBV-DNA in serum of 100 blood donors and 50 HCV-infected patients who were HBsAg negative/anti-HBc positive by nested-PCR and by an HBV monitor commercial test for HBV-DNA. Anti-HBs seroconversion rates were measured in 100 blood donors and in 22 patients with chronic HCV infection after HBV vaccination to determine if the HBV vaccination could eliminate an occult HBV infection in these individuals. Occult HBV infection was detected in proportionally fewer blood donors (6/100 = 6%) than chronic hepatitis C patients (12/50 = 24%) (P < 0.05). We noted seroconversion in 6/6 (100%) HBV-DNA(+) and in 84/94 (89.4%) HBV-DNA(-) blood donors (P > 0.05). All subjects who were HBV-DNA(+) before the first dose of HBV vaccine (D1), became HBV-DNA(-) after D1, D2, and D3. Among 22 HCV-positive patients, 10 HBV-DNA(+) and 12 HBV-DNA(-), seroconversion was observed in 9/10 (90%) HBV-DNA(+) and in 9/12 (75%) HBV-DNA(-) subjects (P > 0.05). The disappearance of HBV-DNA in the majority of vaccinated patients suggests that residual HBV can be eliminated in patients with occult infection.

  14. Prevalence of hepatitis B infection among young and unsuspecting Hmong blood donors in the Central California Valley.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Muhammad Y; Atla, Pradeep R; Raoufi, Rahim; Sadiq, Humaira; Sadler, Patrick C

    2012-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may result in cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma and is one of the leading causes of mortality in Asian Americans including Hmong Americans. The Central California Valley is home to a huge Hmong population. To date, the true prevalence of HBV among Hmong is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to contribute to the limited data on HBV prevalence and its trends in Hmong population in the Central California Valley. Between fiscal years 2006 and 2010, a total of 219, 450 voluntary donors were identified at Central California Blood Center in Fresno. Of these, 821 (399 males and 422 females) were Hmong donors. A cross-sectional review of the HBV (hepatitis B surface antigen) positivity among all donors was carried out. Prevalence estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Ninety-two percent of Hmong donors were between age groups 16 and 35 years, and only 8% were ≥36 years. The overall prevalence in Hmong was noted at 3.41% (95%CI 2.3-4.9) compared to 0.06% (95%CI 0.05-0.07) in donors of all ethnicities. The calculated prevalence could be an underestimate of the true HBV prevalence in Hmong as the study enrolled only healthy blood donors with predominant younger age (≤35 years) population. These results underscore the persistent burden of HBV infection and potentially increased risk of premature death even in the second generation Hmong community of the Central California Valley. This study reemphasizes the unequivocal need to develop robust preventive and treatment strategies for HBV in Hmong community.

  15. Rapid profiling of RSV antibody repertoires from the memory B cells of naturally infected adult donors.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Morgan S A; Castellanos, Carlos A; Chen, Man; Ngwuta, Joan O; Goodwin, Eileen; Moin, Syed M; Mas, Vicente; Melero, José A; Wright, Peter F; Graham, Barney S; McLellan, Jason S; Walker, Laura M

    2016-12-16

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes substantial morbidity and mortality in young children and the elderly. There are currently no licensed RSV vaccines, and passive prophylaxis with the monoclonal antibody palivizumab is restricted to high-risk infants in part due to its modest efficacy. Although it is widely agreed that an effective RSV vaccine will require the induction of a potent neutralizing antibody response against the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, little is known about the specificities and functional activities of RSV F-specific antibodies induced by natural infection. Here, we have comprehensively profiled the human antibody response to RSV F by isolating and characterizing 364 RSV F-specific monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of three healthy adult donors. In all donors, the antibody response to RSV F is comprised of a broad diversity of clones that target several antigenic sites. Nearly half of the most potent antibodies target a previously undefined site of vulnerability near the apex of the prefusion conformation of RSV F (preF), providing strong support for the development of RSV vaccine candidates that preserve the membrane-distal hemisphere of the preF protein. Additionally, the antibodies targeting this new site display convergent sequence features, thus providing a future means to rapidly detect the presence of these antibodies in human vaccine samples. Many of the antibodies that bind preF-specific surfaces are over 100 times more potent than palivizumab, and several cross-neutralize human metapneumovirus (HMPV). Taken together, the results have implications for the design and evaluation of RSV vaccine candidates and offer new options for passive prophylaxis.

  16. Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis frequency among blood donors: A single center study.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Sule Menziletoglu; Candevir, Aslihan; Kibar, Filiz; Karaboga, Gulser; Turhan, Ferda Tekin; Kis, Cem; Dincer, Suleyman; Guvenc, Birol

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to provide updated results for seroprevalence of hepatitis B, hepatitis C viruses while presenting first data for human immunodeficiency virus and syphilis seropositivity amongst blood donors in Adana, Turkey. Screening and confirmatory test results of 62,461 donors were evaluated. HBsAg, anti-HCV, anti-HIV1/2 and syphilis seropositivity was 1.92%, 0.48%, 0.20%, 0.18% respectively, based on screening tests, and 1.66%, 0.05%, 0.003%, 0.10% respectively, according to confirmatory tests. Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTI) was more prevalent in low-educated donors. HBsAg and syphilis seropositivity rates were higher in married subjects. We found that the prevalence of HBV and HCV was significantly decreased in the last two decades in Adana. Importantly, this study provides first data in HIV and syphilis seropositivity rates among blood donors in our region and both HIV and syphilis seroprevalences were found to be low compared to many regions of Turkey. However, considering the fact that increasing number of immigrants may change prevalences and trends of TTI both in Adana and in Turkey, strict monitorization and yearly reporting of TTI rates seem necessary to be able to take proactive measures.

  17. Bacterial contamination of blood components: Norwegian strategies in identifying donors with higher risk of inducing septic transfusion reactions in recipients.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Sofie Strand; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard; Reikvam, Håkon

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood and its cellular components remains the most common microbiological cause of transfusion associated morbidity and mortality, even in developed countries. This yet unresolved complication is seen more often in platelet transfusions, as platelet concentrates are stored at room temperature, in gas permeable containers with constant agitation, which support bacterial proliferation from relatively low undetectable levels, at the beginning of storage time, to relatively high virulent bacteria titers and endotoxin generation, at the end of shelf life. Accordingly, several combined strategies are introduced and implemented to at least reduce the potential risk of bacterial contaminated products for transfusion. These embody: improved donors arms cleaning; bacterial avoidance by diversion of the first portion of collection; reducing bacterial growth through development of newer storage media for longer platelet shelf life; bacterial load reduction by leucoreduction/viral inactivation, in some countries and eliminating the use potentially contaminated units through screening, through current available testing procedures, though none are not yet fully secure. We have not seen the same reduction in bacterial associated transfusion infections as we have observed for the sharp drop in transfusion associated transmission rates of HIV and hepatitis B and C. This great viral reduction is not only caused by the introduction of newer and more sensitive and specific detection methods for different viruses, but also the identification of donor risk groups through questionnaires and personal interviews. While search for more efficient methods for identifying potential blood donors with asymptomatic bacteremia, as well as a better way for detecting bacteria in stored blood components will be continuing, it is necessary to establish more standardized guidelines for the recognition the adverse reactions in recipients of potentially contaminated units

  18. Donating Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood transfusion. Blood donors — especially donors with certain blood types — are always in demand. Who Can Donate Blood? ... Natural Disasters: How to Help Blood Blood Transfusions Blood Types Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  19. Hepatitis B virus infection in blood donors in Argentina: prevalence of infection, genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Pisano, María Belén; Blanco, Sebastián; Carrizo, Horacio; Ré, Viviana Elizabeth; Gallego, Sandra

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the prevalence of HBV infection based on detection of HBsAg and HBV-DNA by NAT in 70,102 blood donors in Argentina (Córdoba province) and shows the viral genotype distribution and frequency of occult HBV infection (OBI) in this population. Forty-two donors were confirmed positive for HBV infection (0.06 %), and four had OBI. Genotype F was the most prevalent (71.4 %), followed by A (14.3 %), C (7.1 %) and D (7.1 %). This is the first report of the prevalence of confirmed HBV infection and the high frequency of occult HBV infection in a blood bank in Argentina.

  20. Comparison of stored umbilical cord blood and adult donor blood: transfusion feasibility.

    PubMed

    Tokan, Rola Sahyoun; Arsan, Saadet; Erdeve, Omer; Solaz, Nuri; Avcı, Aslıhan; Ulkar, Serenay Elgün; Gülyapar, Elif; Ustünyurt, Zeynep; Bıyıklı, Zeynep; Kemahlı, Sabri

    2012-09-01

    Amaç: Çalışmada kordon kanı ile erişkin bağışçı kanlarından elde edilen eritrosit süspansiyonlarının özelliklerini ve saklama sırasında oluşan değişiklikleri izleyerek, kordon kanından elde edilen eritrosit süspansiyonlarının çok düşük doğum ağırlıklı yenidoğanlarda otolog bir transfüzyon kaynağı olarak kullanılabilirliğini değerlendirmek amaçlanmıştır. Gereç ve Yöntemler: 30 yenidoğan (20 preterm, 10 term) kordon kanı ile 31 erişkin bağışçı kanı toplandı. Hazırlanan eritrosit süspansiyonları standard koşullarda saklanarak 1., 21. ve 35. günlerde pH, potasyum (K+), 2,3-BPG, adenozin trifosfat (ATP), plazma Hb ve bakteriyel kontaminasyon bakımından incelendi. Bulgular: Potasyum değerlerinin zamanla artarak, hem kordon kanı hem de erişkin kanlarında 1.-21. ve 1-35. günler arasında anlamlı farklar saptandı. İlk ve 21. Gün değerlerinin kordon kanında erişkin kanlarından daha yüksek olduğu saptandı. 2,3-BPG değerleri kordon kanı ve erişkin kanlarında anlamlı fark göstermedi.Saklamanın 35. gününde hem kordon kanı hem de erişkin kanlarında serbest Hb, ATP ve pH değerlerinin ilk değerlere gore anlamlı fark gösterdiği belirlendi.Bu parametreler açısından kordon kanı ve erişkin kanı grupları arasında da fark olduğu görüldü. Sonuç: Toplanan ve hazırlanan kordon kanı eritrosit süspansiyonları yenidoğan dönemindeki transfüzyon gereksinimini kısmen karşılayabilir ve böylece allogeneik transfüzyonları azaltabilir. Saklama sırasında oluşan hematolojik ve biyokimyasal değişiklikler erişkin bağışçı kanlarındakilere benzerlik göstermekte olup yenidoğan metabolizması için bir risk oluşturacak düzeyde değildir. Kordon kanından hazırlanıp standart koşullarda saklanan eritrosit süspansiyonları çok düşük doğum ağırlıklı yenidoğanlar için bir seçenek olabilir.

  1. [Trichinellosis serology in blood-donors from a non-endemic area of Argentina].

    PubMed

    Barlasina, Mariana S; Pedevilla, Carolina; Kade, Paula; Costantino, Susana N; Taus, María R; Venturiello, Stella M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of human trichinellosis in an area of Argentina historically regarded as free of this parasitic disease. This parasitosis was assessed on 150 blood donors by means of immunoserological tests, and their relation with risk alimentary habits by a questionnaire. The questionnaires showed that 98.0% (n=147) of the individuals consumed pork and pork products at a high frequency. The main pork products incorporated to the habitual diet were the stuffed ones. A 80.3% (n=118) of the individuals had acquired such products at butchers, a 38.1% (n=56) at home slaughters and a 34.0% (n=50) at supermarkets. The immunoserological techniques employed were: enzyme immunoanalysis, indirect immunofluorescence and/or immunoelectrotransfer blot assay. Anti-Trichinella antibodies were detected in 8.0% (n=12) of the serum samples by more than one of the methodologies employed, considering these results as confirmatory of trichinellosis. The studies carried out herein demonstrate the existence of human trichinellosis in an area historically regarded as free of this parasitic disease and suggest its relationship with the ingestion of pork or pork products as a risk factor. These results indicate that the lack of reports should not be the only criterion for an area to be considered as Trichinella-free. The awareness of the existence of the parasite in a region will favor the establishment of control and prevention strategies which is of fundamental importance to avoid the spread of the disease.

  2. Brominated flame retardants in serum from U.S. blood donors.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, A; Patterson, D G; Bergman, A

    2001-10-01

    Serum samples collected in 1988 from U.S. blood donors were analyzed for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated and polybrominated biphenyls (PCBs and PBBs). The levels of the PBDEs are reported for the first time in serum from the U.S. population. The median concentrations and range of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47); 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-153); 2,2',3,4,4',5',6-heptabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-183); and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) were 1.3 (<0.8-49); 0.54 (0.13-3.1); 0.24 (0.12-1.8); and <1 (<1-35) pmol/g lipid weight (l.w.), respectively. In addition we also measured detectable levels of nine additional PBDE congeners in many of the serum samples. The median concentrations and ranges of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachloro- and hexabromobiphenyl (CB-153 and BB-153) were 190 (21-2600) and 19 (4.2-84) pmol/g l.w. The levels of PBDEs and CB-153 found in the U.S. samples were similar to background levels reported in the serum of Swedish hospital cleaners collected 10 years later, i.e., 1997. The BB-153 congener measured in the U.S. samples was not found in the Swedish samples. The difference in exposure to this congener could not be assessed in this study, although might be related to the 1973 BB-153 (FireMaster BP-6) animal and human contamination incident in the State of Michigan.

  3. High detection rates of TTV-like mini virus sequences in sera from Brazilian blood donors.

    PubMed

    Niel, C; Lampe, E

    2001-09-01

    TT virus (TTV) is an unenveloped virus with a single-stranded, circular DNA genome of 3,818-3,853 nucleotides (nt) that infects humans and non-human primates. Recently, the existence of a novel human virus, TTV-like mini virus (TLMV), that shows a genetic organization similar to that of TTV, but with smaller virion particle and genome, was proposed [Takahashi et al. (2000) Archives of Virology 145:979-993]. To date, no information is available with respect to the prevalence and pathogenicity of TLMV. A sensitive PCR assay was developed by using two oligonucleotide primers (LS2 and LA2) designed from the conserved non-coding region of the TLMV genome. One hundred thirty-seven sera from volunteer Brazilian blood donors were tested and 99 (72%) were TLMV DNA positive. No significant differences were observed between the groups of TLMV positive and negative subjects in relation to sex ratio, seroprevalence of TTV DNA, prevalence of anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies, area of residence, occurrence of daily contact with animals, family income, education level, and level of alanine aminotransferase. The specificity of the PCR assay was demonstrated after cloning of amplification products and determination of the nucleotide sequences (200-228 nt) of clones derived from 23 individuals. When DNAs extracted from TLMV/TTV-coinfected sera were submitted to PCR with LS2 and LA2 primers, the amplification products were derived exclusively from the TLMV genome. A markedly wide range of sequence divergence, even higher than that existent among TTV strains, was noted among TLMV isolates, with a maximum evolutionary distance of 0.80.

  4. Confirming the presence of HTLV-1 infection and the absence of HTLV-2 in blood donors from Arequipa, Peru.

    PubMed

    Quispe, Nadia Carmela Santos; Feria, Edwin Bengoa; Santos-Fortuna, Elizabeth de los; Caterino-de-Araujo, Adele

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological studies conducted in Peru disclosed HTLV-1 to be prevalent in different ethnic groups, and found HTLV-2 in some Amazonian Indians and in men who have sex with men. No data concerning HTLV-1/2 infection in blood donors from Arequipa, a highlands region in southern Peru, is available. We searched for the presence of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 antibodies in 2,732 serum samples obtained from blood donors from this geographic area. HTLV-1/2-specific antibodies were detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and were confirmed by Western blot (WB). Reactive sera had their blood bags discarded from donation, and the demographic characteristics of the donors were analyzed. Thirty-five sera (1.2%) were HTLV seroreactive by ELISA, and 25 were confirmed HTLV-1-positive by WB. One serum disclosed HTLV-positivity, and the remaining nine serum samples showed indeterminate results by WB; three of which had an HTLV-1 indeterminate Gag profile. The median age of HTLV-positive individuals was 34.6 years; 27 were male and eight were female. All individuals were from southern Peru: 27 from Arequipa, five from Puno, and three from Cuzco. HTLV co-positivity with hepatitis B (five sera) and syphilis (one serum) were detected. Previous transfusion and tattooing were observed in two and one individuals, respectively. No serum was positive for HTLV/HIV co-infection. This study confirmed, for the first time, HTLV-1 infection and the absence of HTLV-2 infection in blood donors from Arequipa, Peru and suggests vertical transmission as the major route of HTLV-1 transmission and acquisition in this geographic region.

  5. Motivating first-time, group O blood donors to return: Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of a post-donation telephone interview.

    PubMed

    France, Janis L; France, Christopher R; Carlson, Bruce W; Kessler, Debra A; Rebosa, Mark; Shaz, Beth H; Madden, Katrala; Carey, Patricia M

    2015-08-03

    First-time blood donors are essential to the US donor pool, providing nearly a third of all donations. Unfortunately, there are a wide variety of obstacles to repeat donation and new donors are extremely difficult to retain. Because each donor experiences a unique set of deterrents, we developed a post-donation interview based on motivational interview principles in order to flexibly address individual barriers. The primary aim of this randomized clinical trial is to examine retention of first-time, group O blood donors who are randomly assigned to receive either a telephone-delivered interview with motivational and action planning components or a standard-of-care control call approximately six weeks after their donation. Measures of donation attitude, perceived behavioral control, intention, and motivational autonomy will be measured before and after the telephone contact using online surveys, and donation attempts will be tracked for one year using blood center donor databases. We hypothesize that, compared to controls, donors who receive the telephone interview will be more likely to make a donation attempt over the following year. In addition, we will examine possible mechanisms of action of the interview using key predictors of donation behavior as described by Self Determination Theory (i.e., motivational autonomy) and the Theory of Planned Behavior (i.e., attitude, perceived behavioral control, and intention). Results of this intervention may help to support a novel strategy to enhance retention of selected blood donors in an effort to better meet the nation's blood supply needs.

  6. Infections following Transplantation of Bone Marrow or Peripheral-Blood Stem Cells from Unrelated Donors

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jo-Anne H.; Logan, Brent R.; Wu, Juan; Wingard, John R.; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Mudrick, Cathryn; Knust, Kristin; Horowitz, Mary M.; Confer, Dennis L.; Dubberke, Erik R.; Pergam, Steven A.; Marty, Francisco M.; Strasfeld, Lynne M.; Brown, Janice (Wes) M.; Langston, Amelia A.; Schuster, Mindy G.; Kaul, Daniel R.; Martin, Stanley I.; Anasetti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication of hematopoietic cell transplantation. Prolonged neutropenia and graft versus host disease are the two major complications with an associated risk for infection, and these complications differ according to the graft source. A phase 3, multicenter, randomized trial (BMT CTN 0201) of transplantation of bone marrow (BM) versus peripheral-blood stem cells (PBSC) from unrelated donors (URD) showed no significant differences in two-year survival between these graft sources. In an effort to provide data regarding whether bone marrow or peripheral-blood stem cells could be used as a preferential graft source for transplantation, we report a detailed analysis of the infectious complications for 2 years following transplantation from the BMT CTN 0201 trial. A total of 499 patients in this study had full audits of infection data. A total of 1347 infection episodes of moderate or greater severity were documented in 384 (77%) patients; 201/249 (81%) of the evaluable patients had received a BM graft and 183/250 (73%) had received a PBSC graft. Of 1347 infection episodes, 373 were severe and 123 were life-threatening and/or fatal; 710 (53%) of these episodes occurred on the BM arm and 637 (47%) on the PBSC arm, resulting in a two-year cumulative incidence 84.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 79.6–89.8) for BM vs. 79.7% (95%CI, 73.9–85.5) for PBSC, P = .013. The majority of these episodes, 810 (60%), were due to bacteria, with a two-year cumulative incidence of 72.1% and 62.9% in BM versus PBSC recipients, respectively (P = .003). The cumulative incidence of bloodstream bacterial infections during the first 100 days was 44.8% (95%CI, 38.5–51.1) for BM vs. 35.0% (95%CI, 28.9–41.1) for PBSC (P = .027). The total infection density (# infection events / 100 patient days at risk) was .67 for BM and .60 for PBSC. The overall infection density for bacterial infections was .4 in both arms; for viral infections was .2 in both arms; and for fungal

  7. Young adult donor bone marrow infusions into female mice postpone age-related reproductive failure and improve offspring survival.

