Science.gov

Sample records for adult bovine aortic

  1. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  2. A bovine aortic arch in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the “bovine aortic arch”. Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown. PMID:24973853

  3. A bovine aortic arch in humans.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the "bovine aortic arch". Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown.

  4. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  5. Gonococcal ascending aortic aneurysm with penetrating ulcer and bovine arch.

    PubMed

    Oumeiri, Bachar El; Eynden, Frédéric Vanden; Stefanidis, Constantin; Antoine, Martine; Nooten, Guido Van

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with ascending aorta aneurysm and bovine aortic arch who initially presented with fever. A 65-year-old man with a 2-month history of intermittent fever was referred to our hospital and diagnosed as having a gonococcal ascending aorta aneurysm with penetrating ulcers. He was successfully treated by resection of the ascending aorta and ulcers, replacement of the aortic valve, and prolonged postoperative antibiotic therapy.

  6. Biomechanical characterization of ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant bicuspid aortic valve and bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Pham, T; Martin, C; Elefteriades, J; Sun, W

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown that patients harboring bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) or bovine aortic arch (BAA) are more likely than the general population to develop ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA). A thorough quantification of the AsAA tissue properties for these patient groups may offer insights into the underlying mechanisms of AsAA development. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate and compare the mechanical and microstructural properties of aortic tissues from AsAA patients with and without concomitant BAV or BAA. AsAA (n=20), BAV (n=20) and BAA (n=15) human tissues were obtained from patients who underwent elective AsAA surgery. Planar biaxial and uniaxial failure tests were used to characterize the mechanical and failure properties of the tissues, respectively. Histological analysis was performed to detect medial degenerative characteristics of aortic aneurysm. Individual layer thickness and composition were quantified for each patient group. The circumferential stress-strain response of the BAV samples was stiffer than both AsAA (p=0.473) and BAA (p=0.152) tissues at a low load. The BAV samples were nearly isotropic, while AsAA and BAA samples were anisotropic. The areal strain of BAV samples was significantly less than that of AsAA (p=0.041) and BAA (p=0.004) samples at a low load. The BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples in both mechanical and failure properties. On the microstructural level, all samples displayed moderate medial degeneration, characterized by elastin fragmentation, cell loss, mucoid accumulation and fibrosis. The ultimate tensile strength of BAV and BAA sampleswere also found to decrease with age. Overall, the BAV samples were stiffer than both AsAA and BAA samples, and the BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples. The BAV samples were thinnest, with less elastin than AsAA and BAA samples, which may be attributed to the loss of extensibility of these tissues at a low load. No apparent difference in failure mechanics among

  7. Aortic valve leaflet replacement with bovine pericardium to preserve native dynamic capabilities of the aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-02-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations.

  8. Aortic Valve Leaflet Replacement with Bovine Pericardium to Preserve Native Dynamic Capabilities of the Aortic Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-01-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations. PMID:24512414

  9. Aortic coarctation repair in the adult.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Abecasis, Miguel; Anjos, Rui; Marques, Marta; Koukoulis, Giovanna; Aguiar, Carlos; Neves, José Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Aortic coarctation can be repaired surgically or percutaneously. The decision should be made according to the anatomy and location of the coarctation, age of the patient, presence of other cardiac lesions, and other anatomic determinants (extensive collaterals or aortic calcification). This article reviews the different therapeutic options available, explaining the differences between children and adults, describing different approaches to the same disease, exemplified by three cases of nonclassic surgical approach and one percutaneous treatment.

  10. Spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection in a patient with bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Cock, Dries De; Meuris, Bart; Benett, Johan; Desmet, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Carotid artery dissections are commonly associated with trauma or various connective tissue disorders. Dissection of the cerebrovascular arteries can result in ischemic stroke and is a frequent stroke etiology in younger patients. Anatomical variants of aortic arch branching, such as the 'bovine' aortic arch, are assumed to have little or no physiological consequence. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time a case of spontaneous dissection of the common origin of the innominate and left common carotid artery in a bovine aortic arch, resulting in bilateral dissection of the carotid arteries.

  11. Susceptibility of irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.H.; Dong, Q.; Ts'ao, C.

    1988-11-01

    Using cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), the authors attempted to determine whether prior irradiation would alter the susceptibility of these cells to three known injurious stimuli and, if so, whether the alteration would be related to radiation dose. BAEC were irradiated with 0, 5, or 10 Gy of gamma rays and, on the third postirradiation day, exposed to fibrin, nicotine, or bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Release of prelabeled 51Cr, representing cell lysis, cell detachment, or a combination of the two, was determined. Significant differences between irradiated and control cells were determined by using paired Student's t-tests. Irradiation did not appear to have altered the sensitivity of BAEC to fibrin-induced injury. Cells irradiated with 10 Gy of gamma rays, but generally not those irradiated with half this dose, showed a heightened susceptibility to nicotine. Contrary to the nicotine results, irradiated cells showed less cell detachment and lysis after exposure to LPS. These results suggest that the susceptibility of irradiated BAEC to harmful stimuli depends largely on the nature of the stimulus as well as the radiation dose.

  12. Hypertrophy of cultured bovine aortic endothelium following irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, E.M.; Vinter, D.W.; Goldberg, I.D.

    1989-03-01

    The vascular endothelium is a vital multifunctional tissue which covers the entire luminal surface of the circulatory system. Loss of continuity of the endothelial lining normally results in cell migration and proliferation to make up for cell loss and to ensure that exposure of the thrombogenic subendothelium to platelets and clotting factors is minimized. We showed that ionizing radiation (400-3000 cGy) causes dose-dependent cell loss from confluent monolayer cultures of bovine aortic endothelium, which cannot immediately be compensated by cell proliferation. Within 24 h, the remaining attached cells undergo substantial somatic hypertrophy (evidenced by increased protein content, cell volume, and attachment area) but remain diploid. If cell loss is not excessive, monolayer continuity is restored within several days. Although reduced protein degradation may contribute, most of the protein accumulation is due to synthesis of new protein. Unlike endothelium, irradiation of smooth muscle cultures causes neither cell loss nor increased protein synthesis. Hypertrophy of irradiated endothelial cells appears to be a consequence of a proliferative stimulus (cell loss) in a population of cells which is unable to divide. It can be modulated by replating irradiated cells at different densities. We suggest that endothelial hypertrophy is an early vascular homeostatic response before clonal proliferation of surviving cells or repopulation by cells from outside of the irradiated field can compensate for cell loss.

  13. Ethanolamine metabolism in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, B.A.; Davidson, E.P.; Ginsberg, B.H.; Yorek, M.A. )

    1990-05-05

    The role of extracellular ethanolamine in phospholipid synthesis was examined in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. Serine and ethanolamine were both readily accumulated by these cells and incorporated into phospholipid. Exposing cells to extracellular ethanolamine for 4-6 weeks had no effect on cell growth, yet increased the phosphatidylethanolamine content of these cells by 31% as compared to control cells. The intracellular content of ethanolamine was measured by high performance liquid chromatography, and results showed that the ethanolamine-treated cells contained a significantly greater amount of free ethanolamine compared to control cells. Ethanolamine-treated cells also had decreased accumulation and incorporation into lipid of (3H)ethanolamine throughout a 48-h incubation and increased K'm and V'max parameters of ethanolamine transport as compared to control cells. Studies were also done to examine the effect of ethanolamine on the generation of free ethanolamine from phosphatidylserine. In pulse-chase experiments with (3H)serine, a physiological concentration of ethanolamine decreased the amount of 3H-labeled phosphatidylethanolamine produced from 3H-labeled phosphatidylserine by 12 h as compared to the amount of 3H-labeled phosphatidyl-ethanolamine produced in the absence of ethanolamine in the chase incubation. Furthermore, ethanolamine-treated cells accumulated 20% less labeled ethanolamine in the aqueous pool from (3H)serine after 24 h of incubation than did control cells. These results can be explained by isotope dilution with the ethanolamine pool that accumulates in these cells with time when exposed to media supplemented with a physiological concentration of ethanolamine and by an effect of ethanolamine on ethanolamine generation from phosphatidylserine.

  14. Alkaline buffers release EDRF from bovine cultured aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J. A.; de Nucci, G.; Warner, T. D.; Vane, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    1. Release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) and prostacyclin (PGI2) from bovine cultured aortic endothelial cells (EC) was measured by bioassay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. 2. Bradykinin (BK, 3-30 pmol), adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 2-6 nmol) or the sodium ionophore monensin (40-100 nmol) injected through a column of EC released EDRF. L-Arginine free base (FB; 10-20 mumol) or D-arginine FB (10-20 mumol) injected through the column of EC released similar amounts of EDRF and also caused an increase in pH of the Krebs solution perfusing the EC from 7.5-8.0 to 8.6-9.5. Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) an alkaline buffer which caused the same changes in the pH of the Krebs solution also induced the same release of EDRF. The hydrochloride salts of L- or D-arginine did not cause either release of EDRF when injected through the column of EC or increases in the pH of the Krebs solution. 3. Inhibitors of either diacylglycerol lipase (RHC 80267) or kinase (R59022) inhibited the release of EDRF induced by BK or ADP but potentiated the release induced by L-arginine FB, monensin (40-100 nmol) or alkaline buffer (Na2CO3). R59022 and RHC 80267 infused through the EC increased the basal release of EDRF. 4. When calcium chloride was omitted from the Krebs solution the release of EDRF induced by alkaline buffer (Na2CO3; pH 8.6-9.5) or L-arginine FB (10-20 mumol) was selectively inhibited when compared to that induced by BK (3-30 pmol) or ADP (2-6 nmol). This inhibition was reversed when calcium (2.5 mM) was restored. 5. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA; 30 microM) inhibited release of EDRF induced by BK (10-30 pmol) or alkaline buffers (Na2CO3 or D-arginine FB; pH 8.6-9.5). This inhibition was partially reversed by L- but not D-arginine FB or HCl (30-100 microM). 6. Prostacyclin was released when BK (10 pmol), ADP (2 nmol) or arachidonic acid (30 nmol) were injected through the column of EC. However, monensin (40 nmol) or alkaline buffers (pH 8.6-9.5) did not release

  15. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  16. Migration of bovine aortic smooth muscle cells after wounding injury. The role of hyaluronan and RHAMM.

    PubMed Central

    Savani, R C; Wang, C; Yang, B; Zhang, S; Kinsella, M G; Wight, T N; Stern, R; Nance, D M; Turley, E A

    1995-01-01

    The migration of smooth muscle cells is a critical event in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases. We have investigated the role of hyaluronan (HA) and the hyaluronan receptor RHAMM in the migration of adult bovine aortic smooth muscle cells (BASMC). Cultured BASMC migrated from the leading edge of a single scratch wound with increased velocity between 1 and 24 h. Polyclonal anti-RHAMM antisera that block HA binding with this receptor abolished smooth muscle cell migration following injury. HA stimulated the random locomotion of BASMC and its association with the cell monolayer increased following wounding injury. Immunoblot analysis of wounded monolayers demonstrated a novel RHAMM protein isoform that appeared within one hour after injury. At the time of increased cell motility after wounding, FACS analysis demonstrated an increase in the membrane localization in approximately 25% of the cell population. Confocal microscopy of injured monolayers confirmed that membrane expression of this receptor was limited to cells at the wound edge. Collectively, these data demonstrate that RHAMM is necessary for the migration of smooth muscle cells and that expression and distribution of this receptor is tightly regulated following wounding of BASMC monolayers. Images PMID:7533785

  17. Catecholamines are mitogenic in 3T3 and bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sherline, P; Mascardo, R

    1984-01-01

    We have found that catecholamines stimulate DNA synthesis and centrosomal separation in 3T3 and bovine aortic endothelial cells cultured in the absence of serum or added growth factors. The mitogenic effect is mediated by an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor, as it is inhibited by phentolamine and prazosin but not by propranolol or yohimbine. The physiological and pathological consequences of this effect remain to be determined. Images PMID:6611353

  18. Increased aortic tortuosity indicates a more severe aortic phenotype in adults with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Franken, Romy; El Morabit, Abdelali; de Waard, Vivian; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Marquering, Henk; Planken, Nils R N; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2015-09-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) have a highly variable occurrence of aortic complications. Aortic tortuosity is often present in MFS and may help to identify patients at risk for aortic complications. 3D-visualization of the total aorta by MR imaging was performed in 211 adult MFS patients (28% with prior aortic root replacement) and 20 controls. A method to assess aortic tortuosity (aortic tortuosity index: ATI) was developed and reproducibility was tested. The relation between ATI and age, and body size and aortic dimensions at baseline was investigated. Relations between ATI at baseline and the occurrence of a clinical endpoint (aortic dissection, and/or aortic surgery) and aortic dilatation rate during 3 years of follow-up were investigated. ATI intra- and interobserver agreements were excellent (ICC: 0.968 and 0.955, respectively). Mean ATI was higher in 28 age-matched MFS patients than in the controls (1.92 ± 0.2 vs. 1.82 ± 0.1, p=0.048). In the total MFS cohort, mean ATI was 1.87 ± 0.20, and correlated with age (r=0.281, p<0.001), aortic root diameter (r=0.223, p=0.006), and aortic volume expansion rate (r=0.177, p=0.026). After 49.3 ± 8.8 months follow-up, 33 patients met the combined clinical endpoint (7 dissections) with a significantly higher ATI at baseline than patients without endpoint (1.98 ± 0.2 vs. 1.86 ± 0.2, p=0.002). Patients with an ATI>1.95 had a 12.8 times higher probability of meeting the combined endpoint (log rank-test, p<0.001) and a 12.1 times higher probability of developing an aortic dissection (log rank-test, p=0.003) compared to patients with an ATI<1.95. Increased ATI is associated with a more severe aortic phenotype in MFS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Aortic root aneurysm in an adult patient with aortic coarctation: a single-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    Ananiadou, Olga G.; Koutsogiannidis, Charilaos; Ampatzidou, Fotini; Drossos, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a common congenital defect that may be undiagnosed until adulthood. Moreover, coarctation is associated with congenital and acquired cardiac pathology that may require surgical intervention. The management of an adult patient with aortic coarctation and an associated cardiac defect poses a great technical challenge since there are no standard guidelines for the therapy of such a complex pathology. Several extra-anatomic bypass grafting techniques have been described, including methods in which distal anastomosis is performed on the descending thoracic aorta, allowing simultaneous intracardiac repair. We report here a 37-year old man who was diagnosed with an aortic root aneurysm and aortic coarctation. The patient was treated electively with a single-stage approach through a median sternotomy that consisted of valve-sparing replacement of the aortic root and ascending-to-descending extra-anatomic aortic bypass, using a 18-mm Dacron graft. Firstly, the aortic root was replaced with the Yacoub remodelling procedure, and then the distal anastomosis was performed to the descending aorta, behind the heart, with the posterior pericardial approach. The extra-anatomic bypass graft was brought laterally from the right atrium and implanted in the ascending graft. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and a control computed tomographic angiogram 1 month after complete repair showed good results. PMID:22647969

  20. Aortic root aneurysm in an adult patient with aortic coarctation: a single-stage approach.

    PubMed

    Ananiadou, Olga G; Koutsogiannidis, Charilaos; Ampatzidou, Fotini; Drossos, George E

    2012-09-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a common congenital defect that may be undiagnosed until adulthood. Moreover, coarctation is associated with congenital and acquired cardiac pathology that may require surgical intervention. The management of an adult patient with aortic coarctation and an associated cardiac defect poses a great technical challenge since there are no standard guidelines for the therapy of such a complex pathology. Several extra-anatomic bypass grafting techniques have been described, including methods in which distal anastomosis is performed on the descending thoracic aorta, allowing simultaneous intracardiac repair. We report here a 37-year old man who was diagnosed with an aortic root aneurysm and aortic coarctation. The patient was treated electively with a single-stage approach through a median sternotomy that consisted of valve-sparing replacement of the aortic root and ascending-to-descending extra-anatomic aortic bypass, using a 18-mm Dacron graft. Firstly, the aortic root was replaced with the Yacoub remodelling procedure, and then the distal anastomosis was performed to the descending aorta, behind the heart, with the posterior pericardial approach. The extra-anatomic bypass graft was brought laterally from the right atrium and implanted in the ascending graft. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and a control computed tomographic angiogram 1 month after complete repair showed good results.

  1. Radioligand binding to muscarinic receptors of bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, F.; Kukovetz, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    1. Muscarinic receptors on endothelial cells of bovine thoracic aorta were characterized by binding assays in which (-)-[3H]-N-methyl quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-NMeQNB) was used as radioligand. 2. Binding of [3H]-NMeQNB to crude membranes of freshly isolated endothelial cells was atropine-displaceable and of high affinity (KD = 0.48 nM) to a single class of sites (maximum binding capacity: 14 +/- 3 fmol mg-1 protein). Stereospecificity of the binding sites was demonstrated in experiments in which [3H]-NMeQNB binding was inhibited by dexetimide in the nanomolar range (KI = 0.63 nM) and by levetimide, its stereoisomer in the micromolar range (KI = 3.2 microM) (selectivity factor: approximately 5000). 3. Drug competition curves indicated a single class of binding sites for antagonists and the following apparent affinities (KI, nM): methyl atropine: 1.1: 4-diphenylacetoxy N-methyl piperidine methyl bromide (4-DAMP): 3.4; pirenzepine: 16; 11-[2-diethylamino-methyl)-1-piperidinyl- acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido(2,3-b)1,4-benzodiazepine-6-one (AF-DX 116); 2.500. Competition of acetylcholine with [3H]-NMeQNB was best described by two affinity sites (or states) (KH = 0.82 microM, KL = 1.6 microM). In the presence of guanylimido diphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] (100 microM), acetylcholine affinity (IC50) was slightly, but significantly reduced (factor approximately 4). 4. Binding of [3H]-NMeQNB to freshly harvested intact cells was also atropine-displaceable, stereospecific (selectivity factor: approximately 3500) and of high affinity (KD = 0.35 nM). The maximum binding capacity (9 +/- 2 fmol mg-1 total cell protein) was comparable to that of membranes and corresponded to approximately 900 binding sites per endothelial cell.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2015420

  2. Characterization of putative receptors specific for quercetin on bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S.C.; Becker, C.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have reported that tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates (R-BSA), quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells (SMC). To investigate whether there are binding sites or receptors for these polyphenol-containing molecules on SMC, the authors have synthesized /sup 125/I-labeled rutin-bovine serum albumin ((/sup 125/I)R-BSA) of high specific activity (20 Ci/mmol). SMC were isolated from a bovine thoracic aorta and maintained in Eagle's minimum essential medium with 10% calf serum in culture. These SMC at early subpassages were suspended (3-5 x 10/sup 7/ cells/ml) in phosphate-buffered saline and incubated with (/sup 125/I)R-BSA (10 pmol) in the presence or absence of 200-fold unlabeled R-BSA, TGP, BSA, rutin, quercetin or related polyphenols, and catecholamines. Binding of (/sup 125/I)R-BSA to SMC was found to be reproducible and the radioligand was displaced by R-BSA, and also by TGP, rutin, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid, but not by BSA, ellagic acid, naringin, hesperetin, dopamine, epinephrine, or isoproterenol. The binding was saturable, reversible, and pH-dependent. These results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for quercetinon arterial SMC.

  3. Attachment and proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells onto additive modified poly(ether urethane ureas)

    SciTech Connect

    Brunstedt, M.R.; Ziats, N.P.; Rose-Caprara, V.; Hiltner, P.A.; Anderson, J.M. ); Lodoen, G.A.; Payet, C.R. E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wilmington, DE )

    1993-04-01

    To better understand endothelial cell interactions with poly(ether urethane urea) (PEUU) materials, and to assess bovine aortic endothelial cell attachment, films were incubated for 24 h with BAEC in media containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Other films were allowed to incubate for 4 more days in media containing 5% fetal bovine serum without cells to assess BAEC proliferation. The assay was performed on PEUU films modified with acrylate and methacrylate polymer and copolymer additives that spanned a wide range on the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity scale. Tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) was used as a control. The assay showed that PEUU films loaded with Methacrol 2138F [copoly(diisopropylaminoethyl methacrylate [DIPAM]/decyl methacrylate [DM]) (3/1)] or with its hydrophilic component, DIPAM, in homopolymer form (i.e., h-DIPAM), significantly enhanced BAEC attachment and proliferation when compared to unloaded PEUU films or to PEUU films loaded with the more hydrophobic acrylate or methacrylate polymer additives. The assay also showed that PEUU films coated with homopoly(diisopropylaminoethyl acrylate) (h-DIPAA) significantly enhanced BAEC attachment and proliferation when compared to PEUU films coated with h-decyl acrylate films coated with the copolymer of these two acrylates showed intermediate behavior.

  4. Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali; Dietz, Harry C.; Oswald, Gretchen L.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ascending aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections, and stenosis) and associated aortic valve disease are rare but important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Certain genetic causes, such as Marfan syndrome and congenital bicuspid aortic valve disease, are well known. However, other rarer genetic and nongenetic causes of aortic disease exist. Methods We performed an extensive literature search to identify known causes of ascending aortic pathology in children and young adults. We catalogued both aortic pathologies and other defining systemic features of these diseases. Results We describe 17 predominantly genetic entities that have been associated with thoracic aortic disease in this age group. Conclusions While extensive literature on the common causes of ascending aortic disease exists, there is a need for better histologic documentation of aortic pathology in rarer diseases. PMID:19926309

  5. Congenital valvular aortic stenosis in young adults: predictors for rate of progression of stenosis and aortic dilatation.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Denise; Andrinopoulou, Elini-Rosalina; Oechslin, Erwin N; Budts, Werner; van Dijk, Arie P J; Pieper, Petronella G; Wajon, Elly M C J; Post, Marco C; Witsenburg, Maarten; Silversides, Candice K; Oxenius, Angela; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2013-09-30

    Congenital aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common obstructive left-sided cardiac lesion in young adults, however little is known about the progression in adults. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the progression rate of AS and aortic dilatation in a large multicenter retrospective cohort of asymptomatic young adults with congenital valvular AS. Data were obtained from chart abstraction. Linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate the progression of AS and aortic dilatation over time. A joint model combining longitudinal echocardiographic and survival data was used for survival analysis. A total of 414 patients (age 29 ± 10 years, 68% male) were included. Median follow-up duration was 4.1 (2.5-5.1) years (1587 patient-years). Peak aortic velocity was 3.4 ± 0.7 m/s at baseline and did not change over time in the total patient population (-0.01 ± 0.03 m/s/year). Increased left ventricular mass was significantly associated with faster AS progression (p<0.001). Aortic dilatation was present in 34% at baseline and 48% at follow-up (p<0.001). The aortic diameter linearly increased over time with a rate of 0.7 ± 0.2mm/year. Rate of aortic dissection was 0.06% per patient-year. Seventy patients required an aortic valve intervention (4.4% per patient-year), with AS progression rate as most powerful predictor (HR 5.11 (95% CI 3.47-7.53)). In the majority of patients with mild-to-moderate congenital AS, AS severity does not progress over time. However patients with left ventricular hypertrophy are at risk for faster progression and should be monitored carefully. Although aortic dissections rarely occur, aortic dilatation is common and steadily progresses over time, warranting serial aortic imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bovine Aortic Arch and Bilateral Retroesophageal Course of Common Carotid Arteries in a Symptomatic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bissacco, Daniele; Domanin, Maurizio; Schinco, Giuseppina; Gabrielli, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arteries may be related to their development (agenesis, aplasia, hypoplasia) or course (coiling, kinking, tortuosity). Partial or total aberrancies in carotid vessel anatomy rarely occur. We describe the case of a 95-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of confusion and disorientation together with upper limb clonus. Computed tomography (CT)-scan revealed a left frontal brain injury with a not conclusive carotid doppler ultrasound. CT angiography reported a bovine aortic arch with bilateral retroesophageal course of both common carotid arteries and left severe (>70%) internal carotid artery stenosis. The knowledge of anatomical variations of the course of carotid arteries is relevant for possible surgical or endovascular repair or in case of otolaryngology or intubation procedures. PMID:27699162

  7. [Contemporary therapeutic management of adult's congenital aortic coarctation].

    PubMed

    da Gama, A Dinis

    2013-01-01

    Adult congenital aortic coarctation is an entity rarely seen in clinical practice. It is commonly diagnosed and managed in the early stages of life, mean in the neo-natal or young children's ages. Some cases however can be overlooked at this scrutinity and become recognizable at later stages, in adulthood, through symptoms and signs resulting from the deep hemodynamic deregulation caused by the disease in the proximal and distal aortic physiology, requiring often imperative therapeutic repair. In this paper, an extensive revision is made on the main pathologic, clinical and diagnostic features of the disease, culminating in a critical analysis on the contemporary therapeutic methods available, which includes the conventional open surgery and the endovascular intervention, which includes the balloon angioplasty, the stenting and the covered stents.

  8. [Management of aortic coarctation at the adult age].

    PubMed

    Godart, F

    2007-05-01

    Classical treatment of coarctation of the aorta consists of resection and suture through a left thoracotomy. However, over the last 20 years, balloon angioplasty, recently associated with stenting, has progressively supplanted surgery in the adult both in native forms and in recoarctions. Usually, the diameters of the balloon and stent are chosen to be the same as that of the aortic isthmus or proximal aortic arch without exceeding that of the aorta at the diaphragm. Moreover, the tendency now is to recommend stenting in cases of severe, tubular and long stenosis associated with proximal hypoplasia and in cases of residual gradients after dilatation. The complications of percutaneous techniques are the risk of restenosis (11-15%), aneurysm formation (5%), and a very small risk of dissection. However, it is recognised that stenting is associated with fewer complications than dilatation alone or surgery. After correction, the main problem is that of hypertension, often associated with persistence of a pressure gradient at the isthmus. Coarctation is often associated with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve in nearly 50% of cases and the valvular condition may progress to stenosis or incompetence requiring corrective surgery. In these cases, a dilatation of the aorta must also be suspected which may progress to an aneurysm. In addition, pregnancy is often complicated by maternal hypertension. The consequences are a high risk of abortion and, for the child, a prematurity, poor growth, and a small risk of recurrence of the cardiac disease. Pregnant women should be followed up in a multidisciplinary fashion and, when possible, problems of residual stenosis, aneurysm and hypertension should be controlled and corrected before the woman wishes to be pregnant. In practice, medium and long term follow up should be undertaken by specialist teams and comprise clinical examination, blood pressure investigations on effort and by ambulatory recording, Doppler ultrasonography of the

  9. Polyamine degradation in foetal and adult bovine serum.

    PubMed Central

    Gahl, W A; Pitot, H C

    1982-01-01

    1. Using protein-separative chromatographic procedures and assays specific for putrescine oxidase and spermidine oxidase, adult bovine serum was found to contain a single polyamine-degrading enzyme with substrate preferences for spermidine and spermine. Apparent Km values for these substrates were approx. 40 microM. The apparent Km for putrescine was 2 mM. With spermidine as substrate, the Ki values for aminoguanidine (AM) and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) were 70 microM and 20 microM respectively. 2. Bovine serum spermidine oxidase degraded spermine to spermidine to putrescine and N8-acetylspermidine to N-acetylputrescine. Acrolein was produced in all these reactions and recovered in quantities equivalent to H2O2 recovery. 3. Spermidine oxidase activity was present in foetal bovine serum, but increased markedly after birth to levels in adult serum that were almost 100 times the activity in foetal bovine serum. 4. Putrescine oxidase, shown to be a separate enzyme from bovine serum spermidine oxidase, was present in foetal bovine serum but absent from bovine serum after birth. This enzyme displayed an apparent Km for putrescine of 2.6 microM. The enzyme was inhibited by AM and MGBG with Ki values of 20 nM. Putrescine, cadaverine and 1,3-diaminopropane proved excellent substrates for the enzyme compared with spermidine and spermine, and N-acetylputrescine was a superior substrate to N1- or N8-acetylspermidine. PMID:7092834

  10. Triglycidylamine Crosslinking of Porcine Aortic Valve Cusps or Bovine Pericardium Results in Improved Biocompatibility, Biomechanics, and Calcification Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Jeanne M.; Alferiev, Ivan; Clark-Gruel, Jocelyn N.; Eidelman, Naomi; Sacks, Michael; Palmatory, Elizabeth; Kronsteiner, Allyson; DeFelice, Suzanne; Xu, Jie; Ohri, Rachit; Narula, Navneet; Vyavahare, Narendra; Levy, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated a novel polyepoxide crosslinker that was hypothesized to confer both material stabilization and calcification resistance when used to prepare bioprosthetic heart valves. Triglycidylamine (TGA) was synthesized via reacting epichlorhydrin and NH3. TGA was used to crosslink porcine aortic cusps, bovine pericardium, and type I collagen. Control materials were crosslinked with glutaraldehyde (Glut). TGA-pretreated materials had shrink temperatures comparable to Glut fixation. However, TGA crosslinking conferred significantly greater collagenase resistance than Glut pretreatment, and significantly improved biomechanical compliance. Sheep aortic valve interstitial cells grown on TGA-pretreated collagen did not calcify, whereas sheep aortic valve interstitial cells grown on control substrates calcified extensively. Rat subdermal implants (porcine aortic cusps/bovine pericardium) pretreated with TGA demonstrated significantly less calcification than Glut pretreated implants. Investigations of extracellular matrix proteins associated with calcification, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9, tenascin-C, and osteopontin, revealed that MMP-9 and tenascin-C demonstrated reduced expression both in vitro and in vivo with TGA crosslinking compared to controls, whereas osteopontin and MMP-2 expression were not affected. TGA pretreatment of heterograft biomaterials results in improved stability compared to Glut, confers biomechanical properties superior to Glut crosslinking, and demonstrates significant calcification resistance. PMID:15631995

  11. Losartan reduces aortic dilatation rate in adults with Marfan syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Groenink, Maarten; den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; Radonic, Teodora; de Waard, Vivian; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Spijkerboer, Anje M; Marquering, Henk A; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2013-12-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome have an increased risk of life-threatening aortic complications, mostly preceded by aortic dilatation. Treatment with losartan, an angiotensin-II receptor-1 blocker, may reduce aortic dilatation rate in Marfan patients. In this multicentre, open-label, randomized controlled trial with blinded assessments, we compared losartan treatment with no additional treatment in operated and unoperated adults with Marfan syndrome. The primary endpoint was aortic dilatation rate at any predefined aortic level after 3 years of follow-up, as determined by magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 233 participants (47% female) underwent randomization to either losartan (n = 116) or no additional treatment (n = 117). Aortic root dilatation rate after 3.1 ± 0.4 years of follow-up was significantly lower in the losartan group than in controls (0.77 ± 1.36 vs. 1.35 ± 1.55 mm, P = 0.014). Aortic dilatation rate in the trajectory beyond the aortic root was not significantly reduced by losartan. In patients with prior aortic root replacement, aortic arch dilatation rate was significantly lower in the losartan group when compared with the control group (0.50 ± 1.26 vs. 1.01 ± 1.31 mm, P = 0.033). No significant differences in separate clinical endpoints or the composite endpoint (aortic dissection, elective aortic surgery, cardiovascular death) between the groups could be demonstrated. In adult Marfan patients, losartan treatment reduces aortic root dilatation rate. After aortic root replacement, losartan treatment reduces dilatation rate of the aortic arch.

  12. Oestrogen synthesis, oestrogen metabolism and functional oestrogen receptors in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bayard, F; Clamens, S; Delsol, G; Blaes, N; Maret, A; Faye, J C

    1995-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanisms by which oestrogenic hormones influence the vascular system, we have studied their metabolism and the functioning of oestrogen receptors in bovine aortic endothelial cells from primo-secondary cultures, a widely studied model of vascular pathophysiology. We have demonstrated the enzymic activity of oestradiol-17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17-ketoreductase and aromatase in these cells. Immunocytochemical analyses, using two different monoclonal antibodies that recognize epitopes in the A/B domain of the oestrogen receptor, showed that this molecule has a predominantly cytoplasmic localization even after the addition of oestrogen to the culture medium. We showed that the hormone-receptor complexes were functional by demonstrating their transactivating ability in transfection experiments using the luciferase gene reporter and an oestrogen-responsive element transcriptional enhancer, although the amplitude of the response was in the range of only 140-150%: this was not a consequence of the presence of a specific limiting factor, but instead might be related to the peculiar subcellular localization of the oestrogen receptor.

  13. Transcriptional Induction of Metallothionein by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)stibane in Cultured Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fujie, Tomoya; Murakami, Masaki; Yoshida, Eiko; Yasuike, Shuji; Kimura, Tomoki; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Chika; Kaji, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells cover the luminal surface of blood vessels and contribute to the prevention of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis. Metallothionein (MT) is a low molecular weight, cysteine-rich, metal-binding, inducible protein, which protects cells from the toxicity of heavy metals and active oxygen species. Endothelial MT is not induced by inorganic zinc. Adequate tools are required to investigate the mechanisms underlying endothelial MT induction. In the present study, we found that an organoantimony compound, tris(pentafluorophenyl)stibane, induces gene expression of MT-1A and MT-2A, which are subisoforms of MT in bovine aortic endothelial cells. The data reveal that MT-1A is induced by activation of both the MTF-1–MRE and Nrf2–ARE pathways, whereas MT-2A expression requires only activation of the MTF-1–MRE pathway. The present data suggest that the original role of MT-1 is to protect cells from heavy metal toxicity and oxidative stress in the biological defense system, while that of MT-2 is to regulate intracellular zinc metabolism. PMID:27563876

  14. Outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair in adult coarctation patients.

    PubMed

    Lala, Salim; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Chandrekashar, Satish; Giles, Kristina A; Fatima, Javairiah; Berceli, Scott A; Back, Martin R; Huber, Thomas S; Beaver, Thomas M; Beck, Adam W

    2017-09-22

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is most commonly identified in pediatric patients; however, adults can present with late sequelae of untreated coarctation or complications of prior open repair. To date, there are limited data about the role of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in this group of patients. The purpose of this analysis was to describe our experience with management of adult coarctation patients using TEVAR. All TEVAR patients treated for primary coarctation or late sequelae of previous open repair (eg, pseudoaneurysm, recurrent coarctation or anastomotic stenosis related to index open coarctation repair) were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, procedure-related variables, postoperative outcomes, and reintervention were recorded. Computed tomography centerline assessments of endograft morphology were completed to delineate stent anatomy at the coarctation site. Survival and reintervention were estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 21 patients were identified (median age, 46 years [range, 33-71 years]; 67% male [n = 14]). Nine patients (43%) were treated for symptomatic primary (n = 6) or recurrent (n = 3) coarctation. Other indications included degenerative thoracic aneurysm (n = 6), pseudoaneurysm (n = 4), and dissection (n = 2). Technical success was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-100%). No 30-day mortality or paraplegia events occurred; however, two patients (10%) experienced postoperative nondisabling stroke. In primary or recurrent coarctation patients with available computed tomography imaging (n = 8 of 9), nominal stent graft diameters were achieved proximal and distal to the coarctation (range, -0.4 to -1.2 mm of desired final stent diameter). Specific to the coarctation site, there was a significant increase in aortic diameter after TEVAR (before stenting, 11.5 [95% CI, 6.8-12.3] mm; after stenting, 15 [95% CI, 13.7-15.7] mm; P = .004). Concurrently, systolic arterial blood pressure at time of discharge was

  15. Robot-assisted aortic valve replacement using a novel sutureless bovine pericardial prosthesis: proof of concept as an alternative to percutaneous implantation.

    PubMed

    Suri, Rakesh M; Burkhart, Harold M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2010-11-01

    : Percutaneous aortic valve implantation within native valve calcium has progressed to clinical use despite the absence of data proving equivalence to complete surgical excision and prosthetic valve replacement. A novel self-expanding sutureless bovine pericardial prosthesis (Sorin Perceval) derived from a proven stented valve has been successfully used in humans recently through an open transaortic approach. We sought to develop a minimally invasive technique for native aortic valve excision and sutureless prosthetic aortic valve replacement using robot assistance. : The da Vinci S-HD system was used to open and suspend the pericardium anterior to the phrenic nerve in cadavers. A transthoracic cross-clamp was placed across the midascending aorta, following which a transverse aortotomy was made. The native aortic valve cusps were excised, and annular calcium was removed with robotic instruments. After placement of three guide sutures, the Perceval self-expanding pericardial prosthesis mounted on a flexible delivery system was inserted through a working port and lowered into the aortic annulus. : Successful implantation of all valves was possible using a 3-cm right second intercostal space working port, along with two additional 1-cm instrument ports. A standard transverse aortotomy was sufficient for examination/debridement of the native aortic valve cusps, sizing of the annulus, and deployment of the nitinol-stented, bovine pericardial prosthesis. Delivery, seating, and stability of the device were easily confirmed above and below the aortic valve annulus using the robotic camera. : Complete excision of diseased native aortic valve cusps with robot assistance facilitates accurate and reproducible aortic valve replacement using a novel self-expanding sutureless version of a proven bovine pericardial prosthesis. This approach is comparable to the current surgical gold standard and is ready for clinical use as an alternative to percutaneous aortic valve implantation.

  16. FCCP depolarizes plasma membrane potential by activating proton and Na+ currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Jo, Inho; Pak, Kim; Bae, Sung-Won; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Park, Jin; Zhu, Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a protonophore and uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, on plasma membrane potential and ionic currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The membrane potential and ionic currents of BAECs were recorded using the patch-clamp technique in current-clamp and voltage-clamp modes, respectively. FCCP activated ionic currents and depolarized the plasma membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Neither the removal of extracellular Ca2+ nor pretreatment with BAPTA/AM affected the FCCP-induced currents, implying that the currents are not associated with the FCCP-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i increase. FCCP-induced currents were significantly influenced by the changes in extracellular or intracellular pH; the increased proton gradient produced by lowering the extracellular pH or intracellular alkalinization augmented the changes in membrane potential and ionic currents caused by FCCP. FCCP-induced currents were significantly reduced under extracellular Na+-free conditions. The reversal potentials of FCCP-induced currents under Na+-free conditions were well fitted to the calculated equilibrium potential for protons. Interestingly, FCCP-induced Na+ transport (subtracted currents, I(control)- I(Na+-free) was closely dependent on extracellular pH, whereas FCCP-induced H+transport was not significantly affected by the absence of Na+. These results suggest that the FCCP-induced ionic currents and depolarization, which are strongly dependent on the plasmalemmal proton gradient, are likely to be mediated by both H+ and Na+ currents across the plasma membrane. The relationship between H+ and Na+ transport still needs to be determined.

  17. Cyclic strain is a weak inducer of prostacyclin synthase expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segurola, R. J. Jr; Oluwole, B.; Mills, I.; Yokoyama, C.; Tanabe, T.; Kito, H.; Nakajima, N.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that hemodynamic forces such as cyclic strain and shear stress can increase prostacyclin (PGI2) secretion by endothelial cells (EC) but the effect of these forces on prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) gene expression remains unclear and is the focus of this study. Bovine aortic EC were seeded onto type I collagen coated flexible membranes and grown to confluence. The membranes and attached EC were subjected to 10% average strain at 60 cpm (0.5 sec deformation alternating with 0.5 sec relaxation) for up to 5 days. PGIS gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis and protein level by Western blot analysis. The effect of cyclic strain on the PGIS promoter was determined by the transfection of a 1-kb human PGIS gene promoter construct coupled to a luciferase reporter gene into EC, followed by determination of luciferase activity. PGIS gene expression increased 1.7-fold in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 24 hr. Likewise, EC transfected with a pGL3B-PGIS (-1070/-10) construct showed an approximate 1.3-fold elevation in luciferase activity in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 3, 4, 8, and 12 hr. The weak stimulation of PGIS gene expression by cyclic strain was reflected in an inability to detect alterations in PGIS protein levels in EC subjected to cyclic strain for as long as 5 days. These data suggest that strain-induced stimulation of PGIS gene expression plays only a minor role in the ability of cyclic strain to stimulate PGI2 release in EC. These findings coupled with our earlier demonstration of a requisite addition of exogenous arachidonate in order to observe strain-induced PGI2 release, implicates a mechanism that more likely involves strain-induced stimulation of PGIS activity.

  18. Nitrones Reverse Hyperglycemia-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Headley, Colwyn A.; DiSilvestro, David; Hemann, Craig; Bryant, Kelsey E.; Chen, Chun-Aun; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse eNOS dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5 mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50 mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC cells with nitrones for 24 h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased BH4 levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and SOD activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC cells grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC cells. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted. PMID:26774452

  19. Cyclic strain is a weak inducer of prostacyclin synthase expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segurola, R. J. Jr; Oluwole, B.; Mills, I.; Yokoyama, C.; Tanabe, T.; Kito, H.; Nakajima, N.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that hemodynamic forces such as cyclic strain and shear stress can increase prostacyclin (PGI2) secretion by endothelial cells (EC) but the effect of these forces on prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) gene expression remains unclear and is the focus of this study. Bovine aortic EC were seeded onto type I collagen coated flexible membranes and grown to confluence. The membranes and attached EC were subjected to 10% average strain at 60 cpm (0.5 sec deformation alternating with 0.5 sec relaxation) for up to 5 days. PGIS gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis and protein level by Western blot analysis. The effect of cyclic strain on the PGIS promoter was determined by the transfection of a 1-kb human PGIS gene promoter construct coupled to a luciferase reporter gene into EC, followed by determination of luciferase activity. PGIS gene expression increased 1.7-fold in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 24 hr. Likewise, EC transfected with a pGL3B-PGIS (-1070/-10) construct showed an approximate 1.3-fold elevation in luciferase activity in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 3, 4, 8, and 12 hr. The weak stimulation of PGIS gene expression by cyclic strain was reflected in an inability to detect alterations in PGIS protein levels in EC subjected to cyclic strain for as long as 5 days. These data suggest that strain-induced stimulation of PGIS gene expression plays only a minor role in the ability of cyclic strain to stimulate PGI2 release in EC. These findings coupled with our earlier demonstration of a requisite addition of exogenous arachidonate in order to observe strain-induced PGI2 release, implicates a mechanism that more likely involves strain-induced stimulation of PGIS activity.

  20. Bovine Pericardial Patch Augmentation of One Insufficient Aortic Valve Cusp with Twenty-three-year Positive Clinical Follow-up Independent of the Patch Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Arcêncio, Lívia; Evora, Patrícia Martinez; Menardi, Antônio Carlos; Chahud, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Scientific progress shall ultimately boost the current acceptance level for conservative aortic valve surgery. The present text aimed to report the 23-year long-term follow-up of one patient operated with bovine pericardium cusp extension. Growing confidence in the efficacy of the operation will allow a more expeditious indication for surgical treatment, as is already the case in mitral valve repair. This change of attitude will certainly make it possible for patients to be sent for operation in mild aortic valve regurgitation. The present report reinforces the concept and highlights the impression that the aortic valvoplasty, independent of the progressive bovine pericardium degeneration, may positively change the natural history of the aortic valve insufficiency.

  1. Bicuspid aortic valve aortopathy in adults: Incidence, etiology, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Michelena, Hector I; Della Corte, Alessandro; Prakash, Siddharth K; Milewicz, Dianna M; Evangelista, Artur; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2015-12-15

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart defect and is associated with an aortopathy manifested by dilatation of the ascending thoracic aorta. The clinical consequences of this aortopathy are the need for periodic monitoring of aortic diameters, elective prophylactic surgical aortic repair, and the occurrence of aortic dissection or rupture. This review describes the current knowledge of BAV aortopathy in adults, including incidence, pathophysiologic insights into its etiology, contemporary hypothesis-generating observations into its complications, and recommendations for monitoring and intervention.

  2. High density lipoproteins stimulate the production and secretion of endothelin-1 from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, R M; Chuang, M Y; Prins, B; Kashyap, M L; Frank, H J; Pedram, A; Levin, E R

    1994-03-01

    The concentration of HDL in the blood inversely correlates with the incidence of cardiovascular disease, probably related to the ability of these lipoproteins to efflux cholesterol from vascular cells. it is also possible that HDL affect the production or action of vasoactive peptides implicated in the development of vascular diseases. Therefore, we determined the effects of human HDL on the production and secretion of endothelin-1 (ET-1) from cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. HDL produced a highly significant stimulation of endothelin secretion (maximum 240% of control), even at very low levels of lipoproteins (1 microgram/ml). HDL also stimulated the translation of ET-1 by twofold in the bovine aortic endothelial cells. In contrast, HDL had no significant effect on steady state mRNA levels, transcript degradation, or transcription. Stimulation of ET-1 secretion by HDL was dependent on protein kinase C activation. Purified apo A-I, the major apoprotein of HDL, increased ET-1 secretion and translation approximately 85% as potently as HDL. Our results indicate that low concentrations of human HDL strongly stimulate the production of ET-1, a powerful vasoconstrictor and mitogen for the vascular smooth muscle cell. We propose that HDL may participate in the regulation of vasomotor tone through this potentially important effect in the vasculature.

  3. Bradykinin-stimulated calcium influx in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, W.P.; Ritchie, A.K.; Navarro, L.T.; Eskin, S.G. Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston )

    1988-08-01

    Bradykinin (BK)-stimulated release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor has been linked to a rise in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration and a change of K{sup +} permeability of the endothelial cell. In the present study, measurement of BK-induced changes in fura-2 fluorescence and {sup 86}Rb{sup +} efflux were used to monitor changes in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} and K{sup +} permeability in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. In the presence of normal extracellular Ca{sup 2+}, BK induced a fourfold increase in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+}, which peaked at 20 s and declined within 1 min to a value that was 50% of the peak level. Subsequently, cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} decreased and approached basal levels within 8 min. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+}, BK produced a 1.5- to 2-fold increase in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} that peaked within 20 s and declined to basal levels within 2 min. Addition of Ca{sup 2+} to the Ca-free reaction buffer 3-5 min after addition of BK resulted in a two-to three-fold increase in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} that declined slowly back to basal levels. Thus Ca{sup 2+} influx can occur in response to BK at a time when there is minimal elevation of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} above the resting level. Under all conditions tested, {sup 86}Rb{sup +} efflux paralleled changes in the cytosolic Ca{sup 2+}, suggesting that efflux occurred through Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channels. Isosmotic substitution of Na{sup +} with N-methyl-D-glucamine did not affect the BK-stimulated changes in cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} or {sup 86}Rb{sup +} efflux, suggesting that Na{sup +}-Ca{sup 2+} exchange plays little role in the BK response. These results suggest that BK stimulates Ca{sup 2+} influx via a BK receptor-operated channel or a channel activated by some internal messenger other than Ca{sup 2+}.

  4. Prosthesis-patient mismatch in bovine pericardial aortic valves: evaluation using 3 different modalities and associated medium-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Satish Jacob; Ansari, Asimul H; McCarthy, Patrick M; Malaisrie, S Chris; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Li, Zhi; Lee, Richard; McGee, Edwin; Bonow, Robert O; Puthumana, Jyothy J

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) and its impact on survival after aortic valve replacement have not been clearly defined. Historically, the presence of PPM was identified from postoperative echocardiograms or preoperative manufacturer-provided charts, resulting in wide discrepancies. The 2009 American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) guidelines proposed an algorithmic approach to calculate PPM. This study compared PPM prevalence and its impact on survival using 3 modalities: (1) the ASE guidelines-suggested algorithm (ASE PPM); (2) the manufacturer-provided charts (M PPM); and (3) the echocardiographically measured, body surface area-indexed, effective orifice area (EOAi PPM) measurement. A total of 614 patients underwent aortic valve replacement with bovine pericardial valves from 2004 to 2009 and had normal preoperative systolic function. EOAi PPM was severe if EOAi was ≤ 0.60 cm(2)/m(2), moderate if EOAi was 0.60 to 0.85 cm(2)/m(2), and absent (none) if EOAi was ≥ 0.85 cm(2)/m(2). ASE PPM was severe in 22 (3.6%), moderate in 6 (1%), and absent (none) in 586 (95.4%). ASE PPM was similar to manufacturer-provided PPM (P=1.00). ASE PPM differed significantly from EOAi PPM (P<0.001), which identified severe mismatch in 170 (29.7%), moderate in 191 (33.4%), and absent (none) in 211 patients (36.9%). Irrespective of the PPM classification method, PPM did not adversely affect midterm survival (average follow-up, 4.1 ± 1.8 years; median, 3.9 years; range, 0.01-8 years). There were no reoperations for PPM. In patients with normal systolic function undergoing bovine pericardial aortic valve replacement, the prevalence of PPM using the algorithmic-ASE approach was low and correlated well with manufacturer-provided PPM. Independent of the method of PPM assessment, PPM was not associated with medium-term mortality.

  5. Reference Values for Cardiac and Aortic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy, Young Caucasian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Eikendal, Anouk L. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Haaring, Cees; Saam, Tobias; van der Geest, Rob J.; Westenberg, Jos J. M.; den Ruijter, Hester M.; Hoefer, Imo E.; Leiner, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background Reference values for morphological and functional parameters of the cardiovascular system in early life are relevant since they may help to identify young adults who fall outside the physiological range of arterial and cardiac ageing. This study provides age and sex specific reference values for aortic wall characteristics, cardiac function parameters and aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a population-based sample of healthy, young adults using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods In 131 randomly selected healthy, young adults aged between 25 and 35 years (mean age 31.8 years, 63 men) of the general-population based Atherosclerosis-Monitoring-and-Biomarker-measurements-In-The-YOuNg (AMBITYON) study, descending thoracic aortic dimensions and wall thickness, thoracic aortic PWV and cardiac function parameters were measured using a 3.0T MR-system. Age and sex specific reference values were generated using dedicated software. Differences in reference values between two age groups (25–30 and 30–35 years) and both sexes were tested. Results Aortic diameters and areas were higher in the older age group (all p<0.007). Moreover, aortic dimensions, left ventricular mass, left and right ventricular volumes and cardiac output were lower in women than in men (all p<0.001). For mean and maximum aortic wall thickness, left and right ejection fraction and aortic PWV we did not observe a significant age or sex effect. Conclusion This study provides age and sex specific reference values for cardiovascular MR parameters in healthy, young Caucasian adults. These may aid in MR guided pre-clinical identification of young adults who fall outside the physiological range of arterial and cardiac ageing. PMID:27732640

  6. Adult degenerative scoliosis associated with increased aortic diameter and plaque burden and composition.

    PubMed

    Ayça, Burak; Rakıcı, Taşkın; Atıcı, Yunus; Avsar, Murat; Yuksel, Yasin; Akın, Fatih; Okuyan, Ertugrul; Hakan Dinckal, M

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) and the aortic plaques and diameters. We included 219 patients with ADS and 100 control patients without ADS. Diameters of ascending, arch, descending and abdominal aorta and number, localization and types of the aortic plaques, and the Cobb angles of all patients were measured from computed tomography (CT) images. We divided the patients with ADS into three groups according to the Cobb angle, and divided them into four groups according to level of spine deformity. The patients with ADS had a larger aorta and more aortic plaques (both, p < 0.001). The patients with ADS had more fibro-fatty and mix plaques (both, p < 0.001). The patients with severe ADS had larger diameters of the ascending and arch of the aorta (p = 0.026 and p = 0.027, respectively). The patients with the main thoracic curve had a larger ascending aorta and the patients with a thoracolumbar curve had more aortic plaques (p = 0.035 and p = 0.029, respectively). In multivariate regression analysis, the ADS was an independent risk factor for both aortic dilatation (>3.6 cm) and aortic plaque build-up (both, p < 0.001). The ADS may be a risk factor for aortic dilatation and aortic atherosclerosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Isolation and structural characterization of glycosphingolipids of in vitro propagated bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Duvar, S; Peter-Katalinić, J; Hanisch, F G; Müthing, J

    1997-12-01

    Neutral glycosphingolipids and gangliosides were isolated from 3.7 x 10(9) primary bovine aortic endothelial cells and structurally characterized by immunological and chemical methods. Glucosyl- and lactosylceramide were detected as the main neutral glycosphingolipids (28% and 40% of total orcinol stain, respectively); LcOse3Cer and nLcOse4Cer were expressed to somewhat minor amounts (16% and 10% of total orcinol stain, respectively), and nLcOse6Cer occurred only in trace quantities. No neutral glycosphingolipids of the ganglio-series (GgOse3Cer and GgOse4Cer) and the globo-series (GbOse4Cer and the Forssman antigen) have been detected; only traces of GbOse3Cer were identified by TLC immunostaining. Positive CD15 bands obtained by TLC overlay with anti-Gal beta1-4(Fuc alpha1-3)GlcNAc beta1-R antibody indicated the presence of lipid bound Lewisx antigen, whereas the isomeric Lewis(a) structure (Gal beta1-3(Fuc alpha1-4)GlcNAc beta1-R) was not detectable. G(M3) substituted with Neu5Gc and Neu5Ac in a 2:1 ratio was the major ganglioside comprising about 95% within the whole ganglioside fraction. G(M3)-structures were further characterized by FAB-MS and GC-MS of the native compounds and their permethylated derivatives. C18-sphingosine was the only long chain base, whereas variation occurred due to C(24:0,24:1) and C16 fatty acids. Terminally alpha2-3 sialylated neolacto-series gangliosides with nLcOse4- and nLcOse6Cer (<5% of total resorcinol stain) were found in almost equal quantities, whereas no alpha2-6 sialylated counterparts were detected. Fucosylated gangliosides with poly-N-acetyllactosaminyl chains (sialyl Lewis[x], sialyl Lewisa, and VIM-2 antigen) and sulfoglucuronylneolacto series structures with HNK-1 epitope were not detectable in the acidic glycosphingolipid fraction by TLC immunostaining. Gangliotetraose-type gangliosides G(M1) and G(D1a) (<1 % of total resorcinol stain) as well as traces of G(D1b) and G(T1b) have been distinctly identified by combined

  8. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    PubMed

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities.

  9. Sternum-Sparing Hybrid Repair of a Symptomatic Innominate Artery Aneurysm in a Frail Patient with Bovine Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Pellenc, Quentin; Avramenko, Alla; Mordant, Pierre; Castier, Yves

    2016-08-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old man with a bovine aortic arch variation, who presented a symptomatic aneurysm of the innominate artery. Standard open repair was contraindicated and an hybrid approach was performed, regarding general status (Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) Performance Status score 3 and American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification system score 3). Right common carotid artery and right subclavian artery were revascularized surgically from the left common carotid artery. Proximal aneurysm exclusion was performed with a vascular plug. Follow-up computed tomography angiography confirmed the exclusion of the innominate artery aneurysm. Vascular plugs can be used safely through a sternum-sparing hybrid approach to treat symptomatic innominate artery aneurysms in frail patients.

  10. Interaction of antithrombin III with bovine aortic segments. Role of heparin in binding and enhanced anticoagulant activity

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, D.; Nawroth, P.; Marcum, J.; Handley, D.; Kisiel, W.; Rosenberg, R.; Stern, K.

    1985-01-01

    Bovine antithrombin III (AT III) interaction with the luminal surface of bovine aortic segments with a continuous layer of endothelium was examined. Incubation of /sup 125/I-AT III with vessel segments, previously washed free of endogenous AT III, demonstrated specific, time-dependent binding to the protease inhibitor to the endothelium. Half-maximal binding was observed at an added AT III concentration of 14 nM. Binding of /sup 125/I-AT III to the vessel wall was reversible (50% dissociated in 4 min), and addition of either heparin or Factor Xa accelerated displacement of /sup 125/I-AT III from the vessel segment. Dissociation of /sup 125/I-AT III from the vessel segment in the presence of factor Xa coincided with the formation of a Factor Xa-/sup 125/I-AT III complex. Inactivation of Factor IXa and Factor Xa by AT III was facilitated in the presence of vessel segments. Pretreatment of vessel segments with highly purified Flavobacterium heparinase precluded the vessel-dependent augmentation of AT III anticoagulant activity as well as specific binding of /sup 125/I-AT III to the vessel endothelium. In contrast, pretreatment of the vessel segments with chrondroitinases (ABC or AC) had no detectable effect on /sup 125/I-AT III binding or on AT III anticoagulant activity. AT III binding to vessel segments was competitively inhibited by increasing concentration of platelet factor 4. Binding of the protease inhibitor to vessel segments was inhibited by chemical modification of AT III lysyl or tryptophan residues. These AT III derivatives retained progressive inhibitory activity. These data suggest that heparin-like molecules are present on the aortic vessel wall and mediate binding of AT III to the vessel surface, as well as enhancing the anticoagulant activity of AT III at these sites.

  11. Synchronous Carotid Bifurcation Endarterectomy and Retrograde Kissing Stenting of the Innominate and Left Common Carotid Artery in a Patient with a Bovine Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Carignano, Guido; Balderi, Alberto; Novali, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Management of the symptomatic multiple stenosis of supra-aortic vessels (MSSVs) in a “bovine” aortic arch (BAA) configuration is infrequently reported. The optimal treatment choice remains debatable. A successful hybrid treatment for a proximal critical stenosis of the innominate and left common carotid artery was performed in a high-risk patient with a tandem symptomatic lesion in the right carotid bifurcation and a concentric vulnerable plaque in the bovine trunk. This case supports the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of a combined carotid bifurcation endarterectomy and retrograde kissing stenting of common carotid arteries with cerebral protection after evaluation of radiological, anatomical, and clinical parameters. PMID:28487806

  12. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic root dilatation in adult patients after tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Cristina; Pinho, Teresa; Lebreiro, Ana; Silva Cardoso, José; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2013-06-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is an important tool after tetralogy of Fallot repair, of which aortic root dilatation is a recognized complication. In this study we aimed to assess its prevalence and potential predictors. We consecutively assessed adult patients by transthoracic echocardiography after tetralogy of Fallot repair, and divided them into two groups based on the maximum internal aortic diameter at the sinuses of Valsalva in parasternal long-axis view: group 1 with aortic root dilatation (≥38 mm) and group 2 without dilatation (<38 mm). A total of 53 patients were included, mean age 32±10 years, with a mean time since surgery of 23±7 years. An aortopulmonary shunt had been performed prior to complete repair in 25 patients, and a transannular patch was used in 19 patients. Aortic root measurement was possible in all patients. Aortic root dilatation was identified in eight patients (15%), all male. Male gender (p=0.001), body surface area (1.93±0.10 vs. 1.70±0.20 m(2), p=0.03) and increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (p=0.005) were predictors of aortic root dilatation. None of the surgical variables studied were predictors of aortic root dilatation. The prevalence of aortic root dilatation in this cohort was low and male gender was a predictor of its occurrence. The type of repair and time to surgery did not influence its occurrence. Quantification of aortic root diameter is possible by transthoracic echocardiography; we suggest indexing it to body surface area in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Aortic valve insufficiency in the teenager and young adult: the role of prosthetic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Scott M

    2013-10-01

    The contents of this article were presented in the session "Aortic insufficiency in the teenager" at the congenital parallel symposium of the 2013 Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) annual meeting. The accompanying articles detail the approaches of aortic valve repair and the Ross procedure.(1,2) The current article focuses on prosthetic valve replacement. For many young patients requiring aortic valve surgery, either aortic valve repair or a Ross procedure provides a good option. The advantages include avoidance of anticoagulation and potential for growth. In other patients, a prosthetic valve is an appropriate alternative. This article discusses the current state of knowledge regarding mechanical and bioprosthetic valve prostheses and their specific advantages relative to valve repair or a Ross procedure. In current practice, young patients requiring aortic valve surgery frequently undergo valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. In STS adult cardiac database, among patients ≤30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 34% had placement of a mechanical valve, 51% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 9% had aortic valve repair, and 2% had a Ross procedure. In the STS congenital database, among patients 12 to 30 years of age undergoing aortic valve surgery, 21% had placement of a mechanical valve, 18% had placement of a bioprosthetic valve, 30% had aortic valve repair, and 24% had a Ross procedure. In the future, the balance among these options may be altered by design improvements in prosthetic valves, alternatives to warfarin, the development of new patch materials for valve repair, and techniques to avoid Ross autograft failure.