    PubMed

    Selesniemi, Kaisa; Lee, Ho-Joon; Niikura, Teruko; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2008-11-14

    The female reproductive axis is the first major organ system of the body to fail with advancing age. In addition to a permanent cessation of fertile potential, the loss of cyclic ovarian function in humans heralds the onset of menopause, which in turn underlies the emergence of a diverse spectrum of health issues in aging women. Recently, it was reported that bone marrow (BM) transplantation (BMT) into adult female mice conditioned a week earlier with highly cytotoxic drugs rescues ovarian function and fertility. Herein we show in mice receiving no prior conditioning regimen that once-monthly infusions of BM-derived cells retrieved from young adult female donors bearing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene sustain the fertile potential of aging wild-type females long past their time of normal reproductive senescence. The fertility-promoting effects of female donor BM are observed regardless whether the infusions are initiated in young adult or middle-aged females. Although the mechanism by which BM infusions benefit the reproductive performance of aging females remains to be elucidated, the absence of EGFP-expressing offspring suggests that it does not depend on development of mature eggs derived from germline-committed cells in the donor marrow. However, donor BM-derived somatic cells accumulate in the recipients, indicating efficient donor cell engraftment without prior conditioning. These findings provide a strong impetus to further explore development of adult stem cell-based technologies to safely extend function of the female reproductive axis into advanced age without the need for toxic pre-conditioning protocols routinely used in other models of stem cell delivery.

  8. Retrospective Study Evaluating Seroprevalence of Hepatitis E Virus in Blood Donors and in Swine Veterinarians in Italy (2004).

    PubMed

    De Sabato, L; Di Bartolo, I; Montomoli, E; Trombetta, C; Ruggeri, F M; Ostanello, F

    2016-12-02

    Hepatitis E is an emerging viral disease in developed countries, with sporadic cases occasionally linked to the consumption of raw or undercooked pork, wild boar or deer meat. Cases due to transfusion or transplantation have also been reported. In developed countries, hepatitis E is considered a zoonosis and pig is the main reservoir. In the last few years, several studies conducted in Europe reported variable seroprevalence rates among the general population, ranging between 0.26% and 52.5%. A higher seroprevalence was described among workers who come in contact with pigs. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgG and IgM antibodies in blood donors (170) and in pig veterinarians (83). Archival sera were collected in Italy in 2004. The observed seroprevalence was 9.64% and 8.82% in veterinarians and blood donors, respectively. Overall, only three sera from blood donors were positive for IgM, but no HEV-RNA was detected.

  9. Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors for Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Healthy Blood Donors: A Cross-Sectional Study in Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Rascón-Careaga, Antonio; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Corella-Madueño, María Alba Guadalupe; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Aldana-Madrid, María Lourdes; Velasquez-Vega, Edgar; Quizán-Plata, Trinidad; Navarro-Henze, José Luis; Badell-Luzardo, Joel Alberto; Gastélum-Cano, José María; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) can be transmitted by blood transfusion. We determined the prevalence of T. gondii infection in healthy blood donors in Hermosillo city, Mexico, and the association of infection with T. gondii with the sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of blood donors. Four hundred and eight blood donors who attended two public blood banks in Hermosillo city were examined for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Of the 408 blood donors (mean age 31.77 ± 9.52; range 18-60 years old) studied, 55 (13.5%) were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies, and 12 (21.8%) of them were also positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that seropositivity to T. gondii was associated with age (OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.03-2.94; P = 0.03) and tobacco use (OR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.02-4.29; P = 0.04). Seropositivity to T. gondii was correlated with the number of pregnancies, deliveries, and cesarean sections. The seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in blood donors in Sonora is the highest reported in blood donors in northern Mexico so far. This is the first report of an association of T. gondii exposure and tobacco use. Further research to confirm this association is needed.

  10. Seroprevalence and Associated Risk Factors for Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Healthy Blood Donors: A Cross-Sectional Study in Sonora, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Rascón-Careaga, Antonio; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Corella-Madueño, María Alba Guadalupe; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Aldana-Madrid, María Lourdes; Velasquez-Vega, Edgar; Quizán-Plata, Trinidad; Navarro-Henze, José Luis; Badell-Luzardo, Joel Alberto; Gastélum-Cano, José María; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) can be transmitted by blood transfusion. We determined the prevalence of T. gondii infection in healthy blood donors in Hermosillo city, Mexico, and the association of infection with T. gondii with the sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of blood donors. Four hundred and eight blood donors who attended two public blood banks in Hermosillo city were examined for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Of the 408 blood donors (mean age 31.77 ± 9.52; range 18–60 years old) studied, 55 (13.5%) were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies, and 12 (21.8%) of them were also positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that seropositivity to T. gondii was associated with age (OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.03–2.94; P = 0.03) and tobacco use (OR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.02–4.29; P = 0.04). Seropositivity to T. gondii was correlated with the number of pregnancies, deliveries, and cesarean sections. The seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in blood donors in Sonora is the highest reported in blood donors in northern Mexico so far. This is the first report of an association of T. gondii exposure and tobacco use. Further research to confirm this association is needed. PMID:27446960

  11. Is Having Sex with Other Men a Risk Factor for Transfusion-Transmissible Infections in Male Blood Donors in Western Countries? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    De Buck, Emmy; Dieltjens, Tessa; Compernolle, Veerle; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Although increased prevalence of transfusion transmissible infections (TTI) among “men who have sex with men” (MSM) has been well documented, the exclusion of MSM as blood donors is contested. The aim of this systematic review is to find studies that describe the risk of TTI in MSM blood donors. Methods We searched MEDLINE, Embase, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Cinahl, and Web of Science, and used GRADE for determining evidence quality. We included studies comparing MSM and non-MSM blood donors (or people eligible to give blood), living in areas most relevant for our Blood Service. Results Out of 18 987 articles, 14 observational studies were included. Two studies directly compared MSM with non-MSM donors showing that MSM donors have a statistically significant higher risk of HIV-1 infections. In one of these studies it was shown that this was related to recent (< 12 months) MSM contact. In two additional studies no evidence was shown in favour of a certain deferral period for MSM. Ten studies, applying permanent deferral for MSM, compared infected versus non-infected donors. One study found that MSM is a statistically significant risk factor for HIV-1 infection in blood donors. For other TTI such as HBV or HCV, an increased risk of infection could not be demonstrated, because the precision of the results was affected by the low numbers of donors with MSM as risk factor, or because of risk of bias in the included studies. All studies included low level evidence, because of risk of bias and imprecision of the results. Conclusions High-quality studies investigating the risk of TTI in MSM who donate blood are scarce. The available evidence suggests a link between MSM blood donors and HIV-1 infection, but is too limited to be able to unambiguously/clearly recommend a certain deferral policy. PMID:25875812

  12. Vascular complications after adult living donor liver transplantation: Evaluation with ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Lu, Qiang; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been widely used to treat end-stage liver disease with improvement in surgical technology and the application of new immunosuppressants. Vascular complications after liver transplantation remain a major threat to the survival of recipients. LDLT recipients are more likely to develop vascular complications because of their complex vascular reconstruction and the slender vessels. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical for the survival of graft and recipients. As a non-invasive, cost-effective and non-radioactive method with bedside availability, conventional gray-scale and Doppler ultrasonography play important roles in identifying vascular complications in the early postoperative period and during the follow-up. Recently, with the detailed vascular tracing and perfusion visualization, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has significantly improved the diagnosis of postoperative vascular complications. This review focuses on the role of conventional gray-scale ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and CEUS for early diagnosis of vascular complications after adult LDLT. PMID:26819527

  13. Determination of Eligibility in Related Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Donors: Ethical and Clinical Considerations. Recommendations from a Working Group of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Association.

    PubMed

    Bitan, Menachem; van Walraven, Suzanna M; Worel, Nina; Ball, Lynne M; Styczynski, Jan; Torrabadella, Marta; Witt, Volker; Shaw, Bronwen E; Seber, Adriana; Yabe, Hiromasa; Greinix, Hildegard T; Peters, Christina; Gluckman, Eliane; Rocha, Vanderson; Halter, Joerg; Pulsipher, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Related donors for hematopoietic cell (HC) transplantation are a growing population in recent years because of expanding indications for allogeneic transplantation. The safety and welfare of the donor are major concerns for the transplantation community, especially for related sibling donors of young recipients who are children and, thus, not able to fully consent. Because donation of HC does not improve the donor's own physical health and carries a risk of side effects, careful assessment of medical risks specific to the individual donor, as well as consideration of ethical and legal aspects associated with donation from a child, must be considered. In addition, donor centers must balance the needs of both the donor and the recipient, understanding the inherent conflict parents may have as they can be overly focused on the very sick child receiving a transplant, rather than on the relatively less significant health or emotional problems that a sibling donor may have, which could impact risk with donation. Likewise, consideration must be made regarding the nature of the relationship of the sibling donor to the recipient and also aspects of performing research on pediatric HC donors. In this article, as members of the Donor Issues Committee of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, we review key ethical concerns associated with pediatric donation and then give recommendations for screening potential child donors with underlying health conditions. These recommendations are aimed at protecting the physical and emotional well-being of childhood donors and arise out of the Third International Conference on Health and Safety of Donors sponsored by the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

  14. Computer algorithms in the search for unrelated stem cell donors.

    PubMed

    Steiner, David

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a medical procedure in the field of hematology and oncology, most often performed for patients with certain cancers of the blood or bone marrow. A lot of patients have no suitable HLA-matched donor within their family, so physicians must activate a "donor search process" by interacting with national and international donor registries who will search their databases for adult unrelated donors or cord blood units (CBU). Information and communication technologies play a key role in the donor search process in donor registries both nationally and internationaly. One of the major challenges for donor registry computer systems is the development of a reliable search algorithm. This work discusses the top-down design of such algorithms and current practice. Based on our experience with systems used by several stem cell donor registries, we highlight typical pitfalls in the implementation of an algorithm and underlying data structure.

  15. Mitigation of variation observed in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based HIV-1 neutralization assay by donor cell pooling.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Lindsay; Brown, Bruce K; Delsarto Macedo, Camila; Wesberry-Schmierer, Maggie; Ngauy, Viseth; Rosa Borges, Andrew; Michael, Nelson L; Marovich, Mary A; Montefiori, David C; Polonis, Victoria R

    2013-12-01

    Cultured primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) represent a potentially physiologic in vitro model of HIV-1 infection, but assessment of antibody-mediated HIV-1 neutralization using PBMC has been hindered by donor variability and lack of a sustainable individual PBMC source. To advance this model for HIV vaccine evaluation, intra- and inter-assay variability were assessed using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and PBMC targets from multiple HIV-seronegative donors. Inter-assay variability was introduced by using different PBMC for virus propagation, and more substantially, for assay targets. Neutralization titers varied by as much as 4 logs when using different individual donor PBMC as targets; variability was antibody-specific, with the greatest variation observed using an individual polyclonal plasma. Pooling of multiple PBMC donors significantly reduced median inter-assay variation to the level of intra-assay variation, suggesting a pathway forward for establishing a uniform, sustainable and standardized approach to the assessment of antibody function using a PBMC model.

  16. Improving the development of early bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos by treating adult donor cells with vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Zekun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Rongjun; Qin, Yumin; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin C (Vc) has been widely studied in cell and embryo culture, and has recently been demonstrated to promote cellular reprogramming. The objective of this study was to identify a suitable Vc concentration that, when used to treat adult bovine fibroblasts serving as donor cells for nuclear transfer, improved donor-cell physiology and the developmental potential of the cloned embryos that the donor nuclei were used to create. A Vc concentration of 0.15 mM promoted cell proliferation and increased donor-cell 5-hydroxy methyl cytosine levels 2.73-fold (P < 0.05). The blastocyst rate was also significantly improved after nuclear transfer (39.6% treated vs. 26.0% control, P < 0.05); the average number of apoptotic cells in cloned blastocysts was significantly reduced (2.2 vs. 4.4, P < 0.05); and the inner cell mass-to-trophectoderm ratio (38.25% vs. 30.75%, P < 0.05) and expression of SOX2 (3.71-fold, P < 0.05) and POU5F1 (3.15-fold, P < 0.05) were significantly increased. These results suggested that Vc promotes cell proliferation, decreases DNA methylation levels in donor cells, and improves the developmental competence of bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos.

  17. Protecting Adults and Children from Blood-Borne Pathogens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Nancy K.; Corning, Lisa L.

    2000-01-01

    Recommends universal precautions policies and procedures to minimize for children and adults in early childhood settings the risk of infection from exposure to blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B or HIV. Outlines symptoms of hepatitis B and HIV/AIDS. Discusses legal and ethical implications related to inclusion. Lists resources for teachers…

  18. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from a Bombay individual: Moving towards 'universal-donor' red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seifinejad, Ali; Taei, Adeleh; Totonchi, Mehdi; Vazirinasab, Hamed; Hassani, Seideh Nafiseh; Aghdami, Nasser; Shahbazi, Ebrahim; Yazdi, Reza Salman; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini; Baharvand, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is one of the rare phenotypes in the ABO blood group system that fails to express ABH antigens on red blood cells. Nonsense or missense mutations in fucosyltransfrase1 (FUT1) and fucosyltransfrase2 (FUT2) genes are known to create this phenotype. This blood group is compatible with all other blood groups as a donor, as it does not express the H antigen on the red blood cells. In this study, we describe the establishment of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from the dermal fibroblasts of a Bombay blood-type individual by the ectopic expression of established transcription factors Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc. Sequence analyses of fibroblasts and iPSCs revealed a nonsense mutation 826C to T (276 Gln to Ter) in the FUT1 gene and a missense mutation 739G to A (247 Gly to Ser) in the FUT2 gene in the Bombay phenotype under study. The established iPSCs resemble human embryonic stem cells in morphology, passaging, surface and pluripotency markers, normal karyotype, gene expression, DNA methylation of critical pluripotency genes, and in-vitro differentiation. The directed differentiation of the iPSCs into hematopoietic lineage cells displayed increased expression of the hematopoietic lineage markers such as CD34, CD133, RUNX1, KDR, {alpha}-globulin, and {gamma}-globulin. Such specific stem cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to produce a universal blood group donor, in-vitro, thus enabling cellular replacement therapies, once the safety issue is resolved.

  19. Blood Pressure in Young Adults Born at Very Low Birth Weight: Adults Born Preterm International Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Hovi, Petteri; Vohr, Betty; Ment, Laura R; Doyle, Lex W; McGarvey, Lorcan; Morrison, Katherine M; Evensen, Kari Anne I; van der Pal, Sylvia; Grunau, Ruth E; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Andersson, Sture; Saigal, Saroj; Kajantie, Eero

    2016-10-01

    Adults born preterm at very low birth weight (VLBW; <1500 g) have higher blood pressure than those born at term. It is not known whether all VLBW adults are at risk or whether higher blood pressure could be attributed to some of the specific conditions underlying or accompanying preterm birth. To identify possible risk or protective factors, we combined individual-level data from 9 cohorts that measured blood pressure in young adults born at VLBW or with a more stringent birth weight criterion. In the absence of major heterogeneity, we performed linear regression analysis in our pooled sample of 1571 adults born at VLBW and 777 controls. Adults born at VLBW had 3.4 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 2.2-4.6) higher systolic and 2.1 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.0) higher diastolic pressure, with adjustment for age, sex, and cohort. The difference in systolic pressure was present in men (1.8 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-3.5) but was stronger in women (4.7 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.2-6.3). Among the VLBW group, blood pressure was unrelated to gestational age, maternal smoking, multiple pregnancy, retinopathy of prematurity, or bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Blood pressure was higher than that of controls among VLBW adults unexposed to maternal preeclampsia. Among those exposed, it was even higher, especially if born appropriate for gestational age. In conclusion, although female sex and maternal preeclampsia are additional risk factors, the risk of higher blood pressure is not limited to any etiologic subgroup of VLBW adults, arguing for vigilance in early detection of high blood pressure in all these individuals.

  20. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and recombination between HBV genotypes D and E in asymptomatic blood donors from Khartoum, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Mahgoub, Shaza; Candotti, Daniel; El Ekiaby, Magdy; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Sudan is a highly endemic area for hepatitis B virus (HBV), and >5% of blood donors are chronically infected. To examine potential strategies to improve HBV blood safety, 404 replacement donor samples previously screened for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) were tested for antibody to HBV core (anti-HBc), anti-surface antigen (anti-HBs), and HBV DNA. Of 145 anti-HBc-containing samples (36%) identified, 16 retested were HBsAg positive (11%). Anti-HBs was detected in 43/77 (56%) anti-HBc-reactive samples. Six samples were HBsAg(-)/anti-HBc(+)/anti-HBs(+) and contained HBV DNA, meeting the definition of occult HBV infection (OBI). OBIs had low HBV DNA loads (<10 IU/ml) and were genotype B (n = 1) or genotype D (n = 5). Pre-S/S and/or whole genome sequences were obtained from 47 randomly selected HBsAg-positive donors added to the previous 16. Genotype E was identified in 27 strains (57.5%), genotype D in 19 strains (40.5%), and genotype A2 in 1 strain (2%). Two outlier strains within genotype D ultimately were identified as recombinants of genotypes D and E with identical recombination points, suggesting circulating, infectious, recombinant strains. Anti-HBc screening does not appear to be a sustainable blood safety strategy because of the cost and the negative impact on the Sudanese blood supply, even when reduced by anti-HBs testing. Being at the junction between two main African HBV genotypes, genetic recombination occurred and became part of the molecular epidemiology of HBV in Sudan.

  1. Transfusion associated graft versus host disease following whole blood transfusion from an unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan K; Patel, Atul K; Ranjan, Rajiv R; Shah, Apurva P

    2010-09-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a well-known complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is much less common and nearly uniformly fatal complication of blood transfusion. The risk factors underlying the development of TA- GVHD are incompletely defined, but it is commonly seen in individuals with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, transfusions from blood relatives, intrauterine transfusions and HLA-matched platelet transfusions. Diagnosis of TA-GVHD may be difficult at a time due to rarity in occurrence and overlapping clinical features with various infections and drug reactions. We describe a case of transfusion-associated GVHD that occurred after transfusion of whole blood from unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient.

  2. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and 2 Seroprevalence among first-time blood donors in Chile, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Héctor; Balanda, Monserrat; Vergara, Nicolás; Valenzuela, María Antonieta; Cartier, Luis; Ayala, Salvador; Ramírez, Eugenio

    2016-06-01

    Infection with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) is a major health problem. HTLV-1/2 infection is endemic in Chile but representative donor prevalence data are lacking. Data on all blood donors in a large network of Chilean blood centers were examined during 2011-2013. Screening of HTLV-1/2 antibodies were measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) at all blood banks. Blood samples with anticoagulants from initially reactive blood donors were analyzed by serological confirmation tests (immunofluorescence or recombinant immunoblot) at the HTLV National Reference Laboratory of the Public Health Institute of Chile. Additionally, detection of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 provirus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed in all blood donors as confirmatory test. Prevalence rates were calculated. Among 694,016 donors, 706 were seropositive for HTLV-1 (prevalence, 1.02 cases per 1,000; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-1.09), and 97 were seropositive for HTLV-2 (prevalence, 0.14 cases per 1,000; 95%CI, 0.11-0.17). Prevalence of HTLV-1 differed considerably by region, from 0.51 to 1.69 per 1,000. Prevalence of HTLV-2 was similar across the country (0.12-0.16). HTLV-1 prevalence was associated with female sex, older age, and residence in the north of Chile. HTVL-2 prevalence was associated with older age. The HTLV-1 prevalence among Chilean blood donors was relatively high and could be reduced by improving donor recruitment and selection in high prevalence areas. Blood center data may contribute to surveillance for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections.