  14. Interaction of blood platelets with a microfibrillar extract from adult bovine aorta: requirement for von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Fauvel, F; Grant, M E; Legrand, Y J; Souchon, H; Tobelem, G; Jackson, D S; Caen, J P

    1983-01-01

    Adult bovine aortic tissue was treated with 6 M guanidinium chloride in the presence of proteinase inhibitors to obtain an extract that was essentially devoid of collagenous components and appeared homogeneous by electron microscopy. When this extract was dispersed by sonication it was found to be a very potent inducer of human platelet aggregation. This interaction required the presence of von Willebrand factor and of its receptor (glycoprotein Ib) on platelet membrane. This was demonstrated by the fact that the aggregation of normal blood platelets resuspended in plasmas deficient in von Willebrand factor was significantly diminished as compared to aggregation in control plasma. Moreover, this aggregation was inhibited by a monoclonal antibody, IgG AN51, to platelet glycoprotein Ib. These studies provide direct biochemical evidence for the existence of a thrombogenic constituent of the vessel wall that is noncollagenous and von Willebrand factor-dependent. Images PMID:6601274

  15. Aortic valve replacement with the Cardioprotese Premium bovine pericardium bioprosthesis: four-year clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Fábio Rocha; da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Fornazari, Daniele de Fátima; Collatusso, Claudinei; Ferreira, Andreia Dumsch de Aragon; Lopes, Sergio Veiga; Fernandes, Tadeu Augusto

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study reports the initial clinical and echocardiographic results of the Premium bioprosthetic aortic valve up to 4 years of follow-up. METHODS Between October 2007 and July 2011, 121 consecutive patients were submitted for aortic valve replacement with the Premium bioprosthetic valve. The mean age was 68 ± 9 years and 64 patients were males. The patients were periodically evaluated by clinical and echocardiographic examinations. The mean follow-up was 21 months (min = 2, max = 48), yielding 217 patients/year for the analysis. RESULTS The hospital mortality was 8%. Late survival at 3 years was 89% (95% CI: 81.9–93.3%), and 80% of the patients were in NYHA functional class I/II. The rates of valve-related complications were low, with a linearized incidence of 0.9%/100 patients/year for thromboembolic complications, 0% for haemorrhagic events and 0.9%/100 patients/year of bacterial endocarditis. There was no case of primary structural valve dysfunction. The mean effective orifice area was 1.61 ± 0.45 cm2; mean gradient 13 ± 5 mmHg and peak gradient 22 ± 9 mmHg. Significant patient–prosthesis mismatch was found in only 11% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS The Premium bioprosthetic aortic valve demonstrated very satisfactory clinical and echocardiographic results up to 4 years, similar to other commercially available, third-generation bioprosthetic valves. PMID:22588029

  16. Patch annulo-aortoplasty in an adult patient with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoto; Morimoto, Keisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    A 39-year-old woman with familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia had supravalvular and valvular aortic stenosis. Modified Nick's procedure and aortic valve replacement was performed to relieve both the supravalvular and annular stenoses. At surgery, the ascending aorta was found to be narrowing at the level of the sinotubular junction, which was compatible with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis. Histological examination of the aortic cusps showed sclerotic change due to hypercholesterolemia. These findings indicated that familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia caused valvular aortic stenosis and exacerbated congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis.

  17. One-Stage Hybrid Procedure to Treat Aortic Coarctation Complicated by Intracardiac Anomalies in Two Adults.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiao; Lin, Ke; Gan, Chang-ping; Feng, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The traditional approach for treating aortic coarctation with intracardiac anomalies in adults is surgery using 2 surgical incisions or a two-stage hybrid method with a peripheral artery pathway that requires intervention. This paper reports a one-stage hybrid procedure to treat this type of congenital heart disease using 1 surgical incision combined with an ascending aorta puncture intervention approach as transaortic intervention approach. Here, we present 2 aortic coarctation cases; 1 complicated by ventricular septal defect and patent ductus arteriosus, and another complicated by an incomplete atrioventricular septal defect and mitral valve cleft. Both were successfully treated by our one-stage hybrid approach.

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis of variations in branching patterns of the adult aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Popieluszko, Patrick; Henry, Brandon Michael; Sanna, Beatrice; Hsieh, Wan Chin; Saganiak, Karolina; Pękala, Przemysław A; Walocha, Jerzy A; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2017-08-30

    The aortic arch (AA) is the main conduit of the left side of the heart, providing a blood supply to the head, neck, and upper limbs. As it travels through the thorax, the pattern in which it gives off the branches to supply these structures can vary. Variations of these branching patterns have been studied; however, a study providing a comprehensive incidence of these variations has not yet been conducted. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of all the studies that report prevalence data on AA variants and to provide incidence data on the most common variants. A systematic search of online databases including PubMed, Embase, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, SciELO, BIOSIS, and CNKI was performed for literature describing incidence of AA variations in adults. Studies including prevalence data on adult patients or cadavers were collected and their data analyzed. A total of 51 articles were included (N = 23,882 arches). Seven of the most common variants were analyzed. The most common variants found included the classic branching pattern, defined as a brachiocephalic trunk, a left common carotid, and a left subclavian artery (80.9%); the bovine arch variant (13.6%); and the left vertebral artery variant (2.8%). Compared by geographic data, bovine arch variants were noted to have a prevalence as high as 26.8% in African populations. Although patients who have an AA variant are often asymptomatic, they compose a significant portion of the population of patients and pose a greater risk of hemorrhage and ischemia during surgery in the thorax. Because of the possibility of encountering such variants, it is prudent for surgeons to consider potential variations in planning procedures, especially of an endovascular nature, in the thorax. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and partial characterization of an adenosine(5')tetraphospho(5')adenosine hydrolase on intact bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ogilvie, A; Lüthje, J; Pohl, U; Busse, R

    1989-01-01

    The biologically active dinucleotides adenosine(5')tetraphospho(5')adenosine (Ap4A) and adenosine(5')-triphospho(5')adenosine (Ap3A), which are both releasable into the circulation from storage pools in thrombocytes, are catabolized by intact bovine aortic endothelial cells. 1. Compared with extracellular ATP and ADP, which are very rapidly hydrolysed, the degradation of Ap4A and Ap3A by endothelial ectohydrolases is relatively slow, resulting in a much longer half-life on the endothelial surface of the blood vessel. The products of hydrolysis are further degraded and finally taken up as adenosine. 2. Ap4A hydrolase has high affinity for its substrate (Km 10 microM). 3. ATP as well as AMP transiently accumulates in the extracellular fluid, suggesting an asymmetric split of Ap4A by the ectoenzyme. 4. Mg2+ or Mn2+ at millimolar concentration are needed for maximal activity; Zn2+ and Ca2+ are inhibitory. 5. The hydrolysis of Ap4A is retarded by other nucleotides, such as ATP and Ap3A, which are released from platelets simultaneously with Ap4A. PMID:2541689

  20. Inhibition of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cell proliferation by sodium spirulan, a new sulfated polysaccharide isolated from Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Hamada, Chieko; Yamamoto, Chika; Shimada, Satomi; Lee, Jung-Bum; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2002-06-01

    Sodium spirulan (Na-SP) is a sulfated polysaccharide isolated from the blue-green alga Spirulina platensis, which consists of two types of disaccharide repeating units, O-hexuronosyl-rhamnose (aldobiuronic acid) and O-rhamnosyl-3-O-methylrhamnose (acofriose) with sulfate groups, other minor saccharides and sodium ion. Vascular endothelial cells are present on the inner surface of blood vessels in a monolayer and have anticoagulant properties. To address the question whether Na-SP influences the maintenance of endothelial cell monolayers, we investigated the proliferation of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells treated with Na-SP. It was found that Na-SP has an inhibitory activity on endothelial cell proliferation accompanied with suppression of whole protein synthesis but without non-specific cell damage. The inhibitory activity of Na-SP was the strongest when compared to that of heparan sulfate, heparin, dextran sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate A/C and hyaluronan. Furthermore, it was shown that the inhibitory activity of Na-SP disappeared by either desulfation or depolymerization. The present data suggest that Na-SP is a unique sulfated polysaccharide that strongly inhibits vascular endothelial cell proliferation, and the inhibitory activity requires polymerization of sulfated O-rhamnosyl-acofriose repeating units.

  1. Replication of genetic association studies in aortic stenosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Ducharme, Valérie; Lamontagne, Maxime; Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Mathieu, Patrick; Pibarot, Philippe; Bossé, Yohan

    2011-11-01

    Only a handful of studies have attempted to unravel the genetic architecture of calcific aortic valve stenosis (AS). The goal of this study was to validate genes previously associated with AS. Seven genes were assessed: APOB, APOE, CTGF, IL10, PTH, TGFB1, and VDR. Each gene was tested for a comprehensive set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs were genotyped in 457 patients who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement, and allele frequencies were compared to 3,294 controls. A missense mutation in the APOB gene was significantly associated with AS (rs1042031, E4181K, p = 0.00001). A second SNP located 5.6 kilobases downstream of the APOB stop codon was also associated with the disease (rs6725189, p = 0.000013). Six SNPs surrounding the IL10 locus were strongly associated with AS (0.02 > p > 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). The most compelling association for IL10 was found with a promoter polymorphism (rs1800872) well known to regulate the production of the encoded anti-inflammatory cytokine. The frequency of the low-producing allele was greater in cases compared to controls (30% vs 20%, p = 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). SNPs in PTH, TGFB1, and VDR had nominal p values <0.05 but did not resist Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, this study suggests that subjects carrying specific polymorphisms in the IL10 and APOB genes are at higher risk for developing AS.

  2. Adult aortic coarctation discovered incidentally after the rupture of sinus of Valsalva aneurysm: combined surgical and interventional approach.

    PubMed

    Ouali, Sana; Kortas, Chokri; Brockmeier, Konrad; Boughzela, Essia

    2011-12-01

    Combination of ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA), and a coexisting asymptomatic adult aortic isthmic coarctation is extremely rare. The timing and sequence of surgical and/or interventional repair of these two pathologies are controversial. We present a case of a 37-year-old male who was admitted to our department because of severe acute congestive heart failure and signs of ruptured aneurysm of the SV into the right ventricle. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography confirmed the communication between an important right coronary SVA and right ventricle, bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic regurgitation, and revealed severe aortic coarctation. Because of the severe dilation of right sinus of Valsalva a surgical repair of the ruptured aneurysm was performed. Aortic coarctation was treated four weeks later by a percutaneous stent-graft implantation. This case report supports the concept that hybrid approach is feasible in patients with ruptured SVA and aortic coarctation in adulthood.

  3. Thoracic Aorta 3D Hemodynamics in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Bradley D.; van Ooij, Pim; Barker, Alex J.; Carr, Maria; Gabbour, Maya; Schnell, Susanne; Jarvis, Kelly B.; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Rigsby, Cynthia; Robinson, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the 3D hemodynamics in the thoracic aorta of pediatric and young adult bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) patients. Methods 4D flow MRI was performed in 30 pediatric and young adult BAV patients (age: 13.9 ± 4.4 (range: [3.4, 20.7]) years old, M:F = 17:13) as part of this Institutional Review Board-approved study. Nomogram-based aortic root Z-scores were calculated to assess aortic dilatation and degree of aortic stenosis (AS) severity was assessed on MRI. Data analysis included calculation of time-averaged systolic 3D wall shear stress (WSSsys) along the entire aorta wall, and regional quantification of maximum and mean WSSsys and peak systolic velocity (velsys) in the ascending aorta (AAo), arch, and descending aorta (DAo). The 4D flow MRI AAo velsys was also compared with echocardiography peak velocity measurements. Results There was a positive correlation with both mean and max AAo WSSsys and peak AAo velsys (mean: r = 0.84, P < 0.001, max: r = 0.94, P < 0.001) and AS (mean: rS = 0.43, P = 0.02, max: rS = 0.70, P < 0.001). AAo peak velocity was significantly higher when measured with echo compared with 4D flow MRI (2.1 ± 0.98 m/s versus 1.27 ± 0.49 m/s, P < 0.001). Conclusion In pediatric and young adult patients with BAV, AS and peak ascending aorta velocity are associated with increased AAo WSS, while aortic dilation, age, and body surface area do not significantly impact AAo hemodynamics. Prospective studies are required to establish the role of WSS as a risk-stratification tool in these patients. PMID:25644073

  4. Redo sternotomy for extra-anatomical correction of aortic coarctation and mitral repair in an adult after failed endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Ozker, E; Saritas, B; Vuran, C; Yoruker, U; Kocyigit, O I; Turkoz, R

    2011-07-01

    Recently, extra-anatomical bypass surgery has been widely used in complicated adult aortic coarctation cases with concomitant intracardiac repair. Stent implantation has been widely used for primary aortic coarctation as well. The procedure has been shown to be effective with long term follow ups. However, failed stent implantations like stent fracture and dislodgement may complicate the clinical status and subsequent surgical procedure. Extra-anatomic bypass can provide effective results and lower morbidity in cases with concomitant intracardiac problems and stent failure. Here we present an adult aortic coarctation patient who had undergone a Bentall operation and two unsuccessful stent implantations for recurrent aortic coarctation. The patient then got an extra-anatomic bypass for aortic coarctation and concomitant mitral valve commissurotomy through median sternotomy.

  5. A comparison of two forms of the continuity equation in the Trifecta bovine pericardial aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Parkin, Denise; Roxburgh, James; Bapat, Vinayak; Young, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim To compare the classical and simplified form of the continuity equation in small Trifecta valves. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of post-operative echocardiograms performed for clinical reasons after implantation of Trifecta bioprosthetic valves. Results There were 60 patients aged 74 (range 38–89) years. For the valves of size 19, 21 and 23mm, the mean gradient was 11.3, 10.7 and 9.7mmHg, respectively. The effective orifice areas by the classical form of the continuity equation were 1.4, 1.7 and 1.9cm2, respectively. There was a good correlation between the two forms of the continuity equation, but they were significantly different using a t-test (P<0.00001). Results using the classical form were a mean 0.11 (s.d. 0.18)cm2 larger than those using the simple formula. Conclusion Haemodynamic function of the Trifecta valve in the small aortic root is good. There are significant differences between the classical and simplified forms of the continuity equation. PMID:27249811

  6. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    van Slooten, Ymkje J; van Melle, Joost P; Freling, Hendrik G; Bouma, Berto J; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Jongbloed, Monique Rm; Post, Martijn C; Sieswerda, Gertjan T; Huis In 't Veld, Anna; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A; Pieper, Petronella G

    2016-01-01

    To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis later in life. However, the prevalence and clinical consequences of aortic PPM in ACHD are presently unknown. From the national Dutch Congenital Corvitia (CONCOR) registry, we identified 207 ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis for this cross-sectional cohort study. Severe PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.65 cm2/m2 and moderate PPM as an indexed orifice area ≤0.85 cm2/m2 measured using echocardiography. Exercise capacity was reported as percentage of predicted exercise capacity (PPEC). Of the 207 patients, 68% was male, 71% had a mechanical prosthesis and mean age at inclusion was 43.9 years ±11.4. The prevalence of PPM was 42%, comprising 23% severe PPM and 19% moderate PPM. Prevalence of PPM was higher in patients with mechanical prostheses (p<0.001). PPM was associated with poorer exercise capacity (mean PPEC 84% vs. 92%; p=0.048, mean difference =-8.3%, p=0.047). Mean follow-up was 2.6±1.1 years during which New York Heart Association (NYHA) class remained stable in most patients. PPM showed no significant effect on death or hospitalisation during follow-up (p=0.218). In this study we report a high prevalence (42%) of PPM in ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis and an independent association of PPM with diminished exercise capacity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Inclusion cylinder method for aortic valve replacement utilising the Ross operation in adults with predominant aortic stenosis – 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Skillington, Peter D.; Mokhles, M. Mostafa; Wilson, William; Grigg, Leeanne; Larobina, Marco; O'Keefe, Michael; Takkenberg, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Background: To report our experience with the Ross operation in patients with predominant aortic stenosis (AS) using an inclusion cylinder (IC) method. Methods: Out of 324 adults undergoing a Ross operation, 204 patients of mean age of 41.3 years (limits 16–62) underwent this procedure for either AS or mixed AS and regurgitation (AS/AR) between October, 1992 and February, 2012, implanting the PA with an IC method. Clinical follow up and serial echo data for this group is 97% complete with late mortality follow up 99% complete. Results: There has been zero (0%) early mortality, and late survival at 15 years is 98% (96%, 100%). Only one re-operation on the aortic valve for progressive aortic regurgitation (AR) has been required with freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years being 99% (96%, 100%). The freedom from all re-operations on the aortic and pulmonary valves at 15 years is 97% (94%, 100%). Echo analysis at the most recent study shows that 98% have nil, trivial or mild AR. Aortic root size has remained stable, shown by long-term (15 year) echo follow up. Conclusions: In an experience spanning 19 years, the Ross operation used for predominant AS using the IC method described, results in 99% freedom from re-operation on the aortic valve at 15 years, better than any other tissue or mechanical valve. For adults under 65 years without significant co-morbidities who present with predominant AS, the pulmonary autograft inserted with this technique gives excellent results. PMID:24749112

  8. Percutaneous recanalization and balloon angioplasty of congenital isolated local atresia of the aortic isthmus in adults.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Mandalay, A; Rajendiran, G

    2001-08-01

    Congenital isolated local atresia of the aortic isthmus is anatomically similar and morphogenetically related to congenital coarctation of the aorta and was encountered in 4 out of 26 consecutive adult patients selected for coarctation angioplasty at our center. Anterograde recanalization of the atresia was safely and successfully accomplished in all four patients, using a brachial approach. Balloon dilation in the four patients, with ancillary stent implantation in one patient, resulted in reduction of translesion gradient from 84 +/- 11 mm Hg to 9 +/- 7 mm Hg without complications. Angiography in the three non-stented patients after a mean follow-up of 13 months showed no evidence of restenosis, dissection or aneurysm formation, though one patient had mild dilatation of the posterior aspect of the aortic isthmus. The clinical presentation of patients with isolated local aortic atresia, and their short- to mid-term response to percutaneous treatment, is similar to that of patients with isolated severe coarctation of aorta. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Resting Heart Rate and Aortic Stiffness in Normotensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Logan, Jeongok G; Kim, Suk-Sun

    2016-11-01

    Large-artery stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is considered the gold standard measure of arterial stiffness. A resting heart rate is an easily measured vital sign that is also associated with CVD morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have reported the significant relationship of a resting heart rate with arterial stiffness as measured by cfPWV only in hypertensive subjects; their relationship in nonhypertensive subjects remains unknown. The present study, therefore, examined their relationship in normotensive subjects. In 102 healthy Korean Americans between ages 20 and 60 years, their resting heart rate was measured by an automated blood pressure measuring device after a 10 minute rest in the supine position. Arterial stiffness was measured by cfPWV using the SphygmoCor device. The mean resting heart rate of participants (mean age, 39.64 years; 59% women) was 61.91 bpm (standard deviation [SD], 9.62 bpm) and mean the cfPWV was 6.99 (SD, 1.14) m/s. A multiple regression analysis showed that a resting heart rate is a significant predictor of cfPWV after controlling for age, body mass index, and mean arterial pressure. For one bpm increase of resting heart rate, cfPWV increased approximately 0.02 m/s. Our results suggest that a higher resting heart rate is independently associated with increased arterial stiffness as measured by cfPWV in normotensive adults. Arterial stiffness may explain the prognostic role of an individual's heart rate in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  10. Resting Heart Rate and Aortic Stiffness in Normotensive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Jeongok G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Large-artery stiffness is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is considered the gold standard measure of arterial stiffness. A resting heart rate is an easily measured vital sign that is also associated with CVD morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have reported the significant relationship of a resting heart rate with arterial stiffness as measured by cfPWV only in hypertensive subjects; their relationship in nonhypertensive subjects remains unknown. The present study, therefore, examined their relationship in normotensive subjects. Subjects and Methods In 102 healthy Korean Americans between ages 20 and 60 years, their resting heart rate was measured by an automated blood pressure measuring device after a 10 minute rest in the supine position. Arterial stiffness was measured by cfPWV using the SphygmoCor device. Results The mean resting heart rate of participants (mean age, 39.64 years; 59% women) was 61.91 bpm (standard deviation [SD], 9.62 bpm) and mean the cfPWV was 6.99 (SD, 1.14) m/s. A multiple regression analysis showed that a resting heart rate is a significant predictor of cfPWV after controlling for age, body mass index, and mean arterial pressure. For one bpm increase of resting heart rate, cfPWV increased approximately 0.02 m/s. Conclusion Our results suggest that a higher resting heart rate is independently associated with increased arterial stiffness as measured by cfPWV in normotensive adults. Arterial stiffness may explain the prognostic role of an individual's heart rate in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:27826343

  11. Differential expression of cartilage and bone-related proteins in pediatric and adult diseased aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    Wirrig, Elaine E.; Hinton, Robert B.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 5 million people are affected with aortic valve disease (AoVD) in the United States. The most common treatment is aortic valve (AoV) replacement surgery, however, replacement valves are susceptible to failure, necessitating additional surgeries. The molecular mechanisms underlying disease progression and late AoV calcification are not well understood. Recent studies suggest that genes involved in bone and cartilage development play an active role in osteogenic-like calcification in human calcific AoVD (CAVD). In an effort to define the molecular pathways involved in AoVD progression and calcification, expression of markers of valve mesenchymal progenitors, chondrogenic precursors, and osteogenic differentiation was compared in pediatric non-calcified and adult calcified AoV specimens. Valvular interstitial cell (VIC) activation, extracellular matrix (ECM) disorganization, and markers of valve mesenchymal and skeletal chondrogenic progenitor cells were observed in both pediatric and adult AoVD. However, activated BMP signaling, increased expression of cartilage and bone-type collagens, and increased expression of the osteogenic marker Runx2 are observed in adult diseased AoVs and are not observed in the majority of pediatric diseased valves, representing a marked distinction in the molecular profile between pediatric and adult diseased AoVs. The combined evidence suggests that an actively regulated osteochondrogenic disease process underlies the pathological changes affecting AoVD progression, ultimately resulting in stenotic AoVD. Both pediatric and adult diseased AoVs express protein markers of valve mesenchymal and chondrogenic progenitor cells while adult diseased AoVs also express proteins involved in osteogenic calcification. These findings provide specific molecular indicators of AoVD progression, which may lead to identification of early disease markers and the development of potential therapeutics. PMID:21163264

  12. Differential expression of cartilage and bone-related proteins in pediatric and adult diseased aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Elaine E; Hinton, Robert B; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2011-03-01

    Approximately 5 million people are affected with aortic valve disease (AoVD) in the United States. The most common treatment is aortic valve (AoV) replacement surgery, however, replacement valves are susceptible to failure, necessitating additional surgeries. The molecular mechanisms underlying disease progression and late AoV calcification are not well understood. Recent studies suggest that genes involved in bone and cartilage development play an active role in osteogenic-like calcification in human calcific AoVD (CAVD). In an effort to define the molecular pathways involved in AoVD progression and calcification, expression of markers of valve mesenchymal progenitors, chondrogenic precursors, and osteogenic differentiation was compared in pediatric non-calcified and adult calcified AoV specimens. Valvular interstitial cell (VIC) activation, extracellular matrix (ECM) disorganization, and markers of valve mesenchymal and skeletal chondrogenic progenitor cells were observed in both pediatric and adult AoVD. However, activated BMP signaling, increased expression of cartilage and bone-type collagens, and increased expression of the osteogenic marker Runx2 are observed in adult diseased AoVs. They are not observed in the majority of pediatric diseased valves, representing a marked distinction in the molecular profile between pediatric and adult diseased AoVs. The combined evidence suggests that an actively regulated osteochondrogenic disease process underlies the pathological changes affecting AoVD progression, ultimately resulting in stenotic AoVD. Both pediatric and adult diseased AoVs express protein markers of valve mesenchymal and chondrogenic progenitor cells while adult diseased AoVs also express proteins involved in osteogenic calcification. These findings provide specific molecular indicators of AoVD progression, which may lead to identification of early disease markers and the development of potential therapeutics.

  13. MRI in adult patients with aortic coarctation: diagnosis and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, B; Abbas, A; McParland, P; Fitzsimmons, S; Shambrook, J; Peebles, C; Brown, I; Harden, S

    2015-04-01

    Aortic coarctation is a disease that usually presents in infancy; however, a proportion of patients present for the first time in adulthood. These lesions generally require repair with either surgery or interventional techniques. The success of these techniques means that increasing numbers of patients are presenting for follow-up imaging in adulthood, whether their coarctation was initially repaired in infancy or as adults. Thus, the adult presenting to the radiologist for assessment of possible coarctation or follow-up of coarctation repair is not an uncommon scenario. In this review, we present details of the MRI protocols and MRI findings in these patients so that a confident and accurate assessment can be made.

  14. Three-dimensional 10% cyclic strain reduces bovine aortic endothelial cell angiogenic sprout length and augments tubulogenesis in tubular fibrin hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gassman, Andrew A; Kuprys, Tomas; Ucuzian, Areck A; Brey, Eric; Matsumura, Akie; Pang, Yonggang; Larson, Jef; Greisler, Howard P

    2011-05-01

    The development of a functional microvasculature is critical to the long-term survival of implanted tissue-engineered constructs. Dynamic culture conditions have been shown to significantly modulate phenotypic characteristics and stimulate proliferation of cells within hydrogel-based tissue engineered blood vessels. Although prior work has described the effects uniaxial or equibiaxial mechanical stimulation has on endothelial cells, no work has outlined effects of three-dimensional mechanical stimulation on endothelial cells within tubular vessel analogues. We demonstrate here that 7 days of 10% cyclic volumetric distension has a deleterious effect on the average length and density of angiogenic sprouts derived from pellets of bovine aortic endothelial cells. Although both groups demonstrated lumen formation, the sprouts grown under dynamic culture conditions typically had wider, less-branching sprout patterns. These results suggest that prolonged mechanical stimulation could represent a cue for angiogenic sprouts to preferentially develop larger lumens over cellular migration and subsequent sprout length.

  15. Effects of space flight on the histological characteristics of the aortic depressor nerve in the adult rat: electron microscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Masao; Shimizu, Tsuyoshi; Miyake, Masao; Miyamoto, Yukako; Katsuda, Shin-Ichiro; O-Ishi, Hirotaka; Nagayama, Tadanori; Waki, Hidefumi; Katahira, Kiyoaki; Wago, Haruyuki; Okouchi, Toshiyasu; Nagaoka, Shunji; Mukai, Chiaki

    2004-06-01

    The effects of microgravity on the histological characteristics of the aortic depressor nerve, which is the afferent of the aortic baroreflex arc, were determined in 10 female adult rats. The rats were assigned for nursing neonates in the Space Shuttle Columbia or in the animal facility on the ground (NASA Neurolab, STS-90), and were housed for 16 days under microgravity in space (microg, n=5) or under one force of gravity on Earth (one-g, n=5). In the Schwann cell unit in which the axons of unmyelinated fibers are surrounded by one Schwann cell, the average number of axons per unit in the microg group was 2.1 +/- 1.6 (mean +/- SD, n=312) and significantly less than that in the one-g group (3.0 +/- 2.9, n=397, p<0.05). The proportion of unmyelinated fibers in the aortic depressor nerve in the microg group was 64.5 +/- 4.4% and significantly less than that in the one-g group (74.0 +/- 7.3%, p<0.05). These results show that there is a decrease in the number of high-threshold unmyelinated fibers in the aortic depressor nerve in adult rats flown on the Shuttle Orbiter, suggesting that the aortic baroreflex is depressed under microgravity during space flight.

  16. Brachial Pressure Control Fails to Account for Most Distending Pressure-Independent, Age-Related Aortic Hemodynamic Changes in Adults.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Bryan; Norton, Gavin R; Booysen, Hendrik L; Sibiya, Moekanyi J; Raymond, Andrew; Maseko, Muzi J; Majane, Olebogeng H I; Libhaber, Elena; Sareli, Pinhas; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2016-05-01

    Although several characteristics of aortic function, which are largely determined by age, predict outcomes beyond brachial blood pressure (BP), the extent to which brachial BP control accounts for age-related variations in aortic function is uncertain. We aimed to determine the extent to which brachial BP control in the general population (systolic/diastolic BP < 140/90 mm Hg) accounts for age-related aortic hemodynamic changes across the adult lifespan. Central aortic pulse pressure (PPc), backward wave pressure (Pb), pulse wave velocity (PWV), and PP amplification (PPamp) (applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software) were determined in 1,185 participants from a community sample (age >16 years; 36.4% uncontrolled BP). With adjustments for distending pressure (mean arterial pressure, MAP), no increases in PPc, Pb, or PWV and decreases in PPamp were noted in those with an uncontrolled brachial BP younger than 50 years. In those older than 50 years with an uncontrolled brachial BP, MAP-adjusted aortic hemodynamic variables were only modestly different to those with a controlled brachial BP (PPc, 46±14 vs. 42±15 mm Hg, P < 0.02, Pb, 23±8 vs. 21±8 mm Hg, PWV, 8.42±3.21 vs. 8.19±3.37 m/second, PPamp, 1.21±0.17 vs. 1.21±0.14). Nonetheless, with adjustments for MAP, marked age-related increases in PPc, Pb, and PWV and decreases in PPamp were noted in those with uncontrolled and controlled brachial BP across the adult lifespan (P < 0.0001). Brachial BP control in the general population fails to account for most distending pressure-independent, age-related changes in aortic hemodynamics across the adult lifespan. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Mean Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  18. Myelopathy in adult aortic coarctation: Causes and caveats of an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Chandan; Verma, Ashish; Bansal, Anand; Shukla, Ram C; Srivastava, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old female presenting with acute-onset paraplegia was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cervico-dorsal spine. On MRI, multiple tortuous dilated vessels were noted in the epidural space with long segment cord compression and imaging features of compressive myelopathy. Associated small acute cervico-dorsal epidural hematoma was also noted in the same region. Computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed subsequently which revealed post-ductal coarctation of aorta with multiple arterial collaterals in the chest wall and spinal canal. An extensive review of English language literature pertaining to the clinical presentations of adult aortic coarctation revealed only few reports of acute compressive myelopathy due to spinal epidural collateral vessels. Further, presentation at such a late age has not been reported before. In the present case, apart from a hypertrophied anterior spinal artery and perispinal collaterals, an anterior epidural hematoma was an additional important factor in the causation of myelopathy. PMID:28104936

  19. Absorption and safety of serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Audrey L; Mathews, David W; Hinkle, John E; Petschow, Bryon W; Weaver, Eric M; Detzel, Christopher J; Klein, Gerald L; Bradshaw, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have shown that oral administration of bovine immunoglobulin protein preparations is safe and provides nutritional and intestinal health benefits. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the plasma amino acid response following a single dose of serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) and whether bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) is present in stool or in blood following multiple doses of SBI in healthy volunteers. Methods A total of 42 healthy adults were administered a single dose of placebo or SBI at one of three doses (5 g, 10 g, or 20 g) in blinded fashion and then continued on SBI (2.5 g, 5 g, or 10 g) twice daily (BID) for an additional 2 weeks. Serial blood samples were collected for amino acid analysis following a single dose of placebo or SBI. Stool and blood samples were collected to assess bovine IgG levels. Results The area under the curve from time 0 minute to 180 minutes for essential and total amino acids as well as tryptophan increased following ingestion of 5 g, 10 g, or 20 g of SBI, with a significant difference between placebo and all doses of SBI (p<0.05) for essential amino acids and tryptophan but only the 10 g and 20 g doses for total amino acids. Bovine IgG was detected in the stool following multiple doses of SBI. No quantifiable levels of bovine IgG were determined in plasma samples 90 minutes following administration of a single dose or multiple doses of SBI. Conclusion Oral administration of SBI leads to increases in plasma essential amino acids during transit through the gastrointestinal tract and is safe at levels as high as 20 g/day. PMID:27980432

  20. Determinants of Aortic Root Dilatation and Reference Values Among Young Adults Over a 20-Year Period: Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.

    PubMed

    Teixido-Tura, Gisela; Almeida, Andre L C; Choi, Eui-Young; Gjesdal, Ola; Jacobs, David R; Dietz, Harry C; Liu, Kiang; Sidney, Stephen; Lewis, Cora E; Garcia-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Artur; Gidding, Samuel; Lima, João A C

    2015-07-01

    Aortic size increases with age, but factors related to such dilatation in healthy young adult population have not been studied. We aim to evaluate changes in aortic dimensions and its principal correlates among young adults over a 20-year time period. Reference values for aortic dimensions in young adults by echocardiography are also provided. Healthy Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study participants aged 23 to 35 years in 1990-1991 (n=3051) were included after excluding 18 individuals with significant valvular dysfunction. Aortic root diameter (ARD) by M-mode echocardiography at year-5 (43.7% men; age, 30.2 ± 3.6 years) and year-25 CARDIA exams was obtained. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to assess associations of ARD with clinical data at years-5 and -25. ARD from year-5 was used to establish reference values of ARD in healthy young adults. ARD at year-25 was greater in men (33.3 ± 3.7 versus 28.7 ± 3.4 mm; P<0.001) and in whites (30.9 ± 4.3 versus 30.5 ± 4.1 mm; P=0.006). On multivariable analysis, ARD at year-25 was positively correlated with male sex, white ethnicity, age, height, weight, 20-year gain in weight, active smoking at baseline, and 20-year increase in diastolic, systolic, and mean arterial pressure. A figure showing the estimated 95th percentile of ARD by age and body surface area stratified by race and sex is provided. This study demonstrates that smoking, blood pressure, and increase in body weight are the main modifiable correlates of aortic root dilation during young adulthood. Our study also provides reference values for ARD in young adults.

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully will restrict blood flow. This is called aortic stenosis. If there is also a leak, it is ... TAVR is used for people with severe aortic stenosis who aren't ... valve . In adults, aortic stenosis usually occurs due to calcium ...

  2. Unexpected death caused by rupture of a dilated aorta in an adult male with aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Knudsen, Peter Thiis

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is a congenital aortic narrowing. We describe for the first time the findings obtained by unenhanced post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in a case where the death was caused by cardiac tamponade from a ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch without dissection combined with aortic coarctation. The patient, a 46-year-old man, was found dead at home. PMCT showed haemopericardium and dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch. This appearance led to the mistaken interpretation that the images represented a dissecting aneurysm. The autopsy showed instead a thin-walled and floppy dilatation of the ascending aorta and aortic arch with a coarctation just proximal to the ligamentum arteriosum. A longitudinal tear was found in the posterior aortic wall just above the valves. Blood in the surrounding soft tissue intersected with a large haematoma (1000ml) in the pericardial sac. Cardiac hypertrophy (556g) was observed in the patient, though no other cardiovascular abnormalities were found. Histological analysis showed cystic medial necrosis of the ascending aortic wall. A ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch without aortic dissection associated with AC is an uncommon cause of haemopericardium that has only been described a few times before. The case is discussed in relation to other reported cases and in the context of the present understanding of this condition.

  3. Quality of life and prosthetic aortic valve selection in non-elderly adult patients.

    PubMed

    Korteland, Nelleke M; Top, Derya; Borsboom, Gerard J J M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M

    2016-06-01

    This study assesses quality of life in relation to prosthetic aortic valve selection and preferences for shared decision-making among non-elderly adult patients after aortic valve replacement (AVR). A single-centre consecutive cohort of 497 AVR patients who underwent AVR between the age of 18 and 60 years was cross-sectionally surveyed 1-10 years after AVR. Health-related quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey, SF-36), valve-specific quality of life, patient experience with and preferences for involvement and final decision in prosthetic valve selection were investigated. Two-hundred and forty patients (48%) responded. The median age was 57 years (range 26-70). Compared with the general age-matched Dutch population, AVR patients reported worse physical health, but better mental health. Biological valve recipients reported lower general health than mechanical valve recipients. Mechanical valve recipients had more doubts about the decision to undergo surgery, were more bothered by valve sound, the frequency of doctor visits and blood tests, and possible bleeding, but were less afraid of a possible reoperation. Eighty-nine percent were of the opinion that it is important to be involved in prosthetic valve selection, whereas 64% agreed that they actually had been involved. A better patient experience with involvement in prosthetic valve selection was associated with better mental health (P = 0.036). Given the observed suboptimal patient involvement in prosthetic valve selection, the broad patient support for shared decision-making, and the positive association between patient involvement in prosthetic valve selection and mental health, tools to support shared decision-making would be useful in the setting of heart valve replacement. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  4. Strain activation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and alignment: study of strain dependency and the role of protein kinase A and C signaling pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, I.; Cohen, C. R.; Kamal, K.; Li, G.; Shin, T.; Du, W.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype can be altered by physical forces as demonstrated by cyclic strain-induced changes in proliferation, orientation, and secretion of macromolecules. However, the magnitude of strain required and the intracellular coupling pathways remain ill defined. To examine the strain requirements for SMC proliferation, we selectively seeded bovine aortic SMC either on the center or periphery of silastic membranes which were deformed with 150 mm Hg vacuum (0-7% center; 7-24% periphery). SMC located in either the center or peripheral regions showed enhanced proliferation compared to cells grown under the absence of cyclic strain. Moreover, SMC located in the center region demonstrated significantly (P < 0.005) greater proliferation as compared to those in the periphery. In contrast, SMC exposed to high strain (7-24%) demonstrated alignment perpendicular to the strain gradient, whereas SMC in the center (0-7%) remained aligned randomly. To determine the mechanisms of these phenomena, we examined the effect of cyclic strain on bovine aortic SMC signaling pathways. We observed strain-induced stimulation of the cyclic AMP pathway including adenylate cyclase activity and cyclic AMP accumulation. In addition, exposure of SMC to cyclic strain caused a significant increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity and enzyme translocation from the cytosol to a particulate fraction. Further study was conducted to examine the effect of strain magnitude on signaling, particularly protein kinase A (PKA) activity as well as cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein levels. We observed significantly (P < 0.05) greater PKA activity and CRE binding protein levels in SMC located in the center as compared to the peripheral region. However, inhibition of PKA (with 10 microM Rp-cAMP) or PKC (with 5-20 ng/ml staurosporine) failed to alter either the strain-induced increase in SMC proliferation or alignment. These data characterize the strain determinants for activation of

  5. Strain activation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and alignment: study of strain dependency and the role of protein kinase A and C signaling pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, I.; Cohen, C. R.; Kamal, K.; Li, G.; Shin, T.; Du, W.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype can be altered by physical forces as demonstrated by cyclic strain-induced changes in proliferation, orientation, and secretion of macromolecules. However, the magnitude of strain required and the intracellular coupling pathways remain ill defined. To examine the strain requirements for SMC proliferation, we selectively seeded bovine aortic SMC either on the center or periphery of silastic membranes which were deformed with 150 mm Hg vacuum (0-7% center; 7-24% periphery). SMC located in either the center or peripheral regions showed enhanced proliferation compared to cells grown under the absence of cyclic strain. Moreover, SMC located in the center region demonstrated significantly (P < 0.005) greater proliferation as compared to those in the periphery. In contrast, SMC exposed to high strain (7-24%) demonstrated alignment perpendicular to the strain gradient, whereas SMC in the center (0-7%) remained aligned randomly. To determine the mechanisms of these phenomena, we examined the effect of cyclic strain on bovine aortic SMC signaling pathways. We observed strain-induced stimulation of the cyclic AMP pathway including adenylate cyclase activity and cyclic AMP accumulation. In addition, exposure of SMC to cyclic strain caused a significant increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity and enzyme translocation from the cytosol to a particulate fraction. Further study was conducted to examine the effect of strain magnitude on signaling, particularly protein kinase A (PKA) activity as well as cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein levels. We observed significantly (P < 0.05) greater PKA activity and CRE binding protein levels in SMC located in the center as compared to the peripheral region. However, inhibition of PKA (with 10 microM Rp-cAMP) or PKC (with 5-20 ng/ml staurosporine) failed to alter either the strain-induced increase in SMC proliferation or alignment. These data characterize the strain determinants for activation of

  6. [Acute and chronic aortic diseases of the thoracic and abdominal aorta of the adult - 2014 AS SMC Guidelines on the classification and diagnosis of aortic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít

    2015-01-01

    In addition to organovascular arterial ischemic diseases (cardiovascular, vasculovascular, neurovascular, extre-mitovascular, renovascular, genitovascular, bronchopulmovascular, mesenteriovascular, osteoarthromusculovascular, dermovascular, oculovascular, otovascular, stomatovascular etc.), aortic diseases contribute to the wide spectrum of arterial diseases: aortic aneurysms (AA), acute aortic syndromes (AAS) including aortic dissection (AD), intramural haematoma (IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) and traumatic aortic injury (TAI), pseudoaneurysm, aortic rupture, atherosclerosis, vasculitis as well as genetic diseases (e.g. Turner syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) and congenital abnormalities including the coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Similarly to other arterial diseases, aortic diseases may be diagnosed after a long period of subclinical development or they may have an acute presentation. Acute aortic syndrome is often the first sign of the disease, which needs rapid diagnosis and decisionmaking to reduce the extremely poor prognosis. Key clinical-etiology-anatomy-patophysiology (CEAP) diagnostic aspects of aortic diseases are discussed in this document (project Vessels).

  7. Telomere-to-centromere ratio of bovine clones, embryos, gametes, fetal cells, and adult cells.

    PubMed

    Meerdo, Lora N; Reed, William A; White, Kenneth L

    2005-01-01

    In 1997, Dolly, the first animal cloned from an adult cell, was born. It was announced in 1999 that Dolly might be aging faster than normal because her telomeres were shorter than age-matched control sheep. Telomeres, a repeated DNA sequence located at the ends of linear chromosomes, allow for base pair loss during DNA replication. Telomere shortening acts as a "mitotic clock," leading to replicative senescence. By using whole cell lysate and slot-blot analysis, we determined the telomere-to-centromere ratio (T/C) for bovine gametes, embryos, fetal tissues (brain, heart, lung, kidney, uterus, ovary, and skin), adult donor cells, and cloned embryos. Our data indicates a consistency in T/C among the various fetal tissues. The T/C of sperm is significantly lower than in oocytes. The T/C decreases from the oocyte to the 2-8-cell stage embryo, increases dramatically at the morula stage, and decreases at the blastocyst stage. Our data shows no significant difference in T/C between cloned embryos and in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos, but there is a significant difference between cloned embryos and adult donor cells. In conclusion, the enucleated bovine oocyte has the ability to reestablish the telomere length of adult somatic cell donor nuclei.

  8. Characteristics of children and young adults with Marfan syndrome and aortic root dilation in a randomized trial comparing atenolol and losartan therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacro, Ronald V; Guey, Lin T; Dietz, Harry C; Pearson, Gail D; Yetman, Anji T; Gelb, Bruce D; Loeys, Bart L; Benson, D Woodrow; Bradley, Timothy J; De Backer, Julie; Forbus, Geoffrey A; Klein, Gloria L; Lai, Wyman W; Levine, Jami C; Lewin, Mark B; Markham, Larry W; Paridon, Stephen M; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Radojewski, Elizabeth; Selamet Tierney, Elif Seda; Sharkey, Angela M; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Mahony, Lynn

    2013-05-01

    The Pediatric Heart Network designed a clinical trial to compare aortic root growth and other short-term cardiovascular outcomes in children and young adults with Marfan syndrome randomized to receive atenolol or losartan. We report here the characteristics of the screened population and enrolled subjects. Between 2007 and 2011, 21 clinical sites randomized 608 subjects, aged 6 months to 25 years who met the original Ghent criteria and had a body surface area-adjusted aortic root diameter z-score >3.0. The mean age at study entry was 11.2 years, 60% were male, and 25% were older teenagers and young adults. The median aortic root diameter z-score was 4.0. Aortic root diameter z-score did not vary with age. Mitral valve prolapse and mitral regurgitation were more common in females. Among those with a positive family history, 56% had a family member with aortic surgery, and 32% had a family member with a history of aortic dissection. Baseline demographic, clinical, and anthropometric characteristics of the randomized cohort are representative of patients in this population with moderate to severe aortic root dilation. The high percentage of young subjects with relatives who have had aortic dissection or surgery illustrates the need for more definitive therapy; we expect that the results of the study and the wealth of systematic data collected will make an important contribution to the management of individuals with Marfan syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics of children and young adults with Marfan syndrome and aortic root dilation in a randomized trial comparing atenolol and losartan therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacro, Ronald V.; Guey, Lin T.; Dietz, Harry C.; Pearson, Gail D.; Yetman, Anji T.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Loeys, Bart L.; Benson, D. Woodrow; Bradley, Timothy J.; De Backer, Julie; Forbus, Geoffrey A.; Klein, Gloria L.; Lai, Wyman W.; Levine, Jami C.; Lewin, Mark B.; Markham, Larry W.; Paridon, Stephen M.; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Radojewski, Elizabeth; Selamet Tierney, Elif Seda; Sharkey, Angela M.; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Mahony, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background The Pediatric Heart Network designed a clinical trial to compare aortic root growth and other short-term cardiovascular outcomes in children and young adults with Marfan syndrome randomized to receive atenolol or losartan. We report here the characteristics of the screened population and enrolled subjects. Methods and results Between 2007 and 2011, 21 clinical sites randomized 608 subjects, aged 6 months to 25 years who met the original Ghent criteria and had a body surface area–adjusted aortic root diameter z-score >3.0. The mean age at study entry was 11.2 years, 60% were male, and 25% were older teenagers and young adults. The median aortic root diameter z-score was 4.0. Aortic root diameter z-score did not vary with age. Mitral valve prolapse and mitral regurgitation were more common in females. Among those with a positive family history, 56% had a family member with aortic surgery, and 32% had a family member with a history of aortic dissection. Conclusions Baseline demographic, clinical, and anthropometric characteristics of the randomized cohort are representative of patients in this population with moderate to severe aortic root dilation. The high percentage of young subjects with relatives who have had aortic dissection or surgery illustrates the need for more definitive therapy; we expect that the results of the study and the wealth of systematic data collected will make an important contribution to the management of individuals with Marfan syndrome. PMID:23622922

  10. Long-Term Follow-Up of Percutaneous Balloon Angioplasty in Adult Aortic Coarctation

    SciTech Connect

    Paddon, Alex J.; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Ettles, Duncan F.; Travis, Simon J.; Dyet, John F.

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: To assess long-term outcomes following percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of congenital aortic coarctation in adults.Methods: Seventeen patients underwent PTA for symptomatic adult coarctation of the aorta. Sixteen patients, with a mean age of 28 years (range 15-60 years), were reviewed at a mean interval after angioplasty of 7.3 years (range 1.5-11 years). Assessment included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Doppler echocardiography, and clinical examination. Current clinical measurements were compared with pre- and immediate post-angioplasty measurements.Results: At follow-up 16 patients were alive and well. The patient not included in follow-up had undergone surgical repair and excision of the coarctation segment following PTA. Mean brachial systolic blood pressure for the group decreased from 174 mmHg before angioplasty to 130 mmHg at follow-up (p 0.0001). The mean gradient had fallen significantly from 50.9 to 17.8 at follow-up (p = 0.001). The average number of antihypertensive drugs required per patient decreased from 0.56 to 0.31 (p = 0.234). No significant residual stenoses or restenoses were seen at MRI. Small but clinically insignificant residual pressure gradients were recorded in all patients using Doppler echocardiography. Complications included one transient ischemic attack at 5 days, one external iliac dissection requiring stent insertion, and a further patient who developed a false aneurysm close to the coarctation site at 12 months which subsequently required surgical excision.Conclusion: PTA of adult coarctation is safe and effective in the long term. Although primary stenting has recently been advocated in the treatment of this condition, our results suggest that PTA remains the treatment of choice.

  11. The role of apoproteins AI and AII in binding of high-density lipoprotein3 to membranes derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vadiveloo, P K; Fidge, N H

    1992-01-01

    Although binding of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to a variety of cells in culture has been widely reported, the mechanism of this binding has yet to be fully elucidated. The aim of the current studies was to explore the roles of apoproteins (apo) AI and AII in HDL3 binding to membranes derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells. Binding studies showed that HDL3 (which contains both apo AI and apo AII) and AII-HDL3 (which contain only apo AII) bound to membranes with similar affinity (44 +/- 6 and 41 +/- 9 micrograms/ml respectively) and capacity (673 +/- 97 and 969 +/- 101 ng bound/mg of membrane protein respectively). In contrast with these results, HDL3 [AI w/o AII] (which contain apo AI, but not apo AII) bound to the membranes with a significantly higher capacity (2228 +/- 206 ng bound/mg of membrane protein) and lower affinity (65 +/- 3 micrograms/ml) as compared with HDL3 or AII-HDL3. Therefore, although both apo AI and apo AII appear capable of facilitating HDL3 binding, the mechanisms involved probably differ. A model which fits the data postulates that a common receptor exists which binds both apo AI and apo AII, and that a particle containing AII can occupy up to four receptors (partly owing to each AII molecule containing two binding domains), whereas an HDL3 [AI w/o AII] particle can occupy only one. Images Fig. 3. PMID:1599393

  12. Cell patterning without chemical surface modification: Cell cell interactions between printed bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) on a homogeneous cell-adherent hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Barron, J. A.; Ringeisen, B. R.

    2006-10-01

    Cell printing offers the unique ability to directly deposit one or multiple cell types directly onto a surface without the need to chemically pre-treat the surface with lithographic methods. We utilize biological laser printing (BioLP ™) to form patterns of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) onto a homogeneous cell adherent hydrogel surface. These normal cells are shown to retain near-100% viability post-printing. In order to determine whether BAECs encountered shear and/or heat stress during printing, immunocytochemical staining experiments were performed to detect potential expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) by the deposited cells. Printed BAECs expressed HSP at levels similar to negative control cells, indicating that the BioLP process does not expose cells to damaging levels of stress. However, HSP expression was slightly higher at the highest laser energy studied, suggesting more stress was present under these extreme conditions. Printed BAECs also showed preferential asymmetric growth and migration towards each other and away from the originally printed pattern, demonstrating a retained ability for the cells to communicate post-printing.

  13. STIM1 Positively Regulates the Ca2+ Release Activity of the Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor in Bovine Aortic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guillemette, Gaétan

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is actively involved in many functions of the cardiovascular system, such as the modulation of arterial pressure and the maintenance of blood flow. These functions require a great versatility of the intracellular Ca2+ signaling that resides in the fact that different signals can be encoded by varying the frequency and the amplitude of the Ca2+ response. Cells use both extracellular and intracellular Ca2+ pools to modulate the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In non-excitable cells, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is responsible for the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular store. The proteins STIM1 and STIM2 are also located on the ER and they are involved in the activation of a store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Due to their Ca2+ sensor property and their close proximity with IP3Rs on the ER, STIMs could modulate the activity of IP3R. In this study, we showed that STIM1 and STIM2 are expressed in bovine aortic endothelial cells and they both interact with IP3R. While STIM2 appears to play a minor role, STIM1 plays an important role in the regulation of agonist-induced Ca2+ mobilization in BAECs by a positive effect on both the SOCE and the IP3R-dependent Ca2+ release. PMID:25506690

  14. Repair of wounded monolayers of cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells is inhibited by calcium spirulan, a novel sulfated polysaccharide isolated from Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Yasuyuki; Inomata, Yuki; Hamada, Chieko; Yamamoto, Chika; Shimada, Satomi; Lee, Jung-Bum; Hayashi, Toshimitsu

    2002-03-08

    Calcium spirulan (Ca-SP) is a novel sulfated polysaccharide isolated from a blue-green alga Spirulina platensis. Ca-SP inhibits thrombin by activation of heparin cofactor II. Therefore, it could serve as an origin of anti-atherogenic medicines. Since maintenance of vascular endothelial cell monolayers is important for prevention of vascular lesions such as atherosclerosis, the effect of Ca-SP at 20 microg/ml or less on the repair of wounded bovine aortic endothelial cell monolayers in culture was investigated in the present study. When the monolayers were wounded and cultured in the presence of Ca-SP, the polysaccharide inhibited the appearance of the cells in the wounded area. The inhibition was also observed even when the repair was promoted by excess basic fibroblast growth factor, which is one of the autocrine growth factors that are involved in the endothelial cell monolayer maintenance. On the other hand, Ca-SP inhibited the cell growth and the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the acid-insoluble fraction of proliferating endothelial cells, suggesting that Ca-SP inhibits endothelial cell proliferation. From these results, it is concluded that Ca-SP may retard the repair process of damaged vascular endothelium through inhibition of vascular endothelial cell proliferation by induction of a lower ability to respond to stimulation by endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor.

  15. Exercise capacity, physical activity, and obesity in adults with repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Buys, Roselien; Budts, Werner; Delecluse, Christophe; Vanhees, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Patients with aortic coarctation (COA) have a reduced exercise capacity and seem to be more prone to adopt a sedentary lifestyle. During clinical practice, we often observe that patients seem to be overweight. However, data on physical activity and weight status in this population are currently not available. This study aimed to describe weight status, self-reported physical activity levels, and self-perceived health status in adults with repaired COA in comparison with healthy counterparts and to investigate the relationships among exercise capacity, physical activity, weight status, and perceived health status. We studied 103 COA patients who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and who completed the Flemish Physical Activity Computerized Questionnaire and the short-form 36 health survey questionnaire. Patients with COA show a significantly lower exercise tolerance than what would be expected in healthy persons (P < .0001). Weight status was similar to the overall Belgian population, but a tendency toward higher body mass index was present. Patients with COA report a lower level of habitual physical activity (P < .05) as well as reductions in perceived vitality, general health, and mental health (P < .05). Parameters of habitual physical activity are related to exercise capacity (total energy expenditure: r = 0.278, P = .0015). The more active COA patients report higher scores of perceived physical functioning, general health, and mental health. Overweight patients did not perform significantly different than patients with a healthy weight did. Adults with repaired COA have a reduced exercise tolerance, which is related to low physical activity levels. Up to one-third of the COA patients we studied are overweight. As a poor exercise capacity identifies patients at risk for hospitalization and death and obesity might adversely influence the development of cardiovascular disease, it is important to improve the exercise capacity in these patients. Guiding

  16. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... evaluation of aortic stenosis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 29, 2014. Mohty D, ... Valvular heart disease in elderly adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 2, 2014. Bonow RO, ...

  17. Isolation and cultivation of adult primary bovine hepatocytes from abattoir derived liver

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhardt, Sonja; Schmicke, Marion

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to establish a cell culture of adult primary bovine hepatocytes obtained from liver following slaughter and to cultivate the cells in a sandwich culture. Cells and medium samples were taken after separation of cells (day 0), during monolayer (days 1, 2 and 3) and during sandwich culture (days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 10 and 14). The mRNA expression of BAX, BCL2L, FAS, IGF-1 and GHR1A was measured as well as urea and LDH. Hepatocytes were obtained by using a two-step collagenase perfusion and were purified thereafter by density gradient centrifugation. The viability was 68.2 ± 9.5 %. In sandwich culture, cells have a typical polygonal hepatocyte-like shape, build cell-cell contacts, and show irregularity of cell borders suggesting bile canaliculi generation. The BAX mRNA expression increased on day 1 as well but decreased steadily until day 3 and remained constant for 14 days. Urea- and LDH-concentrations increased from day 4 to day 7. In conclusion, we found that it is possible to gather viable primary hepatocytes from adult bovine liver after slaughter, and that cells gathered this way show typical morphologies, urea-production and low LDH-leakage especially at day 4 in a sandwich system. PMID:28275320

  18. Binding of a Calcium Antagonist, [3H]Nitrendipine, to High Affinity Sites in Bovine Aortic Smooth Muscle and Canine Cardiac Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lewis T.; Tremble, Patrice

    1982-01-01

    [3H]Nitrendipine, a potent calcium channel antagonist [3-ethyl-5-methyl-1-1,4-dihydro-2,6 - dimethyl - 4 - (3 - nitrophenyl) - 3,5 - pyridine carboxylate], was used to label high affinity binding sites on membranes prepared from bovine aortic smooth muscle. The binding of [3H]nitrendipine is rapid (t1/2 < 5 min) and reversible at 37°C. The binding sites have a high affinity for [3H]nitrendipine with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.1 nM. The density of sites is 40-60 fmol/mg of membrane protein. Analogues of nitrendipine compete for the binding sites with affinities consistent with their known biological effects as calcium antagonists. Nisoldipine, [isobutyl methyl 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-3,5-pyridine carboxylate], a calcium antagonist more potent than nifedipine [2,6-dimethyl-3,5-dicarbomethoxy-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-1,4-dihydropyridine] in relaxing vascular smooth muscle, has an affinity three-fold higher than that of nifedipine in competing for the binding sites. A biologically inactive derivative of nifedipine does not compete for [3H]nitrendipine binding. Verapamil (α-isopropyl-α[(N-methyl - N-homoveratryl) -α-aminopropyl]-3,4-dimethyoxyphenyl acetonitrile), a structurally different calcium antagonist, only partially (25%) inhibits binding at high concentrations (1 μM). Prazosin, an alpha adrenergic antagonist does not compete for [3H]nitrendipine binding sites. The binding of [3H]nitrendipine is not affected by 1.5 mM calcium. Canine cardiac membranes also have high affinity [3H]nitrendipine binding sites, (KD = 6 nM) but bovine erythrocytes do not. The relative affinities of nisoldipine and nifedipine for the cardiac membrane binding sites reflect the relative activities of these compounds as calcium channel antagonists. These results suggest that the [3H]nitrendipine binding sites are the sites through which dihydropyridines act as calcium channel antagonists. PMID:6282938

  19. Characterization and purification of the detergent solubilized atrial natriuretic peptide receptor from bovine aortic smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, D.; Phelps, M.; Scarborough, R.; Johnson, K.; Lewicki, J.