  3. Long-term follow-up in adult living donors for combined liver/bowel transplant in pediatric recipients: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, Jamie L; Bhati, Chandra; John, Eunice; Tzvetanov, Ivo G; Testa, Giuliano; Jeon, Hoonbae; Oberholzer, Jose; Benedetti, Enrico

    2011-06-01

    Pediatric candidates for combined liver/bowel transplant (LBTx) experience a very high mortality on the cadaver waiting list. Our transplant center has successfully used adult living donors to treat pediatric candidates for LBTx. We report the long-term follow-up of this unique cohort of organ donors. The charts of six adult donors for LBTx performed between 2004 and 2007 were reviewed. All the pertinent clinical data were carefully reviewed and integrated with phone interviews of all donors. A total of six children (average age 13.5 months) received living donor LBTx. Average follow-up for the donors was 42 months (range 29-51). The donors' median age was 25 yr (19-32); five women and one man. The average median hospital stay was nine days. There were no peri-operative complications. At present all donors remain in good health. Three of the five mothers became pregnant after donation. Five of the six children are currently alive and well whereas one died with functioning grafts six months post-transplant due to plasmoblastic lymphoma. Living donor LBTx is an effective therapy for combined hepatic and intestinal failure in children less than five yr. The donor operation can be performed with minimal morbidity.

  4. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  5. Novel UDP-GalNAc Derivative Structures Provide Insight into the Donor Specificity of Human Blood Group Glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd K; Pesnot, Thomas; Palcic, Monica M; Jørgensen, Rene

    2015-12-25

    Two closely related glycosyltransferases are responsible for the final step of the biosynthesis of ABO(H) human blood group A and B antigens. The two enzymes differ by only four amino acid residues, which determine whether the enzymes transfer GalNAc from UDP-GalNAc or Gal from UDP-Gal to the H-antigen acceptor. The enzymes belong to the class of GT-A folded enzymes, grouped as GT6 in the CAZy database, and are characterized by a single domain with a metal dependent retaining reaction mechanism. However, the exact role of the four amino acid residues in the specificity of the enzymes is still unresolved. In this study, we report the first structural information of a dual specificity cis-AB blood group glycosyltransferase in complex with a synthetic UDP-GalNAc derivative. Interestingly, the GalNAc moiety adopts an unusual yet catalytically productive conformation in the binding pocket, which is different from the "tucked under" conformation previously observed for the UDP-Gal donor. In addition, we show that this UDP-GalNAc derivative in complex with the H-antigen acceptor provokes the same unusual binding pocket closure as seen for the corresponding UDP-Gal derivative. Despite this, the two derivatives show vastly different kinetic properties. Our results provide a important structural insight into the donor substrate specificity and utilization in blood group biosynthesis, which can very likely be exploited for the development of new glycosyltransferase inhibitors and probes.

  6. Genomic Assays for Identification of Chikungunya Virus in Blood Donors, Puerto Rico, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Charles Y.; Bres, Vanessa; Yu, Guixia; Krysztof, David; Naccache, Samia N.; Lee, Deanna; Pfeil, Jacob; Linnen, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    A newly developed transcription-mediated amplification assay was used to detect chikungunya virus infection in 3 of 557 asymptomatic donors (0.54%) from Puerto Rico during the 2014–2015 Caribbean epidemic. Viral detection was confirmed by using PCR, microarray, and next-generation sequencing. Molecular clock analysis dated the emergence of the Puerto Rico strains to early 2013. PMID:26196378

  7. MHC Class I Chain-Related Gene A (MICA) Donor-Recipient Mismatches and MICA-129 Polymorphism in Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantations Has No Impact on Outcomes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Study.

    PubMed

    Askar, Medhat; Sobecks, Ronald; Wang, Tao; Haagenson, Mike; Majhail, Navneet; Madbouly, Abeer; Thomas, Dawn; Zhang, Aiwen; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Hsu, Katharine; Verneris, Michael; Lee, Stephanie J; Spellman, Stephen R; Fernández-Viña, Marcelo

    2017-03-01

    Single-center studies have previously reported associations of MHC Class I Chain-Related Gene A (MICA) polymorphisms and donor-recipient MICA mismatching with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In this study, we investigated the association of MICA polymorphism (MICA-129, MM versus MV versus VV) and MICA mismatches after HCT with 10/10 HLA-matched (n = 552) or 9/10 (n = 161) unrelated donors. Included were adult patients with a first unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome that were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1999 and 2011. Our results showed that neither MICA mismatch nor MICA-129 polymorphism were associated with any transplantation outcome (P < .01), with the exception of a higher relapse in recipients of MICA-mismatched HLA 10/10 donors (hazard ratio [HR], 1.7; P = .003). There was a suggestion of association between MICA mismatches and a higher risk of acute GVHD grades II to IV (HR, 1.4; P = .013) There were no significant interactions between MICA mismatches and HLA matching (9/10 versus 10/10). In conclusion, the findings in this cohort did not confirm prior studies reporting that MICA polymorphism and MICA mismatches were associated with HCT outcomes.

  8. Circulating thrombopoietin levels in normal healthy blood donors and in aplastic anemia patients in relation to disease severity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abhay; Verma, Anupam; Nityanand, Soniya; Chaudhary, Rajendra; Elhence, Priti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the key hematopoietic growth factor regulating the production of platelets from bone marrow megakaryocytes and maintaining platelet hemostasis. This study was done to find any relationship between the levels of thrombopoietin and the severity of disease in patients with aplastic anemia. Materials and Methods: Serum samples were collected from 52 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of aplastic anemia and 45 normal healthy blood donors of both sexes over a period of 2 years, and TPO was estimated by using commercially available TPO-specific-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: The median TPO level of 1190 pg/ml (range 625-7651 pg/ml) in aplastic anemia patients was significantly higher than the median TPO level of 121.1 pg/ml (81.25-237.7 pg/ml) in normal healthy blood donors (P = 0.000). No significant difference was observed in TPO levels of male and female patients (P = 0.453). The median TPO concentrations observed in very severe aplastic anemia, severe aplastic anemia, and nonsevere aplastic anemia were 2765 pg/ml (range 625-6451 pg/ml), 1190 pg/ml (range 672.1-7651 pg/ml), and 1111.5 pg/ml (range 761.1-2289.2 pg/ml), respectively. TPO in patients of very severe aplastic anemia was significantly higher than patients of nonsevere aplastic anemia (P = 0.043), with no significant relation among rest of the groups. Discussion: TPO levels in aplastic anemia patients were significantly higher than in healthy blood donors; however, in aplastic anemia patients TPO levels were significantly higher only in patients with very severe disease. PMID:25722577

  9. Risk Factors Associated with Ebola and Marburg Viruses Seroprevalence in Blood Donors in the Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Moyen, Nanikaly; Thirion, Laurence; Emmerich, Petra; Dzia-Lepfoundzou, Amelia; Richet, Hervé; Boehmann, Yannik; Dimi, Yannick; Gallian, Pierre; Gould, Ernest A.; Günther, Stephan; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Background Ebola and Marburg viruses (family Filoviridae, genera Ebolavirus and Marburgvirus) cause haemorrhagic fevers in humans, often associated with high mortality rates. The presence of antibodies to Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) has been reported in some African countries in individuals without a history of haemorrhagic fever. In this study, we present a MARV and EBOV seroprevalence study conducted amongst blood donors in the Republic of Congo and the analysis of risk factors for contact with EBOV. Methodology and Findings In 2011, we conducted a MARV and EBOV seroprevalence study amongst 809 blood donors recruited in rural (75; 9.3%) and urban (734; 90.7%) areas of the Republic of Congo. Serum titres of IgG antibodies to MARV and EBOV were assessed by indirect double-immunofluorescence microscopy. MARV seroprevalence was 0.5% (4 in 809) without any identified risk factors. Prevalence of IgG to EBOV was 2.5%, peaking at 4% in rural areas and in Pointe Noire. Independent risk factors identified by multivariate analysis were contact with bats and exposure to birds. Conclusions/Significance This MARV and EBOV serological survey performed in the Republic of Congo identifies a probable role for environmental determinants of exposure to EBOV. It highlights the requirement for extending our understanding of the ecological and epidemiological risk of bats (previously identified as a potential ecological reservoir) and birds as vectors of EBOV to humans, and characterising the protection potentially afforded by EBOV-specific antibodies as detected in blood donors. PMID:26047124

  10. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Adult Population towards Blood Donation in Gondar Town, Northwest Ethiopia: A Community Based Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Melku, Mulugeta; Terefe, Betelihem; Asrie, Fikir; Enawgaw, Bamlaku; Melak, Tadele; Tsegay, Yakob Gebregziabher; Areba, Mohamedamin; Shiferaw, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Background. Though World Health Organization recommends 100% voluntary blood donation, the percentage of blood collected from voluntary blood donors and the average annual blood collection rate are extremely low in Ethiopia. The role of adults is crucial to meet the demand of safe blood. Thus, this study aimed to assess knowledge, attitude, and practice of adult population towards blood donation in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. Method. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted among 768 adults. Multistage sampling technique together with simple random and systematic random sampling technique was employed. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis and bivariate correlation analysis were done. Result. About 436 (56.8%), 630 (82%), and 141 (18.4%) study participants had adequate knowledge, good attitude, and experience of blood donation, respectively. Secondary and higher educational statuses were significantly associated with adequate knowledge towards blood donation. Participants who were protestant by religion were more likely to have good attitude towards blood donation. Age, self-perceived health status, and religion were significantly associated with blood donation practice. Conclusion. Knowledge and attitude towards blood donation are high. However, the level of practice is low. District and national blood banks and transfusion agency should design strategies that promote and motivate the communities to donate blood.

  11. Applicability and significance of salicylate screening in sera of voluntary blood donors: evaluation of two analytical methods.

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, R; Frutkoff, I; Kidroni, G; Menczel, J

    1982-01-01

    Salicylate concentrations in 3819 sera of apparently healthy voluntary blood donors were determined in view of the significance of this drug in the induction of allergic reactions and its possible interference in platelet function. Two hundred and ninety-five sera were found by a modified colorimetric determination to contain salicylates. The colorimetric determination was compared with a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of salicylate-containing sera. Drug concentrations detected were mostly in the range of 20-100 mg/l. Such concentrations have been reported to evoke allergic reactions and to affect the haemostatic action of platelets. PMID:7061719

  12. HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum infections among blood donors and Transfusion-related complications among recipients at the Laquintinie hospital in Douala, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs) pose a major health risk in Cameroon given the high prevalence of such pathogens and increased demands for blood donations in the local communities. This study aims at establishing the prevalence of commonly encountered TTIs among blood donors and transfusion-related complications among recipients in an urban center of Cameroon. Methods A total of 477 blood donors and 83 blood recipients were recruited by consecutive sampling at the Laquintinie Hospital in Douala (LHD), Cameroon. Serum samples from blood donors were tested by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and/or using various Rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for presence of Hepatits B (HBV) viral antigens, and antibodies to human immunodeficiency (HIV-1/2), Hepatits B (HCV) and Treponema pallidum. Recipient’s medical records were also analyzed for possible transfusion-associated complications. Results The male/female sex ratio of the blood donors was 4/1 with a mean age of 30.2 (Sd = 8.3) years. Of all blood donors, 64/467 (13.7%) were infected by at least one of the four TTIs. Infected volunteer donors represented 8.3% while infected family donors comprised 14.3% of the donor population. The prevalence of HCV, HIV, HBV and T. pallidum were 1.3%, 1.8%, 3.5%, and 8.1%, respectively. More than half of the blood recipients were female (78.3%) and the mean age was 20.6 (SD = 16.1) years. The causes of severe anemia indicative of transfusion in recipients varied with wards (postpartum hemorrhage, caesarean section, uterine or cervical lacerations, abortions, urinary tract infections, severe malaria, vaso-occlusive attacks, wounds and gastrointestinal bleeding). The most frequent complications were chills and hematuria, which represented 46.1% of all observed complications. Other complications such as nausea, vomiting, jaundice, sudden diarrhea, anxiety, tachycardia, or hyperthermia were also found in recipients. Three cases of deaths

  13. Era of blood component therapy: time for mandatory pre-donation platelet count for maximizing donor safety and optimizing quality of platelets.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, R U; Biswas, Dipak

    2013-12-01

    Blood bank regulatory agencies including the Drug and Cosmetics Act (DCA) of India do not mandate a predonation platelet count in whole blood donation. Mandating such practice will definitely optimize the quality of random donor platelets (RDP) in terms of platelet yield and patient therapeutic benefit. We observed poor platelet yield in RDP concentrates prepared at our center with a significant number not meeting the DCA guideline of ≥ 4.5 × 10(10) per bag processed from 450 ml of whole blood. Therefore we planned this study to evaluate the pre-donation hematological values in our blood donor population and effect of these values on the quality of platelet concentrates. The prospective study included 221 blood donors eligible for donating 450 ml of whole blood (WB). Following the departmental standard operating procedure (SOP) RDPs were prepared using the 'Top & Bottom' quadruple bag system and automated component extractor. Quality of RDP was assessed as per departmental protocol. All results were recorded and subsequently transcribed to SPSS working sheet. A significant (p<0.001) decrement of donor blood counts has been observed after WB donation. Mean donor Hb and platelets reduced by 0.72 g/dl and 22.1 × 10(6)/ml respectively. Quality of RDPs in terms of platelet yield was significantly better (p<0.001) when donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Although platelet yield significantly correlated with the donor platelet count however quality of RDPs in terms of red cell contamination showed no correlation with the donor hematocrit. Platelet yield in random donor platelets is a concern in Eastern India. A platelet yield of 4.5 × 10(10) per bag as mandated by the DCA of India was only achieved when the donor platelet count was >200 × 10(6)/ml. Posttransfusion platelet recovery (PPR) was unsatisfactory in the transfused patient. Introduction of pre-donation platelet count in whole blood donation will maximize donor safety and optimize patient platelet

  14. Human T lymphotropic virus types I and II proviral sequences in Argentinian blood donors with indeterminate Western blot patterns.

    PubMed

    Mangano, A M; Remesar, M; del Pozo, A; Sen, Luisa

    2004-10-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) seroindeterminate blood donors have been reported worldwide including Argentina. To investigate the significance of HTLV-I/II seroindeterminate Western blot (WB) patterns, we conducted an 8-year cross-sectional study. Of 86,238 Argentinian blood donors, 146 sera were reactive by screening tests. The WB results indicated that 20% were HTLV-I reactive, 8% HTLV-II reactive, 61% indeterminate, and 11% negative. The overall seroprevalence was 0.034% for HTLV-I, 0.014% for HTLV-II, and 0.103% for indeterminate. In 57 reactive specimens, HTLV-I/II provirus could be examined by type specific PCR for tax, pol, and env regions. When at least two gene fragments were amplified HTLV-I/II infection was considered confirmed. PCR results confirmed all WB seropositive samples for HTLV-I (n = 15), and HTLV-II (n = 7), and the only WB negative case was also PCR negative, showing a complete concordance between PCR and WB. However, of 34 WB seroindeterminate sera studied by PCR, in 5 was proviral DNA amplified. According to our criteria PCR confirmed one to be HTLV-I, and one HTLV-II, 3 remained indeterminate since only tax sequences were amplified. Among WB indeterminate samples tested by PCR, most of their serological profile showed reactivity to gag codified proteins but lacked env reactivities (70%). One sample with a WB gag pattern showed proviral tax sequences, but of the four samples with reactivity to env proteins GD21 (n = 3) or rgp46II (n = 1) PCR results indicated that one was HTLV-I, one was HTLV-II, and two were indeterminate (only tax sequences). In conclusion, the majority of HTLV-seroindeterminate WB donors exhibited a gag indeterminate profile lacking HTLV provirus, and were thus considered uninfected. However, seroreactivity to env proteins, in particular to GD21, may indicate infection and a follow-up study of each seroreactive blood donor should be considered.

  15. Blood cadmium concentration and lipid profile in Korean adults

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kisok

    2012-01-15

    Although animal experiments have shown that cadmium exposure induces alterations in lipid profiles, no epidemiological study of this relationship has been performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between blood cadmium concentration and blood lipid levels in Korean adults. A cross-sectional study comprising participants (n=3903) aged 20 years or older from the 2005, 2008, and 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys was conducted. Demographic characteristics and dietary intake were obtained from the participants by questionnaire, and cadmium and lipid levels were determined by analysis of blood samples. After adjusting for demographic and dietary factors, blood concentration of cadmium was positively associated with the risk of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in a dose-dependent manner (p for trend <0.001). In addition, the odds ratios (ORs) of a high triglyceride to HDL-C ratio was significantly increased in the high blood cadmium groups [OR=1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.79 for fourth quintile and OR=1.41; 95% CI, 1.07-1.86 for fifth quintile] compared with the lowest quintile group. However, high blood cadmium was not associated with a risk of high total cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or high triglycerides. These data suggest that an increased cadmium body burden increases the risk of dyslipidemia, mainly due to the increased risk of low HDL-C and the high ratio of triglycerides to HDL-C.

  16. [Risk Assessment of Single-Donor (Apheresis) Platelet Concentrates and Pooled Whole-Blood-Derived Platelet Concentrates].

    PubMed

    Hitzler, Walter; Hutschenreuter, Gabriele; Wartensleben, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    According to the risk estimates of the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and the Paul Ehrlich-Institute (PEI) an equivalence cannot be assumed to exist between the two different platelet preparations. Differences between single-donor (apheresis) platelet concentrates (ATK) and pooled whole-blood-derived platelet concentrates (PTK) result from donor populations, donation intervals, and preparation techniques. There are no prospective randomized studies with regard to the clinical efficacy, which would unambiguously demonstrate equivalence of the therapeutic efficacy of PTK (buffy coat method) in comparison to ATK. The German Association of Blood Transfusion Services (StKB) points out that, due to the non-equivalence of PTK and ATK, it is incumbent on the transfusion physician to select the platelet concentrate, make the appropriate disclosures, and assume treatment responsibility. Proper compensation for ATK and PTK must be ensured by the health insurance companies, whereby a special indication for the selection of either PTK or ATK is not given. Exceptions are patients with known HLA antibodies in which only selected platelet concentrates may be administered. Otherwise, no indication exists in the selection of the different platelet concentrates (Article is in German).

  17. Prevalence of and risk factors for HIV infection in blood donors and various population subgroups in Ethiopia.

    PubMed Central

    Sentjens, R. E. J. H.; Sisay, Y.; Vrielink, H.; Kebede, D.; Adèr, H. J.; Leckie, G.; Reesink, H. W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection and risk factors for HIV infection in various population subgroups in Ethiopia. Serum panels from blood donors (n = 2610), from various population subgroups in Ethiopia were tested for anti-HIV-1/2 by ELISA. All ELISA repeatedly reactive samples were subjected for confirmation by immunoblot (IB) and anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 specific ELISAs. 155/2610 (5.9%) blood donors were HIV-1 infected. Of pregnant women, 84/797 (10.5%) were HIV-1 infected, and 1/797 (0.1%) was HIV-2 infected. 1/240 (0.4%) individuals from the rural population were HIV-1 infected. 198/480 (41.3%) female attendees, and 106/419 (25.3%) male attendees at sexual transmitted disease (STD) clinics were HIV-1 infected. One (0.2%) male, and 2 (0.4%) female STD patients were infected with both HIV-1 and HIV-2. It was concluded that the prevalence of HIV-1 infection varied from 0.4% among urban residents to 25.3-41.3% among STD attendees. There is a low prevalence of HIV-2 present in Ethiopian subjects. Risky sexual behaviour is significantly associated with HIV-infection in Ethiopia. PMID:12002540

  18. [Hemolytic anemia caused by graft-versus-host reaction in ABO-nonidentical renal transplants from blood group O donors].

    PubMed

    Peces, R; Díaz Corte, C; Navascués, R A

    2001-01-01

    Acute hemolytic anemia is one of the side effects associated with cyclosporin and tacrolimus therapy, and three mechanisms have been described to account for hemolytic anemia in patients receiving these drugs: drug induced hemolysis, autoimmune hemolysis and alloimmune hemolysis resulting from donor lymphocytes derived from the allograft (passenger lymphocyte syndrome). We report four cases of renal transplant recipients who developed alloimmune hemolytic anemia due to minor ABO incompatibility while under treatment with cyclosporin (two) and tacrolimus (two). The anti-erythrocyte antibodies responsible for hemolysis were of the IgG isotype and showed anti-A or anti-B specificity. These findings suggest that the hemolysis could be related to alloantibodies derived from the clonal development of donor B lymphocytes in the recipients (microchimerism). In summary, hemolytic anemia due to ABO-minor incompatibility occurs infrequently after renal transplantation. Risks are higher for patients A, B or AB blood group receiving an O blood group graft under treatment with cyclosporin or tacrolimus. Follow-up of these patients is warranted for the early detection and optimal management may be achieved by reduction of immunosuppression and change to mycophenolate mofetil.

  19. Cord blood banks collect units with different HLA alleles and haplotypes to volunteer donor banks: a comparative report from Swiss Blood stem cells.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Monard, S; Passweg, J; Troeger, C; Eberhard, H-P; Roosnek, E; de Faveri, G Nicoloso; Chalandon, Y; Rovo, A; Kindler, V; Irion, O; Holzgreve, W; Gratwohl, A; Müller, C; Tichelli, A; Tiercy, J-M

    2009-05-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic SCT is a standard therapy for many patients with haematological diseases. A major aim of public umbilical cord blood (UCB) banking is to establish an inventory with a large HLA diversity. Few studies have compared HLA diversity between UCB banks and volunteer unrelated donor (VUD) registries and examined whether UCB banks indeed collect more units with rare alleles and haplotypes. This study compares HLA-A/B/DRB1 allele frequencies and inferred A/B/DRB1-haplotypes in 1602 UCB units and 3093 VUD from two centres in distinct recruitment areas in Switzerland. The results show that the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles as well as of the HLA-A/B/DRB1 haplotypes differ between UCB and VUD. Ten DRB1 alleles occurred at a 2- to 12-fold higher relative frequency in UCB than in VUD and 27 rare alleles were identified in UCB. Out of these 27 alleles, 15 were absent in the entire VUD data set of the national registry. This difference in allele frequencies was found only by intermediate/high-resolution typing. Targeted recruitment of UCB units from non-Caucasian donors could further increase HLA allele and haplotype diversity of available donors. Intermediate or high-resolution DNA typing is essential to identify rare alleles or allele groups.

  20. Analysis of HTLV-1 proviral load (PVL) and antibody detected with various kinds of tests in Japanese blood donors to understand the relationship between PVL and antibody level and to gain insights toward better antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Chieko; Sagara, Yasuko; Sobata, Rieko; Inoue, Yukiko; Morita, Maiko; Uchida, Shigeharu; Kiyokawa, Hiroyuki; Satake, Masahiro; Tadokoro, Kenji

    2017-03-02

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) occurs in approximately 5% of individuals infected with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). A high proviral load (PVL; more than four copies per 100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or 1.6 copies per 100 blood leukocytes) and being male are risk factors for ATL development. Whether anti-HTLV-1 antibody level is related to such risk is unknown. Here, PVL and antibody levels were examined using real-time PCR and other tests in 600 HTLV-1 positive screened Japanese blood donors to understand the relationship between PVL and antibody level in asymptomatic carriers and to gain insights toward better antibody testing for HTLV-1 infection. The 430 donors in whom proviral DNA was detected were considered as true positives for HTLV-1 infection. Among donors aged 40 years or older, more males than females had a PVL corresponding to more than 1.6% infected leukocytes, and an antibody titer below the median (P = 0.0018). In antibody tests using an HTLV-1 positive cell line or Env antigens there was a large discrepancy in antibody titer among 13 provirus-positive samples, probably suggesting that antibody-based screening tests should incorporate multiple HTLV-1 antigens, such as Gag and Env antigens.

  1. How I manage the adult potential organ donor: donation after cardiac death (part 2).

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jennifer A

    2010-02-01

    To address the gap between organs available for transplant and the number of patients on the transplant waiting list, the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Institute of Medicine, United Network for Organ Sharing and the federal government have recommended the increased used of donation after cardiac death (DCD) (JCAHOnline http://www.jointcommission.org/Library/JCAHOnline/jo_06.06.htm ; UNOS, Highlights of the June Board Meeting, 2006). DCD is defined as organ donation once death is declared after irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions, as opposed to brain death (donation after neurological death). Though DCD is one of the fastest growing categories of organ donors, it comprises only 8% of all deceased donors (Steinbrook in N Engl J Med 357:209-213, 2007). Prior to 1968, when the Ad Hoc Committee of Harvard Medical School proposed a neurological definition of death based on brain-death criteria, organs from deceased donors came from patients who had suffered cardio-pulmonary demise (IOM, Non-heart-beating organ transplantation: practice and protocols, 2000). Early transplantation from DCD donors met with limited success and most transplant surgeons turned to brain-dead donors. Consequently, DCD fell out of vogue and, until recently, has not been the focus of transplant initiatives.

  2. World Marrow Donor Association framework for the implementation of HLA matching programs in hematopoietic stem cell donor registries and cord blood banks.

    PubMed

    Bochtler, W; Maiers, M; Bakker, J N A; Oudshoorn, M; Marsh, S G E; Baier, D; Hurley, C K; Müller, C R

    2011-03-01

    A major goal of the World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA) is to foster international transplants of hematopoietic stem cells through the establishment of guidelines and recommendations in this field. In this tradition, this study defines a comprehensive framework for HLA matching programs, which use intricate algorithms to rapidly select potential donors for a patient from a database and to present these donors in a prioritized list. Starting with the comparison of single HLA markers of the donor and the patient possibly obtained using different testing methodologies at different resolutions, the more complex matching of loci and phenotypes is inductively built up. The consensus of this international collaborative group describes the state of the art in the field and points out many important design options compatible with the best practice. This should help existing registries to review and validate the most critical part of their IT systems and newly created donor registries around the world to tackle one of their real challenges.

  3. Adiposity and Blood Pressure in 110 000 Mexican Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gnatiuc, Louisa; Halsey, Jim; Herrington, William G.; López-Cervantes, Malaquías; Lewington, Sarah; Collins, Rory; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Peto, Richard; Kuri-Morales, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have reached differing conclusions about the importance of general versus central markers of adiposity to blood pressure, leading to suggestions that population-specific adiposity thresholds may be needed. We examined the relevance of adiposity to blood pressure among 111 911 men and women who, when recruited into the Mexico City Prospective Study, were aged 35 to 89 years, had no chronic disease, and were not taking antihypertensives. Linear regression was used to estimate the effects on systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 2 markers of general adiposity (body mass index and height-adjusted weight) and 4 markers of central adiposity (waist circumference, hip circumference, waist:hip ratio, and waist:height ratio), adjusted for relevant confounders. Mean (SD) adiposity levels were: body mass index (28.7±4.5 kg/m2), height-adjusted weight (70.2±11.2 kg), waist circumference (93.3±10.6 cm), hip circumference (104.0±9.0 cm), waist:hip ratio (0.90±0.06), and waist:height ratio (0.60±0.07). Associations with blood pressure were linear with no threshold levels below which lower general or central adiposity was not associated with lower blood pressure. On average, each 1 SD higher measured adiposity marker was associated with a 3 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure and 2 mm Hg higher diastolic blood pressure (SEs <0.1 mm Hg), but for the waist:hip ratio, associations were only approximately half as strong. General adiposity associations were independent of central adiposity, but central adiposity associations were substantially reduced by adjustment for general adiposity. Findings were similar for men and women. In Mexican adults, often overweight or obese, markers of general adiposity were stronger independent predictors of blood pressure than measured markers of central adiposity, with no threshold effects. PMID:28223471

  4. Graft failure following reduced-intensity cord blood transplantation for adult patients.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Hiroto; Kami, Masahiro; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Murashige, Naoko; Yuji, Koichiro; Hamaki, Tamae; Masuoka, Kazuhiro; Kusumi, Eiji; Kishi, Yukiko; Matsumura, Tomoko; Wake, Atsushi; Morinaga, Shinichi; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Taniguchi, Shuichi

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 123 adult reduced-intensity cord blood transplantation (RI-CBT) recipients to investigate the clinical features of graft failure after RI-CBT. Nine (7.3%) had graft failure, and were classified as graft rejection rather than primary graft failure; they showed peripheral cytopenia with complete loss of donor-type haematopoiesis, implying destruction of donor cells by immunological mechanisms rather than poor graft function. Three of them died of bacterial or fungal infection during neutropenia. Two recovered autologous haematopoiesis. The remaining four patients underwent a second RI-CBT and developed severe regimen-related toxicities. One died of pneumonia on day 8, and the other three achieved engraftment. Two of them died of transplant-related mortality, and the other survived without disease progression for 9.0 months after the second RI-CBT. In total, seven of the nine patients with graft failure died. The median survival of those with graft failure was 3.8 months (range, 0.9-15.4). Graft failure is a serious complication of RI-CBT. As host T cells cannot completely be eliminated by reduced-intensity preparative regimens, we need to be aware of the difficulty in differentiating graft rejection from other causes of graft failure following RI-CBT. Further studies are warranted to establish optimal diagnostic and treatment strategies.

  5. Comparison of real-time PCR and antigen assays for detection of hepatitis E virus in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is recognized as an emerging and often undiagnosed disease in industrialized countries, with asymptomatic infections actually occurring in blood donors. Sensitive detection of HEV-RNA is crucial for diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression. We evaluated the analytical sensitivity and performance of three HEV RT-PCR assays (RealStar HEV reverse transcription-PCR [RT-PCR], hepatitis@ceeramTools, and ampliCube HEV RT-PCR) for screening of individuals for HEV infections (ID-nucleic acid amplification technology [ID-NAT]) and for blood donor pool screening (minipool-NAT [MP-NAT]). RNA was extracted using NucliSens easyMAG (ID-NAT) and a high-volume extraction protocol (4.8 ml, chemagic Viral 5K, MP-NAT). Three NAT assays were evaluated for ID-NAT but only two assays for MP-NAT due to inhibition of the ampliCube HEV RT-PCR kit using the corresponding RNA extract. Assays provided good analytical sensitivity, ranging from 37.8 to 180.1 IU/ml (ID-NAT) and from 4.7 to 91.2 IU/ml (MP-NAT). The applicability of HEV antigen (HEV-Ag) screening was compared to that of RT-PCR screening and detection of HEV-IgM antibodies using seroconversion panels of 10 HEV genotype 3-infected individuals. Four individuals revealed a positive HEV-Ag detection result, with corresponding viremias ranging from 1.92 E + 03 to 2.19 E + 05 IU/ml, while the progression of HEV-Ag followed that of HEV viremia. The other six individuals showed no presence of HEV-Ag although the corresponding viremias were also in the range of >1.0 E + 03. Anti-HEV-IgM antibodies were detectable in seven donors; one donor presented parallel positivities of HEV-Ag and anti-HEV IgM. The evaluated NAT methods present powerful tools providing sensitive HEV detection. Application of HEV-Ag or anti-HEV IgM screening is currently inferior for the early detection of HEV infection due to the decreased sensitivity compared to NAT methods.

  6. Meta-analysis of cytomegalovirus seroprevalence in volunteer blood donors and healthy subjects in Iran from 1992 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Shaiegan, Mojgan; Rasouli, Mahbobeh; Zadsar, Maryam; Zolfaghari, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Human cytomegalovirus (CMV), a double-strand DNA herpesvirus, can be transmitted via blood transfusion which is especially important for immunocompromised recipients and can cause a fatal infection. CMV seroprevalence in Iran was studied on blood donors, healthy subjects, and some patients. Highly variable rates were detected. The purpose of this study was to review CMV seroprevalence in blood donors and apparently healthy individuals, in Iran. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty-eight electronic and paper-based resources and databases including published articles in internal and external journals, seminars, dissertations, and theses available in the database and different websites were used to be systematically reviewed as a meta-analysis. Less related articles to the issue, papers of specific high risk population, and articles with not enough information, were excluded. Eventually 22 articles that satisfied our selection criteria were systematically reviewed and analyzed. To explore heterogeneity between studies the I square (I2) index was used. Data were analyzed using the statistical software package (STATA) 11. Results: The heterogeneity between selected studies was 97% with an I2 statistic. In this study a random effects model was used for meta-analysis. The prevalence of CMV IgG and CMV IgM antibodies in the country were estimated to be 92% (95% CI: 90-94) and 2.6% (95% CI: 1.7-3.6), respectively. Conclusion: Given high rate of CMV seropositivity in Iran, it seems that CMVAbs screening would not be a reasonable and affordable approach to prevent CMV infection via transfusion especially for immune compromised recipients, so alternative strategies should be considered. PMID:26351551

  7. Umbilical cord blood transplantation from unrelated donors in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Piñana, José Luis; Sanz, Jaime; Picardi, Alessandra; Ferrá, Christelle; Martino, Rodrigo; Barba, Pere; Gonzalez-Vicent, Marta; Pascual, María Jesús; Martín, Carmen; Verdeguer, Amparo; de Heredia, Cristina Diaz; Montesinos, Pau; Ribera, José-María; Sanz, Miguel; Arcese, William; Sanz, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    There are very few disease-specific studies focusing on outcomes of umbilical cord blood transplantation for Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We report the outcome of 45 patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia who underwent myeloablative single unit cord blood transplantation from unrelated donors within the GETH/GITMO cooperative group. Conditioning regimens were based on combinations of thiotepa, busulfan, cyclophospamide or fludarabine, and antithymocyte globulin. At the time of transplantation, 35 patients (78%) were in first complete remission, four (8%) in second complete remission and six (14%) in third or subsequent response. The cumulative incidence of myeloid engraftment was 96% at a median time of 20 days and significantly better for patients receiving higher doses of CD34+ cells. The incidence of acute grade II–IV graft-versus-host disease was 31%, while that of overall chronic graft-versus-host disease was 53%. Treatment-related mortality was 17% at day +100 and 31% at 5 years. The 5-year relapse, event-free survival and overall survival rates were 31%, 36% and 44%, respectively. Although the event-free and overall survival rates in patients without BCR/ABL transcripts detectable at time of transplant were better than those in whom BCR/ABL transcripts were detected (46% versus 24% and 60% versus 30%, respectively) these differences were not statistically significant in the univariate analysis (P=0.07). These results demonstrate that umbilical cord blood transplantation from unrelated donors can be a curative treatment for a substantial number of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:24097633

  8. IgG2 deficiency in a healthy blood donor. Concomitant lack of IgG2, IgA and IgE immunoglobulins and specific anti-carbohydrate antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, L; Smith, C I

    1983-01-01

    Lack of serum IgG2, IgA and IgE was found in a healthy male adult blood donor. No secretory IgA could be demonstrated. In vitro activation of lymphocytes did not induce IgA secreting cells although no class specific suppressor cells could be found. Normal or slightly subnormal titres to a variety of bacterial and viral antigens were demonstrated whereas anti-carbohydrate antibodies (anti-teichoic acid, anti-dextran and anti-pneumococcal polysaccharide) were virtually absent. Isoagglutinins and heteroagglutinins were present in somewhat lower concentrations than normal. PMID:6189654

  9. Prevention of pure red cell aplasia after major or bidirectional ABO blood group incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation by pretransplant reduction of host anti-donor isoagglutinins

    PubMed Central

    Stussi, Georg; Halter, Jörg; Bucheli, Eveline; Valli, Piero V.; Seebach, Lutz; Gmür, Jürg; Gratwohl, Alois; Schanz, Urs; Passweg, Jakob R.; Seebach, Jörg D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Persistent anti-donor isoagglutinins after major ABO blood group incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may cause delayed red blood cell engraftment and post-transplant pure red cell aplasia. Design and Methods We investigated the effect of pretransplant anti-donor isoagglutinin reduction by in vivo absorption and/or plasmapheresis on the incidence of pure red cell aplasia and the time to red blood cell engraftment in 153 hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with major ABO incompatibility. Results Twelve patients (8%) developed pure red cell aplasia, 3/98 (3%) with, and 9/55 (16%) without prior isoagglutinin reduction (p=0.009). Red blood cell engraftment was faster in patients with isoagglutinin reduction; in addition, peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acute graft-versus-host disease, and younger age were associated with faster red blood cell engraftment in Cox regression analysis. In patients with pure red cell aplasia the mean red blood cell engraftment occurred after 225 days (p<0.001) and was associated with a simultaneous decrease of anti-donor isoagglutinins. Patients with pure red cell aplasia had higher pretransplant anti-donor isoagglutinin titers (p=0.001) and received more post-transplant red blood cell transfusions (p<0.001). Conclusions Following major ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, pure red cell aplasia and delayed red blood cell engraftment depend on the levels of anti-donor isoagglutinins and are efficiently prevented by the pretransplant removal of these isoagglutinins. The benefits of reducing the time of transfusion-dependency and transfusion-associated risks must be carefully balanced against the potential side effects of isoagglutinin reduction. PMID:19144657

  10. Volunteer donor apheresis.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Dan A

    2002-02-01

    Volunteer donor apheresis has evolved from early plasmapheresis procedures that collected single components into technically advanced multicomponent procedures that can produce combinations of red blood cells, platelets, and plasma units. Blood collection and utilization is increasing annually in the United States. The number of apheresis procedures is also increasing such that single donor platelet transfusions now exceed platelet concentrates from random donors. Donor qualifications for apheresis vary from those of whole blood. Depending on the procedure, the donor weight, donation interval, and platelet count must be taken into consideration. Adverse effects of apheresis are well known and fortunately occur in only a very small percentage of donors. The recruitment of volunteer donors is one of the most challenging aspects of a successful apheresis program. As multicomponent apheresis becomes more commonplace, it is important for collection centers to analyze the best methods to recruit and collect donors.

  11. Motivational Differences between Whole Blood and Apheresis Donors in Quebec, Canada: A Questionnaire-Based Survey in a Voluntary Nonremunerated Context

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Johanne; Cloutier, Marie-Soleil; Carrier, Élianne

    2015-01-01

    Background. Finding ways to recruit apheresis donors is crucial. The aim of this study was to provide a quantitative analysis of the motivations of regular plasma/platelets donors (PPDs) in comparison with those of regular whole blood donors (WBDs), in a voluntary and nonremunerated context. Study Design and Methods. Motives to donate blood and demographic characteristics were collected through questionnaires completed by 795 WBDs and 473 PPDs. Chi-square tests were completed to determine which motivations stand out across the two blood donor groups. Results. The motivator selected by the highest percentage was “my blood can save lives.” Comparison of WBDs and PPDs showed that 12 out of 23 items were statistically significantly different from one group to another. Conclusion. The belief that helping others is in their nature is more prevalent among PPDs. In this sense, their profile is unique. Four other motivators distinguish this group from the WBDs: “I think there is a strong need for blood products,” “it gives me a sense of pride,” “I like to have goals,” and “I receive telephone reminders.” These motivators point to the role the ongoing support provided by blood collection agencies (BCAs) plays with PPDs. PMID:26295006

  12. Motivational Differences between Whole Blood and Apheresis Donors in Quebec, Canada: A Questionnaire-Based Survey in a Voluntary Nonremunerated Context.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Johanne; Cloutier, Marie-Soleil; Carrier, Élianne

    2015-01-01

    Background. Finding ways to recruit apheresis donors is crucial. The aim of this study was to provide a quantitative analysis of the motivations of regular plasma/platelets donors (PPDs) in comparison with those of regular whole blood donors (WBDs), in a voluntary and nonremunerated context. Study Design and Methods. Motives to donate blood and demographic characteristics were collected through questionnaires completed by 795 WBDs and 473 PPDs. Chi-square tests were completed to determine which motivations stand out across the two blood donor groups. Results. The motivator selected by the highest percentage was "my blood can save lives." Comparison of WBDs and PPDs showed that 12 out of 23 items were statistically significantly different from one group to another. Conclusion. The belief that helping others is in their nature is more prevalent among PPDs. In this sense, their profile is unique. Four other motivators distinguish this group from the WBDs: "I think there is a strong need for blood products," "it gives me a sense of pride," "I like to have goals," and "I receive telephone reminders." These motivators point to the role the ongoing support provided by blood collection agencies (BCAs) plays with PPDs.