    1986-03-01

    A protein has been purified from total homogenates of cultured vascular bovine smooth muscle cells with properties indicative of the receptor for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Specific /sup 125/I-ANP binding activity was solubilized quantitatively from smooth muscle cell membranes with a purified component of Triton X-100. Equilibrium binding studies of the solubilized ANP receptor reveal by Scatchard analysis a single class of binding sites with a K/sub d/ = 1.77 x 10/sup -10/ moles /sup 125/I-ANP/1 and B/sub max/ = 34.6 pmol/mg protein. The ANP receptor solubilized in this manner is stable for greater than or equal to 2 months at -70/sup 0/C. Studies investigating the ANP receptor show that it binds to wheat germ agglutinin and to CM-cellulose at pH 4.1 but not at pH 6.5. These findings imply that the ANP receptor is a neutral to mildly basic glycoprotein. Further purification studies involving affinity chromatography with ANP-Sepharose result in a 500-fold purification and reveal a single protein with a molecular mass of 58,700 daltons as determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The size of this protein is in good agreement with that of an ANP receptor previously identified in intact smooth muscle cells by crosslinking studies with /sup 125/I-ANP.

  20. Three-dimensional model of angiogenesis: coculture of human retinal cells with bovine aortic endothelial cells in the NASA bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Dutt, Kamla; Sanford, Gary; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Brako, Lawrence; Kumar, Ravindra; Sroufe, Angela; Melhado, Caroline

    2003-10-01

    Ocular angiogenesis is the leading cause of blindness and is associated with diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. We describe, in this report, our preliminary studies using a horizontally rotating bioreactor (HRB), developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), to explore growth and differentiation-associated events in the early phase of ocular angiogenesis. Human retinal (HRet) cells and bovine endothelial cells (ECs) were cocultured on laminin-coated Cytodex-3 microcarrier beads in an HRB for 1-36 days. Endothelial cells grown alone in the HRB remained cuboidal and were well differentiated. However, when HRet cells were cocultured with ECs, cordlike structures formed as early as 18-36 h and were positive for von Willebrand factor. In addition to the formation of cords and capillary-like structures, ECs showed the beginning of sprouts. The HRB seems not only to promote accelerated capillary formation, but also to enhance differentiation of retinal precursor cells. This leads to the formation of rosette-like structures (which may be aggregates of photoreceptors that were positive for rhodopsin). Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor was seen in retinal cells grown in the HRB as compared with monolayers and could be one of the factors responsible for accelerated capillary formation. Hence, the HRB promotes three-dimensional assembly and differentiation, possibly through promoting cell-to-cell interaction and/or secretion of growth and differentiation factors.

  1. Glycation does not modify bovine serum albumin (BSA)-induced reduction of rat aortic relaxation: the response to glycated and nonglycated BSA is lost in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Ruiz, Maria Esther; Díaz-Díaz, Eulises; Cárdenas-León, Mario; Argüelles-Medina, Rabindranath; Sánchez-Canales, Patricia; Larrea-Gallo, Fernando; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Guarner-Lans, Verónica

    2008-07-01

    The effects of nonglycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and advanced glycosylation end products of BSA (AGE-BSA) on vascular responses of control and metabolic syndrome (MS) rats characterized by hypertriglyceridemia, hypertension, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance were studied. Albumin and in vitro prepared AGE-BSA have vascular effects; however, recent studies indicate that some effects of in vitro prepared AGEs are due to the conditions in which they were generated. We produced AGEs by incubating glucose with BSA for 60 days under sterile conditions in darkness and at 37 degrees C. To develop MS rats, male Wistar animals were given 30% sucrose in drinking water since weanling. Six month old animals were used. Blood pressure, insulin, triglycerides, and serum albumin were increased in MS rats. Contraction of aortic rings elicited with norepinephrine was stronger. There were no effects of nonglycated BSA or AGE-BSA on contractions in control or MS rats; however, both groups responded to L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis. Arterial relaxation induced using acetylcholine was smaller in MS rats. Nonglycated BSA and AGE-BSA significantly diminished relaxation in a 35% in the control group but the decrease was similar when using nonglycated BSA and AGE-BSA. This decrease was not present in the MS rats and was not due to increased RAGEs or altered biochemical characteristics of BSA. In conclusion, both BSA and AGE-BSA inhibit vascular relaxation in control artic rings. In MS rats the effect is lost possibly due to alterations in endothelial cells that are a consequence of the illness.

  2. Reversal of SIN-1-induced eNOS dysfunction by the spin trap, DMPO, in bovine aortic endothelial cells via eNOS phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amlan; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Druhan, Lawrence J; Wang, Tse-Yao; De Pascali, Francesco; Rockenbauer, Antal; Racoma, Ira; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Zweier, Jay L; Cardounel, Arturo J; Villamena, Frederick A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Nitric oxide (NO) derived from eNOS is mostly responsible for the maintenance of vascular homeostasis and its decreased bioavailability is characteristic of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endothelial dysfunction (ED). Because 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), a commonly used spin trap, can control intracellular nitroso-redox balance by scavenging ROS and donating NO, it was employed as a cardioprotective agent against ED but the mechanism of its protection is still not clear. This study elucidated the mechanism of protection by DMPO against SIN-1-induced oxidative injury to bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Experimental Approach BAEC were treated with SIN-1, as a source of peroxynitrite anion (ONOO−), and then incubated with DMPO. Cytotoxicity following SIN-1 alone and cytoprotection by adding DMPO was assessed by MTT assay. Levels of ROS and NO generation from HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type and mutant eNOS cDNAs, tetrahydrobiopterin bioavailability, eNOS activity, eNOS and Akt kinase phosphorylation were measured. Key Results Post-treatment of cells with DMPO attenuated SIN-1-mediated cytotoxicity and ROS generation, restoration of NO levels via increased in eNOS activity and phospho-eNOS levels. Treatment with DMPO alone significantly increased NO levels and induced phosphorylation of eNOS Ser1179 via Akt kinase. Transfection studies with wild-type and mutant human eNOS confirmed the dual role of eNOS as a producer of superoxide anion (O2−) with SIN-1 treatment, and a producer of NO in the presence of DMPO. Conclusion and Implications Post-treatment with DMPO of oxidatively challenged cells reversed eNOS dysfunction and could have pharmacological implications in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24405159

  3. Aortic Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries (atherosclerosis) Weakened and bulging artery (pre-existing aortic aneurysm) An aortic valve defect (bicuspid aortic valve) A ... valve, tell your doctor. If you have an aortic aneurysm, find out how often you need monitoring and ...

  4. Benefit of endovascular stenting for aortic coarctation on systemic hypertension in adults.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Tahir; Motwani, Manish; Schneider, Heiko; Dua, Jaspal Singh; Hoschtitzky, Andreas; Clarke, Bernard; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2015-12-01

    Endovascular stenting is a recognised treatment strategy for aortic coarctation (CoA) in adults. We assessed systemic hypertension control and the need for antihypertensive therapy after CoA stenting in adults. Data were collected prospectively on 54 patients (36 men; mean age: 34 ± 16 years) who underwent endovascular stenting for CoA over a 7-year period. Five patients were excluded as they did not attend follow-up appointments. Patients underwent clinical examination, including right arm systolic blood pressure (SBP) and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring at baseline, 6-12 weeks and 9-12 months. There was a significant fall in mean peak-to-peak systolic gradient (PG) across the CoA after stenting (26 ± 11 mmHg vs. 5 ± 4 mmHg; P<0.01). There were successive reductions in right arm SBP and ambulatory SBP at baseline, 6-12 weeks and 9-12 months post-procedure (right arm: 155 ± 18 mmHg vs. 137 ± 17 mmHg vs. 142 ± 16 mmHg, respectively; all P-values <0.01; ambulatory: 142 ± 14 mmHg vs. 132 ± 16 mmHg vs. 131 ± 15 mmHg, respectively; all P-values <0.01). Twenty-four patients had severe CoA (PG >25 mmHg before stenting); baseline SBP was significantly higher in severe versus non-severe patients (160 mmHg vs. 148 mmHg; P=0.02). The absolute reduction in PG after stenting was significantly higher in the severe group (31 ± 7 mmHg vs. 14 ± 5 mmHg; P<0.0001), but there was no significant difference in SBP between groups at 6-12 weeks (141 mmHg vs. 135 mmHg; P=0.21) or 9-12 months (139 mmHg vs. 139 mmHg; P=0.96). Endovascular stenting of CoA results in a significant reduction in SBP at 6-12 weeks, which is sustained at 9-12 months, with similar outcomes in severe and non-severe CoA groups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Endovascular Aortic Repair of Primary Adult Coarctation: Implications and Challenges for Postoperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Christina E; Then, Karen L; Rankin, James A; Appoo, Jehangir J

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair is a relatively new surgical technique used to treat a variety of aortic pathologies. Aortic coarctation traditionally has been managed with open surgical repair, involving a large posterolateral thoracotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass, and replacement of the narrowed section of the aorta with a dacron graft. Recent advances in minimally invasive aortic surgery have allowed for repair of the diseased section with an endovascular stent placed percutaneously through the groin under intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance. In this paper, the authors willfocus on the implicationsfor postoperative nursing care after endovascular repair of aortic coarctation using a case study of a 17-year-old male. This novel technique required education of the health care team with respect to implications for practice, understanding potential complications, discharge planning and follow-up. With any new surgical technique there are many questions and challenges that health care professionals raise. The main concerns expressed from the health care team stemmed from a lack of understanding of the disease pathology, and the different risk profile associated with an endovascular repair in contrast to an open repair. The authors will address these concerns in detail.

  6. Aortic surgery is one of the risk factors for enhancement of pressure wave reflection in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Tateno, Shigeru; Kawasoe, Yasutaka; Niwa, Koichiro

    2014-08-20

    Excessive aortic pressure wave reflection is one of the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. In some clinical course of congenital heart diseases, the elevated pressure wave reflection has been reported. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the risk factors of the enhanced pressure wave reflection in adult patients with congenital heart disease. We enrolled 99 adult (≥20 years) patients with congenital heart disease. We measured their radial pressure augmentation index and examined the relationship between it and various clinical variables. The radial pressure augmentation index was 77.1 ± 19.1% and it had a significant correlation with the history of aorto-pulmonary shunt (t=4.194; p<0.0001), age (t=4.091; p<0.0001), height (t=-3.580; p=0.001) and the history of direct aortic surgery (t=2.253; p=0.027). Forty-four patients (44.4%) demonstrated high radial augmentation index (>1SD of age- and gender matched control) and the determinants of the elevated radial augmentation index were the history of aorto-pulmonary shunt (odds ratio, 21.32; 95% confidence interval, 5.47-83.14; p<0.0001) and the direct aortic surgery (4.18; 1.38-12.72; p=0.012). The history of aortic surgeries enhances aortic pressure wave reflection in adult patients with congenital heart disease. The enhanced aortic pressure wave reflection is one of the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, the adult patients with congenital heart disease after aortic surgeries should be carefully observed and tightly controlled concerning the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Intravascular Treatment of Left Subclavian Artery Aneurysm Coexisting with Aortic Coarctation in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pogorzelski, Ryszard; Wołoszko, Tomasz; Toutounchi, Sadegh; Fiszer, Patryk; Krajewska, Ewa; Jakuczun, Wawrzyniec; Szostek, Małgorzata M; Celejewski, Krzysztof; Gałązka, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Coexistence of aortic coarctation with aneurysm of subclavian artery is a uncommon situation and may require unusual treatment in patients. A 40-year-old patient diagnosed incidentally with left subclavian artery aneurysm coexisting with aortic coarctation. Patient was initially referred for hybrid treatment. Initially ostium of the left subclavian artery was covered with a stent-graft. Over a 30-month follow-up period aneurysm became thrombosed all the way up to the ostium of internal mammary artery. The patient did not present with neurological symptoms or signs of upper limb ischemia. Taking into consideration good blood supply to the axillary artery via reversed blood flow in the thyreocervical trunk, hence we decided not to proceed with cervicoaxillary bypass grafting. Implantation stent-graft into aorta coarctation with covering axillary artery is proper way of treatment and may need no other surgical procedures. PMID:28401193

  8. [The assessment of mechanical heart valves stenosis in adults after aortic valve replacement: the advantage of full-flow design of mechanical valve].

    PubMed

    Bokeria, L A; Bokeria, O L; Fadeev, A A; Makhachev, O A; Kosareva, T I; Averina, I I

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of transprosthetic hemodynamics in adults after aortic valve replacement in the Bakoulev Center for Cardiovascular Surgery in 2007-2010 demonstrated the hemodynamic advantage of the concept of new full-flow mechanical aortic valve prosthesis "CorBeat". Having the same size of internal orifice and tissue annulus diameters, the values of transprosthetic parameters (peak and mean gradients, blood flow velocities) through "CorBeat" were close to physiological values of transvalvular native aortic parameters and had a tendency to be not dependent on the size of prosthesis (p = 0.63). In the article for the first time a morphometric database of geometric values of internal orifice area of normal native aortic valves in adults was used taking into account both the gender and the body surface area's of a patient. There was also used the standardized prosthesis size Z-score which represents the number of SDs by which the internal prosthesis area differs from the mean normal native aortic valve area for the patient's body surface area. The article emphasizes the need of the personal selection of the size and the type of prosthesis for any patient as well as the need for new design development of prosthetic heart valves.

  9. Aortic dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - dissection ... also cause abnormal widening or ballooning of the aorta ( aneurysm ). The exact cause is unknown, but more common ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  11. Aortic stiffness, left ventricle hypertrophy, and homogeneity of ventricle repolarization in adult dialyzed patients.

    PubMed

    Zapolski, Tomasz; Jaroszyński, Andrzej; Drelich-Zbroja, Anna; Wysocka, Anna; Furmaga, Jacek; Wysokiński, Andrzej; Książek, Andrzej; Szczerbo-Trojanowska, Małgorzata; Rudzki, Sławomir

    2012-01-01

    Study was designed to assess relationship between aortic compliance and homogeneity of heart electrical activity in dialysis patients. Study group was consisted of 120 dialyzed patients; 57 (age 50,7 ± 7,1) were on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and 73 (age 51,6 ± 7,6) were hemodialyzed (HD). Three-dimensional vectorocardiographic (VCG) monitoring was done to assess: QRS-T(angle), T(el) and T(az). Echocardiography was performed to assess: Ao(max), Ao(min), ASI (aortic siffness index). ASI in HD as well as in CAPD patients was significantly higher compared to controls [resp., 5,51 (±1,32), 5,83 (±1,41), 3,07 (±1,09)]. Cut-off value of ASI was 5,67. In HD patients strong correlations between ASI and QRS-T(angle), T(el) and T(az) were determined (resp., r = 0,429, P < 0,001; r = 0,432, P ≤ 0,001 and r = 0,387, P = 0,001). In CAPD group were significant association between ASI and QRS-T(angle), T(el) and T(az) (resp., r = 0,452, P < 0,001; r = 0,417, P < 0,001 and r = 0,390, P = 0,001). ASI was independently and markedly associated with: QRS-T(angle), T(elev), T(az), ADMA, cTnT, CRP, Total-chol, LDL-chol in HD and CAPD patients. ASI and VCG indices are higher in HD and CAPD patients. Correlation between ASI and VCG parameters may reflect unfavourable influence of poor aortic compliance on the electrical activity of the heart in dialyzed patients. Hypertrophy aggravates repolarization disturbances in hemodialyzed patients.

  12. Ultrastructure of the aortic diverticula of the adult dragonfly Sympetrum danae (Odonata: Anisoptera).

    PubMed

    Jensen, H

    1976-05-06

    The aorta of Sympetrum danae possesses two dorsal diverticula: one in the mesothorax and one in the metathorax. They are very similar in form and position. Each diverticulum has a dorsal valve through which blood is pumped from the wings down into the aorta. The wall of the aortic diverticula consists of two simple cell layers: an outer epidermis-like layer and an inner muscle layer. The nuclei of the muscle cells are situated close to the lumen of the diverticula. The mitochondria are evenly dispersed between the myofibrils and are often paired up on either side of the Z-band. The Z-bands are thick and fragmented. The length of the sarcomeres varies from 3.3 to 6.1 mu. The A-band length is about 3 mu. The myofibrils consist of thick (250 A) and thin (85 A) filaments. Each thick filament is surrounded by 9-12 thin filaments. The sarcoplasmic reticulum is well developed and separates the myofibrils with one or two layers. The T-tubules are flattened and branch irregularly like a two-dimensional tree between the lamellar myofibrils. Intercalated discs are observed. The peculiarities of the muscle of aortic diverticula in S. danae are discussed in relation to various muscles of other insects and arthropods.

  13. A transcriptomic analysis of the adult stage of the bovine lungworm, Dictyocaulus viviparus

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Lungworms of the genus Dictyocaulus (family Dictyocaulidae) are parasitic nematodes of major economic importance. They cause pathological effects and clinical disease in various ruminant hosts, particularly in young animals. Dictyocaulus viviparus, called the bovine lungworm, is a major pathogen of cattle, with severe infections being fatal. In this study, we provide first insights into the transcriptome of the adult stage of D. viviparus through the analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Results Using our EST analysis pipeline, we estimate that the present dataset of 4436 ESTs is derived from 2258 genes based on cluster and comparative genomic analyses of the ESTs. Of the 2258 representative ESTs, 1159 (51.3%) had homologues in the free-living nematode C. elegans, 1174 (51.9%) in parasitic nematodes, 827 (36.6%) in organisms other than nematodes, and 863 (38%) had no significant match to any sequence in the current databases. Of the C. elegans homologues, 569 had observed 'non-wildtype' RNAi phenotypes, including embryonic lethality, maternal sterility, sterility in progeny, larval arrest and slow growth. We could functionally classify 776 (35%) sequences using the Gene Ontologies (GO) and established pathway associations to 696 (31%) sequences in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). In addition, we predicted 85 secreted proteins which could represent potential candidates for developing novel anthelmintics or vaccines. Conclusion The bioinformatic analyses of ESTs data for D. viviparus has elucidated sets of relatively conserved and potentially novel genes. The genes discovered in this study should assist research toward a better understanding of the basic molecular biology of D. viviparus, which could lead, in the longer term, to novel intervention strategies. The characterization of the D. viviparus transcriptome also provides a foundation for whole genome sequence analysis and future comparative transcriptomic analyses. PMID:17784965

  14. A case of an aortic dissection in a young adult: a refresher of the literature of this "great masquerader".

    PubMed

    Pineault, Jérôme; Ouimet, Denis; Pichette, Vincent; Vallée, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Aortic dissection is often misdiagnosed, especially among young patients, and it is associated with a high mortality rate. We present here a case of fatal acute aortic dissection in a young man who was misdiagnosed with pericarditis. We reviewed the literature of acute aortic dissection in young people and we focused particularly on clinical presentations, outcomes and investigations of aortic dissection. We report a case of a 33-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled hypertension with acute pleuretic chest pain who was transferred to our hospital for suspected pulmonary embolism and died of acute hemorragic pericardial effusion from an ascendant aortic dissection. We should never rule out aortic dissection off our differential diagnosis on the sole basis of a patient's young age.

  15. Five-year follow up of Konno aortoventriculoplasty for repeat aortic valve replacement in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Ibrahim; Demir, Tolga; Uyar, Gunseri Uysul; Tulukoglu, Engin; Parlar, Ali Ihsan; Isik, Omer

    2015-02-23

    Konno aortoventriculoplasty (AVP) is performed for various types of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We report on a 32-year-old woman who had undergone double valve replacement five years earlier. She presented with increased interventricular septum thickness, small aortic root and gradient across the aortic mechanical valve. We performed Konno AVP with repeat aortic valve replacement (AVR). The control echocardiography showed no significant residual gradient. Konno AVP with repeat AVR may be safely performed with satisfactory results.

  16. Risk Factors Associated with Aortic and Carotid Intimal-Medial Thickness in Adolescents and Young Adults: the Muscatine Offspring Study

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jeffrey D.; Sonka, Milan; Blecha, Mary Beth; Lin, Wenjiao; Davis, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether cardiovascular risk factors are associated with aortic and carotid intimal-medial thickness (aIMT and cIMT) in adolescents and young adults. Background Atherosclerotic lesions begin developing in youth, first in the distal abdominal aorta and later in the carotid arteries. Knowledge of how risk factors relate to aIMT and cIMT may help in the design of early interventions to prevent cardiovascular disease. Methods Participants were 635 members of the Muscatine Offspring cohort. The mean aIMT and cIMT were measured using an automated reading program. Results The means (SDs) of aIMT and cIMT were 0.63 (0.14) mm and 0.49 (0.04) mm, respectively. In adolescents (ages 11 to 17), aIMT was associated with triglycerides, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), body mass index (BMI), and waist/hip ratio, after adjusting for age, gender, and height. In young adults (ages 18 to 34), aIMT was associated with those same five risk factors, plus HDL-cholesterol and pulse pressure. In adolescents, cIMT was associated with SBP, pulse pressure, heart rate, BMI, and waist/hip ratio. In young adults, cIMT was associated total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, SBP, .DBP, BMI, waist/hip ratio, and HbA1C. In both age groups, aIMT and cIMT were significantly correlated with the PDAY coronary artery risk score. Conclusions Both aIMT and cIMT are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. Using aIMT in adolescents gives information beyond that obtained from cIMT alone. Measurement of aIMT and cIMT may help identify those at risk for premature cardiovascular disease. PMID:19520251

  17. Basic fibroblast growth factor has a differential effect on MyoD conversion of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells from newborn and adult rats.

    PubMed Central

    van Neck, J. W.; Medina, J. J.; Onnekink, C.; van der Ven, P. F.; Bloemers, H. P.; Schwartz, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    MyoD is a master regulatory gene for myogenesis that also converts many mesoderm-derived cells into the skeletal muscle phenotype. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells do not contain MyoD homologous mRNA. However, expression of an exogenously supplied MyoD gene in aortic smooth muscle cells cultured from newborn and adult animals converts these cells to elongated myoblasts and myotubes expressing the skeletal muscle genes for titin, nebulin, myosin, and skeletal alpha-actin. The presence of basic fibroblast growth factor during growth and serum starvation completely inhibits MyoD-mediated conversion in cultures of newborn smooth muscle cells. However, in smooth muscle cell cultures derived from adult rats the presence of fibroblast growth factor increases the conversion frequency. The differential response of exogenous MyoD suggests that the two morphological types of aortic smooth muscle cells, one typical for the newborn rat, the other for the adult rat, represent two distinctive states of differentiation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8391216

  18. Comparison of aortic intima and inner media in young adult versus aging rats. Stereology in a polarized system.

    PubMed Central

    Guyton, J. R.; Lindsay, K. L.; Dao, D. T.

    1983-01-01

    Age-related ultrastructural changes in the intima and inner media of rat thoracic aorta were examined by new morphometric techniques. Young adult male rats, 10 weeks old, were compared with 1-year-old male rats. The most marked changes were found in the sub-endothelium, which increased in thickness more than five-fold. Basement-membrane-like and granular material accounted for the bulk of this thickening. Certain other structures were increased sevenfold or more in subendothelium. These structures and the volume fractions they occupied in 1-year-old rats were as follows: banded collagen, 4.3%; mononuclear leukocytes, 4.5%; cystic structures, 3.3%; and fibrillar elastin, 1.0%. Changes were also demonstrated in the fenestrae of and at selected depth levels below the innermost, or alternatively the internal, elastic lamina. Collagen increased strikingly within fenestrae and just below the elastic lamina. This was associated with a 28% increase in the thickness of the elastic lamina and a recession of smooth muscle cytoplasm to a deeper position within the first musculoelastic medial layer. The alterations in subendothelial tissues imply an altered basis for mechanical support for aortic endothelium in aging rats. These results mark the successful application of micro-computer-based stereology to a situation of polarized geometry. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6846504

  19. [Giant aortic arch aneurysm following ligation of patent ductus arteriosus in an adult patient with Down syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Tano, Kazutoshi; Ichikawa, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    A 45-year-old male with Down syndrome( DS) had abnormal findings pointed out by chest X-ray and admitted to our hospital. He had undergone ligation of the patent ductus arteriosus 33 years before. Computed tomography showed a giant aortic aneurysm at the aortopulmonary window. Aortic arch replacement was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest. The postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative ductal aneurysm in an adult is relatively rare and needs early operation because of the high risk of rupture. In this case, considering the size of the aneurysm, the timing of diagnosis seemed to be late. As the life expectancy of patients with DS has been lengthning recently, their regular health examinations is mandatory to improve the life expectancy and quality of life.

  20. Impact of Hospital Volume on Outcomes of Endovascular Stenting for Adult Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Parth; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Achint; Sonani, Rajesh; Patel, Aashay; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Thakkar, Badal; Savani, Chirag; Jhamnani, Sunny; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nish; Pant, Sadip; Patel, Samir; Arora, Shilpkumar; Dave, Abhishek; Singh, Vikas; Chothani, Ankit; Patel, Jay; Ansari, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Bhimani, Ronak; Grines, Cindy; Cleman, Michael; Mangi, Abeel; Forrest, John K; Badheka, Apurva O

    2015-11-01

    Use of transcatheter endovascular stenting has been increasing in the treatment of coarctation of aorta (CoA). The present study was undertaken on adults with CoA who underwent stent placement from 2000 to 2011 to analyze the relation of hospital volumes to the outcomes of stenting in adults with CoA. It was a retrospective study based on Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2000 to 2011 and identified subjects using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure code of 747.10 (CoA). Annual hospital volume was calculated using unique hospital identifiers. Weights provided by the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to generate national estimates. A total of 105 (weighted 521) subjects were identified with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code of 39.90 (Endovascular stent). Hospital volumes were divided into tertiles. We compared the highest tertile (≥3 procedures annually) with other tertiles (<3 procedure annually). The composite outcomes of the analysis were procedure-related complications, length of stay (LOS), and cost in relation to the hospital volume. No inhospital death was reported in either group. Hospitals with ≥3 procedures annually had significantly lower incidence of complications (9.5% vs 23.0%) compared to the hospitals with <3 procedures annually (p-value 0.002). Similar results were obtained after multivariate regression analysis in relation to hospital volume. Shorter LOS and lower cost were observed with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. In conclusion, stenting adults for CoA is remarkably safe, and the outcomes of the procedure have improved in centers with annual hospital volume of ≥3 procedures. There is also decreasing trend of procedure-related complications, shorter LOS, and lower costs compared to centers with annual volume <3 procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Dehiscence of the Pericardial Patch, after Surgical Treatment of Active Infective Aortic Valve Endocarditis with Reconstruction of the Aortic Annulus Using a Glutaraldehyde-treated Autologous Pericardium].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazufumi; Fukunaga, Naoto; Koizumi, Shigeki; Nishiya, Kenta; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Ishigami, Masanosuke; Nagasawa, Atsushi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2017-03-01

    A 50-year-old man was admitted with fever and chill sensation 6 months ago. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed left and right coronary cusp prolapses and a thickened tissue of the aortic curtain. Congestive heart failure due to active infective aortic valve endocarditis was diagnosed, and he underwent aortic valve replacement. The aortic annulus was reconstructed using a glutaraldehydetreated autologous pericardium. Six months after surgery, TTE showed severe aortic regurgitation and saccular change in the aortic annulus. Transesophageal echocargiography showed some echo free space from left to noncoronary cusp and abnormal movement of the prosthetic valve annulus. Intraoperative examination showed dehiscence of the pericardial patch from the aortic wall, but no finding of infection. Aortic valve rereplacement was performed with reconstruction of the aortic annulus using a bovine pericardium. To prevent the dehiscence of the pericardial patch from the aortic wall, sutures fixing the prosthetic valve were passed from outside of the aortic wall.

  2. Isolation of serotype G8, P6[1] bovine rotavirus from adult cattle with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, M; Nakagomi, T; Tajima, K; Ezura, K; Akashi, H; Nakagomi, O

    1997-01-01

    Two electrophoretically identical strains of group A rotavirus were isolated from diarrheic cows aged 3, 4, and 7 years on a dairy farm in Japan. They had a rare serotype combination of G8 and P6[1] and were shown by RNA-RNA hybridization to be most closely related to bovine strain NCDV-Lincoln (G6P6[1]). PMID:9114422

  3. Anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery with an interarterial course: understanding current management strategies in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Brothers, Julie; Gaynor, J William; Paridon, Stephen; Lorber, Richard; Jacobs, Marshall

    2009-10-01

    Anomalous aortic origin of a coronary artery from the opposite sinus of Valsalva with an interarterial course (AAOCA) is a rare congenital anomaly that is the second leading cardiovascular cause of sudden death in children and adolescents. Management practices with respect to this lesion vary among clinicians. We surveyed practitioners' opinions on treatment and management strategies for patients with AAOCA. A 17-question "Patient Management Questionnaire" was sent to all Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society (CHSS) members (n = 90), who were asked to respond and to distribute the questionnaire to pediatric cardiologists and nurse practitioners at their institutions. Questions addressed patient presentation, diagnostic modalities, therapeutic intervention, complications to therapy, follow-up visits, and type and frequency of follow-up testing. Descriptive statistics were used for analyses. We received 113 responses. Almost all respondents agree that ischemia at presentation or with provocative testing warrants surgical repair, whereas the majority believes that any patient with symptoms but no evidence of ischemia should have surgery. Approximately one-half and one-third of the respondents manage patients who are awaiting surgery or not having surgery by completely restricting exercise or not allowing competitive athletics, respectively. In asymptomatic patients, patient age determines timing of surgical repair but almost one-quarter did not believe that an asymptomatic child should undergo surgery. Among patients managed medically, there were six sudden deaths; there were two deaths in those who had surgical repair. There is marked heterogeneity in physician opinions regarding AAOCA treatment and management. A multicenter registry would facilitate the development of evidence-based treatment and management guidelines for children and young adults with AAOCA.

  4. Bovine coronavirus associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Mélanie J; Kapil, Sanjay

    2010-03-01

    Bovine coronaviruses, like other animal coronaviruses, have a predilection for intestinal and respiratory tracts. The viruses responsible for enteric and respiratory symptoms are closely related antigenically and genetically. Only 4 bovine coronavirus isolates have been completely sequenced and thus, the information about the genetics of the virus is still limited. This article reviews the clinical syndromes associated with bovine coronavirus, including pneumonia in calves and adult cattle, calf diarrhea, and winter dysentery; diagnostic methods; prevention using vaccination; and treatment, with adjunctive immunotherapy.

  5. Aortic pulse wave velocity predicts focal white matter hyperintensities in a biracial cohort of older adults.

    PubMed

    Rosano, Caterina; Watson, Nora; Chang, Yuefang; Newman, Anne B; Aizenstein, Howard J; Du, Yan; Venkatraman, Vijay; Harris, Tamara B; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Although the cross-sectional relationship of arterial stiffness with cerebral small vessel disease is consistently shown in middle-aged and young-old adults, it is less clear whether these associations remain significant over time in very old adults. We hypothesize that arterial stiffness is longitudinally associated with white matter characteristics, and associations are stronger within watershed areas. Neuroimaging was obtained in 2006-2008 from 303 elderly (mean age 82.9 years, 59% women, 41% black) with pulse wave velocity (PWV) measures in 1997-1998. Multivariable regression models estimated the coefficients for PWV (cm/sec) in relationship to presence, severity, and spatial distribution of white matter hyperintensities (WMH), gray matter volume, and fractional anisotropy from diffusion tensor, adjusting for demographic, cardiovascular risk factors, and diseases from 1997-1998 to 2006-2008. Higher PWV in 1997-1998 was associated with greater WMH volume in 2006-2008 within the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (age and total brain WMH adjusted, P=0.023), but not with WMH in other tracts or with fractional anisotropy or gray matter volume from total brain (P>0.2). Associations were stronger in blacks than in whites, remaining significant in fully adjusted models. Elderly with WMH in tracts related to processing speed and memory are more likely to have had higher PWV values 10 years prior, before neuroimaging data being available. Future studies should address whether arterial stiffness can serve as an early biomarker of covert brain structural abnormalities and whether early arterial stiffness control can promote successful brain aging, especially in black elderly.

  6. Improving the development of early bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos by treating adult donor cells with vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huanhuan; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Zekun; Wang, Yongsheng; He, Rongjun; Qin, Yumin; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin C (Vc) has been widely studied in cell and embryo culture, and has recently been demonstrated to promote cellular reprogramming. The objective of this study was to identify a suitable Vc concentration that, when used to treat adult bovine fibroblasts serving as donor cells for nuclear transfer, improved donor-cell physiology and the developmental potential of the cloned embryos that the donor nuclei were used to create. A Vc concentration of 0.15 mM promoted cell proliferation and increased donor-cell 5-hydroxy methyl cytosine levels 2.73-fold (P < 0.05). The blastocyst rate was also significantly improved after nuclear transfer (39.6% treated vs. 26.0% control, P < 0.05); the average number of apoptotic cells in cloned blastocysts was significantly reduced (2.2 vs. 4.4, P < 0.05); and the inner cell mass-to-trophectoderm ratio (38.25% vs. 30.75%, P < 0.05) and expression of SOX2 (3.71-fold, P < 0.05) and POU5F1 (3.15-fold, P < 0.05) were significantly increased. These results suggested that Vc promotes cell proliferation, decreases DNA methylation levels in donor cells, and improves the developmental competence of bovine somatic-cell nuclear transfer embryos. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Long-term safety and effectiveness of mechanical versus biologic aortic valve prostheses in older patients: results from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery National Database.

    PubMed

    Brennan, J Matthew; Edwards, Fred H; Zhao, Yue; O'Brien, Sean; Booth, Michael E; Dokholyan, Rachel S; Douglas, Pamela S; Peterson, Eric D

    2013-04-23

    There is a paucity of long-term data comparing biological versus mechanical aortic valve prostheses in older individuals. We performed follow-up of patients aged 65 to 80 years undergoing aortic valve replacement with a biological (n=24 410) or mechanical (n=14 789) prosthesis from 1991 to 1999 at 605 centers within the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery Database using Medicare inpatient claims (mean, 12.6 years; maximum, 17 years; minimum, 8 years), and outcomes were compared by propensity methods. Among Medicare-linked patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (mean age, 73 years), both reoperation (4.0%) and endocarditis (1.9%) were uncommon to 12 years; however, the risk for other adverse outcomes was high, including death (66.5%), stroke (14.1%), and bleeding (17.9%). Compared with those receiving a mechanical valve, patients given a bioprosthesis had a similar adjusted risk for death (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.07), higher risks for reoperation (hazard ratio, 2.55; 95% confidence interval, 2.14-3.03) and endocarditis (hazard ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-1.94), and lower risks for stroke (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.82-0.93) and bleeding (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.62-0.70). Although these results were generally consistent among patient subgroups, bioprosthesis patients aged 65 to 69 years had a substantially elevated 12-year absolute risk of reoperation (10.5%). Among patients undergoing aortic valve replacement, long-term mortality rates were similar for those who received bioprosthetic versus mechanical valves. Bioprostheses were associated with a higher long-term risk of reoperation and endocarditis but a lower risk of stroke and hemorrhage. These risks varied as a function of a patient's age and comorbidities.

  8. Identification of bovine hibernation-specific protein complex and evidence of its regulation in fasting and aging.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Satoshi; Okamoto, Ryuji; Taniguchi, Masaya; Ban-Tokuda, Tomomi; Konishi, Katsuhisa; Goto, Itaru; Yamamoto, Yasunari; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Mashio; Shiraki, Katsuya; Buechler, Christa; Ito, Masaaki

    2013-05-01

    Hibernation-specific protein (HP) is a plasma protein that regulates hibernation in chipmunks. The HP complex (HP20c) consists of three homologous proteins, HP20, HP25 and HP27, all produced by liver and belonging to the C1q family. To date, HP20c has not been identified in any mammalian species except chipmunk and ground squirrel hibernators. Here, we report a bovine HP20 gene isolated from liver tissue and aortic endothelial cells. Total homology between bovine and chipmunk variants was 63% at the amino acid level. Gene expression was highest in the liver. Western blot revealed HP20 protein in foetal, newborn, calf and adult serum, with highest concentrations in the adult. Similar proteins were detected in sera of other ruminants but not in humans, bears, mice or rats. Bovine HP20 protein was found mainly in ovaries, stomach, heart, kidneys, lungs, testes and prostate, but not in the skeletal muscle. Native HP20 was purified from bovine adult serum as a complex containing 25 and 27 kDa proteins. Mass spectrometry revealed that these proteins are orthologues of chipmunk HP25 and HP27, respectively. Interestingly, bovine HP20 was highly expressed in cattle serum after fasting. Native bovine HP20c may be a useful tool for investigating HP function.

  9. Identification and regulation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor activity and biosynthesis of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Studies in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells and human dermal capillaries.

    PubMed Central

    Merke, J; Milde, P; Lewicka, S; Hügel, U; Klaus, G; Mangelsdorf, D J; Haussler, M R; Rauterberg, E W; Ritz, E

    1989-01-01

    Because 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) has been shown to play roles in both proliferation and differentiation of novel target cells, the potential expression of 1,25(OH)2D3 receptor (VDR) activity was investigated in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Receptor binding assays performed on nuclear extracts of BAEC revealed a single class of specific, high-affinity VDR that displayed a 4.5-fold increase in maximal ligand binding (Nmax) in rapidly proliferating BAEC compared with confluent, density-arrested cells. When confluent BAEC were incubated with activators of protein kinase C (PKC), Nmax increased 2.5-fold within 6-24 h and this upregulation was prevented by sphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC, as well as by actinomycin D or cycloheximide. Immunohistochemical visualization using a specific MAb disclosed nuclear localized VDR in venular and capillary endothelial cells of human skin biopsies, documenting the expression of VDR, in vivo, and validating the BAEC model. Finally, additional experiments indicated that BAEC formed the 1,25(OH)2D3 hormonal metabolite from 25(OH)D3 substrate, in vitro, and growth curves of BAEC maintained in the presence of 10(-8) M 1,25(OH)2D3 showed a 36% decrease in saturation density. These data provide evidence for the presence of a vitamin D microendocrine system in endothelial cells, consisting of the VDR and a 1 alpha-hydroxylase enzyme capable of producing 1,25(OH)2D3. That both components of this system are coordinately regulated, and that BAEC respond to the 1,25(OH)2D3 hormone by modulating growth kinetics, suggests the existence of a vitamin D autocrine loop in endothelium that may play a role in the development and/or functions of this pathophysiologically significant cell population. Images PMID:2542376

  10. Antigenic and biological comparisons of bovine coronaviruses derived from neonatal calf diarrhea and winter dysentery of adult cattle.

    PubMed

    Tsunemitsu, H; Saif, L J

    1995-01-01

    The antigenic and biological properties of 6 strains of bovine coronavirus (BCV) derived from neonatal calf diarrhea (CD) and 8 strains of BCV from winter dysentery (WD) of adult cattle, propagated in HRT-18 cells, were compared to determine if CD and WD strains belong to distinct serotypes or subtypes of BCV. All strains hemagglutinated both mouse and chicken erythrocytes at 4 degrees C, but the ratios of hemagglutination titers with mouse erythrocytes compared to chicken erythrocytes showed diversity for both CD and WD strains. Some CD and WD strains did not hemagglutinate chicken erythrocytes at 37 degrees C and showed receptor-destroying enzyme activity against chicken erythrocytes. Hyperimmune antisera were produced in guinea pigs against 3 and 7 strains of BCV from CD and WD, respectively. No significant differences in antibody titers against these strains were observed by indirect immunofluorescence tests. However, in virus neutralization tests, antisera to 1 CD and 2 WD strains had 16-fold or lower antibody titers against 3 WD and 1 CD strains than against the homologous strains, and this variation reflected low antigenic relatedness values (R = 13-25%), suggesting the presence of different subtypes among BCV. In hemagglutination inhibition tests, some one-way antigenic variations among strains were also observed. These results suggest that some antigenic and biological diversity exists among BCV strains, but these variations were unrelated to the clinical source of the strains; i.e. CD or WD.

  11. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  12. Angiogenic tube formation of bovine aortic endothelial cells grown on patterns formed by H2/He plasma treatment of the plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane film.

    PubMed

    Park, Jisoo; Ha, Myunghoon; Lee, Hye-Rim; Park, Heonyong; Yu, Jung-Hoon; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Jung, Donggeun

    2015-06-27

    Angiogenesis, the process to generate new vessels, is necessary for normal development in children as well as the wound healing and the tumor growth in adults. Therefore, it is physiologically and/or pathophysiologically significant to monitor angiogenesis. However, classical in vitro methods to evaluate angiogenesis take a long time and are expensive. Here, the authors developed a novel method to analyze the angiogenesis in a simple and economical way, using patterned films. In this study, the authors fabricated a plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) thin film deposited by capacitively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition system with various plasma powers. The patterned PPHMDSO film was plasma treated by 10:90 H2/He mixture gas through a metal shadow mask. The films were characterized by water contact angle, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses. Our results show that the PPHMDSO film suppresses the cell adhesion, whereas surface modified PPHMDSO film enhances the cell adhesion and proliferation. From cell culture experiments, the authors found that the patterned film with 300 μm line interval was most efficient to evaluate the tube formation, a sapient angiogenic indicator. This patterned film will provide an effective and promising method for evaluating angiogenesis.

  13. [Aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Acute aortic dissection suddenly occurrs and results in a variety of catastrophic sequelae including cardiac tamponade, rupture, and organ malperfusion. In acute stage (< 2 weeks), according to the classifications on the region of aortic dissection, the condition of the false channel and the onset, appropriate medical, surgical, or endovascular treatments including endovascular aneurysm repair followed by the rapid and accurate diagnosis of aortic dissection using computed tomography and ultrasound should be performed without delay. In the chronic stage (> 2 weeks), the behavior of the chronic dissection or residual distal dissection after the initial treatment should be followed-up carefully with best medical treatment at the regular intervals. If necessary, appropriate surgical and endovascular treatment should be carried out in the proper timing before rupture.

  14. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  15. Adult Onset Dysphagia: Right Sided Aortic Arch, Ductus Diverticulum, and Retroesophageal Ligamentum Arteriosum Comprising an Obstructing Vascular Ring

    PubMed Central

    Raheja, Hitesh; Kamholz, Stephan; Shetty, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    A 49-year-old African American male patient with no past medical history was admitted because of 3 months of difficulty swallowing solid and liquid foods. He had constant retrosternal discomfort and appeared malnourished. The chest radiograph revealed a right sided aortic arch with tracheal deviation to the left. A swallow study confirmed a fixed esophageal narrowing at the level of T6. Contrast enhanced Computed Tomography (CT) angiogram of the chest and neck revealed a mirror image right aortic arch with a left sided cardiac apex and a prominent ductus diverticulum (measuring 1.7 × 1.8 cm). This structure extended posterior to and indented the mid esophagus. A left posterolateral thoracotomy was performed and the ductus diverticulum was resected. A retroesophageal ligamentum arteriosum was found during surgery and divided. This rare combination of congenital anatomical aberrations led to severe dysphagia in our patient. Successful surgical correction in the form of resection of the ductus diverticulum and division of the retroesophageal ligamentum arteriosum led to complete resolution of our patient's symptoms.

  16. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  17. Guilt by association: paradigm for detecting a silent killer (thoracic aortic aneurysm)

    PubMed Central

    Elefteriades, John A; Sang, Adam; Kuzmik, Gregory; Hornick, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed a close association between various medical conditions (intracranial aneurysm, abdominal aortic aneurysm, temporal arteritis, autoimmune disorder, renal cysts), certain aortic anatomic variants (bovine aortic arch, direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch, bicuspid aortic valve), and family history of aneurysm disease with thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. This paper reviews these associations. We propose to capitalise on these associations as powerful and expanding opportunities to diagnose the virulent but silent disease of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This can be accomplished by recognition of this ‘guilt by association’ with the other conditions. Thus, patients with associated diseases and anatomic variants should be investigated for silent aortic aneurysms. Such a paradigm holds substantial potential for reducing death from the silent killer represented by thoracic aortic aneurysm disease. PMID:25932333

  18. Aortic root dilatation in young men with normally functioning bicuspid aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    Nistri, S; Sorbo, M; Marin, M; Palisi, M; Scognamiglio, R; Thiene, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the dimensions of the aortic root in a selected population of young males with isolated normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve.
DESIGN AND SETTING—Echocardiographic and Doppler evaluation of conscripts with bicuspid aortic valve at the time of military pre-enrolment screening in two military hospitals.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—66 consecutive young men with a normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve were studied to assess aortic size at four aortic levels: annulus, sinuses of Valsalva, supra-aortic ridge, and proximal ascending aorta; 70 consecutive normal young subjects, matched for age and body surface area, were used as controls.
RESULTS—In men with a bicuspid aortic valve, the diameter of the aortic root was significantly larger than in controls at the sinuses (3.16 (0.37) v 2.87 (0.31) cm, p < 0.001), at the supra-aortic ridge (2.64 (0.46) v 2.47 (0.28) cm, p = 0.01), and at the level of the proximal ascending aorta (3.12 (0.48) v 2.69 (0.28) cm, p < 0.001). The prevalence of aortic root dilatation was 7.5% at the annulus (5/66), 19.6% at the sinuses (13/66), 15% at the supra-aortic ridge (10/66), and 43.9% at the ascending aorta (29/66); 32 subjects (48%) had aortic root dimensions comparable with controls, while 34 (52%) had definitely abnormal aortic root dimensions.
CONCLUSIONS—Aortic root enlargement in people with a bicuspid aortic valve occurs independently of haemodynamic abnormalities, age, and body size. However, there appear to be different subgroups of young adults with bicuspid aortic valves, one of which is characterised by aortic dilatation, possibly caused by a congenital abnormality of the aortic wall.


Keywords: bicuspid aortic valve; aortic root dilatation PMID:10377302

  19. Dietary supplementation with cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid and aortic stiffness in overweight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Sluijs, Ivonne; Plantinga, Yvonne; de Roos, Baukje; Mennen, Louise I; Bots, Michiel L

    2010-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that dietary cis-9,trans-11 (c9,t11) conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) may inhibit or regress the development of atherosclerosis. The effect of CLA on atherosclerosis has not been assessed in humans. We investigated the effect of c9,t11 CLA supplementation on aortic pulse wave velocity (a marker of atherosclerosis) and on cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese but otherwise apparently healthy subjects. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial, we randomly assigned 401 subjects, aged 40-70 y and with a body mass index (in kg/m(2)) > or = 25, to receive either 4 g CLA/d (2.5 g c9,t11 CLA/d and 0.6 g trans-10,cis-12 CLA/d) or placebo supplements for 6 mo. Aortic pulse wave velocity, blood pressure, anthropometric characteristics, and concentrations of fasting lipid, glucose, insulin, and C-reactive protein were measured before and after supplementation. During the intervention, mean (+/-SE) pulse wave velocity did not change in the c9,t11 CLA group (Delta0.00 +/- 0.07) compared with the placebo group (Delta0.09 +/- 0.06). There was no effect of c9,t11 CLA supplementation on blood pressure, body composition, insulin resistance, or concentrations of lipid, glucose, and C-reactive protein. This study does not support an antiatherosclerotic effect or an effect on cardiovascular risk factors of c9,t11 CLA. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00706745.

  20. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  1. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve. Also, a narrowing of the aortic valve (aortic stenosis) can be associated with leaking. High blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure may stretch the root of the aorta where the aortic valve sits. The valve flaps ( ...

  2. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of ... high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who smoke. ...

  3. Measurement of effective aortic valve area using three-dimensional echocardiography in children undergoing aortic balloon valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Tara; Fernandes, Fernanda; Slorach, Cameron; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Pressure gradient is used for timing of balloon aortic valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis (AS) in children, but does not correlate well with outcome and is limited if ventricular function is poor. In adults, effective orifice area (EOA) is used to assess AS severity, but EOA by continuity equation or 2D echo is unreliable in children. Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) may reliably assess EOA but has not been studied in children. We assessed measurement of aortic valve EOA by 3DE in children with AS before and after balloon aortic valvuloplasty and compared results with change in aortic valve gradient. 3DE was performed at time of catheterization before and after balloon aortic valvuloplasty. Using 3DE multiplanar review mode, valve annulus diameter, area, and EOA were measured and compared with change in aortic gradient and degree of aortic insufficiency. Twenty-four 3DE studies in 12 children (mean age 4.4 ± 5.0 years) were analyzed. EOA was measurable in all. Catheter peak gradient decreased from 45 ± 10 to 26 ± 17 mmHg (P = 0.0018). 3DE EOA increased after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (0.59 ± 0.52 cm(2) vs 0.80 ± 0.70 cm(2) ; P = 0.03), without change in valve diameter. EOA change correlated with change in peak (r = 0.77; P = 0.005) and mean (r = 0.60; P = 0.03) aortic valve gradient post balloon aortic valvuloplasty. 3DE facilitates EOA measurement in pediatric AS and correlates with change in aortic valve gradient after balloon valvuloplasty. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  5. Aortic dilatation in children with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Devereux, Richard B; Dave, Archana; Bell, Cynthia; Portman, Ronald; Milewicz, Diana

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of aortic dilatation in hypertensive children, the prevalence of which is 4% to 10% in hypertensive adults. Prospectively enrolled multiethnic children, untreated for their hypertension, underwent an echocardiogram to exclude congenital heart disease and evaluate for end-organ damage and aortic size. The aorta was measured in the parasternal long-axis view at three levels: the sinus of Valsalva, supra-tubular junction, and the ascending aorta. Aortic dilatation was determined by z-score >2 at any one of the levels measured. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure above the 95th percentile based on the Fourth Working Group criteria confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Among 142 consecutive hypertensive children (median age, 14 years; 45% females) aortic dilatation was detected in 2.8% (95% confidence interval, 1%-7%; median age, 16 years; 100% females). Children with aortic dilatation, when compared with those without, had significantly more aortic valve insufficiency (P = .005) and left ventricular hypertrophy (P = .018). Prevalence of aortic dilatation was 2.8% and was associated with significantly more aortic insufficiency and left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to those without aortic dilatation.

  6. Aortic Dilatation in Children with Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Devereux, Richard B.; Dave, Archana; Bell, Cynthia; Portman, Ronald; Milewicz, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine presence of aortic dilatation in hypertensive children, the prevalence of which is 4–10% in hypertensive adults. Methods Prospectively enrolled multiethnic children untreated for their hypertension, underwent an echocardiogram to exclude congenital heart disease and evaluate for end-organ damage and aortic size. The aorta was measured in the parasternal long-axis view at 3 levels: the sinus of Valsalva, supra-tubular junction and the ascending aorta. Aortic dilatation was determined by z-score > 2 at any 1 of the levels measured. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure above the 95th percentile based on the Fourth Working Group criteria confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results Among 142 consecutive hypertensive children (median age 14 years, 45% females) aortic dilatation was detected in 2.8% (95% CI 1% to 7%, median age 16 years, 100% females). Children with aortic dilatation, when compared to those without, had significantly more aortic valve insufficiency (p = 0.005) and left ventricular hypertrophy (p = 0.018). Conclusions Prevalence of aortic dilatation was 2.8% and was associated with significantly more aortic insufficiency and left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to those without aortic dilatation. PMID:24507486

  7. Increasing of blastocyst rate and gene expression in co-culture of bovine embryos with adult adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Moysés S; Nascimento, Hamilton S; Costa, Mayra P R; Costa, Nathália N; Brito, Karynne N L; Lopes, Cinthia T A; Santos, Simone S D; Cordeiro, Marcela S; Ohashi, Otávio M

    2016-10-01

    Despite advances in the composition of defined embryo culture media, co-culture with somatic cells is still used for bovine in vitro embryo production (IVEP) in many laboratories worldwide. Granulosa cells are most often used for this purpose, although recent work suggests that co-culture with stem cells of adult or embryonic origin or their derived biomaterials may improve mouse, cattle, and pig embryo development. In experiment 1, in vitro produced bovine embryos were co-cultured in the presence of two concentrations of bovine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal cells (b-ATMSCs; 10(3) and 10(4) cells/mL), in b-ATMSC preconditioned medium (SOF-Cond), or SOF alone (control). In experiment 2, co-culture with 10(4) b-ATMSCs/mL was compared to the traditional granulosa cell co-culture system (Gran). In experiment 1, co-culture with 10(4) b-ATMSCs/mL improved blastocyst rates in comparison to conditioned and control media (p < 0.05). Despite that it did not show difference with 10(3) b-ATMSCs/mL (p = 0.051), group 10(4) b-ATMSCs/mL yielded higher results of blastocyst production. In experiment 2, when compared to group Gran, co-culture with 10(4) b-ATMSCs/mL improved not only blastocyst rates but also quality as assessed by increased total cell numbers and mRNA expression levels for POU5F1 and G6PDH (p < 0.05). Co-culture of bovine embryos with b-ATMSCs was more beneficial than the traditional co-culture system with granulosa cells. We speculate that the microenvironmental modulatory potential of MSCs, by means of soluble substances and exosome secretions, could be responsible for the positive effects observed. Further experiments must be done to evaluate if this beneficial effect in vitro also translates to an increase in offspring following embryo transfer. Moreover, this study provides an interesting platform to study the basic requirements during preimplantation embryo development, which, in turn, may aid the improvement of embryo culture protocols in

  8. Genotyping bovine coronaviruses.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) are enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses of the Coronaviridae family. Infection is associated with enteritis and pneumonia in calves and Winter Dysentery in adult cattle. Strains, isolated more than 50 years ago, are used in vaccines and as laboratory ...

  9. Concentrated bovine colostrum protein supplementation reduces the incidence of self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection in adult males.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Grant D; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2003-08-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest that bovine colostrum may prevent upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). There is scant evidence to support such claims, although salivary IgA protects against URTI, and it was recently shown that bovine colostrum increases salivary IgA. The present invesigation examined whether concentrated bovine colostrum protein (CBC) affected the incidence or duration of self-reported symptoms of URTI in adult males. We examined logbooks containing self-reported symptoms of illness from previous studies which examined physiological effects of CBC. In these double-blind, placebo controlled studies, subjects had been randomly allocated to consume 60g. day(-1) of CBC (n = 93) or whey protein (WP) (n = 81) for eight weeks. Symptoms were coded using established criteria to identify those related to URTI. Since the incubation period for an URTI is up to five days, symptoms reported during the first week of supplementation (PRE-EXP) were analysed separately to preclude those arising from infection prior to study commencement. During PRE-EXP, there was no difference in the proportion of subjects taking the different supplements who reported symptoms of URTI (CBC, 11%,WP, 5%; 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI) -14% to 2%; P = 0.16). During the subsequent seven weeks (i. e. the experimental period), a significantly lesser proportion of subjects taking CBC reported symptoms of URTI compared with those taking WP (CBC, 32%,WP, 48%, P = 0.03; 95 % CI -30 % to -2 %), but symptom duration did not differ (CBC, 6.8 +/- 4.2 days,WP, 6.0 +/- 4.4 days; P = 0.27). This study provides preliminary evidence that CBC may enhance resistance to the development of symptoms of URTI.

  10. Late complication after repair of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Anaïs; Cuttone, Fabio; Desgué, Julien; Ivascau, Calin; Caprio, Sabino; Saplacan, Vladimir; Belin, Annette; Babatasi, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital malformation that has long been considered completely correctable with appropriate surgery in childhood. However, with the aging of these patients, many late complications have been reported, and this notion must be reevaluated. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent reoperation between 1992 and 2012 in our adult cardiac surgery department following surgical correction of coarctation in childhood; 18 patients over 15-years old were included in the study. The median time from coarctation repair to reoperation was 25 years. Patients were reoperated on for several late complications: aortic valve disease secondary to bicuspid aortic valve, ascending aortic aneurysm, recoarctation, aortic arch hypoplasia, pseudoaneurysm, associated recoarctation and pseudoaneurysm, subvalvular aortic obstruction, and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. One patient died due to an intraoperative complication. In the other cases, the surgical results were satisfactory at the 6-month follow-up. According to literature data, age at coarctation repair and surgical technique appear to be essential factors in late complications: older age and surgical repair with prosthesis interposition are associated with a higher rate of reintervention. Patients who have undergone repair of aortic coarctation frequently remain asymptomatic for a long time. Late complications can be appropriately treated when diagnosed early. Consequently, all coarctation patients need careful lifelong follow-up, especially those with congenital aortic valve disease or surgery in childhood with interposition of prosthetic material. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. Simple Renal Cysts as Markers of Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Bulat A; Theodoropoulos, Panagiotis; Salloum, Mohammad N; Zaza, Khaled J; Tranquilli, Maryann; Mojibian, Hamid R; Dahl, Neera K; Fang, Hai; Rizzo, John A; Elefteriades, John A

    2016-01-08

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is usually a clinically silent disease; timely detection is largely dependent upon identification of clinical markers of thoracic aortic disease (TAD); (bicuspid aortic valve, intracranial aortic aneurysm, bovine aortic arch, or positive family history). Recently, an association of simple renal cysts (SRC) with abdominal aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection was established. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of SRC in patients with TAD in order to assess whether the presence of SRC can be used as a predictor of TAD. We evaluated the prevalence of SRC in 842 patients with TAD (64.0% males) treated at our institution from 2004 to 2013 and compared to a control group of patients (n=543; 56.2% males). Patients were divided into 4 groups: ascending aortic aneurysm (456; 54.2%); descending aortic aneurysm (86; 10.2%); type A aortic dissection (118; 14.0%); and type B aortic dissection (182; 21.6%). SRC were identified by abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of these patients. Prevalence of SRC is 37.5%, 57.0%, 44.1%, and 47.3% for patients with ascending aneurysm, descending aneurysm, type A dissection, and type B dissection, respectively. Prevalence of SRC in the control group was 15.3%. Prevalence of SRC was not significantly different between male and female aortic disease patients, despite reported general male predominance (2:1), which was also observed in our control group (1.7:1). This study establishes an increased prevalence of SRC in patients with TAD. SRC can potentially be used as a marker for timely detection of patients at risk of TAD. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  13. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  14. Aortic valve replacement in rheumatoid aortic incompetence.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A B; Goldstraw, P; Caves, P K

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatoid aortic valve disease is uncommon. and there are few reports of valve replacement in this condition. Aortic valve replacement and partial pericardiectomy was performed in a patient with acute rheumatoid aortitis and aortic incompetence. Previous reports suggest that any patient with rheumatoid arthritis who develops cardiac symptoms should be carefully assessed for surgically treatable involvement of the pericardium or heart valves. Images PMID:725829

  15. Pharmacological agents as cerebral protectants during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in adult thoracic aortic surgery. A survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, A T; Moore, S J; Liban, J B

    2002-10-01

    A postal survey was sent to members of the Association of Cardiothoracic Anaesthetists to ascertain current practice in the use of pharmacological agents as cerebral protectants during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. The response rate was 60%. Eighty-three per cent of respondents used some form of pharmacological agent specifically for cerebral protection. Fifty-nine per cent of respondents used thiopental, 29% used propofol and 48% used a variety of other agents, the most common of these being a steroid. There were variations in the dose and timing of administration of drugs. Few respondents believed that there was a body of evidence to support this use of pharmacological agents. Only 35% of respondents believed there to be sufficient evidence to support the use of thiopental. Similarly, only 11% of respondents believe that there is evidence supporting the use of propofol, and 16% the use of steroids. The above findings demonstrate that it would not be possible to create a "best practice" set of guidelines at present. A national database of all cases of adult thoracic surgery involving deep hypothermic cardiac arrest, with methodology and outcome, could probably establish such guidelines, evidence based.