  13. Impact of a confirmatory RhD test on the correct serologic typing of blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Castilho, Lilian; Vieira, Otavio Vinicius Neves; Sippert, Emília; Gaspardi, Ane Caroline; Martins, Marina Lobato; da Silva Malta, Maria Clara Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Background The RHD gene is highly polymorphic, which results in a large number of RhD variant phenotypes. Discrepancies in RhD typing are still a problem in blood banks and increase the risk of alloimmunization. In this study, the RhD typing strategy at a blood bank in Brazil was evaluated. Methods One-hundred and fifty-two samples typed as RhD negative and C or E positive by routine tests (automated system and indirect antiglobulin test using the tube technique) were reevaluated for RhD status by three methods. The method with the best performance was implemented and evaluated for a period of one year (n = 4897 samples). Samples that were D positive exclusively in the confirmatory test were submitted to molecular analysis. Results The gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing with anti-D immunoglobulin G (clone ESD1) presented the best results. Seventy samples (1.43%) previously typed as RhD negative showed reactivity in the gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing and were reclassified as D positive. D variants that may cause alloimmunization, such as weak D type 2 and partial DVI, were detected. Conclusion The confirmatory RhD test using the gel test for indirect antiglobulin testing represents a breakthrough in transfusion safety in this blood center. Our results emphasize the importance of assessing the blood group typing strategy in blood banks. PMID:26408363

  14. The Prevalence of Antibodies against Wheat and Milk Proteins in Blood Donors and Their Contribution to Neuroimmune Reactivities

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Aristo; Kharrazian, Datis; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look for the presence of IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies against two widely consumed foods, wheat and milk, in a relatively large number of specimens. As wheat, milk, and their antigens have been found to be involved in neuroimmune disorders, we measured the co-occurrence of their antibodies against various neural antigens. We assessed the reactivity of sera from 400 donors to wheat and milk proteins, GAD-65, cerebellar, MBP, and MOG. Statistical analysis showed significant clustering when certain wheat and milk protein antibodies were cross-referenced with neural antibodies. Approximately half of the sera with antibody elevation against gliadin reacted significantly with GAD-65 and cerebellar peptides; about half of the sera with elevated antibodies against α + β-casein and milk butyrophilin also showed antibody elevation against MBP and MOG. Inhibition studies showed that only two out of four of the samples with elevated cerebellar or MOG antibodies could be inhibited by gliadin or α + β-casein, confirming individual variation in epitope recognition. We conclude that a subgroup of blood donors, due to a breakdown in immunological tolerance, may react and produce significant levels of antibodies (p-values less than 0.05) against wheat and milk antigens that cross-react with different neural antigens, which may have broader implications in the induction of neuroimmune reactivities. PMID:24451306

  15. Incidence of viral markers and evaluation of the estimated risk in the Swiss blood donor population from 1996 to 2003.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, C; Schneider, P; Fopp, M; Ruefer, A; Lévy, G

    2005-02-01

    Among the well known transfusion-associated risks, the transmission of pathogenic viruses is regarded as one of the most serious. Over the past two decades, a series of overlapping safety procedures have been successively implemented to minimise this risk. It is now generally considered that the risk of transmitting viral infections via blood products is very low in developed countries. The present study analyses the incidence of the key infectious diseases HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) between 1996 and 2003 from 99% of voluntary repeat blood donors visiting the blood transfusion service of the Swiss Red Cross. Furthermore the estimated risk of these viral markers was calculated. From 1996 to 2003 the incidence rate for HCV decreased continuously, whereas no significant decrease in the incidence rate of HIV and HBV was observed. From 2001 to 2003, the last calculated period, the residual risk was estimated to be 1 in 1,900,000 for HIV, 1 in 2,200,0000 for HCV and 1 in 115,000 for HBV, respectively. This agrees with international studies, which have been shown that the estimated residual risk for HBV between 1996 and 2003 is higher than that of HCV and HIV.

  16. Effect of intracerebroventricular and intravenous administration of nitric oxide donors on blood pressure and heart rate in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Nurminen, M. L.; Vapaatalo, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of nitric oxide (NO) releasing substances, sodium nitroprusside, 3-morpholino sydnonimine (SIN-1) and a novel oxatriazole derivative, GEA 3162, on blood pressure and heart rate were studied after peripheral or central administration in anaesthetized normotensive Wistar rats. 2. Given as cumulative intravenous injections, both nitroprusside and GEA 3162 (24-188 nmol kg-1) induced short-lasting and dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial pressure, while SIN-1 decreased blood pressure only slightly even after larger doses (94-3000 nmol kg-1). Heart rate increased concomitantly with the hypotensive effect of the NO-releasing substances. 3. Cumulative intracerebroventricular administration of GEA 3162 (24-188 nmol kg-1) induced a dose-dependent hypotension with slight but insignificant increases in heart rate. In contrast, intracerebroventricular nitroprusside induced little change in blood pressure, while a large dose of SIN-1 (3000 nmol kg-1, i.c.v.) slightly increased mean arterial pressure. However, intracerebroventricular nitroprusside and SIN-1 increased heart rate at doses that did not significantly affect blood pressure. 4. To determine whether the cardiovascular effects of GEA 3162 were attributable to an elevation of cyclic GMP levels, pretreatments with methylene blue, a putative guanylate cyclase inhibitor, were performed. This substance failed to attenuate the cardiovascular effects of peripherally or centrally administered GEA 3162, suggesting that the effects were independent of guanylate cyclase. 5. In conclusion, the centrally administered NO-donor, GEA 3162, induced a dose-dependent. hypotensive response without significant changes in heart rate. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular injections of nitroprusside and SIN-1 increased heart rate without affecting blood pressure. These results suggest that NO released by these drugs may affect central mechanisms involved in cardiovascular regulation independently of cyclic GMP. PMID:8968551

  17. Antibody levels correlate with detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA by sensitive PCR assays in seropositive blood donors and possible resolution of infection over time

    PubMed Central

    Sabino, E.C.; Lee, T.H.; Montalvo, L.; Nguyen, M.L.; Leiby, D.A.; Carrick, D.M.; Otani, M.M.; Vinelli, E.; Wright, D.; Stramer, S.L.; Busch, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical significance of anti-T. cruzi low-level reactive samples is incompletely understood. PCR-positive rates and antibody levels among seropositive blood donors in three countries are described. Methods Follow-up whole blood and plasma samples were collected from T. cruzi-seropositive donors from 2008-2010 in the US (n=195) and Honduras (n=58). Also 143 samples from Brazil in 1996-2002, originally positive by three serological assays, were available and paired with contemporary follow-up samples from these donors. All samples were retested with the FDA-approved Ortho ELISA. PCR assays were performed on coded sample panels by two laboratories (BSRI and ARC) that amplified kinetoplast minicircle DNA sequences of T. cruzi. Results PCR testing at BSRI yielded slightly higher overall sensitivity and specificity (33% and 98%) compared with the ARC lab (28% and 94%). Among seropositive donors, PCR-positive rates varied by country (p<0.0001) for the BSRI laboratory: Brazil (57%), Honduras (32%) and the US (14%). ELISA signal/cutoff (S/CO) ratios were significantly higher for PCR-positive compared to PCR-negative donors (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Additionally, PCR-negative Brazilian donors exhibited greater frequencies of antibody decline over time versus PCR-positive donors (p=0.003). Conclusion For all three countries, persistent DNA positivity correlated with higher ELISA S/CO values, suggesting that high-level seroreactivity reflects chronic parasitemia. The higher rate of PCR positivity for Brazilian donors was likely attributable to required reactivity on three assays available a decade ago. Significant S/CO declines in 10% of the PCR-negative Brazilian donors may indicate seroreversion following parasite clearance in the absence of treatment. PMID:23002996

  18. The New Zealand Blood Donors' Health Study: baseline findings of a large prospective cohort study of injury

    PubMed Central

    Ameratunga, S; Norton, R; Whitlock, G; MacMahon, S; Coggan, C; Jackson, R; Langley, J; Parag, V; Smith, D; Woodfield, D

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Cohort studies have contributed important scientific knowledge regarding the determinants of chronic diseases. Despite the need for etiologic investigations, this design has been infrequently used in injury prevention research. Objectives: To describe the baseline findings of the New Zealand Blood Donors' Health Study, a large prospective study designed to investigate relationships between lifestyle, psychosocial factors, and serious injury due to road crashes, falls, self harm, assault, work, sport, and recreation. Methods: Participants were recruited from fixed and mobile collection sites of a voluntary non-profit blood donor program. Baseline exposure data (for example risk taking behaviors, alcohol and marijuana use, sleep habits, and depression) were collected using a self administered questionnaire. Outcome data regarding serious injury will be collected prospectively through computerized record linkage of participants' unique identifiers to national morbidity and mortality databases. Results: In total, 22 389 participants enrolled in the study (81% response rate). The diverse study population included 36% aged 16–24 years, 20% rural residents, and large variability in exposures of interest. For example, in the 12 months before recruitment, 21% had driven a motor vehicle when they considered themselves over the legal limit for alcohol, and 11% had been convicted of traffic violations (excluding parking infringements). Twelve per cent had seriously considered attempting suicide sometime in their life. Conclusions: This is the first, large scale cohort study investigating determinants of serious injury in New Zealand and among the largest worldwide. Preliminary findings from prospective analyses that can inform injury prevention policy are expected within five years. PMID:11928979

  19. Incidence and clinical implication of TT virus in patients with hepatitis and its frequency in blood donors in India

    PubMed Central

    Magu, S.K.; Kalghatgi, A.T.; Bhagat, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transfusion Transmitted Virus (TTV), also known as Torque Teno Virus is a new novel viral agent which appears to correlate with some acute and chronic hepatitis cases and may produce liver damage under specific circumstances. Aim of this study was to detect TT virus by real-time PCR, study its clinical implications and effects of its co-infection in HBV and HCV chronic liver diseases. Methods The study population comprised 50 acute hepatitis, 50 chronic hepatitis patients and 100 voluntary blood donors. All samples were tested for serum bilirubin, AST, ALT and alkaline phosphatase levels and for all available viral markers for hepatitis. The detection of TT viral genome was carried out by real-time PCR using TTV sequences as reported by Takahashi et al with modifications on the basis of database of the DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank (GenBank accession no. AB008394). Result Serum was positive for TTV in 72% of volunteer blood donors, 77.4% (24/31) of hepatitis A cases, 87.6% (36/41) of HBV-positive, 77% (10/13) of HCV-positive, and 92.8% (13/14) of non-B, non-C cases. Co-infection of TTV with other hepatitis viruses was detected in some patients. Conclusion TTV is a frequent virus detected in patients with various types of viral hepatitis, in cases of hepatitis without obvious viral agent, and from the healthy population in India. Rate of TTV was found to be significantly higher (92.8%) for Non A–E hepatitis group. PMID:26663961

  20. Phylogeographical Analysis Reveals Distinct Sources of HIV-1 and HCV Transmitted to Former Blood Donors in China.

    PubMed

    Du, Ling; Wu, Jianjun; Qian, Peiyu; Xin, Ruolei; Ni, Ya; Han, Renzhi; Meng, Zhefeng; Xia, Jinglin

    2017-03-01

    Historically, coinfection of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) was frequent among Chinese former blood donors (FBDs). This is largely due to ignorance/lack of education regarding appropriate sterilizing techniques and/or the availability of single-use needles and equipment. Although HCV shares identical transmission routes with HIV, the source of HCV in the Chinese blood donor population still remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the evolution and transmission of HCV and HIV in the Chinese FBD group. Similar to previous reports, two HCV subtypes (HCV 1b and 2a) and one HIV subtype (Thai-B) were identified in FBDs. The HCV 1b subtype had a similar evolutionary rate of 1.9 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year to that of HIV (2.06 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year), while the HCV 2a subtype had a faster evolutionary rate of 3.8 × 10(-3) substitutions/site/year. Phylogeographical analysis indicated that the introduction of HCV 1b into FBDs was estimated to be earlier than that of HCV 2a and HIV (late 1970s vs. late 1980s). Bayesian Skyline Plot (BSP) analysis further confirmed our findings, showing that HCV 1b infections breached a fast exponential growth from 1991 to 1998, while the HCV 2a infections had a fast exponential growth that occurred in around 1996-2001. Overall, this investigation helps to better understand HCV transmission in China and supports improvements of HCV prevalence control.

  1. Altruistic Behavior among College Students: An Investigation of the Social and Psychological Characteristics of Blood Donors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Wilbert Marcellus, II

    The document describes a field study to investigate the relationship between altruism and blood donating behavior among members of a large midwestern college community. Altruistic behavior is interpreted as combining three motivations: (1) reward-cost, also referred to in terms of behavior as social exchange; (2) social responsibility and…

  2. Cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of double versus single cord blood transplantation in adults with acute leukemia in France.

    PubMed

    Labopin, Myriam; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Gluckman, Eliane; Blaise, Didier; Mannone, Lionel; Milpied, Noel; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Deconinck, Eric; Michallet, Mauricette; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Nguyen, Stephanie; Cahn, Jean Yves; de Revel, Thierry; Garnier, Federico; Faucher, Catherine; Taright, Namik; Kenzey, Chantal; Volt, Fernanda; Bertrand, Dominique; Mohty, Mohamad; Rocha, Vanderson

    2014-03-01

    Double cord blood transplantation extends the use of cord blood to adults for whom a single unit is not available, but the procedure is limited by its cost. To evaluate outcomes and cost-effectiveness of double compared to single cord blood transplantation, we analyzed 134 transplants in adults with acute leukemia in first remission. Transplants were performed in France with reduced intensity or myeloablative conditioning regimens. Costs were estimated from donor search to 1 year after transplantation. A Markov decision analysis model was used to calculate quality-adjusted life-years and cost-effectiveness ratio within 4 years. The overall survival at 2 years after single and double cord blood transplants was 42% versus 62%, respectively (P=0.03), while the leukemia-free-survival was 33% versus 53%, respectively (P=0.03). The relapse rate was 21% after double transplants and 42% after a single transplant (P=0.006). No difference was observed for non-relapse mortality or chronic graft-versus-host-disease. The estimated costs up to 1 year after reduced intensity conditioning for single and double cord blood transplantation were € 165,253 and €191,827, respectively. The corresponding costs after myeloablative conditioning were € 192,566 and € 213,050, respectively. Compared to single transplants, double cord blood transplantation was associated with supplementary costs of € 21,302 and € 32,420 up to 4 years, but with increases in quality-adjusted life-years of 0.616 and 0.484, respectively, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of € 34,581 and €66,983 in the myeloablative and reduced intensity conditioning settings, respectively. Our results showed that for adults with acute leukemia in first complete remission in France, double cord transplantation is more cost-effective than single cord blood transplantation, with better outcomes, including quality-adjusted life-years.

  3. Molecular RH blood group typing of serologically D-/CE+ donors: the use of a polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer test kit with pooled samples.

    PubMed

    Londero, Donatella; Fiorino, Mauro; Miotti, Valeria; de Angelis, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The known presence of RHD blood group alleles in apparently D– individuals who are positive for C or E antigens leads to an appropriate investigation for the RHD gene on the red blood cells (RBCs) of D– blood donors, thus preventing their RBCs from immunizing D– recipients. Ready-to-use polymerase chain reaction–sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) typing kits are available and allow single-sample results. The need to perform this testing on a large number of donors affiliated with the Transfusion Department of Udine (Northern Italy) led to the use of molecular genetic RH blood group typing with PCR-SSP test kits and DNA samples mixed in pools. From a population of 35,000 blood donors screened for D antigen by serologic typing, a total of 235 samples, distributed in pools of 5 DNA samples, were investigated. Positive results were reevaluated by opening the pools and retesting single samples. Validation of DNA-pool typing with commercial kits was done. Among 235 genotyped samples, 12 were found to be PCR positive (5.1%), exhibiting DEL genotype and RHD-CE-D hybrid alleles. Our data demonstrate that the use of a PCR-SSP commercial test kit with pooled samples is a helpful and valid method to correctly detect RHD alleles. As a consequence, we reclassified our donors as carriers of potentially immunogenic alleles.

  4. Prevalence of anti-hepatitis C virus antibody among pregnant women and blood donors at Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Hilda, Awoyelu E; Kola, Oloke Julius; Kolawole, Oladipo E

    2016-09-27

    Hepatitis C virus is one of the emerging infectious diseases that can be transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies among potential blood donors and pregnant women attending Bowen University Teaching Hospital (BUTH), Ogbomoso, Oyo State. This hospital-based study was conducted from December 2014 to September 2015. The study group (N = 279) included potential blood donors and pregnant women. Data on socio-demographic characteristics and potential risk factors were collected using a structured questionnaire. The presence of anti-HCV antibodies in serum samples of the studied subjects were detected using third-generation Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) (WKEA Med Supplies Corp, China). Chisquare test was utilized to assess the association between the socio-demographic variables and HCV status. Logistic regression was done to determine the strength of association between risk factors and HCV status. Statistical significance was set at P ˂ 0.05. Overall seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus infection was found to be 1.79% consisting 0.36% of pregnant women and 1.43% of blood donors. None of the socio-demographic characteristics and potential risk factors among the study groups were significantly associated with hepatitis C virus infection. This study found a seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody to be 1.79%, thus, screening of pregnant women and blood donors for HCV infections with the use of ELISA is recommended because of its important role in detecting the presence of anti-HCV antibody with utmost specificity and sensitivity. HCV, Pregnant women, Blood donors, Seroprevalence, Socio-demographic factor, BOWEN, Ogbomoso.

  5. The relative safety of pooled whole-blood-derived platelets prepared by the buffy-coat method versus single-donor (apheresis) platelets.

    PubMed

    Vamvakas, Eleftherios C

    2010-01-01

    Conversion to a single-donor (apheresis) platelet inventory in Western Europe and other countries that provide similar health care to the US but rely on buffy-coat pooled whole-blood-derived platelets will confer the benefit of a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of all emerging transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs). In Europe, this benefit will include a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of acquiring variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) from platelet transfusion. In countries that use buffy coats from first-time donors to produce platelet pools, there will also be a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus infections. Conversion to a single-donor inventory collected from male donors (or female donors without a history of pregnancy or shown not to have white-blood-cell antibodies) should also reduce the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury, although this prediction is based on theory and may not materialize or prove hard to document. Because conversion to a single-donor inventory can effect a > or = 2-fold reduction in the risk of all TTIs without incurring any risk, it is a more advantageous risk-reduction strategy for emerging TTIs compared with the introduction of pathogen-reduction systems for platelets. The latter cannot protect from vCJD and potentially also from some other emerging TTIs; moreover, they have recently been associated with an increased risk of bleeding.

  6. Robust Vaccine Responses in Adult and Pediatric Cord Blood Transplantation Recipients Treated for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Gunjan L; Shune, Leyla; Purtill, Duncan; Devlin, Sean; Lauer, Emily; Lubin, Marissa; Bhatt, Valkal; McElrath, Courtney; Kernan, Nancy A; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Giralt, Sergio; Perales, Miguel A; Ponce, Doris M; Young, James W; Shah, Monica; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Barker, Juliet N

    2015-12-01

    Because cord blood (CB) lacks memory T and B cells and recent decreases in herd immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases in many developed countries have been documented, vaccine responses in CB transplantation (CBT) survivors are of great interest. We analyzed vaccine responses in double-unit CBT recipients transplanted for hematologic malignancies. In 103 vaccine-eligible patients, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) most commonly precluded vaccination. Sixty-five patients (63%; engrafting units median HLA-allele match 5/8; range, 2 to 7/8) received protein conjugated vaccines, and 63 patients (median age, 34 years; range, .9 to 64) were evaluated for responses. Median vaccination time was 17 months (range, 7 to 45) post-CBT. GVHD (n = 42) and prior rituximab (n = 13) delayed vaccination. Responses to Prevnar 7 and/or 13 vaccines (serotypes 14, 19F, 23F) were seen in children and adults (60% versus 49%, P = .555). Responses to tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae, and polio were observed in children (86% to 100%) and adults (53% to 89%) even if patients had prior GVHD or rituximab. CD4(+)CD45RA(+) and CD19(+) cell recovery significantly influenced tetanus and polio responses. In a smaller cohort responses were seen to measles (65%), mumps (50%), and rubella (100%) vaccines. No vaccine side effects were identified, and all vaccinated patients survived (median follow-up, 57 months). Although GVHD and rituximab can delay vaccination, CBT recipients (including adults and those with prior GVHD) have similar vaccine response rates to adult donor allograft recipients supporting vaccination in CBT recipients.

  7. Robust Vaccine Responses in Adult and Pediatric Cord Blood Transplantation Recipients Treated for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Gunjan L.; Shune, Leyla; Purtill, Duncan; Devlin, Sean; Lauer, Emily; Lubin, Marissa; Bhatt, Valkal; McElrath, Courtney; Kernan, Nancy A.; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Giralt, Sergio; Perales, Miguel A.; Ponce, Doris M.; Young, James W.; Shah, Monica; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Barker, Juliet N.

    2015-01-01

    As cord blood (CB) lacks memory T- and B-cells, and recent decreases in herd immunity to vaccine preventable diseases in many developed countries have been documented, vaccine responses in CB transplantation (CBT) survivors are of great interest. We analyzed vaccine responses in double-unit CBT recipients transplanted for hematologic malignancies. In 103 vaccine eligible patients, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) most commonly precluded vaccination. Sixty-five (63%) patients (engrafting units median HLA-allele match 5/8, range 2–7/8) received protein-conjugated vaccines, and 63 (median age 34 years, range 0.9–64) were evaluated for responses. Median vaccination time was 17 months (range 7–45) post-CBT. GVHD (n = 42) and prior rituximab (n = 13) delayed vaccination. Responses to Prevnar 7 and/or 13 vaccines (serotypes 14, 19f, 23f) were seen in children and adults (60% versus 49%, p = 0.555). Responses to tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, H. influenzae, and polio were observed in children (86–100%) and adults (53–89%) even if patients had prior GVHD or rituximab. CD4+CD45RA+ and CD19+ cell recovery significantly influenced tetanus and polio responses. In a smaller cohort, responses were seen to measles (65%), mumps (50%), and rubella (100%) vaccines. No vaccine side-effects were identified and all vaccinated patients survive (median follow-up 57 months). While GVHD and rituximab can delay vaccination, CBT recipients (including adults and those with prior GVHD) have similar vaccine response rates to adult donor allograft recipients supporting vaccination in CBT recipients. PMID:26271191

  8. Characterisation and follow-up study of occult hepatitis B virus infection in anti-HBc-positive qualified blood donors in southern China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xianlin; Li, Tong; Xu, Xiaoxuan; Du, Peng; Zeng, Jinfeng; Zhu, Weigang; Yang, Baocheng; Li, Chengyao; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Most major Chinese blood centres look for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and perform nucleic acid testing to screen blood for hepatitis B virus infection. The search for antibodies to the core of hepatitis B virus (anti-HBc) has not been implemented because it would lead to a high rate of discarded blood units. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of occult HBV infection among anti-HBc-positive qualified blood donors in southern China. Materials and methods We tested anti-HBc-positive blood donations negative for HBsAg and HBV DNA by standard NAT from Shenzhen for the presence of HBV DNA by sensitive nested and quantitative polymerase chain reactions. Anti-HBs titres were quantified. HBV DNA-positive donors were traced and followed-up. Results Of the 1,033 qualified donors, 47.4% (95% CI: 44.4 to 50.5%) carried anti-HBc as evidence of exposure to HBV. The rate of anti-HBc positivity increased steadily with age, ranging from 32.6% in the age group <30 years to 69.8% in the age group <50 years (p<0.001). Of the 1,033 donors, 777 (75.2%; 95% CI: 72.4 to 77.8%) carried anti-HBs (>10 IU/L). HBV DNA was detected in 14 donors who were anti-HBc-positive, HBsAg-negative and negative by routine NAT. Seven of those 14 specimens had an anti-HBs titre above 100 mIU/mL. The prevalence of OBI in anti-HBc-positive qualified blood donors was 2.86% (95% CI: 1.57 to 4.75%). Eight of the 14 OBI cases were genotype B and one was genotype C; 7/14 cases were followed-up, one case converted to anti-HBe. HBV DNA became undetectable in all follow-up samples. Discussion A small proportion of anti-HBc-positive qualified donors carry HBV DNA after HBsAg and NAT screening. This finding suggests the possibility of HBV transmission from asymptomatic donors, especially in areas of high HBV prevalence. More sensitive NAT rather than anti-HBc testing should be considered to improve blood safety. PMID:27416568

  9. High Resolution Structures of the Human ABO(H) Blood Group Enzymes in Complex with Donor Analogs Reveal That the Enzymes Utilize Multiple Donor Conformations to Bind Substrates in a Stepwise Manner.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Susannah M L; Meloncelli, Peter J; Zheng, Ruixiang B; Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Johal, Asha R; Borisova, Svetlana N; Lowary, Todd L; Evans, Stephen V

    2015-11-06

    Homologous glycosyltransferases α-(1→3)-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) and α-(1→3)-galactosyltransferase (GTB) catalyze the final step in ABO(H) blood group A and B antigen synthesis through sugar transfer from activated donor to the H antigen acceptor. These enzymes have a GT-A fold type with characteristic mobile polypeptide loops that cover the active site upon substrate binding and, despite intense investigation, many aspects of substrate specificity and catalysis remain unclear. The structures of GTA, GTB, and their chimeras have been determined to between 1.55 and 1.39 Å resolution in complex with natural donors UDP-Gal, UDP-Glc and, in an attempt to overcome one of the common problems associated with three-dimensional studies, the non-hydrolyzable donor analog UDP-phosphono-galactose (UDP-C-Gal). Whereas the uracil moieties of the donors are observed to maintain a constant location, the sugar moieties lie in four distinct conformations, varying from extended to the "tucked under" conformation associated with catalysis, each stabilized by different hydrogen bonding partners with the enzyme. Further, several structures show clear evidence that the donor sugar is disordered over two of the observed conformations and so provide evidence for stepwise insertion into the active site. Although the natural donors can both assume the tucked under conformation in complex with enzyme, UDP-C-Gal cannot. Whereas UDP-C-Gal was designed to be "isosteric" with natural donor, the small differences in structure imposed by changing the epimeric oxygen atom to carbon appear to render the enzyme incapable of binding the analog in the active conformation and so preclude its use as a substrate mimic in GTA and GTB.

  10. California adults with elevated blood lead levels, 1987 through 1990.

    PubMed Central

    Maizlish, N; Rudolph, L

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Follow-up of California blood lead registry reports, 95% of which are of occupationally exposed adults, can guide interventions at specific high-risk work sites and measure the impact of targeted, industry-specific interventions. METHODS. A protocol was implemented to follow up the most severe case reports (> or = 2.90 mumol/L) and establish a statistical database for descriptive analysis. RESULTS. From 1987 through 1990, the California Department of Health Services received 17,951 reports for 4069 civilian, noninstitutionalized adults employed by at least 328 companies. Of 232 incident case subjects with severe lead toxicity (> or = 2.90 mumol/L), 182 were successfully traced and interviewed. Index case subjects were mostly male (95%) and disproportionately Hispanic (46%); 35% lived with children aged 7 or younger, and 10% had been hospitalized. Ninety-four percent involved overexposures at work sites that lacked medical removal (50%), ventilation (36%), appropriate respirators (62%), training (64%), clothing changes (45%), or showering (60%). CONCLUSIONS. Well-known risk factors for occupational lead poisoning clustered at the work sites of index case subjects. Despite standards of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, lead overexposure in California adults remains a significant public and occupational health concern. PMID:8438980

  11. [The medical interview motivated by the discovery of markers of viral hepatitis permits the identification, in blood donors, of behavior at risk for HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Guillard, A; Tirtaine, C; Ouzan, D; Follana, R

    1990-07-01

    From December 1988 to September 1989, 973 blood donors, deferred for anti-HBc reactivity, Ag-HBs positivity, elevated ALT, isolated or associated, but negative for anti-HIV, were interviewed in our blood center in the weeks after donation. Among these 973 donors, 53 (5.4%, 46 males, 7 females) were found at risk for HIV infection: intravenous drug abuse: 24 cases; heterosexuality with multiple partners: 17 cases; homosexuality: 8 cases; sexual relations with persons at risk: 4 cases. These 53 donors did not recognize their risk behaviour during the medical talk before donation. 25 out of these 53 donors were seen afterwards and one of them, homosexual man, seroconverted for anti-HIV seven months after the anti HIV negative but anti-HBc positive blood donation. We conclude that, in our experience, director surrogate viral hepatitis markers help to identify donors at risk for HIV infection, and, in one case, earlier in the course of demonstrated HIV infection than the enzyme immunoassays currently licensed.

  12. ABO-blood type incompatible living donor liver transplantation in a patient with Budd-Chiari Syndrome secondary to essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Amano, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Igarashi, Yuki; Ide, Kentarou; Oshita, Akihiko; Itamoto, Toshiyuki; Asahara, Toshimasa; Ohdan, Hideki

    2009-05-01

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) results from diverse causative factors. Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) including essential thrombocythemia (ET) account for a minority of BCS cases in Japan. ABO-blood-type incompatible living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) in adults has become an acceptable procedure owing to the development of new strategies for preventing antibody-mediated rejection. This report presents a rare case of BCS secondary to ET, which was cured by an ABO-incompatible (AB to A) LDLT. In this case, prostaglandin E(1) and gabexate mesilate were administered into portal vein and rituximab prophylaxis was applied. No splenectomy was performed as it is in most ABO-incompatible cases, since a flow cytometry showed no anti-B antibodies in the splenocytes collected by a wedge biopsy during the LDLT. The postoperative course was uneventful. Anti-coagulation therapy was initiated with aspirin and warfarin instead of hydroxyurea. This report describes an ABO-incompatible LDLT without a splenectomy for BCS secondary to ET.

  13. The effect of donor characteristics on survival after unrelated donor transplantation for hematologic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Kollman, Craig; Spellman, Stephen R.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Hassebroek, Anna; Anasetti, Claudio; Antin, Joseph H.; Champlin, Richard E.; Confer, Dennis L.; DiPersio, John F.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo; Hartzman, Robert J.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Hurley, Carolyn K.; Karanes, Chatchada; Maiers, Martin; Mueller, Carlheinz R.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Setterholm, Michelle; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Yu, Neng

    2016-01-01

    There are >24 million registered adult donors, and the numbers of unrelated donor transplantations are increasing. The optimal strategy for prioritizing among comparably HLA-matched potential donors has not been established. Therefore, the objective of the current analyses was to study the association between donor characteristics (age, sex, parity, cytomegalovirus serostatus, HLA match, and blood group ABO match) and survival after transplantation for hematologic malignancy. The association of donor characteristics with transplantation outcomes was examined using either logistic or Cox regression models, adjusting for patient disease and transplantation characteristics associated with outcomes in 2 independent datasets: 1988 to 2006 (N = 6349; training cohort) and 2007 to 2011 (N = 4690; validation cohort). All donor-recipient pairs had allele-level HLA typing at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1, which is the current standard for selecting donors. Adjusting for patient disease and transplantation characteristics, survival was better after transplantation of grafts from young donors (aged 18-32 years) who were HLA matched to recipients (P < .001). These findings were validated for transplantations that occurred between 2007 and 2011. For every 10-year increment in donor age, there is a 5.5% increase in the hazard ratio for overall mortality. Increasing HLA disparity was also associated with worsening survival. Donor age and donor-recipient HLA match are important when selecting adult unrelated donors. Other donor characteristics such as sex, parity, and cytomegalovirus serostatus were not associated with survival. The effect of ABO matching on survival is modest and must be studied further before definitive recommendations can be offered. PMID:26527675

  14. High altitude hypoxia and blood pressure dysregulation in adult chickens.

    PubMed

    Herrera, E A; Salinas, C E; Blanco, C E; Villena, M; Giussani, D A

    2013-02-01

    Although it is accepted that impaired placental perfusion in complicated pregnancy can slow fetal growth and programme an increased risk of cardiovascular dysfunction at adulthood, the relative contribution of reductions in fetal nutrition and in fetal oxygenation as the triggering stimulus remains unclear. By combining high altitude (HA) with the chick embryo model, we have previously isolated the direct effects of HA hypoxia on embryonic growth and cardiovascular development before hatching. This study isolated the effects of developmental hypoxia on cardiovascular function measured in vivo in conscious adult male and female chickens. Chick embryos were incubated, hatched and raised at sea level (SL, nine males and nine females) or incubated, hatched and raised at HA (seven males and seven females). At 6 months of age, vascular catheters were inserted under general anaesthesia. Five days later, basal blood gas status, basal cardiovascular function and cardiac baroreflex responses were investigated. HA chickens had significantly lower basal arterial PO2 and haemoglobin saturation, and significantly higher haematocrit than SL chickens, independent of the sex of the animal. HA chickens had significantly lower arterial blood pressure than SL chickens, independent of the sex of the animal. Although the gain of the arterial baroreflex was decreased in HA relative to SL male chickens, it was increased in HA relative to SL female chickens. We show that development at HA lowers basal arterial blood pressure and alters baroreflex sensitivity in a sex-dependent manner at adulthood.

  15. Pre-transplant prognostic factors of long-term survival after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with matched related/unrelated donors

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Sophie; Porcher, Raphaël; Xhaard, Alienor; Robin, Marie; Masson, Emeline; Larghero, Jerome; Ribaud, Patricia; Dhedin, Nathalie; Abbes, Sarah; Sicre, Flore; Socié, Gérard; de Latour, Regis Peffault

    2014-01-01

    Mobilized peripheral blood has become the predominant stem cell source for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. In this retrospective single center study of 442 patients with hematologic malignancies, we analyzed prognostic factors for long-term survival after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. To account for disease/status heterogeneity, patients were risk-stratified according to the Disease Risk Index. Five-year overall survival was similar after transplants with matched related and unrelated donors (45% and 46%, respectively; P=0.49). Because donor age ≥60 years impacted outcome during model building, we further considered 3 groups of donors: matched unrelated (aged <60 years by definition), matched related aged <60 years and matched related aged ≥60 years. In multivariate analysis, the donor type/age group and the graft CD34+ and CD3+ cell doses impacted long-term survival. Compared with matched unrelated donor transplant, transplant from matched related donor <60 years resulted in similar long-term survival (P=0.67) while transplant from matched related donor ≥60 years was associated with higher risks for late mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 4.41; P=0.006) and treatment failure (HR: 6.33; P=0.009). Lower mortality risks were observed after transplant with CD34+ cell dose more than 4.5×106/kg (HR: 0.56; P=0.002) and CD3+ cell dose more than 3×108/kg (HR: 0.61; P=0.01). The Disease Risk Index failed to predict survival. We built an “adapted Disease Risk Index” by modifying risks for myeloproliferative neoplasms and multiple myeloma that improved stratification ability for progression-free survival (P=0.04) but not for overall survival (P=0.82). PMID:24241489

  16. Pre-transplant prognostic factors of long-term survival after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with matched related/unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Servais, Sophie; Porcher, Raphaël; Xhaard, Alienor; Robin, Marie; Masson, Emeline; Larghero, Jerome; Ribaud, Patricia; Dhedin, Nathalie; Abbes, Sarah; Sicre, Flore; Socié, Gérard; Peffault de Latour, Regis

    2014-03-01

    Mobilized peripheral blood has become the predominant stem cell source for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. In this retrospective single center study of 442 patients with hematologic malignancies, we analyzed prognostic factors for long-term survival after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. To account for disease/status heterogeneity, patients were risk-stratified according to the Disease Risk Index. Five-year overall survival was similar after transplants with matched related and unrelated donors (45% and 46%, respectively; P=0.49). Because donor age ≥60 years impacted outcome during model building, we further considered 3 groups of donors: matched unrelated (aged <60 years by definition), matched related aged <60 years and matched related aged ≥60 years. In multivariate analysis, the donor type/age group and the graft CD34(+) and CD3(+) cell doses impacted long-term survival. Compared with matched unrelated donor transplant, transplant from matched related donor <60 years resulted in similar long-term survival (P=0.67) while transplant from matched related donor ≥60 years was associated with higher risks for late mortality (hazard ratio (HR) 4.41; P=0.006) and treatment failure (HR: 6.33; P=0.009). Lower mortality risks were observed after transplant with CD34(+) cell dose more than 4.5×10(6)/kg (HR: 0.56; P=0.002) and CD3(+) cell dose more than 3×10(8)/kg (HR: 0.61; P=0.01). The Disease Risk Index failed to predict survival. We built an "adapted Disease Risk Index" by modifying risks for myeloproliferative neoplasms and multiple myeloma that improved stratification ability for progression-free survival (P=0.04) but not for overall survival (P=0.82).

  17. Guidelines for potential multiple organ donors (adult). Part III: organ-specific recommendations.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; Caldeira Filho, Milton; Vieira, Kalinca Daberkow; Zaclikevis, Viviane Renata; Bartz, Miriam Cristine Machado; Wanzuita, Raquel; Réa-Neto, Alvaro; Teixeira, Cassiano; Franke, Cristiano; Machado, Fernando Osni; Andrade, Joel de; Matos, Jorge Dias de; Gerent, Karine Becker; Fiorelli, Alfredo; Gonçalves, Anderson Ricardo Roman; Ferraz Neto, Ben-Hur; Dias, Fernando Suparregui; Carvalho, Frederico Bruzzi de; Costa, Gerson; Camargo, José Jesus; Teles, José Mário Meira; Maia, Marcelo; Nogara, Marcelo; Coelho, Maria Emília; Mazzali, Marilda; Youssef, Nazah Cherif Mohamad; Duarte, Péricles; Souza, Rafael Lisboa de; Fernandes, Rogério; Camargo, Spencer; Garcia, Valter Duro

    2011-12-01

    Brain death (BD) alters the pathophysiology of patients and may damage the kidneys, the lungs, the heart and the liver. To obtain better quality transplant organs, intensive care physicians in charge of the maintenance of deceased donors should attentively monitor these organs. Careful hemodynamic, ventilatory and bronchial clearance management minimizes the loss of kidneys and lungs. The evaluation of cardiac function and morphology supports the transplant viability assessment of the heart. The monitoring of liver function, the management of the patient's metabolic status and the evaluation of viral serology are fundamental for organ selection by the transplant teams and for the care of the transplant recipient.