  16. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Asha; Hans, Chetan P; Koenig, Sara N; Nichols, Haley A; Galindo, Cristi L; Garner, Harold R; Merrill, Walter H; Hinton, Robert B; Garg, Vidu

    2011-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs). We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  17. Aortic Stenosis and Vascular Calcifications in Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A.; Gahl, William A.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports . We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. PMID:22100375

  18. Application of the CardioCel bovine pericardial patch – a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Cudak, Edyta; Mrówczyński, Wojciech; Nałęcz, Tomasz K.; Westerski, Przemysław; Wojtalik, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Animal pericardial patches are widely used in adult and pediatric cardiac surgery. A search is ongoing for a new material with optimal surgical properties that will reduce intraoperative bleeding and the occurrence of restenosis, calcification, and pseudoaneurysms in long-term observation. One product of interest is the CardioCel bovine pericardial patch. Aim Evaluation of the short-term results of CardioCel bovine pericardial patch implantation during pediatric cardiac surgery. Material and methods The study included 8 patients who underwent surgical correction of congenital cardiac defects between January 2015 and February 2016. Pericardial patches were used to repair supravalvular aortic stenosis and reconstruct the aortic arch and pulmonary arteries. The age of the patients ranged from 10 days to 14 years. Results There were no hospital deaths. The new material exhibited satisfactory durability and elasticity during surgery, facilitating optimal adaptation of the patch to the patient's tissues. No significant bleeding was reported from the suture site. The median duration of follow-up was 58 days. During the follow-up, there were no symptoms of pseudoaneurysm formation, patch thickening, or calcification in the areas where the pericardial patches were implanted. No clinical or laboratory symptoms of infection were observed in locations where the new material was applied. Conclusions Satisfactory surgical properties of the patch were observed intraoperatively. Positive results using the new pericardial patch were obtained in short-term follow-up. PMID:27785133

  19. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  1. CT in aortic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    A diagnosis of aortic transection was made at computed tomography (CT) in four of 10 patients with acute multiple trauma suspected of having thoracic aortic injuries. There were no false-negative or false-positive examinations. The CT findings of an injured aorta were (1) false aneurysm, (2) linear lucency within the opacified aortic lumen caused by the torn edge of the aortic wall, (3) marginal irregularity of the opacified aortic lumen, (4) periaortic or intramural aortic hematoma, and (5) dissection. The extent of associated mediastinal hemorrhage and the amount of blood in the pleural space were not useful as indicators of aortic injury. Similarly, shift of the trachea and esophagus or absence thereof was found in patients with or without aortic tear.

  2. Aortic dissection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic dissection is a condition in which there is bleeding into and along the wall of the aorta (the ... the inner wall of the artery. Although aortic dissection can affect anybody, it is most often seen ...

  3. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  4. Partial aortic root replacement for aneurysm of the right sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Kyogoku, Masahisa; Fujino, Takahisa; Nakajima, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    An aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva is clinically rare, and its operative indications and procedures are controversial. We herein report the rare case of a 68-year-old woman with severe right ventricular outflow tract obstruction caused by an aneurysm of the right sinus of Valsalva. We performed partial aortic root reconstruction using a bovine pericardial patch, and aortic valve replacement. Although this case provides evidence that these are suitable surgical techniques for treatment of aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, total aortic root replacement should have been chosen based on the pathological finding of aortic medial and valve degeneration.

  5. Unicuspid Aortic Stenosis in a Patient with Turner Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, Michael; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Portillo, Juan Guillermo; Crestanello, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are the cause of premature aortic stenosis in pediatric and younger adult populations. Despite being very rare, unicuspid aortic valves account for approximately 5% of isolated aortic valve replacements. Patients with aortic stenosis, present with the same symptomatology independent of leaflet morphology. However, the presence of bicuspid and unicuspid aortic stenosis is associated with a higher incidence of aortopathy, especially in Turner syndrome patients. Turner syndrome, an X monosomy, is associated with aortic valve anomalies, aortopathy, and hypertension. These risk factors lead to a higher incidence of aortic dissection in this population. Patients with Turner syndrome and aortic stenosis that present for aortic valve replacement should therefore undergo extensive aortic imaging prior to surgery. Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for valvular pathology, yet it can misdiagnose unicuspid aortic valves as bicuspid valves due to certain similarities on imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography is a better tool for distinguishing between the two valvular abnormalities, although diagnostic errors can still occur. We present a case of a 50-year-old female with history of Turner syndrome and bicuspid aortic stenosis presenting for aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed a stenotic unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve with an eccentric orifice, which was missed on preoperative imaging. This case highlights the importance of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in confirming preoperative findings, diagnosing further cardiac pathology, and ensuring adequate surgical repair.

  6. Association of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus with Multiple Viral Infections in Bovine Respiratory Disease Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Lisette; Marois, Paul; Lamontagne, Lucie

    1988-01-01

    We investigated eleven outbreaks of naturally occurring bovine respiratory diseases in calves and adult animals in the St-Hyacinthe area of Quebec. Specific antibodies to bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, reovirus type 3, and serotypes 1 to 7 of bovine adenovirus were found in paired sera from diseased animals. Several bovine viruses with respiratory tropism were involved concomitantly in herds during an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease. In addition, concomitant fourfold rises of antibody titers were frequently observed to two or more viral agents in seroconverted calves (61%) or adult animals (38%). Bovine viral diarrhea virus was found to be the most frequent viral agent associated with multiple viral infection in calves only (92%). PMID:17423116

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Oliemy, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease.

  8. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p < 0.001). Thoracic aortic aneurysms were significantly more likely to be diagnosed in late follow-up in patients with Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p < 0.001). Patients with Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p < 0.001). The much higher long-term rates of aortic complications after AVR observed in patients with Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities

  9. Asymptomatic Interrupted Aortic Arch, Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation, and Bicuspid Aortic Valve in a 76-Year-Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Tajdini, Masih; Sardari, Akram; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Baradaran, Abdolvahab; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with a high infancy mortality rate. The principal finding is loss of luminal continuity between the ascending and descending portions of the aorta. Because of the high mortality rate in infancy, interrupted aortic arch is very rare among adults. In this report, we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman with asymptomatic interrupted aortic arch, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and bicuspid aortic valve. To our knowledge, she is the oldest patient ever reported with this possibly unique combination of pathologic conditions. In addition to reporting her case, we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:27777532

  10. Evaluation of bovine, cold-adapted human, and wild-type human parainfluenza type 3 viruses in adult volunteers and in chimpanzees.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, M L; Belshe, R B; King, J; Newman, F; Westblom, T U; Tierney, E L; London, W T; Murphy, B R

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the level of attenuation of live parainfluenza type 3 virus (PIV3) vaccine candidates, we compared the responses of partially immune adult volunteers inoculated intranasally with 10(6) to 10(7) 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) of bovine PIV3 (n = 18) or cold-adapted (ca) PIV3 (n = 37) with those of 28 adults administered 10(6) to 10(7) TCID50 of wild-type PIV3. The candidate vaccine viruses and the wild-type virus were avirulent and poorly infectious for these adults even though all of them had a low level of nasal antibodies to PIV3. To determine whether the ca PIV3 was attenuated, we then administered 10(4) TCID50 of ca PIV3 (cold-passage 12) or wild-type PIV3 intranasally and intratracheally to two fully susceptible chimpanzees, respectively, and challenged the four primates with wild-type virus 1 month later. Compared with wild-type virus, which caused upper respiratory tract illness, the ca PIV3 was highly attenuated and manifested a 500-fold reduction in virus replication in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts of the two immunized animals. Despite restriction of virus replication, infection with ca PIV3 conferred a high level of protective immunity against challenge with wild-type virus. The ca PIV3 which had been passaged 12 times at 20 degrees C did not retain its ts phenotype. These findings indicate that ca PIV3 may be a promising vaccine candidate for human beings if a passage level can be identified that is genetically stable, satisfactorily attenuated, and immunogenic. PMID:1650789

  11. Percutaneous implantation of the first repositionable aortic valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Grube, Eberhard

    2008-04-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new less-invasive alternative for high-risk surgical candidates with aortic stenosis. However, the clinical experience is still limited, and the currently available 'first-generation devices' revealed technical shortcomings, such as lack of repositionability and presence of paravalvular leakages. We report the first-in-man experience with the new self-expanding Lotus Valve prosthesis composed of a nitinol frame with implemented bovine pericardial leaflets which is designed to address these issues, being repositionable and covered by a flexible membrane to seal paravalvular gaps. We implanted this prosthesis in a 93-year old patient presenting with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (valve area: 0.6 cm(2)). Surgical valve replacement had been declined due to comorbidities. We used a retrograde approach for insertion of the 21-French Lotus catheter loaded with the valve prosthesis via surgical cut-down to the external iliac artery. Positioning of the valve was guided by transesophageal echo and supra-aortic angiograms. The prosthesis was successfully inserted and deployed within the calcified native valve. Echocardiography immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction of the transaortic mean pressure gradient (32 to 9 mmHg; final valve area 1.7 cm(2)) without evidence of residual aortic regurgitation. The postprocedural clinical status improved from NYHA-IV to NYHA-II. These results remained unchanged up to the 3 month follow-up. Successful percutaneous aortic valve replacement can be performed using the new self-expanding and repositionable Lotus valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. Further studies are mandatory to assess device safety and efficacy in larger patient populations. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. A Digital Gene Expression-Based Bovine Gene Atlas Evaluating 92 Adult, Juvenile and Fetal Cattle Tissues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A comprehensive transcriptome survey, or “Gene Atlas,” provides information essential for a complete understanding of the genomic biology of an organism. Using a digital gene expression approach, we developed a Gene Atlas of RNA abundance in 92 adult, juvenile and fetal cattle tissues. The samples...

  13. Cellular Mechanisms of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Acquired aortic valve disease and valvular calcification is highly prevalent in adult populations worldwide and is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. At present, there are no medical therapies that will prevent or regress aortic valve calcification or stenosis and surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement remain the only effective therapies for treating this disease. In the setting of valve injury as a result of exposure to biochemical mediators or hemodynamic forces, normal homeostatic processes are disrupted resulting in extracellular matrix degradation, aberrant matrix deposition and fibrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, lipid accumulation, and neoangiogenesis of the valve tissue and, ultimately, calcification of the valve. Calcification of the aortic valve is now understood to be an active process that involves the coordinated actions of resident valve endothelial and interstitial cells, circulating inflammatory and immune cells, and bone marrow-derived cells. These cells may undergo a phenotype transition to become osteoblast-like cells and elaborate bone matrix, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and form matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for microcalcifications. Each of these mechanisms has been shown to contribute to aortic valve calcification suggesting that strategies that target these cellular events may lead to novel therapeutic interventions to halt the progression or reverse aortic valve calcification. PMID:22896576

  14. Risk-adjusted and case-matched comparative study between antegrade and retrograde cerebral perfusion during aortic arch surgery: based on the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database : the Japan Cardiovascular Surgery Database Organization.

    PubMed

    Usui, Akihiko; Miyata, Hiroaki; Ueda, Yuichi; Motomura, Noboru; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2012-03-01

    Antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) are two major types of brain protection for aortic arch surgery. A large-scale clinical study of RCP and ACP is important to clarify the respective characteristics for major adverse events. We conducted a comparative study to evaluate up-to-date clinical outcomes in Japan based on the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JACVSD). The subjects were confined to cases undergone electively with ACP or RCP for nondissection aneurysms in the ascending aorta and aortic arch between 2005 and 2008 from 13 467 aortic surgeries. There were 2209 ACP cases and 583 RCP cases. A risk-adjusted comparison based on 30-day mortality, operative mortality, and major morbidity was assessed by a multivariable logistic regression analysis. A conditional logistic regression analysis was also conducted in 499 propensity matched-pairs with ACP and RCP. A risk-adjusted analysis showed no significant differences between the ACP and RCP groups regarding 30-day mortality (3.5% vs. 2.6%), operative mortality (5.3% vs. 4.1%), or stroke (6.8% vs. 3.1%). Propensity-matched pairs also revealed no significant differences between ACP and RCP regarding 30-day mortality (3.4% vs. 2.4%), operative mortality (3.8% vs. 3.4%), or stroke rate (5.0% vs. 3.0%); however, RCP resulted in a significantly higher rate of transient neurological dysfunction (3.0% vs. 5.8%) and need for dialysis (1.6% vs. 4.2%). Both RCP and ACP provide comparable clinical outcomes regarding both the mortality and stroke rates. RCP resulted in a higher incidence only in patients demonstrating transient neurological dysfunction and the need for dialysis.

  15. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hagerty, Tracy; Geraghty, Patrick; Braverman, Alan C

    2017-04-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) leads to aortic root aneurysm, while descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) occurs less commonly. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is rarely reported in MFS. Risk factors for AAA are poorly understood and there are no guidelines for AAA screening in MFS. We sought to characterize AAA among Marfan patients in our center. The records of 12 adults with MFS and AAA disease were reviewed. Clinical features, imaging, operative reports, and outcomes were analyzed. Twelve adults with MFS and AAA were studied; age at AAA diagnosis was 44 ± 15 years (range 18-63). Nine patients smoked cigarettes. Eleven patients underwent prior aortic root replacement at age 31 ± 15 years. The size of AAA was 5.0 ± 1.3 cm (range 3.5-7.5) at the time of diagnosis. The AAA was suprarenal in 5, juxtarenal in 2, and infrarenal in 5 patients. Two patients had a descending TAA. Branch vessel aneurysms were present in 7 patients. Five patients underwent open surgical repair, 5 underwent endovascular repair, and 5 are being treated medically. One patient died suddenly with AAA size 5.7 cm, 2 months before death. Three patients subsequently developed type B aortic dissection, from 3 months to 9 years after AAA diagnosis. Adults with MFS are at risk for developing AAA. Evaluation for AAA is recommended in adults with MFS and prior root replacement, especially if descending aortic or branch vessel aneurysm is present or the patient smokes cigarettes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  17. Superimposition of a Mechanical Valve on an Impacted Aortic Bioprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Hassan; Al-Ibrahim, K.; Sorefan, A. Aniff; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    1991-01-01

    During reoperation for replacement of a regurgitant aortic bioprosthesis (a 23-mm bovine pericardial valve), it was judged that total removal of the valve would be difficult, and hazardous to the patient. Therefore, its leaflets were excised and its sewing ring left in situ. A 21-mm Carbomedics bileaflet mechanical valve was sutured to the bioprosthetic sewing ring and implanted in the orifice of the bioprosthesis, resulting in excellent hemodynamic performance. We report this new technique to illustrate its feasibility, safety, and efficiency, as an alternative to complete removal of defective prostheses in the aortic position. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:199-201) Images PMID:15227480

  18. The effect of insulin-like growth factor I on proteoglycan metabolism in immature and adult bovine articular cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Barone-Varelas, J.

    1989-01-01

    Explants of articular cartilage from calf (15 weeks old) and steer (18-24 months old) were cultured for up to 19 days in medium containing either insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) or 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Explants cultured in medium alone were controls. {sup 35}S-proteoglycans (PGs) synthesized on day 7 of culture during a 5-hour pulse with {sup 35}S-sulfate were isolated, quantified and characterized. Lower concentrations of IGF-I were required for maximal stimulation of PG synthesis in calf than in steer (10 vs 20 ng/ml). In calf, IGF-I was as effective as 20% FABS in stimulating PG synthesis. In steer, PG synthesis in the presence of IGF-I reached its maximum at a rate that was half that obtained with 20% FBS. The stimulation by IGF-I or FBS was not accompanied at either age by alterations in the size and composition of the aggregating PGs nor by changes in the relative proportions of the CS-rich and CS-poor PG subpopulations. Importantly, the newly synthesized calf and steer PGs retained marked age-related differences in composition regardless of the culture conditions. The effects of exogenously added IGF-I and FBS on the rate of turnover of cartilage PGs was also studied. In calf, IGF-I and FBS did not significantly alter the rate of turnover of either the {sup 35}S-PGs synthesized in vitro or of the unlabeled PGs representing mostly molecules synthesize and organized into the matrix in vivo. In steer, explants cultured in the absence of IGF-I or FBS exhibited very fast rates of turnover which resulted in severe depletion of matrix PG with time. Importantly, IGF-I and FBS were equally effective in reducing the turnover rate of {sup 35}S-PGs and unlabeled PGs and in preventing PG depletion. These results demonstrate age-related differences in the effect of IGF-I on PG synthesis by articular chondrocytes.

  19. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Schnell E, Wollenek G, Maurer G, Baumgartner H, Lang IM. Mechanisms underlying aortic dilatation in congenital aortic valve malformation . Circulation...1999; 99(16):2138-2143. 10. Roberts CS, Roberts WC. Dissection of the aorta associated with congenital malformation of the aortic valve. J Am Coll... congenital heart defect, often diagnosed incidentally or as a consequence of an associated condition. Patients with this anomaly are at increased risk

  20. Aortic Stenosis: Changing Disease Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Rashedi, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) occurs in almost 10% of adults over age 80 years with a mortality about 50% at 2 years unless outflow obstruction is relieved by aortic valve replacement (AVR). Development of AS is associated with anatomic, clinical and genetic risk factors including a bicuspid valve in 50%; clinical factors that include older age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes and elevated serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels; and genetic factors such as a polymorphism in the Lp(a) locus. Early stages of AS are characterized by focal areas of leaflet thickening and calcification. The rate of hemodynamic progression is variable but eventual severe AS is inevitable once even mild valve obstruction is present. There is no specific medical therapy to prevent leaflet calcification. Basic principles of medical therapy for asymptomatic AS are patient education, periodic echocardiographic and clinical monitoring, standard cardiac risk factor evaluation and modification and treatment of hypertension or other comorbid conditions. When severe AS is present, a careful evaluation for symptoms is needed, often with an exercise test to document symptom status and cardiac reserve. In symptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR improves survival and relieves symptoms. In asymptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR also is appropriate if ejection fraction is < 50%, disease progression is rapid or AS is very severe (aortic velocity > 5 m/s). The choice of surgical or transcatheter AVR depends on the estimated surgical risk plus other factors such as frailty, other organ system disease and procedural specific impediments. PMID:26140146

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Schramm, René; Kupatt, Christian; Becker, Christoph; Bombien, René; Reichart, Bruno; Sodian, Ralf; Schmitz, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    A 77-year-old male patient was scheduled for transcatheter aortic valve implantation for symptomatic and severe aortic valve stenosis. Severe multidirectional kinking of the aorta based on aortic coarctation did not allow for the transfemoral, but only for the transapical approach. The procedure was complicated because of the technically challenging retrograde passage of the transfemorally inserted pig-tail catheter required for intraoperative angiography of the aortic root. Correct positioning of the pig-tail catheter into the ascending aorta was accomplished by use of a loop snare, which was advanced into the descending aorta via the antegrade route, passing the cardiac apex, the stenotic aortic valve, and the coarctation-associated kinking. The pig-tail catheter tip was manipulated into the loop snare, pulled traverse the coarctation, and released within the proximal ascending aorta. Subsequent procedures were uneventful and followed the standardized protocol. A 29 mm Edwards Lifescience transcatheter Sapien bioprosthesis was successfully implanted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Early and long-term results after reconstructive surgery in 42 children and two young adults with renovascular hypertension due to fibromuscular dysplasia and middle aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, W; Dueppers, P; Pourhassan, S; Voiculescu, A; Klee, D; Balzer, K M

    2014-05-01

    This retrospective study presents the early and late results of pediatric patients who underwent reconstructive surgery for renovascular hypertension (RVH) between 1979 and 2009. From 1979 to 2009 44 patients (male 22; mean age 13±5.2 years, range 1-19 years; early childhood 7 [1-6 years], middle childhood 5 [7-10 years]; adolescents 32 [11-19 years]) with renovascular hypertension underwent surgery for abdominal aortic stenoses (n=6), renal artery stenosis (RAS) (n=25) or for combined lesions (n=13). Nineteen aortic stenoses (bypass/interposition 10/5, patch dilatation/thromboendarterectomy 2/2), 51 renal arteries (interposition 36, resection+reimplantation 13, patch dilatation/aneurysmorraphy 1 each), and 10 visceral arteries (resection+reimplantation 6, interposition 3, patch dilatation 1) were reconstructed. Each patient underwent duplex studies and if required intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography. Reoperations within 30 postoperative days were required in four (9%) of the patients for occlusion of four arteries (6%), achieving a combined technical success rate of 94%. After 114±81 months 36 patients were re-examined by duplex and magnetic resonance angiography (2 not surgery-related deaths 7/12 years postoperatively, 8 patients lived abroad). Twelve patients had required a second and three a third procedure. Hypertension was cured early/late postoperatively in 27%/56%, improved in 41%/44%, and remained unchanged in 32%/0%. Best late results were obtained in patients with isolated aortic disease and at the age of middle childhood. Reconstructive surgery for pediatric RVH yields good results at every age and every type of lesion. However, these children should be followed up closely and to avoid early cardiovascular disease and death in later life, surgery should not be delayed. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Watch the video below as Dr. Robbin Cohen describes aortic stenosis Video of Robbin G. Cohen, MD on Aortic Stenosis Causes and Symptoms Causes ... when having dental work. Reviewed by: Robbin G. Cohen, MD, with assistance from John Hallsten and Travis ...

  4. The impact of the Maillard reaction on the in vitro proteolytic breakdown of bovine lactoferrin in adults and infants.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, Alice M; Joubran, Yousef; Briard-Bion, Valerie; Mackie, Alan; Dupont, Didier; Lesmes, Uri

    2014-08-01

    The Maillard reaction has been proposed as a natural pathway to functionalize proteins and modulate their proteolysis. Nevertheless, gaps in understanding the digestive fate of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) still exist, especially regarding bioactive proteins such as lactoferrin (LF). UV absorbance and SDS-PAGE were used to monitor reaction progression under mild thermal processing (60 °C, 79% RH). Dynamic light scattering showed that MRPs had increased colloidal size and turbidity at 3 < pH < 10. FRAP analysis and in vitro digestion experiments demonstrated that MRPs possessed improved antioxidant capacity and higher susceptibility to proteolysis to varying extents under adult conditions compared to infant conditions. Proteomic analyses of MRP digesta revealed altered enzymatic cleavage patterns with no pronounced changes in the formation of known bioactive peptides. These also indicated that MRPs may breakdown in the gastro-intestinal tract to potentially form novel bioactive peptides. Overall, this work highlights that the Maillard reaction could be harnessed to modify the extent of proteolysis and bioactivity of proteins.

  5. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  6. Aortic root stiffness affects the kinematics of bioprosthetic aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Jahren, Silje Ekroll; Winkler, Bernhard Michael; Heinisch, Paul Philipp; Wirz, Jessica; Carrel, Thierry; Obrist, Dominik

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the influence of aortic root distensibility on the haemodynamic parameters and valve kinematics of a bioprosthetic aortic valve was investigated in a controlled in vitro experiment. An Edwards INTUITY Elite 21 mm sutureless aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was inserted in three transparent aortic root phantoms with different wall thicknesses (0.55, 0.85 and 1.50 mm) mimicking different physiological distensibilities. Haemodynamic measurements were performed in an in vitro flow loop at heart rates of 60, 80 and 100 bpm with corresponding cardiac outputs of 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0 l/min and aortic pressures of 100/60, 120/90 and 145/110 mmHg, respectively. Aortic valve kinematics were assessed using a high-speed camera. The geometric orifice area (GOA) was measured by counting pixels in the lumen of the open aortic valve. The effective orifice area (EOA) was calculated from the root-mean-square value of the systolic aortic valve flow rate and the mean systolic trans-valvular pressure gradient. The tested aortic root phantoms reproduce physiological distensibilities of healthy individuals in age groups ranging from 40 to 70 years (±10 years). The haemodynamic results show only minor differences between the aortic root phantoms: the trans-valvular pressure gradient tends to increase for stiffer aortic roots, whereas the systolic aortic valve flow rate remains constant. As a consequence, the EOA decreased slightly for less distensible aortic roots. The GOA and the aortic valve opening and closing velocities increase significantly with reduced distensibility for all haemodynamic measurements. The resulting mean systolic flow velocity in the aortic valve orifice is lower for the stiffer aortic root. Aortic root distensibility may influence GOA and aortic valve kinematics, which affects the mechanical load on the aortic valve cusps. Whether these changes have a significant effect on the onset of structural valve deterioration of bioprosthetic

  7. Transcatheter aortic-valve implantation for aortic stenosis in patients who cannot undergo surgery.

    PubMed

    Leon, Martin B; Smith, Craig R; Mack, Michael; Miller, D Craig; Moses, Jeffrey W; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Webb, John G; Fontana, Gregory P; Makkar, Raj R; Brown, David L; Block, Peter C; Guyton, Robert A; Pichard, Augusto D; Bavaria, Joseph E; Herrmann, Howard C; Douglas, Pamela S; Petersen, John L; Akin, Jodi J; Anderson, William N; Wang, Duolao; Pocock, Stuart

    2010-10-21

    Many patients with severe aortic stenosis and coexisting conditions are not candidates for surgical replacement of the aortic valve. Recently, transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) has been suggested as a less invasive treatment for high-risk patients with aortic stenosis. We randomly assigned patients with severe aortic stenosis, whom surgeons considered not to be suitable candidates for surgery, to standard therapy (including balloon aortic valvuloplasty) or transfemoral transcatheter implantation of a balloon-expandable bovine pericardial valve. The primary end point was the rate of death from any cause. A total of 358 patients with aortic stenosis who were not considered to be suitable candidates for surgery underwent randomization at 21 centers (17 in the United States). At 1 year, the rate of death from any cause (Kaplan–Meier analysis) was 30.7% with TAVI, as compared with 50.7% with standard therapy (hazard ratio with TAVI, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40 to 0.74; P<0.001). The rate of the composite end point of death from any cause or repeat hospitalization was 42.5% with TAVI as compared with 71.6% with standard therapy (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.59; P<0.001). Among survivors at 1 year, the rate of cardiac symptoms (New York Heart Association class III or IV) was lower among patients who had undergone TAVI than among those who had received standard therapy (25.2% vs. 58.0%, P<0.001). At 30 days, TAVI, as compared with standard therapy, was associated with a higher incidence of major strokes (5.0% vs. 1.1%, P=0.06) and major vascular complications (16.2% vs. 1.1%, P<0.001). In the year after TAVI, there was no deterioration in the functioning of the bioprosthetic valve, as assessed by evidence of stenosis or regurgitation on an echocardiogram. In patients with severe aortic stenosis who were not suitable candidates for surgery, TAVI, as compared with standard therapy, significantly reduced the rates of death from any cause

  8. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (<9 months of age) have resistance to Bovine Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature.

  9. Internal mammary artery dilatation in a patient with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, and coronary disease. Case report.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Jose Rubio; Lopez, Laura Reija; Quiroga, Juan Sierra; Martinez Comendador, Jose M; Martinez-de-Alegria, Anxo; Martinez Cereijo, Jose M; Dominguez, Cristian Delgado

    2011-04-17

    The ideal surgical approach is unclear in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta that is associated with other cardiovascular pathologies that require intervention. Standard median sternotomy allows simultaneous, coronary revascularization surgery, valve replacement and repair of aortic coarctation. However the collateral circulation and the anatomy of the mammary arteries must be determined, to avoid possible complications. We report a case of a 69 year-old man with aortic coarctation, aortic stenosis, coronary artery disease and internal mammary artery dilatation who underwent concomitant surgical procedures through a median sternotomy.

  10. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  11. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary valve and aortic valve. Each valve has flaps (cusps or leaflets) that open and close once ... valve consists of three tightly fitting, triangular-shaped flaps of tissue called cusps. Some children are born ...

  12. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  13. Quadricuspid aortic valves in Syrian hamsters and their formation according to current knowledge on valvulogenesis.

    PubMed

    López-García, Alejandro; Carmen Fernández, M; Durán, Ana Carmen; Sans-Coma, Valentín; Fernández, Borja

    2015-02-01

    Occurrence of quadricuspid aortic valves has been reported in humans, in nine dogs and in a greater white-toothed shrew. Moreover, two cases of developing aortic valves with four anticipated leaflets have been described in Syrian hamster embryos. Currently, however, no case of quadricuspid aortic valve in adult hamsters has been recorded. The aim here is to present four adults of this rodent species, two of them with unequivocally quadricuspid aortic valves and the other two with quadricuspid-like aortic valves. The four anomalous aortic valves were detected among 4,190 Syrian hamsters examined in our laboratory, representing an incidence of 0.09%. None of the affected hamsters showed apparent signs of disease. The present findings are considered on the light of current empirical knowledge about the morphogenesis of quadricuspid and bicuspid aortic and pulmonary valves. Quadricuspid aortic valves result from the partition of one of the normal mesenchymal cushions which normally give rise to normal (tricuspid) valves, while quadricuspid-like valves might be the product of a combined mechanism of fusion and partition of the cushions at the onset of the valvulogenesis. The presence of aortic valves with four leaflets in ancient mammalian lineages such as insectivors and rodents suggest that quadricuspid aortic valves, although showing almost certainly a low incidence, may be widespread among the different groups of mammals, including domestic animals.

  14. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  15. Anatomical and clinical predictors of valve dysfunction and aortic dilation in bicuspid aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Arturo; Gallego, Pastora; Calvo-Iglesias, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier; Robledo-Carmona, Juan; Sánchez, Violeta; Saura, Daniel; Arnold, Roman; Carro, Amelia; Maldonado, Giuliana; Sao-Avilés, Augusto; Teixidó, Gisela; Galian, Laura; Rodríguez-Palomares, José; García-Dorado, David

    2017-09-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with early valvular dysfunction and proximal aorta dilation with high heterogeneity. This study aimed to assess the determinants of these complications. Eight hundred and fifty-two consecutive adults diagnosed of BAV referred from cardiac outpatient clinics to eight echocardiographic laboratories of tertiary hospitals were prospectively recruited. Exclusion criteria were aortic coarctation, other congenital disorders or intervention. BAV morphotype, significant valve dysfunction and aorta dilation (≥2 Z-score) at sinuses and ascending aorta were established. Three BAV morphotypes were identified: right-left coronary cusp fusion (RL) in 72.9%, right-non-coronary (RN) in 24.1% and left-non-coronary (LN) in 3.0%. BAV without raphe was observed in 18.3%. Multivariate analysis showed aortic regurgitation (23%) to be related to male sex (OR: 2.80, p<0.0001) and valve prolapse (OR: 5.16, p<0.0001), and aortic stenosis (22%) to BAV-RN (OR: 2.09, p<0.001), the presence of raphe (OR: 2.75, p<0.001), age (OR: 1.03; p<0.001), dyslipidaemia (OR: 1.77, p<0.01) and smoking (OR: 1.63, p<0.05). Ascending aorta was dilated in 76% without differences among morphotypes and associated with significant valvular dysfunction. By contrast, aortic root was dilated in 34% and related to male sex and aortic regurgitation but was less frequent in aortic stenosis and BAV-RN. Normofunctional valves are more prevalent in BAV without raphe. Aortic stenosis is more frequent in BAV-RN and associated with some cardiovascular risk factors, whereas aortic regurgitation (AR) is associated with male sex and sigmoid prolapse. Although ascending aorta is the most commonly dilated segment, aortic root dilation is present in one-third of patients and associated with AR. Remarkably, BAV-RL increases the risk for dilation of the proximal aorta, whereas BAV-RN spares this area. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  16. Long-term survival with a stentless free-hand Batista pericardial aortic valve prosthesis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, Valentina; Labbé, Javier; Cataldo, Anthony; Becerra, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Stented bovine pericardial prosthetic valves are a good option for older patients, except when there is a fragile small aortic annulus, when, if there is no contraindication to anticoagulation, a mechanical prosthesis may be indicated. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a 72 year-old man who underwent coronary bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement with a stentless valve fashioned from bovine pericardium using the Batista technique. Despite early sternal infection and dehiscence, and renal and respiratory failure during 15 years follow-up, he remains alive and self-sufficient. Echocardiography demonstrates a well-functioning aortic valve. DISCUSSION When Batista reported his first 60 patients, concerns were raised about the surgical feasibility of constructing the valve and its long-term durability. Our case perhaps addresses both concerns. CONCLUSION Replacement of the aortic valve with a free-hand Batista pericardial valve is a feasible option in a suitable and carefully selected patient. PMID:25524300

  17. Aortic valve replacement with concomitant annular enlargement for small aortic annulus of less than 19 mm.

    PubMed

    Takakura, H; Sasaki, T; Hashimoto, K; Hachiya, T; Onoguchi, K; Oshiumi, M; Takeuchi, S

    2000-06-01

    Three female patients with aortic stenosis associated with a severely small annulus underwent aortic valve replacement. In intraoperative measurements, a 19-mm obtulator could not pass through the aortic annulus in each case. We therefore concluded that it would be difficult to implant an appropriate-sized prosthesis in a routine fashion, so we performed an annular enlargement in a modified Nicks procedure. By using a wide teardrop-shaped patch for enlargement and slightly tilting insertion of a prosthesis, a 21 mm bileaflet mechanical prosthesis could be inserted into the enlarged annulus. Despite being a simpler method than other enlarging procedures, a two- or three-sizes larger prosthesis than the native annulus can be inserted with relative ease. Thus, the use of a 19 mm mechanical prosthesis may be avoidable in most adult cases.

  18. Aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Le Besnerais, Maëlle; Arnaud, Laurent; Boutémy, Jonathan; Bienvenu, Boris; Lévesque, Hervé; Amoura, Zahir; Marie, Isabelle

    2017-05-17

    To assess prevalence of aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP) patients; to evaluate clinical features and long-term outcome of RP patients exhibiting aortitis, aortic ectasia and/or aneurysm. One hundred and seventy-two RP patients underwent aortic computed tomography (CT)-scan; they were seen in 3 medical centers. Eleven patients (6.4%) had aortic involvement, occurring within a median time of 2 years after RP diagnosis. CT-scan showed isolated aortitis (n=2); the 9 other patients exhibited: aortitis and aortic aneurysm (n=2) or ectasia (n=1), isolated aortic aneurysm (n=4) or ectasia (n=2); aortic localizations were as follows: thoracic (n=6), abdominal (n=2), thoracic and abdominal (n=4) aorta. Patients exhibited: resolution (n=3) improvement (n=3), stabilization (n=4) or deterioration (n=1) of aortic localization. Five patients experienced recurrence of aortic localization; one patient died of aortic abdominal aneurysm rupture. Predictive factors of death related to aortic complications were: aortitis on CT-scan, higher median levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Predictive parameters of aortic relapses were: aortitis on CT-scan and involvement of the abdominal aorta. This study underlines that aortic involvement is severe in RP. Furthermore, we suggest that RP patients exhibiting poor prognostic factors, including panaortitis and higher values of ESR, may require more aggressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  1. Mechanism of development of aortic transection: a possible new angle.

    PubMed

    Warwick, R; Mediratta, N; Pullan, M; Chalmers, J; Poullis, M

    2013-03-01

    Aortic transection injury is a frequently fatal injury secondary to sudden deceleration. To date magnitude of deceleration is the only factor known to influence the development of an aortic transection injury. We hypothesise that different 3D geometries of the aortic arch in healthy young adult patients as a possible predisposing factor for transection injuries when undergoing sudden deceleration. We extend this to hypothesise that the direction of deceleration may be important as well. In addition we hypothesise that the stage in the cardiac cycle, which determines central aortic blood pressure, when the deceleration occurs as an important factor. We utilise known engineering principles such as Newton's second Law of motion, moment of inertia, law of Laplace, and the theory of superposition to explain our hypothesis. We present limited data to demonstrate the wide variation in aortic arch 3D geometry to explain the possible an individual's variable susceptibility to transection injuries via the principle of moment of inertia. Engineering principles suggest that 3D aortic arch geometry, direction of deceleration and stage in the cardiac cycle, in addition to the magnitude of deceleration are potentially important factors in predisposing certain individuals in a given situation to aortic transaction injuries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  3. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  4. Abnormal fibrillin metabolism in bovine Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, K. A.; Hoffman, Y.; Sakai, L. Y.; Byers, P. H.; Besser, T. E.; Milewicz, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Bovine Marfan syndrome is a disorder that closely resembles human Marfan syndrome in its clinical signs and pathological lesions. The similarities between the human and bovine diseases suggest that similar metabolic defects could be responsible. Although indirect immunofluorescent assays for fibrillin in skin biopsies did not distinguish affected cattle from control animals, cultures of skin fibroblasts of affected animals were distinguished from normal, unrelated control animals and normal half-siblings on the basis of fibrillin staining. After 72 to 96 hours in culture, stained with anti-fibrillin monoclonal antibody 201, hyperconfluent fibroblast cultures of affected cattle had less immunoreactive fibrillin than control cultures, and the staining pattern was granular rather than fibrillar. Under similar culture conditions, normal bovine aortic smooth muscle cells produced large amounts of immunoreactive fibrillin, but smooth muscle cells from a single affected cow showed markedly less fibrillin staining. In pulse-chase metabolic labeling experiments with [35S]cysteine, dermal fibroblasts from 6 affected calves, incorporated far less fibrillin into the extracellular matrix than control cells. These findings are similar to those reported in human Marfan syndrome, and they suggest that the bovine Marfan syndrome, like the human disorder, is caused by a mutation in fibrillin, leading to defective microfibrillar synthesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8456941

  5. Robotic aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  6. Aortic hammer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Komen, Niels; Vercauteren, Sven; de Roover, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    To present a case of penetrating aortic ulcer with extraordinary etiology. A 57-year-old man was admitted with acute retrosternal and interscapular pain. He was a demolition worker and often used a pneumatic drill to which he pressed his chest as he drilled. Clinical examination showed previously undiagnosed hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography disclosed a penetrating aortic ulcer in the descending thoracic aorta without any sign of atherosclerosis. Initial treatment consisted of blood pressure control. However, due to progression of the lesion, endovascular treatment was performed to implant a covered endoprosthesis. We hypothesize that the etiology of the ulcer was the shear forces developed by incorrect, repetitive use of the pneumatic hammer in combination with the untreated hypertension. This is analogous to the hypothenar hammer syndrome, and we propose naming this the "aortic hammer syndrome."

  7. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  8. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection and Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Andrés Enríquez; Rodríguez, Sara Castaño; Pañero, Blanca Mateos; Moreira, Beatriz Castaño; López Almodóvar, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with a giant aortic root aneurysm associated with chronic aortic Type A dissection. The patient had been operated on 16 years before due to aortic annuloectasia with mechanical valve replacement. The patient underwent revision aortic surgery with a Bentall-De Bono operation with Svensson modification, using a #21 On-X Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:28097190

  9. Aortic Valve Adaptation to Aortic Root Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Levine, Robert A.; Sun, Byung Joo; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Background The 3-dimensional relationship between aortic root and cusp is essential to understand the mechanism of aortic regurgitation (AR) because of aortic root dilatation (ARD). We sought to test the hypothesis that the stretched cusps in ARD enlarge to compensate for ARD. Methods and Results Computed tomography imaged 92 patients (57 with ARD, 29 with moderate to severe AR, 28 without significant AR) and 35 normal controls. Specialized 3-dimensional software measured individual cusp surface areas relative to maximal mid-sinus cross-sectional area and minimal 3-dimensional annular area, coaptation area fraction, and asymmetry of sinus volumes and intercommissural distances. Total open cusp surface area increased (P<0.001) from 7.6±1.4 cm2/m2 in normals to 12.9±2.2 cm2/m2 in AR-negative and 15.2±3.3 cm2/m2 in AR-positive patients. However, the ratio of closed cusp surface area to maximal mid-sinus area, reflecting cusp adaptation, decreased from normals to AR-negative to AR-positive patients (1.38±0.20, 1.15±0.15, 0.88±0.15; P<0.001), creating the lowest coaptation area fraction. Cusp distensibility (closed diastolic versus open area) decreased from 20% in controls and AR-negative patients to 5% in AR-positive patients (P<0.001). Multivariate determinants of AR and coaptation area fraction reflected both sinus size and cusp-to-annular adaptation. ARD was also progressively asymmetrical with root size, and individual cusp surface areas failed to match this asymmetry. Conclusions Aortic cusp enlargement occurs in ARD, but cusp adaptation and distensibility become limited in prominent, asymmetrical ARD, leading to AR. Optimal AR repair tailored to individual patient anatomy can benefit from appreciating valve adaptation and 3-dimensional relationships; understanding cusp adaptation mechanisms may ultimately provide therapeutic opportunities to improve such compensation. PMID:25051951

  10. Long-term outcome and quality of life following emergency surgery for acute aortic dissection type A: a comparison between young and elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Jussli-Melchers, Jill; Panholzer, Bernd; Friedrich, Christine; Broch, Ole; Renner, Jochen; Schöttler, Jan; Rahimi, Aziz; Cremer, Jochen; Schoeneich, Felix; Haneya, Assad

    2017-03-01

    Innovations in surgical techniques and perioperative management have continuously improved survival rates for acute aortic dissection type A (AADA). The aim of our study was to evaluate long-term outcome and quality of life (QoL) after surgery for AADA in elderly patients compared with younger patients. We retrospectively evaluated 242 consecutive patients, who underwent surgery for AADA between January 2004 and April 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: those aged 70 years and older (elderly group; n  = 78, mean age, 76 ± 4 years) and those younger than 70 years (younger group; n  = 164, mean age, 56 ± 10 years). QoL was assessed with the Short Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36) 1 year after surgery. The questionnaire return rate was 91.0%. There were already significant differences noted between the two groups with regard to preoperative risk factors on admission. The clinical presentation with a cardiac tamponade was higher in the elderly group (62.8% vs 47.6%; P  = 0.03). Intraoperatively, complex procedures were more common in the younger group (21.3% vs 5.2%; P  = 0.001). Accordingly, cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamping times were significantly longer in the younger group. The operative mortality was similar in both groups (3.8% vs 1.2%; P  = 0.33). In the elderly population, 30-day mortality was higher (21.8% vs 7.9%; P  = 0.003). One-year (72% vs 85%), 3-year (68% vs 84%) and 5-year (63% vs 79%) survival rates were satisfactory for the elderly group, but significantly lower compared with the younger group ( P  = 0.008). The physical component summary score also was similar between the groups (39.14 ± 11.12 vs 39.12 ± 12.02; P  = 0.99). However, the mental component summary score might be slightly higher in the elderly group but not statistically significant (51.61 ± 10.73 vs 48.63 ± 11.25; P  = 0.12). Satisfactory long-term outcome and the general perception of well

  11. Neoaortic Xenoprosthetic Grafts for Treatment of Mycotic Aneurysms and Infected Aortic Grafts.

    PubMed

    Anibueze, Chukwudubem; Sankaran, Visesh; Sadat, Umar; Tan, Kelvin; Wilson, Yvonne G; Brightwell, Robert E; Delbridge, Michael S; Stather, Philip W

    2017-10-01

    There is no international consensus regarding the optimum management of infected aortae (mycotic aneurysms, infected aortic grafts). Neoaortoiliac reconstruction has advantages over extra-anatomical bypass grafting; however, the use of autologous vein is associated with venous hypertension and compartment syndrome, alternatively cadaveric homografts are associated with high rates of perianastomotic hemorrhage, limb occlusion, and pseudoaneurysm. Arterial repair using xenoprosthetic patches is associated with lower infection rates compared to the use of prosthetic material. The aim of this case series and literature review is to report the use of xenoprosthetic bovine biomaterial for neoaortic repair of mycotic aneurysmal disease and infected aortic grafts. Patients with evidence of infected aortic grafts or mycotic aneurysms who were suitable for open aortic surgery were included. Following removal of the graft/excision of the aneurysmal sac, a 10 × 16 cm XenoSure Biologic Surgical Patch (LeMaitre, Germany) was rolled into a tube, or bifurcated tube graft, and secured with prolene sutures. Proximal and distal anastomoses were conducted as per standard aortic anastomoses. Patients were continued on long-term antibiotics and surveyed with computerized tomography at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Six patients underwent bovine aortic repair between 2013 and 2015: an infected Dacron aortobi-iliac graft causing iliac pseudoaneurysm, an infected Dacron aortic graft from open repair later relined with endovascular stent graft, a mycotic iliac aneurysm, and 3 mycotic aortic aneurysms. All were treated with bovine reconstructed aortic grafts or patches. Patients had a median age of 69.5 years (range 67-75), with perioperative and 30-day mortality of 0%. Median follow-up was 13 months (range 2-23). Postoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed no evidence of infection at the operative site in all patients. Freedom from reinfection and reintervention was 100

  12. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  13. Efficacy of Stentless Aortic Bioprosthesis Implantation for Aortic Stenosis with Small Aortic Annulus.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Fukunaga, Naoto; Konishi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ken; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2015-09-01

    In patients with small aortic annulus, sufficient size of stented aortic bioprosthesis cannot be implanted without additional procedures. In such cases, we use stentless aortic bioprosthesis to obtain sufficient effective orifice area. In this study, we investigated long-term impact of stentless aortic bioprosthesis on clinical outcomes, compared with stented aortic bioprosthesis. We retrospectively investigated 140 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with porcine bioprosthesis for severe aortic stenosis between 1999 and 2010. Patients who had moderate or more aortic regurgitation and who underwent concomitant mitral procedures were excluded. A total of 69 patients (49%) were implanted stentless bioprosthesis (Freestyle group; Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States) and 71 patients (51%) were implanted stented bioprosthesis (Mosaic group; Medtronic Inc). Follow-up was complete in 97.9% patients. Median follow-up period was 4.2 years. Patients in Freestyle group had smaller body surface area, smaller aortic annulus diameter, smaller aortic valve area, larger mean pressure gradient, higher peak velocity across aortic valve, larger left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Mean size of implanted prosthesis was larger in Freestyle group. In-hospital mortality was 1.4% in Freestyle group and 2.8% in Mosaic group (p = 0.980). Five-year survival rate was not different between two groups (5-year survival rate was 87.5 ± 4.7% in Freestyle group and 84.1 ± 7.5% in Mosaic group; log rank, p = 0.619). Late New York Heart Association functional class was lower in Freestyle group. Late LVMI and LVEF became similar between two groups. Stentless aortic bioprosthesis is superior in left ventricular remodeling after AVR for aortic stenosis and is especially effective for small aortic annulus. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. [Left Ventricular Rupture during Both Mitral and Aortic Valve Replacements].

    PubMed

    Kurumisawa, Soki; Aizawa, Kei; Takazawa, Ippei; Sato, Hirotaka; Muraoka, Arata; Ohki, Shinnichi; Saito, Tsutomu; Kawahito, Koji; Misawa, Yoshio

    2015-05-01

    A 73-year-old woman on hemodialysis was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment of heart valve disease. She required both mitral and aortic valve replacement with mechanical valves, associated with tricuspid annuloplasty. After aortic de-clamping, a massive hemorrhage from the posterior atrioventricular groove was observed. Under repeated cardiac arrest, the left atrium was reopened, the implanted mitral prosthetic valve was removed and a type I left ventricular rupture (Treasure classification) was diagnosed. The lesion was directly repaired with mattress stitches and running sutures, using reinforcement materials such as a glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium. To avoid mechanical stress by the prosthetic valve on the repaired site, a mechanical valve was implanted using a translocation method. The patient suffered from aspiration pneumonia and disuse atrophy for 3 months. However, she was doing well at 1 year post-operation.

  15. Surveillance after endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Zaiem, Feras; Almasri, Jehad; Tello, Mouaffaa; Prokop, Larry J; Chaikof, Elliot L; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-06-26

    The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the optimal modality and frequency of surveillance after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) in adult patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. We searched for studies of post-EVAR surveillance in MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus through May 10, 2016. The outcomes of interest were endoleaks, mortality, limb ischemia, renal complications, late rupture, and aneurysm-related mortality. Outcomes were pooled using a random-effects model and were reported as incidence rate and 95% confidence interval. Of 1099 candidate references, we included 6 meta-analyses and 52 observational studies. Complication rates were common after EVAR, particularly in the first year. Magnetic resonance imaging had a higher detection rate of endoleaks than computed tomography angiography. Doppler ultrasound had lower diagnostic accuracy, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound was likely to be as sensitive as computed tomography angiography. The highest endoleak detection rates were in surveillance approaches that used combined tests. There were no studies that compared different surveillance intervals to determine optimal intervals; however, most studies reported detection rates of patient-important outcomes at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months. Data were insufficient to provide comparative inferences about the best strategy to reduce the risk of patient-important outcomes, such as mortality, limb ischemia, rupture, and renal complications. Several tests with reasonable diagnostic accuracy are available for surveillance after EVAR. The available evidence suggests a high complication rate, particularly in the first year, and provides a rationale for surveillance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. [Balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the adult. Immediate results and in-hospital complications in the latest series of 141 consecutive patients at the University Hospital of Rouen (2002-2005)].

    PubMed

    Agatiello, C; Eltchaninoff, H; Tron, C; Bauer, F; Babaliaros, V; Nercolini, D; Sebagh, L; Vochelet, F; Tapiero, S; Cribier, A

    2006-03-01

    With the aging population, elderly patients with degenerative, severely calcified, and symptomatic aortic stenosis are becoming a frequent problem in medical decision making, particularly because many are declined for surgical valve replacement. For these patients, balloon aortic dilatation could be a palliative treatment. we analyzed retrospectively our techniques and complications during hospitalization for percutaneous aortic balloon dilatation in 141 consecutive patients (45% women, mean age 83 +/- 10 y) from January 2002 to April 2005. The Parsonnet's score was 41 +/- 8 and the Euroscore was 10 +/- 2. We excluded the patients enrolled for percutaneous aortic valve implantation. This technique was performed under local anesthesia, from retrograde or antegrade approach. Rapid pacing stimulation (220/bpm) with a pacing-lead placed in the right ventricle was performed during balloon inflation. the aortic valve area was increased from 0.59 +/- 0.19 to 1.02 +/- 0.34 cm2 (p < 0.001) and the transvalvular mean gradient decreased from 49.3 +/- 21.2 to 22.2 +/- 11.8 mmHg (p < 0.001). Six patients (4%) died (3 during aortic valve dilatation) and 9 patients (6%) had non fatal complications: 2 transitory strokes, 8 non surgical vascular complications and 5 episodes of atrio-ventricular complete block (these complication were non exclusive). The patients were discharged at 5, 6 +/- 3 days. In the hands of skilled operators, aortic percutaneous balloon dilatation has become a simple technique, associated with a low risk of complications despite a very ill patient population. This technique remains a good option for a number of patients before the onset of percutaneous aortic valve implantation.

  17. Effects of aging and body size on proximal and ascending aorta and aortic arch: inner edge-to-inner edge reference values in a large adult population by two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Mirea, Oana; Maffessanti, Francesco; Gripari, Paola; Tamborini, Gloria; Muratori, Manuela; Fusini, Laura; Claudia, Cefalù; Fiorentini, Cesare; Plesea, Iancu Emil; Pepi, Mauro

    2013-04-01

    Aortic size is known to vary significantly by age and body size and to be an important predictor of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to determine reference values for proximal thoracic aorta diameters, using the inner edge technique and two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Diameters of the aortic annulus, sinuses of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, arch, and ascending aorta and the angle of insertion of the aorta were measured in 500 subjects (231 women; mean age, 48 ± 18 years) with normal echocardiographic findings, retrospectively enrolled. The relations of age and body size with aortic measurements were investigated using bivariate and multiple linear regressions. Measurements were highly feasible (83% for the aortic arch, 100% for the other segments). All aortic diameters significantly related to age, weight and body surface area, while height was correlated only with annular diameter. In predictive models adjusted for gender, older age was associated with increased aortic diameters (R(2) values ranged from 0.36 for the sinotubular junction to 0.52 for the sinuses of Valsalva). Adjustments for height and weight led to significant improvements (R(2) values ranged from 0.43 for the sinotubular junction to 0.58 for the sinuses of Valsalva). Similar correlations were observed for men and women. Angle was found to be dependent only on age and gender. Reproducibility analysis showed good to excellent accordance between repeated measurements. The results of this study show the effect of aging on the proximal thoracic aorta and emphasize the importance of accounting for gender and body size when assessing aortic size. The obtained reference ranges will help standardize the assessment of aortic dimensions by applying inner edge convention and facilitate comparisons with other imaging techniques. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  19. Aortic arch compliance and idiopathic unilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Behkam, Reza; Roberts, Kara E; Bierhals, Andrew J; Jacobs, M Eileen; Edgar, Julia D; Paniello, Randal C; Woodson, Gayle; Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M

    2017-08-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVP) occurs related to recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) impairment associated with impaired swallowing, voice production, and breathing functions. The majority of UVP cases occur subsequent to surgical intervention with approximately 12-42% having no known cause for the disease (i.e., idiopathic). Approximately two-thirds of those with UVP exhibit left-sided injury with the average onset at ≥50 yr of age in those diagnosed as idiopathic. Given the association between the RLN and the subclavian and aortic arch vessels, we hypothesized that changes in vascular tissues would result in increased aortic compliance in patients with idiopathic left-sided UVP compared with those without UVP. Gated MRI data enabled aortic arch diameter measures normalized to blood pressure across the cardiac cycles to derive aortic arch compliance. Compliance was compared between individuals with left-sided idiopathic UVP and age- and sex-matched normal controls. Three-way factorial ANOVA test showed that aortic arch compliance (P = 0.02) and aortic arch diameter change in one cardiac cycle (P = 0.04) are significantly higher in patients with idiopathic left-sided UVP compared with the controls. As previously demonstrated by other literature, our finding confirmed that compliance decreases with age (P < 0.0001) in both healthy individuals and patients with idiopathic UVP. Future studies will investigate parameters of aortic compliance change as a potential contributor to the onset of left-sided UVP.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Unilateral vocal fold paralysis results from impaired function of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) impacting breathing, swallowing, and voice production. A large proportion of adults suffering from this disorder have an idiopathic etiology (i.e., unknown cause). The current study determined that individuals diagnosed with left-sided idiopathic vocal fold paralysis exhibited significantly greater compliance than age- and sex-matched controls

  20. Mapping of neurotrophins and their receptors in the adult mouse brain and their role in the pathogenesis of a transgenic murine model of bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Marco-Salazar, P; Márquez, M; Fondevila, D; Rabanal, R M; Torres, J M; Pumarola, M; Vidal, E

    2014-05-01

    Neurotrophins are a family of growth factors that act on neuronal cells. The neurotrophins include nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin (NT)-3, -4 and -5. The action of neurotrophins depends on two transmembrane-receptor signalling systems: (1) the tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family of tyrosine kinase receptors (Trk A, Trk B and Trk C) and (2) the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)). The interaction between neurotrophic factors and their receptors may be involved in the mechanisms that regulate the differential susceptibility of neuronal populations in neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of neurotrophins in the pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) using a transgenic mouse overexpressing bovine prnp (BoTg 110). Histochemistry for Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, haematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry for the abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrP(d)), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), NGF, BDNF, NT-3 and the receptors Trk A, Trk B, Trk C and p75(NTR) was performed. The lesions and the immunolabelling patterns were assessed semiquantitatively in different areas of the brain. No significant differences in the immunolabelling of neurotrophins and their receptors were observed between BSE-inoculated and control animals, except for p75(NTR), which showed increased expression correlating with the distribution of lesions, PrP(d) deposition and gliosis in the BSE-inoculated mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Aortic compressor for aortic occlusion in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, B D; Gerdes, D; Roller, B; Ruiz, E

    1984-01-01

    The aortic compressor is a device that allows rapid, simple, immediately reversible occlusion of the thoracic aorta, without the aortic dissection required to use an aortic cross-clamp. We evaluated the aortic compressor in a controlled study using a canine hemorrhagic shock model. Twelve mongrel dogs were exsanguinated to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 47 mm Hg and maintained at that level for 20 minutes. At that point, all animals had a left lateral thoracotomy. Six study animals had the thoracic aorta occluded at the diaphragm using the compressor. Five minutes after thoracotomy, with or without occlusion, the shed blood was reinfused. Application of the aortic compressor was the only variable. Use of the aortic compressor led to an immediate and statistically significant doubling of the study animals' MAP. The increased afterload of aortic occlusion did not impair cardiac output. The cardiac index of the study animals rose slightly, while that of the control animals fell. At the same time the compressor prevented blood flow to the abdominal aorta. If the canine model can be extrapolated to human application, then the aortic compressor would be expected to enhance perfusion of the heart and brain during hemorrhagic shock, prevent further arterial blood loss from intra-abdominal injury or ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, and preserve already diminished cardiac output. Because the aorta does not need to be dissected out to use the compressor, there is no risk of injury to nearby vascular structures.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions supravalvular aortic stenosis supravalvular aortic stenosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before ...

  3. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection.