  18. Telomere Length Is Not Related to Established Cardiovascular Risk Factors but Does Correlate with Red and White Blood Cell Counts in a German Blood Donor Population

    PubMed Central

    Kelsch, Reinhard; Jäger, Kathrin; Brüggmann, Nina; van der Harst, Pim; Walter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is considered a marker of biological aging and has been associated with the presence of various coronary risk factors in patients. Much less is known about the relationships between TL and classic coronary risk factors in other populations. We measured TL in peripheral blood leukocytes of 343 middle-aged blood donors (mean age 40.2 ± 12.4 years; 201 men, 142 women) using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Median TL was 0.86 (range: 0.48–1.85) relative TL units. In linear regression analyses with natural log-transformed T to S ratio as the dependent variable, there was a significant association with age (per year: beta = -0.007, p<0.001) and sex (males vs. females: beta = 0.075, p = 0.007) with longer telomeres in men. After adjusting for these two variables, we observed no association of TL with classic coronary risk factors including cholesterol (p = 0.36), triglyceride (p = 0.09), HDL-cholesterol (p = 0.26), LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.36), smoking (p = 0.97), and personal (p = 0.46) or family history (p = 0.63) of cardiovascular disease. However, we did find a significant positive association with white (p = 0.011) and red blood cell count (p = 0.031), hemoglobin (p = 0.014) and hematocrit (p = 0.013); we also found a borderline positive association with thrombocytes (p = 0.074). Positive associations remained significant for hemoglobin (p = 0.017), hematocrit (p = 0.023), and leukocytes (p = 0.009) in a subgroup with no reported vascular disease; associations were of borderline significance for erythrocytes (p = 0.053) and thrombocytes (p = 0.088) in this subgroup. The data do not support the concept that classic coronary risk factors contribute to telomere attrition in a blood donor population. However, telomere attrition may be a marker for reduced proliferation reserve in hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:26445269

  19. Increased prevalence of human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8) genome among blood donors from North-Western Argentina.

    PubMed

    Hulaniuk, María Laura; Torres, Oscar; Bartoli, Sonia; Fortuny, Lisandro; Burgos Pratx, Leandro; Nuñez, Félix; Salamone, Horacio; Corach, Daniel; Trinks, Julieta; Caputo, Mariela

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of HHV-8 infection varies widely in South American populations, displaying geographical variations in its distribution. The heterogeneous genetic contributions provided by the transatlantic parental populations that modified the Native American genomes may explain this epidemiological observation. Aiming to determine the prevalence of HHV-8 genome among healthy South American blood donors and its potential association with genetic ancestry, 772 individuals were screened by a highly sensitive PCR protocol and ancestry was assessed in 414 samples. HHV-8 DNA was significantly more prevalent among North-western Argentines than among those from the metropolitan region (P = 0.001) and Bolivians (P = 0.0008), but no differences were found when compared with Peruvians and Paraguayans. Although significant differences were observed in the ancestry components of the studied populations, no association was found in the genetic admixture between HHV-8 [+] and HHV-8 [-] samples from the same place. These results support the hypothesis of the existence of geographical factors related to HHV-8 prevalence which could be explained by the presence of specific risk factors, cultural characteristics or behaviors, probably related to contaminated saliva and/or sexual transmission. The presence of HHV-8 in South American blood units available for transfusion and an increased risk of infection in some provinces of North-western Argentina represent a hazard for immunosuppressed recipients. J. Med. Virol. 89:518-527, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. HBV/HCV co-infection is associated with a high level of HCV spontaneous clearance among drug users and blood donors in China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, H; Rong, X; Wang, M; Xu, R; Huang, K; Liao, Q; Huang, J; Chen, J; Li, C; Tang, X; Shan, Z; Zhang, M; Nelson, K; Fu, Y

    2016-12-12

    Understanding the biology of spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection could lead to improved strategies to prevent the sequelae associated with chronic HCV infection. Chronic infections with hepatitis virus are very common in China, but the factors associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV have not been adequately studied. We evaluated the spontaneous clearance of HCV among 1918 drug users and 1526 HCV-seropositive blood donors in Guangzhou, China. Among participants who were co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 41.38% of drug users and 39.47% of blood donors had cleared their HCV infection without antiviral therapy compared to 9.41% of drug users and 16.73% of blood donors who were mono-infected with a single virus (P<.01). The proportion of subjects who had cleared their HCV infection was significantly greater in the co-infected subjects whose serum HBV DNA was greater than 2000IU/mL than those with lower levels. A multiple logistic regression analysis found female gender, IL28B rs8099917 TT genotype, HBV co-infection and blood donors (vs drug users) associated with increased spontaneous clearance of HCV infection. Although acute HCV infections are common in China, the incidence of chronic HCV may be reduced among the high prevalence of chronic HBV and IL28B genotypes associated with spontaneous clearance of HCV in Chinese populations.

  1. Serologic Surveillance for West Nile Virus and Other Flaviviruses in Febrile Patients, Encephalitic Patients, and Asymptomatic Blood Donors in Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, María de Lourdes Garza; Rodríguez Rodriguez, Diana R.; Blitvich, Bradley J.; López, Miguel Á. Reyes; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Jimenez, Javier Ramos; Farfán-Ale, José A.; Tamez, Rogelio Cazares; Longoria, César Martinez; Aguilar, Maria I. Tavitas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A clinical and serological investigation was performed to determine the presence of West Nile virus (WNV) among febrile and encephalitic patients in northern Mexico. In addition, asymptomatic blood donors were serologically assayed for WNV to determine the seroprevalence of WNV in the general population. The study cohort consisted of 1432 individuals (588 febrile patients, 44 encephalitic patients, and 800 asymptomatic blood donors). All subjects were negative for WNV IgM. Sixty subjects were reactive for dengue virus (DENV) IgM (16 blood donors and 44 febrile patients). A subset (n = 425) of individuals was also screened by ELISA for flavivirus IgG. The prevalence of flavivirus IgG in febrile patients, encephalitic patients, and blood donors ranged from 40% to 59%. A subset (n = 147) of sera reactive for flavivirus IgG was further tested by plaque reduction neutralization test. Six individuals with no history of travel during the preceding 12 months were seropositive for WNV. Another 65 individuals were seropositive for DENV1 and 24 were seropositive for DENV2. The high prevalence of dengue antibodies in northern Mexico appears to limit the incidence of WNV infection in this region. Article Summary Line Antibodies to WNV, DENV-1, and DENV-2 were identified in humans in northern Mexico. PMID:19492946

  2. Protective effects of maternal methyl donor supplementation on adult offspring of high fat diet-fed dams.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Fei; Yan, Xiaoshuang; Yu, Yuan; Zhu, Xiao; Ma, Ying; Yue, Zhen; Ou, Hailong; Yan, Zhonghai

    2016-08-01

    Obesity has become a global public health problem associated with metabolic dysfunction and chronic disorders. It has been shown that the risk of obesity and the DNA methylation profiles of the offspring can be affected by maternal nutrition, such as high-fat diet (HFD) consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate whether metabolic dysregulation and physiological abnormalities in offspring caused by maternal HFD can be alleviated by the treatment of methyl donors during pregnancy and lactation of dams. Female C57BL/6 mice were assigned to specific groups and given different nutrients (control diet, Control+Met, HFD and HFD+Met) throughout gestation and lactation. Offspring of each group were weaned onto a control diet at 3 weeks of age. Physiological (weight gain and adipose composition) and metabolic (plasma biochemical analyses) outcomes were assessed in male and female adult offspring. Expression and DNA methylation profiles of obesogenic-related genes including PPAR γ, fatty acid synthase, leptin and adiponectin were also detected in visceral fat of offspring. The results showed that dietary supplementation with methyl donors can prevent the adverse effects of maternal HFD on offspring. Changes in the expression and DNA methylation of obesogenic-related genes indicated that epigenetic regulation may contribute to the effects of maternal dietary factors on offspring outcomes.

  3. Mechanisms of immunologic unresponsiveness induced by ultraviolet-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusions and peritransplant cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Chabot, J.; Pepino, P.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1988-09-01

    Recipient pretreatment with UV-B irradiated donor-specific blood transfusions (UV-DST) combined with peritransplant cyclosporine on days 0, +1, and +2 leads to permanent cardiac allograft survival in the ACI-to-Lewis rat strain combination. This study investigates the mechanisms of immunologic unresponsiveness induced by UV-DST and CsA by examining several in vitro and in vivo parameters in long-term cardiac allograft recipients. The results of the in vitro studies demonstrate that thoracic duct lymphocytes (TDL) of treated and allografted Lewis rats respond less in a mixed lymphocyte reaction to donor splenic lymphocytes (SpL) by 69%, 75%, and 73% (P less than 0.001) at 30, 50, and 100 days after transplantation, respectively, compared with controls, while the response to a third-party (W/F) SpL is unimpaired. In coculture experiments, the TDL from treated recipients specifically suppressed the response of unmodified Lewis TDL to ACI SpL by 59% and 40% (P less than 0.01) at 30 and 50 days after transplantation, respectively, while responses to W/F SpL were suppressed by only 3-6%. The sera obtained from ungrafted rats transfused with UV-DST suppressed the MLR between unmodified Lewis TDL and ACI SpL by 31% (P less than 0.05) while the sera from UV-DST and CsA-treated and allografted rats specifically suppressed the MLR by 75%, 80% (P less than 0.001) and 37% (P less than 0.01) at 10, 30, and 50 days after transplantation, respectively. In vivo adoptive transfer of 10(4) donor-type dendritic cells (DC) into recipients of beating cardiac allografts at 40 or 60 days after transplantation led to rapid and acute allograft rejection, while the adoptive transfer of 10(8) unseparated SpL obtained at 50 days after transplantation from treated Lewis recipients to syngeneic naive hosts led to a modest but significant prolongation of ACI test cardiac allografts.

  4. Control of Blood Vessel Identity: From Embryo to Adult

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Arteries and veins have been historically defined by the direction of blood flow and oxygen tension within the vessel, in addition to their functional, hemodynamic, and anatomical differences. It is now known that the molecular identity of these vessels is genetically predetermined, with specific molecular pathways activated during the development of arteries and veins. Eph-B4 is a determinant of venous differentiation and Ephrin-B2 is a determinant of arterial differentiation. Placement of a vein into the higher pressure and flow of the arterial circulation results in adaptation of the vein to the arterial environment. There is selective loss of Eph-B4 expression without induction of Ephrin-B2 expression during vein graft adaptation. These findings suggest that loss of venous identity is the crucial mechanism in vein graft adaptation and that developmentally critical determinants of vessel identity are plastic during adult life. PMID:23555335

  5. Systematic donor blood qualification by flow cytometry would have been able to avoid CLL-type MBL transmission after unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, Christophe; Garnache-Ottou, Francine; Collonge-Rame, Marie Agnès; Larosa, Fabrice; Blanc, Michel; Behar, Catherine; Giannoli, Catherine; Garnier, Frédérico; Tiberghien, Pierre; Deconinck, Eric; Rohrlich, Pierre Simon

    2012-03-01

    The current screening for eligibility of unrelated volunteer marrow donors comprises a complete clinical check-up, a blood CBC and serum protein immunoelectrophoresis. This allows to eliminate acute leukemias, myeloproliferative and myelodysplastic disorders, myelomas and MGUS. To date, the risk of transmission of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) disease is only evaluated by the clinical evaluation and CBC. We report here the case of a CLL-type MBL disease occurring in a 12-year-old boy after unrelated BMT. Deep biological investigations, as Immunophenotyping, cytogenetic and molecular biology allow us to determine the donor origin of the CLL clone. In 2010, 14.2% donor (105/737) for unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were over 45y. It is currently estimated (USA) that 1 in 210 men and women will be diagnosed with CLL during their lifetime. Given the long asymptomatic phase of CLL, this raises the case for a detection strategy analog to that used for MGUS and myeloma through serum protein electrophoresis. This case-report, to our knowledge, of a CLL-type MBL unrelated donor-to-recipient transmission through BMT raises ethical and practical questions, such as the proper information about disease transmission risk. The cost-effectiveness of a systematic peripheral blood Immunophenotyping in donors elder than 40y at time of stem cell donation should be evaluated.

  6. Blood Pressure Response to Submaximal Exercise Test in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Szmigielska, Katarzyna; Leszczynska, Joanna; Jegier, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The assessment of blood pressure (BP) response during exercise test is an important diagnostic instrument in cardiovascular system evaluation. The study aim was to determine normal values of BP response to submaximal, multistage exercise test in healthy adults with regard to their age, gender, and workload. Materials and Methods. The study was conducted in randomly selected normotensive subjects (n = 1015), 512 females and 498 males, aged 18–64 years (mean age 42.1 ± 12.7 years) divided into five age groups. All subjects were clinically healthy with no chronic diseases diagnosed. Exercise stress tests were performed using Monark bicycle ergometer until a minimum of 85% of physical capacity was reached. BP was measured at rest and at peak of each exercise test stage. Results. The relations between BP, age, and workload during exercise test were determined by linear regression analysis and can be illustrated by the equations: systolic BP (mmHg) = 0.346 × load (W) + 135.76 for males and systolic BP (mmHg) = 0.103 × load (W) + 155.72 for females. Conclusions. Systolic BP increases significantly and proportionally to workload increase during exercise test in healthy adults. The relation can be described by linear equation which can be useful in diagnostics of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27703976

  7. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(1;19)(q23;p13.3); E2A-PBX1 (TCF3-PBX1); B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; DS Stage II Plasma Cell Myeloma; DS Stage III Plasma Cell Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  8. Racial differences in seroprevalence of HAV and HEV in blood donors in the Western Cape, South Africa: a clue to the predominant HEV genotype?

    PubMed

    Lopes, T; Cable, R; Pistorius, C; Maponga, T; Ijaz, S; Preiser, W; Tedder, R; Andersson, M I

    2017-03-30

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a major cause of acute hepatitis worldwide. This infection causes major water-borne outbreaks in low- and middle-income countries, whilst in industrialised countries this infection is zoonotic. These differences in epidemiology are related to different HEV genotypes. HEV genotype 3 is a zoonotic infection, whilst genotype 2 causes large outbreaks. This study determined the seroprevalence of HEV in blood donors from the Western Cape. Anti-hepatitis A virus (anti-HAV) antibody was detected in 184/300 (61%) donors. Antibody to HEV (anti-HEV) was detected in 78 of 300 donors (26%). It was highest in mixed race donors (62/100), followed by white donors (23/100) and lowest in black donors (19/100) P = 0.019. Since it is thought that genotypes 1 and 2 predominate both viruses would be acquired by the oro-faecal route, it is surprising that HEV seroprevalence does not mirror that of HAV. We postulate that this may reflect differences in socio-economic status and consumption of dietary meat. So the marked divergence between HEV and HAV seroprevalence may be the result of different routes of transmission. Further data are needed to explore the risk factors associated with HEV infection.

  9. Simplified Assay for Epigenetic Age Estimation in Whole Blood of Adults

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Bralo, Laura; Lopez-Golan, Yolanda; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Biological age is not always concordant with chronological age and the departures are of interest for understanding how diseases and environmental insults affect tissue function, organismal health, and life expectancy. The best-known biological age biomarker is telomere length, but there are more accurate biomarkers as the recently developed based in epigenetic, transcriptomic, or biochemical changes. The most accurate are the epigenetic biomarkers based on specific changes in DNA methylation referred as DNA methylation age measures (DmAM). Here, we have developed and validated a new DmAM that addresses some limitations of the previously available. The new DmAM includes the study in whole blood (WB) of 8 CpG sites selected as the most informative on a training set of 390 healthy subjects. The 8 CpG DmAM showed better accuracy than other DmAM based in few CpG in an independent validation set of 335 subjects. Results were not significantly influenced by sex, smoking, or variation in blood cell subpopulations. In addition, the new 8 CpG DmAM was amenable to study in a single multiplex reaction done with methylation-sensitive single-nucleotide primer extension (MS-SNuPE), a methodology based on commercially available reagents and run in capillary electrophoresis sequencers. In this way, the high cost of DNA methylation microarrays or of a pyrosequencer, which are needed for alternative DmAM, was avoided. Performance of the DmAM with MS-SNuPE was assessed in a set of 557 donors, showing high call rate (>97%), low CV (<3.3%) and high accuracy (Mean Absolute Deviation = 6.07 years). Therefore, the 8 CpG DmAM is a feasible and accurate tool for assessing the epigenetic component of biological age in blood of adults. PMID:27471517

  10. In vitro Biphasic Effect of Honey Bee Venom on Basophils from Screened Healthy Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Giovanna; Ortolani, Riccardo; Vella, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Apis mellifera L. bee venom is the most studied hymenoptera allergen, but many aspects of its action on human basophils remain unclear. Allergologists seek evidence of the effectiveness of bee venom immunotherapy as this approach is the chosen treatment for systemic allergic reactions. The effect of bee venom on human basophils in vitro has not been studied in detail for many reasons, including the paucity of basophils in peripheral blood, inter-individual basophil response variability, and the reliability and predictability of basophil activation tests. We conducted a brief preliminary survey of the effect of Apis bee venom on healthy asymptomatic (non-allergic) subjects. A dose of an aqueous commercial extract of Apis bee venom as high as 10 µg/mL activated resting basophils (CD63=+80-90%, CD203c=+30%), while it inhibited the expression of CD63 (-50%) following basophil stimulation by the soluble agonists formyl-Met-Leu-Phe or anti-IgE. The activation of resting basophils appeared to be dose-related. Only when basophils were activated with an IgE-mediated agonist, did bee venom extract exhibit a possible priming mechanism at the lowest doses used only via CD63, while it was ineffective via CD203c. Autocrine interleukin-3 may play a role in the observed biphasic behavior. PMID:21217927

  11. Effectiveness of three types of rapid tests for the detection of hepatitis C virus antibodies among blood donors in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Tahish, Ghamdan; El-Barrawy, Mohamed A; Hashish, Mona H; Heddaya, Zeinab

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C is one of the most important diseases transmitted through screened improperly blood donation. The detection of HCV antibodies is performed by enzyme immunoassays (EIA) or supplementary assays (immunoblots). However, these methods are not well-suited to developing countries due to their high cost and technicality. The effectiveness of three different rapid tests for the detection of anti-HCV antibodies was evaluated compared to third-generation ELISA among blood donors attending the blood bank of Medical Research Institute in Alexandria, Egypt. The results were compared subsequently to the results of HCV RNA obtained by qualitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The three types of rapid tests showed a specificity of 100% and sensitivities of 96-98% compared to ELISA. Compared to RT-PCR, ELISA and all three types of rapid tests showed an almost equal specificity (77-78.5%). ELISA showed 100% sensitivity while all three types of rapid tests showed equal sensitivities of 97% compared to RT-PCR. The rapid tests showed good performance for detecting anti-HCV antibodies in the sera of blood donors compared to ELISA. Therefore, the present study recommends the use of the tested rapid tests to screen for anti-HCV among blood donors in resource-limited countries as an alternative for conventional ELISA.

  12. Data on how several physiological parameters of stored red blood cells are similar in glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient and sufficient donors.

    PubMed

    Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Foudoulaki-Paparizos, Leontini E; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Wither, Matthew J; Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Papassideri, Issidora S; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Antonelou, Marianna H

    2016-09-01

    This article contains data on the variation in several physiological parameters of red blood cells (RBCs) donated by eligible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient donors during storage in standard blood bank conditions compared to control, G6PD sufficient (G6PD(+)) cells. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell fragility and membrane exovesiculation were measured in RBCs throughout the storage period, with or without stimulation by oxidants, supplementation of N-acetylcysteine and energy depletion, following incubation of stored cells for 24 h at 37 °C. Apart from cell characteristics, the total or uric acid-dependent antioxidant capacity of the supernatant in addition to extracellular potassium concentration was determined in RBC units. Finally, procoagulant activity and protein carbonylation levels were measured in the microparticles population. Further information can be found in "Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient subjects may be better "storers" than donors of red blood cells" [1].

  13. HLA class I (A, B) and II (DR, DQ) gene and haplotype frequencies in blood donors from Wales.

    PubMed

    Darke, C; Guttridge, M G; Thompson, J; McNamara, S; Street, J; Thomas, M

    1998-01-01

    Accurate estimates of HLA-A, B, DR and DQ phenotype, gene and haplotype frequencies (HF) in the normal population are of importance in, for example, disease susceptibility studies, platelet transfusion support and transplantation. HLA population genetics studies have been performed on numerous groups, however, no major studies have been carried out on the population of Wales. As part of the validation process for our routine HLA-A and B typing by PCR using sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) we examined 1,798 normal, unrelated Caucasoid blood donors living in Wales and recruited onto the Welsh Bone Marrow Donor Registry (WBMDR). Typing was performed by serology (HLA-A, B) and PCR-SSP at low resolution (HLA-A, B, DR, DQ) resulting in a particularly rigorous level of HLA specificity assignment. Four discrepancies were found between the HLA-A and B serological and PCR-SSP specificity assignments: (1) two instances of HLA-A2 by serology were undetected by PCR-SSP and were a new HLA-A2 allele - A*0224; (2) one example of HLA-B*15 by PCR-SSP failed to react by serology, and remained undetectable by serology in subsequent samples, and (3) one example of HLA-B45 by serology was identified as HLA-B*5002 by PCR-SSP. Hardy-Weinberg and homozygosity analysis showed that the goodness-of-fit was excellent (p > 0.05), for both phenotype distribution and the number of homozygotes identified, for all four loci. The phenotype and gene frequencies for the 18 HLA-A, 34 -B, 15 -DR and 8 -DQ specificities identified and two- and three-locus HF, linkage disequilibrium and related values for HLA-A/B, B/DR, DR/DQ and HLA-A/B/DR and B/DR/DQ were essentially typical of a northern European population. HLA-A2, B44, DR4 and DQ2 were the highest frequency phenotypes and HLA-A2403, A34, A74, B42, B75, B2708, B48, B67 and B703 occurred once only. There were no examples of: A36, A43, A69, A80, B46, B54, B59, B73, B76, B77, B7801, B8101 or DR18 specificities. DR17, DQ2 and A1, B8, DR17 were the

  14. Development and Application of a High-Throughput Micro-Neutralization Assay - Lack of XMRV/MLV Detection in Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Steffen, Imke; Montalvo, Leilani; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Zemel, Reeve; Switzer, William M.; Tang, Shaohua; Jia, Hongwei; Heneine, Walid; Winkelman, Valerie; Tailor, Chetankumar S.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Simmons, Graham

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) and other related MLVs have been described with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and certain types of prostate cancer. In addition, prevalence rates as high as 7% have been reported in blood donors, raising the risk of transfusion-related transmission. Several laboratories have utilized micro-neutralization assays as a surrogate marker for detection of anti-MLV serological responses – with up to 25% of prostate cancer patients reported to harbor neutralizing antibody responses. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS We developed a high-throughput micro-neutralization assay for research studies on blood donors using retroviral vectors pseudotyped with XMRV-specific envelopes. Infection with these pseudotypes was neutralized by sera from both macaques and mice challenged with XMRV, but not pre-immune serum. 354 plasma samples from blood donors in the Reno/Tahoe area were screened for neutralization. RESULTS 6.5% of donor samples gave moderate neutralization of XMRV, but not control pseudotypes. However, further testing by Western blot revealed no evidence of antibodies against MLVs in any of these samples. Furthermore, no evidence of infectious virus or viral nucleic acid was observed. CONCLUSION A micro-neutralization assay was developed for detection of XMRV, and can be applied in a high-throughput format for large scale studies. Although a proportion of blood donors demonstrated the ability to block XMRV envelope-mediated infection, we found no evidence that this inhibition was mediated by specific antibodies elicited by exposure to XMRV/MLV. It is likely that this moderate neutralization is mediated through another, non-specific mechanism. PMID:22239212

  15. Substantial improvements in performance indicators achieved in a peripheral blood mononuclear cell cryopreservation quality assurance program using single donor samples.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Wayne B; Pett, Sarah L; Sullivan, John S; Emery, Sean; Cooper, David A; Kelleher, Anthony D; Lloyd, Andrew; Lewin, Sharon R

    2007-01-01

    Storage of high-quality cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is often a requirement for multicenter clinical trials and requires a reproducibly high standard of practice. A quality assurance program (QAP) was established to assess an Australia-wide network of laboratories in the provision of high-quality PBMC (determined by yield, viability, and function), using blood taken from single donors (human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and HIV negative) and shipped to each site for preparation and cryopreservation of PBMC. The aim of the QAP was to provide laboratory accreditation for participation in clinical trials and cohort studies which require preparation and cryopreservation of PBMC and to assist all laboratories to prepare PBMC with a viability of >80% and yield of >50% following thawing. Many laboratories failed to reach this standard on the initial QAP round. Interventions to improve performance included telephone interviews with the staff at each laboratory, two annual wet workshops, and direct access to a senior scientist to discuss performance following each QAP round. Performance improved substantially in the majority of sites that initially failed the QAP (P = 0.002 and P = 0.001 for viability and yield, respectively). In a minority of laboratories, there was no improvement (n = 2), while a high standard was retained at the laboratories that commenced with adequate performance (n = 3). These findings demonstrate that simple interventions and monitoring of PBMC preparation and cryopreservation from multiple laboratories can significantly improve performance and contribute to maintenance of a network of laboratories accredited for quality PBMC fractionation and cryopreservation.

  16. Analysis of HCV genotypes from blood donors shows three new HCV type 6 subgroups exist in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Shinji, Toshiyuki; Kyaw, Yi Yi; Gokan, Katsunori; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Ochi, Koji; Kusano, Nobuchika; Mizushima, Takaaki; Fujioka, Shin-ichi; Shiraha, Hidenori; Lwin, Aye Aye; Shiratori, Yasushi; Mizokami, Masashi; Khin, Myo; Miyahara, Masayuki; Okada, Shigeru; Koide, Norio

    2004-06-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in Myanmar in comparison with the rest of Southeast Asia is not well known. Serum samples were obtained from 201 HCV antibody-positive volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Of these, the antibody titers of 101 samples were checked by serial dilution using HCV antibody PA test II and Terasaki microplate as a low-cost method. To compare antibody titers by this method and RNA identification, we also checked HCV-RNA using the Amplicor 2.0 test. Most high-titer groups were positive for HCV-RNA. Of the 201 samples, 110 were successfully polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified. Among them, 35 (31.8%) were of genotype 1, 52 (47.3%) were of genotype 3, and 23 (20.9%) were of type 6 variants, and phylogenetic analysis of these type 6 variants revealed that 3 new type 6 subgroups exist in Myanmar. We named the subgroups M6-1, M6-2, and M6-3. M6-1 and M6-2 were relatively close to types 8 and 9, respectively. M6-3, though only found in one sample, was a brand-new subgroup. These subtypes were not seen in Vietnam, where type 6 group variants are widely spread. These findings may be useful for analyzing how and when these subgroups were formed.

  17. Reduced-intensity allogeneic transplant in patients older than 55 years: unrelated umbilical cord blood is safe and effective for patients without a matched related donor.

    PubMed

    Majhail, Navneet S; Brunstein, Claudio G; Tomblyn, Marcie; Thomas, Avis J; Miller, Jeffrey S; Arora, Mukta; Kaufman, Dan S; Burns, Linda J; Slungaard, Arne; McGlave, Philip B; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2008-03-01

    The lower morbidity and mortality of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have allowed allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in older patients. Unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been investigated as an alternative stem cell source to suitably HLA matched related (MRD) and adult volunteer unrelated donors. We hypothesized that RIC HCT using UCB would be safe and efficacious in older patients, and compared the treatment-related mortality (TRM) and overall survival (OS) of RIC HCT in patients older than 55 years using either MRD (n = 47) or, in patients with no 5 of 6 or 6 of 6 HLA compatible related donors, UCB (n = 43). RIC regimen consisted of total-body irradiation (TBI; 200 cGy) and either cyclophosphamide and fludarabine (n = 69), or busulfan and fludarabine (n = 16) or busulfan and cladribine (n = 5). The median age of MRD and UCB cohorts was 58 (range, 55-70) and 59 (range, 55-69) years, respectively. acute myelogenous leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) (50%) was the most common diagnosis. All MRD grafts were 6 of 6 HLA matched to the recipient. Among patients undergoing UCB HCT, 88% received 2 UCB units to optimize cell dose and 93% received 1-2 HLA mismatched grafts. The median follow-up for survivors was 27 (range: 12-61) months. The 3-year probabilities of progression-free survival (PFS; 30% versus 34%, P = .98) and OS (43% versus 34%, P = .57) were similar for recipients of MRD and UCB. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host (aGVHD) disease (42% versus 49%, P = .20) and TRM at 180-days (23% versus 28%, P = .36) were comparable. However, UCB recipients had a lower incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) at 1 year (40% versus 17%, P = .02). On multivariate analysis, graft type had no impact on TRM or survival, and the HCT comorbidity index score was the only factor independently predictive for these endpoints. Our study supports the use of HLA mismatched UCB as an alternative

  18. Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Transplant In Patients Older Than 55 Years: Unrelated Umbilical Cord Blood Is Safe And Effective For Patients Without A Matched Related Donor

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S; Brunstein, Claudio G; Tomblyn, Marcie; Thomas, Avis J; Miller, Jeffrey S; Arora, Mukta; Kaufman, Dan S; Burns, Linda J; Slungaard, Arne; McGlave, Philip B; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2009-01-01

    The lower morbidity and mortality of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens have allowed allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in older patients. Unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been investigated as an alternative stem cell source to suitably HLA matched related (MRD) and adult volunteer unrelated donors. We hypothesized that RIC HCT using UCB would be safe and efficacious in older patients and compared the transplant related mortality (TRM) and overall survival of RIC HCT in patients older than 55 years using either MRD (n=47) or, in patients with no 5/6 or 6/6 HLA compatible related donors, UCB (n=43). RIC regimen consisted of total-body irradiation (200 cGy) and either cyclophosphamide and fludarabine (n=69), or busulfan and fludarabine (n=16) or busulfan and cladribine (n=5). The median age of MRD and UCB cohorts was 58 (range, 55-70) and 59 (range, 55-69) years, respectively. AML/MDS (50%) was the most common diagnosis. All MRD grafts were 6 of 6 HLA matched to the recipient. Among patients undergoing UCB HCT, 88% received two UCB units to optimize cell dose and 93% received 1-2 HLA mismatched grafts. The median followup for survivors was 27 (range, 12-61) months. The 3-year probabilities of progression-free survival (30% vs. 34%, p=0.98) and overall survival (43% vs. 34%, p=0.57) were similar for recipients of MRD and UCB. The cumulative incidence of grade 2-4 acute graft-versus-host disease (42% vs. 49%, p=0.20) and TRM at 180-days (23% vs. 28%, p=0.36) were comparable. However, UCB recipients had a lower incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease at 1-year (40% vs. 17%, p=0.02). On multivariate analysis, graft type had no impact on TRM or survival and HCT comorbidity index score was the only factor independently predictive for these endpoints. Our study supports the use of HLA mismatched UCB as an alternative graft source for older patients who need a transplant but do not have a MRD. The use of RIC and UCB extends the

  19. [Development of acute myeloid leukemia from donor cells after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in a female patient with acute monoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Development of leukemia from donor cells is a rare complication of allogeneic blood stem cells (BSC). The paper describes a case of evolving acute myeloid leukemia of a graft in a patient with resistant acute monoblastic leukemia after related allogeneic peripheral BSC transplantation. The rarity of this complication, difficulties in providing evidence for the donor origin of a leukemic clone demonstrate a need for all-round careful dynamic assessment of the hematopoietic system after allogeneic transplantation, by applying the current cytogenetic (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and molecular (hypervariable genomic region amplification test using the polymerase chain reaction, hypervariable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), and short number of tandem repeats (STR)) techniques, which permits errors to be avoided in the assessment of a clinical situation and in the diagnosis of leukemia from donor cells. There is no developed policy for treatment of acute graft-versus-leukemia.

  20. Trends in blood pressure among adults with hypertension: United States, 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Sug; Gu, Qiuping; Nwankwo, Tatiana; Wright, Jacqueline D; Hong, Yuling; Burt, Vicki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe trends in the awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension; mean blood pressure; and the classification of blood pressure among US adults 2003 to 2012. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003 to 2012, a total of 9255 adult participants aged ≥18 years were identified as having hypertension, defined as measured blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg or taking prescription medication for hypertension. Awareness and treatment among hypertensive adults were ascertained via an interviewer administered questionnaire. Controlled hypertension among hypertensive adults was defined as systolic blood pressure <140 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg. Blood pressure was categorized as optimal blood pressure, prehypertension, and stage I and stage II hypertension. Between 2003 and 2012, the percentage of adults with controlled hypertension increased (P-trend <0.01). Hypertensive adults with optimal blood pressure and with prehypertension increased from 13% to 19% and 27% to 33%, respectively (P-trend <0.01 for both groups). Among hypertensive adults who were taking antihypertensive medication, uncontrolled hypertension decreased from 38% to 30% (P-trend <0.01). Similarly, a decrease in mean systolic blood pressure was observed (P-trend <0.01); however, mean diastolic blood pressure remained unchanged. The trend in the control of blood pressure has improved among hypertensive adults resulting in a higher percentage with blood pressure at the optimal or prehypertension level and a lower percentage in stage I and stage II hypertension. Overall, mean systolic blood pressure decreased as did the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension among the treated hypertensive population.

  1. Risk factors associated with hepatitis B or C markers or elevated alanine aminotransferase level among blood donors on a tropical island: the Guadeloupe experience.

    PubMed

    Fest, T; Viel, J F; Agis, F; Coffe, C; Dupond, J L; Hervé, P

    1992-10-01

    Donated blood is currently screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels to prevent posttransfusion hepatitis. A prospective study of 2368 blood donors was carried out in Guadeloupe (French West Indies) with a view to determining the risk factors associated with serologic abnormalities. Blood donors included in the study had to complete a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed on the data thus obtained: 571 donations (24%) were positive for at least one of the four analyzed markers. The results were that 3.2 percent were positive for HBsAg, 22 percent for anti-HBc, and 0.8 percent for anti-HCV, and 1.4 percent had ALT > or = 45 IU per L. A good correlation was found between anti-HCV and elevated ALT. Transfusion history and two socioeconomic categories (working class, military personnel) were found to be risk factors. Other risk factors were lifelong residence in Guadeloupe (with risk increasing with the number of years), birthplace and current residence in the southern part of the island, and the existence of gastrointestinal discomfort unrelated to viral hepatitis (odds ratio = 2.98). The results of this study illustrate the difficulty of implementing a preventive policy against posttransfusion hepatitis in a tropical area. The unique epidemiologic situation of Guadeloupe as regards hepatitis B virus has led to more restrictive criteria for the acceptance of blood donors.

  2. Hepatitis B virus DNA in blood donors with anti-HBc as a possible indicator of active hepatitis B virus infection in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Montalvo, B M; Farfán-Ale, J A; Acosta-Viana, K Y; Puerto-Manzano, F I

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) may be present in serum even when negative for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). If routine screening of sera for anti-HBV core antigen (anti-HBc) is not done, low-level HBV viraemia may not be identified. A study was done on the presence of HBV DNA in serum samples from Mexican blood donors negative for HBsAg. Sera from 158 volunteer blood donors, negative for HBsAg and anti-HBs, but positive for anti-HBc, were analysed using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). HBV DNA was detected in sera from 13 (8.23%) of the 158. Specificity of the PCR-amplified products was corroborated using Southern blot. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis showed identical SSCP-banding patterns for all 13 PCR products, suggesting similar cDNA sequences. Occult HBV infection was observed in approximately 8% of anti-HBc only donors. The absence of HBsAg in the blood of apparently healthy individuals may not be sufficient to ensure lack of circulating HBV, and blood containing anti-HBc only may be infectious until proven otherwise.

  3. The watching-eyes phenomenon and blood donation: Does exposure to pictures of eyes increase blood donation by young adults?

    PubMed

    Sénémeaud, Cécile; Sanrey, Camille; Callé, Nathalie; Plainfossé, Candice; Belhaire, Alexandra; Georget, Patrice

    2016-11-14

    This study examined the effectiveness of exposure to a "watching-eyes image" in increasing blood donation rates among young people, a segment of the population that is particularly underrepresented among blood donors. Participants were 454 first-year university students, each of who was given a blood-donation flyer at the beginning of a lecture. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions depending on whether the flyer they received bore a picture of eyes (experimental condition) or a neutral picture (control condition). We recorded the numbers of participants who promised to give blood and who actually gave blood during the blood drive. Results show that the number of people who gave blood was significantly higher in the experimental condition than in the control condition. These findings provide the first evidence of the effectiveness of the watching-eyes strategy in encouraging young people to give blood. We discuss the processes underlying the "watching-eyes effect" with respect to blood donation.

  4. Atorvastatin Increases Exercise Leg Blood Flow in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Beth A.; Capizzi, Jeffrey A.; Augeri, Amanda L.; Grimaldi, Adam S.; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We sought to examine the effect of atorvastatin therapy on exercise leg blood flow in healthy middle-aged and older, men and women. BACKGROUND The vasodilatory response to exercise decreases in humans with aging and disease and this reduction may contribute to reduced exercise capacity. METHODS We used a double-blind, randomly assigned, placebo-controlled protocol to assess the effect of atorvastatin treatment on exercising leg hemodynamics. We measured femoral artery blood flow (FBF) using Doppler ultrasound and calculated femoral vascular conductance (FVC) from brachial mean arterial pressure (MAP) before and during single knee-extensor exercise in healthy adults (ages 40–71) before (PRE) and after (POST) 6 months of 80 mg atorvastatin (A: 14 men, 16 women) or placebo (P: 14 men, 22 women) treatment. FBF and FVC were normalized to exercise power output and estimated quadriceps muscle mass. RESULTS Atorvastatin reduced LDL cholesterol by approximately 50%, but not in the placebo group (p < 0.01). Atorvastatin also increased exercise FBF from 44.2 ± 19.0 to 51.4 ± 22.0 mL/min/W/kg muscle whereas FBF in the placebo group was unchanged (40.1 ± 16.0 vs 39.5 ± 16.1) (p <0.01). FVC also increased with atorvastatin from 0.5 ± 0.2 to. 0.6 ± 0.2 mL/min/mmHg/W/kg muscle, but not in the placebo subjects (P: 0.4 ± 0.2 vs 0.4 ± 0.2) ( p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS High-dose atorvastatin augments exercising leg hyperemia. Statins may mitigate reductions in the exercise vasodilatory response in humans that are associated with aging and disease. PMID:22018642

  5. The HBsAg Prevalence Among Blood Donors From Eastern Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Babanejad, Mehran; Izadi, Neda; Najafi, Farid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2016-01-01

    Context The world health organization (WHO) recommends that all blood donations should be screened for evidence of infections, such as hepatitis B. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in blood donors at the eastern Mediterranean region office (EMRO) of the WHO and middle eastern countries. Evidence Acquisition A meta-analysis was carried out based on the results of an electronic literature search of PubMed, Ovid, Scopus, and Google Scholar for articles published from January 1, 2000, to August 31, 2015. In accordance with a significant homogeneity test and a large value of I2, the random effects model was used to aggregate data from the studies and produce the pooled estimates using the “Metan” command. Results We included 66 eligible studies. The pooled prevalence of HBsAg in blood donors of both EMRO and middle eastern (E and M) countries was 2.03% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.79 – 2.26). In addition, the prevalence rates in the EMRO countries was 1.99% (95% CI: 1.84 – 2.14) and 1.62% in the Middle Eastern countries (95% CI: 1.36 – 1.88). The prevalence among blood donors with more than one study was 1.58% in Egypt, 0.58% in Iran, 0.67% in Iraq, 2.84% in Pakistan, 3.02% in Saudi Arabia, 1.68% in Turkey, and 5.05% in Yemen. Conclusions Based on the WHO classification of hepatitis B virus (HBV) prevalence, the prevalence of HBsAg in bl