  4. Regional structure-function relationships in mouse aortic valve tissue

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Varun K.; Guilak, Farshid; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Hinton, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific biomechanical properties of the aortic valve play an important role in native valve function, and alterations in these properties may reflect mechanisms of degeneration and disease. Small animals such as targeted mutagenesis mice provide a powerful approach to model human valve disease pathogenesis; however, physical mechanical testing in small animals is limited by valve tissue size. Aortic valves are comprised of highly organized extracellular matrix compartmentalized in cusp and annulus regions, which have different functions. The objective of this study was to measure regional mechanical properties of mouse aortic valve tissue using a modified micropipette aspiration technique. Aortic valves were isolated from juvenile, adult and aged adult C57BL/6 wild type mice. Tissue tensile stiffness was determined for annulus and cusp regions using a half-space punch model. Stiffness for the annulus region was significantly higher compared to the cusp region at all stages. Further, aged adult valve tissue had decreased stiffness in both the cusp and annulus. Quantitative histochemical analysis revealed a collagen-rich annulus and a proteoglycan-rich cusp at all stages. In aged adult valves, there was proteoglycan infiltration of the annulus hinge, consistent with observed mechanical differences over time. These findings indicate that valve tissue biomechanical properties vary in wild type mice in a region-specific and age-related manner. The micropipette aspiration technique provides a promising approach for studies of valve structure and function in small animal models, such as transgenic mouse models of valve disease. PMID:20863504

  5. Aortic Dissection in Patients With Genetically Mediated Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Devereux, Richard B.; Preiss, Liliana R.; Feher, Attila; Roman, Mary J.; Basson, Craig T.; Geevarghese, Alexi; Ravekes, William; Dietz, Harry C.; Holmes, Kathryn; Habashi, Jennifer; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Bavaria, Joseph; Milewski, Karianna; LeMaire, Scott A.; Morris, Shaine; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Prakash, Siddharth; Maslen, Cheryl; Song, Howard K.; Silberbach, G. Michael; Shohet, Ralph V.; McDonnell, Nazli; Hendershot, Tabitha; Eagle, Kim A.; Asch, Federico M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Aortic dissection (AoD) is a serious complication of thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). Relative risk for AoD in relation to TAA etiology, incidence, and pattern after prophylactic TAA surgery are poorly understood. OBJECTIVES This study sought to determine the incidence, pattern, and relative risk for AoD among patients with genetically associated TAA. METHODS The population included adult GenTAC participants without AoD at baseline. Standardized core laboratory tests classified TAA etiology and measured aortic size. Follow-up was performed for AoD. RESULTS Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) (39%) and Marfan syndrome (MFS) (22%) were the leading diagnoses in the studied GenTAC participants (n = 1,991). AoD occurred in 1.6% over 3.6 ± 2.0 years; 61% of AoD occurred in patients with MFS. Cumulative AoD incidence was 6-fold higher among patients with MFS (4.5%) versus others (0.7%; p < 0.001). MFS event rates were similarly elevated versus those in patients with BAV (0.3%; p < 0.001). AoD originated in the distal arch or descending aorta in 71%; 52% of affected patients, including 68% with MFS, had previously undergone aortic grafting. In patients with proximal aortic surgery, distal aortic size (descending thoracic, abdominal aorta) was larger among patients with AoD versus those without AoD (both p < 0.05), whereas the ascending aorta size was similar. Conversely, in patients without previous surgery, aortic root size was greater in patients with subsequent AoD (p < 0.05), whereas distal aortic segments were of similar size. MFS (odds ratio: 7.42; 95% confidence interval: 3.43 to 16.82; p < 0.001) and maximal aortic size (1.86 per cm; 95% confidence interval: 1.26 to 2.67; p = 0.001) were independently associated with AoD. Only 4 of 31 (13%) patients with AoD had pre-dissection images that fulfilled size criteria for prophylactic TAA surgery at a subsequent AoD site. CONCLUSIONS Among patients with genetically associated TAA, MFS augments risk for AoD even after

  6. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  7. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  8. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Use of the Konno procedure in an 80-year-old woman with aortic stenosis, a narrow left ventricular outflow tract, and a small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Misumi, Hiroyasu; Katayama, Yukihiro; Takaji, Kentaro; Oshitomi, Takashi; Uesugi, Hideyuki; Hirayama, Touitsu; Takeuchi, Takamasa

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a technique for repairing an aortic stenosis in an elderly patient with a small aortic annulus and a narrow left ventricular outflow tract. Preoperative echocardiography in an 80-year-old woman showed severe aortic stenosis with a narrow outflow tract: the aortic valve area was 0.48 cm(2), the aortic annular diameter was 14 mm, and the left ventricular outflow tract diameter was 14 mm. The Konno procedure was used to enlarge both the small aortic annulus and the left ventricular outflow tract, and a 19-mm Carpentier-Edwards bioprosthetic valve was implanted. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. The left ventricular mass decreased from a preoperative value of 236 g to 96 g, 3 years after surgery. Only a few reports have described the use of the Konno operation in adult patients. In the present case, the Konno operation was demonstrated to be a good option for aortic stenosis accompanied by a small aortic annulus and a narrow left ventricular outflow tract, even in an elderly patient.

  10. Diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated dendrimers in rat aortic tissue.

    PubMed

    Cho, Brenda S; Roelofs, Karen J; Majoros, Istvan J; Baker, James R; Stanley, James C; Henke, Peter K; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2006-11-01

    In this study, the distribution of labeled dendrimers in native and aneurysmal rat aortic tissue was examined. Adult male rats underwent infrarenal aorta perfusion with generation 5 (G5) acetylated Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated dendrimers for varying lengths of time. In a second set of experiments, rats underwent aortic elastase perfusion followed by aortic dendrimer perfusion 7 days later. Aortic diameters were measured prior to and postelastase perfusion, and again on the day of harvest. Aortas were harvested 0, 12, or 24 h postperfusion, fixed, and mounted. Native aortas were harvested and viewed as negative controls. Aortic cross-sections were viewed and imaged using confocal microscopy. Dendrimers were quantified (counts/high-powered field). Results were evaluated by repeated measures ANOVA and Student's t-test. We found that in native aortas, dendrimers penetrated the aortic wall in all groups. For all perfusion times, fewer dendrimers were present as time between dendrimer perfusion and aortic harvest increased. Longer perfusion times resulted in increased diffusion of dendrimers throughout the aortic wall. By 24 h, the majority of the dendrimers were through the wall. Dendrimers in aneurysmal aortas, on day 0 postdendrimer perfusion, diffused farther into the aortic wall than controls. In conclusion, this study documents labeled dendrimers delivered intra-arterially to native rat aortas in vivo, and the temporal diffusion of these molecules within the aortic wall. Increasing perfusion time and length of time prior to harvest resulted in continued dendrimer diffusion into the aortic wall. These preliminary data provide a novel mechanism whereby local inhibitory therapy may be delivered locally to aortic tissue.

  11. Late outcome analysis of the Braile Biomédica® pericardial valve in the aortic position

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Lisandro Gonçalves; Veronese, Elinthon Tavares; Santiago, José Augusto Duncan; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aortic valve replacement with Braile bovine pericardial prosthesis has been routinely done at the Heart Institute of the Universidade de São Paulo Medical School since 2006. The objective of this study is to analyze the results of Braile Biomédica® aortic bioprosthesis in patients with aortic valve disease. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients with aortic valve disease submitted to aortic valve replacement with Braile Biomédica® bovine pericardial prosthesis, between 2006 and 2010. Mean age was 59.41±16.34 years and 67.3% were male. Before surgery, 73.4% of patients were in NYHA functional class III or IV. Results Hospital mortality was 8.16% (16 patients). Linearized rates of mortality, endocarditis, reintervention, and structural dysfunction were 1.065%, 0.91%, 0.68% and 0.075% patients/year, respectively. Actuarial survival was 90.59±2.56% in 88 months. Freedom from reintervention, endocarditis and structural dysfunction was respectively 91.38±2.79%, 89.84±2.92% and 98.57±0.72% in 88 months. Conclusion The Braile Biomédica® pericardial aortic valve prosthesis demonstrated actuarial survival and durability similar to that described in the literature, but further follow up is required to assess the incidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis and structural dysfunction in the future. PMID:25372903

  12. Late outcome analysis of the Braile Biomédica® pericardial valve in the aortic position.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Lisandro Gonçalves; Veronese, Elinthon Tavares; Santiago, José Augusto Duncan; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement with Braile bovine pericardial prosthesis has been routinely done at the Heart Institute of the Universidade de São Paulo Medical School since 2006. The objective of this study is to analyze the results of Braile Biomédica® aortic bioprosthesis in patients with aortic valve disease. We retrospectively evaluated 196 patients with aortic valve disease submitted to aortic valve replacement with Braile Biomédica® bovine pericardial prosthesis, between 2006 and 2010. Mean age was 59.41±16.34 years and 67.3% were male. Before surgery, 73.4% of patients were in NYHA functional class III or IV. Hospital mortality was 8.16% (16 patients). Linearized rates of mortality, endocarditis, reintervention, and structural dysfunction were 1.065%, 0.91%, 0.68% and 0.075% patients/year, respectively. Actuarial survival was 90.59±2.56% in 88 months. Freedom from reintervention, endocarditis and structural dysfunction was respectively 91.38±2.79%, 89.84±2.92% and 98.57±0.72% in 88 months. The Braile Biomédica® pericardial aortic valve prosthesis demonstrated actuarial survival and durability similar to that described in the literature, but further follow up is required to assess the incidence of prosthetic valve endocarditis and structural dysfunction in the future.

  13. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  14. Spectrum of aortic valve abnormalities associated with aortic dilation across age groups in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Laura J; Baba, Ridhwan Y; Arai, Andrew E; Bandettini, W Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A

    2013-11-01

    Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm, and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome. Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with Turner syndrome and to determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular MRI in 208 subjects with Turner syndrome in an institutional review board-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve, 64% (n=133); partially fused aortic valve, 12% (n=25); bicuspid aortic valve, 23% (n=47); and unicuspid aortic valve, 1% (n=3). Age and body surface area were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, toward larger body surface area-indexed ascending aortic diameters with increasing valve fusion. Ascending aortic diameters were (mean±SD) 16.9±3.3, 18.3±3.3, and 19.8±3.9 mm/m(2) (P<0.0001) for tricuspid aortic valve, partially fused aortic valve, and bicuspid aortic valve+unicuspid aortic valve, respectively. Partially fused aortic valve, bicuspid aortic valve, and unicuspid aortic valve were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Aortic valve abnormalities in Turner syndrome occur with a spectrum of severity and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased ascending aortic diameters.

  15. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing on...

  16. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule document...

  17. No Beneficial Effect of General and Specific Anti-Inflammatory Therapies on Aortic Dilatation in Marfan Mice

    PubMed Central

    den Hartog, Alexander W.; Radonic, Teodora; de Vries, Carlie J. M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Groenink, Maarten; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Waard, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Aims Patients with Marfan syndrome have an increased risk of life-threatening aortic complications, mostly preceded by aortic dilatation. In the FBN1C1039G/+ Marfan mouse model, losartan decreases aortic root dilatation. We recently confirmed this beneficial effect of losartan in adult patients with Marfan syndrome. The straightforward translation of this mouse model to man is reassuring to test novel treatment strategies. A number of studies have shown signs of inflammation in aortic tissue of Marfan patients. This study examined the efficacy of anti-inflammatory therapies in attenuating aortic root dilation in Marfan syndrome and compared effects to the main preventative agent, losartan. Methods and Results To inhibit inflammation in FBN1C1039G/+ Marfan mice, we treated the mice with losartan (angiotensin II receptor type 1 inhibitor), methylprednisolone (corticosteroid) or abatacept (T-cell-specific inhibitor). Treatment was initiated in adult Marfan mice with already existing aortic root dilatation, and applied for eight weeks. Methylprednisolone- or abatacept-treated mice did not reveal a reduction in aortic root dilatation. In this short time frame, losartan was the only treatment that significantly reduced aorta inflammation, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling and aortic root dilatation rate in these adult Marfan mice. Moreover, the methylprednisolone-treated mice had significantly more aortic alcian blue staining as a marker for aortic damage. Conclusion Anti-inflammatory agents do not reduce the aortic dilatation rate in Marfan mice, but possibly increase aortic damage. Currently, the most promising therapeutic drug in Marfan syndrome is losartan, by blocking the angiotensin II receptor type 1 and thereby inhibiting pSmad2 signaling. PMID:25238161

  18. A shifting approach to management of the thoracic aorta in bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Opotowsky, Alexander R; Perlstein, Todd; Landzberg, Michael J; Colan, Steven D; O'Gara, Patrick T; Body, Simon C; Ryan, Liam F; Aranki, Sary; Singh, Michael N

    2013-08-01

    The scientific understanding of aortic dilation associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) has evolved during the past 2 decades, along with improvements in diagnostic technology and surgical management. We aimed to evaluate secular trends and predictors of thoracic aortic surgery among patients with BAV in the United States. We used the 1998-2009 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an administrative dataset representative of US hospital admissions, to identify hospitalizations for adults aged 18 years or more with BAV and aortic valve or thoracic aortic surgery. Covariates included age, gender, year, aortic dissection, endocarditis, thoracic aortic aneurysm, number of comorbidities, hospital teaching status and region, primary insurance, and concomitant coronary artery bypass surgery. Between 1998 and 2009, 48,736 ± 3555 patients with BAV underwent aortic valve repair or replacement and 1679 ± 120 patients with BAV underwent isolated thoracic aortic surgery. The overall number of surgeries increased more than 3-fold, from 4556 ± 571 in 1998/1999 to 14,960 ± 2107 in 2008/2009 (P < .0001). The proportion of aortic valve repair or replacement including concomitant thoracic aortic surgery increased from 12.8% ± 1.4% in 1998/1999 to 28.5% ± 1.6% in 2008/2009, which mirrored an increasing proportion of patients with a diagnosis of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Mortality was equivalent for patients undergoing aortic valve repair or replacement with thoracic aortic surgery and those undergoing isolated aortic valve repair or replacement (1.8% ± 0.3% vs 1.5% ± 0.2%; multivariable odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.67-1.57), with decreasing mortality over the study period (from 2.5% ± 0.6% in 1998/1999 to 1.5% ± 0.2% in 2008/2009; multivariable odds ratio per 2-year increment, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.99; P = .03). Total charges for BAV surgical hospitalizations increased more than 7.5-fold from approximately $156 million in 1998 to $1.2 billion in

  19. The two faces of hypertension: role of aortic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Smulyan, Harold; Mookherjee, Saktipada; Safar, Michel E

    2016-02-01

    Adult hypertension can be divided into two relatively distinct forms-systolic/diastolic hypertension in midlife and systolic hypertension of the aged. The two types differ in prevalence, pathophysiology, and therapy. The prevalence of systolic hypertension in the elderly is twice that of midlife hypertension. The systolic pressure is elevated in both forms, but the high diastolic pressure in midlife is due to a raised total peripheral resistance, whereas the normal or low diastolic pressure in the elderly is due to aortic stiffening. Aortic stiffness, as measured by the carotid/femoral pulse wave velocity, has been found to be a cardiovascular risk marker independent of traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis. Instead, it is related to microcirculatory disease of the brain and kidney and to disorders of inflammation. Loss of aortic distensibility is an inevitable consequence of aging, but a review of its causes suggests that it may be amenable to future pharmacologic therapy.

  20. Unlocking the bovine genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus) has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries. ...

  1. [Aortic valve replacement for the small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Oshima, H; Usui, A; Akita, T; Ueda, Y

    2006-04-01

    Aortic valve surgery for the small aortic annulus is still challenging for surgeons. Recently, the new types of high performance prosthesis have been developed and the chance of an aortic root enlargement (ARE) is decreasing. In this study, we propose the ideal strategy of the aortic surgery for the small aortic annulus. We analyzed the clinical records of 158 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement from August 1999 to October 2005 in our institution. The small aortic annulus was observed in 38 patients (24%). Fourteen patients of this group underwent ARE. Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was less frequently observed in patients with ARE compared to those without ARE. The additional time required for ARE was not considerable, and neither ischemic time nor cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly prolonged by ARE. In conclusion, we have to select a prosthesis with sufficient orifice area to avoid PPM, otherwise we should choose an option of ARE. For this consideration, we definitely need the chart that demonstrates the relationship between the nominal size of various types of prostheses and the size of a patient's annulus that those prostheses actually fit.

  2. Mild aerobic exercise blocks elastin fiber fragmentation and aortic dilatation in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Christine; Nielsen, Cory; Alex, Ramona; Cooper, Kimbal; Farney, Michael; Gaufin, Douglas; Cui, Jason Z; van Breemen, Cornelis; Broderick, Tom L; Vallejo-Elias, Johana; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2017-07-01

    Regular low-impact physical activity is generally allowed in patients with Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. However, being above average in height encourages young adults with this syndrome to engage in high-intensity contact sports, which unfortunately increases the risk for aortic aneurysm and rupture, the leading cause of death in Marfan syndrome. In this study, we investigated the effects of voluntary (cage-wheel) or forced (treadmill) aerobic exercise at different intensities on aortic function and structure in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Four-week-old Marfan and wild-type mice were subjected to voluntary and forced exercise regimens or sedentary lifestyle for 5 mo. Thoracic aortic tissue was isolated and subjected to structural and functional studies. Our data showed that exercise improved aortic wall structure and function in Marfan mice and that the beneficial effect was biphasic, with an optimum at low intensity exercise (55-65% V̇o2max) and tapering off at a higher intensity of exercise (85% V̇o2max). The mechanism underlying the reduced elastin fragmentation in Marfan mice involved reduction of the expression of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 within the aortic wall. These findings present the first evidence of potential beneficial effects of mild exercise on the structural integrity of the aortic wall in Marfan syndrome associated aneurysm. Our finding that moderate, but not strenuous, exercise protects aortic structure and function in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome could have important implications for the medical care of young Marfan patients.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present study provides conclusive scientific evidence that daily exercise can improve aortic health in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome associated aortic aneurysm, and it establishes the threshold for the exercise intensity beyond which exercise may not be as protective. These findings establish a platform for

  3. Pentacuspid aortic valve diagnosed by transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cemri, M; Cengel, A; Timurkaynak, T

    2000-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are quite a rare finding in echocardiographic examinations. A case of a 19 year old man with a pentacuspid aortic valve without aortic stenosis and regurgitation, detected by transoesophageal echocardiography, is presented.


Keywords: pentacuspid aortic valve; echocardiography PMID:10995427

  4. En bloc aortic and mitral valve replacement and left ventricular outflow tract enlargement using a combined transaortic and trans-septal atrial approach.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammed; Windsor, Jimmy; Ricci, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Aortic and mitral valve replacement with division and reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body has been described in clinical situations involving infective endocarditis, extensive annular calcifications and diminutive valve annuli. Herein, we describe a combined transaortic and trans-septal approach with division of the inter-valvular fibrosa for combined aortic and mitral valve replacement. The reconstruction of the inter-valvular fibrous body, atrial walls and aortic root was carried out using a 'three-patch' technique with bovine pericardium.

  5. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, B M; Jaarsma, W; Wely, L Relik-van; van Swieten, H A; Ernst, J M P G; Plokker, H W M

    2003-03-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high.

  6. Early molecular changes in irradiated aortic endothelium.

    PubMed

    Gajdusek, C; Onoda, K; London, S; Johnson, M; Morrison, R; Mayberg, M

    2001-07-01

    Irradiated aortic endothelial cells (EC) exhibit distinct morphological, functional, and physiological responses to ionizing radiation (IR). However, the molecular basis for these responses has not been fully characterized. Cultured bovine and rat aortic endothelial cells were exposed to single fraction doses (0-30 Gy) of gamma radiation. IR caused dose-dependent DNA strand breaks which were repaired to near baseline levels within 30 min. A dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth was noted for IR greater than 1 Gy. At doses greater than 2.5 Gy, morphologic changes consistent with apoptosis and loss of cell viability were present beginning 12-16 h after radiation, with subsequent detachment of EC from the cell monolayer. By Western blot analysis, expression of p53, gadd45, p21, and bax protein increased in a time-and dose-dependent manner; p53 expression was maximal at 3 h after IR, and gadd45, bax and p21 levels peaked at 6 h. By Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), levels of p53 mRNA were not significantly increased after IR, whereas gadd45 exhibited time- and dose-dependent increase in mRNA synthesis after IR. Activation of intracellular caspases, manifest by proteolytic poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and lamin B cleavage, was maximal at 15 h after IR, concident with other indices of EC apoptosis, including oligonucleosomal DNA degradation, TUNEL immunostaining, and morphologic changes. The tripeptide protease inhibitor z-Val-Ala-Asp (zVAD) prevented PARP and lamin cleavage, DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and cell detachment in irradiated EC. The combined data suggested that gamma radiation induces a dose- and time-dependent sequence of early events in cultured EC with modulate growth arrest, apoptosis, and possibly premature senescence in surviving cells.

  7. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  8. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prosthesis-preserving aortic root repair after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Taira; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe a new technique of prosthesis-preserving aortic root replacement for patients who have previously undergone aortic valve replacement. With preservation of the mechanical prosthesis, we implant a Gelweave Valsalva graft using double suture lines. The first suture line is made between the sewing cuff of the mechanical valve and the graft, with mattress sutures of 2/0 braided polyester with pledgets. After the first sutures are tied, the second suture line is created between the graft collar and the aortic root remnant with continuous 4/0 polypropylene sutures.

  10. Anomalous origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta accompanied by absent pulmonary valve syndrome and right-sided aortic arch: a rare case in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Khajali, Zahra; Mohammadzadeh, Ali; Khayatzadeh, Marzieh

    2015-04-01

    We present a rare congenital heart disease in a 20-year-old man with anomalous origin of the right pulmonary artery from the ascending aorta, accompanied by absent pulmonary valve syndrome, and a right-sided aortic arch suspected initially in transthoracic echocardiography and subsequently confirmed by cardiac catheterisation and computed tomography angiography.

  11. The excluder aortic endograft.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Daniel M; Stevens, Scott L

    2008-06-01

    Since its introduction, more than 59000 patients have been treated with Gore Excluder endoprosthesis (GORE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the past 11 years. It has become clearer that differences in device delivery and design provide certain advantages that may favor one anatomical milieu over another. Behavior of the aneurysm sac also seems to be graft dependent as more long-term data become available. The currently available low-permeability GORE seems to have addressed the problem of endotension noted with previous designs. Cumulative data are reviewed, and the data demonstrate very low perioperative morbidity and mortality and excellent protection from aneurysm-related complications with the GORE device. Superior ease of use, excellent trackability, and rare failures requiring acute open conversion characterize the GORE device. By addressing clinical demands of aortic endografting, Gore has eclipsed other endografts in the industry to now dominate the US market. The aim of this review is to describe the history, experience, advantages, and future goals with the GORE for the treatment of AAA.

  12. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  13. An Important but Forgotten Technique: Aortic Fenestration.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Mihriban; Tayfur, Kaptan Derya; Urkmez, Melih

    2016-10-01

    Aortic fenestration is a technique that treats organ ischemia in descending aortic dissection. Open surgical aortic fenestration is an effective yet uncommonly used and widely forgotten procedure. Here, we describe 2 patients suffering from chronic thoracoabdominal aortic dissection, and we aimed to identify under what circumstances surgical aortic fenestration should be applied, to assess its safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Salvage periaortic pericardial baffle equalizes mortality in bleeding patients undergoing aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Toole, John Matthew; Stroud, Martha R; Ikonomidis, John S

    2014-07-01

    Bleeding is a potentially serious complication of aortic surgery. We report our experience with the use of a periaortic bovine pericardial baffle to control intractable intraoperative bleeding. All patients who underwent aortic root, ascending, or arch replacements between January 2002 and April 2013 were reviewed. A bovine pericardial periaortic baffle was created to shunt shed blood into the right atrium. The transverse sinus was sutured closed in patients undergoing primary sternotomy. Baffle recipients were compared with the remaining patients undergoing aortic surgery. The Fisher exact test was used to determine statistical significance for categoric variables. Continuous variables were compared using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank-sum test. All factors with a P value less than .2 were considered for multivariate logistic regression to determine independent associations with baffle use. A total of 413 patients were identified, of whom 23 received a baffle. Operative mortality for patients receiving a baffle was 4% (1/23) compared with 6% (25/390) (P = 1) for the remaining patients. Prolonged ventilation was more common in the baffle recipients (P < .0005); otherwise, there were no differences in postoperative morbidity. Multivariate analysis of all patients undergoing aortic surgery revealed infectious endocarditis (P < .0005; odds ratio, 15.1; 95% confidence interval, 4.8-47.2), redo sternotomy (P < .0005; odds ratio, 11.9; 95% confidence interval, 4.1-34.1), and male gender (P = .04; odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-19.3) to be predictive of baffle placement. Patients requiring salvage periaortic pericardial baffle for intractable intraoperative hemorrhage experienced an operative mortality similar to that in the remaining patients undergoing aortic surgery. Infectious endocarditis requiring root replacement or reoperative aortic surgery should alert the surgeon to the potential need for baffle placement, including prophylactic

  15. Kinetics of selected plasma cytokines during innate-adaptive immune response transition in adult cattle infected with the bovine ephemeral fever virus.

    PubMed

    Barigye, R; Melville, L F; Davis, S; Walsh, S; Hunt, N; Hunt, R

    2016-04-15

    While virus neutralizing antibodies are known to be variably protective against bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) virus (BEFV) infections, the cytokine events that mediate the nascent adaptive immune response have not been defined in cattle. This study determined the plasma kinetics of IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-10 during the period of innate-immune response transition and evaluated the relationship between the virus neutralizing antibody response and viraemia in BEFV-infected cattle. Plasma from four virus-infected and uninfected negative control animals was tested by cytokine-specific immunoenzymatic assays, viraemia monitored by qRT-PCR, and virus neutralizing antibody titres determined using a standard protocol. Unlike the negative controls, plasma IL-6 and IL-10 were increased in all the virus-infected animals starting several days prior to initiation of viraemia. In one animal, plasma IL-2 and IFN-γ were consistently higher than in the other three virus-infected animals and the negative control mean. The animal with the strongest IL-2 and IFN-γ responses had the shortest viraemia while the heifer with the lowest IL-2/IFN-γ indices demonstrated the longest viraemia. Evidently, increase in plasma IL-6 and IL-10 precedes seroconversion during BEFV infections in cattle suggesting the two cytokines may influence immunological events that pave way to B-cell activation and seroconversion. While there is remarkable variability in IL-2 and IFN-γ expression amongst BEFV-infected animals, increased plasma levels of the two cytokines appear to be associated with a shorter viraemia. Ongoing studies will help define the precise role of T cells in anti-BEFV adaptive immune responses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Extended replacement of a calcified ascending aorta in adulthood sporadic, diffuse type, supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Borghetti, Valentino; D'Addario, Giancarlo; Bravi, Ilaria; Pardinia, Alessandro

    2011-08-01

    The diffuse variant of supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is one of the most rare congenital vascular pathological conditions of adulthood. Due to its rarity, surgical treatment of this clinical entity is still a matter of debate because of the variable degree of aortic narrowing, presence of multilevel obstruction, and age at presentation, all factors that strongly influence the disease prognosis. We report a case of an adult patient with an extremely calcified diffuse SVAS who underwent successful replacement of the ascending aorta through the interposition of a tubular prosthesis. Six months' follow-up showed complete relief of the aortic gradient and an improvement in clinical performance.

  17. Aortic Coarctation Diagnosed During Pregnancy in a Woman With Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Zakaria; Iriart, Xavier; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation is thought to be a rare condition in patients with tetralogy of Fallot. We report the case of a 26 year old woman presenting with systemic hypertension at 17 weeks of pregnancy after repair of tetralogy of Fallot in childhood. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed right aortic arch with severe isthmic coarctation. Her blood pressure was controlled medically during the rest of her pregnancy, and delivery was uneventful. Successful transcatheter placement of a covered stent at the level of the coarctation was performed after delivery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of aortic coarctation diagnosed in an adult patient late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

  18. Mechanisms of the in vivo inhibition of calcification of bioprosthetic porcine aortic valve cusps and aortic wall with triglycidylamine/mercapto bisphosphonate.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, H Scott; Connolly, Jeanne M; Fulmer, James; Dai, Ning; Murti, Brandon H; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H; Alferiev, Ivan; Levy, Robert J

    2007-02-01

    Heart valve replacements fabricated from glutaraldehyde (Glut)-crosslinked heterograft materials, porcine aortic valves or bovine pericardium, have been widely used in cardiac surgery to treat heart valve disease. However, these bioprosthetic heart valves often fail in long-term clinical implants due to pathologic calcification of the bioprosthetic leaflets, and for stentless porcine aortic valve bioprostheses, bioprosthetic aortic wall calcification also typically occurs. Previous use of the epoxide-based crosslinker, triglycidyl amine (TGA), on cardiac bioprosthetic valve materials demonstrated superior biocompatibility, mechanics, and calcification resistance for porcine aortic valve cusps (but not porcine aortic wall) and bovine pericardium, vs. Glut-prepared controls. However, TGA preparation did not completely prevent long-term calcification of cusps or pericardium. Herein we report further mechanistic investigations of an added therapeutic component to this system, 2-mercaptoethylidene-1,1-bisphosphonic acid (MABP), a custom synthesized thiol bisphosphonate, which has previously been shown in a preliminary report to prevent bioprosthetic heterograft biomaterial calcification when used in combination with initial TGA crosslinking for 7 days. In the present studies, we have further investigated the effectiveness of MABP in experiments that examined: (1) The use of MABP after optimal TGA crosslinking, in order to avoid any competitive interference of MABP-reactions with TGA during crosslinking; (2) Furthermore, recognizing the importance of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in the formation of dystrophic calcific nodules, we have investigated the hypothesis that the mechanism by which MABP primarily functions is through the reduction of ALP activity. Results from cell-free model systems, cell culture studies, and rat subcutaneous implants, show that materials functionalized with MABP after TGA crosslinking have reduced ALP activity, and in vivo have no significant

  19. GenTAC Registry Report: Gender Differences Among Individuals with Genetically-Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Kathryn W.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kindem, Mark; Kroner, Barbara L.; Song, Howard K.; Ravekes, William; Dietz, H.C.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Roman, Mary J.; Devereux, Richard B.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Bavaria, Joseph; Milewski, Karianna; Milewicz, Dianna; LeMaire, Scott A.; Hendershot, Tabitha; Eagle, Kim A.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Silberbach, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Previous data suggest women are at increased risk of death from aortic dissection. Therefore, we analyzed data from the GenTAC registry, the NIH-sponsored program that collects information about individuals with genetically-triggered thoracic aortic aneurysms and cardiovascular conditions. We performed cross-sectional analyses in adults with Marfan syndrome (MFS), familial thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection (FTAAD), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, and subjects under 50 years of age with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection (TAAD<50y). Women comprised 32% of 1449 subjects and were 21% of subjects with BAV, 34% with FTAAD, 22% with TAAD <50y, and 47% with MFS. Thoracic aortic dissections occurred with equal gender frequency yet women with BAV had more extensive dissections. Aortic size was smaller in women but was similar after controlling for BSA. Age at operation for aortic valve dysfunction, aneurysm or dissection did not differ by gender. Multivariate analysis (adjusting for age, BSA, hypertension, study site, diabetes, and subgroup diagnoses) showed that women had fewer total aortic surgeries (OR= 0.65, p < 0.01) and were less likely to receive angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) (OR=0.68, p < 0.05). As in BAV, other genetically-triggered aortic diseases such as FTAAD and TAAD<50 are more common in males. In women, decreased prevalence of aortic operations and less treatment with ACEi may be due to their smaller absolute aortic diameters. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if women are at higher risk for adverse events. PMID:23444191

  20. 5B.05: MARFAN SYNDROME: ASSESSMENT OF AORTIC DISSECTION RISK BY ANALYSIS OF AORTIC VISCOELASTIC PROPERTIES.

    PubMed

    Grillo, A; Pini, A; Marelli, S; Gan, L; Giuliano, A; Trifirò, G; Santini, F; Salvi, L; Salvi, P; Viecca, F; Carretta, R; Parati, G

    2015-06-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by an abnormal fibrillin-1 synthesis. Aortic root dilation and dissection are the main problems affecting patients prognosis in these patients. Their pharmacological prophylaxis with losartan or with a beta-blocker counteracts the aortic root dilation, but a close follow-up is required to assess therapeutic response rate and to identify non-responders. Unfortunately genotype-phenotype studies do not allow to determine the exact risk profile in these patients and there is no reliable method to accurately predict their risk of aortic dissection. Aim of this study was to evaluate non-invasive markers for identification of Marfan patients at higher risk of aortic complications. We studied 187 Marfan patients (identified according to 2010 Revised Ghent Criteria and positive genetic analysis), age 32.3 ± 16.5 yrs (mean ± SD). 52 patients (27.8%) had undergone surgical ascending aorta replacement (David or Bentall procedure). Central pressure curves were recorded by PulsePen tonometer, and the aortic viscoelastic aortic properties were studied by determination of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). With reference to the age related distribution of PWV values in a normal population, defined according to Arterial-Stiffness-Collaboration, PWV mean values in Marfan patients corresponded to 60th percentile in non- operated patients and to the 67th percentile in those operated. Adult Marfan patients (n = 146) generally displayed a low blood pressure, because of the pharmacological prophylaxis, and were compared with a population of 189 adult healthy subjects (81 males), matched by age (38 ± 13 vs 38 ± 16 yrs.), heart rate (64 ± 9 bpm vs 64 ± 11 bpm) and blood pressure (mean BP = 78 ± 9 mmHg vs 79 ± 4 mmHg) values. Average PWV value was higher than in healthy controls (PWV = 7.0 ± 1.7) both in not operated (PWV = 7.6 ± 1.6; p = 0

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open ... Open surgery to repair an AAA is sometimes done as an emergency procedure when there is bleeding inside your body from the aneurysm. You may have an ...

  2. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  3. Misconceptions and Facts About Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Windecker, Stephan; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease leading to intervention, and it is typically a disease of the elderly. Recent clinical advances have expanded the role of transcatheter aortic valve intervention in patients with severe aortic stenosis, making aortic valve intervention feasible and effective even in patients at intermediate, high, and prohibitive surgical risk. With the rapid advances in treatment, proper diagnosis becomes crucial for a wide range of patients with aortic stenosis: from "concordant" high-gradient aortic stenosis to "discordant" low-gradient aortic stenosis. The latter group commonly presents a clinical challenge requiring thoughtful and comprehensive evaluation to determine eligibility for aortic valve intervention. Providers at all levels should be familiar with basic diagnostic caveats and misconceptions when evaluating patients with possible aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  5. Rare or unusual causes of chronic, isolated, pure aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, B.F.; Taliercio, C.P.; Dickos, D.K.; Howard, J.; Adlam, J.H.; Jolly, W. )

    1990-08-01

    Six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement had rare or unusual causes of isolated, pure aortic regurgitation. Two patients had congenitally bicuspid aortic valves with a false commissure (raphe) displaced to the aortic wall (tethered bicuspid aortic valve), two had floppy aortic valves, one had a congenital quadricuspid valve, and one had radiation-induced valve damage.

  6. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis. Initial experience].

    PubMed

    Careaga-Reyna, Guillermo; Lázaro-Castillo, José Luis; Lezama-Urtecho, Carlos Alberto; Macías-Miranda, Enriqueta; Dosta-Herrera, Juan José; Galván Díaz, José

    2016-12-09

    Aortic stenosis is a frequent disease in the elderly, and is associated with other systemic pathologies that may contraindicate the surgical procedure. Another option for these patients is percutaneous aortic valve implantation, which is less invasive. We present our initial experience with this procedure. Patients with aortic stenosis were included once selection criteria were accomplished. Under general anaesthesia and echocardiographic and fluosocopic control, a transcatheter aortic valve was implanted following s valvuloplasty. Once concluded the procedure, angiographic and pressure control was realized in order to confirm the valve function. Between November 2014 and May 2015, 6 patients were treated (4 males and 2 females), with a mean age of 78.83±5.66 years-old. The preoperative transvalvular gradient was 90.16±28.53mmHg and posterior to valve implant was 3.33±2.92mmHg (P<.05). Two patients had concomitant coronary artery disease which had been treated previously. One patient presented with acute right coronary artery occlusion which was immediately treated. However due to previous renal failure, postoperative sepsis and respiratory failure, the patient died one month later. It was concluded that our preliminary results showed that in selected patients percutaneous aortic valve implantation is a safe procedure with clinical improvement for treated patients. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Coronary Flow Impacts Aortic Leaflet Mechanics and Aortic Sinus Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon L; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical stresses on aortic valve leaflets are well-known mediators for initiating processes leading to calcific aortic valve disease. Given that non-coronary leaflets calcify first, it may be hypothesized that coronary flow originating from the ostia significantly influences aortic leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus blood flow and leaflet motion with and without physiological coronary flow in a well-controlled in vitro setup. The in vitro setup consists of a porcine aortic valve mounted in a physiological aorta sinus chamber with dynamically controlled coronary resistance to emulate physiological coronary flow. Results were analyzed using qualitative streak plots illustrating the spatiotemporal complexity of blood flow patterns, and quantitative velocity vector and shear stress contour plots to show differences in the mechanical environments between the coronary and non-coronary sinuses. It is shown that the presence of coronary flow pulls the classical sinus vorticity deeper into the sinus and increases flow velocity near the leaflet base. This creates a beneficial increase in shear stress and washout near the leaflet that is not seen in the non-coronary sinus. Further, leaflet opens approximately 10% farther into the sinus with coronary flow case indicating superior valve opening area. The presence of coronary flow significantly improves leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics in a manner that would reduce low wall shear stress conditions while improving washout at the base of the leaflet.

  8. Aortic Atherosclerosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Roldan, Paola C; Ratliff, Michelle; Snider, Richard; Macias, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Sibbitt, Wilmer; Roldan, Carlos A

    Aortic atherosclerosis (AoA) defined as intima-media thickening or plaques and aortic stiffness (AoS) also considered an atherosclerotic process and defined as decreased vessel distensibility (higher pulse pressure to achieve similar degree of vessel distension) are common in patients with SLE. Immune-mediated inflammation, thrombogenesis, traditional atherogenic factors, and therapy-related metabolic abnormalities are the main pathogenic factors of AoA and AoS. Pathology of AoA and AoS suggests an initial subclinical endothelialitis or vasculitis, which is exacerbated by thrombogenesis and atherogenic factors and ultimately resulting in AoA and AoS. Computed tomography (CT) for detection of arterial wall calcifications and arterial tonometry for detection of increased arterial pulse wave velocity are the most common diagnostic methods for detecting AoA and AoS, respectively. MRI may become a more applicable and accurate technique than CT. Although transesophageal echocardiography accurately detects earlier and advanced stages of AoA and AoS, it is semi-invasive and cannot be used as a screening method. Although imaging techniques demonstrate highly variable prevalence rates, on average about one third of adult SLE patients may have AoA or AoS. Age at SLE diagnosis; SLE duration; activity and damage; corticosteroid therapy; metabolic syndrome; chronic kidney disease; and mitral annular calcification are common independent predictors of AoA and AoS. Also, AoA and AoS are highly associated with carotid and coronary atherosclerosis. Earlier stages of AoA and AoS are usually subclinical. However, earlier stages of disease may be causally related or contribute to peripheral or cerebral embolism, pre-hypertension and hypertension, and increased left ventricular afterload resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Later stages of disease predisposes to visceral ischemia, aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. Even earlier stages of AoA and Ao

  9. Thoracic aortopathy in Turner syndrome and the influence of bicuspid aortic valves and blood pressure: a CMR study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To investigate aortic dimensions in women with Turner syndrome (TS) in relation to aortic valve morphology, blood pressure, karyotype, and clinical characteristics. Methods and results A cross sectional study of 102 women with TS (mean age 37.7; 18-62 years) examined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR- successful in 95), echocardiography, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Aortic diameters were measured by CMR at 8 positions along the thoracic aorta. Twenty-four healthy females were recruited as controls. In TS, aortic dilatation was present at one or more positions in 22 (23%). Aortic diameter in women with TS and bicuspid aortic valve was significantly larger than in TS with tricuspid valves in both the ascending (32.4 ± 6.7 vs. 26.0 ± 4.4 mm; p < 0.001) and descending (21.4 ± 3.5 vs. 18.8 ± 2.4 mm; p < 0.001) aorta. Aortic diameter correlated to age (R = 0.2 - 0.5; p < 0.01), blood pressure (R = 0.4; p < 0.05), a history of coarctation (R = 0.3; p = 0.01) and bicuspid aortic valve (R = 0.2-0.5; p < 0.05). Body surface area only correlated with descending aortic diameter (R = 0.23; p = 0.024). Conclusions Aortic dilatation was present in 23% of adult TS women, where aortic valve morphology, age and blood pressure were major determinants of the aortic diameter. PMID:20222980

  10. Aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique for quadricuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    A 67-year old man with ascending aortic aneurysm was referred because of a quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique. Under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, replacement of the ascending aorta was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful without recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  11. Surgical Correction of Aberrant Right Coronary Anomalies Stranding an Aortic Commissure with and Without Unroofing.

    PubMed

    Abdelhady, Khaled; Durgam, Samarth; Elzein, Chawki; Ilbawi, Michel N; Rhoiney, David; Massad, Malek G

    2017-02-18

    The technique for successful surgical correction of an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the opposite aortic cusp with an aberrant course between the aorta and pulmonary artery is illustrated in a symptomatic 62-year-old woman. The intramural course of the right coronary artery traversed the tip of the commissure between the anterior and posterior leaflets, and its repair entailed unroofing of the intramural segment from inside the aortic intima. This technique required resuspension of the overlying commissure to maintain optimal aortic valve leaflet coaptation and prevent aortic insufficiency. Modifications of this technique have been utilized by us whenever the intramural segment traversed behind the commissure. In these cases, partial or subtotal unroofing of the intramural segment was performed to preserve the integrity of the intima behind the overlying commissure. More recently, we have performed the surgical correction by probing the intramural segment within the aortic wall to its most anterior location and then performing a wide anterior unroofing in the aortic intima, and marsupializing the aortic and coronary intima to avoid dissection or intimal flap development. We favor utilizing these techniques of anatomic correction of the anomalous coronary to other techniques involving coronary artery bypass grafting of the anomalous coronary, especially in adult patients, as unroofing provides more lasting results.

  12. Spontaneous aortic dissection within an infrarenal AAA.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Kathryn J; Bailey, Marc A; McAree, Barry; Mekako, Anthony; Berridge, David C; Nicholson, Tony; Scott, D Julian A

    2012-12-01

    Aortic dissection occurring in the infrarenal abdominal aorta is uncommon. We present the case of a patient presenting with an enlarging abdominal aortic aneurysm and concurrent dissection (with associated radiological imaging) and briefly discuss the literature relating to this phenomenon.

  13. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Aortic Arch Interruption and Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch in Phace Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis and Postnatal Course.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Enrico; Greco, Antonella; Fainardi, Valentina; Passantino, Silvia; Serranti, Daniele; Favilli, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    PHACE is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome where posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, cerebrovascular anomalies, aortic arch anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities are variably associated. We describe the prenatal detection and the postnatal course of a child with PHACE syndrome with a unique type of aortic arch anomaly consisting of proximal interruption of the aortic arch and persistence of the fifth aortic arch. The fifth aortic arch represented in this case a vital systemic-to-systemic connection between the ascending aorta and the transverse portion of the aortic arch allowing adequate forward flow through the aortic arch without surgical treatment.

  15. Current aortic endografts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Colvard, Benjamin; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Swanstrom, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular Aneurysm Repair is a widely adopted method of treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The minimally invasive approach offered with EVAR has become popular not only among physicians and patients, but in the medical device industry as well. Over the past 25 years the global market for aortic endografts has increased rapidly, resulting in a wide range of devices from various companies. Currently, there are seven endografts approved by the FDA for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These devices offer a wide range of designs intended to increase inclusion criteria while decreasing technical complications such as endoleak and migration. Despite advances in device design, secondary interventions and follow-up requirements remain a significant issue. New devices are currently being studied in the U.S. and abroad and may significantly reduce complications and secondary interventions.

  16. Management of bicuspid aortic valve with or without involvement of ascending aorta and aortic root.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, S

    2014-06-01

    Patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) constitute a heterogeneous population with variable clinical presentation and complications. More than 50% of the patients who require aortic valve replacement have a BAV, a condition that may be associated with dilation of ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency caused by cusp disease or aortic root pathology. Of the potential BAV-related complications, dilation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are among the most serious. The dilation of ascending aorta and aortic root have been the subject of controversy. Whereas some surgeons believe that the dilation of the aorta is caused by the hemodynamic properties of the BAV, others believe that the dilation of the aortic root is secondary to genetic defects associated with the BAV. Management of a BAV should be tailored to each patient's clinical condition. The surgical approach varies from aortic valve replacement to combined aortic valve and root replacement to aortic-valve-sparing root replacement.

  17. Fibrotic Aortic Valve Stenosis in Hypercholesterolemic/Hypertensive Mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi; Lund, Donald D; Doshi, Hardik; Keen, Henry L; Knudtson, Kevin L; Funk, Nathan D; Shao, Jian Q; Cheng, Justine; Hajj, Georges P; Zimmerman, Kathy A; Davis, Melissa K; Brooks, Robert M; Chapleau, Mark W; Sigmund, Curt D; Weiss, Robert M; Heistad, Donald D

    2016-03-01

    Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension are associated with aortic valve stenosis (AVS) in humans. We have examined aortic valve function, structure, and gene expression in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. Control, hypertensive, hypercholesterolemic (Apoe(-/-)), and hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice were studied. Severe aortic stenosis (echocardiography) occurred only in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. There was minimal calcification of the aortic valve. Several structural changes were identified at the base of the valve. The intercusp raphe (or seam between leaflets) was longer in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice than in other mice, and collagen fibers at the base of the leaflets were reoriented to form a mesh. In hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice, the cusps were asymmetrical, which may contribute to changes that produce AVS. RNA sequencing was used to identify molecular targets during the developmental phase of stenosis. Genes related to the structure of the valve were identified, which differentially expressed before fibrotic AVS developed. Both RNA and protein of a profibrotic molecule, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, were increased greatly in hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice. Hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice are the first model of fibrotic AVS. Hypercholesterolemic/hypertensive mice develop severe AVS in the absence of significant calcification, a feature that resembles AVS in children and some adults. Structural changes at the base of the valve leaflets include lengthening of the raphe, remodeling of collagen, and asymmetry of the leaflets. Genes were identified that may contribute to the development of fibrotic AVS. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Conserved transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in aortic valve development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wirrig, Elaine E.; Yutzey, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for activation of developmental transcriptional regulatory pathways in heart valve disease. Here we review molecular regulatory mechanisms involved in heart valve progenitor development, leaflet morphogenesis, and extracellular matrix organization that also are active in diseased aortic valves. These include regulators of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transitions, such as the Notch pathway effector RBPJ, and the valve progenitor markers Twist1, Msx1/2, and Sox9. Little is known of the potential reparative or pathological functions of these developmental mechanisms in adult aortic valves, but it is tempting to speculate that valve progenitor cells could contribute to repair in the context of disease. Likewise, loss of either RBPJ or Sox9 leads to aortic valve calcification in mice, supporting a potential therapeutic role in prevention of disease. During aortic valve calcification, transcriptional regulators of osteogenic development are activated in addition to valve progenitor regulatory programs. Specifically, the transcription factor Runx2 and its downstream target genes are induced in calcified valves. Runx2 and osteogenic genes also are induced with vascular calcification, but activation of valve progenitor markers and the cellular context of expression are likely to be different for valve and vascular calcification. Additional research is necessary to determine if developmental mechanisms contribute to valve repair or if these pathways can be harnessed for new treatments of heart valve disease. PMID:24665126

  19. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm from Chronic Antiestrogen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rishi; Sainathan, Sandeep; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common but often undetected pathology prevalent in the population. They are often detected as incidental findings on imaging studies performed for unrelated pathologies. Estrogens have been shown to exert a protective influence on aortic tissue. Pharmacological agents blocking the actions of estrogens may thus be implicated in causing aortic pathologies. We present the case of an elderly woman with breast carcinoma treated for 18 years with antiestrogen therapy who subsequently developed acute thoracic aortic deterioration (enlargement and wall disruption).

  20. Anomaly in aortic arch alters pathological outcome of transient global ischemia in Rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Koichi; Yasuhara, Takao; Maki, Mina; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yu, Guolong; Xu, Lin; Tambrallo, Laura; Rodriguez, Nancy A.; Stern, David M.; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Kawase, Takeshi; Hess, David C.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated a non-human primate (NHP) transient global ischemia (TGI) model which was induced by clipping the arteries originating from the aortic arch. Previously we demonstrated that our TGI model in adult Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) results in marked neuronal cell loss in the hippocampal region, specifically the cornu Ammonis (CA1) region. However, we observed varying degrees of hippocampal cell loss among animals. Here, we report for the first time an anomaly of the aortic arch in some Rhesus macaques that appears as a key surgical factor in ensuring the success of the TGI model in this particular NHP. Eleven adult Rhesus macaques underwent the TGI surgery, which involved 10-15-minute clipping of both innominate and subclavian arteries. Animals were allowed to survive between 1 day and 28 days after TGI. Because of our experience and knowledge that Japanese macaques exhibited only innominate and subclavian arteries arising from the aortic arch, macroscopic visualization of these two arteries alone in the Rhesus macaques initially assured us that clipping both arteries was sufficient to produce TGI. During the course of one TGI operation, however, we detected 3 arterial branches arising from the aortic arch, which prompted us to subsequently search for 3 branches in succeeding TGI surgeries. In addition, we performed post-mortem examination of the heart to confirm the number of arterial branches in the aortic arch. Finally, in order to reveal the pathological effect of the aortic arch anomaly, we compared the hippocampal cell loss between animals found to have 3 arterial branches but had all or only two branches clipped during TGI operation. Post-mortem examination revealed eight NHPs had the typical two arterial aortic branches, but three NHPs displayed an extra arterial aortic branch, indicating that about 30% of Rhesus macaques had 3 arterial branches arising from the aorta. Histological analyses using Nissl staining showed that in NHPs with the

  1. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  2. Successful percutaneous stent implantation for isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Tsauo, Jia-Yu; Chen, Mao; Feng, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking in adults is rare, and there is no recommended therapy at present. Percutaneous stent implantation may be an effective method to correct it and could be considered. Patient concerns: We report a 46-year-old woman who suffered from recurrent migraine and refractory hypertension with a significant systolic blood pressure difference between upper limbs. Diagnoses: The woman was diagnosed with isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking with refractory hypertension. Interventions: Percutaneous stent implantation was performed. Due to the kinking nature of the diseased transverse aortic arch, the first covered stent moved forward to the proximal transverse aortic arch during deploying without the left common carotid artery occlusion. And then, a second stent was placed to cover the residual kinked part of the dismal transverse arch. Outcomes: Angiography and post-procedural computed tomography angiography revealed fully corrected of the diseased segment. At 6-month follow-up after procedure, the patient was free of any symptoms and had a normal blood pressure under antihypertensive treatment. Lessons: This case indicates that transverse aortic arch kinking in isolation can be well treated by percutaneous stent implantation in adult patients. Unlike pure aortic coarctation, elongation and bucking give the rise to the occurrence rate of stent sliding and migration and sometimes a second stent is needed. PMID:28272200

  3. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-09-29

    To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25-50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8-50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual values and preferences, highlighting the importance of well-informed and

  4. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  5. New ascending aortic aneurysm model in rats reproduces main structural features of degenerative ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms in human beings.

    PubMed

    Radu, Narcis Costin; Gervais, Marianne; Michineau, Stéphanie; Blanc, Raphaël; Fifre, Alexandre; Kirsch, Ernst Wilhelm Matthias; Allaire, Eric

    2013-06-01

    The singularity of the ascending aorta regarding mechanisms driving aneurysm formation requires the development of specific animal models. We investigated if adventitial elastase application results in ascending aorta aneurysms in rats. Adult Lewis rats (n = 26) were anesthetized, their ascending aortas measured by transthoracic ultrasound, and exposed via median sternotomy. Elastase or saline was applied on the ascending aortic adventitia. Ascending aorta diameters were monitored by ultrasound at 10 and 30 days, when the animals were killed. Wall area was measured on orcein stained sections. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels were quantified on gelatin zymography. Following elastase application, ascending aortic diameter increased at 10 and 30 days follow-up by 38% and 44%, respectively (P = .004). Despite thinning of the media secondary to vascular dilation, standardized medial area was not different between elastase-treated aortas and controls. Standardized total wall area had a significant increase in treated aortas compared with controls. Active matrix metalloproteinase-2 was significantly increased at 30 days in treated aortas, whereas active matrix metalloproteinase-9 was no different from controls. Elastase application on rat ascending aortic adventitia produced aneurysms, creating a reproducible model. Aortic wall remodeling evolved toward an increase in total wall area, reproducing the main structural features of this disease in human beings. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prolonged Survival in 2 Nonagenarians with Heart Failure and Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Charles Y.; Alexander, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of severe aortic stenosis is 6% in persons 85 to 86 years of age according to a Finnish population-based report. In the United States, the population over 80 years old is projected to rise from the current 7 million to 25 million by the year 2050. Thus, aortic stenosis in aging adults, and the management questions it poses, will be increasingly common. We report herein the cases of 2 nonagenarian patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who far outlived the natural history of this disease. We suspect that we are seeing a change in the prognosis of senile aortic stenosis as a result of advances in the geriatric care and management of advanced heart failure. Furthermore, the unusual longevity of these patients was made possible by the remarkable holistic care given by a dedicated, altruistic caregiver who had training in psychology, theology, and nursing. PMID:18941592

  7. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, B.M.; Jaarsma, W.; Wely, L. Relik-van; van Swieten, H.A.; Ernst, J.M.P.G.; Plokker, H.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696195

  8. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  9. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  10. Comparison of biochemical and cytotoxic activities of extracts obtained from dorsal spines and caudal fin of adult and juvenile non-native Caribbean lionfish (Pterois volitans/miles).

    PubMed

    Sáenz, Aránzazu; Ortiz, Natalia; Lomonte, Bruno; Rucavado, Alexandra; Díaz, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    Pterois volitans/miles lionfish (adult and juvenile) dorsal spines and caudal fin extracts were compared in their general composition, enzymatic activities and hemolytic and cytotoxic effects on bovine aortic endothelial cells and murine myoblasts, to distinguish between the activities present in the venom and epidermal mucus. Intradermal and intramuscular injections were also administered in mice to determine in vivo effects. This work shows that crude venom of Caribbean species of lionfish, present in dorsal spines, induces several in vitro effects including hemolysis, weak cytotoxicity, proteolytic and hyaluronidase activities, whereas in vivo, it is not hemorrhagic nor myotoxic, but causes edema, plasma extravasation and a thrombotic-associated lesion on the skin. Some small differences were observed between adult and juvenile venomous secretions. Gelatinolytic activity of the epidermal mucus, the only activity found in caudal fin extracts, could contribute to the in vivo toxicity of the venom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Severe aortic stenosis: forgotten associations.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Amorim, Sandra; Campelo, Manuel; Martins, Elisabete; Lopez Rodriguez, Elisa; Coelho, Rosa; Macedo, Guilherme; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 68-year-old man with predominantly right heart failure in the context of severe aortic stenosis associated with pulmonary hypertension. Anemia was diagnosed which, after endoscopic study, was considered to be secondary to angiodysplasia and a diagnosis of Heyde syndrome was made. After valve replacement surgery the patient's heart failure improved and hemoglobin levels stabilized. We present this case to show the need to recognize less common associations of severe aortic stenosis, in order to provide immediate and appropriate treatment.

  12. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-05-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved.

  13. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-01-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved. Images Fig. 11. Fig. 13. PMID:1130881

  14. A Case of Patent Ductus Arteriosus in an Elderly Patient Treated by Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Yamada, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Yuki; Hagihara, Makiyo; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    The patient described herein was a 75-year-old female. Echocardiography showed patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Heart failure symptoms gradually appeared, and she was referred to our department for treatment. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a tubular structure communicating between the aortic arch and pulmonary artery trunk, suggesting adult PDA. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was performed to close PDA. Completion angiography confirmed the disappearance of PDA. Post-TEVAR CT revealed no endoleak. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 11th day after surgery. TEVAR is more useful and less invasive for adult PDA than conventional open surgery. PMID:28018507

  15. Predictive risk models for proximal aortic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rocío; Pascual, Isaac; Álvarez, Rubén; Alperi, Alberto; Rozado, Jose; Morales, Carlos; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-01-01

    Predictive risk models help improve decision making, information to our patients and quality control comparing results between surgeons and between institutions. The use of these models promotes competitiveness and led to increasingly better results. All these virtues are of utmost importance when the surgical operation entails high-risk. Although proximal aortic surgery is less frequent than other cardiac surgery operations, this procedure itself is more challenging and technically demanding than other common cardiac surgery techniques. The aim of this study is to review the current status of predictive risk models for patients who undergo proximal aortic surgery, which means aortic root replacement, supracoronary ascending aortic replacement or aortic arch surgery. PMID:28616348

  16. Predictive risk models for proximal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Díaz, Rocío; Pascual, Isaac; Álvarez, Rubén; Alperi, Alberto; Rozado, Jose; Morales, Carlos; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-05-01

    Predictive risk models help improve decision making, information to our patients and quality control comparing results between surgeons and between institutions. The use of these models promotes competitiveness and led to increasingly better results. All these virtues are of utmost importance when the surgical operation entails high-risk. Although proximal aortic surgery is less frequent than other cardiac surgery operations, this procedure itself is more challenging and technically demanding than other common cardiac surgery techniques. The aim of this study is to review the current status of predictive risk models for patients who undergo proximal aortic surgery, which means aortic root replacement, supracoronary ascending aortic replacement or aortic arch surgery.

  17. Acute aortic dissection at two extreme ages.

    PubMed

    Ramzisham, A R M; Arief, H; Ngoo, K S; Zamrin, D M; Joanna, O S M

    2011-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition, warranting prompt diagnosis and treatment. Management of which incorporates multidisciplinary expertise from the medical, surgical and intensive care. If left untreated, the mortality rate of acute aortic disease exceeds 50% within 48 hours and 80% within two weeks, with a 5-year survival rate of 19%. The most common cause of death in untreated acute aortic dissection, regardless of aetiology, is aortic rupture. We would like to share our successful experience of cases at the two extreme ages of acute aortic dissection. Literature review with their pathogenesis are discussed.

  18. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  19. Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement for inoperable severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory P; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Kapadia, Samir; Pichard, Augusto D; Douglas, Pamela S; Thourani, Vinod H; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Webb, John G; Herrmann, Howard C; Bavaria, Joseph E; Kodali, Susheel; Brown, David L; Bowers, Bruce; Dewey, Todd M; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, Murat; Moses, Jeffrey W; Williams, Matthew R; Siegel, Robert J; Akin, Jodi J; Anderson, William N; Pocock, Stuart; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B

    2012-05-03

    Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is the recommended therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not suitable candidates for surgery. The outcomes beyond 1 year in such patients are not known. We randomly assigned patients to transfemoral TAVR or to standard therapy (which often included balloon aortic valvuloplasty). Data on 2-year outcomes were analyzed. A total of 358 patients underwent randomization at 21 centers. The rates of death at 2 years were 43.3% in the TAVR group and 68.0% in the standard-therapy group (P<0.001), and the corresponding rates of cardiac death were 31.0% and 62.4% (P<0.001). The survival advantage associated with TAVR that was seen at 1 year remained significant among patients who survived beyond the first year (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.92; P=0.02 with the use of the log-rank test). The rate of stroke was higher after TAVR than with standard therapy (13.8% vs. 5.5%, P=0.01), owing, in the first 30 days, to the occurrence of more ischemic events in the TAVR group (6.7% vs. 1.7%, P=0.02) and, beyond 30 days, to the occurrence of more hemorrhagic strokes in the TAVR group (2.2% vs. 0.6%, P=0.16). At 2 years, the rate of rehospitalization was 35.0% in the TAVR group and 72.5% in the standard-therapy group (P<0.001). TAVR, as compared with standard therapy, was also associated with improved functional status (P<0.001). The data suggest that the mortality benefit after TAVR may be limited to patients who do not have extensive coexisting conditions. Echocardiographic analysis showed a sustained increase in aortic-valve area and a decrease in aortic-valve gradient, with no worsening of paravalvular aortic regurgitation. Among appropriately selected patients with severe aortic stenosis who were not suitable candidates for surgery, TAVR reduced the rates of death and hospitalization, with a decrease in symptoms and an improvement in valve hemodynamics that were sustained at 2 years of

  20. Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm rupture potential

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess rupture risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at rupture was 5.6 ± 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce rupture was 579.4 ± 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of rupture, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ≥100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience rupture than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the “future” onset of yielding and rupture in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA rupture. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500

  1. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially <1%. The incidence of acute aneurysm formation was 0% to 13% after angioplasty, 0% to 5% after bare metal stent placement, and <1% after covered stent placement. The reported incidence and natural history of both acute and new AWI during follow-up after endovascular therapy for CoA varies considerably, likely secondary to ascertainment and reporting biases and inconsistent definitions. Although important AWI after endovascular treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA.

  2. Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Won

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms are characterized by structural deterioration of the vascular wall leading to progressive dilatation and, potentially, rupture of the aorta. While aortic aneurysms often remain clinically silent, the morbidity and mortality associated with aneurysm expansion and rupture are considerable. Over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States are attributable to aortic aneurysm rupture with less than 1 in 3 persons with aortic aneurysm rupture surviving to surgical intervention. Environmental and epidemiologic risk factors including smoking, male gender, hypertension, older age, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and family history are highly associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms, while heritable genetic mutations are commonly associated with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Similar to other forms of cardiovascular disease, family history, genetic variation, and heritable mutations modify the risk of aortic aneurysm formation and provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of human aortic aneurysms. This review will examine the relationship between heritable genetic and epigenetic influences on thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation and rupture. PMID:28116311

  3. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM) post aortic valve replacement (AVR) is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR) and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI). PMID:28028424

  4. Notch-dependent EMT is attenuated in patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Kostina, Aleksandra S; Uspensky, Vladimir Е; Irtyuga, Olga B; Ignatieva, Elena V; Freylikhman, Olga; Gavriliuk, Natalia D; Moiseeva, Olga M; Zhuk, Sergey; Tomilin, Alexey; Kostareva, Аnna А; Malashicheva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart malformation and the reasons for the aortopathies associated with bicuspid aortic valve remain unclear. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with bicuspid aortic valve and have been found in individuals with various left ventricular outflow tract abnormalities. Notch is a key signaling during cardiac valve formation that promotes the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We address the role of Notch signaling in human aortic endothelial cells from patients with bicuspid aortic valve and aortic aneurysm. Aortic endothelial cells were isolated from tissue fragments of bicuspid aortic valve-associated thoracic aortic aneurysm patients and from healthy donors. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition was induced by activation of Notch signaling. Effectiveness of the transition was estimated by loss of endothelial and gain of mesenchymal markers by immunocytochemistry and qPCR. We show that aortic endothelial cells from the patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve have down regulated Notch signaling and fail to activate Notch-dependent endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in response to its stimulation by different Notch ligands. Our findings support the idea that bicuspid aortic valve and associated aortic aneurysm is associated with dysregulation of the entire Notch signaling pathway independently on the specific gene mutation.

  5. Dietary flavonoid quercetin stimulates vasorelaxation in aortic vessels.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Nicholas K H; White, C Roger; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Zhou, Fen; Constance, Chad; Inoue, Takafumi; Patel, Rakesh P; Parks, Dale A

    2010-08-01

    Considerable epidemiological evidence indicates that dietary consumption of moderate levels of polyphenols decreases both the incidence of cardiovascular disease and the mortality associated with myocardial infarction. Molecular mechanisms of this cardiovascular protection remain uncertain but can involve changes in rates of nitric oxide (NO) generation by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). We examined the vascular responses to quercetin using a combination of biochemical and vessel function criteria. Quercetin treatment for 30min enhanced relaxation of rat aortic ring segments. Moreover, the addition of L-NAME (100muM) or charybdotoxin (ChTx) blocked quercetin-mediated vasorelaxation thus demonstrating the effect was partially dependent on NOS and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Additionally, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) treated with quercetin showed a rapid increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations as well as a dose- and time-dependent stimulation of eNOS phosphorylation with a concomitant increase in NO production. These results demonstrate that quercetin-mediated stimulation of eNOS phosphorylation increases NO bioavailability in endothelial cells and can thus play a role in the vascular protective effects associated with improved endothelial cell function.

  6. DIETARY FLAVONOID QUERCETIN STIMULATES VASORELAXATION IN AORTIC VESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; White, C. Roger; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Zhou, Fen; Constance, Chad; Inoue, Takafumi; Patel, Rakesh P.; Parks, Dale A.

    2010-01-01

    Considerable epidemiological evidence indicates that dietary consumption of moderate levels of polyphenols decreases both the incidence of cardiovascular disease and the mortality associated with myocardial infarction. Molecular mechanisms of this cardiovascular protection remain uncertain but can involve changes in rates of nitric oxide (NO) generation by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). We examined the vascular responses to quercetin using a combination of biochemical and vessel function criteria. Quercetin treatment for 30 min enhanced relaxation of rat aortic ring segments. Moreover, the addition of L-NAME (100 μM) or charybdotoxin (ChTx) blocked quercetin-mediated vasorelaxation thus demonstrating the effect was partially dependent on NOS and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Additionally, bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) treated with quercetin showed a rapid increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations as well as a dose- and time-dependent stimulation of eNOS phosphorylation with a concomitant increase in NO production. These results demonstrate that quercetin-mediated stimulation of eNOS phosphorylation increases NO bioavailability in endothelial cells and can thus play a role in the vascular protective effects associated with improved endothelial cell function. PMID:20423726

  7. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  8. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  9. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  10. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  11. Bovine milk exosome proteome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin and are found in blood, urine, amniotic fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, as well as human and bovine milk. Exosomes are extracellular organelles important in intracellular communication/signaling, immune function, and biomarkers ...

  12. Does altered aortic flow in marfan syndrome relate to aortic root dilatation?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hung‐Hsuan; Chiu, Hsin‐Hui; Tseng, Wen‐Yih Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine possible hemodynamic alterations in adolescent to adult Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients with aortic root dilatation. Materials and Methods Four‐dimensional flow MRI was performed in 20 MFS patients and 12 age‐matched normal subjects with a 3T system. The cross‐sectional areas of 10 planes along the aorta were segmented for calculating the axial and circumferential wall shear stress (WSSaxial, WSScirc), oscillatory shear index (OSIaxial, OSIcirc), and the nonroundness (NR), presenting the asymmetry of segmental WSS. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to present the correlations between the quantified indices and the body surface area (BSA), aortic root diameter (ARD), and Z score of the ARD. P < 0.05 indicated statistical significance. Results Patients exhibited lower WSSaxial in the aortic root and the WSScirc in the arch (P < 0.05–0.001). MFS patients exhibited higher OSIaxial and OSIcirc in the sinotubular junction and arch, but lower OSIcirc in the descending aorta (all P < 0.05). The NR values were lower in patients (P < 0.05). The WSSaxial or WSScirc exhibited moderate to strong correlations with BSA, ARD, or Z score (R2 = 0.50–0.72) in MFS patients. Conclusion The significant differences in the quantified indices, which were associated with BSA, ARD, or Z score, in MFS were opposite to previous reports for younger MFS patients, indicating that altered flows in MFS patients may depend on the disease progress. The possible time dependency of hemodynamic alterations in MFS patients strongly suggests that longitudinal follow‐up of 4D Flow is needed to comprehend disease progress. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:500–508. PMID:26854646

  13. Prognostic significance of mild aortic regurgitation in predicting mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon M; Tuzcu, E Murat; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Popovic, Zoran; Mick, Stephanie; Roselli, Eric E; Gul, Sajjad; Devgun, Jasneet; Mistry, Sohi; Jaber, Wael A; Svensson, Lars G; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-09-01

    Moderate to severe aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with worse outcomes. The impact of mild aortic regurgitation has been less clear, possibly because of the broad categories that have been used in clinical trials, but holds increasing importance in the study of next-generation devices in low- and intermediate-risk cohorts. A more granular scheme, which is common in clinical practice and proposed for future trials, may add prognostic value. We evaluated all patients undergoing transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement at the Cleveland Clinic from 2006 to 2012. The degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement was reported from the echocardiography database based on a clinical, transthoracic echocardiogram performed within 30 days of the procedure. Aortic regurgitation was finely discriminated on the basis of a multiwindow, multiparametric, integrative approach using our usual clinical scale: none, trivial to 1+, 1+, 1 to 2+, 2+, 2 to 3+, 3+, 3 to 4+, or 4+. There were 237 patients included in the analysis. By controlling for age, gender, Society of Thoracic Surgeons score, baseline ejection fraction, and aortic regurgitation before transcatheter aortic valve replacement, there was a significant increase in mortality for each half grade of aortic regurgitation compared with the complete absence of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The unit hazard ratio for each 1+ increase in aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement was 2.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.48-3.43; P < .001) considering aortic regurgitation as a continuous variable. Other clinical variables did not significantly affect mortality. Even mild aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with worse long-term mortality. There may be prognostic value in reporting milder categories of aortic regurgitation with more granular

  14. Visceral Infarction Following Aortic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Willard C.; Nabseth, Donald C.

    1974-01-01

    An experience with aortic surgery is reported which reveals that visceral ischemia is more frequent than expected and significantly contributes to operative mortality. Two of five deaths among 84 patients who had aorto-iliac occlusive disease and four of 40 deaths among 103 aneurysmectomies (both ruptured and elective) were related to visceral ischemia. A review of the literature reveals 99 cases of colonic ischemia in more than 6,100 cases of aortic surgery, an incidence of 1.5%. Only 10 cases of small bowel ischemia were recorded. The present experience with 9 cases of colon ischemia and one of small bowel ischemia is presented particularly with reference to pathophysiology and prevention. It is concluded that patients should be identified by appropriate angiography if considered a risk for visceral infarction, and, if present, visceral arterial reconstruction should be performed in addition to aortic reconstructive surgery. Colon infarction following aortic aneurysmal surgery is directly related to ligation of a patent IMA. Thus re-implantation of the patent IMA should be considered. ImagesFig. 1a. PMID:4277757

  15. Bovine colostrum: an emerging nutraceutical.

    PubMed

    Bagwe, Siddhi; Tharappel, Leo J P; Kaur, Ginpreet; Buttar, Harpal S

    2015-09-01

    Nutraceutical, a term combining the words "nutrition" and "pharmaceuticals", is a food or food product that provides health benefits as an adjuvant or alternative therapy, including the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases in children and adults. There is emerging evidence that bovine colostrum (BC) may be one of the promising nutraceuticals which can prevent or mitigate various diseases in newborns and adults. Immunity-related disorders are one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. BC is rich in immunity, growth and antimicrobial factors, which promote tissue growth and the maturation of digestive tract and immune function in neonatal animals and humans. The immunoglobulins and lactoferrin present in colostrum are known to build natural immunity in newborns which helps to reduce the mortality rate in this population. Also, the side-effect profile of colostrum proteins and possible lactose intolerance is relatively less in comparison with milk. In general, BC is considered safe and well tolerated. Since colostrum has several important nutritional constituents, well-designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with colostrum products should be conducted to widen its therapeutic use. The objectives of this review are to create awareness about the nutraceutical properties of colostrum and to discuss the various ongoing alternative treatments of colostrum and its active ingredients as well as to address colostrum's future nutraceutical and therapeutic implications in humans.

  16. Critical aortic stenosis and acute ascending aortic penetrating ulcer managed utilizing transapical TAVR and TEVAR.

    PubMed

    Allen, Keith B; Davis, J Russell; Cohen, David J

    2015-10-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of acute ascending aortic pathology is feasible; however, the unique features of this aortic segment in addition to access challenges restricts its use to a select, high-risk subset of patients. With the advent of TAVR, large device delivery using transapical access has become a well-defined technique. We report a patient with critical aortic stenosis and an acute ascending aortic penetrating ulcer with tamponade managed successfully utilizing transapical TAVR and TEVAR. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a hybrid single-stage TAVR and ascending aortic TEVAR using transapical access.

  17. Apicoaortic Valve Conduit for a Patient with Aortic Valve Stenosis and Patent Coronary Bypass Grafts Using Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Anthony G.; Relle, Margaret A.; Lombardi, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: In adults over 65 years of age, aortic valve stenosis has been found to be present in 2–9% within this group. Furthermore, aortic valve replacements in patients whom have had a previous coronary artery bypass grafting surgery have a mortality rate as high as 18%. A non-conventional effective surgical approach of bypassing the aortic valve by inserting an apicoaortic valve conduit (AVC) connecting the left ventricular apex to the descending thoracic aorta has been previously documented. We describe the case of a successful implantation of an AVC in a 64-year-old Caucasian male using cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:26834287

  18. Apicoaortic Valve Conduit for a Patient with Aortic Valve Stenosis and Patent Coronary Bypass Grafts Using Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Anthony G; Relle, Margaret A; Lombardi, Sarah A

    2015-12-01

    In adults over 65 years of age, aortic valve stenosis has been found to be present in 2-9% within this group. Furthermore, aortic valve replacements in patients whom have had a previous coronary artery bypass grafting surgery have a mortality rate as high as 18%. A non-conventional effective surgical approach of bypassing the aortic valve by inserting an apicoaortic valve conduit (AVC) connecting the left ventricular apex to the descending thoracic aorta has been previously documented. We describe the case of a successful implantation of an AVC in a 64-year-old Caucasian male using cardiopulmonary bypass.

  19. Aortic biomechanics by magnetic resonance: early markers of aortic disease in Marfan syndrome regardless of aortic dilatation?

    PubMed

    Teixido-Tura, Gisela; Redheuil, Alban; Rodríguez-Palomares, Jose; Gutiérrez, Laura; Sánchez, Violeta; Forteza, Alberto; Lima, Joao A C; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Artur

    2014-01-15

    Previous studies demonstrated the usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of aortic biomechanics in Marfan patients with aortic dilatation. However, these parameters have not been well studied in earlier stages of aortic disease. The present work aimed to study aortic biomechanics: aortic distensibility (AD) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), by MRI in Marfan patients without advanced aortic disease. Eighty consecutive Marfan patients were compared with 36 age- and sex-matched controls. MRI images at the level of ascending, descending and abdominal aorta were used to determine AD and PWV. Marfan patients (27 men; age: 32.0 ± 10.5 years; mean aortic root diameter: 37.2 ± 4.6mm) had lower AD at all levels (ascending 2.6 ± 2.1 vs. 6.2 ± 3.7 mm Hg(-1)·10(-3), p<0.001; descending 3.1 ± 2.0 vs. 8.3 ± 4.2, p<0.001; and abdominal 4.5 ± 2.2 vs. 14.0 ± 5.2, p<0.001), higher aortic arch PWV (8.1 ± 6.5 vs. 4.3 ± 1.8m/s, p<0.01) and ascending-to-abdominal PWV (6.1 ± 3.0 vs. 4.7 ± 1.5m/s, p<0.01) compared with controls. Thirty-five Marfan patients had a non-dilated aortic root (mean aortic root diameter: 34.5 ± 3.8 mm). In multivariable analyses, after adjustment for age, pulse pressure and aortic dimensions, AD remained lower and PWV higher in Marfan patients; even Marfan patients with non-dilated aortic root showed impaired aortic biomechanics compared with controls. Z-score for ascending AD<-3.5 distinguished Marfan patients from controls with 82.5% sensitivity and 86.1% specificity. Aortic biomechanics by MRI were abnormal in the entire aorta in Marfan patients. Moreover, Marfan patients without dilated aortic root showed clear impairment of aortic biomechanics, which suggests that they may be used as early markers of aortic involvement in these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased expression of fibulin-4 in aortic wall of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Huawei, P; Qian, C; Chuan, T; Lei, L; Laing, W; Wenlong, X; Wenzhi, L

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we will examine the expression of Fibulin-4 in aortic wall to find out its role in aortic dissection development. The samples of aortic wall were obtained from 10 patients operated for acute ascending aortic dissection and five patients for chronic ascending aortic dissection. Another 15 pieces of samples from patients who had coronary artery bypass were as controls. The aortic samples were stained with aldehyde magenta dyeing to evaluate the arrangement of elastic fibers. The Fibulin-4 protein and mRNA expression were both determined by Western blot and realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, both in acute and chronic ascending aortic dissection, elastic fiber fragments increased and the expression of fibulin-4 protein significantly decreased (P= 0.045 < 0.05). The level of fibulin-4 mRNA decreased in acute ascending aortic dissection (P= 0.034 < 0.05), while it increased in chronic ascending aortic dissection (P=0.004 < 0.05). The increased amounts of elastic fiber fragments were negatively correlated with the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA in acute ascending aortic dissection. In conclusion, in aortic wall of ascending aortic dissection, the expression of fibulin-4 protein decreased and the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA was abnormal. Fibulin-4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection.

  1. One stage surgical treatment of aortic valve disease and aortic coarctation with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zipu; Wu, Shengjun; Li, Chengchen; Zou, Yu; Ma, Liang

    2015-11-10

    To validate ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting treatment for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease. The three patients in whom a descending atypical aortic coarctation was associated with an aortic valve disease were treated with one stage surgical treatment with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement in our heart center. Operative technique consisted of performing ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting through diaphragm muscle and implementing aortic valve replacement. The mean time for extracorporeal circulation and occluding clamp of aorta was recorded. Blood pressure data for pre- and post-operation was measured in the limbs. Computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms of pre- and post-operation were applied for detection of aortic stenosis. The other adverse events were noticed in outpatient service during a follow-up period. The mean extracorporeal circulation time was 54 ± 11 min. The mean time for occluding clamp of aorta was 34 ± 6 min. An arterial pressure gradient was totally corrected after surgical treatment. Post-operation computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms showed the grafts to be open with a fluent flow. The patients had no gastrointestinal tract complications. No adverse event was noticed during a follow-up period in outpatient service. Treatment of ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass is advisable for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease.

  2. Hedgehog signaling pathway in small bovine ovarian follicles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The hedgehog signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and turnover in a variety of mammalian embryonic and adult tissues including bovine ovarian granulosa and theca cells. Binding of hedgehog to the patch receptor derepresses smoothened resulting in t...

  3. Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies, France, 2001-2007.

    PubMed

    Biacabe, Anne-Gaëlle; Morignat, Eric; Vulin, Johann; Calavas, Didier; Baron, Thierry G M

    2008-02-01

    In France, through exhaustive active surveillance, approximately 17.1 million adult cattle were tested for bovine spongiform encephalopathy from July 2001 through July 2007; approximately 3.6 million were >8 years of age. Our retrospective Western blot study of all 645 confirmed cases found that 7 were H-type and 6 were L-type.

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2010-12-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening. The acceptance rate was 77%, and 95% accept control scans. Furthermore, persons at the highest risk of having an AAA attend screening more frequently. We found that 97% of the interval cases developed from aortas that initially measured 2.5-2.9 cm - i.e. approx. only 5% attenders need re-screening at 5-year intervals. Two large RCTs have given clear indications of operation. Survivors of surgery enjoy the same quality of life as the background population, and only 2-5% of patients refuse an offer of surgery. Early detection seems relevant since the cardiovascular mortality is more than 4 times higher in AAA patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could inhibit further AAA progression. All 4 existing RCTs point in the same direction, viz. in favour of screening of men aged 65 and above. We found that screening significantly reduced AAA-related mortality by 67% within the first five years (NNT = 352). Restriction of screening to men with previous cardiovascular or pulmonary hospital discharge diagnoses would request only 27% of the relevant male population study to be invited, but would only have prevented 46.7% of the

  5. Moderate aortic enlargement and bicuspid aortic valve are associated with aortic dissection in Turner syndrome: report of the international turner syndrome aortic dissection registry.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Misty; Airhart, Nathan; Lopez, Leo; Silberbach, Michael

    2012-10-30

    Girls and women with Turner syndrome are at risk for aortic dissection and rupture. However, the size of the aorta and the clinical characteristics among those with Turner syndrome and dissection have received little attention. We obtained medical records from 20 individuals who voluntarily participated in the International Turner Syndrome Aortic Dissection Registry. Type A dissections occurred in 17 of 20 (85%) cases, and type B occurred in 3 cases of which 1 occurred after coarctation stent placement. Of those with spontaneous aortic dissections, 18 of 19 (95%) had an associated cardiac malformation that included a bicuspid aortic valve. In 1 individual there was no predisposing finding other than the presence of Turner syndrome. Associated pregnancy was documented in 1 of 19 (5%). More than half (13/19, 68%) came to medical attention >24 hours after the onset of symptoms. For those with type A dissections, the mean ascending aortic size index was 2.7±0.6 cm/m(2) (n=9). Aortic dissection in Turner syndrome occurs in young individuals at smaller aortic diameters than in the general population or other forms of genetically triggered aortopathy. The absence of aortic valve or other cardiac malformations appears to markedly reduce the risk of aortic dissection However, aortic dissection can occur in Turner syndrome without cardiac malformations or hypertension. Individuals with Turner syndrome who are >18 years of age with an ascending aortic size index >2.5 cm/m(2) should be considered for an aortic operation to prevent aortic dissection.

  6. Endothelial nitric oxide signaling regulates Notch1 in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Authors: Kevin; Hans, Chetan P.; Zhao, Ning; Koenig, Sara N.; Huang, Nianyuan; Guggilam, Anuradha; LaHaye, Stephanie; Tao, Ge; Lucchesi, Pamela A.; Lincoln, Joy; Lilly, Brenda; Garg, Vidu

    2013-01-01

    The mature aortic valve is composed of a structured trilaminar extracellular matrix that is interspersed with aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) and covered by endothelium. Dysfunction of the valvular endothelium initiates calcification of neighboring AVICs leading to calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The molecular mechanism by which endothelial cells communicate with AVICs and cause disease is not well understood. Using a co-culture assay, we show that endothelial cells secrete a signal to inhibit calcification of AVICs. Gain or loss of nitric oxide (NO) prevents or accelerates calcification of AVICs, respectively, suggesting that the endothelial cell-derived signal is NO. Overexpression of Notch1, which is genetically linked to human CAVD, retards the calcification of AVICs that occurs with NO inhibition. In AVICs, NO regulates the expression of Hey1, a downstream target of Notch1, and alters nuclear localization of Notch1 intracellular domain. Finally, Notch1 and NOS3 (endothelial NO synthase) display an in vivo genetic interaction critical for proper valve morphogenesis and the development of aortic valve disease. Our data suggests that endothelial cell-derived NO is a regulator of Notch1 signaling in AVICs in the development of the aortic valve and adult aortic valve disease. PMID:23583836

  7. New technique for single-staged repair of aortic coarctation and coexisting cardiac disorder.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Askin Ali; Guden, Mustafa; Onan, Burak; Tarakci, Sevim Indelen; Demir, Ali Soner; Sagbas, Ertan; Sarikaya, Tugay

    2011-01-01

    The management of adults with aortic coarctation and a coexisting cardiac disorder is still a surgical challenge. Single-staged procedures have lower postoperative morbidity and mortality rates than do 2-staged procedures. We present our experience with arch-to-descending aorta bypass grafting in combination with intracardiac or ascending aortic aneurysm repair.From October 2004 through April 2010, 5 patients (4 men, 1 woman; mean age, 45.8 ± 9.4 yr) underwent anatomic bypass grafting of the arch to the descending aorta through a median sternotomy and concomitant repair of an intracardiac disorder or an ascending aortic aneurysm. Operative indications included coarctation of the aorta in all cases, together with severe mitral insufficiency arising from damaged chordae tendineae in 2 patients, ascending aortic aneurysm with aortic regurgitation in 2 patients, and coronary artery disease in 1 patient. Data from early and midterm follow-up were reviewed.There was no early or late death. Follow-up was complete for all patients, and the mean follow-up period was 34.8 ± 18 months (range, 18 mo-5 yr). All grafts were patent. No late graft-related sequelae or reoperations were observed.For single-staged repair of aortic coarctation with a coexistent cardiac disorder, we propose arch-to-descending aorta bypass through a median sternotomy as an alternative for selected patients.

  8. Estimated Aortic Stiffness is Independently Associated with Cardiac Baroreflex Sensitivity in Humans: Role of Aging and Habitual Endurance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Gary L.; Harris, Stephen A.; Seals, Douglas R.; Casey, Darren P.; Barlow, Patrick B.; Stauss, Harald M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that differences in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) would be independently associated with aortic stiffness and augmentation index (AI), clinical biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, among young sedentary and middle-aged/older sedentary and endurance-trained adults. A total of 36 healthy middle-aged/older (age 55-76 years, n=22 sedentary; n=14 endurance-trained) and 5 young sedentary (age 18-31 years) adults were included in a cross-sectional study. A subset of the middle-aged/older sedentary adults (n=12) completed an 8-week aerobic exercise intervention. Invasive brachial artery blood pressure waveforms were used to compute spontaneous cardiac BRS (via sequence technique) and estimated aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) and AI (AI, via brachial-aortic transfer function and wave separation analysis). In the cross-sectional study, cardiac BRS was 71% lower in older compared with young sedentary adults (P<0.05), but only 40% lower in older adults who performed habitual endurance exercise (P=0.03). In a regression model that included age, sex, resting heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), body mass index and maximal exercise oxygen uptake, estimated aortic PWV (β±SE = −5.76 ± 2.01, P=0.01) was the strongest predictor of BRS (Model R2=0.59, P<0.001). The 8 week exercise intervention improved BRS by 38% (P=0.04) and this change in BRS was associated with improved aortic PWV (r=−0.65, P=0.044, adjusted for changes in MAP). Age- and endurance exercise-related differences in cardiac BRS are independently associated with corresponding alterations in aortic PWV among healthy adults, consistent with a mechanistic link between variations in the sensitivity of the baroreflex and aortic stiffness with age and exercise. PMID:26911535

  9. Transapical implantation of a novel self-expanding sutureless aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Mario; Suri, Rakesh M; Kraehenbuehl, Eva S; Hellige, Gerrit; Wenaweser, Peter; Zobrist, Claudia; Schaff, Harzell V; Carrel, Thierry P

    2010-03-01

    To date, transapical aortic valve implantation has required a balloon-expandable stented valve prosthesis. More recently, a novel self-expanding sutureless stented bovine pericardial prosthesis has been developed which allows rapid aortic valve replacement via an open transaortic approach in humans. The aim of this animal study was to develop a reliable protocol to facilitate the transapical implantation of this self-expanding valve in a porcine model. Off-pump transapical aortic valve implantation was performed through a left mini-thoracotomy using a bovine pericardial valve mounted on a self-expandable nitinol stent of size 21 mm and 23 mm in 11 pigs (average weight 60 kg). The crimped valve was introduced through the left ventricular apex using a flexible and steerable delivery sheath, using a three-step technique. Biplane fluoroscopy and transesophageal echocardiography were simultaneously used for guidance. Successful adjustment of alignment along three axes prior to deployment of the valve was accomplished in each animal. Deployments were performed during a period of rapid pacing. All valves were successfully deployed and functioned normally following transapical removal of the delivery system. Paravalvular leak was documented in one case (9.1%) due to prosthetic misalignment. There was no evidence of valve migration. Correct anatomic seating was confirmed during post-procedure necropsy. Successful transapical implantation of a novel self-expandable bovine pericardial valve was accomplished in 11 animals, without cardiopulmonary bypass. A flexible, steerable delivery system with a three-step release mechanism allowed precise positioning of the valve with a low rate of paravalvular leakage, and excellent device stability.

  10. [Surgical technique of aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Fujiwara, K; Furukawa, H; Tsushima, Y; Yoshitaka, H; Kuinose, M; Minami, H; Ishida, A; Tamura, K; Totsugawa, T; Kanemitsu, H; Ozawa, M

    2006-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that aortic valve replacement in elderly patients over 65 years with atherosclerotic aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus is possible by using a small sized bioprosthesis (Carpentier-Edwards pericardial valve). Here we present out surgical technique. Firstly, the native calcified aortic valve was removed completely to gain total exposure of the surrounding aortic root and sinus of Valsalva like Bentall procedure. Secondly, a small sized bioprosthesis was implanted with intermittent noneverting mattress 2-0 sutures with spaghetti and small polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt. Aortic annulus is the dilated by inserting Hegar dilator sizing from 25 to 27 mm. Therefore, aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in intra- or supra-annular position should be easily accomplished. Good surgical results and hemodynamic state were achieved in 25 consecutive cases using this technique.

  11. Hypertensive Emergency in Aortic Dissection and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm—A Review of Management

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prateek K.; Gupta, Himani; Khoynezhad, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few decades, treatment for aortic dissection and thoracic aortic aneurysms has evolved significantly with improvement in outcomes. Treatment paradigms include medical, endovascular and surgical options. As aortic dissection presents as a hypertensive emergency, diligent control of BP is of utmost importance in order to reduce the progression of dissection with possible aortic branch malperfusion. Treatment should begin on arrival to the emergency department and continues in the intensive care unit, endovascular suite or the operating room. Novel antihypertensive medications with improved pharmacological profile and improved surgical techniques, have improved the prognosis of patients with aortic aneurysm and/or aortic dissection. Nevertheless, morbidity and mortality remain high and hypertensive emergency poses a significant challenge in aortic dissection and thoracic aortic aneurysms. PMID:27713224

  12. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  13. The Relationship between Tension and Length of the Aortic Adventitia Resected from the Aortic Wall of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Mitsuru; Teranishi, Hiroo; Kudo, Masahumi; Matsuura, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To our knowledge, no previous study has described the measurement of the tensile strength of the human aortic adventitia. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the tension and length of the aortic adventitia resected from the aortic wall of patients with acute aortic dissection. Methods: We obtained rectangular specimens from the aortic adventitia that was resected in patients with acute aortic dissection during surgery. The specimens were placed on a tension meter (Digital Force Gauge FGS-10, SHIMPO, Kyoto, Japan) within 15 min after resection and stretched until they were pulled apart, and the tension and length were recorded. Results: We obtained 18 specimens during surgery from 11 cases of acute aortic dissection. When the specimen was being pulled apart, the mean tension recorded was 10.2 ± 4.9 N/cm specimen width, whereas the mean elongated length recorded was 4.2 ± 1.1 mm/cm specimen length. Discussion: We determined that the aortic adventitia is elastic and expandable up to 140% of its original length. This indicates that dilation of the aorta to >4.2 cm in diameter may result in a rupture if the original aortic diameter prior to dissection was 3 cm. (*English translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2013; 53: 77-81) PMID:25298826

  14. Selenium in bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Niemi, S M; Kuzan, F B; Senger, P L

    1981-05-01

    This study investigated the association of selenium with ejaculated bovine spermatozoa. Over 75% of the radioactive spermatozoa. Over 75% of the radioactive selenium-75 was released after 30 min of incubation in 2 X 10(-3) dithiothreitol. Of the selenium-75 released by dithiothreitol, 85% was associated with spermatozoal protein. Protein containing selenium-75 was found predominantly in a single band after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molecular weight was approximately 21,500 daltons.

  15. Severe Aortic Stenosis Associated with Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve in a Middle Aged Male

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kim, Song Soo; Sun, Byung Joo; Jin, Sun Ah; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Siwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Seong, In-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is an extremely rare form of congenital aortic valvular abnormality. Although UAV shows similar clinical characteristics to bicuspid aortic valve, the clinical symptoms develop at earlier age and progress at a faster pace in UAV. In this report, we are presenting a 42-year-old male with severe aortic stenosis associated with unicommissural UAV. The patients underwent a successful Bentall operation. PMID:27721957

  16. Aortic Stenosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jessica; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Giri, Jay; Goldberg, Sheldon

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of aortic stenosis increases with age, affecting up to 10% of the population by the eighth decade. Once symptoms develop, aortic stenosis is rapidly fatal. Proper management requires an understanding of the physiology and criteria used to define disease severity. There is no effective pharmacologic treatment. Surgical aortic valve replacement has been the gold standard treatment for decades. However, over the last 10 years transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as an attractive, less-invasive option for appropriately selected patients. Refinements in valve design and delivery systems have led to widespread use of this breakthrough technology in selected patients. We review the pathophysiology, criteria for valve replacement, and the results of the trials comparing transcatheter aortic valve replacement with surgical aortic valve replacement.

  17. Computed Tomography of the Normal Bovine Tarsus.

    PubMed

    Hagag, U; Tawfiek, M; Brehm, W; Gerlach, K

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide a detailed multiplanar computed tomographic (CT) anatomic reference for the bovine tarsus. The tarsal regions from twelve healthy adult cow cadavers were scanned in both soft and bone windows via a 16-slice multidetector CT scanner. Tarsi were frozen at -20(o) C and sectioned to 10-mm-thick slices in transverse, dorsal and sagittal planes respecting the imaging protocol. The frozen sections were cleaned and then photographed. Anatomic structures were identified, labelled and compared with the corresponding CT images. The sagittal plane was indispensable for evaluation of bone contours, the dorsal plane was valuable in examination of the collateral ligaments, and both were beneficial for assessment of the tarsal joint articulations. CT images allowed excellent delineation between the cortex and medulla of bones, and the trabecular structure was clearly depicted. The tarsal soft tissues showed variable shades of grey, and the synovial fluid was the lowest attenuated structure. This study provided full assessment of the clinically relevant anatomic structures of the bovine tarsal joint. This technique may be of value when results from other diagnostic imaging techniques are indecisive. Images presented in this study should serve as a basic CT reference and assist in the interpretation of various bovine tarsal pathology.

  18. Surgery for congenital aortic stenosis in children with left ventricular noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Miao, Qi; Liu, Xingrong; Li, Xiaofeng

    2013-07-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is an uncommon genetic disorder of endocardial morphogenesis, which carries a high mortality from heart failure or sudden cardiac death. This condition is often first diagnosed in adults, but it has also been described in children with other cardiac anomalies. We discuss the management of a 10-year-old female with congenital aortic stenosis associated with LVNC.

  19. Aortic root vasculitis associated with Cogan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gasparovic, Hrvoje; Djuric, Zeljko; Bosnic, Dubravka; Petricevic, Mate; Brida, Margita; Dotlic, Snjezana; Biocina, Bojan

    2011-07-01

    Cogan's syndrome is characterized by nonsyphilitic interstitial keratitis and an audiovestibular disorder resembling Meniere disease. We report a patient with progressive congestive heart failure due to massive aortic and mitral insufficiency coupled with aortitis leading to an ascending aortic aneurysm. The patient underwent successful aortic root replacement and mitral valve repair. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Traumatic aortic incompetence following road traffic accident

    PubMed Central

    Irving, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    This case report describes the presentation and treatment of a case of aortic incompetence, resulting from a road traffic accident. The relevant literature is briefly reviewed. Aortic incompetence due to trauma has been described following non-penetrating chest injuries, such as kicks from horses (Barie, 1881), falls from heights and crushing accidents (Kissane, Koons and Clark, 1948; Levine, Roberts and Morrow, 1962). Despite the frequency of road traffic accidents, there have been no recent reports of traumatic aortic valve damage. PMID:4467876

  1. Association Between Gout and Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kevin; Yokose, Chio; Tenner, Craig; Oh, Cheongeun; Donnino, Robert; Choy-Shan, Alana; Pike, Virginia C; Shah, Binita D; Lorin, Jeffrey D; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Sedlis, Steven P; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-02-01

    An independent association between gout and coronary artery disease is well established. The relationship between gout and valvular heart disease, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the association between gout and aortic stenosis. We performed a retrospective case-control study. Aortic stenosis cases were identified through a review of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) reports. Age-matched controls were randomly selected from patients who had undergone TTE and did not have aortic stenosis. Charts were reviewed to identify diagnoses of gout and the earliest dates of gout and aortic stenosis diagnosis. Among 1085 patients who underwent TTE, 112 aortic stenosis cases were identified. Cases and nonaortic stenosis controls (n = 224) were similar in age and cardiovascular comorbidities. A history of gout was present in 21.4% (n = 24) of aortic stenosis subjects compared with 12.5% (n = 28) of controls (unadjusted odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.48, P = .038). Multivariate analysis retained significance only for gout (adjusted odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.00-4.32, P = .049). Among subjects with aortic stenosis and gout, gout diagnosis preceded aortic stenosis diagnosis by 5.8 ± 1.6 years. The age at onset of aortic stenosis was similar among patients with and without gout (78.7 ± 1.8 vs 75.8 ± 1.0 years old, P = .16). Aortic stenosis patients had a markedly higher prevalence of precedent gout than age-matched controls. Whether gout is a marker of, or a risk factor for, the development of aortic stenosis remains uncertain. Studies investigating the potential role of gout in the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis are warranted and could have therapeutic implications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for bicuspid aortic stenosis 13years post heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maureen B; Desai, Nimesh; Brozena, Susan; Herrmann, Howard C

    2016-12-16

    Despite the widespread use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for moderate and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, it is utilized less frequently in patients with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV). Orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) donors tend to be younger and may have undiagnosed BAV. We present a case of successful TAVR in a patient with BAV thirteen years after OHT.

  3. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-07

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm(2)) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS.

  4. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques.

  5. Elastin Haploinsufficiency Results in Progressive Aortic Valve Malformation and Latent Valve Disease in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Robert B.; Adelman-Brown, Jennifer; Witt, Sandra; Krishnamurthy, Varun K.; Osinska, Hanna; Sakthivel, Bhuvaneswari; James, Jeanne F.; Li, Dean Y.; Narmoneva, Daria A.; Mecham, Robert P.; Benson, D. Woodrow

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Elastin is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that is highly organized in heart valves and arteries. Because elastic fiber abnormalities are a central feature of degenerative valve disease, we hypothesized that elastin deficient mice would manifest viable heart valve disease. Objective To analyze valve structure and function in elastin insufficient mice (Eln+/−) at neonatal, juvenile, adult and aged adult stages. Methods and Results At birth, histochemical analysis demonstrated normal ECM organization in contrast to the aorta. However, at juvenile and adult stages thin elongated valves with ECM disorganization, including elastin fragment infiltration of the annulus, were observed. The valve phenotype worsened by the aged adult stage with overgrowth and proteoglycan replacement of the valve annulus. The progressive nature of elastin insufficiency was also shown by aortic mechanical testing that demonstrated incrementally abnormal tensile stiffness from juvenile to adult stages. Eln+/− mice demonstrated increased valve interstitial cell (VIC) proliferation at the neonatal stage and varied VIC activation at early and late stages. Gene expression profile analysis identified decreased TGF-β mediated fibrogenesis signaling in Eln+/− valve tissue. Juvenile Eln+/− mice demonstrated normal valve function, but progressive valve disease (predominantly aortic regurgitation) was identified in 17% of adult and 70% of aged adult Eln+/− mice by echocardiography. Conclusions These results identify the Eln+/− mouse as a model of latent aortic valve disease and establish a role for elastin dysregulation in valve pathogenesis. PMID:20576933

  6. [Surgery of aortic dissection: for which patient?].

    PubMed

    Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Abouliatim, Issam; Larralde, Antoine; Beneux, Xavier; Heautot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    In the acute stage (less than two weeks), surgery is indicated for Stanford type A aortic dissections. With respect to the initial work-up, surgery consists in replacing the ascending aorta, sometimes the aortic arch (with supra aortic vessels reimplantation), and aortic valve replacement (valve replacement, Bentall valved tube or valve sparing Tyron David technique). Ischemic visceral complications must be searched for and treated by endovascular techniques or surgery. Aneurismal evolution of chronic dissections must be treated surgically. Replacement can encompass the entire aorta. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Aortic Aneurysm: Etiopathogenesis and Clinicopathologic Correlations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm (AA) is one of the life-threatening aortic diseases, leading to aortic rupture of any cause including atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic diseases. AA is diagnosed in a variable proportion of patients with dilated aorta by imaging modality. The etiopathogenesis of AA remains unclear in many aortic diseases. Furthermore, although it may be difficult to explain all phenotypes of patients even if genetic mutation could be identified in some proteins such as smooth muscle cell α-actin (ACTA2), myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11) or SMAD3, individualized consideration of these factors in each patient is essential on the basis of clinicopathological characteristics. PMID:27375798

  8. Bacillus licheniformis prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Santini, F; Borghetti, V; Amalfitano, G; Mazzucco, A

    1995-01-01

    A 73-year old man developed an acute prosthetic aortic valve dehiscence for which emergent operation was undertaken. The intraoperative evidence of an aortic annular disruption and of a subannular abscess led to the hypothesis that an endocarditis process was involved. The aortic valve was replaced with a stentless porcine bioprosthesis. Cultures taken intraoperatively from the aortic area had a pure growth of aerobic, spore-forming, gram-positive bacilli identified as Bacillus licheniformis. The patient responded to specific antibiotic therapy with no relapse at a 20-month follow-up. The potentiality of B. licheniformis as a pathogen should be reconsidered. PMID:8576381

  9. Hypoplasia of the aortic root 1

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Rowan; Cartmill, T.; Bernstein, L.

    1970-01-01

    We report a technique for the enlargement of a hypoplastic aortic root by an operation whereby the hypoplastic aortic root has been so enlarged by the insertion of a Dacron fabric gusset that it will accommodate a size 9A or larger Starr-Edwards prosthesis. Our experience in five patients is described. No matter what type of valve is used for replacement of a diseased aortic valve, and no matter what improved designs of valvular prosthesis are ultimately developed, it will be necessary (in the particular group described) to enlarge the aortic ring to accommodate a size which will function correctly without causing left ventricular outflow obstruction. Images PMID:5452289

  10. Cocking of a poppet-disc prosthesis in the aortic position. A cause of intermittent aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Hammer, W J; Hearne, M J; Roberts, W C

    1976-02-01

    Intermittent aortic regurgitation due to cocking is described for the first time after replacement of the aortic valve with a poppet-disc prosthesis. A combination of disc grooving and strut thrombus produced the cocking with resultant aortic regurgitation.

  11. Cardiac imaging in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  12. The effect of an increase in aortic pressure upon the inotropic state of eat and dog left ventricles

    PubMed Central

    Elzinga, G.; Noble, M. I. M.; Stubbs, J.

    1977-01-01

    1. The effect of increased aortic pressure on the inotropic state of the left ventricle was studied in isolated cat hearts, perfused with bovine red cells in Tyrode solution, ejecting into a hydraulic model with the same input impedance as that of the cat aorta. 2. Inotropic state was assessed at a controlled left ventricular end-diastolic pressure by interpolating single isovolumic beats by means of an occluder in the aortic cannula. 3. When such isovolumic beats during periods of raised aortic pressure were compared with those during control periods, the difference in peak isovolumic pressure ranged from -0·3 to +0·5 kPa indicating differences in inotropic state which were small and inconsistent in direction. 4. The maximum rate of rise of left ventricular pressure (dP/dtmax.) of ejecting beats was little affected by a rise of aortic pressure and the direction of changes was inconsistent. 5. The effect of increased aortic pressure was studied in intact dogs after cardiac denervation; left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was uncontrolled and therefore rose to a higher steady level. 6. No consistent change of dP/dtmax. was found during the period of increased aortic pressure. 7. All flow and pressure variables remained steady during the period of increased aortic pressure after the higher level of left ventricular end-diastolic pressure had been established. 8. These results demonstrate that neither the positive inotropic effect nor the negative inotropic effect of increased load dominates in these preparations. This may be the result of a balance between the two effects, or they may be of unimportant magnitude under physiological conditions. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:604450

  13. The concept of aortic replacement based on computational fluid dynamic analysis: patient-directed aortic replacement†

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Laurant; Poole, Robert J.; Warwick, Richard; Poullis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Aortic replacement is based on the aortic diameter in the absence of dissection or connective tissue diseases. Frequently, a number of different aortic-to-prosthetic anastomotic positions are possible depending on patient factors and surgeon preferences. High stress on residual aortic tissue may result in aneurysm formation or aneurysmal dilatation. Utilizing a computational fluid dynamic evaluation, we aimed to define possible optimal operative interventions with regard to the extent of aortic replacement. METHODS For proof of principle, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, using Fluent 6.2 (Ansys UK Ltd, Sheffield, UK), was performed on a simplified ascending arch and descending aortic geometry. Wall shear stress in three dimensions was assessed for the standard operations: ascending aortic replacement, arch replacement and proximal descending aortic replacement. RESULTS Hermiarch replacement is superior to isolated ascending aortic replacement with regard to residual stress analysis on tissues (up to a 10-fold reduction). Aortic arch replacement with island implantation of the supra-aortic vessels may potentially result in high stress on the residual aorta (10-fold increase). Aortic arch replacement with individual supra-aortic vessel implantation may result in areas of high stress (10-fold increase) on native vessels if an inadequate length of supra-aortic tissue is not resected, regardless of it being aneurysmal. CONCLUSIONS Computational fluid dynamic evaluation, which will have to be patient-specific, 3D anatomical and physiological, potentially has enormous implications for operative strategy in aortic replacement surgery. CFD analysis may direct the replacement of normal-diameter aortas in the future. PMID:23407695

  14. Increased aortic pulse wave velocity in obese children.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ataç; Ozçetin, Mustafa; Yerli, Yasemin; Damar, Ibrahim Halil; Kadı, Hasan; Koç, Fatih; Ceyhan, Köksal

    2011-10-01

    Obesity may start in childhood and obese children are more likely to grow up to be obese adults. Atherosclerosis is one of the most important complications of obesity. Pulse wave velocity (PWV), a noninvasive measure of arterial stiffness, is accepted to be an indicator of subclinical atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to determine PWV in obese children. The study included 30 obese (12 boys, 18 girls; mean age 13 ± 2 years) and 30 lean children (13 boys, 17 girls; mean age 12.5 ± 1.7 years). Weight and height were measured and obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) of greater than the 95th percentile for age. All the subjects underwent echocardiographic evaluation and blood samples were obtained. Pulse-wave velocity was calculated using the following equation: PWV (m/sec) = height-based aortic length (cm)/(100xtransit time [sec]). The latter was measured as the difference in the time of onset of two flows at the diaphragm and the aortic valve. Obese subjects had significantly higher blood pressure levels compared to the control group (p<0.001). The two groups were similar with respect to fasting glucose, hemoglobin, serum creatinine, and lipid levels. Among echocardiographic parameters, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, interventricular septum thickness, posterior wall thickness, left ventricular mass index, left atrium dimension, and aortic root dimension were significantly increased in obese subjects compared to controls (p<0.01). Obese children had significantly higher PWV values than the controls (4.0 ± 0.8 vs. 3.3 ± 0.7 m/sec, p<0.001). A positive significant correlation was found between PWV and BMI (r=0.391, p=0.002). Our findings show that aortic PWV is increased in obese children, suggesting that obesity may cause subclinical atherosclerosis even at early ages.

  15. [Emergent transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis in cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Pizzighini, S; Finet, G; Obadia, J-F; Revel, D; Bresson, D; Rioufol, G

    2015-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a therapeutic option for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and with cardiac symptoms. This procedure requires the preliminary evaluation by a "heart team" and presents some contraindications. We report the case of a 58-year-old man with severe bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and cardiogenic shock. In spite of contraindications and because of the failure of balloon aortic valvuloplasty, transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed in emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Fernández, M. Carmen; Soto-Navarrete, María Teresa; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Durán, Ana Carmen; Fernández, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40%) incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. A total of 51 adult (180–240 days old) and 56 old (300–440 days old) animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30), or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45) or BAV (n = 32). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta. PMID:27711171

  17. Identification of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR Assays in Aortic Tissue of Syrian Hamsters with Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Fernández, M Carmen; Soto-Navarrete, María Teresa; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Durán, Ana Carmen; Fernández, Borja

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital cardiac malformation in humans, and appears frequently associated with dilatation of the ascending aorta. This association is likely the result of a common aetiology. Currently, a Syrian hamster strain with a relatively high (∼40%) incidence of BAV constitutes the only spontaneous animal model of BAV disease. The characterization of molecular alterations in the aorta of hamsters with BAV may serve to identify pathophysiological mechanisms and molecular markers of disease in humans. In this report, we evaluate the expression of ten candidate reference genes in aortic tissue of hamsters in order to identify housekeeping genes for normalization using quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. A total of 51 adult (180-240 days old) and 56 old (300-440 days old) animals were used. They belonged to a control strain of hamsters with normal, tricuspid aortic valve (TAV; n = 30), or to the affected strain of hamsters with TAV (n = 45) or BAV (n = 32). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined by RT-qPCR using three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable reference genes for the three algorithms employed were Cdkn1β, G3pdh and Polr2a. We propose the use of Cdkn1β, or both Cdkn1β and G3pdh as reference genes for mRNA expression analyses in Syrian hamster aorta.

  18. Simultaneous aortic and tricuspid valve rupture after fall injury

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Niazi, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: This case study concerns a patient with disruption of both tricuspid and aortic valves: a previously healthy, adult man, who sustained a 5-meter fall from a building under construction. The mechanism of the injury was acceleration and deceleration, acting in two different phases of the cardiac cycle, i.e. systole and diastole. Simultaneous occurrence of these injuries is exceedingly rare and in a careful literature review, we did not find any such combination of injury. The possible mechanisms of this injury, as well as surgical techniques are discussed. PMID:23511124

  19. Modelling and numerical simulation of the in vivo mechanical response of the ascending aortic aneurysm in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J; Herrera, Emilio A

    2017-03-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a genetic disorder that affects connective tissue, impairing cardiovascular structures and function, such as heart valves and aorta. Thus, patients with Marfan disease have a higher risk of developing circulatory problems associated with mitral and aortic valves prolapse, manifested as dilated aorta and aortic aneurysm. However, little is known about the biomechanical characteristics of these structures affected with MFS. This study presents the modelling and simulation of the mechanical response of human ascending aortic aneurysms in MFS under in vivo conditions with intraluminal pressures within normotensive and hypertensive ranges. We obtained ascending aortic segments from five adults with MFS subjected to a vascular prosthesis implantation replacing an aortic aneurysm. We characterised the arterial samples via ex vivo tensile test measurements that enable fitting the material parameters of a hyperelastic isotropic constitutive model. Then, these material parameters were used in a numerical simulation of an ascending aortic aneurysm subjected to in vivo normotensive and hypertensive conditions. In addition, we assessed different constraints related to the movement of the aortic root. Overall, our results provide not only a realistic description of the mechanical behaviour of the vessel, but also useful data about stress/stretch-based criteria to predict vascular rupture. This knowledge may be included in the clinical assessment to determine risk and indicate surgical intervention.

  20. A rare combination of vascular anomalies: Hypoplastic aortic arch, coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, Şakir; Üreyen, Çağın Mustafa; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Erol, Bekir

    2015-04-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is the fifth most common congenital cardiac anomaly encountered in adults. It is important for prognosis to diagnose and treat this anomaly early. An aneurysm might develop due to tunica media abnormalities in patients with coarctation of the aorta. We hereby present an adult case with a very rare combination of vascular anomalies including ascending aorta aneurysm, hypoplastic aortic arch, coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm.

  1. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small aortic annulus in a patient having Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, M; Kasuya, S; Yamamoto, K; Koshika, M; Oguma, F; Hayashi, J

    2001-12-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by premature aging and scleroderma-like involvement of the skin. We report a case of aortic valve replacement for severely calcified aortic valve stenosis with a small annulus in a patient suffering from Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis

  2. Dislocation of a transapically implanted aortic valve prosthesis with a functionally bicuspid aortic valve and ascending aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, T; Subramanian, S; Lehmann, S; Kempfert, J; Misfeld, M; Mohr, F W; Borger, M A

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, catheter-based aortic valve interventions have become established procedures for the treatment of high-risk and advanced age patients with aortic valve pathologies. One of the limitations of the widespread applicability of this procedure is the annulus size. Until recently, no prosthesis was available to treat patients with a large annulus. We report on a patient with high-grade aortic stenosis (AS) and a 27-mm annulus, who underwent transapical implantation (TAP) of an Edwards SAPIEN® 29-mm prosthesis (Edwards LifeScience, Irvine, CA, USA). Due to insufficient dilation of his heavily calcified, functionally bicuspid aortic valve leaflets during balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV), the TAP prosthesis did not anchor adequately. This was determined during follow-up as he developed progressive aortic insufficiency and orthopnea, and an echocardiography revealed that the valve had been displaced into the LVOT. A conventional aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement were performed, at which time the TAP prosthesis was removed. The patient recovered uneventfully, and was discharged with a well-functioning aortic bioprosthetic valve and in good general condition. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Aortic Stiffness, Cerebrovascular Dysfunction, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Leroy L.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and cognitive decline. This mini-review focuses on relations of aortic stiffness with microvascular dysfunction and discusses the contribution of abnormal pulsatile hemodynamics to cerebrovascular damage and cognitive decline. We also provide a rationale for considering aortic stiffness as a putative and important contributor to memory impairment in older individuals. Summary Aging is associated with stiffening of the aorta but not the muscular arteries, which reduces wave reflection and increases the transmission of pulsatility into the periphery. Aortic stiffening thereby impairs a protective mechanism that shields the peripheral microcirculation from excessive pulsatility within downstream target organs. Beyond midlife, aortic stiffness increases rapidly and exposes the cerebral microcirculation to abnormal pulsatile mechanical forces that are associated with microvascular damage and remodeling in the brain. Aortic stiffening and high-flow pulsatility are associated with alterations in the microvasculature of the brain; however, a mechanistic link between aortic stiffness and memory has not been established. We showed that in a community-based sample of older individuals, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities - markers of cerebrovascular remodeling and damage - mediated the relation between higher aortic stiffness and lower performance on memory function tests. These data suggest that microvascular and white matter damage associated with excessive aortic stiffness contribute to impaired memory function with advancing age. Key Messages Increasing evidence suggests that vascular etiologies - including aortic stiffness and microvascular damage - contribute to memory impairment and the pathogenesis of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Interventions that reduce aortic stiffness may delay memory decline among older individuals. PMID:27752478

  4. Mitral and aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Sorysz, Danuta; Kochman, Janusz; Jastrzębski, Jan; Kukulski, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the impact of postprocedural mitral regurgitation (MR), in an interaction with aortic regurgitation (AR), on mortality following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods To assess the interaction between MR and AR, we compared the survival rate of patients (i) without both significant MR and AR versus (ii) those with either significant MR or significant AR versus (iii) with significant MR and AR, all postprocedure. 381 participants of the Polish Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Registry (166 males (43.6%) and 215 females (56.4%), age 78.8±7.4 years) were analysed. Follow-up was 94.1±96.5 days. Results Inhospital and midterm mortality were 6.6% and 10.2%, respectively. Significant MR and AR were present in 16% and 8.1% patients, including 3.1% patients with both significant MR and AR. Patients with significant versus insignificant AR differed with respect to mortality (log rank p=0.009). This difference was not apparent in a subgroup of patients without significant MR (log rank p=0.80). In a subgroup of patients without significant AR, there were no significant differences in mortality between individuals with versus without significant MR (log rank p=0.44). Significant MR and AR had a significant impact on mortality only when associated with each other (log rank p<0.0001). At multivariate Cox regression modelling concomitant significant MR and AR were independently associated with mortality (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.54 to 5.71, p=0.002). Conclusions Significant MR or AR postprocedure, when isolated, had no impact on survival. Combined MR and AR had a significant impact on a patient's prognosis. PMID:26908096

  5. Aortic annuloplasty with aortic root reconstruction to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Richard A

    2006-07-01

    Part of the ongoing argument concerning patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) following aortic valve replacement (AVR) is due to the perception that aortic annulus enlargement procedures increase the risk and technical difficulty of aortic valve surgery. Here, an aortic root reconstruction that involves enlargement of the annulus and tailoring of the aortic root to accommodate larger stented prostheses is presented that has been personally performed in 196 patients with no technique-related surgical deaths or complications, and thus can be carried out without additional risk. This aortic root enlargement aortoplasty and annuloplasty method can be calibrated to all AVRs involving stented manufactured prostheses when these are deemed the prosthesis of choice for the patient with a relatively small annulus and/or aortic root, severe left ventricular hypertrophy, compromised LV function or a very active lifestyle, to achieve predicted EOA values > or = 1.00 cm2/m2.

  6. Sutureless Medtronic 3f Enable aortic valve replacement in a heavily calcified aortic root.

    PubMed

    Vola, Marco; Fuzellier, Jean-Francois; Kasra, Azarnoush; Morel, Jérôme; Campisi, Salvatore; Ruggeri, Gianvito; Favre, Jean Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The case is reported of a surgical aortic valvular stenosis with a severely calcified ascending aortic root in a 76-year-old woman. The morphology and size of the aortic annulus were unsuitable for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); thus, surgery was scheduled. Aortic calcifications allowed a transverse aortotomy 4 cm superior to the sinotubular junction, with a remote endoaortic view of the valve. A Medtronic 3f Enable sutureless bioprosthesis was then implanted after aortic annular decalcification. Sutureless bioprostheses are new tools that promise to reduce technical difficulties and cross-clamp times in minimally invasive aortic valve replacement surgery. In addition, sutureless techniques may have other possible advantages in special circumstances requiring full sternotomy access, such as in the present case.

  7. Transient exposure to elastase induces mouse aortic wall smooth muscle cell production of MCP-1 and RANTES during development of experimental aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Colonnello, Jamie S; Hance, Kirk A; Shames, Murray L; Wyble, Charles W; Ziporin, Scott J; Leidenfrost, Jeremy E; Ennis, Terri L; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Thompson, Robert W

    2003-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated with chronic transmural inflammation and destruction of the elastic media. The purpose of this study was to elucidate molecular mechanisms that might orchestrate leukocyte recruitment into the outer aortic wall by determining whether CC chemokines contribute to development of aneurysm degeneration in an elastase-induced mouse model of AAA. Adult male C57BL/6J mice underwent transient elastase perfusion of the abdominal aorta to induce development of AAA. At various intervals after elastase perfusion (0, 4, 7, 14 days), real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure aortic wall expression of the CC (beta) chemokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES). Expression of these chemokines by cultured mouse aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC) was similarly assessed after transient (5 minutes) exposure to elastase solutions in vitro. Mouse aortic diameter (mean +/- SEM) increased to aneurysmal proportions by 14 days after elastase perfusion (from 0.51 +/- 0.03 mm to 1.34 +/- 0.32 mm; 163% increase; P <.05), with macrophage infiltration of the outer aortic wall beginning within 7 to 10 days. Increased aortic wall messenger RNA expression for MCP-1 (28-fold) and RANTES (11-fold) was observed on day 4, with maximal production of chemokine protein on day 7 (MCP-1, from 7.07 +/- 0.06 ng/mL to 19.60 +/- 0.19 ng/mL; P <.001; RANTES, from 0.23 +/- 0.006 ng/mL to 2.03 +/- 0.057 ng/mL; P <.001). Neither MCP-1 nor RANTES was detected in normal mouse aorta with immunohistochemistry, but both chemokines were abundant in AAA. Within 48 hours of transient exposure to elastase, cultured mouse AoSMC exhibited pronounced induction (>90-fold) of MCP-1 and RANTES, despite concomitant decrease in cell numbers. Increased mouse aortic wall expression of MCP-1 and RANTES occurs early in development of

  8. Recent advances in aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adhami, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is no longer an operation that is approached solely through a median sternotomy. Recent advances in the fields of transcatheter valves have expanded the proportion of patients eligible for intervention. Comparisons between transcatheter valves and conventional surgery have shown non-inferiority of transcatheter valve implants in patients with a high or intermediate pre-operative predictive risk. With advances in our understanding of sutureless valves and their applicability to minimally invasive surgery, the invasiveness and trauma of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome. The strategy of care has radically changed over the last decade. PMID:27803800

  9. Ultrasonographic anatomy of the bovine eye.

    PubMed

    Potter, Timothy J; Hallowell, Gayle D; Bowen, I Mark

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to describe the ultrasonographic appearance and measurements of the normal bovine eye, to compare the measurements to those reported previously for cadaveric eyes and to describe differences between ocular dimensions of Holstein Friesian and Jersey cattle. Sixty transpalpebral ocular ultrasonographic examinations were performed on 30 adult Holstein Friesian cows, and 16 examinations were performed on 8 adult Jersey cows. Transpalpebral ultrasonographic images were obtained with a 10 MHz linear transducer in both horizontal and vertical imaging planes. The ultrasonographic appearance of structures within the bovine eye is similar to that in other species, although the ciliary artery was frequently identified, appearing as a 0.33 +/- 0.04 cm diameter hypoechoic area. The axial length of the globe was significantly greater in Holstein Friesian cattle (3.46 +/- 0.09 cm) compared with Jersey cattle (3.27 +/- 0.19 cm; P = 0.001), although the vitreous depth was smaller in Holstein Friesian cattle (1.46 +/- 0.09 cm) (P = 0.0009). The anterioposterior depth of the lens was significantly greater in Jersey cattle (1.92 +/- 0.11 cm) and the cornea was thinner in Jersey cattle (0.17 +/- 0.02 cm). The appearance and ocular distances for live animals were similar to those reported previously for cadaveric specimens. The knowledge of normal ocular dimensions facilitates the use of ultrasonography in the evaluation of ocular disease in cattle.

  10. Endovascular approach to acute aortic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karmy-Jones, Riyad; Teso, Desarom; Jackson, Nicole; Ferigno, Lisa; Bloch, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic thoracic aortic injury remains a major cause of death following motor vehicle accidents. Endovascular approaches have begun to supersede open repair, offering the hope of reduced morbidity and mortality. The available endovascular technology is associated with specific anatomic considerations and complications. This paper will review the current status of endovascular management of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries. PMID:21160721

  11. Aortic Valve Calcification in Mild Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Shinichi; Walker, Marcella Donovan; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Hyodo, Eiichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Liu, Rui; Sacco, Ralph L.; Homma, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Context: It is unclear whether cardiovascular disease is present in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Objective: Aortic valve structure and function were compared in PHPT patients and population-based controls. Design: This is a case-control study. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital metabolic bone disease unit. Participants: We studied 51 patients with PHPT and 49 controls. Outcome Measures: We measured the aortic valve calcification area and the transaortic pressure gradient. Results: Aortic valve calcification area was significantly higher in PHPT (0.24 ± 0.02 vs. 0.17 ± 0.02 cm2, p<0.01), although there was no difference in the peak transaortic pressure gradient, a functional measure of valvular calcification (5.6 ± 0.3 vs. 6.0 ± 0.3 mm Hg, P = 0.39). Aortic valve calcification area was positively associated with PTH (r = 0.34; P < 0.05) but not with serum calcium, phosphorus, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels or with calcium-phosphate product. Serum PTH level remained an independent predictor of aortic valve calcification area after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, history of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusions: Mild PHPT is associated with subclinical aortic valve calcification. PTH, but not serum calcium concentration, predicted aortic valve calcification. PTH was a more important predictor of aortic valve calcification than well-accepted cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22031523

  12. Adiposity assessed by anthropometric measures has a similar or greater predictive ability than dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measures for abdominal aortic calcification in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xianwen; Scott, David; Hodge, Allison; Khan, Belal; Khan, Nayab; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Ebeling, Peter R; Sanders, Kerrie M

    2016-09-01

    To determine whether adiposity assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) compared to simple anthropometric assessments, are more predictive of abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), a risk factor for atherosclerosis. A cross-sectional study of 312 participants (60.3 % female) aged 70.6 ± 5.6 years was conducted in 2010-2011. AAC was assessed by radiography. Adiposity was estimated for whole body, trunk, android, gynoid and visceral regions using DXA in addition to body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist to hip ratio (WHR). WHR [tertile 1 as reference, OR (95 % CI) for tertile 3: 3.62 (1.35-9.72)] and android to gynoid fat ratio [tertile 3: 2.87 (1.03-8.01)] were independent predictors of AAC severity among men. Positive associations with AAC severity were observed for WC [tertile 1 as reference, OR for tertile 3: 2.46 (1.12-5.41)], % trunk fat mass [tertile 2: 3.26 (1.52-7.03)], % android fat mass [tertile 2: 2.42 (1.13-5.18), tertile 3: 2.20 (1.02-4.73)] and visceral fat area [tertile 2: 2.28 (1.06-4.87), tertile 3: 2.32 (1.01-5.34)] among women. Indices of total body composition, BMI and % body fat mass were not associated with AAC severity in either men or women. Simple anthropometric measures, WHR and WC were the best predictors of AAC severity in men and women respectively, although higher android to gynoid fat ratio and central fat, assessed by DXA, were also predictive of higher risks of AAC severity in men and women respectively. Our findings add to existing evidence that relatively inexpensive and easily obtained anthropometric measures can be clinically useful indicators of atherosclerosis risk.

  13. Severity of Preoperative Aortic Regurgitation Does Not Impact Valve Durability of Aortic Valve Repair Following the David V Valve Sparing Aortic Root Replacement.

    PubMed

    Keeling, W Brent; Leshnower, Bradley G; Binongo, Jose; Lasanajak, Yi; McPherson, LaRonica; Chen, Edward P

    2017-03-01

    The David V valve-sparing aortic root replacement (VSRR) is an established and durable method of root reconstruction for varying pathologies. However, the impact of the severity of preoperative aortic regurgitation (AR) on long-term durability remains unclear. The purpose of this research was to investigate the impact of the degree of preoperative AR on midterm durability following VSRR. A retrospective review of the adult cardiac surgical database at a single academic center was undertaken from 2005 to 2015 for 223 adult patients who underwent VSRR. Patients were followed annually with echocardiograms, and a prospectively maintained database kept track of patient data. Follow-up was 97.7% complete, and the median echocardiographic follow-up was 25.5 months (range, 1 to 123 months). Patients with preoperative AR less than or equal to 2 were compared with patients with AR greater than 2 to determine the impact of preoperative AR upon valve repair durability. There were 223 patients who underwent VSRR during the study period, including 114 (51.1%) who required concomitant cusp repair. The operative mortality was 5 (2.2%). Ninety-seven patients (43.5%) had preoperative AR greater than 2. A total of 213 patients (95.5%) were available for long-term follow-up; of these patients, 7 (3.3%) had AR greater than 2. Fifty-two patients had a bicuspid aortic valve (22 AR ≤2 and 30 AR >2; p = 0.02). Patients with preoperative AR greater than 2 experienced greater reverse left ventricular remodeling and increases in left ventricular ejection fraction than did patients with preoperative AR less than or equal to 2 (p < 0.01). The midterm freedom from AR greater than 2 was similar for both preoperative AR groups (p = 0.57). The 8-year freedom from AR greater than 2 was 89.1% (95% confidence interval, 55.3% to 97.8%) for patients with preoperative AR less than or equal to 2 and 92.7% (95% confidence interval, 78.8% to 97.6%) for preoperative AR greater than 2. Five patients (2

  14. Incidence and prognosis of congenital aortic valve stenosis in Liverpool (1960-1990).

    PubMed Central

    Kitchiner, D J; Jackson, M; Walsh, K; Peart, I; Arnold, R

    1993-01-01

    after 10 years of follow up. CONCLUSIONS--Congenital aortic valve stenosis may be progressive even when it is mild at presentation. Patients presenting with mild stenosis, however, have a significantly better prognosis than those presenting with moderate stenosis. An accurate clinical and echocardiographic assessment of the severity of aortic valve stenosis at presentation provides a good guide to prognosis into early adult life. PMID:8457400

  15. [Acute aortic syndromes and sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, often present in "cardiovascular or metabolic patients". OSA favours the occurrence of arterial lesions, all the more if severe. There is a strong relationship between OSA and acute aortic syndromes (AAS). This relationship is in part explained by aortic dilatation linked to OSA. The presence of repeated episodes of sudden variation of transmural pressure applied on aortic wall seems to play a major role in this dilatation. All OSA patients should have a search of aortic dilatation by ultrasound (at a thoracic and abdominal level). Also, screening of OSA should be systematically performed in patients with aortic disease. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure in apneic patients with AAS has not been studied.

  16. Valvular and aortic diseases in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Arvin; Fayers, Trevor; Clarke, Sophie; Parsonage, William

    2013-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inheritable connective tissue disorder caused by defective collagen synthesis with the principal manifestations of bone fragility. OI has been associated with left sided valvular regurgitation and aortic dilation. Valve and aortic surgery are technically feasible in patients with OI but are inherently high risk due to the underlying connective tissue defect. This report reviews the valvular and aortic pathology associated with OI and their management. We describe two cases of patients with OI who have significant aortic and mitral valve regurgitation, one of whom has been managed conservatively and the other who has undergone successful mitral valve repair and aortic valve replacement. The latter case represents the fifth case of mitral valve repair in a patient with OI reported in the medical literature. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hesr2 knockout mice develop aortic valve disease with advancing age.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Hiroki; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Nakashima, Yasumi; Kume, Tsutomu; Yoshizumi, Masao; Nakanishi, Toshio; Saga, Yumiko

    2013-03-01

    Acquired heart diseases, such as valve disease, are major causes of human morbidity and mortality. However, the pathological mechanisms underlying these diseases are largely unknown. Our aim is to identify the role of the hairy and enhancer of split-related (Hesr)-2 gene in the adult heart. Echocardiography detected heart dysfunctions indicative of aortic valve anomalies, stenosis, and regurgitation, in ≈59% of >12-month-old Hesr2 knockout survivor mice. Morphological and histological analyses revealed thickened semilunar valves with increased fibrotic areas, indicating that sclerotic degeneration of valves is the main cause of aortic valve disease. The expression of osteogenic genes, such as osteopontin and sclerostin, were upregulated in the mutants, and the overexpression of sclerostin in endothelial cells resulted in thickened semilunar valves with increased fibrotic areas, similar to that seen in the Hesr2 knockout mice, suggesting that Hesr2 can regulate osteogenic gene expression in valves. Reduced left ventricular function, which may be caused by increased ventricular interstitial fibrosis, and enlarged myocardial cell size without ventricular wall thickening were found in both aortic valve stenosis/regurgitation-positive (33%) and aortic valve stenosis/regurgitation-negative (38%) subpopulations in 12-month-old survivor mice. Dilated left ventricular internal dimensions were specifically detected in the aortic valve stenosis/regurgitation-positive subpopulation, thus suggesting that the degeneration of cardiomyocytes is influenced by irregular hemodynamics. These data revealed that survivor mice lacking the Hesr2 gene exhibit fibrosis in the aortic valve and ventricle in adulthood, thus suggesting that Hesr2 plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of the aortic valve and ventricle.

  18. Hemodynamic responses to acute aortic coarctation in conscious sinoaortic denervated rats.

    PubMed

    Fazan Júnior, R; Machado, B H; Salgado, H C

    1997-10-01

    The hemodynamic responses to acute (45 min) partial aortic constriction were studied in conscious intact (N = 7) or sinoaortic denervated (SAD) adult male Wistar rats (280-350 g, N = 7) implanted with carotid and femoral arterial catheters, a pneumatic cuff around the abdominal aorta and a pulsed Doppler flow probe to measure changes in aortic resistance. In addition, the hypertensive response and the reflex bradycardia elicited by total (N = 8) vs partial (N = 7) aortic constriction (monitored by maintenance of the pressure distal to the cuff at 50 mmHg) were compared in two other groups of intact rats. Intact rats presented a smaller hypertensive response (26 to 40% above basal level) to partial aortic constriction than SAD rats (38 to 58%). The calculated change in aortic resistance imposed by constriction of the aorta increased progressively only in intact rats, but was significantly smaller (193 to 306%) than that observed (501 to 591%) in SAD rats. Intact rats showed a significant bradycardia (23 to 26% change in basal heart rate) throughout coarctation, whereas the SAD rats did not (1 to 3%). Partial or total occlusion of the aorta induced similar hypertensive responses (37-38% vs 24-30% for total constriction) as well as reflex bradycardia (-15 to -17% vs -22 to -33%) despite a greater gradient in pressure (97-98 vs 129-140 mmHg) caused by total constriction. The present data indicate that the integrity of the baroreflex in intact rats can cause the hypertensive response to level off at a lower value than in SAD rats despite a progressive increase in aortic resistance. In addition, they also indicate that the degree of partial aortic constriction by maintenance of the pressure distal to the cuff at 50 mmHg already elicits a maximal stimulation of the arterial baroreflex.

  19. Aortic arch morphology and late systemic hypertension following correction of coarctation of aorta.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Daniel; Curtin, John; Malcolm, Paul; Clark, Allan; Freeman, Leisa

    2007-01-01

    To reproduce in an adult population a pediatric study that found an association between aortic arch geometry and late systemic hypertension following successful repair of aortic coarctation. Fifty-one patients with successful repair of coarctation of the aorta had blood pressure measurement at rest and during exercise. After cross-sectional imaging of the aortic arch, patients were assigned to 1 of 3 previously defined morphological categories: normal, gothic, or crenel. The degree of residual stenosis and the ratio of the height/transverse diameter of the arch (A/T ratio) were calculated. No relationship was found between arch geometry and either resting- or exercise-induced hypertension. We found the classification into 3 morphological types difficult and did not find an association between gothic arch or a high A/T ratio and hypertension.

  20. The macroanatomical investigations on the aortic arch in porcupines (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Atalar, O; Yilmaz, S; Burma, O; Ilkay, E

    2003-12-01

    The anatomy of aortic arch in porcupine was studied. Angiography was applied to each of the three adult porcupines (two males, one female) following the injection of latex from the abdominal aorta for the examination of aortic arch. The results indicated that three arteries arose from aortic arch in porcupine. These were truncus brachiocephalicus, arteria carotis communis sinistra and arteria subclavia sinistra. The truncus brachiocephalicus in porcupine yielded arteria subclavia dextra and arteria carotis communis dextra. Truncus bicaroticus was absent. The origin of truncus costocervicalis (right) and arteria vertebralis (right) arose from a common root. Left or right axillary arteries seemed to be a continuation of subclavian arteries. The results of this study may contribute to the data in this area of science.

  1. Subgross and macroscopic investigation of blood vessels originating from aortic arch in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Cevik-Demirkan, A; Türkmenoğlu, I

    2008-04-01

    A total of 10 adult, healthy, male chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) were used to investigate the vessels originating from aortic arch. Coloured latex was injected into the carotid arteries following conventional anatomical applications in all the chinchillas examined. The brachiocephalic trunk and the left subclavian artery arose from the aortic arch at the level of the second intercostal region in the thoracic cavity. The right and left subclavian arteries detached branches at the level of first intercostal region and divided into the following vessels: internal thoracic artery, dorsal scapular artery, vertebral artery, superficial cervical artery and axillar artery. The vessels originating from the aortic arch displayed some significant differences in chinchillas compared to rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, porcupines and other laboratory rodents.

  2. Low-gradient aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a ‘low-gradient’ AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm2) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA—low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS. PMID:27190103

  3. Diagnostic imaging for aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Andrew J; Litt, Harold I

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging for aortic dissection has dramatically changed in recent years. Previously, imaging consisted of conventional X-ray radiography, followed by invasive catheter angiography. Now imaging of dissection is performed primarily with multidetector CT, and to a lesser extent, with ultrasound and MRI. Catheter angiography is used primarily as a means of treating complications. Which modality to choose depends on patient factors, physician preference, and differences in availability of state-of-the-art equipment. All three modalities are highly accurate in experienced hands and have revolutionized the detection and evaluation of this condition.

  4. [Non-aneurysmatic aortic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Rivera, P; Ferrer, L; Tuset, J A; Pamos, S; López Mut, J; Luján, M; Tomé, A; Medina, E

    1999-01-01

    Esophageal compression by a vascular structure is a rare cause of dysphagia, the aberrant right subclavian artery being the most common congenital abnormality. Aortica dysphagia is usually observed in the elderly, especially in hypertensive women with cardiopathy and degenerative osteopathy. We report a 73-year-old woman with dysphagia, caused by a non-aneurysmatic aortic elongation, who presented progressive dysphagia, which ended in aphagia associated with heart failure. The diagnostic approach to these patients is discussed. The patient received cinitapride and, following treatment for heart failure, remains asymptomatic after a 3-year follow-up period, although manometric alterations persist.

  5. Abdominal Aortic Surgery: Anesthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the review are to highlight the clinical characteristics of the patient population; to assess multivariate risk factor analysis and the invasive/non-invasive techniques available for risk factor identification and management in this high-risk surgical population; to assess the major hemodynamic, metabolic, and regional blood flow changes associated with aortic cross-clamping/unclamping procedures and techniques for their modification or attenuation; and to assess the influence of perioperative anesthetic techniques and management on patient outcome. PMID:1814052

  6. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    PubMed

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  7. Risk of rupture or dissection in descending thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Bum; Kim, Kibeom; Lindsay, Mark E; MacGillivray, Thomas; Isselbacher, Eric M; Cambria, Richard P; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2015-10-27

    Current practice guidelines recommend surgical repair of large thoracic aortic aneurysms to prevent fatal aortic dissection or rupture, but limited natural history data exist to support clinical criteria for timely intervention. Of 3247 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm registered in our institutional Thoracic Aortic Center Database, we identified and reviewed 257 nonsyndromic patients (age, 72.4±10.5 years; 143 female) with descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm without a history of aortic dissection in whom surgical intervention was not undertaken. The primary end point was a composite of aortic dissection/rupture and sudden death. Baseline mean maximal aortic diameter was 52.4±10.8 mm, with 103 patients having diameters ≥55 mm. During a median follow-up of 25.1 months (quartiles 1-3, 8.3-56.4 months), definite and possible aortic events occurred in 19 (7.4%) and 31 (12.1%) patients, respectively. On multivariable analyses, maximal aortic diameter at baseline emerged as the only significant predictor of aortic events (hazard ratio=1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.15). Estimated rates of definite aortic events within 1 year were 5.5%, 7.2%, and 9.3% for aortic diameters of 50, 55, and 60 mm, respectively. Receiver-operating characteristic curves for discriminating aortic events were higher for indexed aortic sizes referenced by body size (area under the curve=0.832-0.889) but not significantly different from absolute maximal aortic diameter (area under the curve=0.805). Aortic size was the principal factor related to aortic events in unrepaired descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. Although the risk of aortic events started to increase with a diameter >5.0 to 5.5 cm, it is uncertain whether repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms in this range leads to overall benefit, and the threshold for repair requires further evaluation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Role of Cardiac CT Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Catheter-based aortic valve implantation is increasingly being performed in high-risk patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. For successful planning of the procedure, CT has been shown to provide crucial information concerning the aortic root as well as the peripheral access vessels. This article illustrates the increasing role of CT before transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  9. Improved technique of transapical aortic valve implantation: "the Berlin addition".

    PubMed

    Pasic, Miralem; Dreysse, Stephan; Drews, Thorsten; Buz, Semih; Unbehaun, Axel; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexandar; Hetzer, Roland

    2010-06-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation carries some degree of uncertainty regarding the definitive valve position. We added angiographic visualization of the aortic root while the prosthetic valve is being slowly deployed. It enables easy correction of the position of the valve so that perfect alignment can be achieved of the relationships between the prosthetic valve, aortic valve annulus, aortic cusps, and the coronary arteries.

  10. Aortic valve and ascending aortic root modeling from 3D and 3D+t CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbic, Saša; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Zäuner, Dominik; Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-02-01

    Aortic valve disorders are the most frequent form of valvular heart disorders (VHD) affecting nearly 3% of the global population. A large fraction among them are aortic root diseases, such as aortic root aneurysm, often requiring surgical procedures (valve-sparing) as a treatment. Visual non-invasive assessment techniques could assist during pre-selection of adequate patients, planning procedures and afterward evaluation of the same. However state of the art approaches try to model a rather short part of the aortic root, insufficient to assist the physician during intervention planning. In this paper we propose a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of both the aortic valve and the ascending aortic root. A novel physiological shape model is introduced, consisting of the aortic valve root, leaflets and the ascending aortic root. The model parameters are hierarchically estimated using robust and fast learning-based methods. Experiments performed on 63 CT sequences (630 Volumes) and 20 single phase CT volumes demonstrated an accuracy of 1.45mm and an performance of 30 seconds (3D+t) for this approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a complete model of the aortic valve (including leaflets) and the ascending aortic root, estimated from CT, has been proposed.

  11. Nontraumatic avulsion of aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rei-Yeuh; Chen, Chien-Chang; Hsu, Wei-Pang; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Tsai, Han-Lin; Hsiao, Ping-Gune; Wu, Jiann-Der; Guo, How-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Avulsion of the aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation is mostly due to trauma, infective endocarditis, or ascending aortic dissection. Nontraumatic avulsion of the aortic valve commissure is very rare. We reviewed the literature and analyzed potential risk factors of nontraumatic avulsion. Case presentation: An 80-year-old male with hypertension was seen in the emergency department with acute onset dyspnea. Echocardiogram revealed left ventricular hypertrophy with adequate systolic function, prolapse of the noncoronary cusp, and incomplete coaptation of the right coronary and noncoronary cusps with severe aortic valve regurgitation. Surgery revealed an avulsion between the left coronary and noncoronary cusps. Histopathology examination of the aortic valve showed myxoid degeneration, fibrosis, and calcification. Examination of the ascending aorta revealed myxoid degeneration and fragmentation of elastic fibers. Aortic valve replacement was performed, and the patient was alive and well 4 years after surgery. A review of the literature showed that more than three-fourths of the similar cases occurred in males, and about half in patients with hypertension and those 60 years of age or older. Conclusions: In the case of acute aortic regurgitation without a history of trauma, infection, or valvotomy, when 2 prolapsed aortic cusps are observed by echocardiography in the absence of an intimal tear of the ascending aorta, an avulsion of the aortic commissure should be suspected, especially in males with hypertension who are 60 years of age or older. PMID:27749570

  12. 3D Bioprinting of Heterogeneous Aortic Valve Conduits with Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4±3.4% for SMC and 83.2±4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin when printed in stiff matrix, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin in soft matrix. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  13. Effect of age and blood pressure on aortic size and stroke distance.

    PubMed Central

    Towfiq, B A; Weir, J; Rawles, J M

    1986-01-01

    The diameters of the ascending and descending aorta at the level of the carina were measured from computerised tomograms in 200 adults without cardiac or aortic disease. At all ages the ascending aorta had a greater cross sectional area than the descending aorta, and both areas increased significantly with age. The increase was proportionately greater in the descending than in the ascending aorta and the percentage changes were similar in males and females, the latter having a smaller mean descending aortic diameter. The extent of the increase in cross sectional area of the aorta is sufficient to explain the observed fall of stroke distance that occurs with age. The effect of changing blood pressure on aortic cross sectional area, and hence the relation between stroke distance and stroke volume, was calculated from published data on aortic compliance at different ages. Assuming constant peripheral resistance, stroke distance would change by 34, 82, and 94% for a 100% change of stroke volume at age 20, 50, and 80 respectively. At age 80 the aorta behaves like a rigid pipe but at age 20 its elasticity is such that constancy of aortic size cannot be assumed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3718794

  14. The association between aortic regurgitation and undetermined embolic infarction with aortic complex plaque.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Won; Cho, Jung Sun; Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Kye Hun; Sun, Byung Joo; Park, Jae-Hyeong

    2017-01-01

    Background Retrograde embolism from the descending thoracic aorta is one possible cause of undetermined ischemic stroke. Significant aortic regurgitation can increase the amount of reversed flow in the thoracic aorta and thus is associated with an increased incidence of stroke. Aims This study aimed to examine the association between significant aortic regurgitation and undetermined embolic infarction with aortic complex plaques. Methods This study included 380 patients with undetermined embolic stroke who did not have abnormal flow such as atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale determined by agitated saline bubble test, intracardiac thrombi on transesophageal echocardiography, atrial fibrillation, or small vessel stroke, cerebral artery, and carotid stenosis on the brain magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were divided into the complex aortic plaques group (n = 63), which was defined as having plaque with >4 mm in thickness, ulceration, or high mobility, and the no complex aortic plaques group (n = 317). Results Transesophageal echocardiography with a bubble study, brain MRI, and laboratory tests were performed for all subjects. Significant aortic regurgitation was more prevalent in patients with undetermined embolic stroke and complex aortic plaques than in patients without complex aortic plaques (adjusted OR = 4.981; 95% CI = 1.323-18.876, P = 0.028). In addition, the distribution of complex aortic plaques according to the severity of aortic regurgitation in patients with undetermined embolic stroke had a tendency toward the ascending thoracic aorta and proximal aortic arch. Conclusions Significant aortic regurgitation may affect undetermined embolic stroke in patients with complex aortic plaques.

  15. Aortic disease in patients with Marfan syndrome: aortic volume assessment for surveillance.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; de Witte, Piet; Radonic, Teodora; Marquering, Henk A; van der Steen, Wessel E; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2013-11-01

    To assess the reproducibility of aortic volume estimates and to serially test their use in patients with Marfan syndrome. The study was approved by the medical ethics committee and all subjects gave written informed consent. In 81 patients with Marfan syndrome and seven healthy control subjects, aortic volumes and diameters at baseline were estimated by means of contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. At 3 years of follow-up, aortic expansion rate were calculated in a subgroup of 22 patients with Marfan syndrome. Total aortic volume was defined as volume measurement from the level of the aortic annulus to the aortic bifurcation. Intra- and interobserver agreement of aortic volume were calculated by using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Differences in variables were analyzed with the Student t test and logistic regression. Effect size was calculated. Intra- and interobserver agreement of aortic volume calculation was 0.996 and 0.980, respectively. Mean aortic volume was significantly greater in patients with Marfan syndrome than in control subjects (104 mL/m(2); 95% confidence interval [CI]: 95, 114 mL/m(2) vs 74 mL/m(2); 95% CI: 62, 87 mL/m(2); P < .001). In 22 patients with Marfan syndrome, mean aortic volume was increased at 3 years of follow-up (17 mL; 95% CI: 8, 26 mL; P = .001; effect size, 0.29), while mean aortic diameter did not increase significantly (0.4 mm; 95% CI: 0.0, 0.9 mm; P = .171; effect size, 0.13). Assessment of aortic volume is highly reproducible and may be suited for use in the detection of aortic expansion in patients with Marfan syndrome. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13122310/-/DC1. RSNA, 2013

  16. High pacing rates for management of aortic insufficiency after balloon aortic valvuloplasty or transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omar; Salinger, Michael H; Levisay, Justin P; Feldman, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Aortic insufficiency (AI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is difficult to manage when associated with congestive heart failure. AI after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) may be catastrophic, especially in patients who are not candidates for TAVR. We describe the use of urgent temporary pacing, followed by permanent pacing, to increase the heart rate to diminish diastolic filling time for the short term management of AI after BAV or TAVR. The strategy is particularly useful in patients who already have permanent pacemakers, which are common in this population.

  17. Severe Aortic Coarctation in a 75-Year-Old Woman: Total Simultaneous Repair of Aortic Coarctation and Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hyun; Song, Sung Gook; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jun; Choo, Ki Seuk; Kim, June Hong; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is usually diagnosed and repaired in childhood and early adulthood. Survival of a patient with an uncorrected coarctation to more than 70 years of age is extremely unusual, and management strategies for these cases remain controversial. We present a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with aortic coarctation and severe aortic valve stenosis 5 years ago and who underwent a successful one-stage repair involving valve replacement and insertion of an extra-anatomical bypass graft from the ascending to the descending aorta. PMID:22363387

  18. Long-term outcomes of aortic root operations for Marfan syndrome: A comparison of Bentall versus aortic valve-sparing procedures.

    PubMed

    Price, Joel; Magruder, J Trent; Young, Allen; Grimm, Joshua C; Patel, Nishant D; Alejo, Diane; Dietz, Harry C; Vricella, Luca A; Cameron, Duke E

    2016-02-01

    Prophylactic aortic root replacement improves survival in patients with Marfan syndrome with aortic root aneurysms, but the optimal procedure remains undefined. Adult patients with Marfan syndrome who had Bentall or aortic valve-sparing root replacement (VSRR) procedures between 1997 and 2013 were identified. Comprehensive follow-up information was obtained from hospital charts and telephone contact. One hundred sixty-five adult patients with Marfan syndrome (aged > 20 years) had either VSRR (n = 98; 69 reimplantation, 29 remodeling) or Bentall (n = 67) procedures. Patients undergoing Bentall procedure were older (median, 37 vs 36 years; P = .03), had larger median preoperative sinus diameter (5.5 cm vs 5.0 cm; P = .003), more aortic dissections (25.4% vs 4.1%; P < .001), higher incidence of moderate or severe aortic insufficiency (49.3% vs 14.4%; P < .001) and more urgent or emergent operations (24.6% vs 3.3%; P < .001). There were no hospital deaths and 9 late deaths in more than 17 years of follow-up (median, 7.8 deaths). Ten-year survival was 90.5% in patients undergoing Bentall procedure and 96.3% in patients undergoing VSRR (P = .10). Multivariable analysis revealed that VSRR was associated with fewer thromboembolic or hemorrhagic events (hazard ratio, 0.16; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.85; P = .03). There was no independent difference in long-term survival, freedom from reoperation, or freedom from endocarditis between the 2 procedures. After prophylactic root replacement in patients with Marfan syndrome, patients undergoing Bentall and valve-sparing procedures have similar late survival, freedom from root reoperation, and freedom from endocarditis. However, valve-sparing procedures result in significantly fewer thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lipedema is associated with increased aortic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Szolnoky, G; Nemes, A; Gavallér, H; Forster, T; Kemény, L

    2012-06-01

    Lipedema is a disproportional obesity due to unknown pathomechanism. Its major hallmark is frequent hematoma formation related to increased capillary fragility and reduced venoarterial reflex. Beyond microangiopathy, both venous and lymphatic dysfunction have also been documented. However, arterial circulation in lipedema has not been examined, and therefore we explored aortic elastic properties by echocardiography. Fourteen women with and 14 without lipedema were included in the study. Each subject consented to blood pressure measurement, physical examination, and transthoracic echocardiography. Aortic stiffness index (beta), distensibility, and strain were evaluated from aortic diameter and blood pressure data. Mean systolic (30.0 +/- 3.2 vs. 25.5 +/- 3.6, P < 0.05) and diastolic (27.8 +/- 3.3 vs. 22.3 +/- 3.1) aortic diameters (in mm) and aortic stiffness index (9.05 +/- 7.45 vs. 3.76 +/- 1.22, P < 0.05) were significantly higher, while aortic strain (0.082 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.143 +/- 0.038, P < 0.05) and distensibility (2.24 +/- 1.07 vs. 4.38 +/- 1.61, P < 0.05) were significantly lower in lipedematous patients compared to controls. Thus, lipedema is characterized with increased aortic stiffness.

  20. Repair for acquired aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Antunes, M J

    1996-10-01

    The favorable results of mitral valvuloplasty when compared with valve replacement have renewed the interest of many surgeons in aortic valve repair. However, these efforts have, for the most part, been unsuccessful. Also, the results of aortic valve replacement are usually better than those of mitral valve replacement. Yet, some patients appear to derive benefit from a conservative aortic valve procedure. The best examples are mild or moderate aortic valve disease associated with mitral valve or coronary artery disease, which constitute the primary indication for operation, where "prophylactic" aortic valve replacement does not appear justifiable. Other possible indications for aortic valvuloplasty includes patient's lack of compliance or contraindication to anticoagulation in young patients. Senile aortic stenosis, in very old patients with a small annulus, preserved leaflet morphology and nonsignificant commissural fusion should be considered for repair. However, since the procedure is not easily reproducible and the results not uniformly predictable, it cannot be recommended for generalized use. Nonetheless, experienced surgeons should be encouraged to continue these efforts.

  1. Medical management of thoracic aortic aneurysm disease.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Alan C

    2013-03-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease requires careful evaluation and management over his or her lifetime. This includes assessment for the presence of an underlying genetic disorder, such as Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve disease, or a familial aortic aneurysm syndrome. Screening family members is necessary, inasmuch as up to 20% of first-degree relatives of the patient with a thoracic aortic aneurysm will also have aneurysm disease. Medical therapy is often prescribed, and beta-blocker therapy to reduce the stress on the aortic wall is usually recommended. However, very few clinical trials of pharmacologic therapy in humans with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease have been conducted. Mouse models have led to important discoveries and insight into the pathogenesis of aneurysm syndromes, and there is hope these may lead to effective therapy in people. Several studies are ongoing that examine the role of angiotensin receptor blockers in Marfan syndrome. Lifestyle modification is also important for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, including restrictions on physical activity, weight lifting, and recommendations about the management of pregnancy. Long-term surveillance of the aorta, even after successful surgery, is necessary for timing of prophylactic surgery and to evaluate for late complications. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Age and Aortic Diameters in Pilots.

    PubMed

    Akın, Ahmet; Ozturk, Cengiz; Aparci, Mustafa; Cakmak, Tolga; Metin, Suleyman; Balta, Sevket; Sen, Ahmet

    2015-12-01

    Pilots are exposed to various physical and hemodynamic stresses during flight. Aortic dilatation may be one of the important consequences of flight-related stress. In this study, we evaluated whether or not variation in aortic diameter was associated with the type of aircraft and the age of pilots. Medical records of 87 jet aircraft pilots (JP) (mean age = 30.0 ± 7.0 years) and 65 non-jet aircraft pilots (NJP) (mean age = 32.63 ± 5.7) were reviewed. Echocardiographic diameters of the aortic sinus (AoS) and ascending aorta (AoAsc) were measured using standard echo probe positions. Aortic diameters were not statistically different between JP and NJP. Regression analysis revealed that the diameters of the AoS (R = 0.484, R(2) = 0.234, p < 0.001) and AoAsc (R = 0.514, R(2) = 0.264, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with age in the JP group. Whereas, there was not any relationship found between age and the diameters of the AoS and AoAsc in the NJP group. Jet pilots had aortic enlargement as they became older in contrast to the NJP group. Although the aortic diameters were not within the critical ranges in the JP group, these results could suggest that flight-related stresses might result in acute aortic syndromes in the long term. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Neonatal aortic thrombosis: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Nagel, K; Tuckuviene, R; Paes, B; Chan, A K

    2010-05-01

    Neonatal aortic thrombosis is a rare occurrence, but can be fatal. Treatment of this condition is hampered by the lack of large studies involving this pediatric population. Reporting of this condition is also not standardized. The purpose of this review is to collate available literature on the incidence, risk factors, presentation, treatment and outcome of neonatal aortic thrombosis as well as suggest a treatment model. A Medline search of PubMed, OVID and Cochrane databases was undertaken using the key words "neonatal", "infant", "aorta", "aortic", "thrombosis", "thrombus" and "clot". Limits were set for articles that were English language only and published between 1980 and September 2009. Following review of all articles using predetermined search words and criteria, 38 were found with sufficient data for our purpose. The reported total number of neonatal patients with aortic thrombosis was 148 and 78% of the aortic thromboses in this review were related to arterial umbilical catheterization. We have suggested a classification system to standardize reporting of neonatal aortic thrombosis, as well as a treatment decision tree, and a clinical guide for the treatment of thrombosis in children. As always, clinicians should balance the risks and benefits of their decision to treat with the level of local expertise. This guide may specifically serve the neonatal population with line-related aortic thrombosis.

  4. Concealed primary aortic sarcoma induced hypertensive encephalopathy resulting from a thoracic aortic occlusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunmin; Yoon, Hee-Jeoung; Jang, Woo-Ik; Kim, Chang-Young; Doh, Joon-Hyung

    2013-04-18

    Primary aortic sarcoma is a rare condition that is frequently associated with distal embolization. In addition, growth characteristics of primary aortic sarcoma lead to the narrowing of the involved aortic lumen. A 72-year-old Korean male with primary aortic sarcoma showed progressive unexplained blood pressure elevation that didn't improve with additional antihypertensive drug therapy. Because follow-up measures were not taken, the patient ultimately developed hypertensive encephalopathy with concurrent embolic dissemination. Although we successfully performed open transcatheter embolectomy in both legs, the patient died because of multiple organ failure 3 days after surgery. Given the ominous prognosis for this condition, this case report highlights the fact that the value of early detection and prompt evaluation of altered vital signs should not be overemphasized. We describe a rare case of primary aortic sarcoma that showed hypertensive encephalopathy caused by thoracic aortic occlusion and also had embolic metastases to the lower extremities.

  5. Left coronary ostial obstruction after aortic valve replacement with a supra-annular aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kanji; Unno, Hideya; Konishi, Taisuke; Shigeta, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    We report a rare case of left coronary ostial obstruction after aortic valve replacement with a Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve, which was diagnosed with intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography and successfully treated with an unplanned coronary bypass. The patient was a 76-year-old woman (height 143 cm, weight 44 kg) with aortic stenosis and regurgitation. A 19-mm Top Hat valve was implanted in the supra-annular position because of a small aortic annulus. There was a possibility that the high profile of this prosthesis might block the left coronary ostium. There may be a problem with the use of this prosthesis in patients with small and rigid aortic roots with little compliance. Although the Top Hat valve has a great advantage for small aortic annuli, care in its use should be taken due to possible interference with the coronary ostia.

  6. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Moore, A.V. Jr.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-08-01

    Abdominal computed tomography was performed in six patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm but in whom an alternate clinical diagnosis was seriously considered. In each patient, a large aortic aneurysm was demonstrated in association with a retroperitoneal accumulation of high-density blood. The retroperitoneal blood was primarily confined to the extracapsular perinephric space. In four of the six patients, a focal area of the aortic wall was indistinct on the side of the retroperitoneal hemorrhage at the presumed site of rupture. Five of the six patients underwent emergency surgery, which confirmed the site of aneurysm, presence of rupture and the location of fresh retroperitoneal blood.

  7. Bacillus cereus endocarditis in native aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ngow, H A; Wan Khairina, W M N

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus cereus endocarditis is rare. It has been implicated in immunocompromised individuals, especially in intravenous drug users as well as in those with a cardiac prosthesis. The patient was a 31-year-old ex-intravenous drug addict with a past history of staphylococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis, who presented with symptoms of decompensated cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with an oscillating vegetation seen on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus. We report this as a rare case of Bacillus cereus endocarditis affecting a native aortic valve.

  8. Aortic root abscess presenting as alternating bundle branch block: Infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh; Kader, Muneer; Sajeev, C.G.; Krishnan, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac malformation, affecting 1%–2% of the population. Among various complications, incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) in the bicuspid aortic valve population is high with higher rate of periannular extension resulting in conduction disturbances. Here we are reporting a rare case of infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve presented with alternating bundle branch block. PMID:26138186

  9. Structural valve deterioration after aortic valve replacement with Medtronic freestyle stentless porcine aortic root bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hidefumi; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Sakaguchi, Genichi; Shimamoto, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The Medtronic freestyle aortic root bioprosthesis (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) is a stentless valve with an effective orifice area that is larger than that observed on other bioprostheses. However, there have been sporadic reports of structural valve deterioration (SVD), such as aortic root wall rupture, leaflet tearing, and pseudoaneurysm formation. We report five cases of SVD of freestyle aortic root bioprostheses. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Cardiac Surgery Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Acute Type B Aortic Dissection in a Patient with Previous Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hun; Rha, Seung-Woon

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) was relatively safe, and became a widely performed procedure. If aortic dissection (AD) occurred in patient with previous EVAR, it could cause fatal complications like endograft collapse. Surgical treatment was limited in this situation for comorbidities and complex anatomies. Here we report a rare case of acute type B AD developed following trans-radial coronary intervention in a patient with previous EVAR of abdominal aortic aneurysm, which was treated with thoracic EVAR. PMID:28377913

  11. Simulations of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation – Implications for Aortic Root Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Kodali, Susheel; Primiano, Charles; Sun, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortic root rupture is one of the most severe complications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The mechanism of this adverse event remains mostly unknown. The purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of the biomechanical interaction between the tissue and stent for patients with a high risk of aortic rupture. Methods We simulated the stent deployment process of three TAVI patients with high aortic rupture risk using finite element method. The first case was a retrospective analysis of an aortic rupture case, while the other two cases were prospective studies, which ended with one cancelled procedure and one successful TAVI. Simulation results were evaluated for the risk of aortic root rupture, as well as coronary artery occlusion, and paravalvular leak. Results For Case 1, the simulated aortic rupture location was the same as clinical observations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the large calcified spot on the interior of the left coronary sinus between coronary ostium and the aortic annulus was pushed by the stent, causing the aortic rupture. For Case 2 and Case 3, predicated results from the simulations were presented to the clinicians at pre-procedure meetings; and they were in agreement with clinician’s observations and decisions. Conclusions Our results indicated that the engineering analysis could provide additional information to help clinicians evaluate complicated, high risk aortic rupture cases. Since a systematic study of a large patient cohort of aortic rupture is currently not available (due to the low occurrence rate) to clearly understand underlying rupture mechanisms, case by case engineering analysis is recommended for evaluating patient-specific aortic rupture risk. PMID:24736808

  12. Temporal changes of aortic neck morphology in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Propper, Brandon W; Rasmussen, Todd E; Jones, W Tracey; Gifford, Shaun M; Burkhardt, Gabriel E; Clouse, W Darrin

    2010-05-01

    This study characterized temporal changes in the infrarenal aortic aneurysm neck in patients with small, untreated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Patients with infrarenal AAA who had contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans separated by >6 months were identified and their images reviewed. Infrarenal neck diameter and length were measured along with aneurysm diameter. Comparisons between the interval CT scans were made and analysis of factors affecting neck changes performed. Sixty patients met inclusion criteria with an imaging interval of 3.8 years (median, 3.4 years; range, 0.75-9.6 years). During the interval, there was an increase in proximal and distal neck diameters of 1.1 mm (SD, 2.2) (0.28 mm/y) and 1.0 mm (SD, 3.0) (0.26 mm/y), respectively. During the same interval, the neck length decreased by 4 mm (SD, 11) (1 mm/y). A neck length of <15 mm was present in 10 patients (17%) at the initial imaging. Four of the remaining 50 patients experienced an interval decrease in neck length to <15 mm, all of whom had initial lengths of 15 to 20 mm. Medications had no association with changes in neck morphology; however, diabetes correlated with a slower rate of neck shortening (P = .001). The natural history of the aneurysm neck is one of expansion and shortening that will not affect most patients under surveillance. Patients with marginal neck lengths (range, 15-20 mm) at the initial imaging are more likely to experience loss of neck length that may negatively affect endovascular suitability. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  13. Stent graft implantation in an aortic pseudoaneurysm associated with a fractured Cheatham-Platinum stent in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Berden, Pavel; Podnar, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of aortic pseudoaneurysm associated with a fractured bare Cheatham-Platinum stent following stenting for aortic coarctation. These complications were recognised 6 years after the implantation procedure and were successfully managed by percutaneous stent graft implantation. Staged approach for stent dilatation might prevent development of aortic pseudoaneurysms. In addition, careful follow-up is warranted after stenting for aortic coarctation, particularly in patients with recognised aortic wall injury.

  14. Heparin-Induced-Thrombocytopenia Causing Massive Aortic Thrombosis after Ascending Aortic Replacement for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Keiji; Isoda, Susumu; Karube, Norihisa; Yasuda, Shota; Masuda, Munetaka

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent emergency ascending aortic replacement for type A acute aortic dissection. Fifteen days after the operation, she had motor and sensory disturbances in the lower limbs. Computed tomography revealed multiple aortic thrombi and disrupted blood flow in the right external iliac and left common iliac arteries. She underwent an emergency thrombectomy for acute limb ischemia. Because heparin- induced-thrombocytopenia (HIT) was suspected to have caused the multiple aortic thrombi, we postoperatively changed the anticoagulant therapy from heparin to argatroban. Seventeen days after the first operation, gastrointestinal bleeding developed, and the patient died of mesenteric ischemia caused by HIT. Arterial embolization caused by HIT after cardiovascular surgery is a rare, but fatal event. To avoid fatal complications, early diagnosis and early treatment are essential. Use of a scoring system would probably facilitate early diagnosis. PMID:26780951

  15. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM. PMID:27867654

  16. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L

    2016-10-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM.

  17. Surgical versus percutaneous treatment of aortic coarctation: new standards in an era of transcatheter repair.

    PubMed

    Luijendijk, Paul; Bouma, Berto J; Groenink, Maarten; Boekholdt, Matthijs; Hazekamp, Mark G; Blom, Nico A; Koolbergen, Dave R; de Winter, Robbert J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2012-12-01

    Aortic coarctation is a common congenital cardiovascular defect, which can be diagnosed over a wide range of ages and with varying degrees of severity. Surgery has proven to be an effective treatment for the management of native aortic coarctation, and remains the treatment of choice in neonates. Balloon angioplasty with or without stenting has evolved rapidly over the past decade. Balloon angioplasty is the treatment of choice in children with re-coarctation, and currently available immediate results in native coarctation are similar with regards to gradient reduction as compared with surgery. However, both treatment options carry the risk of restenosis and aortic wall complications, especially after balloon angioplasty without stenting in native coarctation. On the other hand, stent implantation has shown excellent short-term results in both children beyond infancy and in adults with native coarctation. In patients with recurrent coarctation who are at high surgical risk, balloon angioplasty and stent repair offer a less invasive and equally effective method. Stent repair is preferred over balloon angioplasty in adults and outgrown children with a recurrent coarctation, as the risk for re-coarctation and aneurysm formation seems to be lower. Data with regard to long-term outcome after percutaneous treatment strategies are scarce. This review summarizes the current insights in the efficacy and safety of both surgical and transcatheter treatment options for aortic coarctation.

  18. Assessment of aortic and mitral annuli dynamics during the cardiac cycle using speckle tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenjuan; Li, Hui; Tang, Hong; Zhang, Qing; Zhu, Ye; Rao, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aims of this study were i) to evaluate mitral and aortic annuli excursion, and aortomitral angle (AMA) during the cardiac cycle in healthy adults using two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography, ii) to assess two annuli dynamics and coupling behaviors as an integral, and iii) to detect the relation between two annuli and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). A total of 74 healthy adults underwent transthoracic echocardiography. In the parasternal long-axis view, a number of points were extracted, including right coronary aortic annular, aortomitral fibrous junction, and posterior mitral annular points. The annuli excursion and AMA were measured using a speckle tracking-derived software during the cardiac cycle. During the isovolumic contraction and the isovolumic relaxation phase, annuli excursion and AMA remain stable for a short time. During the systole, annuli excursion increased sharply to the maximum, while AMA narrowed quickly to the minimum value. During the diastole, there are three patterns of decrease in annuli excursion and AMA expansion in different phases. The annuli excursion of three points correlates well with the LVEF (right coronary aortic annulus excursion, r=0.71, P<0.05; non-coronary aortic annulus excursion, r=0.70, P<0.05; posterior mitral annulus excursion, r=0.82, P<0.05). Moreover, there are positive correlations between annuli excursion and the variation of AMA (r=0.60, P<0.05). The annuli excursion and AMA have various regular patterns in healthy adults. The interactions of mitral and aortic annuli correlate with the left ventricular function. Our findings may have relevance to the evaluation of left ventricular function and presurgical planning of patients with valvular diseases.

  19. Management of concomitant large aortic aneurysm and severe stenosis of aortic arc.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shiyan; Sun, Guang; Yang, Yuguang; Liu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Primary large saccular aortic aneurysm with high grade stenosis of aortic arc is rare, and no standard therapy is available. We have encountered one case and successfully treated using a hybrid interventional approach. A 59-year-old woman with a 7-day history of headache, dizziness and chest pain, and a 5-year history of hypertension admitted and was diagnosed with transverse aortic aneurysm with sever aortic stenosis, the huge saccular aneurysm was located behind the transverse aortic arc. During surgery, a bypass with graft from ascending aorta to left external iliac artery was made initially in order to ensure the blood supply to the left leg, afterward, a 40 mm × 160 mm covered stent was implanted to cover the orifice of aneurysm and was used as a supporting anchorage in the descending aorta, a second covered stent (20 mm × 100 mm) was implanted to expand the stenosis of aortic arc. Follow-up at 1.5-year after surgery, the patient has been doing well without any surgical complication. A collateral pathway between internal mammary artery and inferior epigastric artery via the superior epigastric artery was found on3-dimensional reconstruction before surgery. Interruption of the compensatory arterial collateral pathway in the patient with severe stenosis of aortic arc should be prevented if possible in order to ensure the satisfactory perfusion of the lower limbs of the body.In conclusion, a patient with transverse aortic aneurysm accompanied with severe aortic stenosis can be treated by hybrid surgery.

  20. [Surgery of aortic coarctation with aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic coronary fistula].

    PubMed

    Ben Jmaà, H; Abdennadher, M; Hadj Kacem, A; Masmoudi, S; Kammoun, S; Karoui, A; Frikha, I

    2009-11-01

    Aortic coarctation is rarely associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and an aortic coronary fistula. In this study, we report the case of a 52-year-old man undergoing surgery for an isthmic coarctation who also had an aneurysm of the initial portion of the aorta and an aortic coronary fistula. The diagnosis was clinically suspected and confirmed by vascular catheterism. The first operative stage consisted of treating the coarctation. The second stage was performed two months later to remove the aneurysm and replace the ascending aorta and the aortic valve with a prosthesis. The coronary arteries were then reimplanted. The postoperative results were quite favourable.

  1. Management of Traumatic Aortic and Splenic Rupture in a Patient With Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Ahmet Can; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Bolukcu, Ahmet; Dagsali, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is rupture of all or part of the aortic wall, mostly resulting from blunt trauma to the chest. The most common site of rupture is the aortic isthmus. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta is rare. A 62-year-old man with a family history of ascending aortic aneurysm was referred to our hospital after a motor vehicle accident. He had symptoms of cardiogenic shock. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed rupture of the proximal ascending aorta and an ascending aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 55 mm at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. Transthoracic echocardiography at the bedside revealed severe aortic valvular insufficiency. We performed a successful Bentall procedure. During postoperative recovery, the patient experienced a cerebrovascular accident. Transesophageal echocardiography did not reveal thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis. The patient's symptoms resolved in time, and he was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 47 without any sequelae. He has been symptom free during a 6-month follow-up period. We suggest that individuals who have experienced blunt trauma to the chest and have symptoms of traumatic aortic rupture and a known medical history of ascending aortic aneurysm should be evaluated for a rupture at the ascending aorta and the aortic isthmus.

  2. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-06-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium.

  3. The significance of aortic valve calcification in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xinshuang; Zhang, Minghui; Liu, Kun; Hou, Zhihui; Gao, Yang; Yin, Weihua; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhennan; Lu, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a common congenital heart disease. Our study was to analyze clinical features of BAV and evaluate whether aortic valve calcium score (AVCS) was a reliable marker for aortic stenosis (AS) in patients with BAV. 101 patients with BAV who both underwent echocardiology and cardiac computed tomography (CT) scan in our institution were included. Basic clinical data, haemodynamic feature, aortic valve and coronary calcium score were collected and compared among patients with different valve function and different degree of AS. Risk factors related to severe AS were evaluated by logistic regression, and a receiver operative characteristic curve was used to determine the cutoff calcium score greater than which the diagnosis of severe AS was optimized. Patients with aortic regurgitation (AR) were younger and demonstrated larger aortic annulus and sinus compared with patients with other valve dysfunction. Aortic valve calcium score was higher in patients with AS than with AR. For patients with different degree of AS, there were statistical significances in the value of age, aortic valve calcium score and coronary calcium score. AVCS was positively related to severe AS with an odd ratio of 1.286 (95% CI 1.099-1.504) by every 300 points increase. AVCS was also a strong predictor for severe AS with area under the curve 0.855 with a cutoff value of 897 (sensitivity 86.7%, specificity 72.2%). Conclusively, aortic calcium score calculated by quantitative CT is a reliable marker in evaluating severity of AS.

  4. Emergency Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Acute and Early Failure of Sutureless Perceval Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Durand, Eric; Tron, Christophe; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old woman admitted for cardiogenic shock related to acute and early failure (severe aortic regurgitation) of a Perceval sutureless aortic bioprosthesis (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy). Clinical stability was achieved using rescue transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation with an Edwards SAPIEN 3 prosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA). To our knowledge, we report herein the first case of successful valve-in-valve implantation using a SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve in a sutureless bioprosthetic aortic valve with acute and early deterioration.

  5. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium. PMID:26798724

  6. Hybrid Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for Intercostal Patch Aneurysm after Thoracoabdominal Aortic Replacement.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Hiroto; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Hirano, Akinori; Kasai, Mio; Akamatsu, Yuta; Oka, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for intercostal patch aneurysm after thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. Eighteen years ago, a 63-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome had undergone thoracoabdominal aortic replacement with reimplantation of the intercostal artery in an island fashion. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) revealed a remaining intercostal patch aneurysm of diameter 60 mm 17 years after the last operation. Hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for exclusion of this intercostal patch aneurysm was successfully performed, with visceral artery bypasses. Postoperative CT showed no anastomotic stenosis or endoleak.

  7. Differential expression of Dlk-1 in bovine adipose tissue depots.

    PubMed

    Vuocolo, T; Pearson, R; Campbell, P; Tellam, R L

    2003-02-01

    Dlk-1, a type 1 membrane glycoprotein, is a member of the Epidermal Growth Factor-like family of homeotic proteins that are typically involved in cell fate decisions and in mice it has been implicated in the control of differentiation of adipocytes. The aim of this study was to determine whether there were tissue-specific expression patterns of Dlk-1 splice variants in bovine tissues. Only the Dlk-1-C2 variant was expressed in adult bovine tissues while both Dlk-1-C2 and Dlk-1-A variants were expressed in foetal tissues. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed large differences in the relative levels of expression of the Dlk-1-C2 variant in adult adipose tissue depots with no expression in subcutaneous and brisket adipose tissues. Expression was also demonstrated in three adult skeletal muscle samples. The large variation in the level of expression of Dlk-1-C2 in different adult tissues may reflect the relative preadipocyte content of those tissues and consequently their potential for generating new adipocytes. A low abundance soluble glycoprotein (bFA1) was purified from bovine amniotic fluid. Analyses of its amino acid sequence revealed that it corresponded to most of the extracellular domain of bovine Dlk-1 and was derived by proteolytic processing from the full-length Dlk-1 protein encoded by the Dlk-1-A variant. The tissues expressing the Dlk-1-A variant have not been identified but are likely to be foetal in origin. Splice variants of Dlk-1 may have varied functional roles with the foetal Dlk-1-A form capable of generating a protein that undergoes proteolytic processing to release a soluble ecto-domain of Dlk-1. In contrast the Dlk-1-C2 splice variant codes for a protein lacking this processing site and therefore it probably remains bound to the cell membrane.

  8. Inhibition of rat and bovine trypsins and chymotrypsins by soybean, bovine basic pancreatic, and bovine colostrum trypsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Esparza, I; Brock, J H

    1978-01-01

    1. Bovine (Bos taurus) trypsin and trypsin activity in rat (Rattus norvegicus) pancreatic extract were inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor and by bovine basic pancreatic and colostrum inhibitors. 2. Bovine alpha-chymotrypsin was inhibited by soybean and bovine basic pancreatic inhibitors but only weakly by colostrum inhibitor. 3. Chymotrypsin activity in rat pancreatic extract was due to at least three different components against all of which the inhibitors were largely ineffective. 4. It is concluded that bovine colostrum inhibitor has a more limited inhibition spectrum than the phylogenetically related basic pancreatic inhibitor which, in turn, is less active against rat than against bovine enzymes.

  9. Management of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Dehlin, Jennifer M; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a lethal disease. Ultrasound is the modality of choice for screening patients for AAAs. It is reasonable to screen patients over age 60, particularly men, women with cardiovascular risk factors, smokers, and patients with a family history of AAAs. Patients with small (< 5.5 cm) AAAs should be followed with serial ultrasound. Medical management should focus on treating comorbidities, particularly those that put patients at risk for other cardiovascular diseases. Smoking cessation is mandatory in these patients. Patients with large or symptomatic AAAs should be evaluated for surgery; this includes careful imaging of the abdomen, aggressive treatment of comorbidities, and perioperative beta blockade. Endovascular repair has lower short-term morbidity compared with conventional open repair. Trials assessing long-term results are in progress. Basic science and translational research focusing on the underlying pathogenesis of AAAs will likely pave the way for medical therapies in the future.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysms in women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has long been recognized as a condition predominantly afflicting males, with sex-associated differences described for almost every aspect of the disease from pathophysiology and epidemiology to morbidity and mortality. Women are generally spared from AAA formation by the immunomodulating effects of estrogen but once they develop, the natural history of AAAs in women appears to be more aggressive, with more rapid expansion, a higher tendency to rupture at smaller diameters, and higher mortality following rupture. However, simply repairing AAA at smaller diameters in women is a debatable solution, as even elective endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is fraught with higher morbidity and mortality in women compared to men. The goal of this review is to summarize what is currently known about the effect of gender on AAA presentation, treatment, and outcomes. Additionally, we aim to review current controversies over screening recommendations and threshold for repair in women. PMID:26747679

  11. Smooth muscle cell-specific Tgfbr1 deficiency promotes aortic aneurysm formation by stimulating multiple signaling events

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pu; Schmit, Bradley M.; Fu, Chunhua; DeSart, Kenneth; Oh, S. Paul; Berceli, Scott A.; Jiang, Zhihua

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling disorder has emerged as a common molecular signature for aortic aneurysm development. The timing of postnatal maturation plays a key role in dictating the biological outcome of TGF-β signaling disorders in the aortic wall. In this study, we investigated the impact of deficiency of TGFβ receptors on the structural homeostasis of mature aortas. We used an inducible Cre-loxP system driven by a Myh11 promoter to delete Tgfbr1, Tgfbr2, or both in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of adult mice. TGFBR1 deficiency resulted in rapid and severe aneurysmal degeneration, with 100% penetrance of ascending thoracic aortas, whereas TGFBR2 deletion only caused mild aortic pathology with low (26%) lesion prevalence. Removal of TGFBR2 attenuated the aortic pathology caused by TGFBR1 deletion and correlated with a reduction of early ERK phosphorylation. In addition, the production of angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme was upregulated in TGFBR1 deficient aortas at the early stage of aneurysmal degeneration. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation or blockade of AngII type I receptor AT1R prevented aneurysmal degeneration of TGFBR1 deficient aortas. In conclusion, loss of SMC-Tgfbr1 triggers multiple deleterious pathways, including abnormal TGFBR2, ERK, and AngII/AT1R signals that disrupt aortic wall homeostasis to cause aortic aneurysm formation. PMID:27739498

  12. Assessment and feasibility of the four landmarks of the aortic root in a cohort of very preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Sam; de Waal, Koert A

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diameter of the aortic root is used as a parameter to calculate blood flow in very preterm infants. There are considerable differences in diameter of the four anatomical landmarks of the aortic root in children and adults, but limited data are available for the very preterm population. The aim of this study was to obtain reference and reliability data on two-dimensional measurements of the aortic root in very preterm infants <30 weeks gestation. Materials and Methods: Fifty long axis echocardiograms were reviewed and re-analyzed for measurements at the four anatomical landmarks of the aortic root; the aortic annulus, sinus of Valsalva (SV), sinotubular junction, and the proximal ascending aorta (PAA). A subjective visual scoring system was developed to quantify image quality. A random sample of images was blindly re-measured to assess intra- and inter-observer reliability. Results: Significant differences in diameter were found between the four landmarks, except between SV and PAA. Inter-observer coefficients showed marginal variation ranging from 5.0% to 8.2%, with slightly lower intra-observer variability. Overall image quality score was poorest for PAA on standard long axis images but improved when the probe was adjusted along the outflow tract. Conclusion: We present reliability and reference values for all four anatomic landmarks of the aortic root in very preterm infants and demonstrated the importance of standardizing and reporting cardiac output measurements in preterm infants. PMID:26556963

  13. Cardioprotection of exogenous erythropoietin in mice with ligature-induced aortic stenosis: effects on maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L; Xu, J; Qiu, W; Liu, X; Zhao, C-M; Chen, D; Chen, Y

    2010-02-01

    Pre-operative treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin may improve aortic stenosis patients' condition, including anemia and/or cardiac dysfunction, for subjecting to aortic valve replacement. In this study, we tested this hypothesis in a mouse model of aortic stenosis. Adult male mice were subjected to either aortic stenosis created by aortic ligature or sham operation. Aortic stenosis for 4 weeks caused cardiac hypertrophy, pulmonary congestion and left ventricular dysfunction. It was associated with increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in serum and myocardium, and reduced levels of interleukin-10 in myocardium but not in serum. Myocyte apoptosis rate, level of cleaved caspase 3, activity of nuclear factor-kappaB and expression of p38-MAPK pathway were also elevated. Erythropoietin treatment increased hematocrit but did not prevent the development of cardiac hypertrophy. It, however, reduced the apoptosis, prevented the increases in tumor necrosis factor-alpha, nuclear factor-kappaB activation and phosphorylation of p38, and attenuated the increases in lung weight, the decreases in LVEF and LVFS, and the increases in LVDd and LVDs. In conclusion recombinant human erythropoietin has cardioprotective effects in maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappaB activation, phosphorylation of p38-MAPK pathway, and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, together leading to a reduced apoptosis.

  14. Computational analysis of an aortic valve jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Astorino, Matteo; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2009-11-01

    In this work we employ a coupled FSI scheme using an immersed boundary method to simulate flow through a realistic deformable, 3D aortic valve model. This data was used to compute Lagrangian coherent structures, which revealed flow separation from the valve leaflets during systole, and correspondingly, the boundary between the jet of ejected fluid and the regions of separated, recirculating flow. Advantages of computing LCS in multi-dimensional FSI models of the aortic valve are twofold. For one, the quality and effectiveness of existing clinical indices used to measure aortic jet size can be tested by taking advantage of the accurate measure of the jet area derived from LCS. Secondly, as an ultimate goal, a reliable computational framework for the assessment of the aortic valve stenosis could be developed.

  15. Gallium localization in dissecting aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Haden, H.T.; Lippman, H.R.

    1988-08-01

    Gallium concentration was demonstrated in a dissecting aneurysm of the aortic arch, imaged approximately 2 weeks after dissection. Concentration of gallium was apparently due to the inflammatory reaction associated with the organizing intramural hematoma.

  16. Aortic Dissection and Rupture in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yun Ju; Lee, Eun Jeong; Oh, Jin Won; Moon, Chang Min; Cho, Deok Kyu; Cho, Yun Hyeong; Byun, Ki Hyun

    2011-01-01

    After developing sudden severe chest pain, an 11-year-old boy presented to the emergency room with chest pain and palpitations and was unable to stand up. The sudden onset of chest pain was first reported while swimming at school about 30 minutes prior to presentation. Arterial blood pressure (BP) was 150/90 mmHg, heart rate was 120/minute, and the chest pain was combined with shortness of breath and diaphoresis. During the evaluation in the emergency room, the chest pain worsened and abdominal pain developed. An aortic dissection was suspected and a chest and abdomen CT was obtained. The diagnosis of aortic dissection type B was established by CT imaging. The patient went to surgery immediately with BP control. He died prior to surgery due to aortic rupture. Here we present this rare case of aortic dissection type B with rupture, reported in an 11-year-old Korean child. PMID:21519516

  17. Understanding the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ryer, Evan J.; Elmore, James R.; Tromp, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Summary An aortic aneurysm is a dilatation in which the aortic diameter is ≥ 3.0 cm. If left untreated, the aortic wall continues to weaken and becomes unable to withstand the forces of the luminal blood pressure resulting in progressive dilatation and rupture, a catastrophic event associated with a mortality of 50 – 80%. Smoking and positive family history are important risk factors for the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Several genetic risk factors have also been identified. On the histological level, visible hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. We expect that large genetic, genomic, epigenetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies will be undertaken by international consortia to identify additional risk factors and biomarkers, and to enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of AAA. Collaboration between different research groups will be important in overcoming the challenges to develop pharmacological treatments for AAA. PMID:26308600

  18. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  19. Treating calcific aortic stenosis: an evolving science.

    PubMed

    Hull, Christine L

    2012-01-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis is a common valvular disease, but its pathophysiology remains undetermined and important considerations exist for treatment. Pathophysiology, treatment by the advanced practice nurse, and literature review are discussed in the context of a case study.

  20. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis. PMID:27785132

  1. Aortic intramural hematoma: an unpredictable evolution.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Marta; Dias Ferreira, Nuno; Bettencourt, Nuno; Caeiro, Daniel; Fonseca, Marlene; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Vouga, Luís; Gama, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is an acute aortic syndrome characterized by bleeding into the media of the aortic wall without intimal disruption or the classic flap formation. Its natural history is variable and still poorly understood, so strategies for therapeutic management are not fully established. In some cases there is partial or complete regression of the hematoma under medical treatment, but most progress to dissection, aneurysmal dilatation or aortic rupture. The authors present the case of a 44-year-old hypertensive male patient admitted with a diagnosis of IMH of the descending aorta. Despite initial symptom resolution and optimal medical therapy, the IMH evolved to a pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully treated by an endovascular approach. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Anterior longitudinal aortotomy in aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kanji; Kudo, Yohei; Ikeda, Akihiko; Konishi, Taisuke; Jikuya, Tomoaki

    2016-02-01

    We adopted an anterior longitudinal aortotomy in some cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR), and report them here. The potential of this method is also discussed. We analyzed the data on 24 patients (75.5 ± 7.8 years of age) who had undergone AVR through anterior longitudinal aortotomy. The indications for surgery were prosthetic valve complication in 5 patients, aortic stenosis (AS) with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis (LVOTS) in 16 patients, and aortic regurgitation with moderately dilated ascending aorta in 3 patients. The Konno procedure was performed in 6 cases with small aortic annuli. A longitudinal aortotomy was made at the aortic root along the left side of the right coronary ostium, and extended beyond the right coronary annulus to the interventricular septum as needed. Bioprostheses (21.1 ± 1.7 mm) were used in 23 patients and a 21-mm mechanical valve for one (a 59-year-old man). One high-risk patient died of low output syndrome, leading to a mortality rate of 4.2 %. All other patients recovered well, though atrioventricular block occurred in 2 cases. Anterior longitudinal aortotomy provides a good field of vision at the aortic annulus and the flexibility to develop into anterior annular enlargement. Major indications for this approach are small sino-tubular junction and very small aortic annulus. This approach could be an attractive option in AVR for cases of AS with small aortic annuli and LVOTS. It could also be useful for AVR cases with moderately dilated ascending aorta requiring aortoplasty.

  3. Regional aortic distensibility and its relationship with age and aortic stenosis: a computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis T L; Narayan, Om; Leong, Darryl P; Bertaso, Angela G; Maia, Murilo G; Ko, Brian S H; Baillie, Timothy; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Worthley, Matthew I; Meredith, Ian T; Cameron, James D

    2015-06-01

    Aortic distensibility (AD) decreases with age and increased aortic stiffness is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The association of severe aortic stenosis (AS) with AD in different aortic regions has not been evaluated. Elderly subjects with severe AS and a cohort of patients without AS of similar age were studied. Proximal aortic cross-sectional-area changes during the cardiac cycle were determined using retrospective-ECG-gating on 128-detector row computed-tomography. Using oscillometric-brachial-blood-pressure measurements, the AD at the ascending-aorta (AA), proximal-descending-aorta (PDA) and distal-descending-aorta (DDA) was determined. Linear mixed effects modelling was used to determine the association of age and aortic stenosis on regional AD. 102 patients were evaluated: 36 AS patients (70-85 years), 24 AS patients (>85 years) and 42 patients without AS (9 patients <50 years, 20 patients between 51-70 years and 13 patients 70-85 years). When comparing patients 70-85 years, AA distensibility was significantly lower in those with AS compared to those without AS (0.9 ± 0.9 vs. 1.4 ± 1.1, P = 0.03) while there was no difference in the PDA (1.0 ± 1.1 vs. 1.0 ± 1.2, P = 0.26) and DDA (1.1 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.97). In patients without AS, AD decreased with age in all aortic regions (P < 0.001). The AA in patients <50 years were the most distensible compared to other aortic regions. There is regional variation in aortic distensibility with aging. Patients with aortic stenosis demonstrated regional differences in aortic distensibility with lower distensibility demonstrated in the proximal ascending aorta compared to an age-matched cohort.

  4. Long-term durability of preserved aortic root after repair of acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Kamohara, Keiji; Koga, Shugo; Takaki, Jun; Yoshida, Nozomi; Furukawa, Kojiro; Morita, Shigeki

    2017-08-01

    Optimal management of aortic root in type A aortic dissection (AAD) is controversial. To determine the most appropriate strategy, we studied the late outcomes after conservative repair of aortic root. 234 AAD patients (mean age 68 ± 12 years) underwent surgical repair using supracommissural replacement (SCR) for aortic root reconstruction from 1989 to 2014. Ascending aortic replacement or hemi-arch replacement was performed in 180 patients (non-arch group), whereas total arch replacement (TAR) was performed in 54 patients. In both groups, proper and firm reapproximation of proximal edge was performed exactly at the sinotubular junction (STJ). The long-term durability of preserved aortic root (mean follow-up 89 months) was evaluated. Hospital mortality occurred in 25 of 234 patients (10.6%). Aorta-related deaths occurred in five patients (four in non-arch; one in TAR), with over 90% 10-year actuarial survival rate in each group. Among 19 aorta-related events, there were only four proximal events (three in non-arch; one in TAR). The 10-year freedom rate from proximal aorta-related events exceeded 90%, with no significant difference in both groups. Freedom rate from moderate aortic regurgitation at 10 years was statistically similar between non-arch (86.3%) and TAR (85.7%) groups. The long-term durability of SCR with proximal aortic reapproximation exactly at the STJ was acceptable with low rates of proximal aortic events. This technique can be the standard technique for aortic root reconstruction in AAD patients, except those with aortic root pathology.

  5. Stimulation of aortic smooth muscle cell mitogenesis by serotonin

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, G.M.; Coughlin, S.R.; Handley, D.A.; Moskowitz, M.A.

    1986-02-01

    Bovine aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro responded to 1 nM to 10 ..mu..M serotonin with increased incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into DNA. The mitogenic effect of serotonin was half-maximal at 80 nM and maximal above 1 ..mu..M. At a concentration of 1 ..mu..M, serotonin stimulated smooth muscle cell mitogenesis to the same extent as human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 12 ng/ml. Tryptamine was approx. = 1/10th as potent as serotonin as a mitogen for smooth muscle cells. Other indoles that are structurally related to serotonin (D- and L-tryptophan, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan, N-acetyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, melatonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 5-hydroxytryptophol) and quipazine were inactive. The stimulatory effect of serotonin on smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis required prolonged (20-24 hr) exposure to the agonist and was attenuated in the presence of serotonin D receptor antagonists. When smooth muscle cells were incubated with submaximal concentrations of serotonin and PDGF, synergistic rather than additive mitogenic responses were observed. These data indicate that serotonin has a significant mitogenic effect on smooth muscle cells in vitro, which appears to be mediated by specific plasma membrane receptors.

  6. Patient-prosthesis mismatch in patients with aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kaminishi, Yuichiro; Misawa, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Konishi, Hiroaki; Miyata, Hiroaki; Motomura, Noboru; Takamoto, Shin-ichi

    2013-05-01

    Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) may affect clinical outcomes in patients with aortic valve replacement (AVR). We retrospectively examined the PPM in patients with isolated AVR in the Japan Adult Cardiovascular Surgery Database (JACVSD). We examined all patients with isolated AVR between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2009. The JACVSD data collection form has a total of 255 variables. We defined PPM as an effective orifice area index of ≤ 0.85 m(2)/cm(2). PPM was observed in 306 of 3,609 cases analyzed, PPM rate was 8.5 %. Body surface area was larger and body mass index was higher in the PPM group than the non-PPM group (P < 0.001). Patients with PPM were older (P = 0.001) and had a higher prevalence of diabetes (P = 0.004), dyslipidemia (P < 0.001), hypertension (P < 0.001), cerebrovascular disease (P = 0.031), old myocardial infarction (P = 0.006), previous percutaneous coronary artery intervention (P = 0.001), coronary artery disease (P = 0.018), and aortic valve stenosis (P < 0.001). Perioperative blood transfusion (P < 0.001) and dialysis (P = 0.005) were more frequent in the PPM group. Postoperative ventilation (P = 0.004) and intensive care unit stay (P = 0.004) were significantly longer in the PPM group. Age, aortic valve stenosis, dyslipidemia, hypertension, old myocardial infarction, previous percutaneous coronary artery intervention, diabetes mellitus, cerebrovascular disease, and high body mass index were the risk factors for PPM. PPM was not an independent risk factor for short-term mortality.

  7. Semi-automatic aortic aneurysm analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodur, Osman; Grady, Leo; Stillman, Arthur; Setser, Randolph; Funka-Lea, Gareth; O'Donnell, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are the 13 th leading cause of death in the United States. In standard clinical practice, assessing the progression of disease in the aorta, as well as the risk of aneurysm rupture, is based on measurements of aortic diameter. We propose a method for automatically segmenting the aortic vessel border allowing the calculation of aortic diameters on CTA acquisitions which is accurate and fast, allowing clinicians more time for their evaluations. While segmentation of aortic lumen is straightforward in CTA, segmentation of the outer vessel wall (epithelial layer) in a diseased aorta is difficult; furthermore, no clinical tool currently exists to perform this task. The difficulties are due to the similarities in intensity of surrounding tissue (and thrombus due to lack of contrast agent uptake), as well as the complications from bright calcium deposits. Our overall method makes use of a centerline for the purpose of resampling the image volume into slices orthogonal to the vessel path. This centerline is computed semi-automatically via a distance transform. The difficult task of automatically segmenting the aortic border on the orthogonal slices is performed via a novel variation of the isoperimetric algorithm which incorporates circular constraints (priors). Our method is embodied in a prototype which allows the loading and registration of two datasets simultaneously, facilitating longitudinal comparisons. Both the centerline and border segmentation algorithms were evaluated on four patients, each with two volumes acquired 6 months to 1.5 years apart, for a total of eight datasets. Results showed good agreement with clinicians' findings.

  8. Minimally invasive "pocket incision" aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Yakub, M A; Pau, K K; Awang, Y

    1999-02-01

    A minimally invasive approach to aortic valve surgery through a transverse incision ("pocket incision") at the right second intercostal space was examined. Sixteen patients with a mean age of 30 years underwent this approach. The third costal cartilage was either excised (n = 5) or dislocated (n = 11). The right internal mammary artery was preserved. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was established with aortic-right atrial cannulation in all except the first case. Aortic valve replacements (AVR) were performed in 15 patients and one had aortic valve repair with concomitant ventricular septal defect closure. There was no mortality and no major complications. The aortic cross-clamp, CPB and operative times were 72 +/- 19 mins, 105 +/- 26 mins and 3 hrs 00 min +/- 29 mins respectively. The mean time to extubation was 5.7 +/- 4.0 hrs, ICU stay of 27 +/- 9 hrs and postoperative hospital stay of 5.1 +/- 1.2 days. Minimally invasive "pocket incision" aortic valve surgery is technically feasible and safe. It has the advantages of central cannulation for CPB, preservation of the internal mammary artery and avoiding sternotomy. This approach is cosmetically acceptable and allows rapid patient recovery.

  9. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  10. Gender Differences in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hannawa, Kevin K.; Eliason, Jonathan L.; Upchurch, Gilbert R.

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise the 10th leading cause of death in Caucasian males 65–74 years of age, and accounted for nearly 16,000 deaths overall in the year 2000. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of AAAs is an important undertaking. Clinically, multiple risk factors are associated with the development of AAAs, including increasing age, positive smoking history, and hypertension. Male gender is also a well-established risk factor for the development of an AAA with a 4:1 male to female ratio. The reason for this gender disparity is unknown. The pathogenesis of AAAs formation is complex and multifactorial. Histologically, AAAs are characterized by early chemokine driven leukocyte infiltration into the aortic wall. Subsequent destruction of elastin and collagen in the media and adventitia ensues due to excessive local production of matrix degrading enzymes, and is accompanied by smooth muscle cell loss and thinning of the aortic wall. At present, there are no medical therapies available to treat patients with aortic aneurysms, using only the crude measurement of aortic diameter as a threshold for which patients must undergo life-threatening and costly surgery. Defining the early mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in AAA formation are critical, as understanding differences in disease patterns based on gender may allow us to develop new translational approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with aortic aneurysms. PMID:19426607

  11. Gender differences in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Kevin K; Eliason, Jonathan L; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise the tenth leading cause of death in Caucasian males 65 to 74 years of age and accounted for nearly 16,000 deaths overall in 2000. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of AAAs is an important undertaking. Clinically, multiple risk factors are associated with the development of AAAs, including increasing age, positive smoking history, and hypertension. Male gender is also a well-established risk factor for the development of an AAA, with a 4:1 male to female ratio. The reason for this gender disparity is unknown. The pathogenesis of AAAs formation is complex and multifactorial. Histologically, AAAs are characterized by early chemokine-driven leukocyte infiltration into the aortic wall. Subsequent destruction of elastin and collagen in the media and adventitia ensues owing to excessive local production of matrix-degrading enzymes and is accompanied by smooth muscle cell loss and thinning of the aortic wall. At present, no medical therapies are available to treat patients with aortic aneurysms, using only the crude measurement of aortic diameter as a threshold for which patients must undergo life-threatening and costly surgery. Defining the early mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in AAA formation is critical as understanding differences in disease patterns based on gender may allow us to develop new translational approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with aortic aneurysms.

  12. Fetal sonographic diagnosis of aortic arch anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S-J; Min, J-Y; Lee, Y-H; Roman, K; Jaeggi, E; Smallhorn, J

    2003-11-01

    Aortic arch anomalies refer to congenital abnormalities of the position or branching pattern, or both of the aortic arch. Although aortic arch anomalies are not uncommon, reports on their prenatal diagnosis are scarce. Insight into the hypothetical arch model is crucial to understanding anomalies of the aortic arch in the fetus. Recognition of the trachea, three major vessels, ductus arteriosus and descending aorta in the axial views of the upper mediastinum is necessary for a complete fetal cardiac assessment. Clues to aortic arch anomalies include abnormal position of the descending aorta, absence of the normal 'V'-shaped confluence of the ductal and aortic arches, a gap between the ascending aorta and main pulmonary artery in the three-vessel view, and an abnormal vessel behind the trachea with or without a vascular loop or ring around the trachea. Meticulous attention to anatomic landmarks will lead to successful prenatal diagnosis of important vascular rings making early postnatal management possible. Copyright 2003 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Measurement of aortic regurgitation by Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Nitter-Hauge, S; Ihlen, H; Rootwelt, K; Myhre, E

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to develop a new approach to the non-invasive measurement of aortic regurgitation, transmitral volumetric flow (MF) and left ventricular total stroke volume (SV) were measured by Doppler and cross sectional echocardiography in 23 patients without aortic valve disease (group A) and in 26 patients with aortic regurgitation (group B). The transmitral volumetric flow was obtained by multiplying the corrected mitral orifice area by the diastolic velocity integral, and the left ventricular total stroke volume was derived by subtracting the left ventricular end systolic volume from the end diastolic volume. The aortic regurgitant fraction (RF) was calculated as: RF = 1 - MF/SV. In group A there was a close agreement between the transmitral volumetric flow and the left ventricular total stroke volume, and the difference between the two measurements did not differ significantly from zero. In group B the left ventricular total stroke volume was significantly larger than the transmitral volumetric flow, and there was good agreement between the regurgitant fractions determined by Doppler echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. Discrepancies between the two techniques were found in patients with combined aortic and mitral regurgitation or a low angiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%). The effective cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography accorded well with that measured by the Fick method. Doppler echocardiography provides a new and promising approach to the non-invasive measurement of aortic regurgitation. PMID:3947478

  14. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  15. Characterization of a Staphylococcus aureus small colony variant (SCV) associated with persistent bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Atalla, Heba; Gyles, Carlton; Jacob, Christian L; Moisan, Helene; Malouin, François; Mallard, Bonnie

    2008-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of bovine mastitis and foodborne and other diseases in humans. This study tested the hypothesis that small colony variants (SCVs) of S. aureus are implicated in chronic bovine mastitis. Six S. aureus isolates from foremilk samples from 11 chronically infected cows were investigated. Five isolates had typical morphology and were hemolytic and coagulase positive; one was a heterogeneous population of typical and SCV phenotype (tiny nonhemolytic colonies). In the presence of gentamicin, three of the previously typical S. aureus developed SCVs that were confirmed as S. aureus by biochemical and genetic analyses; these SCVs reverted to the typical form on antibiotic-free medium. The SCV isolate (Heba3231) from the heterogeneous population had a slow growth rate and prolonged lag phase and did not revert during 10 h of incubation. Transcriptional analysis showed that SCV Heba3231 had reduced expression of agr, hla, and coa and increased expression of indicators of fermentation pathways compared to the parent strain. Invasion of and persistence in a primary culture of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) showed that SCV Heba3231 had minimal deleterious effects, whereas the parent strain or the Newbould 305 strain caused severe damage. Recovery of the parent strain from BAEC yielded a mixture of the parent and SCV phenotypes. This study reports for the first time the isolation of S. aureus SCV from persistent bovine mastitis and suggests that SCV may be an important contributor to the prolonged survival of S. aureus in some cases of mastitis.

  16. Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease in a patient who had bovine bioprosthetic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hashoul, Jehard; Saliba, Waleed; Bloch, Irina; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen

    2016-01-01

    Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by rapidly progressing dementia, general neurologic deterioration, and death. When the leading symptoms are visual disturbances, it is termed as the Heidenhain variant of CJD (HvCJD). CJD was reported following prion-contaminated pericardium transplants but never after bovine bioprosthetic cardiac valve. In this case report, we describe HvCJD in a patient who had a bovine bioprosthetic cardiac valve implant. An 82-year-old-woman was referred to neuro-ophthalmology clinic for unexplained visual loss that started 1 month previously. Medical history included aortic valve replacement with bovine bioprosthetic valve. On examination, best-corrected visual acuity was 20/120 in the right eye and 20/200 in the left eye; otherwise, the eye examination was normal. Humphrey visual fields revealed complete right homonymous hemianopsia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated nonspecific white matter changes. A week later, she was hospitalized due to memory impairment; repeated MRI and total body computed tomography scan showed no significant findings. Electroencephalography recordings and extremely elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau protein were compatible with CJD. The patient died 3 weeks later; autopsy was not performed. The patient had HvCJD. Ophthalmologists being first to see these patients should be aware of this diagnosis. Contaminated bovine bioprosthetic valve might be another source for prion disease. Further research is required to establish this issue. PMID:27905341

  17. Transcatheter versus surgical aortic-valve replacement in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B; Mack, Michael J; Miller, D Craig; Moses, Jeffrey W; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat; Webb, John G; Fontana, Gregory P; Makkar, Raj R; Williams, Mathew; Dewey, Todd; Kapadia, Samir; Babaliaros, Vasilis; Thourani, Vinod H; Corso, Paul; Pichard, Augusto D; Bavaria, Joseph E; Herrmann, Howard C; Akin, Jodi J; Anderson, William N; Wang, Duolao; Pocock, Stuart J

    2011-06-09

    The use of transcatheter aortic-valve replacement has been shown to reduce mortality among high-risk patients with aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgical replacement. However, the two procedures have not been compared in a randomized trial involving high-risk patients who are still candidates for surgical replacement. At 25 centers, we randomly assigned 699 high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis to undergo either transcatheter aortic-valve replacement with a balloon-expandable bovine pericardial valve (either a transfemoral or a transapical approach) or surgical replacement. The primary end point was death from any cause at 1 year. The primary hypothesis was that transcatheter replacement is not inferior to surgical replacement. The rates of death from any cause were 3.4% in the transcatheter group and 6.5% in the surgical group at 30 days (P=0.07) and 24.2% and 26.8%, respectively, at 1 year (P=0.44), a reduction of 2.6 percentage points in the transcatheter group (upper limit of the 95% confidence interval, 3.0 percentage points; predefined margin, 7.5 percentage points; P=0.001 for noninferiority). The rates of major stroke were 3.8% in the transcatheter group and 2.1% in the surgical group at 30 days (P=0.20) and 5.1% and 2.4%, respectively, at 1 year (P=0.07). At 30 days, major vascular complications were significantly more frequent with transcatheter replacement (11.0% vs. 3.2%, P<0.001); adverse events that were more frequent after surgical replacement included major bleeding (9.3% vs. 19.5%, P<0.001) and new-onset atrial fibrillation (8.6% vs. 16.0%, P=0.006). More patients undergoing transcatheter replacement had an improvement in symptoms at 30 days, but by 1 year, there was not a significant between-group difference. In high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, transcatheter and surgical procedures for aortic-valve replacement were associated with similar rates of survival at 1 year, although there were important differences in

  18. Vaccination against bovine babesiosis.

    PubMed

    De Vos, A J; Bock, R E

    2000-01-01

    Bovine babesiosis is an important disease caused by Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, and B. divergens. Solid immunity develops after infection and this feature has been exploited with the use of live attenuated organisms as immunogens. Attributes of live vaccines include a durable immunity to heterologous challenge after one vaccination. To overcome disadvantages relating to poor quality control (risk of contamination and adverse reactions), production procedures have been modified to meet the requirements of codes of good manufacturing practice. This includes development of methods to allow production of cryopreserved vaccine and limit antigenic drift. Killed vaccines have also been used on a limited basis and consist of antigens extracted from cultured material or blood of infected calves, and given with adjuvant. The degree and duration of immunity against heterologous challenge is not well documented. Attempts are being made to develop subunit vaccines but the progress has been slow. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the expression of protective immunity against Babesia spp will aid in the identification of protective antigens.

  19. Pathology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M; Vidal, E; Marco, A

    2014-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic granulomatous caseous-necrotising inflammatory process that mainly affects the lungs and their draining lymph nodes (Ln.). The pathological changes associated with bTB infection reflect the interplay between the host defence mechanisms and the mycobacterial virulence factors and the balance between the immunologic protective responses and the damaging inflammatory processes. Inhalation is the most common infection route and causes lesions of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract, including its associated lymph nodes. The initial infection (primary complex) may be followed by chronic (post-primary) tuberculosis or may be generalised. Goat tuberculosis often produces liquefactive necrosis and caverns, similarly to human TB. The assessment of the severity of TB lesions is crucial for vaccine trials. Semi-quantitative gross lesion scoring systems have been developed for cattle, but imaging technology has allowed the development of more standardised, objective, and quantitative methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which provides quantitative measures of lesion volume.

  20. Robot assisted Aortic and Non-aortic Vascular Operations.

    PubMed

    Štádler, P; Dvořáček, L; Vitásek, P; Matouš, P

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical experience with 310 robot assisted vascular procedures. The da Vinci system has been used by a variety of disciplines for laparoscopic procedures but the use of robots in vascular surgery is still relatively uncommon. From November 2005 to May 2014, 310 robot assisted vascular operations were performed. Two hundred and twenty four patients were prospectively evaluated for occlusive disease, 61 patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm, four for a common iliac artery aneurysm, four for a splenic artery aneurysm, one for a internal mammary artery aneurysm, and after the unsuccessful endovascular treatment five for hybrid procedures, two patients for median arcuate ligament release and nine for endoleak II treatment post EVAR. Among these patients, 224 underwent robotic occlusive disease treatment (Group I), 65 robotic aorto-iliac aneurysm surgery (Group II) and 21 other robotic procedures (Group III). A total of 298 cases (96.1%) were successfully completed robotically. In 10 patients (3.2%) conversion was necessary. The 30 day mortality was 0.3%, and two (0.6%) late prosthetic infections were seen. Targeted Group I and Group II patients were compared. Robotic ilio-femoral bypass, aorto-femoral bypass, or aorto-iliac thrombo-endarterectomy with prosthetic patch (Group I) required an operative time of 194 (range, 127-315) minutes and robotic aorto-iliac aneurysm surgery (Group II), 253 (range, 185-360) minutes. The mean aortic cross clamping time was 37 minutes in Group I and 93 minutes in Group II. The mean blood loss was more significant in Group II (1,210 mL) than in Group I (320 mL). From a practical point of view, the greatest advantage of the robot assisted procedure has been the speed and relative simplicity of construction of the vascular anastomosis. This experience with robot assisted laparoscopic surgery has demonstrated the feasibility of this technique in different areas of vascular surgery. Copyright

  1. Studies on bovine demodecosis in northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Slingenbergh, J; Mohammed, A N; Bida, S A

    1980-04-01

    Summary The study reported in the present paper discusses the clinical and histological picture of bovine demodecosis and the morphology of Demodex mites as seen in four cows suffering from generalized demodecosis. There were no clinical signs of other skin affections. Changes in both the number and the appearance of visible skin lesions were seen and related to the level of nutrition and the exposure to sunshine of the cattle. Histological sections of some skin nodules showed the presence of mite colonies in the hair follicles. Only adults were seen in the sebaceous glands. Microscopical study of the morphology of the mites revealed the presence of two types of demodicids in the skin lesions and three types from epilated eyelashes. Morphological criteria are presented to aid in identification of species and of life stages.

  2. Early aortic valve cusp rupture in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D A; Jackson, R; Rae, A P; Capell, H A

    1992-01-01

    Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp rupture with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive treatment. The possibility of cusp rupture with sudden haemodynamic deterioration should be considered in patients with relapsing polychondritis who develop aortic regurgitation. Images PMID:1575597

  3. Valve sparing: aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique.

    PubMed

    Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Tamer, Sadallah; de Kerchove, Laurent; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve-sparing procedures are alternative options to aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic root aneurysm and/or severe aortic regurgitation reducing the risk of prosthesis-related complications, such as thromboembolism, and have no need for long-term oral anticoagulation. However, these techniques are technically demanding and long-term results are highly dependent on perfect intraoperative restoration of valve function. We describe a systematic approach to aortic valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique the way it is currently performed in our institution.

  4. Bovine tuberculosis slaughter surveillance in the United States 2001–2010: assessment of its traceback investigation function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The success of tracing cattle to the herd of origin after the detection and confirmation of bovine tuberculosis (TB) lesions in cattle at slaughter is a critical component of the national bovine TB eradication program in the United States (U.S.). The aims of this study were to 1) quantify the number of bovine TB cases identified at slaughter that were successfully traced to their herd of origin in the U.S. during 2001–2010, 2) quantify the number of successful traceback investigations that found additional TB infected animals in the herd of origin or epidemiologically linked herds, and 3) describe the forms of animal identification present on domestic bovine TB cases and their association with traceback success. Results We analyzed 2001–2010 data in which 371 granulomatous lesions were confirmed as bovine TB. From these 114 bovine TB cases, 78 adults (i.e. sexually intact bovines greater than two years of age), and 36 fed (i.e. less than or equal to two years of age) were classified as domestic cattle (U.S. originated). Of these adults and fed cases, 83% and 13% were successfully traced, respectively. Of these traceback investigations, 70% of adult cases and 50% of fed cases identified additional bovine TB infected animals in the herd of origin or an epidemiologically linked herd. We found that the presence of various forms of animal identification on domestic bovine TB cases at slaughter may facilitate successful traceback investigations; however, they do not guarantee it. Conclusions These results provide valuable information with regard to epidemiological traceback investigations and serve as a baseline to aid U.S. officials when assessing the impact of newly implemented strategies as part of the national bovine TB eradication in the U.S. PMID:25123050

  5. Usefulness of triphasic CT aortic angiography in acute and surveillance: Our experience in the assessment of acute aortic dissection and endoleak.

    PubMed

    Reginelli, Alfonso; Capasso, Raffaella; Ciccone, Vincenzo; Croce, Maria Rosaria; Di Grezia, Graziella; Carbone, Mattia; Maggialetti, Nicola; Barile, Antonio; Fonio, Paolo; Scialpi, Michele; Brunese, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Computed tomography angiography (CTA) has been widely used in the diagnostic evaluation of many aortic diseases, but no standardized techniques actually exist for aortic CTA. The aim of this study was to describe the usefulness of triphasic CTA in aortic assessment in both non-traumatic emergency and surveillance conditions. We performed non ECG-gated CTA examinations with a 64-slice CT scanner using a triphasic protocol consisting of an unenhanced acquisition, and two (early and delayed) contrastographic phases with a delay of 25-30 s and 100-120 s respectively after the injection of contrast medium. Were retrospectively selected adult patients with imaging findings of acute aortic dissection (AAD) or endoleak (EL) from November 2012 to November 2014. AAD was detected in 36 (67%) patients: 23 type A-AADs, and 13 type B-AADs. The presence of EL was observed in 18 (33%) patients: 1 type Ia, 5 types IIa, 2 types IIb, 1 type IIIa and 9 types IIIb. Triphasic CTA is useful to provide correct and prompt diagnosis of AAD in emergency, allowing the evaluation of type and atypical forms of AAD, and the identification of possible branch-vessel involvement and complications. During surveillance, triphasic CTA assures accurate and complete assessment of all known and unknown ELs and it is essential for first follow-up examination. Triphasic CTA represents a reliable imaging tool for aortic assessment in both non-traumatic emergency and surveillance after endovascular aneurysm repair. Modified protocol could be employed in selected patients and tailored in their known disease. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Aortic assessment of bicuspid aortic valve patients and their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Straneo, Pablo; Parma, Gabriel; Lluberas, Natalia; Marichal, Alvaro; Soca, Gerardo; Cura, Leandro; Paganini, Juan J; Brusich, Daniel; Florio, Lucia; Dayan, Victor

    2017-03-01

    Background Bicuspid aortic valve patients have an increased risk of aortic dilatation. A deficit of nitric oxide synthase has been proposed as the causative factor. No correlation between flow-mediated dilation and aortic diameter has been performed in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and normal aortic diameters. Being a hereditary disease, we compared echocardiographic features and endothelial function in these patients and their first-degree relatives. Methods Comprehensive physical examinations, routine laboratory tests, transthoracic echocardiography, and measurements of endothelium-dependent and non-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation were performed in 18 bicuspid aortic valve patients (14 type 1 and 4 type 2) and 19 of their first-degree relatives. Results The first-degree relatives were younger (36.7 ± 18.8 vs. 50.5 ± 13.9 years, p = 0.019) with higher ejection fractions (64.6% ± 1.7% vs. 58.4% ± 9.5%, p = 0.015). Aortic diameters indexed to body surface area were similar in both groups, the except the tubular aorta which was larger in bicuspid aortic valve patients (19.3 ± 2.7 vs. 17.4 ± 2.2 mm·m(-2), p = 0.033). Flow-dependent vasodilation was similar in both groups. A significant inverse correlation was found between non-flow-dependent vasodilation and aortic root diameter in patients with bicuspid aortic valve ( R = -0.57, p = 0.05). Conclusions Bicuspid aortic valve patients without aortopathy have larger ascending aortic diameters than their first-degree relatives. Endothelial function is similar in both groups, and there is no correlation with ascending aorta diameter. Nonetheless, an inverse correlation exists between non-endothelial-dependent dilation and aortic root diameter in bicuspid aortic valve patients.

  7. Aortic Dissection in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve–Associated Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wojnarski, Charles M.; Svensson, Lars G.; Roselli, Eric E.; Idrees, Jay J.; Lowry, Ashley M.; Ehrlinger, John; Pettersson, Gösta B.; Gillinov, A. Marc; Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Navia, Jose L.; Hammer, Donald F.; Griffin, Brian; Thamilarasan, Maran; Kalahasti, Vidyasagar; Sabik, Joseph F.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Lytle, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data regarding the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and large ascending aortic diameter are limited, and appropriate timing of prophylactic ascending aortic replacement lacks consensus. Thus our objectives were to determine the risk of aortic dissection based on initial cross-sectional imaging data and clinical variables and to isolate predictors of aortic intervention in those initially prescribed serial surveillance imaging. Methods From January 1995 to January 2014, 1,181 patients with bicuspid aortic valve underwent cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to ascertain sinus or tubular ascending aortic diameter greater than or equal to 4.7 cm. Random Forest classification was used to identify risk factors for aortic dissection, and among patients undergoing surveillance, time-related analysis was used to identify risk factors for aortic intervention. Results Prevalence of type A dissection that was detected by imaging or was found at operation or on follow-up was 5.3% (n = 63). Probability of type A dissection increased gradually at a sinus diameter of 5.0 cm—from 4.1% to 13% at 7.2 cm—and then increased steeply at an ascending aortic diameter of 5.3 cm—from 3.8% to 35% at 8.4 cm—corresponding to a cross-sectional area to height ratio of 10 cm2/m for sinuses of Valsalva and 13 cm2/m for the tubular ascending aorta. Cross-sectional area to height ratio was the best predictor of type A dissection (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.73). Conclusions Early prophylactic ascending aortic replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve should be considered at high-volume aortic centers to reduce the high risk of preventable type A dissection in those with aortas larger than approximately 5.0 cm or with a cross-sectional area to height ratio greater than approximately 10 cm2/m. PMID:26209494

  8. Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, Thomas R; Khokhar, Arif; Akhtar, Mohammed Majid; Mathur, Anthony; Weerackody, Roshan; Kennon, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in the management of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has come under the spotlight following the development of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) technique. Previous indications for BAV were limited to symptom palliation and as a bridge to definitive therapy for patients undergoing conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). In the TAVI era, BAV may also be undertaken to assess the ‘therapeutic response’ of a reduction in aortic gradient in borderline patients often with multiple comorbidities, to assess symptomatic improvement prior to consideration of definitive TAVI intervention. This narrative review aims to update the reader on the current indications and practical techniques involved in undertaking a BAV procedure. In addition, a summary of the haemodynamic and clinical outcomes, as well as the frequently encountered procedural complications is presented for BAV procedures conducted during both the pre-TAVI and post-TAVI era. PMID:28008354

  9. Aortobronchial Fistula after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) for Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Melvan, John Nicholas; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Vasquez, Julio C

    2017-03-07

    Continued enlargement of the aneurysm sac after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a known risk after endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. For this reason, periodic outpatient follow-up is required to identify situations that require repair. Here, we describe an aortobronchial fistula (ABF) in a patient lost to follow-up, that presented 3 years after an elective TEVAR done for a primary, descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Our patient arrived in extremis and suffered massive hemoptysis leading to her demise. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram near the time of her death demonstrated a bleeding ABF immediately distal to her previous TEVAR repair. Aortic aneurysmal disease remains life threatening even after repair. Improved endovascular techniques and devices have resulted in decreased need for reintervention. However, this case demonstrates the risk of thoracic aortic disease progression and highlights the importance of establishing consistent, long-term follow-up after TEVAR.

  10. Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Keeble, Thomas R; Khokhar, Arif; Akhtar, Mohammed Majid; Mathur, Anthony; Weerackody, Roshan; Kennon, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in the management of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has come under the spotlight following the development of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) technique. Previous indications for BAV were limited to symptom palliation and as a bridge to definitive therapy for patients undergoing conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). In the TAVI era, BAV may also be undertaken to assess the 'therapeutic response' of a reduction in aortic gradient in borderline patients often with multiple comorbidities, to assess symptomatic improvement prior to consideration of definitive TAVI intervention. This narrative review aims to update the reader on the current indications and practical techniques involved in undertaking a BAV procedure. In addition, a summary of the haemodynamic and clinical outcomes, as well as the frequently encountered procedural complications is presented for BAV procedures conducted during both the pre-TAVI and post-TAVI era.

  11. The aortic valve: structure, complications and implications for transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rozeik, Mm; Wheatley, Dj; Gourlay, T

    2014-07-01

    The aortic valve operates in a complex haemodynamic environment, opening and closing over 100,000 times a day. When complications arise, such as aortic stenosis, prognosis can be very poor, leading to death within the first few years. Surgical valve replacement is currently the standard treatment for aortic stenosis. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and function of the native valve is imperative when developing a prosthetic replacement that can withstand the complex demands of the heart. This review focuses on the anatomy, structure and disease of the aortic valve and the implications for a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Current complications with TAVR, such as major vascular bleeding, conduction disturbances and patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), can be overcome by reducing the delivery profile and through the use of more accurate imaging technologies to work towards a fully functional and durable prosthesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Limited versus full sternotomy for aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kirmani, Bilal H; Jones, Sion G; Malaisrie, S C; Chung, Darryl A; Williams, Richard Jnn

    2017-04-10

    , assess quality, and identify risk of bias. A third review author provided arbitration where required. The quality of evidence was determined using the GRADE methodology and results of patient-relevant outcomes were summarised in a 'Summary of findings' table. The review included seven trials with 511 participants. These included adults from centres in Austria, Spain, Italy, Germany, France, and Egypt. We performed 12 comparisons investigating the effects of minimally invasive limited upper hemi-sternotomy on aortic valve replacement as compared to surgery performed via full median sternotomy.There was no evidence of any effect of upper hemi-sternotomy on mortality versus full median sternotomy (risk ratio (RR) 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36 to 2.82; participants = 511; studies = 7; moderate quality). There was no evidence of an increase in cardiopulmonary bypass time with aortic valve replacement performed via an upper hemi-sternotomy (mean difference (MD) 3.02 minutes, 95% CI -4.10 to 10.14; participants = 311; studies = 5; low quality). There was no evidence of an increase in aortic cross-clamp time (MD 0.95 minutes, 95% CI -3.45 to 5.35; participants = 391; studies = 6; low quality). None of the included studies reported major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events as a composite end point.There was no evidence of an effect on length of hospital stay through limited hemi-sternotomy (MD -1.31 days, 95% CI -2.63 to 0.01; participants = 297; studies = 5; I(2) = 89%; very low quality). Postoperative blood loss was lower in the upper hemi-sternotomy group (MD -158.00 mL, 95% CI -303.24 to -12.76; participants = 297; studies = 5; moderate quality). The evidence did not support a reduction in deep sternal wound infections (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.22 to 2.30; participants = 511; studies = 7; moderate quality) or re-exploration (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.48 to 2.13; participants = 511; studies = 7; moderate quality). There was no change in pain scores by upper hemi

  13. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology.

  14. CEREBROVASCULAR DAMAGE MEDIATES RELATIONS BETWEEN AORTIC STIFFNESS AND MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Leroy L.; Woodard, Todd; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; van Buchem, Mark A.; Torjesen, Alyssa A.; Inker, Lesley A.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stiffness is associated with cognitive decline. Here, we examined the association between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and cognitive function and investigated whether cerebrovascular remodeling and parenchymal small vessel disease damage mediate the relation. Analyses were based on 1820 (60% women) participants in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility – Reykjavik Study. Multivariable linear regression models adjusted for vascular and demographic confounders showed that higher carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity was related to lower memory score (standardized β: −0.071±0.023; P=0.002). Cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities were each associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and memory (P<0.05). Together, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities (total indirect effect: −0.029; 95% CI: −0.043, −0.017) attenuated the direct relation between carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and memory (direct effect: −0.042; 95% CI: −0.087, 0.003; P=0.07) and explained approximately 41% of the observed effect. Our results suggest that in older adults, associations between aortic stiffness and memory are mediated by pathways that include cerebral microvascular remodeling and microvascular parenchymal damage. PMID:26573713

  15. Endovascular Repair for Type A Aortic Dissection After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Medtronic CoreValve.

    PubMed

    Berfield, Kathleen K S; Sweet, Matthew P; McCabe, James M; Reisman, Mark; Mackensen, G Burkhard; Mokadam, Nahush A; Dean, Larry S; Smith, Jason W

    2015-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is being used with increasing frequency in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are otherwise deemed to be at high surgical risk. Aortic dissection is a rare complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement and poses a unique management dilemma. We describe the treatment of an acute Stanford type A aortic dissection after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a modified thoracic endovascular stent graft in a 95-year-old woman. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bovine trophectoderm cell lines induced from bovine fibroblasts with reprogramming factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine trophectoderm (TE) cells were induced [induced bovine trophectoderm-like (iBT)] from bovine fetal liver-derived fibroblasts, and other bovine fetal fibroblasts, after viral-vector transduction with either four or six reprogramming factors (RF), including POU5F1, KLF4, SOX2, C-MYC, SV40 large ...

  17. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  18. Aortic Disease Presentation and Outcome Associated with ACTA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dongchuan; Prakash, Siddharth; Bensend, Tracy A.; Flynn, Kelly; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Liang, David; Hyland, James; Child, Anne; Arno, Gavin; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Braverman, Alan; Moran, Rocio; Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko; Consortium, Montalcino Aortic; Pyeritz, Reed; Coselli, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ACTA2 mutations are the major cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. We sought to characterize these aortic diseases in a large case series of individuals with ACTA2 mutations. Methods and Results Aortic disease, management, and outcome associated with the first aortic event (aortic dissection or aneurysm repair) were abstracted from the medical records of 277 individuals with 41 various ACTA2 mutations. Aortic events occurred in 48% of these individuals, with the vast majority presenting with thoracic aortic dissections (88%) associated with 25% mortality. Type A dissections were more common than type B dissections (54% versus 21%), but the median age of onset of type B dissections was significantly younger than type A dissections (27 years, IQR 18–41 versus 36 years, IQR 26–45). Only 12% of aortic events were repair of ascending aortic aneurysms, which variably involved the aortic root, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Overall cumulative risk of an aortic event at age 85 years was 0.76 (95% CI 0.64, 0.86). After adjustment for intra-familial correlation, gender and race, mutations disrupting p.R179 and p.R258 were associated with significantly increased risk for aortic events, whereas p.R185Q and p.R118Q mutations showed significantly lower risk of aortic events compared to other mutations. Conclusions ACTA2 mutations are associated with high risk of presentation with an acute aortic dissection. The lifetime risk for an aortic event is only 76%, suggesting that additional environmental or genetic factors play a role in expression of aortic disease in individuals with ACTA2 mutations. PMID:25759435

  19. Aortic Valve Calcification is Mediated by a Differential Response of Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Venardos, Neil; Nadlonek, Nicole A.; Zhan, Qiong; Weyant, Michael J.; Reece, T. Brett; Meng, Xianzhong; Fullerton, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While calcific aortic stenosis is common, calcification of the other three heart valves is not. The aortic valve interstitial cell (VIC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis. Pro-inflammatory stimulation of aortic VICs induces an osteogenic and inflammatory phenotypic change. We hypothesized that the VICs of the other heart valves do not undergo these changes. Using isolated human VICs from normal aortic, mitral, pulmonary and tricuspid valves, our purpose was to compare the osteogenic response to pro-inflammatory stimulation via TLR-4. Materials And Methods Aortic, pulmonic, mitral, and tricuspid (n=4 for each valve type) VICs were isolated from hearts valves explanted from patients undergoing cardiac transplantation. Cells were cultured and grown to confluence in passage 2-6 before treatment with LPS (100-200ng/mL) for 24 or 48 hours. Cells were characterized by immunofluorescent staining. TLR-4 expression was analyzed (immunoblotting, flow cytometry). BMP-2 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) production were determined (immunoblotting). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were determined by ELISA. Statistics were by Mann-Whitney U test. Results TLR-4 stimulation induced BMP-2 production only in aortic VICs (p<0.05). ICAM-1 production and MCP-1 secretion increased in a similar fashion among TLR4-stimulated VICs from all four valves. Conclusions Pro-inflammatory stimulation induces an osteogenic phenotype in aortic VICs but not mitral, pulmonic, or tricuspid VICs. We conclude that this differential osteogenic response of aortic VICs contributes to the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis. PMID:24746950

  20. Classification of blunt aortic injuries a new systematic overview of aortic trauma.

    PubMed

    Prijon, Ticijana; Ermenc, Branko

    2010-02-25

    Blunt (non-penetrating) aortic injuries, in which the arterial wall is damaged in the direction from the intima towards the adventitia, are most commonly the result of a traffic accident. The various forms of blunt aortic injuries, from limited laceration of the intima to complete transection of the aorta, depend on the morphological structure of the arterial wall and the strength of forces causing the trauma. An overview of the literature and medical documentation reveals that different terms, including tear, laceration, disruption, transection, rupture and pseudoaneurysm, are used to describe certain forms of traumatic aortic injuries, which can lead to misinterpretation of findings or diagnoses. We therefore, propose a classification that would enable uniform systematic screening of all forms of blunt aortic injuries. In a retrospective examination of autopsy reports from 1999 to 2006, all those who had died in traffic accidents and who had blunt aortic injuries were selected from the archive at the Institute of Forensic Medicine of the Medical Faculty of the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Blunt aortic injuries (ruptures) were classified into three basic types and corresponding subtypes: type I (intramural), type II (transmural) and type III (multiple) aortic ruptures. The study included 230 deceased persons with 355 aortic ruptures. According to our classification, type I ruptures were observed in 25 (11%), type II ruptures in 131 (57%) and type III ruptures in 74 (32%) cases. The new classification we propose allows simple and systematic screening of all types of blunt aortic injuries. It prevents misinterpretation of various types of aortic injury in medical practice. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [New technique of concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus for congenital bicuspid aortic valve].

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shingo; Fukasawa, Manabu; Kawahara, Yu; Suzuki, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yuriko

    2012-12-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases, with a high incidence of associated valvular lesions and aortic abnormalities including aortic stenosis( AS), aortic regurgitation, aortic dilatation, and aortic dissection. Patients with BAV and AS often have a small aortic annulus. We encountered a case of BAV in which a 51-year-old woman with severe AS having a small aortic annulus and a dilated ascending aorta required surgical intervention. We performed the surgery using new technique that involved concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus using a single uniquely-shaped graft to avoid prosthesis patient mismatch. We trimmed the proximal end of the straight graft in shape of 2 teardrops hanging on it to fit the cut annulus. It requires only a single suture line to replace the ascending aorta and enlarge the aortic annulus, which entails a decreased risk of bleeding during surgery. We believe that it could be applicable to many cases requiring concomitant surgery.

  2. Effects of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation in a model of septic shock.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Steven B; Minneci, Peter C; Deans, Katherine J; Feng, Jing; Eichacker, Peter Q; Banks, Steven M; Danner, Robert L; Natanson, Charles; Solomon, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Fluid refractory septic shock can develop into a hypodynamic cardiovascular state in both children and adults. Despite management of these patients with empirical inotropic therapy (with or without a vasodilator), mortality remains high. The effect of cardiovascular support using intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation was investigated in a hypodynamic, mechanically ventilated canine sepsis model in which cardiovascular and pulmonary support were titrated based on treatment protocols. Each week, three animals (n = 33, 10-12 kg) were administered intrabronchial Staphylococcus aureus challenge and then randomized to receive intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation for 68 hrs or no intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (control). Bacterial doses were increased over the study (4-8 x 10(9) cfu/kg) to assess the effects of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation during sepsis with increasing risk of death. Compared with lower bacterial doses (4-7 x 10(9) colony-forming units/kg), control animals challenged with the highest dose (8 x 10(9) colony-forming units/kg) had a greater risk of death (mortality rate 86% vs. 17%), with worse lung injury ([A - a]O2), and renal dysfunction (creatinine). These sicker animals required higher norepinephrine infusion rates to maintain blood pressure (and higher FIO2) and positive end-expiratory pressure levels to maintain oxygenation (p < or = 0.04 for all). In animals receiving the highest bacterial dose, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation improved survival time (23.4 +/- 10 hrs longer; p = 0.003) and lowered norepinephrine requirements (0.43 +/- 0.17 microg/kg/min; p = 0.002) and systemic vascular resistance index (1.44 +/- 0.57 dynes/s/cm5/kg; p = 0.0001) compared with controls. Despite these beneficial effects, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation was associated with an increase in blood urea nitrogen (p = 0.002) and creatinine (p = 0.12). In animals receiving lower doses of bacteria, intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation had no

  3. A roadmap to investigate the genetic basis of bicuspid aortic valve and its complications: insights from the International BAVCon (Bicuspid Aortic Valve Consortium).

    PubMed

    Prakash, Siddharth K; Bossé, Yohan; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D; Michelena, Hector I; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Della Corte, Alessandro; Pluchinotta, Francesca R; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Evangelista, Artur; Benson, D Woodrow; Body, Simon C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2014-08-26

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common adult congenital heart defect and is found in 0.5% to 2.0% of the general population. The term "BAV" refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by diverse aortic valve malformations with associated aortopathy, congenital heart defects, and genetic syndromes. Even after decades of investigation, the genetic determinants of BAV and its complications remain largely undefined. Just as BAV phenotypes are highly variable, the genetic etiologies of BAV are equally diverse and vary from complex inheritance in families to sporadic cases without any evidence of inheritance. In this paper, the authors discuss current concepts in BAV genetics and propose a roadmap for unraveling unanswered questions about BAV through the integrated analysis of genetic and clinical data.

  4. Conduction disturbance after isolated surgical aortic valve replacement in degenerative aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, You Mi; Kim, Jun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Minsu; Hwang, Jongmin; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Nam, Gi Byoung; Choi, Kee Joon; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, You Ho

    2017-06-15

    Conduction disturbances are common in patients with aortic stenosis. We investigated the incidence, reversibility, and prognosis of conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker implantation in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis after isolated aortic valve replacement. This was a retrospective study conducted at a tertiary care center. We evaluated the incidence of conduction disturbances in patients who underwent isolated surgical aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis between January 2005 and May 2015. Relevant clinical information was obtained from the patients' medical records. We reviewed results of 663 patients with pathologically proven degenerative aortic stenosis (bicuspid aortic valve, n = 285 [43.0%]) who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement (mechanical valve, n = 310 [46.8%]). Patients' mean age was 67.1 ± 8.1 years, and 362 were male (54.6%). Immediate postoperative intraventricular conduction disorders occurred in 56 patients (8.4%), and atrioventricular block occurred in 68 patients (10.3%). Ten patients with symptomatic second-degree or third-degree atrioventricular block underwent permanent pacemaker implantation within 30 days of aortic valve replacement. During the mean follow-up period of 1288 ± 1122 days, 64 patients (9.7%) developed irreversible conduction disorders (bundle branch block n = 24 and first-degree atrioventricular block n = 42). Of the 10 patients requiring permanent pacemakers, 4 remained depend on the permanent pacemaker during follow-up. Beyond 30 days after aortic valve replacement, 1 patient underwent permanent pacemaker implantation for de novo conduction disturbance 44 months postoperatively. After isolated aortic valve replacement, permanent pacemaker implantation for conduction disturbance is rare (n = 10/663, 1.5%). Isolated aortic valve replacement for degenerative aortic stenosis has a low risk of conduction disturbances during long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 The

  5. MicroRNAs, fibrotic remodeling, and aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2012-01-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common clinical condition that can cause death due to aortic dissection or rupture. The association between aortic aneurysm pathogenesis and altered TGF-β signaling has been the subject of numerous investigations. Recently, a TGF-β–responsive microRNA (miR), miR-29, has been identified to play a role in cellular phenotypic modulation during aortic development and aging. In this issue of JCI, Maegdefessel and colleagues demonstrate that decreasing the levels of miR-29b in the aortic wall can attenuate aortic aneurysm progression in two different mouse models of abdominal aortic aneurysms. This study highlights the relevance of miR-29b in aortic disease but also raises questions about its specific role. PMID:22269322

  6. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... your doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Am I at risk for AAA? Men ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  8. Acute thoracic aortic dissection: how to defuse a time bomb.

    PubMed

    McClarren-Curry, C; Shaughnessy, K

    1999-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection is frequently misdiagnosed, and even with surgical intervention, the mortality rate is 50%. This article focuses on assessment, interventions, and postoperative care of patients with aortic dissection.

  9. Intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs) are circulatory assist devices used to treat a number of cardiovascular conditions. IABPs provide temporary circulatory support by reducing the resistance to blood flow out of the heart during systole and by providing added pressure to aid in perfusing the heart during diastole. In this Evaluation, we tested three IABPs from three suppliers. We examined the units' technical performance, safety and monitoring, human factors design, transport operation, and supplier support. Rather than test all the triggering (activation) modes available, we focused our testing on the modes most commonly used on each unit. We also provide information on an IABP currently available only in Japan; although we did not test this unit, we do provide a preliminary judgment based on the information provided to us by the supplier. In the Technology Overview also included in the Evaluation, we describe the basic operation and use of an IABP, as well as review th